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Sample records for flexor hallucis longus

  1. Os trigonum syndrome with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis in a professional football referee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M E; Wolin, P M

    1999-07-01

    The presentation of posterior ankle pain in any patient poses a diagnostic dilemma. The os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus stenosing tenosynovitis have been reported to occur in professional and amateur ballet dancers. It is important to consider these diagnoses in a patient who is not a dancer, as is shown in the case presented here. The patient in this case is a professional referee who injured his ankle while working on artificial turf. The treatment for os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis is initially conservative, but in refractory cases, surgical removal of the os and release of the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be successfully performed. This is the first reported case of os trigonum syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis presenting simultaneously in a patient who is not a dancer.

  2. Chondroma within the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. A case report and literature review.

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    Brahms, M A; Fumich, R M

    1978-01-01

    Chondromas in tendon sheaths are a rare entity proviously reported in the flexor sheaths on the hand and possibly the foot. This is the first reported case of condroma of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath at the ankle region. A literature review with regard to pathogenesis, classification, and recurrence has been presented.

  3. Giant cell tumor of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath: a case study.

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    Findling, Jeff; Lascola, Natalie K; Groner, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is infrequently documented in the foot and even less near the ankle. This case report involves such a tumor of the flexor hallucis longus tendon presenting at the posterior ankle. Diagnosis was aided by magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment consisted of complete surgical excision. Pathologic examination verified the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed no remnants or recurrence of tumor 1 year after surgery.

  4. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

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    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  5. Low-intensity resistance training attenuates dexamethasone-induced atrophy in the flexor hallucis longus muscle.

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    Macedo, Anderson G; Krug, André L O; Herrera, Naiara A; Zago, Anderson S; Rush, James W E; Amaral, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the potential protective effect of low-intensity resistance training (RT) against dexamethasone (DEX) treatment induced muscle atrophy. Rats underwent either an 8 week period of ladder climbing RT or remained sedentary. During the last 10 days of the exercise protocol, animals were submitted to a DEX treatment or a control saline injection. Muscle weights were assessed and levels of AKT, mTOR, FOXO3a, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 proteins were analyzed in flexor hallucis longus (FHL), tibialis anterior (TA), and soleus muscles. DEX induced blood glucose increase (+46%), body weight reduction (-19%) and atrophy in FHL (-28%) and TA (-21%) muscles, which was associated with a decrease in AKT and an increase in MuRF-1 proteins levels. Low-intensity RT prevented the blood glucose increase, attenuated the FHL atrophy effects of DEX, and was associated with increased mTOR and reductions in Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in FHL. In contrast, TA muscle atrophy and signaling proteins were not affected by RT. These are the first data to demonstrate that low-intensity ladder-climbing RT specifically mitigates the FHL atrophy, which is the main muscle recruited during the training activity, while not preventing atrophy in other limb muscle not as heavily recruited. The recruitment-dependent prevention of atrophy by low intensity RT likely occurs by a combination of attenuated muscle protein degradation signals and enhanced muscle protein synthesis signals including mTOR, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Catastrophic Failure of an Infected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair Managed with Combined Flexor Hallucis Longus and Peroneus Brevis Tendon Transfer.

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    Simonson, Devin C; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Deep infection is one of the most devastating complications following repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment requires not only culture-driven antibiotic therapy, but more importantly, appropriate débridement of some or even all of the Achilles tendon. This may necessitate delayed reconstruction of the Achilles tendon. The authors present a successful case of reconstruction of a chronically infected Achilles tendon in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man via a multistaged approach using the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis tendons. We also provide a brief review of the literature regarding local tendon transfer used in the reconstruction of Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

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    Song Ho Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder.

  8. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Song Ho; Naito, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder. PMID:28255483

  9. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance

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    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals...

  10. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  11. Combined flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer and gastrocnemius recession for reconstruction of gapped chronic achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgohary, Hatem Elsayed Ahmed; Elmoghazy, Nabil A; Abd Ellatif, Mohammed Serry

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcomes after a combined FHL transfer and a gastrocnemius recession for treatment of chronic ruptures of Achilles tendon with a gap and to investigate the patient's satisfaction about the great toe function after transfer. 19 patients with chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap were treated with a flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession, Clinical diagnosis depends on the presence of gap in the tendon on examination, inability of tip toe walking on the affected side and positive calf-squeeze test, MRI was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society hind foot score was used for assessment of the results. The AOFAS score improved significantly from a mean of 65 preoperatively to 94 at the last follow up (ptendon weaved through the stump of the Achilles tendon and those with trans osseous tunnels, the mean AOFAS score at the last follow up was 94.2, 93.8 respectively, no patient complained of big toe dysfunction. Management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap with flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession is a safe and reliable method with a significantly improved functional outcome, muscle advancement through gastrocnemius recession decreases the length of the gap without affecting the muscle function, flexor halluces longus tendon transfer doesn't harm the big toe function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  13. Septic ankle with purulence tracking up the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath leading to deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism and compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McClure, Philip; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-06-01

    The differential diagnosis for lower extremity swelling and ankle pain is broad and can have overlapping and related diagnoses. If there is concern for more than one diagnosis, the practitioner should perform a thorough physical examination, order the appropriate studies, and perform the correct procedures to completely diagnose and treat the patient. This article presents the case of a 19-year-old male who presented with 5 days of left ankle pain, fevers, and swelling without any known trauma to the area. Physical examination was concerning for a septic ankle joint, cellulitis, deep venous thrombosis, and compartment syndrome. Duplex venous ultrasound confirmed a deep venous thrombosis in the popliteal vein. Joint aspiration of the ankle had gross purulence with the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was taken emergently to the operating room where he was found to have gross purulence in the deep posterior compartment, medial and lateral soft tissues of the ankle, and gross purulence in the ankle joint. The deep posterior compartment also had significant muscle necrosis and evidence of compartment syndrome. This case presents the possibility of a septic ankle leading to compartment syndrome and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism due to the intra-articular nature of the flexor hallucis longus tendon sheath. Case report, Level IV. © 2014 The Author(s).

  14. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

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    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  15. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

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    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  16. Extensor hallucis longus tendon injury in taekwondo athletes.

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    Lee, Kyung Tai; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Jeong Pil; Young, Ki Won; Park, Shin Yi

    2009-08-01

    Extensor hallucis longus (EHL) tendon injuries can occur in taekwondo athletes when performing hyperplantarflexed barefoot kicking exercises. A state of full excursion of the extensor tendon is used to strike opponents in which the metatarsal bone and the proximal phalanx area is in contact with the opponent. The purpose of this study is to examine the incidence of extensor hallucis longus tendon injury in taekwondo athletes. Case-control study. 50 Athletes from the Korean taekwondo national team and a control group of 50 healthy subjects. History of sports participation, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and ultrasound imaging of the EHL. Difference in the AOFAS scores were noted with the control group at 92.95+/-9.18, and the experimental group score at 88.45+/-10.93 (ptaekwondo group displayed changes in 16 tendons (20%). EHL thickness of the experimental group (1.52+/-0.16 mm) was greater and the control group (1.46+/-0.11 mm) (pTaekwondo athletes have a higher incidence of changes on sonographic imaging of the EHL compared to non-taekwando participating healthy subjects.

  17. Treatment of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture using V-Y tendinous flap and transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon%V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈宇辉; 刘津浩; 徐向阳

    2008-01-01

    目的 介绍V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂的术式、手术指征及疗效.方法 2003年10月至2006年5月对21例跟腱断裂采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈躅长肌腱转移治疗,其中采用铆钉17例,界面螺钉4例.介绍该手术方法,并根据文献和实践总结手术指征. 结果 本组所有患者获得12~18个月(平均14个月)随访.根据Arner-Lindholm疗效评价标准:优19例,良2例.术后伤口均一期愈合,随访期间跟腱无再次断裂,无伤口感染,无皮肤坏死,踝关节活动好,无僵直,无神经血管损伤.行走步态基本正常,对前足推进影响不大.该术式修复强度允许跟腱早期功能锻炼. 结论 采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合足屈(足母)长肌腱治疗跟腱断裂疗效好,该术式适用于跟腱组织退变、炎症和部分缺损(<3cm)患者,术中单纯V-Y肌腱瓣修补强度不够可采用屈(足母)长肌腱转移.%Objective To introduce the technique.indication and outcome of treatment of degenerative Achilles'rupture with transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap. Methods From October 2003 to May 2006,21 cases of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture were treated in our department using transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap.Rivets were used in 17 cases and surface screws in 4.They were followed up for 12 to 18 months(average,14). Results According to the Arner-Lindholm criteria for curative results,19 of the 21 cases were excellent and 2 good.Follow-ups revealed no Achilles'tendon re-rupture,infection,skin necrosis,stiff ankle,or injury to nerves and vessels.Walking gaits nearly recovered to normal.The repair strength allowed early functional exercise of the Achilles'tendon. Conclusion Transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon combined with V-Y tendinous flap can cure the degenerative Achilles'tendon ruptures and defects of Achilles'tendon within 3 cm.

  18. Radiologic findings of the flexor pollicis longus hypoplasia

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    Alicioglu, Banu [Trakya University Medical School, Department of Radiologyy, Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    A case of a 10-year-old boy with hypoplasia of the flexor pollicis longus and without other associated anomalies and trauma history is reported. Flexor pollicis longus tendon anomalies are rare; several types of this congenital anomaly have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis should be considered to the conditions of a patient who was unable to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. Hypoplastic thumb or absent interphalangeal joint crease may be a diagnostic feature in such cases. We preoperatively present the radiological findings of this rare congenital anomaly. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features have never been reported in the literature. (orig.)

  19. [Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rupture of Kuwada IV].

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    Du, Jun-feng; Zhu, Yang-yi

    2015-05-01

    To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmentation material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated, including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old (20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon.ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months (means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred, all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were recovered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23±12.86 preoperatively to 90.00±5.10 postoperatively. The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation, quick recovery, firm tendon fixation, and less complications.

  20. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence and morphology of accessory heads of flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus (Gantzer's muscles)

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    JONES, M.; ABRAHAMS, P. H.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; CAMPILLO, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1813 Gantzer described 2 accessory muscles in the human forearm which bear his name (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Testut, 1884; Le Double, 1897). The more frequent of the 2 accessory muscles or ‘accessorius ad pollicem’ was found to arise from the coronoid process of the ulna, coursing distally to attach into the flexor pollicis longus muscle (flexor pollicis longus accessory head, FPLah). The less frequently observed or ‘accessorius ad flexorem profundum digitorum’ was again found to arise from the coronoid process and course to join into the flexor digitorum profundus (flexor digitorum profundus accessory head, FDPah). Since their initial description, they have been examined in further detail by a number of authors (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Le Double, 1897; Dykes & Anson, 1944; Mangini, 1960; Malhotra et al. 1982; Dellon & McKinnon, 1987; Kida, 1988). These studies, most of them focusing on the FPLah, all show different results of prevalence, origin, insertion, relations and nerve supply. We undertook this study with the aim of providing a more accurate account of the detailed morphology of both accessory muscles because of the above-mentioned inconsistent anatomical descriptions and the lack of information as to important aspects such as vascular supply, morphology (shape and length) and the coexistence of both accessory heads. PMID:9419002

  2. Bilateral Tensor Fasciae Suralis Muscles in a Cadaver with Unilateral Accessory Flexor Digitorum Longus Muscle

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    Logan S. W. Bale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle variants are routinely encountered in the dissection laboratory and in clinical practice and therefore anatomists and clinicians need to be aware of their existence. Here we describe two different accessory muscles identified while performing educational dissection of a 51-year-old male cadaver. Tensor fasciae suralis, a rare muscle variant, was identified bilaterally and accessory flexor digitorum longus, a more common muscle variant, was present unilaterally. Tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus are clinically relevant muscle variants. To our knowledge, the coexistence of tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus in the same individual has not been reported in either cadaveric or imaging studies.

  3. Flexor accessorius longus: A rare variation of the deep extrinsic digital flexors of the leg and its phylogenetic significance

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    Jaijesh P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalies of the calf muscles are rare. One such anomalous muscle, known as the Muscle Flexor accessorius longus (also named accessorius ad accessorium, accessorius secondus, accessory flexor digitorum longus or pronator pedis is of morphological significance. When present, this originates in the deep fascia of the tibia or fibula and inserts in the foot either into the flexor digitorum accessorius or into the tendons of the flexor digitorum longus. In this report we present a discussion of the morphological significance and phylogenetic history of one such muscle observed. In this case report we describe an anomalous calf muscle which extends from the popliteal region, runs along the posterior compartment of the leg, reaches the sole and is inserted to the flexor digitorum longus muscle. This kind of muscle variations are considered to be the higher origin of the flexor digitorum accessorius muscle of the sole. Here we discuss the phylogenetic history of this muscle as this muscle variant is present in some primitive mammals, absent in apes and in this particular case appeared as one of the muscles of the flexor compartment of the leg.

  4. Cortical excitability differences between flexor pollicis longus and APB.

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    Bae, Jong Seok; Menon, Parvathi; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2013-04-29

    Although abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) share a common peripheral nerve supply, these muscles subserve different functions and may be differently affected in neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As a consequence, differences in cortical excitability may potentially develop in relation to these functional differences. Cortical excitability was assessed using the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique in 15 healthy controls with motor responses recorded over the APB and FPL using surface electrode recordings. Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced from the FPL compared to APB (SICIFPL 6.9±1.8%; SICIAPB 10.7±1.4%, P<0.01). In addition, the FPL motor evoked potential amplitude (MEPFPL 14.7±2.3%; MEPAPB 21.7±3.9%; P<0.01) and cortical silent period duration (CSPFPL 174.7±6.7ms; CSPAPB 205.4±3.9ms, P<0.01) were significantly smaller. The findings in the present study indicate that cortical inhibition and corticomotoneuronal output is reduced when recording over the FPL. The differences in cortical excitability may develop as a consequence of varied function and could potentially explain the dissociated muscle atrophy evident in ALS.

  5. A combined variation of Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis: Case report and review of literature.

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    Bernardes, A; Melo, C; Pinheiro, S

    2016-12-01

    The muscles of the anterior compartment of the forearm often exhibit anatomic variations. During dissection of the upper right limb of a preserved cadaver, morphological variations in the Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were found. The Palmaris longus muscular fibers converged to a tendon that passed beneath the Flexor retinaculum, and inserted at the base of the middle phalanx of the fourth digit, replacing the tendon of Flexor digitorum superficialis. The Flexor digitorum superficialis was divided into two muscular heads: a digastric medial head giving tendons to the second and fifth digits, and a lateral head giving one tendon to the third digit. All these tendons were inserted in the respective digits by two bundles between which were located the tendon of the Flexor digitorum profundus muscle. Variations of flexor muscles must be documented because of their clinical significance and their potential use of these muscles in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic Muscle Infarction of the Tibialis Anterior and Extensor Hallucis Longus Muscles Mimicking the Malignant Soft-Tissue Tumor.

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    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Tokunaga, Karen; Tsukimura, Itsuko; Tada, Hiroshi; Doita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common causes of skeletal muscle infarction is diabetic muscle infarction (DMI), a rare complication associated with poorly controlled diabetes. We report an atypical case of DMI localized in the tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor hallucis longus (EHL) muscles of an elderly individual. A 64-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a 6-month history of a palpable mass in his lower left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the mass exhibited heterogeneous signals on T1- and T2-weighted images and slight heterogeneous enhancement within the muscles on fat suppressed T1-weighted images. Because histopathological analysis revealed mostly necrotic muscle tissues but no neoplastic cells, we resected the affected muscles. A typical symptom of DMI is severe abrupt-onset pain in the region of the affected muscles, but the patient did not complain of pain. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment for DMI were delayed, and widespread irreversible muscle necrosis developed. MRI findings of DMI can be similar to that of a malignant soft-tissue tumor. So, it is necessary to consider the malignant soft-tissue tumor as one of the differential diagnoses of DMI.

  7. Anatomic variation of palmaris longus and flexor digitorum superficialis of little finger in Indian population

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    Mugalur Aakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Palmaris longus and flexor digitorum superficialis of the little finger are highly variable anatomically. The tendons vary in different parts of the globe and different regions of the same country. Many studies have negated an association between the tendons. However, most of the studies have a sample size of less than 500 subjects. Aims and objectives: The aim was to study the tendons in the Indian population and study the association, if any between the tendons and to test functional significance of the tendons using the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire. Methods and material: It was a single centre cross-sectional study with a sample size of 1500 in the age group of 20–60 years. The subjects were tested for the presence of the tendons and their functionality was assessed by Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire. The data was tabulated and was assessed using SPSS 13.0 software. Results: Palmaris longus was bilaterally absent in 10.9% and flexor digitorum superficialis of the little finger was bilaterally absent in 42% of the cases. There was a statistically significant association between the tendons when considered bilaterally. The tendons did not have any bearing on the functionality as assessed by the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire. Conclusions: There is significant variability in the palmaris longus and flexor digitorum superficialis tendon to the little finger not only in the different countries but in different regions of the same country. However despite the various clinical and medicolegal aspects concerning both the tendons, they do not have much bearing on the functionality of the hand.

  8. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus in an 8-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheterpal, Arvin; Zoga, Adam; McClure, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common source of musculoskeletal pain in adults; however, it is rarely encountered in children. Calcific tendinitis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of hydroxyapatite deposition disease, in which calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition occurs in tendons. It may cause acute or chronic pain, or may be entirely asymptomatic. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus tendon in an 8-year-old boy, who initially presented to our department for workup of a mass felt along the volar aspect of the right wrist.

  9. A rare instance of an accessory long flexor to the second toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev GP

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During routine anatomical dissection a rare case of a flexor digitorum accessorius longus muscle was observed. This muscle arose with a well-formed muscular belly from the lower part of the lateral intermuscular septum, and then passed obliquely downward and medially deep to the calcaneal tendon in the canal of the flexor hallucis longus. In the sole region the aberrant muscle prolonged in a thin tendon that divided into two parts: superficial and deep. The superficial part attached to the tendon of the flexor digitorum longus for the second toe; the deep part of the tendon joined the tendon of the quadratus plantae and also an additional portion of the flexor hallucis longus tendon to the second toe. The possible clinical implications of this muscle in practical surgery and also in imaging radiology are reviewed.

  10. Flexor pollicis longus repair in a patient with Linburg-Comstock anomaly: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Unal

    2016-08-01

    Results: At the end of the rehabilitation program, the thumb recovered full range of motion, and physical examination revealed synchronous flexion movement (synkinesis of the thumb and index finger. Conclusion: Flexor pollicis longus tendon lacerations are common in the clinical practice of hand surgeons. Making a separate proximal wrist incision is a very useful technique to reach a proximal tendon stump. Otherwise, aggressive maneuvers may cause additional damage to the tendons involved and result in unpredicted outcomes. The attempts to retrieve the tendon at the injury site resulted in failure and gave a tethering sensation to the surgeon who recalled the Linburg-Comstock anomaly. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 88-91

  11. High incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis after trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for basal joint arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, T H; Hales, P F

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis in 77 patients (81 thumbs) who had trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Eighteen patients, 20 wrists (25%) had flexor carpi radialis tendinitis. The onset was 2-10 months (mean 4.7) after surgery. Two cases had preceding trauma. Eight cases (40%) responded to splinting and steroid injection. Ten patients, 12 wrists (60%) underwent surgery after failing non-operative treatment. Eleven wrists had frayed or partially torn flexor carpi radialis tendon and one had a complete tendon rupture with pseudotendon formation. Flexor carpi radialis tenotomy and pseudotendon excision were performed. All operated patients obtained good pain relief initially post-operatively. However, the pain recurred in two patients after 8 months. One required a local steroid injection for localized tenderness at the site of the proximal tendon stump. The other patient required a revision operation for scaphotrapezoid impingement. Both obtained complete pain relief. Our study has shown a high incidence of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis following trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty. Patients should be warned about this potential complication. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Comparison of transfer sites for flexor digitorum longus in a cadaveric adult acquired flatfoot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudreuil, Nicholas J; Ledoux, William R; Roush, Grant C; Whittaker, Eric C; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) dysfunction (PTTD) is associated with adult acquired flatfoot deformity. PTTD is commonly treated with a flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer (FDLTT) to the navicular (NAV), medial cuneiform (CUN), or distal residuum of the degraded PTT (rPTT). We assessed the kinetic and kinematic outcomes of these three attachment sites using cadaveric gait simulation. Three transfer locations (NAV, CUN, rPTT) were tested on seven prepared flatfoot models using a robotic gait simulator (RGS). The FDLTT procedures were simulated by pulling on the PTT with biomechanically realistic FDL forces (rPTT) or by pulling on the transected FDL tendon after fixation to the navicular or medial cuneiform (NAV and CUN, respectively). Plantar pressure and foot bone motion were quantified. Peak plantar pressure significantly decreased from the flatfoot condition at the first metatarsal (NAV) and hallux (CUN). No difference was found in the medial-lateral center of pressure. Kinematic findings showed minimal differences between flatfoot and FDLTT specimens. The three locations demonstrated only minimal differences from the flatfoot condition, with the NAV and CUN procedures resulting in decreased medial pressures. Functionally, all three surgical procedures performed similarly.

  13. Clinical Assessment of the Congenital Absence of Palmaris Longus and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Muscles in Young Saudi Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Talal Alzahrani; Mohammad Abdullah Almalki; Turki Abdullah Al-Thunayan; Amjaad Hamad Almohawis; Ahmed Turki Al Turki; Loung Umedani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital Palmaris Longus (PL) absence was found in 15%–20.25% of population globally. This condition and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (FDS) tendon absence in little finger are not known in Saudi Arabia. We studied prevalence of PL and FDS agenesis in Saudi Arabian population. Methods. A random cross-sectional study was carried out after an ethical approval in the Riyadh universities. Schaeffer’s test was used to examine PL absence. The Modified test was used to examine FDS a...

  14. FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY OF THE SOFT-TISSUES OF THE HAND AND WRIST - INVIVO EXCURSION MEASUREMENT OF THE FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS-TENDON USING MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; KONINGS, JG; WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the flexor pollicis longus-tendon (FPL-tendon) with the thumb in different positions allows the in vivo assessment of its abduction-adduction/flexion excursion. Measurements can also be performed in different positions of the wrist. In our study, the mean

  15. FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY OF THE SOFT-TISSUES OF THE HAND AND WRIST - INVIVO EXCURSION MEASUREMENT OF THE FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS-TENDON USING MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; KONINGS, JG; WOLF, RFE; MOOYAART, EL

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the flexor pollicis longus-tendon (FPL-tendon) with the thumb in different positions allows the in vivo assessment of its abduction-adduction/flexion excursion. Measurements can also be performed in different positions of the wrist. In our study, the mean excursio

  16. Split-hand plus sign in ALS: differential involvement of the flexor pollicis longus and intrinsic hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Parvathi; Bae, Jong Seok; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2013-05-01

    The flexor pollicis longus (FPL), a key muscle involved in fractionated thumb movements, may be relatively spared in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared to the thenar group of muscles, termed the split-hand plus sign. Consequently, the diagnostic utility of the split-hand plus sign was prospectively assessed in ALS. In total, 103 patients (37 ALS and 66 non-ALS) with neuromuscular symptoms underwent assessment of FPL and APB strength using the Medical Research Council (MRC) score. A median nerve strength index (MSI) was developed to quantify differential involvement by expressing the APB strength score as a fraction of the FPL strength score. The APB muscle strength was significantly reduced compared to FPL strength in ALS patients (p hand plus sign distinguished ALS from non-ALS neuromuscular disorders, thereby suggesting a diagnostic utility of this novel clinical sign in ALS.

  17. (足母)长伸肌神经支配的解剖学研究和临床意义%An anatomical study and clinical value of the innervation of hallucis longus muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵兴; 方向前; 范顺武; 徐文斌; 陈帅

    2013-01-01

    目的 明确(足母)长伸肌神经支配的解剖学特征及其对临床的指导意义.方法 10具新鲜成人标本,男6具,女4具;年龄41~73岁,平均53.2岁.取左小腿标本9具,右小腿标本10具,共获得19具小腿标本.解剖标本,确认胫骨前肌和趾长伸肌深面的(足母)长伸肌,并沿腓深神经解剖(足母)长伸肌的神经肌支,观察神经肌支的位置、数量.测量神经肌支长度(nerve length,NL)、神经肌支起点与腓骨头尖部的距离(nerve-fibula head length,NFL)以及腓骨长度(fibula length,FL).应用苏木精-伊红染色,观察神经肌支内神经束的数量.结果 19具小腿标本共发现23支(足母)长伸肌的神经肌支,其中15具肢体由单支神经肌支支配,4具肢体由双支神经肌支支配,1具标本的左、右侧肢体均由双支神经肌支支配.所有神经肌支均起源于腓深神经.神经肌支由腓侧进入(足母)长伸肌14支,由前方进入3支,由胫侧进入6支.19具标本小腿长度为34.5~40.6 cm,平均(37.0±1.9) cm;神经肌支起点与腓骨头尖部的距离为75.4~97.2 mm,平均(89.0±5.2) mm;神经肌支长度为33.6~57.4 mm,平均(48.5±5.0) mm;神经肌支起点与腓骨头尖部的距离/腓骨长度为0.211~0.280,平均0.245±0.020.前方进入(足母)长伸肌的神经肌支长度最短.单神经肌支支配的15具标本的神经肌支中,12支有两个神经束、3支仅有一个神经束;而在双神经肌支支配的4具标本的8个神经肌支中,除1支有两个神经束外,其余7支均仅有一个神经束.结论 (足母)长伸肌神经肌支的特殊解剖学特征可能是其出现孤立性损伤和损伤以后预后不佳的原因.%Objective To study the anatomy of the innervation of hallucis longus muscle,and discuss the clinical value of the innervation.Methods Nineteen limbs of 10 cadavers were studied.There were 4 female cadavers and 6 male cadavers.Nine were left legs and 10 were right legs.The specimens were

  18. The prevalence and anatomical characteristics of the accessory head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyeeta Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The accessory head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle (AHFPL, also known as the Gantzer’s muscle, was first described in 1813. The prevalence rates of an AHFPL significantly vary between studies, and no consensus has been reached on the numerous variations reported in its origin, innervation, and relationships to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve (AIN and the Median Nerve (MN. The aim of our study was to determine the true prevalence of AHFPL and to study its associated anatomical characteristics.Methods. A search of the major electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science was performed to identify all articles reporting data on the prevalence of AHPFL in the population. No date or language restriction was set. Additionally, an extensive search of the references of all relevant articles was performed. Data on the prevalence of the AHFPL in upper limbs and its anatomical characteristics and relationships including origin, insertion, innervation, and position was extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis using MetaXL version 2.0.Results. A total of 24 cadaveric studies (n = 2,358 upper limb were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of an AHFPL was 44.2% (95% CI [0.347–0.540]. An AHFPL was found more commonly in men than in women (41.1% vs. 24.1%, and was slightly more prevalent on the right side than on the left side (52.8% vs. 45.2%. The most common origin of the AHFPL was from the medial epicondyle of the humerus with a pooled prevalence of 43.6% (95% CI [0.166–0.521]. In most cases, the AHFPL inserted into the flexor pollicis longus muscle (94.6%, 95% CI [0.731–1.0] and was innervated by the AIN (97.3%, 95% CI [0.924–0.993].Conclusion. The AHFPL should be considered as more a part of normal anatomy than an anatomical variant. The variability in its anatomical characteristics, and its potential to cause compression of the AIN and MN, must be taken into account

  19. Clinical Assessment of the Congenital Absence of Palmaris Longus and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Muscles in Young Saudi Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Talal Alzahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital Palmaris Longus (PL absence was found in 15%–20.25% of population globally. This condition and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (FDS tendon absence in little finger are not known in Saudi Arabia. We studied prevalence of PL and FDS agenesis in Saudi Arabian population. Methods. A random cross-sectional study was carried out after an ethical approval in the Riyadh universities. Schaeffer’s test was used to examine PL absence. The Modified test was used to examine FDS absence. Data was analyzed using Microsoft Excel and the SPSS Software version 22. Results. The volunteers, 331, males 164 (49.5% and females 167 (50.5%, mean age of 23 (SD ± 5.3, showed right hand dominance in 294 (88.8% and bilateral absence of PL and FDS in 15.1% and 14.8%, respectively. The hand dominance showed no significant relation between PL and FDS absence, p value = 0.788, 0.835, respectively. Generally, we found a weak correlation between absence of the PL and FDS, p value ≥ 0.595. Conclusion. The bilateral absence of PL and FDS was found as 15.1% and 14.8%, respectively. Variation of the FDS tendon absence was an independent entity for the PL absence. The dominance of hands was not related to the tested variables found in PL and FDS agenesis.

  20. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  1. Addressing stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: biomechanically repairing the osseous structures without the need of performing the flexor digitorum longus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Thomas, Zachary M; Fahim, Ramy

    2014-07-01

    The clinical presentation of adult flatfoot can range from a flexible deformity with normal joint integrity to a rigid, arthritic flat foot. Debate still exists regarding the surgical management of stage II deformities, especially in the presence of medial column instability. This article reviews and discusses various surgical options for the correction of stage II flatfoot reconstructive procedures. The authors discuss their opinion that is not always necessary to transfer the flexor digitorum longus tendon to provide relief and stability in this patient population. The anatomy, diagnosis, and current treatments of flexible flatfoot deformity are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chiasma crurale: intersection of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons above the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging-anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Zurich (Switzerland); Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the precise anatomy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the chiasma crurale in cadavers, paying special attention to degenerative changes Twelve fresh human ankles were harvested from 11 nonembalmed cadavers (mean age at death 77 years) and used according to institutional guidelines. MR imaging and MR tenography were used to investigate the anatomy of the chiasma crurale using proton density-weighted sequences. The gross anatomy of the chiasma crurale was evaluated and compared to the MR imaging findings. Histology was used to elucidate further the structure of the chiasma crurale. Above the chiasma, five specimens had a small amount of fat tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendon. In all specimens both tendons had a sheath below the chiasma but not above it. At the central portion of the chiasma there was no soft tissue between the tendons, except in two specimens that showed an anatomic variant consisting of a thick septum connecting the tibial periosteum and the deep transverse fascia of the leg. In MR images, eight specimens showed what were believed to be degenerative changes in the tendons at the level of the chiasma. However, during gross inspection and histologic analysis of the specimens, there was no tendon degeneration visible. At the central portion of the chiasma, there is no tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons unless there is an anatomic variant. At the chiasma crurale, areas with irregular tendon surfaces are normal findings and are not associated with tendon degeneration (fraying). (orig.)

  3. Long-term follow-up of flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, C; Whitehouse, S L; Saxby, T S

    2015-03-01

    Flexor digitorum longus transfer and medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy is a well-recognised form of treatment for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Although excellent short- and medium-term results have been reported, the long-term outcome is unknown. We reviewed the clinical outcome of 31 patients with a symptomatic flexible flat-foot deformity who underwent this procedure between 1994 and 1996. There were 21 women and ten men with a mean age of 54.3 years (42 to 70). The mean follow-up was 15.2 years (11.4 to 16.5). All scores improved significantly (p Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 48.4 pre-operatively to 90.3 (54 to 100) at the final follow-up. The mean pain component improved from 12.3 to 35.2 (20 to 40). The mean function score improved from 35.2 to 45.6 (30 to 50). The mean visual analogue score for pain improved from 7.3 to 1.3 (0 to 6). The mean Short Form-36 physical component score was 40.6 (sd 8.9), and this showed a significant correlation with the mean AOFAS score (r = 0.68, p = 0.005). A total of 27 patients (87%) were pain free and functioning well at the final follow-up. We believe that flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy provides long-term pain relief and satisfactory function in the treatment of stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Incidental tenosynovial huge cell tumors of the flexor hallucis longus muscle: seldom differential diagnosis of metabolic lesions using F18-FDG PET/CT; Inzidenteller tenosynovialer Riesenzelltumor des Musculus flexor hallucis longus. Seltene Differenzialdiagnose stoffwechselaktiver Laesionen in der F-18-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, W.; Daemmrich, M.; Derlin, T.

    2016-03-15

    Tenosynovial huge cell tumors are seldom benign tumors in extremities originating from bone joint synovia and tendon sheats. In F18-FDG PET/CT imaging the tenosynovial huge cell tumors show increased metabolic activity and can trigger false diagnoses.

  5. [Medial flexor digitorum longus tendon augmentation and lateral foot column lengthening or reorienting triple arthrodesis as surgical therapy of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, M; Klaue, K

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the alignment and functional outcome after surgical augmentation of the tibialis posterior by tendon transfer and lateral column lengthening by osteotomy of the os calcis, calcaneo-cuboidal arthrodesis or reorientating triple arthrodesis. From 1991 to 1999 41 patients with the clinical and radiological diagnosis of dysfunction of the tibialis posterior tendon underwent surgical exploration and repair. These 41 patients (22 women, 19 men) had an average age of 44.3 years (range, 19-69 years) and had been symptomatic for an average of 2.3 years (range, 6 months to 6 years). All patients had the symptoms of a painful flatfoot deformity without dynamic support along the medioplantar aspect. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfer as reconstruction of the tibialis posterior tendon was performed in the cases without major deformity (n = 77). Patients underwent FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (n = 15) of the os calcis or calcaneocuboidal (c-c) arthrodesis (n = 12) if passive correction of the foot deformity was still possible and reorientating triple arthrodesis (n = 7) when a fixed flatfoot deformity had developed. AOFAS score and radiological examination were used preoperatively and in the follow-up. The AOFAS score improved for stage 1 patients after a mean follow-up of 43 months with FDL transfer from a preoperative mean of 54 to 84 points, for stage II patients with FDL transfer and lengthening osteotomy (mean follow-up 36 m) from 47 to 92 points, with c-c arthrodesis (follow-up 66 m) from 48 to 86 points, and for stage III patients with triple arthrodesis from 42 to 72 points. In two patients, the deformity failed to improve (stage I) necessitating a revision surgery with a calceneo-cuboidal lengthening arthrodesis for relapsing deformity. In order to correct deformity and provide substantial relief of foot pain and dysfunction, we recommend the transfer of the FDL tendon in flexible flat foot deformity together

  6. 拇长屈肌腱转位结合挤压螺钉重建KuwadaⅣ型陈旧性跟腱断裂%Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rup-ture of Kuwada IV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜俊锋; 朱仰义

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmenta⁃tion material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods:From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated,including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old(20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. Results:All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months(means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred,all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were re⁃covered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23 ± 12.86 preoperatively to 90.00 ± 5.10 postoperatively. Conclusion:The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation,quick recovery,firm tendon fixation,and less complications.%目的:探讨拇长屈肌腱转位后应用挤压螺钉重建陈旧性KuwadaⅣ型跟腱断裂的临床效果。方法:回顾性分析2010年9月至2012年6月,拇长屈肌腱转位后采用挤压螺钉固定重建26例陈旧性跟腱断裂患者的临床资料,其中男18例,女8例;年龄20~66岁,平均44.2岁。所有患者为单侧损伤。MRI显示跟腱断端距离为6.0~9.0 cm。观察术后并发症情况,并采用美国足踝外科协会(American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society,AOFAS)踝与后足评分及Leppilahti跟腱修复评分进行评价疗效。结果:26例获得随访,时间18~68个月,平均30.4个月。

  7. Epifascial accessory palmaris longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengo, Cesare; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Bassetto, Franco; De Caro, Raffaele

    2006-09-01

    In hand reconstructive surgery the palmaris longus muscle is one of the most utilized donor site for tendon reconstruction procedures. However, its anatomic position is variable and anatomic variations may be responsible for median nerve compression. We report the case of a 40-year-old, right-handed woman, who presented with numbness and paresthesias in the palm and in the flexor aspect of the first, second, and third fingers of her right hand for the preceding 5 months, coinciding with increase of office work (typing). The clinical examination and radiological investigations (ultrasound and magnetic resonance) revealed a subcutaneous mass (15 mm x 2.3 mm x 6 cm), with a lenticular shape and definite edges at the level of the volar aspect of the distal third of the forearm. The fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed the presence of striated muscle fibers. During surgery, a muscle belly was found in the epifascial plane. This muscle originated from subcutaneous septa in the middle forearm and inserted on to the superficial palmar aponeurosis with fine short tendon fibers. Exposure of the antebrachial fascia did not reveal any area of weakness or muscle herniation. The palmaris longus tendon, flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, and flexor carpi radialis tendon showed usual topography under the antebrachial fascia. The accessory muscle was excised and histology revealed unremarkable striated muscle fibers, limited by a thin connective sheath. The presence of an accessory palmaris longus (APL) located in the epifascial plane could be ascribed to an unusual migration of myoblasts during the morphogenesis. Although extremely rare, APL is worth bearing in mind as a possible cause of median nerve compression and etiology of a volar mass in the distal forearm.

  8. The high variability of the chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons: Anatomical aspects of tendon transfer in foot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretterklieber, Bettina

    2017-05-01

    As tendon transfer of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is an established procedure, exact knowledge of the formation of the chiasma plantare is of great interest. Although the quadratus plantae (QP) appears to play a major role, it has been rarely addressed in previous studies. The aim of the present study was to reinvestigate the formation of the chiasma plantare and the composition of the long flexor tendons in order to clarify the inexact and partly contradictory descriptions published from 1865 onward. The chiasma plantare and the long flexor tendons in both feet of 50 formalin-fixed specimens of body donors (25 men and women) were analyzed by gross anatomical dissection. It was composed of one (3%), two (69%) or three layers (28%) which were variably established by the tendinous and muscular fibers of the FHL, the FDL and the QP. In 61% the FHL gave one or more slips to the FDL, and in 39% there was a bidirectional interconnection between the two tendons. The slip from the FHL to the FDL largely reinforces the second (45%), or the second and third tendon (46%). Thus, the FHL is involved in the first tendon in all cases, in the second one in 97% of cases, and in the third tendon in about one half of cases (53%). In all instances, the FDL contributes to the third to fourth, in 98% the second, and in at least 39% to the first tendon. The QP reinforces the second to fourth tendon in nearly all cases, the fifth in about one half of cases, and even the first tendon in 14% of cases. In addition, the individual composition of the five long flexor tendons arising from the chiasma plantare was analyzed in detail. Special emphasis was placed on the evaluation of side and sex differences as well as individual symmetry. Furthermore, biomechanical, developmental and phylogenetic aspects were outlined. In terms of the outcome of this study, the FHL appears to be the better donor for tendon transfer to restore lost function, but

  9. Bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle with trifid insertion, a rare variation

    OpenAIRE

    Gune, Anita R.; Anand J. Pote; Patil, Ashalata D.; Priya S Patil; Vasudha R. Nikam

    2014-01-01

    Normally the palmaris longus muscle originates from the medial epicondyle of the humerus from common flexor origin. In the middle of the forearm, the muscle belly forms a tendon which is inserted into the flexor retinaculum and the palmar aponeurosis. In our study after dissection of both forearms of a 45-year-old male cadaver we found a reversed palmaris longus muscle. This means that the palmaris longus muscle was tendinous in its proximal part and muscular in its distal part. The fleshy be...

  10. Myofascial force transmission is increasingly important at lower forces: firing frequency-related length-force characteristics of rat extensor digitorum longus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.J.M; Baan, G.C.; Huijing, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Effects of submaximal stimulation frequencies on myofascial force transmission were investigated for rat anterior crural muscles with all motor units activated. - Methods: Tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus (TAEHL) muscles were kept at constant muscle-tendon complex length, but exte

  11. Bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle with trifid insertion, a rare variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita R. Gune

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normally the palmaris longus muscle originates from the medial epicondyle of the humerus from common flexor origin. In the middle of the forearm, the muscle belly forms a tendon which is inserted into the flexor retinaculum and the palmar aponeurosis. In our study after dissection of both forearms of a 45-year-old male cadaver we found a reversed palmaris longus muscle. This means that the palmaris longus muscle was tendinous in its proximal part and muscular in its distal part. The fleshy belly of muscle was passing over flexor retinaculum, was ensheathed by separate fascia. The muscle belly was spreading on both the sides of each palm for insertion which was trifid, that is centrally into palmar aponeurosis, laterally continuous with the fascia covering the thenar muscles and medially with Abductor digit minimi. It was having tendinous interconnection with the muscle mass of both the sides. Bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle mentioned in the literature, was a surgical finding in a patient who suffered from edema and pain in the wrist. The overuse of the reversed palmaris longus muscle can lead to the muscle's local hypertrophy. As per the literature a reversed palmaris longus muscle may cause a compartment syndrome with pain and edema in the wrist area, the carpal tunnel syndrome and Guyon's syndrome. The variation is also useful to the hand surgeon, as the palmaris longus muscle is an anatomical landmark for operations in this area. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 741-743

  12. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  13. An unusual palmaris longus tendon: variation in the insertion and orientation at the level of wrist joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar V

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Palmaris longus is a muscle often used in reconstructive plastic surgery mainly in tendon transfer procedures for replacement of long flexors of the fingers. It has also been used for many other procedures including ptosis correction, lip augmentation and management of facial paralysis. Absence of palmaris longus in humans appears to be hereditary, but its genetic transmission is not clear. We report here a variant pattern of insertion of palmaris longus, and its probable significants. Any variation in the insertion of tendon of the palmaris longus is gaining importance as it is becoming very popular amongst graft material for reconstructive surgeries.

  14. Nomenclatural review of long digital forelimb flexors in carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoor, C F; Badoux, D M

    1986-12-01

    A hitherto-unknown atavistic muscle in the dog initiated a review of the literature on the homologies and nomenclature of the forelimb flexors in carnivores and man. A consequence is that we recommend a revision of the nomenclature in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (Ithaca, New York, 1983) so that it is in agreement with the Nomina Anatomica (Wilkins, Baltimore, 1983). This revision mainly consists of the incorporation of the terms M. palmaris longus and Mm. flexores breves manus.

  15. ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF PALMARIS LONGUS: TENDINOUS ORIGIN AND FLESHY INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhadeb Ghosh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A tendinous origin and fleshy insertion of palmaris longus muscle was observed in the left forearm during routine dissection which was performed on adult male cadaver in the department of Anatomy, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College. It was having long tendinous origin from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and the surrounding deep fascia. It was fusiform at the lower middle of the forearm. The fleshy muscular insertion was noted to the flexor retinaculum and few muscular fibers interdigitate with flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and palmar aponeurosis. The length of tendon was 19 inches and fleshy muscular length was 11inches. The median nerve and ulnar nerve was covered by this fleshy insertion. This palmaris longus variation is helpful for the surgeon and the radiologist, orthopaedic, plastic surgeon during any diagnosis of the forearm because this fleshy part of muscle can compress the median nerve and ulnar nerve or it can be mistaken as a tumor or ganglion during radiological or clinical examination.

  16. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Flexor Tendon Injuries Email to a friend * required fields From * ... move the fingers through cord-like extensions called tendons, which connect the muscles to bone. The flexor ...

  17. The role of hind limb flexor muscles during swimming in the toad, Bufo marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Gary B

    2007-01-01

    Most work examining muscle function during anuran locomotion has focused largely on the roles of major hind limb extensors during jumping and swimming. Nevertheless, the recovery phase of anuran locomotion likely plays a critical role in locomotor performance, especially in the aquatic environment, where flexing limbs can increase drag on the swimming animal. In this study, I use kinematic and electromyographic analyses to explore the roles of four anatomical flexor muscles in the hind limb of Bufo marinus during swimming: m. iliacus externus, a hip flexor; mm. iliofibularis and semitendinosus, knee flexors; and m. tibialis anticus longus, an ankle flexor. Two general questions are addressed: (1) What role, if any, do these flexors play during limb extension? and (2) How do limb flexors control limb flexion? Musculus iliacus externus exhibits a large burst of EMG activity early in limb extension and shows low levels of activity during recovery. Both m. iliofibularis and m. semitendinosus are biphasically active, with relatively short but intense bursts during limb extension followed by longer and typically weaker secondary bursts during recovery. Musculus tibialis anticus longus becomes active mid way through recovery and remains active through the start of extension in the next stroke. In conclusion, flexors at all three joints exhibit some activity during limb extension, indicating that they play a role in mediating limb movements during propulsion. Further, recovery is controlled by a complex pattern of flexor activation timing, but muscle intensities are generally lower, suggesting relatively low force requirements during this phase of swimming.

  18. Variant insertion of extensor carpi radialis longus in a South Indian cadaver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetti R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of muscular variations in the antebrachial region is clinically significant in certain operative procedures like tendon transfer, correction of hand deformities. Extensor carpi radialis accessorius and extensor carpi radialis intermedius were reported variations of extensor region. We present a rare variation of extensor carpi radialis longus, which was inserted into the fibrous flexor sheath of middle, ring, and little fingers on the palmar aspect. The present variation will influence the biomechanics of wrist joint.

  19. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  20. Proximo-distal organization and fibre type regionalization in rat hindlimb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, LC; Kernell, D

    2000-01-01

    Five muscles of the rat's lower hindlimb were compared with regard to their histochemical fibre type distribution at seven different proximo-distal levels. The muscles were: extensor digitorum longus (ED), flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FD), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), peroneus longus (PE) a

  1. Calcifications simulating peroneus longus tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A. de; Illum, F.; Joergensen, J.

    1984-06-01

    In two patients with sprains of the ankle joint calcification adjacent to the posterior tibial margin was evident in the lateral projection of a standard radiographic examination. Calcifying peroneus longus tendinitis was suggested. Further tangential views and computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed, however, that the calcifications in both patients were located in the tibial insertion of the posterior and inferior tibio-fibular ligament. In such cases, a correct diagnosis will avoid unnecessary treatment for a non-existent tendinitis.

  2. Distally Based Abductor Hallucis Adipomuscular Flap for Forefoot Plantar Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanglim; Kim, Min Bom; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Jeong Kook; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Soft tissue and bone defects of the lower leg, ankle, and heel region often require coverage by local or distant flaps. The authors successfully used the distally based adipomuscular abductor hallucis flap for the treatment of 7 patients with soft tissue defect on the plantar forefoot after diabetic ulcer (n = 2), excision of melanoma at the medial forefoot (n = 3), and posttraumatic defects of the plantar forefoot (n = 2). The size of the defects ranged from 6 to 36 cm. All defects were covered successfully without major complications. The distally based adipomuscular flap from the abductor hallucis muscle provides a reliable coverage for small and moderate defects of the plantar and medial forefoot. This flap is often preferable to the use of free flaps because the surgery is rapidly performed and does not require microsurgical expertise.

  3. Morphometric and Statistical Analysis of the Palmaris Longus Muscle in Human and Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqueline A. G. M. F. Aversi-Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The palmaris longus is considered a phylogenetic degenerate metacarpophalangeal joint flexor muscle in humans, a small vestigial forearm muscle; it is the most variable muscle in humans, showing variation in position, duplication, slips and could be reverted. It is frequently studied in papers about human anatomical variations in cadavers and in vivo, its variation has importance in medical clinic, surgery, radiological analysis, in studies about high-performance athletes, in genetics and anthropologic studies. Most studies about palmaris longus in humans are associated to frequency or case studies, but comparative anatomy in primates and comparative morphometry were not found in scientific literature. Comparative anatomy associated to morphometry of palmaris longus could explain the degeneration observed in this muscle in two of three of the great apes. Hypothetically, the comparison of the relative length of tendons and belly could indicate the pathway of the degeneration of this muscle, that is, the degeneration could be associated to increased tendon length and decreased belly from more primitive primates to those most derivate, that is, great apes to modern humans. In conclusion, in primates, the tendon of the palmaris longus increase from Lemuriformes to modern humans, that is, from arboreal to terrestrial primates and the muscle became weaker and tending to be missing.

  4. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, B A; Young, V L; Arfken, C

    1990-07-01

    A review of 253 consecutive digits with stenosing flexor tenosynovitis was done to clarify the respective role of steroid injection and surgical release in the management of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis. Treatment selection was based on the patient's age and severity of presenting complaints. In patients aged 10 years or more, analysis showed no statistically significant difference between results with steroid injection and surgical release. Surgical treatment was associated with higher cost and more complications. Based on this review, we recommend up to three injections of 20 mg of triamcinolone into the digital flexor sheath as the initial management of nonlocking, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in adults. Initial management by surgical release is reserved for children and patients with digits locked in flexion.

  5. Single-stage reconstruction of flexor tendons with vascularized tendon transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, P C; Pérez-García, A; Thione, A; Lorca-García, C

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of finger flexor tendons with vascularized flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon grafts (flaps) based on the ulnar vessels as a single stage is not a popular technique. We reviewed 40 flexor tendon reconstructions (four flexor pollicis longus and 36 finger flexors) with vascularized FDS tendon grafts in 38 consecutive patients. The donor tendons were transferred based on the ulnar vessels as a single-stage procedure (37 pedicled flaps, three free flaps). Four patients required composite tendon and skin island transfer. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, and functional results were evaluated using a total active range of motion score. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors that could be associated with the postoperative total active range of motion. The average postoperative total active range of motion (excluding the thumbs) was 178.05° (SD 50°). The total active range of motion was significantly lower for patients who were reconstructed with free flaps and for those who required composite tendon and skin island flap. Age, right or left hand, donor/motor tendon and pulley reconstruction had no linear effect on total active range of motion. Overall results were comparable with a published series on staged tendon grafting but with a lower complication rate. Vascularized pedicled tendon grafts/flaps are useful in the reconstruction of defects of finger flexor tendons in a single stage, although its role in the reconstructive armamentarium remains to be clearly established. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  7. Change of the agenesis rate of palmaris longus muscle in an isolated village in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkáts, N

    2015-01-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is a slender, fusiform muscle which lies on the flexor surface of the forearm. Its agenesis is considered the most frequent anatomic variation in the human body. Agenesis of PLM shows strong racial and ethnic variability. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of agenesis of PLM in Dercen, an isolated Hungarian village in Ukraine. Five hundred forty-eight persons were examined by Thompson's, Shaffer's, Pushpakumar's, Mishra's 1, and Mishra's 2 tests to confirm or refute the presence of a PLM. All the examined subjects were of Hungarian ethnic origin. The overall prevalence of absence of the palmaris longus was 52.92%. During the examination, unusual results appeared regarding the agenesis of PLM in the elder population of village. Further tests among elder population shoved that in people born before 1945 the agenesis rate of PLM was higher than 70%, and in villagers born after 1945 the agenesis rate drops by 23%. In the light of historical events of the country, we can say that the unexpected change of the PLM agenesis rate in 1945 was caused by invasion of soviet army and deportation of local men from their homeland.

  8. A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.

    2015-01-01

    An adductor longus muscle rupture is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus rupture. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus rupture. PMID:25918663

  9. A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. L. L. van de Kimmenade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adductor longus muscle rupture is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus rupture. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus rupture.

  10. Distal rupture of the adductor longus in a skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greditzer, Harry G; Nawabi, Danyal; Li, Angela Eh; Jawetz, Shari T

    Acute adductor longus ruptures occur infrequently and have been rarely described in the literature. Schlegel et al. reviewed a series of adductor longus tendon ruptures and found that all ruptured proximally. A 42-year-old man with right hip pain 3 weeks following a skiing injury underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which demonstrated a distal adductor longus avulsion. The diagnosis of acute adductor longus injury can be difficult on physical examination alone, but MRI can accurately depict the site of injury. Surgery may be indicated for a proximal avulsion, but a distal injury may heal with nonoperative treatment, as in our case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Freeze-dried allograft-mediated gene or protein delivery of growth and differentiation factor 5 reduces reconstructed murine flexor tendon adhesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Sys Hasslund; Dadali, Tulin; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Advances in allograft processing have opened new horizons for clinical adaptation of flexor tendon allografts as delivery scaffolds for antifibrotic therapeutics. Recombinant adeno-associated-virus (rAAV) gene delivery of the growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5) has been previously...... associated with antifibrotic effects in a mouse model of flexor tendoplasty. In this study, we compared the effects of loading freeze-dried allografts with different doses of GDF-5 protein or rAAV-Gdf5 on flexor tendon healing and adhesions. We first optimized the protein and viral loading parameters using...... reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and in vivo bioluminescent imaging. We then reconstructed flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons of the mouse hindlimb with allografts loaded with low and high doses of recombinant GDF-5 protein and r...

  12. Prevalence of palmaris longus absence – a study in the Yoruba population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaka, Godwin O; Ejiwunmi, Adedayo B

    2009-01-01

    Background Palmaris longus (PL) has received a growing interest for its role in constructive surgery. Since the agenesis of PL shows a strong racial variation, it is conceivable that its prevalence on the Yoruba ethnic population in Nigeria will further confirm this phenomenon. Methods A total of 600 subjects comprising 335 males and 265 females aged 8-60years were used to assess the prevalence of agenesis of the PL in Yoruba tribe. Results The overall prevalence of absence both unilaterally and bilaterally in the two sexes was 6.7%. In males, unilateral absence was 5.4%. The distribution on the right and left were 2.4% and 3.0% respectively. The bilateral absence was 1.5%. In females, unilateral absence was 6.0%. The distribution on the right and left were 2.6% and 3.4% respectively. Bilaterally, it was 0.4%. In one subject unilaterally, PL was observed to have differentiated from flexor carpi radialis. Conclusion Results of this finding suggested that the prevalence of PL agenesis as reported in standard anatomy texts is significantly different from our observation in this Yoruba population. The differentiation of PL tendon from flexor carpi radialis is indicative that both muscles may develop from the same muscle group as previously suggested. PMID:19568443

  13. The significance of a crossed extensor hallucis response in neurologic disorders: a comparison with the Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindfelt, B; Rosén, I; Hanko, J

    1976-04-01

    The significance of a crossed extensor hallucis response on active flexion of the hip was analysed in various neurological disorders. It is concluded that this sign, not formerly described, is a pathological reflex or synkinesia. In the cooperative patient the crossed extensor response is a more sensitive indicator of a minor disturbance within the cortico-spinal motor pathways than the Babinski sign. With lesions above the foramen magnum a crossed extensor hallucis response is observed more frequently than the Babinski sign.

  14. Clinical relevance of palmaris longus agenesis: common anatomical aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Sudhir K; Tiwari, Akshay; Kumar, Abhishek; Bhatia, Rajesh; Tantuway, Vinay; Kapoor, Saurabh

    2008-03-01

    Palmaris longus muscle, although of little functional use to the human upper limb, assumes great importance when used as a donor tendon for transfer or transplant. The variability in the prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis among various ethnic groups has been established, and the surgeon's awareness of the prevalence in a population or ethnic group is desirable. The prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis has, to the best of the authors' knowledge, not been reported in Indian patients. Five hundred Indian patients were examined for the presence or absence of palmaris longus tendon, using the conventional test for presence of palmaris longus. The prevalence and pattern of palmaris longus agenesis was analyzed statistically and any difference in prevalence or pattern of palmaris longus agenesis with regard to body side or sex was looked for. All statistical analysis was done using SPSS (version 12). chi2 test was used to analyze the association of agenesis with limb laterality and sex. The prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis was found to be 17.2% (8% bilateral and 9.2% unilateral). The prevalence of agenesis was significantly more common on the left side. Male subjects had a greater likelihood of unilateral agenesis, while female subjects were more likely to have bilateral agenesis. That prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis is race dependent is reaffirmed in the present study. Although the prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis in Indian patients was found to be much higher than the reported average prevalence in an Asian population, this tendon can still be counted on by surgeons treating Indian patients for use as a donor tendon, which will be present in a vast majority of Indian patients.

  15. A Case of Reverse Palmaris Longus Muscle- An Additional Muscle in the Anterior Compartment of the Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ashwini Lagadamane Sathynarayana; Gadahad, Mohandas Rao Kappettu

    2016-01-01

    It is uncommon to have additional muscles in the upper limb. Some of them may restrict the movements or compress the nerves and vessels, while others may go unnoticed. During the routine dissection for undergraduate medical students, we observed an additional muscle in the anterior compartment of the forearm in about 60-year-old male cadaver. The muscle had a prominent belly and a long tendon. Distally, it was attached to the flexor retinaculum by a short and thick tendon. Proximally, long tendon of the muscle passed between the flexor carpi ulnaris and palmaris longus and was attached to the common aponeurosis shared by the extensor carpi ulnaris and flexor digitorum profundus muscles. The additional muscle belly was supplied by a branch from the anterior interosseous nerve. The ulnar nerve and artery was passing deep to the fleshy belly of the muscle. The muscle reported here might compress the ulnar nerve and artery and may produce neurovascular symptoms. On the other hand, the tendon and fleshy belly of the muscle could be useful in muscle/tendon grafts. The observations made by us in the present case will supplement our knowledge of variations of the muscles in this region which could be useful for surgeons during the forearm and hand surgeries. PMID:27134851

  16. Multiple tendons of abductor pollicis longus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur DI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic variations of the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL and its knowledge is important to assess the diseased and traumatized hand and when considering tendons for repair or graft. During routine dissection of a 63-year-old male cadaver, in the Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India we came across an unusual APL in the right upper limb. The muscle had altogether 9 tendons and they were inserted to the lateral and anterolateral sides of the base of the 1st metacarpal bone, opponens pollicis (two tendons each, the abductor pollicis brevis, trapezium and thenar fascia (one tendon each. The number of accessory tendons of APL has functional significance in the development of de Quervain’s syndrome.

  17. Abductor hallucis muscle flap with circular external fixation for Charcot foot osteomyelitis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zgonis, Thomas; Ramanujam, Crystal L.; Facaros, Zacharia

    2011-01-01

    Complicated soft tissue defects of the diabetic foot often call for alternative methods to traditional primary closure. Despite the popularity of microvascular free flaps, local muscle flaps can offer reliable reconstruction for these challenging wounds with shorter surgical times and reduced complication rates. In this article, the authors describe the successful use of the abductor hallucis muscle flap and external fixation for soft tissue reconstruction of a chronic Charcot foot wound and ...

  18. Abductor hallucis muscle flap with circular external fixation for Charcot foot osteomyelitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Complicated soft tissue defects of the diabetic foot often call for alternative methods to traditional primary closure. Despite the popularity of microvascular free flaps, local muscle flaps can offer reliable reconstruction for these challenging wounds with shorter surgical times and reduced complication rates. In this article, the authors describe the successful use of the abductor hallucis muscle flap and external fixation for soft tissue reconstruction of a chronic Charcot foot wound and osteomyelitis in a diabetic patient.

  19. Team physician #3. The relationship of low back/pelvic somatic dysfunctions to dance injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, R M

    1988-10-01

    Most dance injuries are the result of faulty technique caused by maladaptive movement patterns. This paper examines the biomechanical relationship of these cumulative microtraumatic injuries (eg, stress fractures, ankle impingement syndromes, Achilles and flexor hallucis longus tendinitis, anterior knee pain syndromes, and some medial collateral ligament and meniscal disease) to lumbopelvic dysfunction and psoas insufficiency.

  20. Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai; Meijer, Onno G; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hodges, Paul W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Strijers, Rob L; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B; van Royen, Barend J; Wu, Wen Hua; Xia, Chun

    2011-05-01

    Psoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ("Side"), and without or with weight added above the ankle ("Condition"). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane.

  1. Adductor longus tendon rupture mistaken for incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Bas R J; Plaisier, Peter W; Jakma, Tijs S C

    2014-03-01

    An incarcerated inguinal hernia is a common diagnosis, since the risk of an inguinal hernia incarcerating or strangulating is around 0.3-3%. An acute rupture of the adductor longus tendon is rarely seen and mostly affects (semi-) professional sportsmen. We present a case of a patient with an assumed incarcerated inguinal hernia which turned out to be a proximal adductor longus tendon rupture. If patients without a history of inguinal hernia present themselves with acute groin pain after suddenly exorotating the upper leg, a rupture of the adductor longus tendon should be considered. Both surgical and non-surgical treatment can be performed.

  2. Muscle-Pair Specific Distribution and Grip-Type Modulation of Neural Common Input to Extrinsic Digit Flexors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winges, Sara A.; Johnston, Jamie A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into the synergistic control of hand muscles, we have recently quantified the strength of correlated neural activity across motor units from extrinsic digit flexors during a five-digit object-hold task. We found stronger synchrony and coherence across motor units from thumb and index finger flexor muscle compartment than between the thumb flexor and other finger flexor muscle compartments. The present study of two-digit object hold was designed to determine the extent to which such distribution of common input among thumb-finger flexor muscle compartments, revealed by holding an object with five digits, is preserved when varying the functional role of a given digit pair. We recorded normal force exerted by the digits and electrical activity of single motor units from muscle flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and two compartments of the m. flexor digitorum profundus (FDP2 and FDP3; index and middle finger, respectively). Consistent with our previous results from five-digit grasping, synchrony and coherence across motor units from FPL-FDP2 was significantly stronger than in FPL-FDP3 during object hold with two digits [common input strength: 0.49 ± 0.02 and 0.35 ± 0.02 (means ± SE), respectively; peak coherence: 0.0054 and 0.0038, respectively]. This suggests that the distribution of common neural input is muscle-pair specific regardless of grip type. However, the strength of coherence, but not synchrony, was significantly stronger in two- versus five-digit object hold for both muscle combinations, suggesting the periodicity of common input is sensitive to grip type. PMID:16723414

  3. [Graft reconstruction of flexor tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, N; Pedeutour, B; Dautel, G

    2014-12-01

    The improvement of primary flexor tendon repair has limited the indications of secondary repairs to neglected initial wound care and deficiencies in the surgical technique or rehabilitation. The surgical and rehabilitation care is complex and prolonged, requiring full cooperation of the patient. That is why the surgeon must evaluate patient's ability to integrate instructions and to comply with a long and demanding protocol. The functional needs of the patient are important in treatment decisions and the surgeon should not hesitate to use an appropriate surgical alternative (tenodesis, arthrodesis, tendon transfer, etc.). After a brief historical review, the authors discuss the indications, technical procedures and finally the results of one-stage and two-stage flexor tendon graft, which despite mixed results keep a real place in our current armamentarium.

  4. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Shai; Haze, Amir

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an uncommon, emergent hand infection. The literature lacks any description of the disease and the variability of its manifestations in young children. We describe 3 cases. Two cases were diagnosed and treated promptly, and the third presented late, with atypical clinical signs, causing a delay in his diagnosis and treatment and stressing the caution to be taken with the evaluation of these children with signs of hand infection.

  5. An objective functional evaluation of the flexor carpi ulnaris set of triple tendon transfer in radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latheef, L; Bhardwaj, P; Sankaran, A; Sabapathy, S R

    2017-02-01

    This study reports an objective assessment of postoperative function of 11 triple transfers for high radial palsies, using pronator teres for wrist extension, flexor carpi ulnaris for finger extension and palmaris longus for thumb extension. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years. Assessment was done by recording the active ranges of wrist motion, grip strength, wrist and finger strength and work simulation. The mean strength and range of wrist extension were 42% and 86%, respectively, of the contralateral wrist. Other measured movements were within the functional range and work simulation confirmed good restoration of function. The mean DASH score was 3.45, with no patient reporting any specific functional complaints. This study shows that even though the range of wrist motion and the strength of the wrist and fingers are less than normal, hand function remains good. We conclude that the flexor carpi ulnaris set of tendon transfer works well. 3.

  6. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis leading to an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Iyer, Srinivasan

    2012-08-24

    Flexor tenosynovitis is an aggressive closed-space infection of the digital flexor tendon sheaths of the hand. We present a case of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in an immunocompromised patient and discuss the importance of early diagnosis and referral to a specialist hand surgery unit. A 61-year-old man visited his general practitioner because of swelling and tenderness of his left index finger. The patient was discharged on oral antibiotics but returned 4 days after because of deterioration of his symptoms and was referred to a plastic surgery unit. A diagnosis of flexor tenosynovitis was made and the patient required multiple debridements in theatre, resulting in the amputation of the infected finger. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a relatively common but often misdiagnosed hand infection. Patients with suspected flexor tenosynovitis should be referred and treated early to avoid significant morbidity, especially when risk factors for poor prognosis are present.

  7. Congenital hypoplasia of the medical hallucial sesamoid with avascular necrosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Choi, Chan Bum [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Avascular necrosis of the hallucial sesamoids is an uncommon cause of metatarsalgia, and the congenital absence of the medial sesamoid is also a rarely reported condition in the podiatric literature. It must be distinguished from other painful conditions of the sesamoid due to the opposite direction of treatment. To our knowledge, there is no reported case of congenital hypoplasia of the medial sesamoid with osteonecrosis. We report a case of nontraumatic metatarsal pains with progressive sclerosis and fragmentation of the medial sesamoid on serial radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography with an incidental finding for the absence of contralateral medial sesamoid in a 33-year-old female.

  8. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  9. [Neck pain due to tendonitis of the longus colli muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coebergh, Jan Adriaan; Koppen, Hille; van Gils, Ad P; de Bruijn, Bas F

    2010-01-01

    Two patients presented to Accidents and Emergency with severe neck pain: a 70-year-old woman with acute, severe neck pain, which had developed a few days after outpatient resection of her left lingual tonsil. The patient was suspected to have spondylodiscitis. The other patient, a 54-year-old woman, was referred with severe neck pain and suspected meningitis. In both women, the pain was diagnosed as acute calcifying tendonitis of the longus colli muscle. This benign condition can present to many different specialities. Both patients responded well to treatment with NSAIDs. Acute calcifying tendonitis of the longus colli muscle can be diagnosed using various imaging techniques, such as X-ray, CT or MRI imaging. Calcification on cervical CT or a high signal on T2-weighted MRI images of the longus colli muscle are pathognomonic of tendonitis. A correct diagnosis can prevent further invasive diagnostics and/or unnecessary treatment.

  10. Rupture of adductor longus tendon due to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzopoulos, George; Stamatakos, Mihalis; Vasiliadis, George; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2005-12-01

    We present a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the adductor longus tendon induced by ciprofloxacin. A 35-year-old man was diagnosed with pneumonia and was recommended ciprofloxacin 500 mg iv twice a day for 7 days. Three days after receiving the initial dose, he developed discomfort in his left medial thigh, and pain and swelling in the same area followed ten days later. He consulted us when he noted a palpable mass on the medial side of his left thigh, and MRI study revealed adductor longus tendon rupture. There was no obvious underlying disease or other factor causing fragility of his adductor longus tendon. We review the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to fluoroquinolone-related tendon rupture as well as the risk factors and discuss proper management.

  11. Surgical technique for treatment of recalcitrant adductor longus tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Thomas J; Carroll, Kaitlin M; Makani, Amun; Wall, Andrew J; Dumont, Guillaume D; Cohn, Randy M

    2014-04-01

    Chronic groin pain in the athlete can be a difficult problem to manage. Adductor dysfunction is the most common cause of groin pain in athletes, with the adductor longus being the tendon most commonly involved. The most reproducible finding for adductor longus tendinopathy is tenderness along the tendon with passive abduction and resisted hip adduction in extension. Magnetic resonance imaging and injection of a corticosteroid and anesthetic into the proximal muscle-tendon junction are both helpful in confirming the diagnosis. Nonoperative treatment may consist of protected weight bearing, ice application, ultrasonography, electrical stimulation, and gentle stretching with progressive strengthening. However, nonoperative management is not always successful. In these instances, surgical treatment can be quite effective. We present the indications, surgical technique, and rehabilitation protocol of adductor tenotomy for chronic tendinopathy. This can prove a useful tool for the treatment of recalcitrant groin pain attributable to the adductor longus.

  12. Clinical recovery of two hip adductor longus ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Petersen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-operative treatment of acute hip adductor longus ruptures in athletes has been described in the literature. However, very limited information concerning the recovery of this type of injury exists. This case represented a unique possibility to study the recovery of two acute adduct...

  13. Adequacy of palmaris longus and plantaris tendons for tendon grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubietz, Michael G; Jakubietz, Danni F; Gruenert, Joerg G; Zahn, Robert; Meffert, Rainer H; Jakubietz, Rafael G

    2011-04-01

    The reconstruction of tendon defects is challenging. The palmaris longus and plantaris tendon are generally considered best for tendon grafting. Only a few studies have examined whether these tendons, when present, meet criteria for successful grafting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these tendons in regard to adequacy as tendon grafts. To evaluate adequacy for grafting, the palmaris longus and plantaris tendons were harvested from 92 arms and legs of 46 cadavers. Macroscopic evaluation and measurements concerning presence, length, and diameter of the tendons were obtained. Criteria for adequacy were a minimum length of 15 cm with diameter of 3 mm or, alternatively, 30 cm with a diameter of 1.5 mm. The palmaris longus tendon was present bilaterally in 36 cases and was absent bilaterally in 4 cases. The plantaris tendon was present bilaterally in 38 cases and absent bilaterally in 4 cases. In 29 cadavers, the palmaris longus tendon did not meet the criteria to be used as a tendon graft. Only in 8 cases were the tendons satisfactory for grafting bilaterally. The plantaris tendon met criteria for grafting in 20 cases bilaterally. In 17 cases, the tendons were considered inadequate bilaterally. Despite their presence, the palmaris longus and plantaris tendons are adequate for grafting less often than previously thought. In less than 50%, the tendons, although present, would serve as useful grafts. Our findings underscore the importance of choosing a second donor site before surgery in case the primarily selected tendon is not found to be suitable. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Discharge properties of motor units of the abductor hallucis muscle during cramp contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco A; Holobar, Ales; Botter, Alberto; Farina, Dario

    2009-09-01

    We analyzed individual motor units during electrically elicited cramp contractions with the aim of characterizing the variability and degree of common oscillations in their discharges. Intramuscular and surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the abductor hallucis muscle of 11 healthy subjects (age 27.0+/-3.7 yr) during electrically elicited cramps. In all, 48 motor units were identified from the intramuscular EMG. These motor units were active for 23.6+/-16.2 s, during which their average discharge rate was 14.5+/-5.1 pulses/s (pps) and their minimum and maximum rates were, respectively, 6.0+/-0.8 and 25.0+/-8.0 pps (Pcramps showed a range of discharge rates similar to that observed during voluntary contractions but larger ISI variability, probably due to large synaptic noise. Moreover, the discharge rates of the active motor units showed common oscillations.

  15. Tendon transfers in the treatment of the adult flatfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Jonathon D; McCormick, Jeremy J

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfers are critical to successful surgical correction of adult flexible flatfoot deformity and may be beneficial in correcting rigid deformities as well. Patients with refractory stage I and II deformities often require selective osteotomies in addition to tendon transfer. Patients with stage III and IV deformities typically require hindfoot arthrodesis. One of several tendons can be used for transfer based on surgeon's preference. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfers have been shown to have good results. A peroneus brevis transfer is typically used to supplement small FDL or FHL transfer donors or in revision cases.

  16. The effects of gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises for four weeks on navicular drop and lower extremity muscle activity during gait with flatfoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of abductor hallucis and gluteus maximus strengthening exercises on pronated feet. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was conducted with 18 adults without no history of surgery on the foot or ankle. One group performed both gluteus maximus strengthening exercises and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises, while the other group performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] The group that performed both gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises showed smaller values in the height of navicular drop than the group that performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises. The muscle activity of the gluteus maximus and the vastus medialis increased during heel-strike in the group that added gluteus maximus exercises, and the muscle activity of the abductor hallucis significantly increased in both groups. [Conclusion] Given the results of the present study, it can be suggested that strengthening the gluteus maximus while also performing exercises to correct the pronated foot is an effective method for achieving normal gait. PMID:27134383

  17. The effect of controlled passive motion in the postoperative rehabilitation of digital flexor tendon injury%控制性被动活动在手屈肌腱损伤术后功能康复后的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁勇; 马保安; 周勇; 唐农轩

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of controlled passive motion in the postoperative rehabilitation of digital flexor tendon injury.Method 69 patients with 106 fingers involved were reviewed in this study.Average interval between injury and first stage operation was 6.9 months(range 1 to 24 months).Combined with digital nerve repair and scar resection,digital flexor tendon resection and Hunter rods implantation were performed in the first stage operation.During the second stage operation,which performed 2 to 6 months later,palmaris longus or plantaris were grafted into the pseudo sheath formed by Hunter rod.Results All cases were followed for 6 to 24 months(average 11months).Evaluation based on TAM was excellent or good in 84% ,fair in 12% ,poor in 4% . Conclusions Our findings suggest that early controlled passive motion could effectively promote postoperative rehabilitation after digital flexor tendon repair surgery and prevent postoperative adhesion formation.

  18. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  19. Resurfacing with Chemically Modified Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing. PMID:23335124

  20. Resurfacing with chemically modified hyaluronic acid and lubricin for flexor tendon reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-06-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing.

  1. The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangata, Hope; Ndou, Robert; Louw, Graham

    2010-05-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons.

  2. Tendons in the plantar aspect of the foot: MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rodrigo [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Fleury Medical Center, Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Rodrigo; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this anatomic imaging study was to illustrate the normal complex anatomy of tendons of the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic correlation in cadavers. Seven fresh cadaveric feet (obtained and used according to institutional guidelines, with informed consent from relatives of the deceased) were studied with intermediate-weighted fast-spin-echo MR imaging. For anatomic analysis, cadaveric specimens were sectioned in 3-mm-thick slices in the coronal and axial planes that approximated the sections acquired at MR imaging. The entire courses of the tendons into the plantar aspect of the foot were analyzed. The tibialis posterior tendon has a complex distal insertion. The insertions in the navicular, second, and third cuneiforms bones were identify in all cases using axial and coronal planes. A tendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons was identified in five of our specimens (71%). The coronal plane provided the best evaluation. The peroneus longus tendon changes its direction at three points then obliquely crosses the sole and inserts in the base of the first metatarsal bone and the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform. MR imaging provides detailed information about the anatomy of tendons in the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot. It allows analysis of their insertions and the intertendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons. (orig.)

  3. Flexor Tendon Pulley Injuries in Rock Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth A; Lien, John R

    2017-02-01

    Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation. Sequential pulley ruptures require surgical reconstruction. Most climbers are able to return to their previous activity level.

  4. The hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango (Polyborinae, Falconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosto, María Clelia; Carril, Julieta; Picasso, Mariana Beatriz Julieta

    2013-10-01

    We describe the hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango. This member of the Falconidae: Polyborinae is a generalist and opportunist that can jump and run down prey on the ground, unlike Falconinae that hunt birds in flight and kill them by striking with its talons. Due to differences in the locomotion habits between the subfamilies, we hypothesized differences in their hindlimb myology. Gross dissections showed that the myology of M. chimango is concordant with that described of other falconids, except for the following differences: the m. flexor cruris medialis has one belly with a longitudinal division; the m. iliotibialis lateralis does not have a connection with the m. iliofibularis; the m. fibularis longus is strongly aponeurotic; the m. tibialis cranialis lacks an accessory tendons and the m. flexor hallucis longus has one place of origin, instead of two. The presence of the m. flexor cruris lateralis can be distinguished as it has been described absent for the Falconidae. We associated its presence with the predominant terrestrial habit of the M. chimango. Each muscle dissected was weighed and the relationship between flexors and extensors at each joint was assessed. The extensor muscles predominated in all joints in M. chimango. Among the flexors, the m. flexor hallucis longus was the heaviest, which could be related to the importance of the use of its talons to obtain food.

  5. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus: clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Guy; Wolovelsky, Alejandro; Rinott, Micha; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The extensor pollicis longus (EPL) is a consistent structure with rare anomalies, the most common being a group of different tendon duplications passing through the fourth compartment without symptoms. The second form comprises anomalies in the course of the EPL having significant clinical importance due to the predisposition for creating tenosynovitis of the EPL mimicking other types of tendon tenosynovitis. Clinical symptoms of radial dorsal wrist pain mimicking intersection syndrome or de-Quervain disease with the "absent snuff box" sign should raise suspicions for an anomaly in the course of the EPL.

  6. Ultrasonographic features of an adductor longus tear: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Lesley-Ann Hui-huan [Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Rethy, C.K.; Wang Shih-chang [National Univ. Hospital (Singapore); Tho Kam San [Alexandra Hospital (Singapore)

    2001-08-01

    Muscle strain of the lower extremities is among the most common injuries in sports. Excessive force, rather than direct trauma, causes disruption of the muscle-tendon unit, usually at the myotendinous junction, and improper rest and rehabilitation of a minor strain can often lead to a far more disabling injury. High-resolution ultrasonography is useful for direct imaging of muscle injuries. We present a case where ultrasonography was used to detect, treat and follow-up an adductor longus tear in a soccer player. (author)

  7. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  8. Peritendinitis calcarea of flexor carpi ulnaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandee, R W; Harrison, R B; Dee, P M

    1979-12-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris presents a characteristic radiographic appearance of amorphous calcification near the pisiform. This calcification frequently is associated with acute symptoms and may be related to certain occupations and hobbies. Knowledge of the pertinent anatomic and radiographic criteria permits accurate diagnosis.

  9. Flexor Tenorrhaphy Using Absorbable Suture Materials

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    Hyung Joo Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Nonabsorbable sutures are favorable for repairing flexor tendons. However,absorbable sutures have performed favorably in an animal model.Methods Two-strand sutures using the interlocking modified Kessler method with polydioxanoneabsorbable sutures 4-0 were used to repair completely ruptured flexor tendons in 55 fingersfrom 41 consecutive patients. The medical records of average 42 follow up weeks were analyzedretrospectively. The data analyzed using the chi-squared test, and Fisher’s exact test was used forpostoperative complications. The results were compared with those of other studies.Results Among the index, middle, ring, and little fingers were injured in 9, 17, 16, and13 fingers, respectively. The injury levels varied from zone 1 to 5. Of the 55 digits in ourstudy, there were 26 (47% isolated flexor digitorum profundus (FDP injuries and 29 (53%combined FDP and with flexor digitorum superficialis injuries. Pulley repair was also conducted.Concomitant injuries of blood vessels and nerves were found in 17 patients (23 fingers; nerveinjuries occurred in 5 patients (10 fingers. Two patients had ruptures (3.6%, and one patienthad two adhesions (3.6%. Using the original Strickland criteria, all the patients were assessedto be excellent or good. Also, fibrosis and long-term foreign body tissue reactions such as stitchgranuloma were less likely occurred in our study. Compared to the Cullen’s report that usednonabsorbable sutures, there was no significant difference in the rupture or adhesion rates.Conclusions Therefore, this study suggests that appropriate absorbable core sutures can beused safely for flexor tendon repairs.

  10. Cortical excitability is not depressed in movement-modulated stretch response of human thumb flexor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, C J; Miles, T S

    2001-08-01

    There is strong evidence that the predominant pathway of the long-latency stretch reflex for flexor pollicis longus crosses the motor cortex. This reflex response is diminished during active thumb movements. We tested the hypothesis that this could be due to a decrease in the excitability of the transcortical component during movement. During isometric, concentric and eccentric thumb movements, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex was given at a time when the reflex signal was traversing the motor cortex. TMS was also given earlier in separate runs when the signal was traversing the spinal cord under each of the three contractile conditions. The electromyogram was analysed for non-linear summation between stretch responses and the potential evoked by the cortical stimulus. The response to TMS alone was uniform across the three types of contraction, and the lack of cortical involvement in the short-latency reflex was confirmed. The TMS-evoked response summed in a non-linear manner with the long-latency reflex response, confirming that the excitability of the motor cortex was increased as the reflex signal passed through it. The long-latency response was markedly depressed during isotonic compared with isometric contractions. However, the non-linear summation was not greater during the isometric contractions. Thus, the depressed reflex responses during isotonic movements do not stem from reduced motor cortical responsiveness or afferent input to the transcortical pathway, and may instead reflect modulation of cutaneous reflexes during isotonic contractions.

  11. Guyons canal syndrome due to accessory palmaris longus muscle: aetiological classification: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lal, Ramavath Ashok; Raj, Sakamuri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessory muscles and anatomic variations are well described at the Guyon's canal. Though this case report is similar to variants published in previous reports, it differs from the rest due to rapidity of worsening of symptoms in few months following use of cane. Case presentation We report a case of 69 year old man with ulnar nerve compression at Guyon's canal by accessory palmaris longus arose from distal third palmaris longus and from deep fascia of forearm. The hypertrophied ...

  12. Frequency of Agenesis Palmaris Longus through Clinical Examination - An East African Study

    OpenAIRE

    James W M Kigera; Stephen Mukwaya

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Palmaris longus, one of the most variable muscles in the body both flexes the wrist and tenses the palmar fascia. It is used by surgeons as a source of tendon graft and racial differences in its variation have been documented. We sought to determine the frequency of the absence of the Palmaris longus in an East African population. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted using ten common clinical tests among patients and students in a large teaching hospital in East Africa...

  13. Anomalous Course of the Extensor Pollicis Longus With Multiple Absences of Thumb Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jayoung; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung-Mook

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 10-year-old girl with anomalous course of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) muscle, which exists with absence of thenar muscles and muscles in the 1st extensor compartment. Her chief complaint was severe atrophy on the right thenar eminence. On physical examination, there was no obvious functional abnormality on her right thumb. On magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the abductor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis ...

  14. Surgical Management of a Completely Avulsed Adductor Longus Muscle in a Professional Equestrian Rider

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    Conal Quah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion injuries of the adductor longus muscle tendon are rare and a challenge to manage especially in athletes. There has been little published literature on the outcome of conservative and operative treatment for these injuries. We report the first case of an acute adductor longus avulsion injury which was surgically repaired in a professional equestrian rider. Return to full preinjury function was achieved at 3 months with surgical repair using 3 suture anchors.

  15. The Prevalence of Palmaris longus agenesis among the Ghanaian population

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    Osonuga A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Background: Studies have documented the agenesis of Palmaris longus muscle in different populations but none has included the Ghanaian population. Methods: The study involved 226 subjects (130 females and 96 males who are students of the University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana. The presence of the PLM was clinically determined using the Schaeffer’s test. Subjects in which the tendon was not visualized or palpable, two other tests were performed to confirm the absence. Results: The total prevalence of absence of PLM was 3.1%; absence on the left hand was commoner than on the right hand. The frequency of PLM absence was also slightly higher in females than in males representing 1.8% and 1.3% respectively. One female had the PLM absent bilaterally whiles a male subject had a trifid tendon on the right forearm with a bifid on the left. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLM agenesis in the Ghanaian population is lower compared to values coated in standard textbook on surgery. PLM is not diminishing as fast as observed in some population hence it is can be readily used as donor tendon by Ghanaian surgeons.

  16. Rare causes of closed rupture of the flexor tendon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Ruttermann, Mike; Werker, Paul M. N.

    Closed injuries to the flexor tendon are relatively rare. We present three rare causes of closed injury to the flexor tendon. Early recognition and adequate treatment by a specialised hand surgeon are crucial for the prognosis of such cases. Delayed diagnosis and treatment often require secondary

  17. Rare causes of closed rupture of the flexor tendon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Ruttermann, Mike; Werker, Paul M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Closed injuries to the flexor tendon are relatively rare. We present three rare causes of closed injury to the flexor tendon. Early recognition and adequate treatment by a specialised hand surgeon are crucial for the prognosis of such cases. Delayed diagnosis and treatment often require secondary re

  18. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis following a rattlesnake bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lydia; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-07-13

    Snakebite victims have been described previously in orthopedic literature in regard to complications such as compartment syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome. We introduce a previously unreported complication of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in a patient bitten by a rattlesnake. After being bitten in her right forearm, the patient experienced mild systemic symptoms of fever and nausea and was assessed at an outside hospital, where it was determined that she did not suffer from envenomation and therefore did not require antivenin therapy. She presented to our institution 1 week later with signs and symptoms of acute, new-onset right thumb flexor tenosynovitis, with pain and tenderness at the level of the A1 pulley of the thumb, with intermittent triggering. She also presented the following week with ipsilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The patient reported no such symptoms prior to the snakebite. Given the recent development of these conditions after her snakebite, in addition to her history of endocrine disorders, we believe that our patient suffered from envenomation that led to these complications. Nonoperative measures including splinting and steroid injections were taken, with mixed results, and surgical intervention was necessary. While the proper management of snakebites is controversial, especially in regard to the administration of antivenin, we believe our patient would have benefitted from immediate evaluation and consideration for antivenin. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Longus colli tendinitis. A review of literature and case series

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    Shawky Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To increase the awareness of longus colli tendinitis (LCT among spine specialists and to present a practical overview of diagnostic and treatment options, so that unnecessary interventions are avoided. Five sample cases from a German spine center will also be presented. Methods: Literature review and case series. A PubMed search was performed in May 2015, and the articles found were reviewed for clinical presentation, investigations, and treatment. The frequency of publication of LCT cases and the specialty of journals were also noted. Recent cases treated in our institution were also reviewed. The clinical findings, investigations, and therapeutic interventions were summarized. Results: The PubMed search from May 2015 found 104 articles, published over 51 years, on the topic of LCT. Only four were published in spine journals. A review of this literature yielded a total of 242 cases. The classic clinical triad included neck pain, limitation of movements, and swallowing complaints. C-reactive Protein (CRP values were available in 21 cases (mean 23.66 mg/dL. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan was the best diagnostic modality. LCT is usually a self-limiting condition, but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may help alleviate discomfort. Five cases of LCT were diagnosed and treated in our center over the past three years. Conclusions: LCT, which is uncommon and has non-specific symptoms, is often referred to spine centers. Spine specialists should be aware of its clinical presentation and radiographic findings in order to avoid unnecessary interventions. The condition is self-limiting and can be treated conservatively.

  20. Kinesiology taping does not change fibularis longus latency time and postural sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Christophe; Lopes, Susana; Gonçalves, Rafael; Torres, Rui; Pinho, Francisco; Gonçalves, Pedro; Rodrigues, Mário; Costa, Rui; Lopes, Mário; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Kinesiology tape seems to improve muscle force, although little is known regarding its effect on latency time and postural sway. To examine the effects of kinesiology taping on fibularis longus latency time and postural sway in healthy subjects. Thirty participants were equally randomized into three groups, two experimental groups receiving kinesiology tape (EG1, from origin to insertion; EG2, from insertion to origin) and a control group. Before and 20-min after the intervention, postural sway was assessed on a force platform and fibularis longus latency time was recorded with surface electromyography during a sudden inversion perturbation. At baseline, no differences were found between groups regarding age, anthropometrics variables, postural sway and fibularis longus latency time. In both experimental groups, the application of tape did not change postural sway and fibularis longus latency time (EG1: 93.7 ± 15.0 to 89.9 ± 15.6 ms; EG2, 81.24 ± 14.21 to 81.57 ± 16.64, p Kinesiology tape seems not to enhance fibularis longus reaction time and postural sway in young healthy subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An Overview of the Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries still remain a challenging condition to manage to ensure optimal outcome for the patient. Since the first flexor tendon repair was described by Kirchmayr in 1917, several approaches to flexor tendon injury have enabled successful repairs rates of 70-90%. Primary surgical repair results in better functional outcome compared to secondary repair or tendon graft surgery. Flexor tendon injury repair has been extensively researched and the literature demonstrates successful repair requires minimal gapping at the repair site or interference with tendon vascularity, secure suture knots, smooth junction of tendon end and having sufficient strength for healing. However, the exact surgical approach to achieve success being currently used among surgeons is still controversial. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the results of studies demonstrating the current knowledge regarding the optimal approach for flexor tendon repair. Post-operative rehabilitation for flexor tendon surgery is another area, which has caused extensive debate in hand surgery. The trend to more active mobilisation protocols seems to be favoured but further study in this area is needed to find the protocol, which achieves function and gliding but avoids rupture of the tendons. Lastly despite success following surgery complications commonly still occur post surgery, including adhesion formation, tendon rupture and stiffness of the joints. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the appropriate management of these difficulties post surgery. New techniques in management of flexor tendon will also be discussed including external laser devices, addition of growth factors and cytokines. PMID:22431948

  2. Acute Compartment Syndrome after Non-Contact Peroneus Longus Muscle Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, Jarrad; Villacis, Diego; Kephart, Curtis; Yi, Anthony; Romano, Russ; Hatch, George F Rick

    2015-12-01

    This case demonstrates a rare variation in the pattern of injury and the presentation of acute lateral compartment syndrome of the leg. Although uncommon, lateral compartment syndrome of the leg after an ankle inversion leading to peroneus longus muscle rupture has been previously documented. This case was unusual because there was no overt ankle injury and the patient was able to continue physical activity, in spite of a significant rupture of the peroneus longus muscle that was determined later. This case highlights the necessary vigilance clinicians must maintain when assessing non-contact injuries in patients with possible compartment syndrome.

  3. Flexor Tendon Ruptures After Distal Scaphoid Excision for Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Mitchell, Charles H; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Distal scaphoid excision is one treatment option for osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint following failure of conservative measures. Potential complications of this procedure include injury to the carpal ligaments, cartilage, and radial artery. A single case was identified by the senior author, and the medical record was reviewed for surgical notes, progress notes, and radiographs. A 68-year-old male sustained ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus to the index finger 3 years following a distal scaphoid excision for symptomatic STT osteoarthritis. He required a flexor tendon reconstruction using the remaining FDS tendon for graft incorporated with a Pulvertaft weave. His midcarpal pain continued after recovery of his index finger function, eventually requiring a 4-corner fusion of the wrist. Flexor tendon rupture is a previously unreported complication of distal scaphoid excision for STT arthritis.

  4. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline M Ferreira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05. A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32. Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary.

  5. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurana, Shruti [Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Amirlak, Bardia [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  6. Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Skin deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported a small study at the Federation of European Societies for Surgery of the hand, which was entitled ′What is secondary flexor tendon surgery′? This study concluded that ′secondary flexor tendon surgery′ was a generic name encompassing a multitude of pathologies. Between 10% and 15% of cases exhibited pathology of the skin and subcutaneous fat and required flap reconstruction of these tissues. Skin replacement may be used prophylactically at primary surgery or become necessary at secondary surgery after release of scar contractures, to achieve cover of vital structures. The long-term problem of skin deficiency relating to flexor tendon function is one of loss of extension from longitudinal scar shortening of the integument, even if the flexor tendons are primarily concerned with bending the digits, not straightening them. This loss of extension can only be tolerated in a hand to a certain degree without significant loss of function. This paper is largely an analysis of the flaps available and suitable for different degrees of skin deficiency and at different places along the course of the flexor system. It attempts to dispel the idea that ′any flap will do′ provided the flexors are adequately covered.

  7. Flexor origin slide for contracture of spastic finger flexor muscles: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin-Lemoine, Camille; Denormandie, Philippe; Schnitzler, Alexis; Lautridou, Christine; Allieu, Yves; Genêt, François

    2013-03-06

    Contracture of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and pronator muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system disorders. The proximal release of the extrinsic flexor and pronator muscles was first described by Page and Scaglietti for a Volkmann contracture. The aim of the present study was to assess the amount of increase in extension and the improvements in global hand function that can be expected following this lengthening procedure in patients with central nervous system disorders. A single-center retrospective review of patients with central nervous system lesions and contractures of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and forearm pronator muscles, causing aesthetic, hygienic, or functional impairment, was carried out. The Page-Scaglietti technique was used for all interventions. Before the operation, motor nerve blocks were used to distinguish between spasticity and contractures with surgical intervention only for contractures. The Zancolli and House classifications were used to evaluate improvements. Data from fifty-four hands and fifty patients (thirty-five men and fifteen women) were evaluated. The mean duration of follow-up (and standard deviation) was 26 ± 21 months (range, three to 124 months). The mean gain (and standard deviation) in wrist extension with fingers extended was 67° ± 25° (range, -10° to 110°). Preoperatively, no hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1, whereas twenty-five hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1 at the latest follow-up review. Ten nonfunctional hands (rated as House Group 0 or Group 1) became functional as a supporting hand postoperatively. Zancolli and House classifications increased significantly (p contracture of the intrinsic muscles, which required further intervention. The Page-Scaglietti technique appears to improve range of motion and function in people with wrist and finger contractures due to central nervous system disorders.

  8. Flexor tendon tissue engineering: acellularization of human flexor tendons with preservation of biomechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgen, Brian C; Woon, Colin Y L; Kim, Maxwell; Thorfinn, Johan; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2011-08-01

    Acellular human tendons are a candidate scaffold for tissue engineering flexor tendons of the hand. This study compared acellularization methods and their compatibility with allogeneic human cells. Human flexor tendons were pretreated with 0.1% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) for 4  h followed by 24  h treatments of 1% Triton X-100, 1% tri(n-butyl)phosphate, or 0.1% or 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 0.1% EDTA. Outcomes were assessed histologically by hematoxylin and eosin and SYTO green fluorescent nucleic acid stains and biochemically by a QIAGEN DNeasy kit, Sircol collagen assay, and 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue glycosaminoglycan assay. Mechanical data were collected using a Materials Testing System to pull to failure tendons acellularized with 0.1% SDS. Acellularized tendons were re-seeded in a suspension of human dermal fibroblasts. Attachment of viable cells to acellularized tendon was assessed biochemically by a cell viability assay and histologically by a live/dead stain. Data are reported as mean±standard deviation. Compared with the DNA content of fresh tendons (551±212  ng DNA/mg tendon), only SDS treatments significantly decreased DNA content (1% SDS [202.8±37.4  ng DNA/mg dry weight tendon]; 0.1% SDS [189±104  ng DNA/mg tendon]). These findings were confirmed by histology. There was no decrease in glycosaminoglycans or collagen following acellularization with SDS. There was no difference in the ultimate tensile stress (55.3±19.2 [fresh] vs. 51.5±6.9 [0.1% SDS] MPa). Re-seeded tendons demonstrated attachment of viable cells to the tendon surface using a viability assay and histology. Human flexor tendons were acellularized with 0.1% SDS in 0.1% EDTA for 24  h with preservation of mechanical properties. Preservation of collagen and glycoaminoglycans and re-seeding with human cells suggest that this scaffold is biocompatible. This will provide a promising scaffold for future human flexor tendon tissue engineering studies to

  9. Heterogeneous atrophy occurs within individual lower limb muscles during 60 days of bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miokovic, Tanja; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter; Belavý, Daniel L

    2012-11-01

    To better understand disuse muscle atrophy, via magnetic resonance imaging, we sequentially measured muscle cross-sectional area along the entire length of all individual muscles from the hip to ankle in nine male subjects participating in 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (2nd Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2). We hypothesized that individual muscles would not atrophy uniformly along their length such that different regions of an individual muscle would atrophy to different extents. This hypothesis was confirmed for the adductor magnus, vasti, lateral hamstrings, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, peroneals, and tibialis anterior muscles (P ≤ 0.004). In contrast, the hypothesis was not confirmed in the soleus, adductor brevis, gracilis, pectineus, and extensor digitorum longus muscles (P ≥ 0.20). The extent of atrophy only weakly correlated (r = -0.30, P atrophy during bed rest also differed between muscles (P muscles recovered to their baseline size between 14 and 90 days after bed rest, but flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and lateral gastrocnemius required longer than 90 days before recovery occurred. On the basis of findings of differential atrophy between muscles and evidence in the literature, we interpret our findings of intramuscular atrophy to reflect differential disuse of functionally different muscle regions. The current work represents the first lower-limb wide survey of intramuscular differences in disuse atrophy. We conclude that intramuscular differential atrophy occurs in most, but not all, of the muscles of the lower limb during prolonged bed rest.

  10. Anatomical description of the muscles of the pelvic limb in the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, D; Weissengruber, G E; Egerbacher, M; Forstenpointner, G

    2004-04-01

    Dissections of 12 formalin-fixed ostriches were performed to give anatomical descriptions of the muscles and tendons of the pelvic, femoral, tibiotarsal, tarsometatarsal and digital regions. In the pelvic limb of the ostrich, 36 muscles can be determined. The ostrich lacks those muscles to the first and second toes (with exception of the M. flexor hallucis longus), which can be found in birds with four toes. The Mm. iliotrochantericus medius, plantaris, extensor proprius digiti IV and adductor digiti IV, which are present in other birds, are also absent, whereas the Mm. pectineus and femorotibialis accessorius additionally occur in the ostrich. The Pars supramedialis is a tendineous part of the M. gastrocnemius, on which the Mm. flexor cruris lateralis and flexor cruris medialis insert by means of a fascial sheet. The caudal part of the M. iliofibularis terminates within the caudal aspect of the superficial fascia cruris. The caudal heads of the Mm. flexor perforatus digiti III and flexor perforatus digiti IV as well as the M. flexor hallucis longus have a common origin on the Fossa poplitea of the femur. The lateral head of the M. flexor perforatus digiti IV and the femoral head of the M. flexor perforans et perforatus digiti III originate on the tendon of origin of the Caput laterale of the M. flexor perforatus digiti III. Furthermore, the last named tendon fuses with the tendon of insertion of the M. ambiens. The M. extensor proprius digiti III originates on a plate-like fascial sheet part of the dorsal joint capsule of the intertarsal joint.

  11. De Quervain disease caused by abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Ito, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tadayoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain disease is caused by a stenosing tenosynovitis in the first dorsal compartment, and the main aetiology is extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tenosynovitis. We encountered three cases in which EPB tenosynovitis was absent and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tenosynovitis was confirmed during operation. In the treatment of de Quervain disease, APL tenosynovitis should be paid as much attention as EPB tenosynovitis.

  12. A rare case of neck pain: acute longus colli calcific tendinitis in a possibly immunocompromised individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimable, Kerlie; Rizk, Cynthia; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe neck pain in a 45-year-old man with severe hidradenitis suppurativa who was participating in a study involving adalimumab. The neck pain was associated with acute longus colli calcific tendinitis, which is a noninfectious inflammatory response in the longus colli tendons secondary to deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography, which showed calcifications and deposits, and magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a retropharyngeal effusion. Ears, Nose, and Throat Services performed a fiberoptic scope examination, which revealed a patent airway and no drainable abscess. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs resulted in a dramatic improvement in the patient's clinical symptoms. In acute longus colli tendinitis, differentiating retropharyngeal aseptic effusion from infection is important. Of note, the confounding factor in this case was that the patient was blinded to whether he was receiving the placebo or adalimumab, so whether the patient was immunosuppressed and at risk for infection was unknown. Clinician familiarity and education concerning acute calcific longus colli tendinitis may lead to decreased costs stemming from incorrect diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  13. Frequency of agenesis Palmaris longus through clinical examination--an East African study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W M Kigera

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Palmaris longus, one of the most variable muscles in the body both flexes the wrist and tenses the palmar fascia. It is used by surgeons as a source of tendon graft and racial differences in its variation have been documented. We sought to determine the frequency of the absence of the Palmaris longus in an East African population. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted using ten common clinical tests among patients and students in a large teaching hospital in East Africa to determine the presence of a Palmaris longus. RESULTS: The overall rate of absence was 4.4% with unilateral absence at 3.3% and bilateral absence at 1.1%. The overall difference between males and females was not statistically significant (p = 0.605. Participants were more likely to have absence in their non dominant hand. DISCUSSION: Our findings though in contrast to many studies worldwide, it concurs with most studies done in the African setting. These differences may be due to the higher levels of manual labour and the more use of the right hand in these activities. The frequency of the absence of Palmaris longus in East Africa has been determined. Surgeons should acquaint themselves with prevalence in their areas of practice.

  14. Using a double-layered palmaris longus tendon for suspension of facial paralysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Bakholdt, Vivi; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Facial palsy is a debilitating condition entailing both cosmetic and functional limitations. Static suspension procedures can be performed when more advanced dynamic techniques are not indicated. Since 2006, we have used a double-layered palmaris longus tendon graft through an ovular...

  15. Interval training by normobaric hypoxia accelerates the reinnervation of musculus extensor digitorum longus in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; (Vard'ya); Mospanova, Svetlana V.

    2000-01-01

    Dokl Biol Sci. 2000 Mar-Apr;371:112-4. Interval training by normobaric hypoxia accelerates the reinnervation of musculus extensor digitorum longus in mice. Vard'ya IV , Mospanova SV , Portnov VV , Balezina OP , Koshelev VB . Department of Human and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Moscow St...... State University, Russia. PMID: 10833635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Udgivelsesdato: 2000...

  16. Frequency of Agenesis Palmaris Longus through Clinical Examination - An East African Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W. M.; Mukwaya, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Palmaris longus, one of the most variable muscles in the body both flexes the wrist and tenses the palmar fascia. It is used by surgeons as a source of tendon graft and racial differences in its variation have been documented. We sought to determine the frequency of the absence of the Palmaris longus in an East African population. Methods A prospective study was conducted using ten common clinical tests among patients and students in a large teaching hospital in East Africa to determine the presence of a Palmaris longus. Results The overall rate of absence was 4.4% with unilateral absence at 3.3% and bilateral absence at 1.1%. The overall difference between males and females was not statistically significant (p = 0.605). Participants were more likely to have absence in their non dominant hand. Discussion Our findings though in contrast to many studies worldwide, it concurs with most studies done in the African setting. These differences may be due to the higher levels of manual labour and the more use of the right hand in these activities. The frequency of the absence of Palmaris longus in East Africa has been determined. Surgeons should acquaint themselves with prevalence in their areas of practice. PMID:22174943

  17. Frequency of agenesis Palmaris longus through clinical examination--an East African study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Mukwaya, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The Palmaris longus, one of the most variable muscles in the body both flexes the wrist and tenses the palmar fascia. It is used by surgeons as a source of tendon graft and racial differences in its variation have been documented. We sought to determine the frequency of the absence of the Palmaris longus in an East African population. A prospective study was conducted using ten common clinical tests among patients and students in a large teaching hospital in East Africa to determine the presence of a Palmaris longus. The overall rate of absence was 4.4% with unilateral absence at 3.3% and bilateral absence at 1.1%. The overall difference between males and females was not statistically significant (p = 0.605). Participants were more likely to have absence in their non dominant hand. Our findings though in contrast to many studies worldwide, it concurs with most studies done in the African setting. These differences may be due to the higher levels of manual labour and the more use of the right hand in these activities. The frequency of the absence of Palmaris longus in East Africa has been determined. Surgeons should acquaint themselves with prevalence in their areas of practice.

  18. Age-related changes of elements in the tendons of the peroneus longus muscles in Thai, Japanese, and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Suwanahoy, Patipath; Tohno, Setsuko; Sinthubua, Apicha; Azuma, Cho; Nishiwaki, Fumio; Moriwake, Yumi; Kumai, Tsukasa; Minami, Takeshi; Laowatthanaphong, Sikrai; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Oishi, Takao; Hayashi, Motoharu

    2010-03-01

    To elucidate compositional changes of the tendon of the peroneus longus muscle with aging, the authors investigated age-related changes of elements in the insertion of tendons of the peroneus longus muscle (peroneus longus tendons) in Thai, Japanese, and monkeys and the relationships among element contents by direct chemical analysis. After ordinary dissections at Chiang Mai University and Nara Medical University were finished, the peroneus longus tendons were resected from the subjects. The peroneus longus tendons were also resected from rhesus and Japanese monkeys bred in Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. The wraparound regions of the insertion tendons of the peroneus longus muscle in contact with the cuboid bone were used as the peroneus longus tendon. After ashing with nitric acid and perchloric acid, element contents were determined with an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. It was found that there were no significant correlations between age and the seven elements, such as Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, Fe, and Na, in the peroneus longus tendons of Thai and Japanese. The Ca content higher than 10 mg/g was contained in seven cases out of 34 peroneus longus tendons of Thai (incidence = 20.6%) and in one case out of 22 peroneus longus tendons of Japanese (incidence = 4.5%), respectively. All of the peroneus longus tendons with the Ca content higher than 10 mg/g were found in Thai and Japanese men. In the peroneus longus tendons of monkeys, the Ca and P content increased suddenly at 2 years of age and reached to about 40 mg/g at 5 years of age. Thereafter, the Ca and P content did not increase in the peroneus longus tendons of monkeys at old age. Regarding the relationships among element contents, significant direct correlations were found among the contents of Ca, P, Mg, Zn, and Na in Thai and monkeys, whereas significant inverse correlations were found between S and element contents, such as Ca, P, Mg, Zn, and Na, in Thai and monkeys.

  19. Intraoperative value of the thompson test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttica, Daniel J; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity of the Thompson sign and determine whether the deep flexors of the foot can produce a falsely intact Achilles tendon.Ten unmatched above-the-knee lower extremity cadaveric specimens were studied. In group 1, the Achilles tendon was sectioned into 25% increments. The Thompson maneuver was performed after each sequential sectioning of the Achilles tendon, including after it had been completely sectioned. If the Thompson sign was still intact after complete release of the Achilles tendon, we proceeded to release the tendon, and tendon flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and posterior tibial tendons. The Thompson test was performed after the release of each tendon. In group 2, the tendon releases were performed in a reverse order to that of group 1, with the Thompson test performed after each release. In group 1, the Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the tendon. After complete (100%) release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens. In group 2, the Thompson sign remained intact after sectioning of the posterior tibial, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons in all specimens. The Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the Achilles tendon. After complete release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens.The Thompson test is an accurate clinical test for diagnosing complete Achilles tendon ruptures. However, it might not be a useful test for diagnosing partial Achilles tendon ruptures. Our findings also call into question the usefulness of the Thompson test in the intraoperative setting.

  20. Ultrasound evaluation of foot muscles and plantar fascia in pes planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic soft tissue structures that apply forces and support the medial longitudinal arch have been implicated in pes planus. These structures have common functions but their interaction in pes planus is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles and plantar fascia thickness between normal and pes planus feet. Forty-nine adults with a normal foot posture and 49 individuals with pes planus feet were recruited from a university population. Images of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles and the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness of AbH, FHB and PER muscles were significantly smaller (AbH -12.8% and -6.8%, FHB -8.9% and -7.6%, PER -14.7% and -10%), whilst FDL (28.3% and 15.2%) and FHL (24% and 9.8%) were significantly larger in the pes planus group. The middle (-10.6%) and anterior (-21.7%) portions of the plantar fascia were thinner in pes planus group. Greater CSA and thickness of the extrinsic muscles might reflect compensatory activity to support the MLA if the intrinsic foot muscle function has been compromised by altered foot structure. A thinner plantar fascia suggests reduced load bearing, and regional variations in structure and function in feet with pes planus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute neck pain in the ED: Consider longus colli calcific tendinitis vs meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tyag K; Weis, James C

    2017-06-01

    Presented here is a rare cause of severe neck pain - acute longus colli calcific tendinitis - in a 54year old man who presented to the emergency department. The neck pain is due to inflammation caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition in the tendons on the longus colli muscles. This is non-infectious. The gold standard for diagnosis is a CT neck which best shows the calcifications in the anterior vertebral column of C1-C4, where the tendons of these muscles insert bilaterally. Longus colli calcific tendinitis is not life-threatening and patients will make a full recovery after treatment with NSAIDs. However, this condition is often confused with life-threatening conditions such as infection (meningitis or retropharyngeal abscess), intracranial hemorrhage, trauma, herniation of cervical discs, or malignancy (Estimable et al. (2015) [1]). Symptoms associated with calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle are non-specific and include mild fever, moderate-severe headache, neck pain, and drastically reduced range of motion of the neck. More specific symptoms are the presence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Lab findings usually are significant for mild leukocytosis, and elevated ESR and CRP. Awareness of this condition by E.D. physicians can avoid unnecessary invasive interventions, increased costs, and delays that result from incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This is a unique case in which a patient who was afebrile with a normal ESR was worked up for meningitis and an intracranial process, and also empirically treated for meningitis before finally being diagnosed with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle in the E.D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of the palmaris longus in relation to the hand dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erić, Mirela; Koprivčić, Ivan; Vučinić, Nikola; Radić, Radivoje; Krivokuća, Dragan; Lekšan, Igor; Selthofer, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The incidence of left-handedness in the general population is between 8 and 15%. There is a presumption that the prevalence of palmaris longus muscle differ between right-handed and left-handed people. This prospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence of the palmaris longus in relation to the hand dominance. The study included 542 subjects (216 male and 326 female). They were initially tested to hand dominance and after that they were asked to do the standard test (Schaeffer's test) for the assessment of the palmaris longus tendon. If the tendon was not visualized or palpable, four additional tests (Thompson's test, Mishra's tests I and II, Pushpakumar's "two-finger sign" method) were done to confirm its absence. Right hand dominance was recorded in 452 (83.4%) subjects while the left hand dominance was recorded in 90 (16.6%) subjects. In right-handed subjects, palmaris longus tendon was absent on the right side in 24 (5.3%) and on the left side in 50 (11.1%) cases. In left-handed subjects, it was absent on the right side in 18 (20%) and on the left side in 2 (2.2%) cases. These differences were statistically significant. Bilateral absence of palmaris longus tendon was similar in both examined groups (25.1% in the overall series, 24.3% in right-handed subjects, 28.9% in left-handed subjects). The results of our study show that a right-sided absence was more common in left-handed persons while the left-sided absence was more common in right-handed persons. Unilateral tendon absence was more common on the non-dominant hand.

  3. Stiffness mapping of lower leg muscles during passive dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Nordez, Antoine; Andrade, Ricardo; Hug, François; Freitas, Sandro; Gross, Raphaël

    2017-05-01

    It is challenging to differentiate the mechanical properties of synergist muscles in vivo. Shear wave elastography can be used to quantify the shear modulus (i.e. an index of stiffness) of a specific muscle. This study assessed the passive behavior of lower leg muscles during passive dorsiflexion performed with the knee fully extended (experiment 1, n = 22) or with the knee flexed at 90° (experiment 2, n = 20). The shear modulus measurements were repeated twice during experiment 1 to assess the inter-day reliability. During both experiments, the shear modulus of the following plantar flexors was randomly measured: gastrocnemii medialis (GM) and lateralis (GL), soleus (SOL), peroneus longus (PL), and the deep muscles flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), tibialis posterior (TP). Two antagonist muscles tibialis anterior (TA), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were also recorded. Measurements were performed in different proximo-distal regions for GM, GL and SOL. Inter-day reliability was adequate for all muscles (coefficient of variation muscles and PL exhibited low levels of stiffness during the stretch in young asymptomatic adults, which was unknown until now. These results provide a deeper understanding of passive mechanical properties and the distribution of stiffness between and within the plantar flexor muscles during stretching between them and thus could be relevant to study the effects of aging, disease progression, and rehabilitation on stiffness. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  4. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawabata Y

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  5. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: decellularization of human flexor tendons reduces immunogenicity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shyam S; Woon, Colin Y L; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Choi, Matthew S S; Pridgen, Brian C; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2012-04-01

    In mutilating hand injuries, tissue engineered tendon grafts may provide a reconstructive solution. We have previously described a method to decellularize cadaveric human flexor tendons while preserving mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunogenicity and strength of these grafts when implanted into an immunocompetent rat model. Cadaveric human flexor tendons were divided into two groups. Group 1 was untreated, and Group 2 was decellularized by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both groups were then analyzed for the presence of major histocompatibility complexes by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Pair-matched tendons from each group were then placed into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue and anchored to the spinal ligaments of Wistar rats for 2 or 4 weeks, and harvested. The infiltration of B-cells and macrophages was determined using IHC. The explants where then subjected to mechanical testing to determine the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM). Statistical analysis was performed using a paired Student's t-test. The decellularization protocol successfully removed cells and MHC-1 complexes. At 2 weeks after implantation, there was increased infiltration of B-cells in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular), both in the capsule and tendon substance. There was improved ultimate tensile stress (UTS, 42.7 ± 8.3 vs. 22.8 ± 7.8 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized. At 4 weeks, there was continued B-cell infiltration in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular). There was no appreciable difference in macrophage infiltration at both time points. At 4 weeks Group 2 (acellular) demonstrated persistently greater UTS (40.5 ± 9.1 vs. 14.6 ± 4.2 MPa, ptendons that were decellularized with SDS, EDTA, and PAA resulted in removal of cellular antigens and a decreased immune response when placed into Wistar

  6. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  7. Tenosynovial osteochondromatosis of the tarsal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Kazuya; Iwai, Makoto [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saiseikai Nara Hospital, 4-643 Hachijo, Nara-shi, Nara (Japan); Kawate, Kenji; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara-shi, Nara (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    A case of tenosynovial osteochondromatosis in the tarsal tunnel in a 23-year-old man is presented. The lesion was treated surgically, and multiple osteochondromas were excised, which had no continuity with any tarsal bone or joint cavity but did with the sheaths of the flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus. Histologic examination of the lesion showed a fibrous capsule, hyaline cartilage and extensive areas of cancellous bone. Necrosis and mitosis were absent in the hyaline cartilage and there were no synovial nodules indicative of synovial metaplasia. The macroscopic findings showed ''end-stage'' tenosynovial osteochondromatosis. There was no evidence of recurrence 5 years after operation, and the patient remains free of symptoms. (orig.)

  8. Effects of motor imagery on hand function during immobilization after flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, Martin W.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether motor imagery during the immobilization period after flexor tendon injury results in a faster recovery of central mechanisms of hand function. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Tertiary referral hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=28) after surgical flexor

  9. Acute neck pain due to tendonitis of the longus colli: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artenian, D.J.; Lipman, J.K.; Scidmore, G.K.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1989-05-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendonitis is an under-recognized cause of acute cervical pain produced by inflammation of the longus colli muscle. Although the clinical presentation may mimic more serious disorders, the diagnosis can be established radiographically by identification of prevertebral soft tissue calcification and swelling. Six patients with typical signs and symptoms of retropharyngeal tendonitis are presented. All were evaluated with plain films, four with CT and one with MRI. The pathognomonic finding of amorphous calcification anterior to C1-2 with associated asymmetric soft tissue swelling was clearly demonstrated by CT. Diffuse swelling of the longus colli muscle was shown as prominent high signal in the prevertebral region by T2 weighted MRI.

  10. Distribution of different fibre types of M. extensor carpi radialis longus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A de C; Silva M dal, D; Pai, V D

    1994-12-01

    As revealed by the NADH-diaphorase and myosine ATPase, the M. extensor carpi radialis longus of the rat possesses at least 3 main kinds of fibres, with different distribution on the superficial and deep portions of the muscle. The superficial portion revealed that 67.68% are FG (fast-twitch-glycolytic) fibres, 14.72% are FOG (fast-twitch-oxidative) fibres and 17.60% are SO (slow-twitch-glycolytic) fibres. Already the deep portion revealed that 71.29% are SO (slow-twitch-glycolytic) fibres, 17.46% are FOG (fast-twitch-oxidative-glycolytic) fibres and 11.25% are FG (fast-twitch-glycolytic) fibres. The miosine ATPase reaction was used to demonstrate contracting characteristics. These findings suggest that the movements of fast contraction of the M. extensor carpi radialis longus are predominant.

  11. Anomalous course of the extensor pollicis longus with multiple absences of thumb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jayoung; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung-Mook

    2013-02-01

    We report a rare case of a 10-year-old girl with anomalous course of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) muscle, which exists with absence of thenar muscles and muscles in the 1st extensor compartment. Her chief complaint was severe atrophy on the right thenar eminence. On physical examination, there was no obvious functional abnormality on her right thumb. On magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the abductor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis brevis muscles were absent. The tendon of the EPL muscle was found, but it had abnormal insertion on the radial side of the proximal phalanx, not on the distal phalanx. This variation was thought to have played a major role in compensating for impaired abduction of the thumb, which is usually accompanied by agenesis of major abductors of the thumb.

  12. The clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the palmaris longus muscle in the Black African population of Zimbabwe and a proposed new testing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangata, Hope

    2009-03-01

    The presence of the palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is highly variable. Rates of absence vary from 0.6% in the Korean population to as high as 63.9% in the Turkish population. The tendon of PLM may be absent on one or both forearms, may have duplicated tendons on one forearm or may be laterally shifted to the extent that the tendon of the PLM lies superficial to that of flexor carpi radialis muscle. Among Black American populations, in which there is usually mixed ancestry, rates of absence are 3.5%. Only two studies have been performed on Black African populations: in Republic of Congo and Uganda, and each showed widely differing rates of absence of 3.0% and 14.6%, respectively. In this study, a total of 890 Black Zimbabwean subjects in Harare aged between 8 and 13 years, were examined for clinical surface anatomy anomalies of the tendon of PLM. The results showed that the tendon of the PLM was absent unilaterally in 0.9% of the population, and bilaterally absent in 0.6% with an overall rate of absence of 1.5%. Other variations noted were a laterally shifted PLM in 1.1% of subjects and duplicated tendons on one forearm, which was the least prevalent anomaly, in 0.2% of subjects. The author proposes a new technique to test the tendon of PLM, which combines resisted thumb abduction and resisted wrist flexion. The proposed technique capitalizes on the role of the PLM as an important abductor of the thumb.

  13. Does the longus colli have an effect on cervical vertigo?: A retrospective study of 116 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Fu-Min; Yong, Zhi-Yao; Ba, Zhao-Yu; Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the longus colli muscles in cervical vertigo.We retrospectively analyzed 116 adult patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) during 2014 in our department. Patients were assigned to the vertigo group or the nonvertigo group. Demographic data were recorded. Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli were measured using coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).The vertigo group (n = 44) and the nonvertigo group (n = 72) were similar in demographic data. Mean preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was higher in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P = 0.037), but no difference postoperatively. Mean JOA scores increased significantly postoperatively in both groups (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001). The mean vertigo score decreased significantly from pre- to postoperatively in the vertigo group (P = 0.023). The mean preoperative Cobb angle was significantly smaller in the vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group (P vertigo group (P vertigo group (P vertigo group than in the nonvertigo group. Mean Miyazaki scores were significantly higher in the vertigo group at C3/4 and C4/5 (P = 0.044 and P = 0.037). Moreover, a shorter inner distance and smaller CSA were related to a higher Miyazaki score.Inner distance and cross-sectional area (CSA) of longus colli are associated closely with cervical vertigo. Shorter inner distance and smaller CSA of the longus colli muscles might be risk factors for cervical vertigo. ACDF provided a good resolution of cervical vertigo.

  14. Bilateral variations of abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis: Surgical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) muscles are known to exhibit numerous variations. Aims: We would like to put across an accidental unusual finding of APL and EPB muscles. Materials and Methods: During routine cadaveric dissection of a 52 year old female cadaver, we found an unusual APL and EPB muscles variations bilaterally. Results: Duplication of APL tendon was noted, one showing normal attachment and the additional one on trapezium. EPB muscle had an ...

  15. Inflammation of vertebral bone associated with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihmanli, I.; Kanberoglu, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey); Karaarslan, E. [Intermed Medical Center, Nisantasi, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis with characteristic findings on radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To our knowledge, this is the first acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis report having inflammation of both the vertebra itself and the longus colli muscle diagnosed on MRI. In patients with neck pain, acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis, even if these patients had vertebral pathological signals on MRI. (orig.)

  16. Prevalence of palmaris longus absence – a study in the Yoruba population

    OpenAIRE

    Godwin O. Mbaka; Ejiwunmi, Adedayo B

    2009-01-01

    Background Palmaris longus (PL) has received a growing interest for its role in constructive surgery. Since the agenesis of PL shows a strong racial variation, it is conceivable that its prevalence on the Yoruba ethnic population in Nigeria will further confirm this phenomenon. Methods A total of 600 subjects comprising 335 males and 265 females aged 8-60years were used to assess the prevalence of agenesis of the PL in Yoruba tribe. Results The overall prevalence of absence both unilaterally ...

  17. [Reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament in treating Rockwood - III Acromioclavicular dislocation by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-lin; Mo, Huan-peng

    2015-06-01

    To explore therapeutic effects of reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament for the treatment of Rockwood-III Acromioclavicular dislocation by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture. From August 2011 to November 2013,37 cases with Rockwood-III acromioclavicular dislocation were treated with reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture. Among patients, 24 were males and 13 were females, ranging the age from 19 to 46 years old, with an average of 32 years old. There were 11 cases on the left side and 26 cases on the right side. Twenty-nine cases were fresh dislocation and 8 cases were old dislocation. Blood loss, operative time were observed, and Karlsson evaltae standard were applied for assessing postoperative recovery of shoulder joint function. All patients were followed up from 2.5 to 5 months with an average of 3.5 months. Operative time ranged from 52 to 98 (meaned 72) min, blood loss ranged from 50 to 180 (meaned 75) ml. All operative incision were healed at the satge I . According to Karlsson standard, 32 cases obtained excellent results and 5 cases were moderate. For Rockwood-III acromioclavicular dislocation,reconstructing coracoclavicular ligament by palmaris longus muscle with polyester suture has advantages of simple operation, and rapid recovery of shoulder joint function.

  18. A simple blind tenolysis for flexor carpi radialis tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Peter R G; Franssen, Bas B G M; Disseldorp, Dominique J G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendinopathy is an entity with a chronic form (repetitiveness of work) and an acute form (acute overstretching of the wrist). Confirmation of this syndrome can be established by injection of a small amount of a local anesthetic in the sheet of the FCR at this

  19. Large strengthening effect of a hip-flexor training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Zebis, Mette;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect on hip-flexion strength of a 6-week hip-flexor training programme using elastic bands as resistance. We hypothesized that the training group, compared to a control group, would increase their hip-flexion strength more. METHODS: Thirty-three healthy subjects (45 ...

  20. Clinical outcome after percutaneous flexor tenotomy in forefoot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarge, Romain; Philippot, Rémy; Viola, Jérémy; Besse, Jean Luc

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the percutaneous flexor tenotomy. We compared the results of two groups. The first group included 23 patients who underwent forefoot surgery without percutaneous flexor tenotomy, and the second group included 50 patients who underwent the same procedure combined with percutaneous flexor tenotomy for claw toe deformities, secondary to shortening metatarsal Scarf osteotomy. The average follow-up was 11.6 months. Three algoneurodystrophies were noted. No delayed wound healing was observed. Functional dissatisfaction rate (18% vs.17.4%) and toe pulp contact defect (12% vs. 8.7%) were not significantly different in the two groups. Toe grasping defect rate (10% vs. 4.3%) was superior in the tenotomy group. Five recurring claw toe deformities of the second toe were noted in the tenotomy group. Percutaneous flexor tenotomy is a simple, rapid, and efficient method to correct reducible secondary claw toe deformities. However, despite a significant postoperative loss of toe grasping function, no patient reported major dissatisfaction.

  1. Bilateral spontaneous rupture of flexor digitorum profundus tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    Spontaneous tendon rupture is an unusual condition usually associated with underlying disease processes such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal failure or bony abnormalities of the hand. We report a case of spontaneous, non-concurrent bilateral rupture of flexor profundus tendons in an otherwise healthy individual. Treatment was successful and consisted of a two-stage reconstruction of the ruptured tendon.

  2. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro;

    2015-01-01

    involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients......, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement...

  3. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... voluntary contraction using surface electromyography and glucose uptake using positron emission tomography. Additionally, Achilles tendon glucose uptake was quantified. FINDINGS: Normalized myoelectric activity of soleus was higher (P

  4. Midsubstance Tendinopathy, Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarbo, William T; Bullock, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    Noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy often responds to nonoperative treatment. When nonoperative treatment fails, the clinician must distinguish between paratendinopathy and noninsertional tendinopathy. In paratendinopathy, myofibroblasts synthesize collagen, causing adhesions, and the paratenon may be released or excised. If a core area of tendinopathy is identified on MRI, the area is excised longitudinally and repaired with a side-to-side suture. If greater than 50% of the tendon diameter is excised, the authors recommend a short flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer with an interference screw. A turndown flap of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis is also described with good results.

  5. Unusual origin of the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingerter, S; Gupta, S; Le, S; Shamasunder, S; Bernstein, R; Rabitaille, W; Kukuyeva, Y; Downie, S

    2003-11-01

    An unusual origin of the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle of the right hand was discovered during cadaveric dissection. The muscle originated from the anterior aspect of the transverse fibers of the distal antebrachial fascia and inserted onto the base of the fifth proximal phalanx. When traction was applied to the proximal portion of the muscle, flexion was produced at the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint. Other intrinsic muscles of the hand and the muscles of the flexor forearm compartment had normal morphology. Although muscular anomalies in the hypothenar region have been described, the muscular variant described here was distinct in its origin and size from those previously reported. Knowledge of anomalous muscles in the hand has important clinical significance in routine surgery and in determining associated pathology.

  6. A technique for introducing looped sutures in flexor tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stronger flexor tendon repairs facilitate early active motion therapy protocols. Core sutures using looped suture material provide 1 ½ to twice the strength of Kessler′s technique (with four strand and six strand Tsuge technique respectively. The technique is well-described and uses preformed looped sutures (supramid. This is not available in many countries and we describe a technique whereby looped sutures can be introduced in flexor tendon repair by the use of 23 G hypodermic needle and conventional 4.0 or 5.0 sutures. This is an alternative when the custom made preformed sutures are not available. This can be practiced in zone 3 to zone 5 repairs. Technical difficulties limit its use in zone 2 repairs.

  7. Cuboid oedema due to peroneus longus tendinopathy: a report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, Paul; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To highlight focal bone abnormality in the cuboid due to tendinopathy of the adjacent peroneus longus. A retrospective review was carried out of the relevant clinical and imaging features. Two male and two female patients were studied, mean age 51.5 years (range 32 - 67 years), referred with foot pain and imaging showing an abnormal cuboid thought to represent either tumour or infection. A long history of foot pain was usual with a maximum of 8 years. Radiographs were normal in two cases and showed erosion in two, one of which exhibited periosteal new bone formation affecting the cuboid. Bone scintigraphy was undertaken in two patients, both of whom showed increased uptake of isotope. MRI, performed in all patients, showed oedema in the cuboid adjacent to the peroneus longus tendon. The tendon and/or paratendinous tissues were abnormal in all cases, but no tendon discontinuity was identified. One patient possessed an os peroneum. Unequivocal evidence of bone erosion was seen using MRI in three patients, but with greater clarity in two cases using CT. Additional findings of tenosynovitis of tibialis posterior, oedema in the adjacent medial malleolus and synovitis of multiple joints in the foot were seen in one patient. Imaging diagnosis was made in all cases avoiding bone biopsy, but surgical exploration of the peroneal tendons was performed in two cases and biopsy of ankle synovium in one. Oedema with erosion of the cuboid bone, simulating a bone lesion (cuboid ''pseudotumour''), may be caused by adjacent tendinopathy of peroneus longus. It is vital to be aware of this entity to avoid unnecessary biopsy of the cuboid. (orig.)

  8. Late extensor pollicis longus rupture following plate fixation in Galeazzi fracture dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjaya Sabat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late rupture of extensor pollicis longus (EPL tendon after Galeazzi fracture dislocation fixation is an unknown entity though it is a well-established complication following distal radius fractures. We report the case of a 55-year old male who presented with late EPL tendon rupture 4 months following internal fixation of Galeazzi fracture dislocation with a Locking Compression Plate (LCP. He was managed with extensor indicis proprius (EIP transfer to restore thumb extension. At 4 years followup, functional result of the transfer was good. We identify possible pitfalls with this particular patient and discuss how to avoid them in future.

  9. Late extensor pollicis longus rupture following plate fixation in Galeazzi fracture dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Dhananjaya; Dabas, Vineet; Dhal, Anil

    2014-07-01

    Late rupture of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon after Galeazzi fracture dislocation fixation is an unknown entity though it is a well-established complication following distal radius fractures. We report the case of a 55-year old male who presented with late EPL tendon rupture 4 months following internal fixation of Galeazzi fracture dislocation with a Locking Compression Plate (LCP). He was managed with extensor indicis proprius (EIP) transfer to restore thumb extension. At 4 years followup, functional result of the transfer was good. We identify possible pitfalls with this particular patient and discuss how to avoid them in future.

  10. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic M. Colella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Longus colli tendinitis (LCT is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation.

  11. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Dominic M.; Calderón Sandoval, Fiorela; Powers, David W.; Patel, Nimal; Sobrado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Longus colli tendinitis (LCT) is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation. PMID:28100997

  12. Clinical prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2013-09-01

    We report a systematic review and a proportion meta-analysis of prevalence studies evaluating the prevalence of palmaris longus agenesis (PLA) in the literature. The overall PLA rate was defined to be the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were rates of PLA in relation to ethnicity, laterality, side, gender, age, and hand dominance. We identified 26 articles which met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed an overall PLA pooled rate of 20.25%, higher than the commonly reported overall rate of 15%. Our results also showed significantly lower pooled rates in Africans (11.3%) and East Asians (4.5%) when compared to Arab Middle Eastern population (41.7%). A subgroup analysis of the African group showed a pooled rate of 2.71%, the lowest, in the East and South East African population. The pooled rate was 26.3% among Caucasians, 26.16% among South and Southeast Asians and 34.13% among Turkish. In discordance with the literature, PLA was statistically more predominant on the right side. No significant differences in PLA rates were found for laterality, gender, the combination of gender and side or the combination of gender and laterality. The lowest rate of PLA found in East and South East African populations might be indicative of the subsequent phylogenetic degeneration of the palmaris longus muscle in modern humans after the "Out of Africa" migration.

  13. Surface Modification Counteracts Adverse Effects Associated with Immobilization after Flexor Tendon Repair

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Although post-rehabilitation is routinely performed following flexor tendon repair, in some clinical scenarios post-rehabilitation must be delayed. We investigated modification of the tendon surface using carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lub) to maintain gliding function following flexor tendon repair with postoperative immobilization in a in vivo canine model. Flexor digitorum profundus tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of one forepaw of six dogs were transected...

  14. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  15. Resistance exercise prevents plantar flexor deconditioning during bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Hunter, G. R.; Stevens, B. R.; Guilliams, M. E.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REX) and unloading induce opposing neuromuscular adaptations, we tested the efficacy of REX against the effects of 14 d of bed rest unloading (BRU) on the plantar flexor muscle group. Sixteen men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NOE, N = 8) or REX (N = 8). REX performed 5 sets x 6-10 repetitions to failure of constant resistance concentric/eccentric plantar flexion every other day during BRU. One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was tested on the training device. The angle-specific torque-velocity relationship across 5 velocities (0, 0.52, 1.05, 1.75, and 2.97 rad.s-1) and the full range-of-motion power-velocity relationship were assessed on a dynamometer. Torque-position analyses identified strength changes at shortened, neutral, and stretched muscle lengths. Concentric and eccentric contractile work were measured across ten repetitions at 1.05 rad.s-1. Maximal neural activation was measured by surface electromyography (EMG). 1RM decreased 9% in NOE and improved 11% in REX (P muscle lengths (P < 0.05) in NOE while REX maintained or improved strength at all joint positions. Concentric (15%) and eccentric (11%) contractile work fell in NOE (P < 0.05) but not in REX. Maximal plantar flexor EMG did not change in either group. In summary, constant resistance concentric/eccentric REX completely prevented plantar flexor performance deconditioning induced by BRU. The reported benefits of REX should prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity and for patients susceptible to functional decline during bed- or chair-bound hospital stays.

  16. Complete avulsion of the adductor longus in a semi-professional football player: Rapid return to play with nonoperative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince W Lands

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adductor longus has become recognized as one of the more commonly injured muscles in the medial compartment. Acute complete rupture injuries occurring at the proximal aspect of the muscle are less common. Limited data exist regarding management of the injuries in athletes required for return to play and functioning. The current data favors operative management; however, nonoperative treatment may be a viable option. Nonoperative management of avulsion injuries of the proximal adductor longus tendon may prove equal results to surgical repair in return to play and functioning. A semi-professional football player sustained a left groin injury while participating in the play. Due to continued pain, swelling, and suspicion of injury, a magnetic resonance imaging was performed diagnosing a complete tear of proximal adductor longus tendon. Physical examination, strength, and range of motion were recorded until the patient was able to function normally without strength deficit, the range of motion loss, and the return of speed. The player was treated nonoperatively and was eventually allowed to return to play. The time of return to play was 6 weeks. Strength deficit was not appreciated or loss of motion and player was able to return to baseline function. Nonoperative management of complete avulsion injuries of the proximal adductor longus tendon result in faster return to play than operative management even if significant retraction is present.

  17. Longus, a Type IV Pilus of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Is Involved in Adherence to Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazariego-Espinosa, Karina; Cruz, Ariadnna; Ledesma, Maria A.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in the developing world, as well as the most common cause of traveler's diarrhea. The main hallmarks of this type of bacteria are the expression of one or more enterotoxins and fimbriae used for attachment to host intestinal cells. Longus is a pilus produced by ETEC. These bacteria grown in pleuropneumonia-like organism (PPLO) broth at 37°C and in 5% CO2 produced longus, showing that the assembly and expression of the pili depend on growth conditions and composition of the medium. To explore the role of longus in the adherence to epithelial cells, quantitative and qualitative analyses were done, and similar levels of adherence were observed, with values of 111.44 × 104 CFU/ml in HT-29, 101.33 × 104 CFU/ml in Caco-2, and 107.11 × 104 CFU/ml in T84 cells. In addition, the E9034AΔlngA strain showed a significant reduction in longus adherence of 32% in HT-29, 22.28% in Caco-2, and 21.68% in T84 cells compared to the wild-type strain. In experiments performed with nonintestinal cells (HeLa and HEp-2 cells), significant differences were not observed in adherence between E9034A and derivative strains. Interestingly, the E9034A and E9034AΔlngA(pLngA) strains were 30 to 35% more adherent in intestinal cells than in nonintestinal cells. Twitching motility experiments were performed, showing that ETEC strains E9034A and E9034AΔlngA(pLngA) had the capacity to form spreading zones while ETEC E9034AΔlngA does not. In addition, our data suggest that longus from ETEC participates in the colonization of human colonic cells. PMID:20348256

  18. Using a double-layered palmaris longus tendon for suspension of facial paralysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Bakholdt, Vivi; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Facial palsy is a debilitating condition entailing both cosmetic and functional limitations. Static suspension procedures can be performed when more advanced dynamic techniques are not indicated. Since 2006, we have used a double-layered palmaris longus tendon graft through an ovular...... follow-up of 49 months (range: 3-89 months). 93% noted an improvement of their facial appearance at follow-up. Seven out of 11 patients with preoperative problems with speech noted an improvement at follow-up. Eight out of 12 patients with preoperative problems with oral competence noted an improvement......, and it improves the quality of life of patients with facial palsy. It is an acceptable alternative when more advanced procedures are not indicated. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  19. Unusual case of acute neck pain: acute calcific longus colli tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gunjan S; Fomin, Daren A; Joshi, Gargi S; Serano, Richard D

    2016-06-02

    Acute calcific longus colli tendinitis (ACLCT), a very rare cause of severe neck pain, dysphagia and odynophagia, is often mistaken for other common causes of neck pain. However, prompt recognition of this uncommon presentation is important to prevent unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 1-day history of severe neck pain, headache and odynophagia. The patient was afebrile with stable vital signs, however, the laboratory data showed mildly elevated C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The physical examination was remarkable for markedly reduced cervical range of motion. MRI revealed the pathognomonic findings of paravertebral oedema and calcification. The definitive diagnosis of ACLCT was made and the patient was successfully managed with a short course of oral steroid, benzodiazepine and aural acupuncture, with complete resolution of the condition within a week. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Gender differences in contractile and passive properties of mdx extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The mdx mouse is the first and perhaps the most commonly used animal model for study of DMD. Both male and female mdx mice are used. However, it is not completely clear whether gender influences contraction and the passive mechanical properties of mdx skeletal muscle. We compared isometric tetanic forces and passive forces of the extensor digitorum longus muscle between male and female mdx mice. At age 6 months, female mdx mice showed better-preserved specific tetanic force. Interestingly, at 20 months of age, female mdx muscle appeared stiffer. Our results suggest that gender may profoundly influence physiological measurement outcomes in mdx mice. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Isolated Tuberculous Tenosynovitis of the Anterior Tibial and Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhan Genç

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal system is involved in 1-5% of extrapulmonary cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is a rare form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the tendon sheath in the hand has been seen in a few cases. Involvement of the tendons of the leg is less common. Diagnosis is not easy as there are no specific clinical symptoms or signs. A 33-year-old male presented with painful swelling in the distal right lower limb that caused restriction of movement. Imaging studies showed inflammation and infection of the extensor digitorium longus and tibialis anterior tendons. Histopathological studies showed a necrotizing granulomatous inflammation in the synovial tissue. A diagnosis of tuberculosis was made and medical treatment was initiated that proved successful. Patient remained infection-free at 26-month follow-up examination.

  2. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  3. Basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb: comparison of suture button versus abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Kristopher R; Nydick, Jason A; White, Brian D; Vaccaro, Lisa; Hess, Alfred V; Stone, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-01

    Our purpose was to compare the outcomes of patients with severe basilar thumb osteoarthritis treated with trapeziectomy and suspensionplasty using abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon versus a suture button device. A retrospective study was performed for patients undergoing trapeziectomy and suspensionplasty with APL tendon or suture button fixation. Outcome measures included disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH); visual analog score (VAS); grip strength; key pinch; tip pinch; and thumb opposition. Radiographic measurements, surgical times, and complications were recorded. Thirty-three patients in the APL tendon group and 27 patients in the suture button group had a minimum 6-month follow-up. VAS, DASH, and functional measurements improved after surgery for both groups. Mean operative time was 68 min for the APL tendon group and 48 min for the suture button group. Complications were similar between groups. The use of suture button fixation when compared to APL tendon suspensionplasty offers similar clinical outcomes. Therapeutic III.

  4. Structural characterization of CFA/III and Longus type IVb pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Roos, Justin; Yuen, Alex S W; Pierce, Owen M; Craig, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    The type IV pili are helical filaments found on many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, with multiple diverse roles in pathogenesis, including microcolony formation, adhesion, and twitching motility. Many pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates express one of two type IV pili belonging to the type IVb subclass: CFA/III or Longus. Here we show a direct correlation between CFA/III expression and ETEC aggregation, suggesting that these pili, like the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), mediate microcolony formation. We report a 1.26-Å resolution crystal structure of CofA, the major pilin subunit from CFA/III. CofA is very similar in structure to V. cholerae TcpA but possesses a 10-amino-acid insertion that replaces part of the α2-helix with an irregular loop containing a 3(10)-helix. Homology modeling suggests a very similar structure for the Longus LngA pilin. A model for the CFA/III pilus filament was generated using the TCP electron microscopy reconstruction as a template. The unique 3(10)-helix insert fits perfectly within the gap between CofA globular domains. This insert, together with differences in surface-exposed residues, produces a filament that is smoother and more negatively charged than TCP. To explore the specificity of the type IV pilus assembly apparatus, CofA was expressed heterologously in V. cholerae by replacing the tcpA gene with that of cofA within the tcp operon. Although CofA was synthesized and processed by V. cholerae, no CFA/III filaments were detected, suggesting that the components of the type IVb pilus assembly system are highly specific to their pilin substrates.

  5. [Chronic compartment syndrome of the flexor muscles in the forearm due to motocross].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, J; Baur, E M; Piza-Katzer, H

    2006-04-01

    A case of a mechanic and motorcyclist is reported who developed unilateral chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the flexor muscles in the forearm. After years of discomfort and medical check-ups, a subcutaneous fasciotomy of the superficial compartments of the flexor muscles in the forearm led to a complete relief of symptoms, which allowed the patient unrestricted activity.

  6. Plantar flexor neuromuscular adjustments following match-play football in hot and cool conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, O; Nybo, Lars; Mohr, Magni;

    2015-01-01

    We assessed neuromuscular fatigue and recovery of the plantar flexors after playing football with or without severe heat stress. Neuromuscular characteristics of the plantar flexors were assessed in 17 male players at baseline and ∼30 min, 24, and 48 h after two 90-min football matches in tempera...

  7. Mechanical efficiency of the elbow flexors in rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompa, T O; Borms, J; Hebbelinck, M

    1990-06-01

    Biomechanical and especially kinesiological investigations of the mechanical efficiency of rowers are rarely found in today's literature. The coach frequently relates to skills or technical movements in terms of their aesthetic appearance rather than their mechanical effectiveness. The force output of the elbow flexors appears to be a function of the forearm position. The literature referring to the mechanical efficiency of the elbow flexors seems to favor both semiprone and supine positions, whereas the prone position appears to be discredited. It is the latter grip position that is actually employed and traditionally accepted in the sport of rowing. In fact, this technique was never challenged or scientifically researched to see whether a modified one might lead to better efficiency. Consequently, the purpose of this investigation was to analyze whether athletes' force output differed if the gripping technique was changed from pronation to a semiprone grip (one arm prone, the other semiprone). Under the specific conditions of this investigation, it was demonstrated that the semiprone position was generating greater force output and higher electrical activity, thus being superior to the classical prone grip.

  8. Gantzer's muscle-like variation inserted into the forearm flexor retinaculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, M; Ishida, H

    1989-05-01

    A rare muscle variation belonging to the forearm flexor muscle group has been observed in three forearms out of nearly 200 Japanese cadavers. It arose from the well developed fascia of the superficial forearm flexor group, crossed the median nerve obliquely and posteriorly lying radial to that nerve, and was inserted into the flexor retinaculum. The muscle variations in the three cases were discussed according to the concept of "corrected" nerve-muscle specificity and conservative morphology. They were conclusively ascribable to the original antebrachial flexor group of Yamada. This seemed to indicate that the variations were related or identical to Gantzer's muscle, and that they showed a possible original or archaic pattern of the original antebrachial flexors.

  9. Functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hao; ZHANG Shao-cheng; TAN Zhang-yong; ZHU Hong-wei; ZHANG Qiu-lin; LI Ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the method of functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb and propose a classification protocol for ischemic contracture in the lower limb based on its severity and prognosis.Methods: Atotal of 42 patients with ischemic contracture in the lower limb were included in this study. According to different types of disturbance and degrees of severity,surgical reconstructions consisting of nerve decompression,tendon lengthening or transfer, intrinsic foot muscle release and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis were performed in every patient.Results: Postoperatively, all patients were able to walk on flat ground. Drop foot was corrected in 10 patients,and 5 patients still felt some difficulty during stair activity.Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon was performed in 12 patients, and their walking stability was improved. Seven patients accepted ipsilateral suraltibial nerve anastomosis, and sensitivity recovery reached to S2 in 2 patients and S3 in 5 patients.Conclusions: Ischemic contracture in the lower limb is a devastating complication after lower limb trauma. The prevention of contracture is much more important than the treatment of an established contracture. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis, which was initially implemented by us, could improve the functional recovery of ischemic contracture in lower limbs, and thus provides a new alternative for functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb.

  10. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial.

  11. Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2014-07-01

    We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Use of muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare cervical flexor activity between patients with whiplash-associated disorders and people who are healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnie, Barbara; Dolphens, Mieke; Peeters, Ian; Achten, Eric; Cambier, Dirk; Danneels, Lieven

    2010-08-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) have been shown to be associated with motor dysfunction. Increased electromyographic (EMG) activity in neck and shoulder girdle muscles has been demonstrated during different tasks in participants with persistent WAD. Muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) is an innovative technique to evaluate muscle activity and differential recruitment of deep and superficial muscles following exercise. The purpose of this study was to compare the recruitment pattern of deep and superficial neck flexors between patients with WAD and controls using mfMRI. A cross-sectional design was used. The study was conducted in a physical and rehabilitation medicine department. The participants were 19 controls who were healthy (10 men, 9 women; mean [+/-SD] age=22.2+/-0.6 years) and 16 patients with WAD (5 men, 11 women; mean [+/-SD] age=32.9+/-12.7 years). The T2 values were calculated for the longus colli (Lco), longus capitis (Lca), and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles at rest and following cranio-cervical flexion (CCF). In the overall statistical model for T2 shift, there was a significant main effect for muscle (F=3.906, P=.033) but not for group (F=2.855, P=.101). The muscle x group interaction effect was significant (F=3.618, P=.041). Although not significant, there was a strong trend for lesser Lco (P=.061) and Lca (P=.060) activity for the WAD group compared with the control group. Although the SCM showed higher T2 shifts, this difference was not significant (P=.291). Although mfMRI is an innovative and useful technique for the evaluation of deep cervical muscles, consideration is required, as this method encompasses a postexercise evaluation and is limited to resistance types of exercises. Muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a difference in muscle recruitment between the Lco, Lca, and SCM during CCF in the control group, but failed to demonstrate a changed activity pattern in the WAD group compared

  13. Flexor Tendon Sheath Engineering Using Decellularized Porcine Pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megerle, Kai; Woon, Colin; Kraus, Armin; Raghavan, Shyam; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2016-10-01

    The flexor tendon sheath is an ideal target for tissue engineering because it is difficult to reconstruct by conventional surgical methods. The authors hypothesized that decellularized porcine pericardium can be used as a scaffold for engineering a biologically active tendon sheath. The authors' protocol removed cellular material from the pericardium and preserved the structural architecture in addition to the collagen and glycosaminoglycan content. The scaffold was successfully reseeded with human sheath synoviocytes and human adipose-derived stem cells. Cells were evaluated for 8 weeks after reseeding. The reseeded construct demonstrated continuous production of hyaluronic acid, the main component of synovial fluid. After being seeded on the membrane, adipose-derived stem cells demonstrated down-regulation of collagen I and III and up-regulation of hyaluronan synthase 2. The results indicate that decellularized porcine pericardium may be a potential scaffold for engineering a biologically active human tendon sheath.

  14. Digital flexor musculotendinous contracture in two Devon Rex cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Leonie K; Pool, Roy R; Malik, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Clinical summary: A 13-year-old, spayed Devon Rex with unilateral digital flexor musculotendinous contracture of the forelimb was treated by surgical tenotomy. The condition improved transiently, but recurred rapidly and became bilateral. Histopathologic analysis of necropsy tissues resulted in a morphologic diagnosis of fibromyositis of the antebrachial muscles causing contracture and flexural deformity of the carpi and phalanges of both thoracic limbs. A search for similar cases yielded the clinical notes of a second cat, a 10-year-old, spayed Devon Rex, also with bilateral disease. This second case responded well to surgical tenotomy but tissue biopsies were not obtained to permit microscopic assessment of the underlying pathologic process. Relevance and novel information: Acquired and permanent contracture of the digital flexor muscles and/or tendons of the forelimbs is a rare and poorly described condition of cats. The very limited number of documented cases describing disease affecting one or more digits (but not the carpus) infers a causal link with onychectomy, but reported histopathologic changes have been limited to the tendons. The two cases described in this report suffered contracture of the carpus and all digits bilaterally, one without previous onychectomy and the other 9 years after onychectomy. There were novel histopathologic findings in the muscles of the one case for which biopsy material was available. Information gained from these two cases provides a new perspective for the investigation and treatment of future cases. Specifically, consideration should be given to an underlying immune-mediated myopathic process and a possible genetic predisposition in the Devon Rex breed. Currently, the poorly understood etiopathogenesis hinders our ability to definitively recommend treatment options, which might include corticosteroids and other forms of immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. PERONEUS LONGUS ACTIVITY IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF TAPING: ATHLETES WITH ANKLE INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rahmani Jaffar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Participation in sport among university athletes in Malaysia has progressed right up to Olympic level. However, some of these athletes are prevented from competing due to injuries. Ankle injuries, in particular, are among the common types of injury. Even so, there is still lack of local data and research describing the incidence of ankle injuries. Objectives: To determine peroneus longus muscle activity in different taped ankles and positions among subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI. Methods: Twenty-three subjects with ankle instability (AJFAT score > 26 volunteered to take part in the study. The subjects were tested under three conditions; 1 no tape (NT, 2 Kinesio(r tape (KT, and 3 rigid tape (RT. The subjects completed two postural stability tests, followed by a sudden inversion perturbation test with EMG, recording throughout the procedures. The EMG data were analyzed, filtered, full-wave rectified and normalized. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance (Independent T-test and ANOVA to evaluate differences in peak muscle activation (mV and peroneal latency (ms. Results: Peak muscle activation of the peroneus was activated more in the RT group during both the Static and Dynamic Stability Tests. Apart from that, there were no statistically significant differences. During sudden inversion perturbation, the RT group was the one that was most activated (p=0.001. Peroneal latency was even delayed in KT and RT during the three tests, and shorter in the NT group. There were significant differences during the Dynamic Stability Test, between the NT and KT groups (p=0.001 and between the NT, RT and KT groups (p=0.001. Conclusion: RT tape may enhance the peroneus longus response by maintaining a higher level of muscle activation, especially during dynamic movements and sudden inversion of the ankle, and may selectively benefit individuals with FAI. The KT ankle did not show superior effect to the NT ankle, and

  16. Subcutaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon after Corticosteroid Injections for DeQuervain’s Stenosing Tenovaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Boussakri; Amara Bouali

    2014-01-01

    DeQuervain’s stenosing tenovaginitis is a common condition. Nonsurgical treatment by corticosteroid injection has significantly improved the management of this disease. The authors describe a case of subcutaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon at the wrist, three months after two corticosteroid injections for DeQuervain’s stenosing tenovaginitis. The etiological history has not found any trauma history of the wrist. The aim of our work is to draw attention to this rare complic...

  17. Avulsion fracture of the extensor carpi radialis longus carpal insertion due to a basketball injury: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, N; Zbili, D; Bellity, J; Doursounian, L; Mauprivez, R

    2014-12-01

    Articular fractures of the base of the 2nd metacarpal involving the extensor carpi radialis longus insertion are unusual and poorly understood. There is no consensus as to how these fractures should be treated. We report the case of a 2nd metacarpal base fracture in a professional basketball player that was treated surgically with open reduction and internal fixation using cannulated screws. The management of this case is compared to similar cases in the literature.

  18. Attritional rupture of extensor pollicis longus: a rare complication following elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sproule, James A

    2011-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nail fixation has become established as an acceptable method of treatment for diaphyseal fractures of both forearm bones in the paediatric population. It is considered safe, minimally invasive and does not compromise physeal growth. We report a case of delayed rupture of extensor pollicis longus due to attrition over the sharp edges of a protruding nail end after elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial diaphyseal fracture.

  19. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans. PMID:27069895

  20. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rodrigo César; de Oliveira, Kennedy Martinez; Léo, Jorge Alfredo; Elias, Bruno Adriano Borges; Dos Santos, Paulo Ricardo; de Santiago, Hildemberg Agostinho Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans.

  1. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  2. Amylin evokes protein p20 phosphorylation and insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle extensor digitorum longus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate effect of amylin on the insulin sensitivity of rat skeletal muscle extensor digitorum longus (EDL) using in vitro intact muscle incubation in combination with metabolic radioactive labeling. The molecular basis of the amylin action was further examined using proteomic analysis. In particular, proteins of interest were characterized using an integrated microcharacterization procedure that involved in-gel trypsin digestion, organic solvent extraction, high performance liquid chromatography separation, microsequencing and microsequence analysis. We found that amylin significantly decreased the insulin-stimulated glucose incorporation into glycogen (p < 0.01) and produced a protein spot of approximately 20 ku in size. This amylin responsive protein (hereby designated as amylin responsive protein 1, APR1) was identified to be protein p20. Moreover, ARP1 spots on gels were found to consistently produce a corresponding radioactive spot on X-ray films in 32Pi but not in 35S-methionine labeling experiments. In conclusion, our results showed that in vitro amylin concomitantly evoked the production of ARP1 and caused insulin resistance in EDL muscle. It is suggested that protein p20 may be involved in amylin signal transduction and the appearance of ARP1 may be a step in a molecular pathway leading to the development of insulin resistance. ARP1 might therefore be a useful molecular marker for amylin action, insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

  3. Heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of extensor digitorum longus in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, K; Une, S; Akiyama, J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 12-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6 per group): control (Con), heat stress (HS), diabetes mellitus (DM), and diabetes mellitus/heat stress (DM + HS). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Heat stress was induced in the HS and DM + HS groups by immersion of the lower half of the body in hot water at 42 °C for 30 min; it was initiated 7 days after injection of streptozotocin, and was performed once a day, five times a week for 3 weeks. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area of EDL muscles from diabetic and non-diabetic rats was determined; heat stress protein (HSP) 72 and HSP25 expression levels were also analyzed by western blotting. Diabetes-induced muscle fiber atrophy was attenuated upon heat stress treatment in diabetic rats. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was upregulated in the DM + HS group compared with the DM group. Our findings suggest that heat stress attenuates atrophy of the EDL muscle by upregulating HSP72 and HSP25 expression.

  4. Origin attachments of the caudofemoralis longus muscle in the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cau

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The caudofemoralis longus muscle (CFL is the primary limb retractor among non-avian sauropsids, and underwent a dramatic reduction along the dinosaur lineage leading to birds. The osteological correlates of the CFL among fossil reptiles have been controversial, because, contrary to traditional interpretations, the extent of the muscle is not necessarily related to the distribution of the caudal ribs. In some Cretaceous dinosaurs, the extent of the CFL has been inferred based on the preserved bony septa between the CFL and other tail muscles. Here, we describe a series of tail vertebrae of the Jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus, each showing a previously-unreported feature: a sulcus, formed by a regular pattern of tightly packed horizontal slits, that runs vertically along the lateral surfaces of the centra and neural arches. These sulci are interpreted as the origin attachment sites of the CFL, allowing for direct determination of the muscle extent along the tail of this dinosaur. Anteriorly to the 18th caudal vertebra, the sulcus runs along most of the centrum and neural arch, then it progressively reduces its vertical extent, and disappears between caudals 24 and 32, a pattern consistent with previous CFL reconstructions in other theropods.

  5. Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibis, A H; Giannis, D; Malizos, K N; Kitsioulis, P; Arvanitis, D L

    2013-05-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle (or retropharyngeal tendinitis) is an aseptic inflammatory process characterized by acute posterior neck pain, neck stiffness and dysphagia or odynophagia. Awareness of its existence is crucial in the differential diagnosis, because many other conditions, such as retropharyngeal abscess, meningitis or disc herniation, show similar clinical features. We present a case exhibiting an uncommon symptom (torticollis) and a brief literature review to emphasize the risk of misdiagnosis. A 36-year-old woman presented with neck stiffness and torticollis accompanied by dysphagia and prevertebral space sensitivity on the second day. The diagnosis was established by computed tomography (CT), the gold standard for identifying the presence of prevertebral oedema and calcific deposition associated with retropharyngeal tendinitis. Treatment with NSAIDs and low doses of corticosteroids relieved the symptoms within 48 h. Retropharyngeal tendinitis is an underreported entity in the literature and orthopaedists should become aware of its existence. Misdiagnosis of this important mimicker may lead to unnecessary antibiotics administration and interventions in the retropharyngeal space.

  6. Incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis (longus colli tendinitis) in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gilad; Ben-Ari, Oded; Brenner, Adi; Fliss, Dan M; Wasserzug, Oshri

    2013-06-01

    To determine the incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis (longus colli tendinitis) in a general urban adult population. Observational study in a municipal medical center. Single tertiary referral center. All symptomatic patients with a differential diagnosis of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis underwent fiber-optic assessment, laboratory studies, and imaging studies. The main outcome measure was the incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. Thirteen patients with symptoms suggestive of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis were evaluated in our institution between January 2008 and December 2011. Final diagnosis was made by means of a computed tomographic scan: 8 patients had retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, 1 had retropharyngeal abscess, and the remaining 4 had other deep neck infections. The mean annual crude retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis incidence was 0.50 cases per 100,000 person-years, and the standardized incidence was 1.31 for the age-matched population. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is not a rare disease and is probably underdiagnosed because symptoms are nonspecific, treating physicians are often unfamiliar with this entity, and it is a self-limiting pathology.

  7. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  8. Different pattern of aquaporin-4 expression in extensor digitorum longus and soleus during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicchia, Grazia P; Mola, Maria G; Pisoni, Michela; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2007-05-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the neuromuscular water channel expressed at the sarcolemma of mammalian fast-twitch fibers that mediates a high water transport rate, which is important during muscle activity. Clinical interest in the neuromuscular expression of AQP4 has increased as it is associated with the protein complex formed by dystrophin, the product of the gene affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The expression of AQP4 during development has not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of AQP4 in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus, a fast- and slow-twitch muscle, respectively, during the first weeks after birth. The results show that AQP4 expression in both types of skeletal muscle occurs postnatally. The time course of expression of AQP4 in the two types of muscles was also different. Whereas the expression of AQP4 protein levels in the EDL showed a progressive increase during the first month after birth, reaching levels found in adults by day 24, the levels of the protein in the soleus showed a transient peak between day 12 and day 24 and declined thereafter, an effect that may be related to the transient high number of fast motor units innervating the soleus muscle during this time. The results suggest that AQP4 expression in skeletal muscle is under neuronal influence and contribute to the understanding of the molecular events of fiber differentiation during development.

  9. Passive mechanical properties of maturing extensor digitorum longus are not affected by lack of dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Andrew V; Niday, Ashley K; Voelker, Kevin A; Call, Jarrod A; Evans, Nicholas P; Granata, Kevin P; Grange, Robert W

    2006-09-01

    Mechanical weakness of skeletal muscle is thought to contribute to onset and early progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but this has not been systematically assessed. The purpose of this study was to determine in mice: (1) whether the passive mechanical properties of maturing dystrophic (mdx) muscles were different from control; and (2) if different, the time during maturation when these properties change. Prior to and following the overt onset of the dystrophic process (14-35 days), control and dystrophic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were subjected to two passive stretch protocols in vitro (5% strain at instantaneous and 1.5 L(0)/s strain rates). Force profiles were fit to a viscoelastic muscle model to determine stiffness and damping. The mdx and control EDL muscles exhibited similar passive mechanical properties at each age, suggesting a functional threshold for dystrophic muscle below which damage may be minimized. Determining this threshold may have important clinical implications for treatments of muscular dystrophy involving physical activity.

  10. Total lower lip reconstruction with a composite radial forearm-palmaris longus tendon flap: a clinical series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Seng-Feng; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Wei, Fu-Chan; Su, Chih-Ying; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2004-01-01

    Large, full-thickness lip defects after head and neck surgery continue to be a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. The reconstructive aims are to restore the oral lining, the external cheek, oral competence, and function (i.e., articulation, speech, and mastication). The authors' refinement of the composite radial forearm-palmaris longus free flap technique meets these criteria and allows a functional reconstruction of extensive lip and cheek defects in one stage. A composite radial forearm flap including the palmaris longus tendon was designed. The skin flap for the reconstruction of the intraoral lining and the skin defect was folded over the palmaris longus tendon. Both ends of the vascularized tendon were laid through the bilateral modiolus and anchored with adequate tension to the intact orbicularis muscle of the upper lip. This procedure was used in 12 patients. Six patients had cancer of the lower lip, five patients had a buccal cancer involving the lip, and one patient had a primary gum cancer that extended to the lower lip. Total to near-total resection (more than 80 percent) of the lower lip was indicated in six patients. In two other patients, the cancer ablation included more than 80 percent of the lower lip and up to 40 percent of the upper lip. A radial forearm palmaris longus free flap was used in all cases for reconstruction of the defect. Free flap survival was 100 percent. At the time of final evaluation, which was 1 year after the operation, all patients had good oral continence at rest (static suspension) and had achieved sufficient oral competence when eating. Ten patients were able to resume a regular diet, and two patients could eat a soft diet. All patients regained normal or near-normal speech and had an acceptable appearance. The described refinement of the composite radial palmaris longus free flap technique allows the reconstruction of the lower lip with a functioning oral sphincter; the technique can be recommended for patients who

  11. Sustantial Observation on Foot Taeyang Meridian Muscle in Human Lower Limb from a Anatomical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Sik Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was carried to identify the anatomical component of FTMM(Foot Taeyang Meridian Muscle in human lower limb, and further to help the accurate application to real acupuncture. Methods : FTM at the surface of the lower limb was labelled with latex. And cadaver was stripped off to demonstrate muscles, nerves and the others and to display the internal structures of FTMM, being divided into outer, middle, and inner layer. Results : FTMM in human lower limb is composed of muscles, nerves, ligaments etc. The internal composition of the FTMM in human lower limb are as follows : 1 Muscle : Gluteus maximus. biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gastrocnemius, triceps calf, fibularis brevis tendon, superior peroneal retinacula, calcaneofibular ligament, inferior extensor retinaculum, abductor digiti minimi, sheath of flexor tendon at outer layer, biceps femoris, semimembranosus, plantaris, soleus, posterior tibialis, fibularis brevis, extensor digitorum brevis, flexor digiti minimi at middle layer, and for the last time semimembranosus, adductor magnus, plantaris, popliteus, posterior tibialis, flexor hallucis longus, dorsal calcaneocuboidal ligament at inner layer. 2 Nerve : Inferior cluneal nerve, posterior femoral cutaneous n., sural cutaneous n., proper plantar branch of lateral plantar n. at outer layer, sciatic nerve, common peroneal n., medial sural cutaneous n., tibial n. at middle layer, and for the last time tibial nerve, flexor hallucis longus branch of tibial n. at inner layer. Conclusions : This study proves comparative differences from already established studies from the viewpoint of constituent elements of FTMM in the lower limb, and also in the aspect of substantial assay method. We can guess that there are conceptional differences between terms (that is, nerves which control muscles of FTMM and those which pass near by FTMM in human anatomy.

  12. Separate Belly and Tendon of Flexor Digitorum Superficialis to the Fifth Digit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mohandas; Somayaji, S Nagabhushana; Mishra, Snigdha; Guru, Anitha; Rao, Ashutosh

    2011-11-01

    Variation in the origin of long flexor tendons in the anterior compartment of forearm is common. During routine cadaveric dissection at Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Campus), we observed a separate muscle belly and tendon of flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) to the fifth digit in the right upper limb of a 60 year-old male cadaver. The anomalous muscle belly originated from the common flexor tendon from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and continued as a thin tendon at the middle of the forearm to get inserted into the middle phalanx of the fifth digit. This can be considered as a case of split flexor digitorum superficialis. Such muscle variations and knowledge of their frequency, appearance, and location can be helpful for surgeons.

  13. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  14. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  15. A review of current concepts in flexor tendon repair: physiology, biomechanics, surgical technique and rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the surgical treatment of flexor tendon injuries has always been associated with controversy. It was not until 1967, when the paper entitled Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man’s land was presented at the American Society of Hand Surgery, which reported excellent results and catalyzed the implementation of this technique into world-wide practice. We present an up to date literature review using PubMed and Google Scholar where the terms flexor tendon, repair and rehabilitation were used. Topics covered included functional anatomy, nutrition, biomechanics, suture repair, repair site gapping, and rehabilitation. This article aims to provide a comprehensive and complete overview of flexor tendon repairs.

  16. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  17. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Complications of common hand and wrist surgery procedures: flexor and extensor tendon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lauren H; Abzug, Joshua M; Osterman, A Lee; Stern, Peter J; Chang, James

    2014-01-01

    Orthopaedic and hand surgeons frequently treat disorders of the flexor and extensor tendon systems. Common conditions, such as trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor tendon injury, and zone II flexor tendon injury, can be challenging to treat. Complications that limit normal hand function still occur despite advances in surgical techniques and therapy protocols. It is helpful to be aware of the complications related to the treatment of these hand disorders and understand surgical techniques to minimize their frequency.

  20. Percutaneous flexor tenotomy for preventing and treating toe ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Almdal, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of flexor tenotomy in a modified technique to prevent and heal neuropathic and neuroischaemic pressure ulcers on the tip of the toe in claw- or hammer-toe deformities in people with diabetes.......The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of flexor tenotomy in a modified technique to prevent and heal neuropathic and neuroischaemic pressure ulcers on the tip of the toe in claw- or hammer-toe deformities in people with diabetes....

  1. DYNAMIC SONOGRAPHY OF THE EQUINE METACARPO(TARSO)PHALANGEAL DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON SHEATH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Daria L; Rademacher, Nathalie; Riggs, Laura M; Baumruck, Rebecca A; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-11-01

    Palmar/plantar annular desmitis is a common disease that may be associated with adhesions and structures affecting the flexor tendons, which requires tenoscopy to diagnose. The purpose of this descriptive study was to develop a dynamic sonographic technique for evaluating the motion of normal equine flexor tendons in relation to the palmar/plantar annular ligament and to compare findings with horses previously diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis. Ten healthy adult horses were examined prospectively and the images of four horses diagnosed with palmar/plantar annular desmitis were retrospectively evaluated. Dynamic sonography was performed at the level of the metacarpo/metatarsophalangeal joint by maximally extending and flexing the interphalangeal joints. Palmar/plantar annular ligament thickness (mm), size of any gap between the flexor tendons, and subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the superficial digital flexor tendon were measured. The presence of gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and superficial digital flexor tendon was determined by consensus. Twenty-eight healthy control limbs (16 hind/12 fore) and four with palmar/plantar annular desmitis (3 hind/1 fore) were evaluated. Controls had unrestricted gliding motion between the palmar/plantar annular ligament and flexor tendons and zero to 13° of angulation of the long linear echoes. The four affected horses had restricted gliding motion and between 20-35° angulation of the long linear echoes. Dynamic ultrasound is a feasible technique for detecting restricted flexor tendon and palmar/plantar annular ligament gliding motion, as well as subjectively increased angulation of the long linear echoes of the flexor tendon in affected horses compared with controls and warrants further investigation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. The use of Teno Fix tendon repair device in a patient with multiple flexor tendon ruptures

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Flexor tendon laceration repairs remain challenging despite numerous advances in hand surgery. Although progress on this vital subject matter has been achieved, there continues to be discussion over which surgical technique produces the optimal result. Currently there are several recommended surgical repair options for the lacerated flexor tendon. However, these repairs continue to have possible significant complications including adhesions, decreased range of motion, gapping, and post operat...

  3. Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Kishida, Aiko; Taniguchi, Daigo; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has not previously been reported. While tendon ruptures in association with SLE have been focused on the previous studies, upper extremity tendon ruptures are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we present an uncommon case of spontaneous flexor tendon rupture of the ring and little fingers in a patient with SLE and discuss the mechanism of injury and its surgical treatment.

  4. Metabolic demand and muscle damage induced by eccentric cycling of knee extensor and flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Guzmán, Nicolás; Cangas, José; Reyes, Alvaro; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic demand and extent of muscle damage of eccentric cycling targeting knee flexor (FLEX) and knee extensor (EXT) muscles. Eight sedentary men (23.3 ± 0.7 y) underwent two eccentric cycling sessions (EXT and FLEX) of 30 min each, at 60% of the maximum power output. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) and rated perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during cycling. Countermovement and squat jumps (CMJ and SJ), muscle flexibility, muscle soreness and pain pressure threshold (PPT) of knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured before, immediately after and 1-4 days after cycling. FLEX showed greater VO2 (+23%), HR (+14%) and RPE (+18%) than EXT. CMJ and SJ performance decreased similarly after cycling. Muscle soreness increased more after EXT than FLEX and PPT decreased in knee extensor muscles after EXT and decreased in knee flexor muscles after FLEX. Greater loss of muscle flexibility in knee flexor muscles after FLEX was observed. Eccentric cycling of knee flexor muscles is metabolically more demanding than that of knee extensors, however muscle damage induced is similar. Knee flexors experienced greater loss of muscle flexibility possibly due to increased muscle stiffness following eccentric contractions.

  5. Assessment of the presence/absence of the palmaris longus muscle in different sports, and elite and non-elite sport populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlie, Craig; Fuller, Colin; Pratten, Margaret K

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether higher presence of the palmaris longus muscle is associated with sports that require hand grip. Cross-sectional study. Six hundred and forty-two medical students, members of sports clubs and national athletes. Participants were invited to complete a questionnaire that assessed their main sport, elite or non-elite level of participation, and level of activity. The presence of the palmaris longus was assessed visually using a standardised test. Presence of the palmaris longus, type of hand grip required for the sport and the level of participation. The presence of the palmaris longus was higher in elite athletes (21/22, 96%) than non-elite athletes (66/84, 79%; P=0.066) for sports that require a dominant-handed or two-handed cylindrical grip (18/22, 82% and 19/35, 54%, respectively; P=0.034). For both elite and non-elite athletes, the presence of the palmaris longus was higher in those participating in sustained grip sports (325/387, 84%) compared with sports that do not require a sustained grip (150/197, 76%; P=0.012). The palmaris longus may provide an advantage in certain types of sport that require hand grip, and for elite athletes participating in sports that require a dominant-handed or two-handed cylindrical hand grip. Orthopaedic specialists considering the use of the palmaris longus for a grafting procedure on an athlete should consider the level of participation and the type of hand grip required in the athlete's sport. Copyright © 2011 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A new barbed device for repair of flexor tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, K M

    2012-02-01

    We split 100 porcine flexor tendons into five groups of 20 tendons for repair. Three groups were repaired using the Pennington modified Kessler technique, the cruciate or the Savage technique, one using one new device per tendon and the other with two new devices per tendon. Half of the tendons received supplemental circumferential Silfverskiold type B cross-stitch. The repairs were loaded to failure and a record made of their bulk, the force required to produce a 3 mm gap, the maximum force applied before failure and the stiffness. When only one device was used repairs were equivalent to the Pennington modified Kessler for all parameters except the force to produce a 3 mm gap when supplemented with a circumferential repair, which was equivalent to the cruciate. When two devices were used the repair strength was equivalent to the cruciate repair, and when the two-device repair was supplemented with a circumferential suture the force to produce a 3 mm gap was equivalent to that of the Savage six-strand technique.

  7. Intramuscular EMG from the hip flexor muscles during human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E A; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1997-11-01

    The purpose was to investigate the activation pattern of five major hip flexor muscles and its adaptation to changing speed and mode of progression. A total of 11 healthy subjects performed walking and running on a motor-driven treadmill at speeds ranging from 1.0 to 6.0 m s-1. Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes were used to record myoelectric signals from the iliacus, psoas, sartorius, rectus femoris and tensor fascia latae muscles. The basic pattern, with respect to number of activation periods, remained the same irrespective of speed and mode of progression. However, differences in the relative duration and timing of onset of activation occurred between individual muscles. Over the speed range in walking, a progressively earlier onset was generally seen for the activation period related to hip flexion. Changes in EMG amplitude were measured in the iliacus and psoas muscles and showed a marked increase and difference between walking and running at speeds above 2.0 m s-1. Thus, the alternating flexion-extension movements at the hip during locomotion appear to be governed by a rather fixed 'neural program' which normally only needs minor modulations to accomplish the adjustments accompanying an increase in speed of progression as well as a change from walking to running.

  8. Incidence of agenesis of palmaris longus in the Andhra population of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Devi Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The knowledge of Palmaris longus (PL is a growing interest for its wide role in reconstructive plastic surgeries as a donor tendon for transfer or transplant. The prevalence of the PL agenesis has been well-documented by many authors in different ethnic groups or populations. Many conventional tests for determining the presence of the PL has been described, but lamentably there are many discrepancies in confirming its presence or absence. Slight modifications of the prevailing methods can still give authenticate results. Aim : This prospective study was conducted to determine the incidence of unilateral and bilateral agenesis of PL and its association with sex and side of the limb in the Andhra population of India. Materials and Methods : A total of 942 subjects of both sexes belonging to 18-23 years were used to access the PL using various tendon examination techniques including our modified Schaeffer′s test. The data collected were analyzed by Pearsons χ2 test using SPSS software. Results : Overall agenesis of muscle in both sexes was 264 (28.0%, out of which 40.2% was seen in females and 14.7% in males with the ratio of 3:1. The unilateral agenesis was seen in 70.5% and bilateral agenesis in 29.5% subjects. The left side agenesis was seen in 51.6% and right side in 48.4% subjects. Conclusions : The prevalence of bilateral and unilateral agenesis was more common on left side with a greater likelihood in the female subjects. The proposed technique could bring better results in all subjects and can be implemented in manual examination of PL.

  9. Pseudotear of the peroneus longus tendon on MRI, secondary to a fibrocartilaginous node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didolkar, Manjiri M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Malone, Alfred L. [Radiology of Huntsville, PC, Huntsville, AL (United States); Nunley, James A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Durham, NC (United States); Dodd, Leslie G. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Durham, NC (United States); Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node within the distal peroneus longus tendon (PLT) just proximal to the cubital tunnel and correlate this with MRI signal characteristics of the distal PLT, which could result in a pseudotear appearance on MRI. We correlated imaging characteristics with pathologic specimens. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Retrospectively, 91 ankle MRIs utilizing a standard ankle protocol were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Four cadaver ankles were imaged using a standard ankle MRI protocol and reviewed by the same radiologists. All the MRIs were examined for signal changes in the PLT. The cadaver ankles then underwent PLT dissection by an orthopaedic surgeon, and a pathologic review was undertaken by a pathologist with orthopaedic specialization, who looked for an os peroneum or proposed fibrocartilaginous node relating to the signal change found on the MRIs. In the 91 ankle MRI studies, the PLT demonstrated normal low and increased signals. On the fat-saturated T2-weighted sequence, 76 (83.5%) ankles demonstrated low signal and 15 (16.5%) demonstrated increased signal. Of the cadaver ankle MRIs, all four demonstrated increased signal within the PLT; three contained a fibrocartilaginous node and one contained an os peroneum in that same region. The MRI signal of the PLT can change with the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node, which may be due to the molecular and chemical content of the fibrocartilage. This node increases the MRI signal in the distal PLT and gives the appearance of a pseudotear. (orig.)

  10. The palmaris longus muscle and its relations with the antebrachial fascia and the palmar aponeurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Lancerotto, Luca; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Sanudo, Jose Ramon; De Caro, Raffaele

    2009-03-01

    The palmaris longus (PL) is a muscle of the forearm with a long distal tendon that is continuous with the palmar aponeurosis (PA). It is generally assumed that the muscle lies deep to the antebrachial fascia from origin to termination, but a detailed description is lacking. The relationship of the PL tendon with the antebrachial fascia was studied in 30 dissections. The PL was completely absent in six specimens (20%), whereas the PA was identified in all. Average length of the forearm was 25.5 cm (SD: 2.1 cm, range 22-29 cm), overall length of the PL muscle 26.9 cm (SD: 2.6 cm, range 22.5-31.5 cm), muscular belly 13.8 cm (SD: 3.4 cm, range 9.5-23 cm), tendon 13.1 cm (SD: 3.3 cm, range 8-15.5 cm). Proximally, the PL was situated deep to the antebrachial fascia, then in the lower third of the forearm its tendon perforated the antebrachial fascia (at 4.7 +/- 1.7 cm from the bistyloid line) moving to a suprafascial plane, inserting in the PA. The PA could be divided into two layers: the superficial one formed by longitudinal fibers and adherent to the skin, the deep one formed by transverse fibers continuous laterally with the deep fascia of the hand. The PL tendon was found to be in continuity only with the longitudinal fibers of the PA. Based on the anatomical findings, it may be suggested that the superficial part of the PA is situated in the subcutaneous planes of the palm, and that the muscle should be considered as a tensor of the superficial fascial system of the subcutaneous tissue.

  11. Incidence of agenesis of palmaris longus in the Andhra population of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, K. Devi; Bhanu, P. Sharmila; John, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The knowledge of Palmaris longus (PL) is a growing interest for its wide role in reconstructive plastic surgeries as a donor tendon for transfer or transplant. The prevalence of the PL agenesis has been well-documented by many authors in different ethnic groups or populations. Many conventional tests for determining the presence of the PL has been described, but lamentably there are many discrepancies in confirming its presence or absence. Slight modifications of the prevailing methods can still give authenticate results. Aim: This prospective study was conducted to determine the incidence of unilateral and bilateral agenesis of PL and its association with sex and side of the limb in the Andhra population of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 942 subjects of both sexes belonging to 18-23 years were used to access the PL using various tendon examination techniques including our modified Schaeffer's test. The data collected were analyzed by Pearsons χ2 test using SPSS software. Results: Overall agenesis of muscle in both sexes was 264 (28.0%), out of which 40.2% was seen in females and 14.7% in males with the ratio of 3:1. The unilateral agenesis was seen in 70.5% and bilateral agenesis in 29.5% subjects. The left side agenesis was seen in 51.6% and right side in 48.4% subjects. Conclusions: The prevalence of bilateral and unilateral agenesis was more common on left side with a greater likelihood in the female subjects. The proposed technique could bring better results in all subjects and can be implemented in manual examination of PL. PMID:21713200

  12. Results of Abductor Pollicis Longus Suspension Ligamentoplasty for Treatment of Advanced First Carpometacarpal Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Poong-Taek; Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Lee, Suk-Joong; Nam, Sang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Suspension ligamentoplasty using abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon without bone tunneling, was introduced as one of the techniques for treatment of advanced first carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiologic and clinical results of APL suspension ligamentoplasty. Methods The medical records of 19 patients who underwent APL suspension ligamentoplasty for advanced first CMC arthritis between January 2008 and May 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The study included 13 female and 6 male patients, whose mean age was 62 years (range, 43 to 82 years). For clinical evaluation, we assessed the grip and pinch power, radial and volar abduction angle, thumb adduction (modified Kapandji index), including visual analogue scale (VAS) and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores. Radiologic evaluation was performed using simple radiographs. Results The mean follow-up was 36 months (range, 19 to 73.7 months). Mean power improved from 18.3 to 27 kg for grip power, from 2.8 to 3.5 kg for tip pinch, and from 4.3 to 5.4 kg for power pinch. All patients showed decreased VAS from 7.2 to 1.7. Radial abduction improved from 71° preoperatively to 82° postoperatively. The modified Kapandji index showed improvement from 6 to 7.3, and mean DASH was improved from 41 to 17.8. The height of the space decreased from 10.8 to 7.1 mm. Only one case had a complication involving temporary sensory loss of the first dorsal web space, which resolved spontaneously. Conclusions The APL suspension ligamentoplasty for treatment of advanced first CMC arthritis yielded satisfactory functional results. PMID:26330961

  13. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shkelzen B Duci; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu; , Burim Neziri; Agon Y. Mekaj; Shpetim Lajqi; Labinot Shahini

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and b...

  14. Nonseptic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath caused by longitudinal tears in the digital flexor tendons: a retrospective study of 135 tenoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensburg, L; Wilderjans, H; Simon, O; Dewulf, J; Boussauw, B

    2011-11-01

    Longitudinal tears (LTs) of the digital flexor tendons are an important cause of chronic tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS). The origin of those marginal tears is not yet fully understood. The long-term outcome after medical and surgical treatment is guarded. To determine the prevalence of LTs of the digital flexor tendons in a large population of horses undergoing diagnostic tenoscopy of the DFTS and to assess the outcome of surgical treatment and the factors influencing the outcome. Medical records of 130 horses with chronic tenosynovitis of the DFTS that had tenoscopic surgery between 1999 and 2009 were evaluated. One hundred and thirty-five DFTSs were examined. LTs were diagnosed in 104 DFTSs in 101 horses and long-term follow-up was obtained. Seventy-eight percent of the horses with a nonseptic tenosynovitis of the DFTS had a LT. Preoperative ultrasonographic examination diagnosed tears in 76% of the cases. In showjumpers forelimbs were more frequently affected than hindlimbs (88 vs. 12%), with the right front having a higher incidence of injury than the left front (76 vs. 24%). Seventy-nine percent of the tears involved the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and 87% were located on the lateral tendon border. Thirty-seven horses (38%) returned to an equal or higher level of work. The use of a radiofrequency probe (coblation) was associated with a lower level of performance and decreased the cosmetic end result. Persistence of marked post operative distension of the DFTS carried a poor prognosis for return to previous level of work. A guarded prognosis for future soundness should be given to horses presented for treatment of LTs of the digital flexor tendons. The use of coblation wands had a negative effect on the final outcome. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome.

  16. Allograft reconstruction of peroneus longus and brevis tendons tears arising from a single muscular belly. Case report and surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Manuel J; Adams, Samuel B; Parekh, Selene G

    2015-03-01

    Anatomic variants of the peroneal tendons may cause tendon disorders. Moreover, there is a lack of evidence on how to address chronic tendon pathology when a variant of the peroneal tendons is causing the patient's symptoms. We present a patient with an uncommon peroneal muscle presentation: a single muscular belly dividing into both the peroneus longus and brevis tendons. After extensive debridement of tendinopathic tissue, primary repair or tenodesis was not possible; therefore a unique solution for this problem was performed, reconstructing both peroneal tendons using a semitendinosus allograft. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical properties of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jerrod J; Guseila, Loredana M; Saranathan, Archana; Shary, Timothy J; Lippitt, Steven B; Elias, John J

    2013-12-01

    The current study was performed to determine the strength and rigidity of the intact flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon attachment and compare the rigidity at the attachment site to the rigidity within a more proximal part of the tendon. Eight cadaveric index fingers were tested to failure of the FDP tendon. Lines were drawn on each tendon with India ink stain at the position of the attachment to bone and 5 mm and 10 mm proximally. Each test was recorded using a high resolution video camera. A minimum of six images per test were used for analysis of tissue deformation. The centroid of each line was computationally identified to characterize the deformation of the tendon between the lines. Force vs. deformation curves were generated for the 5 mm region representing the tendon attachment and the 5 mm region adjacent to the attachment. Stiffness measurements were generated for each curve, and normalized by the initial length to determine the rigidity. The failure strength ranged from 263 N to 548 N, with rigidity values ranging from 2201 N/(mm/mm) to 8714 N/(mm/mm) and from 3459 N/(mm/mm) to 6414 N/(mm/mm) for the attachment and the tendon proximal to the attachment, respectively. The rigidity did not vary significantly between the attachment and proximal tendon based on a Wilcoxon signed rank test (p = 0.2). The measured strength and rigidity establish biomechanical properties for the FDP tendon attachment to bone.

  18. 38 CFR 4.73 - Schedule of ratings-muscle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) flexor digiti minimi brevis; (9) dorsal and plantar interossei. Other important plantar structures: Plantar aponeurosis, long plantar and calcaneonavicular ligament, tendons of posterior tibial, peroneus... muscles of the foot: Plantar: (1) Flexor digitorum brevis; (2) abductor hallucis; (3) abductor...

  19. Recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K; Douroudos, Ioannis I; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Flouris, Andreas D; Fouris, Andreas D; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60 h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (Pfootball-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical conditioning level.

  20. Recovery Kinetics of Knee Flexor and Extensor Strength after a Football Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C.; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Fouris, Andreas D.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12h, 36h and 60h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12h, 36h and 60h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (Pfootball-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical conditioning level. PMID:26043222

  1. Arthroscopic release of first metatarsophalangeal arthrofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun H

    2006-08-01

    Various degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrofibrosis frequently occur in patients with bunion surgery or big toe trauma. In those patients with functional limitation who fail to respond to conservative treatment, surgery is indicated. We describe here an arthroscopic approach to first metatarsophalangeal release that is designed to improve functional results. Dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals are established at the medial and lateral sides of the extensor hallucis longus tendon. Through these 2 portals, the dorsal capsule is released and the medial and lateral joint gutters can be cleared up. The metatarsosesamoid compartment is approached through the straight medial portal and the working portal, the latter of which is located 4 cm proximal to the joint line between the abductor hallucis tendon and the medial head of the flexor hallucis brevis. Under visualization through the medial portal, adhesions around the sesamoid apparatus can be debrided with a shaver through the working portal. This completes the release of joint circumference and improves the motion range of the joint.

  2. Maximum isometric knee flexor and extensor muscle contractions: normal patterns of torque versus time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M P; Baldwin, J M; Gardner, G M; Sepic, S B; Downs, W J

    1977-06-01

    Isometric torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles were recorded for 5 seconds at three knee joint positions. The subjects included healthy men in age groups from 20 to 35 and 45 to 65 years of age. The amplitudes and duration of peak torque and the time to peak torque were measured for each contraction. Peak torque was usually maintaned less than 0.1 second and never longer than 0.9 second. At each of the three angles, the mean extensor muscle torque was higher than the mean flexor muscle torque in both age groups, and the mean torque for both muscle group was higher among the younger than among the older man. The highest average torque was recorded at the knee angle of 60 degrees for the extensor muscles and 45 degrees for the flexor muscles, but this was not always a stereotyped response either for a given individual or among individuals.

  3. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  4. Use of radial forearm free flap with palmaris longus tendon in reconstruction of total maxillectomy with sparing of orbital contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Ibrahim; Oktay, M Faruk; Kilinc, Nihal

    2003-03-01

    Nasal paragangliomas are extremely rare. The most adequate treatment is total excision. After surgical excision requiring total maxillectomy, there has been no ideal technique for reconstruction. A 47-year-old man was admitted to our clinic because of recurrent epistaxis, which lasted for 2 months. He was also suffering from nasal airway obstruction. The physical examination revealed a mass originating from the medial aspect of the middle turbinate of the right nasal cavity. It invaded the anterior maxillary wall and hard and soft palate. Endoscopic examination showed that the mass pushed the nasal septum to the left side and protruded into the nasopharynx. The mass was fleshy and had a rich capillary network. Conventional paranasal sinus radiographs were normal. Computerized tomography of the skull showed the mass protruding into the nasopharynx. A total maxillectomy was performed. Histopathological evaluation showed neoplastic tissue consisting of round, oval, or slightly elongated cells, altogether of a rather monomorphous appearance, tending to arrange themselves in clusters adjacent to or around capillary blood vessels. The blood vessels were numerous and branched. Reticulum staining showed a typical Zellballen arrangement of the neoplastic cells to provide a firmer basis for the diagnosis of paraganglioma. To reconstruct the total maxillectomy defect, a radial forearm free flap with the palmaris longus tendon was elevated to inlay the nasal cavity and the oral cavity and to suspend the ocular globe. The flap was placed into the defect, and the palmaris longus tendon was medially and laterally anchored to the periosteum of the frontal bone to suspend the ocular globe in the orbital cavity. One part of the skin island was used to close the defect of the nasal mucosal cavity, and the other part was used to repair the oral mucosal defect of the palate. Consequently, speech was considered near normal; the patient was able to eat an unrestricted diet and to retain

  5. Degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of trunk flexors and extensors among healthy women,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Neves Granito

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of aging on the degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles among women without a densitometric diagnosis of osteoporosis.METHODS: Thirty women were selected to make up three groups: young women (n = 10; 24.60 ± 2.27 years of age; adults (n = 10; 43.50 ± 2.88; and elderly women (n= 10; 62.40 ± 2.67. Bone mineral density (BMD, degree of thoracic kyphosis and peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors were evaluated. Differences between the groups were evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess correlations between the variables. The significance level was taken to be 5% (p < 0.05.RESULTS: The elderly group presented a greater degree of thoracic kyphosis (p = 0.009 and lower peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors than the young group. The adult group presented lower peak torque of the trunk than the young group. A negative correlation was observed between age and peak torque of the trunk flexors and extensors (p < 0.001, and a positive correlation between age and the degree of thoracic kyphosis (r = 0.58; p < 0.001. The elderly group presented higher values for the eccentric/concentric ratio of the peak torque for flexors (p = 0.03 and extensors (p = 0.02.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that physiological aging may be associated with a greater degree of thoracic kyphosis and lower muscle strength of the trunk flexors and extensors. Moreover, the elderly women showed a relative capacity for preservation of eccentric strength.

  6. Physio-therapeutical methods after injuries of the flexor and extensor tendons of a hand

    OpenAIRE

    MUROŇOVÁ, Markéta

    2010-01-01

    This diploma thesis entitled ``Physio-therapeutical methods after injuries of the flexor and extensor tendons of a hand{\\crqq} describes the anatomy of forearm and hand muscles, as well as fascia and tendon loops. The main objective is to summarize a basic knowledge on injuries of the hand{\\crq}s flexor and extensor tendons and physiotherapy of this problem. The work also includes the application of this knowledge into practice by elaboration of case reports of patients with injuries of the h...

  7. Flexion synergy overshadows flexor spasticity during reaching in chronic moderate to severe hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael D; Schut, Ingrid; Dewald, Julius P A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention targets arm flexor spasticity with an often-unsuccessful goal of improving function. Flexion synergy is a related motor impairment that may be inadvertently neglected. Here, flexor spasticity and flexion synergy are disentangled to determine their contributions to reaching dysfunction. Twenty-six individuals participated. A robotic device systematically modulated shoulder abduction loading during ballistic reaching. Elbow muscle electromyography data were partitioned into windows delineated by elbow joint velocity allowing for the separation of synergy- and spasticity-related activation. Reaching velocity decreased with abduction loading (pstroke recovery trials. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  9. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  10. Delayed rupture of flexor tendons in zone V complicated by neuritis 18 years following Galeazzi fracture-dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Shah, Bhavik; Sankar, Thangasamy

    2014-04-16

    We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman who presented with delayed, complete rupture of superficial (flexor digitorum superficialis) and deep flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus) of the third, fourth and fifth digits of the right hand in zone V of the flexor tendons. The patient, who was otherwise healthy, active and independent, incurred a closed fracture of her right wrist 18 years ago, which was treated conservatively. Current X-rays and operative findings confirmed a malunited Galeazzi fracture-dislocation with volar dislocation of the ulna from the distal radioulnar joint. She underwent surgical treatment to improve her hand function and agonising neuritis symptoms, as she was unable to use her middle, ring and little fingers and had developed severe neuritis of the ulnar nerve. Exploration and repair of the flexor tendons, nerve decompressions and Darrach procedure were performed. On follow-up, the patient showed improvement in hand function with the neuritis completely resolved.

  11. Long-latency reflexes of elbow and shoulder muscles suggest reciprocal excitation of flexors, reciprocal excitation of extensors, and reciprocal inhibition between flexors and extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Meriggi, Jenna; Parikh, Nidhi; Saad, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Postural corrections of the upper limb are required in tasks ranging from handling an umbrella in the changing wind to securing a wriggling baby. One complication in this process is the mechanical interaction between the different segments of the arm where torque applied at one joint induces motion at multiple joints. Previous studies have shown the long-latency reflexes of shoulder muscles (50-100 ms after a limb perturbation) account for these mechanical interactions by integrating information about motion of both the shoulder and elbow. It is less clear whether long-latency reflexes of elbow muscles exhibit a similar capability and what is the relation between the responses of shoulder and elbow muscles. The present study utilized joint-based loads tailored to the subjects' arm dynamics to induce well-controlled displacements of their shoulder and elbow. Our results demonstrate that the long-latency reflexes of shoulder and elbow muscles integrate motion from both joints: the shoulder and elbow flexors respond to extension at both joints, whereas the shoulder and elbow extensors respond to flexion at both joints. This general pattern accounts for the inherent flexion-extension coupling of the two joints arising from the arm's intersegmental dynamics and is consistent with spindle-based reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow flexors, reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow extensors, and across-joint inhibition between the flexors and extensors. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tear: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Kinugasa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Norimasa; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hamada, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Drop foot is typically caused by neurologic disease such as lumbar disc herniation, but we report two rare cases of deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tears. Both patients developed mild pain in the lower legs while playing sport, and were aware of drop foot. As compartment pressures were elevated, fasciotomy was performed immediately, and the tendon of the peroneus longus was completely detached from its proximal origin. The patients were able to return their original sports after 3 months, and clinical examination revealed no hypesthesia or muscle weakness in the deep peroneal nerve area at the time of last follow-up. The common peroneal nerve pierced the deep fascia and lay over the fibular neck, which formed the floor of a short tunnel (the so-called fibular tunnel), then passed the lateral compartment just behind the peroneus longus. The characteristic anatomical situation between the fibular tunnel and peroneus longus might have caused deep peroneal nerve palsy in these two cases after hematoma adjacent to the fibular tunnel increased lateral compartment pressure.

  13. Reconstruction of Buccal Mucosa, Upper and Lower Lip Defect Using Free Radial Forearm Flap with Palmaris Longus Tendon: A Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Khazaeni

    2011-06-01

    The radial forearm free flap with palmaris longus tendon provides a good functional lip with a reasonable aesthetics in our patient. The patient was satisfied with the result and there were no functional complaints such as drooling reported by him. We think that this flap could be a flap of choice for reconstruction of the large, full thickness lip defects.

  14. Enhanced physiological tremor deteriorates plantar flexor torque steadiness after bed rest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E.R.; Horstman, A.M.; Gerrits, K.; Massa, M.; Kleine, B.U.; Haan, A. de; Belavy, D.L.; Felsenberg, D.; Zwarts, M.J.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of resistance training to preserve submaximal plantar flexor (PF) torque steadiness following 60 days of bed rest (BR). Twenty-two healthy male subjects underwent either BR only (CTR, n=8), or BR plus resistance training (RT, n=14). The magnitude of torque fluc

  15. Entrapment of the Flexor Digitorum Profundus in the Callus after a Closed Distal Radial Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thione, Alessandro; Cavadas, Pedro C; Rubi, Carlo G

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old boy sustained a closed distal radius fracture; a closed reduction and external fixation was performed. After failed rehabilitation for digital flexion restriction, a surgical exploration was decided, revealing entrapment of flexor digitorum profundus in the bony callus; tendons were freed, obtaining a full range of motion.

  16. Flexor tendon and synovial gliding during simultaneous and single digit flexion in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; An, K.N.; Zhao, C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; Amadio, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), which lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS). How this fibrosis might affect tendon function is unknown. To better understand the

  17. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; Zhao, C.; Amadio, P.C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; An, K.N.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the

  18. Sonographic analyses of pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger with interphalangeal joint contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the sonographic appearance of the pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger in correlation with the contracture of the interphalangeal (IP) joint in the thumb or proximal IP (PIP) joint in the other digits. Sonographic measurements using axial images were performed in 177 affected digits including 17 thumbs and 34 other digits judged to have IP or PIP joint contracture and 77 contralateral control digits. The A1 pulley of the contracture group was significantly thicker than that of the non-contracture group in all digits, whereas the flexor tendon was thicker only in digits other than the thumb. In the analysis using calculated cut-off values, A1 pulley thickening in the thumb and A1 pulley and flexor tendon thickening in the other digits showed statistically significant correlations with IP or PIP joint contracture. This study sonographically confirmed previous reports showing that enlargement of the flexor tendons contribute to the pathogenesis of PIP joint contracture. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of imagery motor training on torque production of ankle plantar flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Toering, ST; Bessem, B; van der Laan, O; Diercks, RL

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in control subjects the effect of imagery training on the torque of plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Twenty-nine subjects were allocated to one of three groups that performed either imagery training, low-intensity strength training, or no training (only m

  20. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, A.M.; Zhao, C.; Amadio, P.C.; O'Byrne, M.M.; An, K.N.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the u

  1. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CEREBRAL REORGANISATION AFTER PRIMARY DIGITAL FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coert, J. H.; Stenekes, M. W.; Paans, A. M. J.; Nicolai, J. -P. A.; De Jong, B. M.

    After flexor tendon injury, most attention is given to the quality of the tendon repair and postoperative early passive dynamic mobilisation. Schemes for active mobilisation have been developed to prevent tendon adhesions and joint stiffness. This paper describes five patients to demonstrate the

  2. Growth factor and protease expression during different phases of healing after rabbit deep flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, M E; Hart, D A; Reno, C; Wiig, M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to contribute to the mapping of molecular events during flexor tendon healing, in particular the growth factors insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-13) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, and the protease cathepsin K. In a rabbit model of flexor tendon injury, the mRNA expression for the growth factors, MMPs and TIMPs were measured in tendon and tendon sheath tissue at several time points (3, 6, 21, and 42 days) representing different phases of the healing process. We found that MMP-13 remained increased during the study period, whereas MMP-3 returned to normal levels within the first week after injury. TIMP-3 was down-regulated in the tendon sheaths. Cathepsin K was up-regulated in tendons and sheaths after injury. NGF was present in both tendons and sheaths, but unaltered. IGF-1 exhibited a late increase in the tendons, while VEGF was down-regulated at the later time points. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of NGF in flexor tendons. MMP-13 expression appears to play a more protracted role in flexor tendon healing than MMP-3. The relatively low levels of endogenous IGF-1 and VEGF mRNA following injury support their potential beneficial role as exogenous modulators to optimize tendon healing and strength without increasing adhesion formation.

  3. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Ettema, A.M.; Berglund, L.J.; An, K.N.; Amadio, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding r

  4. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Explanations pertaining to the Hip Joint Flexor Moment During the Stance Phase of Human Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild;

    2012-01-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different...

  6. Flexor carpi ulnaris tenotomy alone does not eliminate its contribution to wrist torque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Bruin; M.J.C. Smeulders; M. Kreulen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle tenotomy and transfer to the extensor side of the wrist are common procedures used to improve wrist position and dexterity in patients with cerebral palsy. Our aim was to determine whether this muscle still influences wrist torque even after tenotomy of its di

  7. Eccentric Knee Flexor Strength and Risk of Hamstring Injuries in Rugby Union: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) represent the most common cause of lost playing time in rugby union. Eccentric knee flexor weakness and between-limb imbalance in eccentric knee flexor strength are associated with a heightened risk of HSIs in other sports; however, these variables have not been explored in rugby union. To determine if lower levels of eccentric knee flexor strength or greater between-limb imbalance in this parameter during the Nordic hamstring exercise are risk factors for HSIs in rugby union. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. This prospective study was conducted over the 2014 Super Rugby and Queensland Rugby Union seasons. In total, 178 rugby union players (mean age, 22.6 ± 3.8 years; mean height, 185.0 ± 6.8 cm; mean weight, 96.5 ± 13.1 kg) had their eccentric knee flexor strength assessed using a custom-made device during the preseason. Reports of previous hamstring, quadriceps, groin, calf, and anterior cruciate ligament injuries were also obtained. The main outcome measure was the prospective occurrence of HSIs. Twenty players suffered at least 1 HSI during the study period. Players with a history of HSIs had a 4.1-fold (95% CI, 1.9-8.9; P = .001) greater risk of subsequent HSIs than players without such a history. Between-limb imbalance in eccentric knee flexor strength of ≥15% and ≥20% increased the risk of HSIs by 2.4-fold (95% CI, 1.1-5.5; P = .033) and 3.4-fold (95% CI, 1.5-7.6; P = .003), respectively. Lower eccentric knee flexor strength and other prior injuries were not associated with an increased risk of future HSIs. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that the risk of reinjuries was augmented in players with strength imbalances. Previous HSIs and between-limb imbalance in eccentric knee flexor strength were associated with an increased risk of future HSIs in rugby union. These results support the rationale for reducing imbalance, particularly in players who have suffered a prior HSI, to mitigate the risk of future

  8. Recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Draganidis

    Full Text Available We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF and extensor (KE strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match. Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12 h, 36 h and 60 h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon and conventional (KFcon/KEcon ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60 h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (P<0.05 at 12 h (both limbs and 36 h (dominant limb only, b eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors declined (P<0.05 in both limbs for 36 h at 60°/s and for 60 h at 180°/s with eccentric peak torque of knee flexors demonstrating a greater (P<0.05 reduction than concentric peak torque, c strength deterioration was greater (P<0.05 at 180°/s and in dominant limb, d the functional ratio was more sensitive to match-induced fatigue demonstrating a more prolonged decline. Discriminant and regression analysis revealed that strength deterioration and recovery may be related to the amount of eccentric actions performed during the match and athletes' football-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players

  9. Forearm Flexor Muscles in Children with Cerebral Palsy Are Weak, Thin and Stiff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pontén

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP often develop reduced passive range of motion with age. The determining factor underlying this process is believed to be progressive development of contracture in skeletal muscle that likely changes the biomechanics of the joints. Consequently, to identify the underlying mechanisms, we modeled the mechanical characteristics of the forearm flexors acting across the wrist joint. We investigated skeletal muscle strength (Grippit® and passive stiffness and viscosity of the forearm flexors in 15 typically developing (TD children (10 boys/5 girls, mean age 12 years, range 8–18 yrs and nine children with CP Nine children (6 boys/3 girls, mean age 11 ± 3 years (yrs, range 7–15 yrs using the NeuroFlexor® apparatus. The muscle stiffness we estimate and report is the instantaneous mechanical response of the tissue that is independent of reflex activity. Furthermore, we assessed cross-sectional area of the flexor carpi radialis (FCR muscle using ultrasound. Age and body weight did not differ significantly between the two groups. Children with CP had a significantly weaker (−65%, p < 0.01 grip and had smaller cross-sectional area (−43%, p < 0.01 of the FCR muscle. Passive stiffness of the forearm muscles in children with CP was increased 2-fold (p < 0.05 whereas viscosity did not differ significantly between CP and TD children. FCR cross-sectional area correlated to age (R2 = 0.58, p < 0.01, body weight (R2 = 0.92, p < 0.0001 and grip strength (R2 = 0.82, p < 0.0001 in TD children but only to grip strength (R2 = 0.60, p < 0.05 in children with CP. We conclude that children with CP have weaker, thinner, and stiffer forearm flexors as compared to typically developing children.

  10. Effects of Age on Strength and Morphology of Toe Flexor Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Karen J; Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Nester, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Descriptive, cross-sectional. Background Age-related muscle atrophy is common in lower-limb muscles. We therefore speculated that foot muscles may also diminish with age. However, there is a paucity of literature characterizing foot muscle strength and morphology, and any relationship between these 2, in older people. Objective To compare the strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of older adults relative to their younger counterparts. Methods Seventeen young adults with a normal foot type were matched by sex and body mass index to 17 older adults with a normal foot type, from an available sample of 41 younger (18 to 50 years of age) and 44 older (60 or more years of age) adults. Among the matched groups (n = 34), muscle thickness and cross-sectional area for 5 intrinsic and 2 extrinsic toe flexor muscles were obtained using ultrasound. Toe strength was assessed using a pressure platform. Differences in toe flexor strength and muscle size between the young and older matched groups were determined using analysis of covariance (controlling for height). Correlations between strength and size of the toe flexor muscles of the pooled group (n = 34) were also calculated. Results Toe strength and the thickness and cross-sectional area of most foot muscles were significantly reduced in the older adults (Pstrength values were strongly correlated with the size of the intrinsic toe flexor muscles. Conclusion The smaller foot muscles appear to be affected by sarcopenia in older adults. This could contribute to reduced toe flexion force production and may affect the ability of older people to walk safely. Interventions aimed at reversing foot muscle atrophy in older people require further investigation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1065-1070. Epub 29 Oct 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6597.

  11. Effects of the optimal flexor/extensor ratio on G-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Sub; Choi, Jean; Kim, Jung Woon; Jeon, Sang Yun; Kang, Sunghwun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the flexor/extensor ratio of the knee joints and compare it with the results of Korean Air Force students in G-tolerance test. [Subjects and Methods] The body composition of Korea Air Force students (n=77) was measured by an impedance method. A muscular function test was performed using a Humac Norm (USA) at angular speeds of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and an isokinetic muscular function test was also conducted. [Results] In the failed C and passing groups, muscle mass and fat percentages were significantly higher than those of students in the failed A group. The BMI of the failed C and passing groups were significantly higher than that of the failed A group. The group that passed had a significantly higher value of left knee 60°/sec flexion peak torque than the failed B group. Moreover, the total work of left knee extension of the failed C group and the passing group was significantly higher than that of the failed A group. The C group and the passing group had significantly higher values of the trunk 60°/sec flexor/extensor ratio than the failed A group, and the total work flexor/extensor ratio of the passing group was significantly higher than that of the failed A group. [Conclusions] Based on these results, balance the right and left knee flexor/extensor ratio, and a high flexor/extensor ratio of the trunk are required to endure a high G-tolerance test (+6G/30 sec). Moreover, an improvement in the maximum muscular strength is necessary to endure a situation of rapidly increasing acceleration in the early stage.

  12. Turkey model for flexor tendon research: in vitro comparison of human, canine, turkey, and chicken tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Assaf; Thoreson, Andrew R; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are one of the most common hand injuries and remain clinically challenging for functional restoration. Canine and chicken have been the most commonly used animal models for flexor tendon-related research but possess several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential turkey model for flexor tendon research. The third digit from human cadaveric hands, canine forepaws, turkey foot, and chicken foot were used for this study. Six digits in each of four species were studied in detail, comparing anatomy of the flexor apparatus, joint range of motioņ tendon excursion, tendon cross-sectional area, work of flexion, gliding resistance at the level of the A2 pulley, modulus of elasticity, suture retention strength, and histology across species. Anatomically, the third digit in the four species displayed structural similarities; however, the tendon cross-sectional area of the turkey and human were similar and larger than canine and chicken. Furthermore, the turkey digit resembles the human's finger with the lack of webbing between digits, similar vascularization, tendon excursion, work of flexion, gliding resistance, mechanical properties, and suture holding strength. More importantly, human and turkey tendons were most similar in histological appearance. Turkey flexor tendons have many properties that are comparable to human flexor tendons which would provide a clinically relevant, economical, nonhuman companion large animal model for flexor tendon research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceus infiltration of wrist flexor tendon: first manifestation of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, P; Caba, M; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Morales, M

    2011-11-09

    The authors report an unusual case of flexor tenosynovitis, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and triggering at the carpal tunnel as the first manifestation of gout. A 69-year-old man presented with digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand and was treated surgically. A flexor tenosynovectomy and a median nerve neurolysis were performed through an extended carpal tunnel approach. The sublimis and the profundus tendons were involved. Partial ruptures and multiple whitish lesions suggestive of tophacceous infiltration of the flexor tendons were seen. Macroscopically, the removed synovial tissue was involved by multiple whitish nodules that were milimetric in size and was suggestive of monosodium urate crystals deposits. By light microscopy examination, numerous nonnecrotizing granulomas of different sizes were observed that were compounded by large aggregations of acellular nonpolarized material, surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes, mononuclear cells, and foreign body multinucleated giant cells. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with resolution of the median nerve symptoms and a near-to-full range of motion of the affected digits.To the authors' knowledge, this patient is the first case report with flexor tendons tophacceous infiltration as the first clinical sign of gout. Gouty flexor tenosynovitis can occur in the absence of a long history of gout. A high index of suspicion is paramount to the initiation of proper management. Operative treatment of gouty flexor tenosynovitis is mandatory to debulk tophaceous deposits, improve tendon gliding, and decompress nerves. Routine uric acid determination could be helpful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with flexor tenosynovitis.

  14. Estudio de la vascularización arterial del músculo flexor digitorum superficialis Anatomical study of the arterial vascularization of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Comellas Melero

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de nuestro estudio es describir la distribución de la vascularización del músculo flexor digitorum superficialis para optimizar sus indicaciones en Cirugía Reconstructiva de miembro superior. Disecamos 15 antebrazos fijados según el método Thiel y coloreados mediante la inyección de látex en los vasos femorales. Centramos nuestro estudio en la disección del músculo flexor digitorum superficialis, seleccionando únicamente los pedículos vasculares que superan los 2 mm, valorando los resultados en función de sus relaciones anatómicas y de su longitud. El número total hallado de arterias nutrientes del vientre muscular fue de 219, localizándose en mayor porcentaje en el tercio medio del antebrazo. De los resultados obtenidos de nuestro estudio podemos deducir que las arterias cubital y cubital recurrente aportan la vascularización dominante. Medialmente, el músculo recibe ramas de la arteria cubital y cubital recurrente, en la parte profunda del vientre muscular. Lateral y proximalmente, recibe ramas de la arteria mediana, mientras que lateral y distalmente recibe ramas de la arteria radial, que penetran en la superficie del músculo.We present an anatomical study that describes the distribution of the muscular perforators of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. In this study we dissected 15 forearms fixed according to Thiel method and coloured latex injection in the femoral vessels.The study was centered on the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle. Only muscular perforator arteries with diameters over 2mm were selected. The vascular origin and length were also studied. In all cases, measurements were taken from the bicondyle line. The total number of arteries obtained from the muscle belly was 219, with the greatest percentage located in the half of the forearm. The principal vascular origin of the perforator arteries was the cubital artery. From the results obtained in our work, we can deduce that the ulnar and

  15. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: effect of different protocols on tendon excursion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, Jan-Wiebe H; Soeters, Johannes N M; Schreuders, Ton A R; Amadio, Peter C; Hovius, Steven E R; Stam, Henk J; Selles, Ruud W

    2012-03-07

    Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of the injured finger. We hypothesized that the positions of adjacent fingers influence the long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursion, measured both absolutely and relative to the surrounding tissue of the tendon. Long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions and surrounding tissue movement were measured in zone V in eleven healthy subjects during three different rehabilitation protocols and two experimental models: (1) an active four-finger mobilization protocol, (2) a passive four-finger mobilization protocol, (3) a modified Kleinert mobilization protocol, (4) an experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model, and (5) an experimental modified Kleinert extension mobilization model. Tendon excursions were measured with use of a frame-to-frame analysis of high-resolution ultrasound images. The median absolute long finger flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions were 23.4, 17.8, 10.0, 13.9, and 7.6 mm for the active four-finger mobilization protocol, the passive four-finger mobilization protocol, the modified Kleinert mobilization protocol, the experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model, and the experimental modified Kleinert extension mobilization model, respectively, and these differences were all significant (p ≤ 0.041). The corresponding relative flexor digitorum profundus tendon excursions were 11.2, 8.5, 7.2, 10.4, and 5.6 mm. Active four-finger mobilization protocol excursions were significantly (p = 0.013) greater than passive four-finger mobilization protocol excursions but were not significantly greater than experimental modified Kleinert flexion mobilization model excursions (p =0.213). The present study demonstrated large and

  16. The deep band of the plantar aponeurosis of the human foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cralley, J C; Schuberth, J M; Fitch, K L

    1982-01-01

    The deep band of the plantar aponeurosis is a variable structure formed by fibers from both the medial and lateral portions of the plantar aponeurosis. This band courses directly to the plantar ligament of the fourth metatarsophalangeal joint. Proximally it is superficial. Distally it passes deep to the tendons of the flexor digitorum longus to attach at the metatarsophalangeal joint. The second plantar and third and fourth dorsal interosseous muscles as well as the transverse head of adductor hallucis have attachments to the deep aponeurotic band. This band becomes taut when the proximal phalanx of the fourth toe is extended. No recent references to this structure could be found. The function of the deep band of the plantar aponeurosis is unknown, although the anatomical arrangement may make it important in stabilizing the fourth ray of the foot during locomotion.

  17. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse;

    2010-01-01

    of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... isometric hallux flexion, passive hallux extension, and selective percutaneous stimulation of the gastrocnemius medialis (MG). In each experiment plantar- and hallux flexion force and corresponding EMG activity were sampled. During all tasks ultrasonography was applied at proximal and distal sites to assess...... task-induced tissue displacement (which is assumed to represent loading) for the plantarflexor muscles [MG, soleus (SOL), and flexor hallucis longus (FHL)]. Selective MG stimulation and passive knee extension resulted in displacement of both the MG and SOL muscles. Minimal displacement of the triceps...

  18. Endoscopic Release of Master Knot of Henry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    A post-traumatic partial tear of the flexor hallucis longus tendon at the master knot of Henry and the resultant fibrosis of the knot can result in pain at the medial foot arch or posteromedial ankle pain with trigger hallux. Open debridement of the master knot of Henry is indicated if the symptoms do not improve with nonoperative treatment. The open procedure requires extensive soft-tissue dissection because the master knot of Henry is a deep structure. Endoscopic release of the master knot of Henry is an alternative to the open procedure and has the advantage of less surgical trauma and potential for less chance of recurrence of fibrosis of the master knot of Henry.

  19. Identified ankle extensor and flexor motoneurons display different firing profiles in the neonatal rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotel, Florence; Antri, Myriam; Barthe, Jean-Yves;

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare the firing profiles exhibited by lumbar flexor or extensor motoneurons in response to injection of depolarizing/repolarizing currents. Motoneurons were recorded intracellularly in the in vitro brainstem-spinal cord of newborn rats (P4-P7). They were...... population of flexor motoneurons solely exhibited the type II profile, characterized by a frequency-current (F-I) relationship with a clockwise hysteresis. In contrast, in addition to this type II profile, the other three profiles of repetitive firing (type I, III and IV) were observed in extensor...... motoneurons; a linear F-I relationship (type I profile), a self-sustained discharge pattern together with a linear F-I relationship (type III profile) and a self-sustained firing pattern together with an F-I relationship showing a counter-clockwise hysteresis (type IV profile). Thus, during the early...

  20. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per ...

  1. Is Enhanced-Eccentric Resistance Training Superior to Traditional Training for Increasing Elbow Flexor Strength?

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Barstow, Ian K.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    Protocols for strengthening muscle are important for fitness, rehabilitation, and the prevention of myotendinous injuries. In trained individuals, the optimal method of increasing strength remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a traditional method of strengthening with a method that allowed for enhanced-eccentric training, on changes in elbow flexor strength in trained subjects. Thirty-nine (8 male, 31 female) trained subjects with normal elbow function part...

  2. Differential Effects of Unilateral Concentric Vs. Eccentric Exercise on the Dominant and Nondominant Forearm Flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Travis W; Ye, Xin; Wages, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) intensity patterns after unilateral concentric vs. eccentric exercise in the dominant (DOM) and nondominant (NONDOM) forearm flexors. Twenty-six men (mean ± SD: age, 24.0 ± 3.7 years) volunteered to perform a maximal isometric muscle action of the DOM and NONDOM forearm flexors before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) a series of maximal concentric isokinetic or maximal eccentric isokinetic muscle actions of the DOM forearm flexors. The concentric isokinetic and eccentric isokinetic muscle actions were performed on separate days that were randomly ordered. However, in both cases, the subjects performed 6 sets of 10 maximal muscle actions. A bipolar surface EMG signal was detected from the biceps brachii of the DOM and NONDOM limbs during the PRE and POST isometric muscle actions. The signals were then analyzed with a wavelet analysis, and the resulting intensity patterns were classified with a paired pattern classification procedure. The results indicated that the EMG intensity patterns could be correctly classified into their respective PRE vs. POST categories with an accuracy rate that was significantly better than random (20 of 26 patterns = 76.9% accuracy) but only for the DOM limb following the eccentric muscle actions. All other classifications were not significantly better than random. These findings indicated that eccentric exercise had a significant influence on the muscle activation pattern for the forearm flexors. It is possible that the muscle damage resulting from eccentric exercise affects muscle spindle or golgi tendon organ or both activity, thereby altering the muscle activation pattern.

  3. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  4. Wide-Awake Primary Flexor Tendon Repair, Tenolysis, and Tendon Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    Tendon surgery is unique because it should ensure tendon gliding after surgery. Tendon surgery now can be performed under local anesthesia without tourniquet, by injecting epinephrine mixed with lidocaine, to achieve vasoconstriction in the area of surgery. This method allows the tendon to move actively during surgery to test tendon function intraoperatively and to ensure the tendon is properly repaired before leaving the operating table. I applied this method to primary flexor tendon repair ...

  5. Isokinetic Evaluation of Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscle Strength in Behcet’s Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Durmus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behçet’s disease (BD is an idiopathic, multisystemic, progressive disease. The purpose of this study is to compare the knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths of Behcet’s patients with that of healthy subjects. Methods: Twenty-five (13 male and 12 female patients with BD and 25 (15 male and 10 female healthy individuals were included in the study. Velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec, and 150°/sec were used for the isokinetic muscle strength testing. Patients with active inflammatory knee arthritis were excluded. Peak torque (Nm and peak torque adjusted to body weight (% were taken into consideration for comparison between study groups. Results: Compared to healthy controls, there was a statistically significant decrease in both the bilateral knee extensor and flexor muscle isokinetic peak torques(Nm as well as the peak torques adjusted to body weight (% at velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec and 150°/sec in patients with BD (p < 0.05. However, there was no significant difference in the agonist-antagonist ratio of the isokinetic peak torques of knee muscles between the two groups. Conclusion: In light of these findings, we have concluded that both knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths are lower in BD. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of patients with BD in terms of muscle strength.

  6. Explanations pertaining to the hip joint flexor moment during the stance phase of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild ί; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2012-11-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different positions: normal, inclined and reclined. Net joint moments were calculated about the hip, knee and ankle joint. The peak hip joint flexor moment during late stance was significantly lower during inclined walking than in the two other conditions. During normal walking the iliacus muscle showed no or very weak activity and first at the transition from stance to swing. When walking reclined, a clear but rather low activity level of the iliacus muscle was seen in the first half of the stance phase, which could contribute to the hip moment. In the inclined condition the iliacus showed much increased activity but only in the swing phase. It is concluded that the hip flexor moment in question is largely generated by passive structures in the form of ligaments resisting hip joint extension.

  7. Flexor Tenosynovitis Due to Tuberculosis in Hand and Wrist: Is Tenosynovectomy Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakaş, Fatih; Uğurlar, Meriç; Turan, Derya Bayirli; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Mersa, Berkan; Özçelik, İsmail Bülent

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of flexor tenosynovitis in the hand and wrist due to tuberculosis is controversial. Although some authors recommend the antituberculous chemotherapy, the others recommend the surgical treatment. In this article, 12 patients with synovial tuberculosis of the flexor aspect of the hand and the wrist were evaluated with respect to diagnosis and treatment modalities. None of the patients had a history of tuberculosis, concomitant disease, immunosuppressive drug use, drug abuse, and human immunodefficiency virus positivity. A chest x-ray and family screening were performed in all of the cases, none had evidence of tuberculosis in the lung. The biopsy, histopathological examination, acid-fast bacillus staining, and BACTEC tuberculosis culture were performed. Antituberculous chemotherapy was initiated in patients diagnosed with tuberculosis by either histological or microbiological examinations. The patients did not undergo any further surgery after biopsy procedures. The lesions regressed totally in all patients after 3 months of treatment. Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and signs recruited at five months of treatment. In patients with flexor tuberculosis tenosynovitis, it is possible to achieve good results by applying only medical therapy after a biopsy, and without the need for further surgery.

  8. The quantitative role of flexor sheath incision in correcting Dupuytren proximal interphalangeal joint contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazar, P E; Floyd, E W; Earp, B E

    2016-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding intra-operative treatment of residual proximal interphalangeal joint contractures after Dupuytren's fasciectomy. We test the hypothesis that a simple release of the digital flexor sheath can correct residual fixed flexion contracture after subtotal fasciectomy. We prospectively enrolled 19 patients (22 digits) with Dupuytren's contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint. The average pre-operative extension deficit of the proximal interphalangeal joints was 58° (range 30-90). The flexion contracture of the joint was corrected to an average of 28° after fasciectomy. In most digits (20 of 21), subsequent incision of the flexor sheath further corrected the contracture by an average of 23°, resulting in correction to an average flexion contracture of 4.7° (range 0-40). Our results support that contracture of the tendon sheath is a contributor to Dupuytren's contracture of the joint and that sheath release is a simple, low morbidity addition to correct Dupuytren's contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Additional release of the proximal interphalangeal joint after fasciectomy, after release of the flexor sheath, is not necessary in many patients. IV (Case Series, Therapeutic). © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Digital flexor tendon contracture treated by tenectomy: different clinical presentations in three cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cabon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary Three cats, Siamese or Siamese cross, were presented with a chronic thoracic limb weightbearing lameness. Previous anti-inflammatory administrations were unable to improve lameness consistently in the three cats. Two of the three cats had undergone onychectomy several years before presentation. A permanent flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of one or more digits, associated with a difficult and painful extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, was noticed during orthopedic examination. A digital flexor tendon contracture was suspected and confirmed with radiographic examination. Surgical exploration was then performed. For all cats, treatment consisted of a tenectomy or tenotomy of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in order to release the contracture. The three cats responded well to the surgical treatment and became sound around 2–4 weeks after surgery. Relevance and novel information Digital flexor tendon contracture is rarely reported as a cause of lameness in cats. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of feline lameness whenever onychectomy has been performed in the past. The precise etiology that explains this tendon contracture is unknown, but trauma or breed predisposition could represent potential causes.

  10. Effects of Acute Fatigue of the Hip Flexor Muscles on Hamstring Muscle Extensibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyor José M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of acute fatigue of the hip flexor muscles on scores attained in tests frequently used in literature to measure hamstring muscle extensibility, namely the passive straight leg raise (PSLR, active straight leg raise (ASLR, passive knee extension (PKE, active knee extension (AKE, sit-and-reach (SR and toe-touch (TT tests. A total of seventy-five healthy and recreationally active adults voluntarily participated in this study. To reach fatigue, the participants actively lifted their legs alternately as many times as possible. In the passive tests, the results were 7.10 ± 5.21° and 5.68 ± 4.54° higher (p 0.05. Moderate (r = 0.40 to high (r = 0.97 correlation coefficients were found, which were statistically significant among all the measured flexibility tests both pre- and post-fatigue. In conclusion, the active implication of the hip flexor muscles until reaching fatigue had acute influences on the results of the PSLR, PKE and ASLR tests, but not on the results of the AKE, SR and TT tests. It is recommended to use the AKE test to assess hamstring muscle extensibility in situations where athletes show fatigue in their hip flexor muscles.

  11. Validity of gait parameters for hip flexor contracture in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang Hyeong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoas contracture is known to cause abnormal hip motion in patients with cerebral palsy. The authors investigated the clinical relevance of hip kinematic and kinetic parameters, and 3D modeled psoas length in terms of discriminant validty, convergent validity, and responsiveness. Methods Twenty-four patients with cerebral palsy (mean age 6.9 years and 28 normal children (mean age 7.6 years were included. Kinematic and kinetic data were obtained by three dimensional gait analysis, and psoas lengths were determined using a musculoskeletal modeling technique. Validity of the hip parameters were evaluated. Results In discriminant validity, maximum psoas length (effect size r = 0.740, maximum pelvic tilt (0.710, maximum hip flexion in late swing (0.728, maximum hip extension in stance (0.743, and hip flexor index (0.792 showed favorable discriminant ability between the normal controls and the patients. In convergent validity, maximum psoas length was not significantly correlated with maximum hip extension in stance in control group whereas it was correlated with maximum hip extension in stance (r = -0.933, p Conclusions Maximum pelvic tilt, maximum psoas length, hip flexor index, and maximum hip extension in stance were found to be clinically relevant parameters in evaluating hip flexor contracture.

  12. Home-based rehabilitation in the postoperative treatment of flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín-Fernández, M; Fernández-Bran, B; Couceiro-Otero, J

    To evaluate the results and complications of flexor tendon repair in which a home-based rehabilitation program was utilized without the assistance of a hand therapist during the first 4postoperative weeks. Between July 2009 and July 2014, a total of 21 digits in 15 patients were treated in our institution for complete laceration of the flexor tendons within the flexor pulley system (zone 1 and 2). Passive and active exercises performed by the patients themselves were started the morning after the operation. Data, as range-of-motion and complications, were collected 6months after the surgery. Fifteen digits had full recovery of flexion. One patient suffered a rupture in the fifth postoperative week. Ten of the 21 digits developed a flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint; in 5 the contracture was less or equal to 10° without impairment of function or aesthetics. Over recent decades, specialized hand therapy has been of great importance in the postoperative treatment of hand diseases. Unfortunately, these professionals are not always available in our area in the first days after surgery. With this protocol, the patient is in charge of carrying out the postoperative exercises, which could lead to a worse final result and a higher rate of complications. The home-based rehabilitation program yielded complete recovery of joint mobility in most cases with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of dynamic stretching on plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samukawa, Mina; Hattori, Masaki; Sugama, Naoko; Takeda, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stretching is commonly used in warm-up routines for athletic activities. Even though several positive effects of dynamic stretching on athletic performance have been reported, the effects on the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) itself are still unclear. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of dynamic stretching on the ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon properties by use of ultrasonography. Twenty healthy male subjects participated in the present study. The subjects were asked to engage in dynamic stretching of plantar flexors for 30 s and to repeat for 5 sets. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured before and after the dynamic stretching. Changes in the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), pennation angle, and fascicle length were also determined by using ultrasonography. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM increased significantly after the dynamic stretching (p MTJ was observed until the second stretching set (p MTJ was found, indicating some change in the tendon tissues. Therefore, dynamic stretching of the plantar flexors was considered an effective means of lengthening the tendon tissues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Middle phalanx skeletal morphology in the hand: can it predict flexor tendon size and attachments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzke, Mary W; Shrewsbury, Marvin M; Horner, Kristin E

    2007-10-01

    Specific sites on the palmar diaphysis of the manual middle phalanges provide attachment for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon. It has been assumed in the literature that lateral palmar fossae on these bones reflect locations for these attachments and offer evidence for relative size of the flexor tendon. This assumption has led to predictions about relative FDS muscle force potential from sizes of fossae on fossil hominin middle phalanges. Inferences about locomotor capabilities of fossil hominins in turn have been drawn from the predicted force potential of the flexor muscle. The study reported here provides a critical first step in evaluating hypotheses about behavioral implications of middle phalangeal morphology in fossil hominins, by testing the hypothesis that the lateral fossae reflect the size of the FDS tendon and the location of the terminal FDS tendon attachments on the middle phalanx. The middle phalangeal region was dissected in 43 individuals from 16 primate genera, including humans. Qualitative observations were made of tendon attachment locations relative to the lateral fossae. Length measurements of the fossae were tested as predictors of FDS tendon cross-sectional area and of FDS attachment tendon lengths. Our results lead to the conclusion that the hypothesis must be rejected, and that future attention should focus on functional implications of the palmar median bar associated with the lateral fossae.

  15. Digital flexor tendon contracture treated by tenectomy: different clinical presentations in three cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cabon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary Three cats, Siamese or Siamese cross, were presented with a chronic thoracic limb weightbearing lameness. Previous anti-inflammatory administrations were unable to improve lameness consistently in the three cats. Two of the three cats had undergone onychectomy several years before presentation. A permanent flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of one or more digits, associated with a difficult and painful extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, was noticed during orthopedic examination. A digital flexor tendon contracture was suspected and confirmed with radiographic examination. Surgical exploration was then performed. For all cats, treatment consisted of a tenectomy or tenotomy of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in order to release the contracture. The three cats responded well to the surgical treatment and became sound around 2–4 weeks after surgery. Relevance and novel information Digital flexor tendon contracture is rarely reported as a cause of lameness in cats. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of feline lameness whenever onychectomy has been performed in the past. The precise etiology that explains this tendon contracture is unknown, but trauma or breed predisposition could represent potential causes.

  16. Reconstruction of Buccal Mucosa, Upper and Lower Lip Defect Using Free Radial Forearm Flap with Palmaris Longus Tendon: A Case Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kamran Khazaeni; Arash Beiraghi Toosi; Shirin Irani; Leila Mashhadi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced lip carcinomas can invade adjacent structures. Performing surgery for these cancers will lead to defects in this anatomically and functionally important area and will cause post-op difficulties such as drooling, speech alterations and aesthetic considerations, if not properly managed. Case Report: In this study, we will introduce a radial forearm free flap with palmaris longus tendon to reconstruct a defect of a large lower lip carcinoma. Our patients was a male in the ...

  17. Reconstruction of Buccal Mucosa, Upper and Lower Lip Defect Using Free Radial Forearm Flap with Palmaris Longus Tendon: A Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Khazaeni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Advanced lip carcinomas can invade adjacent structures. Performing surgery for these cancers will lead to defects in this anatomically and functionally important area and will cause post-op difficulties such as drooling, speech alterations and aesthetic considerations, if not properly managed. Case Report: In this study, we will introduce a radial forearm free flap with palmaris longus tendon to reconstruct a defect of a large lower lip carcinoma. Our patients was a male in the 7th decade of life with an advanced lower lip carcinoma invading the full thickness of the buccal mucosa, left commissure and the left third of the upper lip. Resection was performed with adequate margins; checked by frozen sections and radical modified neck dissection was also performed on the left side. Free radial forearm flap with palmaris longus tendon was harvested and anastomosed in the neck. Four months after surgery commissurroplasty was done and the flap volume reduced Conclusion: The radial forearm free flap with palmaris longus tendon provides a good functional lip with a reasonable aesthetics in our patient. The patient was satisfied with the result and there were no functional complaints such as drooling reported by him. We think that this flap could be a flap of choice for reconstruction of the large, full thickness lip defects.

  18. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rossi, Ignacio [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  19. Seasonal variation in isokinetic strength of knee flexors and extensors in soccer players

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    Michal Lehnert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle strength is an important factor in soccer from the performance and health perspective. There is a lack of knowledge about changes in muscle strength of the knee flexors and extensors and their ratios during annual training cycle. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the seasonal variability of the observed parameters of isokinetic strength of the knee flexors and extensors in soccer players, U19, from the performance and health perspective. METHODS: The strength of the knee flexors and extensors was measured in players U19 category (n = 9; the average age 18.5 ±0.4 years on the isokinetic dynamometer IsoMed 2000 in angular velocity 60° × s-1. Measurement was performed in concentric/concentric and excentric/excentric mode of muscle action at the beginning of the winter preparatory period, at the end of the preparatory period and at the end of the spring competitive period. Monitored parameters were absolute peak torque (PT, conventional H/Q ratio (H/QCON, functional H/Q ratio (H/QFUN and functional H/Q ratio in range 10-30° of knee flexion (H/QFUN_10-30. RESULTS: Significant change in PT (p < .05 was noted only in cases of the knee extensors of the nondominant leg in the concentric mode. The evaluation of imbalance of the knee flexors and extensors by H/QCON and H/QFUN ratios did not show any significant changes, but there was found a significant decrease of the H/QFUN_10-30 ratio in the dominant leg between measurements at the beginning and at the end of the winter preparatory period. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study indicate that throughout the monitored periods of the annual training cycle desirable changes in knee flexors and extensors strength did not occur. The values suggest the disruption of the dynamic stabilization of the knee joint and increase in injury risk. Different dynamics of the three observed ratios confirmed that they provide different information about the physical fitness of

  20. Extensor Pollicis Longus Injury in Addition to De Quervain’s with Text Messaging on Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhaskaranand; Bhat, Anil K; Venugopal, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To do a clinical and ultrasonic evaluation of subjects with thumb pain with text messaging. Background: Thumbs are commonly used for text messaging, which are not as well designed for fine manipulative or dexterous work. Repetitive use as in text messaging can lead to the injury to the tendons of the thumb. Materials and Methods: Ninety eight students with symptoms of Repetitive Strain Type of injuries of the thumb were selected from a survey and evaluated both clinically and by ultrasound analysis of the musculotendinous unit of the thumb to note changes due to excessive use of the mobile phone. Age and sex matched controls were also subjected to ultrasound evaluation. Results: Clinical examination showed positive Finkelstein test in 40% of the cases, significant reduction in the lateral and tip pinch strengths in the cases. Ultrasound detected changes in the first and the third compartments in 19% of the cases. Conclusion: Isolated cases of pain in the thumb have been reported but this study noted changes both clinically and by ultrasound in the tendons of the thumb. These changes should be taken as warning signs of possible subclinical changes taking place in the soft tissues of the thumb in these subjects due to repetitive use of mobile phones and thus, making them prone for developing painful Musculoskeletal Disorders. Application: Repetitive use of mobile phones for text messaging can lead to the damage of Extensor pollicis longus of the thumb in addition to the tendons of the first compartment of the wrist. PMID:25584249

  1. Environmental control of growth and BChl a expression in an aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium,Erythrobacter longus (DSMZ6997)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; JIAO Nianzhi; PENG Zaiqing

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB), which form a unique functional group of heterotrophic bacteria, have the ability to utilize light energy. The impact of carbon source and light intensity on the growth and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) expression of a typical strain of AAPB, Erythrobacter longus strain DSMZ6997 was examined during batch culture and continuous culture. The results showed that the expression of BChl a in DSMZ6997 was regulated by both carbon-source and light conditions, and was stimulated by low availability of carbon but inhibited by light to a certain extent at 300 lx and completely at 1 500 lx. In contrast, cell abundance, and even cell size of this strain, was substantially enhanced under light/dark cycle cultivation conditions over dark conditions, indicating the promotion of growth by light. These results led to the conclusion that utilization of light through BChl a helps AAPB to survive under carbon stress, while light at high intensity is harmful to the synthesis of BChl a in AAPB.

  2. Muscles within muscles: a tensiomyographic and histochemical analysis of the normal human vastus medialis longus and vastus medialis obliquus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnik, Ludvik; Djordjevič, Srdjan; Rozman, Sergej; Hribernik, Marija; Dahmane, Raja

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to show the connection between structure (anatomical and histochemical) and function (muscle contraction properties) of vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and vastus medialis longus (VML). The non-invasive tensiomyography (TMG) method was used to determine the contractile properties (contraction time; T(c)) of VML and VMO muscle, as a reflection of the ratio between the slow and fast fibers in two groups of nine young men. VML and VMO significantly (P knee, and to the VMO, which maintains the stable position of the patella in the femoral groove. Our results obtained by TMG provided additional evidence that muscle fibers within the segments of VM muscle were not homogenous with regard to their contractile properties, thereby confirming the histochemical results. T(c) can be attributed to the higher percentage of slow-twitch fibers - type 1. The statistically shorter T(c) (P ≤ 0.001) of VMO (22.8 ± 4.0 ms) compared with VML (26.7 ± 4.0 ms) in our study is consistent with previously found differences in histochemical, morphological and electrophysiological data. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that the VML and VMO muscles are not only anatomically and histochemically different muscles, but also functionally different biological structures.

  3. Comparisons of eccentric knee flexor strength and asymmetries across elite, sub-elite and school level cricket players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalker, Wade J; Shield, Anthony J; Opar, David A; Keogh, Justin W L

    2016-01-01

    Background. There has been a continual increase in injury rates in cricket, with hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) being the most prominent. Eccentric knee flexor weakness and bilateral asymmetries are major modifiable risk factors for future HSIs. However, there is a lack of data relating to eccentric hamstring strength in cricket at any skill level. The objective of this study was to compare eccentric knee flexor strength and bilateral asymmetries in elite, sub-elite and school level cricket players; and to determine if playing position and limb role influenced these eccentric knee flexor strength indices. Methods. Seventy four male cricket players of three distinct skill levels performed three repetitions of the Nordic hamstring exercise on the experimental device. Strength was assessed as the absolute and relative mean peak force output for both limbs, with bilateral asymmetries. Differences in mean peak force outputs between skill level and playing positions were measured. Results. There were no significant differences between elite, sub-elite and school level athletes for mean peak force and bilateral asymmetries of the knee flexors. There were no significant differences observed between bowler's and batter's mean peak force and bilateral asymmetries. There were no significant differences between front and back limb mean peak force outputs. Discussion. Skill level, playing position and limb role appeared to have no significant effect on eccentric knee flexor strength and bilateral asymmetries. Future research should seek to determine whether eccentric knee flexor strength thresholds are predictive of HSIs in cricket and if specific eccentric knee flexor strengthening can reduce these injuries.

  4. Comparisons of eccentric knee flexor strength and asymmetries across elite, sub-elite and school level cricket players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade J. Chalker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. There has been a continual increase in injury rates in cricket, with hamstring strain injuries (HSIs being the most prominent. Eccentric knee flexor weakness and bilateral asymmetries are major modifiable risk factors for future HSIs. However, there is a lack of data relating to eccentric hamstring strength in cricket at any skill level. The objective of this study was to compare eccentric knee flexor strength and bilateral asymmetries in elite, sub-elite and school level cricket players; and to determine if playing position and limb role influenced these eccentric knee flexor strength indices. Methods. Seventy four male cricket players of three distinct skill levels performed three repetitions of the Nordic hamstring exercise on the experimental device. Strength was assessed as the absolute and relative mean peak force output for both limbs, with bilateral asymmetries. Differences in mean peak force outputs between skill level and playing positions were measured. Results. There were no significant differences between elite, sub-elite and school level athletes for mean peak force and bilateral asymmetries of the knee flexors. There were no significant differences observed between bowler’s and batter’s mean peak force and bilateral asymmetries. There were no significant differences between front and back limb mean peak force outputs. Discussion. Skill level, playing position and limb role appeared to have no significant effect on eccentric knee flexor strength and bilateral asymmetries. Future research should seek to determine whether eccentric knee flexor strength thresholds are predictive of HSIs in cricket and if specific eccentric knee flexor strengthening can reduce these injuries.

  5. Climbing-specific finger flexor performance and forearm muscle oxygenation in elite male and female sport climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Marc; Wegst, Daniel; Müller, Tom; Raschner, Christian; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Climbing performance relies to a great extent on the performance of the finger flexor muscles. Only a few studies investigated this performance in top class climbers and only one study compared gender-specific differences. This study investigated the climbing-specific finger flexor strength and endurance and related muscular oxygenation in 12 elite female and male climbers and 12 non-climbers. After the assessment of maximum voluntary finger flexor contraction (MVC), two isometric finger flexor endurance tests were performed at 40% MVC until exhaustion. A continuous isometric test was followed by an intermittent isometric test (10 s contraction, 3 s rest). Changes in oxygenation of finger flexor muscles were recorded using near infrared spectroscopy. MVC and strength-to-weight ratio were greater in climbers than non-climbers (P = 0.003; P < 0.001) and greater in men than women (P < 0.001; P = 0.002). Time to task failure for the intermittent test and the force-time integrals for the continuous and the intermittent test were also significantly greater in climbers (P = 0.030; P = 0.027; P = 0.005). During the intermittent test, re-oxygenation of the working muscles was faster in climbers (P < 0.05) without gender-specific differences. Close correlations were demonstrated between the best on-sight climbing performance and strength-to-weight ratio (r (2) = 0.946, P < 0.001) only in female climbers. The superior intermittent finger flexor endurance of climbers over non-climbers may be explained by the faster re-oxygenation of the finger flexor muscles during the short rest phases.

  6. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex induces opposite modulation of reciprocal inhibition in wrist extensor and flexor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Klomjai, Wanalee; Bussel, Bernard; Katz, Rose; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is used as a noninvasive tool to modulate brain excitability in humans. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that tDCS applied over the motor cortex also modulates spinal neural network excitability and therefore can be used to explore the corticospinal control acting on spinal neurons. Previously, we showed that reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist flexor motoneurons is enhanced during contralateral anodal tDCS, but it is likely that the corticospinal control acting on spinal networks controlling wrist flexors and extensors is not similar. The primary aim of the study was to explore the effects of anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist extensor motoneurons. To further examine the supraspinal control acting on the reciprocal inhibition between wrist flexors and extensors, we also explored the effects of the tDCS applied to the ipsilateral hand motor area. In healthy volunteers, we tested the effects induced by sham and anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition pathways innervating wrist muscles. Reciprocal inhibition directed from flexor to extensor muscles and the reverse situation, i.e., reciprocal inhibition, directed from extensors to flexors were studied in parallel with the H reflex technique. Our main finding was that contralateral anodal tDCS induces opposing effects on reciprocal inhibition: it decreases reciprocal inhibition directed from flexors to extensors, but it increases reciprocal inhibition directed from extensors to flexors. The functional result of these opposite effects on reciprocal inhibition seems to favor wrist extension excitability, suggesting an asymmetric descending control onto the interneurons that mediate reciprocal inhibition.

  7. Hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with acetabular labral tears compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, M Dilani; Wilson, Stephen J; Hayes, David A; Watts, Mark C; Hides, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    Acetabular labral tears are a source of hip pain and are considered to be a precursor to hip osteoarthritis. Hip flexor muscles contribute to hip joint stability and function but it is unknown if their size and function is altered in the presence of labral pathology. This study aimed to investigate hip flexor muscle size, strength and recruitment pattern in patients with hip labral pathology compared to control subjects. 12 subjects diagnosed with an unilateral acetabular labral tear were compared to 12 control subjects matched for age and gender. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lumbo-pelvic region. Average muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, tensor fascia latae and rectus femoris muscles were measured. Hip flexion strength was measured by an externally fixed dynamometer. Individual muscle recruitment pattern during a resisted hip flexion exercise task was measured by muscle functional MRI. Hip flexor muscle strength was found to be decreased in patients with labral pathology compared to control subjects (p muscle size (all p > 0.17) and recruitment pattern (all p > 0.53). Decreased hip flexor muscle strength may affect physical function in patients with hip labral pathology by contributing to altered gait patterns and functional tasks. Clinical rehabilitation of these patients may need to include strengthening exercises for the hip flexor muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical and diagnostic imaging characteristics of lateral digital flexor tendinitis within the tarsal sheath in four horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Weston; Caniglia, Christopher J; Lustgarten, Meghann; Blackwelder, Travis; Robertson, Ian; Redding, W Rich

    2014-01-01

    Lateral digital flexor tendonitis is a rarely reported cause of hind limb lameness in performance horses. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe clinical and diagnostic imaging findings for a group of horses with lateral digital flexor tendinitis within the tarsal sheath. Equine cases with a diagnosis of lateral digital flexor tendonitis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the affected region were retrieved from North Carolina University’s medical record database. Recorded data for included horses were signalment; findings from history, physical examination, lameness examination, and all diagnostic imaging studies; treatment administered; and outcome. Four horses met inclusion criteria. Lameness was mild/moderate in severity and insidious in onset in all patients. Responses to flexion tests were variable. All horses showed positive improvement(70–90%) in lameness after tarsal sheath analgesia. Radiographic, scintigraphic, and ultrasonographic findings were inconclusive. For all horses, MRI characteristics included increased T2, PD, and STIR signal intensity within the lateral digital flexor tendon in the area of the tarsal sheath. Tarsal sheath effusion was slight in three horses, and mild/moderate in one horse. With medical treatment, two horses were sound at 6-month follow up, one horse was sound at 1-year followup, and one horse had a slight persistent lameness (grade 1/5) at 9-month followup. Findings supported the use of MRI for diagnosing lateral digital flexor tendonitis within the tarsal sheath in horses. Affected horses may have a good prognosis for return to athletic performance following appropriate medical treatment.

  9. The histochemical profile of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle differentiates after birth and dedifferentiates in senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lehnert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Age dependent motor unit dedifferentiation is a key component of impaired muscle function in advanced age. Here, we tested the hypothesis that rat muscle histochemical profile during the lifespan of an individual has an age-specific pattern since comprehensive longitudinal studies of muscle differentiation after birth and dedifferentiation in advanced age are scarce. Our results show that extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL is comprised only of two fiber types after birth, type slow-oxidative (SO and type SDH-intermediate (SDHINT, the latter being indicative for the presence of polyneuronal innervation. In contrast to the constantly growing crosssectional area of the muscle fibers, a dramatic decrease in SDH-INT proportion occurs between day 14 and 21 after birth resulting in a complete loss of fiber type SDH-INT at the age of 90 days (p<0.05. At the age of 270 days, the fiber type composition of rat EDL dedifferentiates as shown by the reappearance of the SDH-INT type with a further increase at the age of 540 days (p<0.05. These changes in histochemical fiber type spectra are brought about by fiber type conversion within the fast twich fibers. The findings of the present study provide further evidence that fiber type conversion is a basic mechanism leading to motor unit differentiation and dedifferentiation during ontogenesis. Fiber type conversion shows a distinct time specific pattern and is also characteristic for motor unit regeneration after peripheral nerve repair. Factors that influence fiber type conversion and thereby motor unit organization may provide a future therapeutic option to enhance the regenerative capacity of motor units.

  10. A comparison of ultrasound and clinical examination in the detection of flexor tenosynovitis in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouqal Redouane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenosynovitis is widely accepted to be common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and postulated to be the first manifestation of RA, but its true prevalence in early disease and in particular the hand has not been firmly established. The aims of this study were first to investigate the frequency and distribution of finger flexor tenosynovitis using ultrasound in early arthritis, second to compare clinical examination with ultrasound (US using the latter as the gold standard. Methods 33 consecutive patients who had who were initially diagnosed with polyarthritis and suspected of polyarthritis and clinical suspicion of inflammatory arthritis of the hands and wrists were assessed during consecutive, routine presentations to the rheumatology outpatient clinic. We scanned a total of 165 finger tendons and subsequent comparisons were made using clinical examination. Results Flexor tenosynovitis was found in 17 patients (51.5% on ultrasound compared with 16 (48.4% of all patients on clinical examination. Most commonly damaged joint involved on US was the second finger followed by the third, fifth, and fourth. Both modalities demonstrated more pathology on the second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP compared with the fourth and fifth MCP. A joint-by-joint comparison of US and clinical examination demonstrated that although the sensitivity, specificities and positive predictive values of clinical examination were relatively high, negative predictive value of clinical examination was low (0.23. Conclusions Our study suggest that clinical examination can be a valuable tool for detecting flexor disease in view of its high specificity and positive predictive values, but a negative clinical examination does not exclude inflammation and an US should be considered. Further work is recommended to standardize definitions and image acquisition for peritendinous inflammation for ultrasound.

  11. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  12. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Martin; Weippert, Matthias; Wassermann, Franziska; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC) and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after 8 weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0-100, 100-200 ms) and iMVC of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave), peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that cycling endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue resistance.

  13. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBehrens

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after eight weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0-100, 100-200 ms and isometric maximum voluntary contraction of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave, peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that the endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue

  14. Tendon-derived progenitor cells improve healing of collagenase-induced flexor tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgam, Sushmitha S; Stewart, Allison A; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J; Stewart, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    Tendinitis is a common and a performance-limiting injury in athletes. This study describes the value of intralesional tendon-derived progenitor cell (TDPC) injections in equine flexor tendinitis. Collagenase-induced tendinitis was created in both front superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons. Four weeks later, the forelimb tendon lesions were treated with 1 × 10(7) autogenous TDPCs or saline. Tendinitis was also induced by collagenase in one hind SDF tendon, to study the survival and distribution of DiI-labeled TDPCs 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after injection. The remaining normal tendon was used as a "control." Twelve weeks after forelimb TDPC injections, tendons were harvested for assessment of matrix gene expression, biochemical, biomechanical, and histological characteristics. DiI-labeled TDPCs were abundant 1 week after injection but gradually declined over time and were undetectable after 6 weeks. Twelve weeks after TDPC injection, collagens I and III, COMP and tenomodulin mRNA levels were similar (p = 0.3) in both TDPC and saline groups and higher (p < 0.05) than normal tendon. Yield and maximal stresses of the TDPC group were significantly greater (p = 0.005) than the saline group's and similar (p = 0.6) to normal tendon. However, the elastic modulus of the TDPC and saline groups were not significantly different (p = 0.32). Histological assessment of the repair tissues with Fourier transform-second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that collagen alignment was significantly better (p = 0.02) in TDPC group than in the saline controls. In summary, treating collagenase-induced flexor tendon lesions with TDPCs improved the tensile strength and collagen fiber alignment of the repair tissue. Study Design © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2162-2171, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the hip flexor muscles - a detailed MRI study in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serner, A; Weir, A; Tol, J L; Thorborg, K; Roemer, F; Guermazi, A; Yamashiro, E; Hölmich, P

    2017-06-26

    Hip flexor injuries account for one-third of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics. The aims of this study were to describe acute hip flexor injuries using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in athletes with acute groin pain and to compare specific muscle injuries with reported injury situations. Male athletes with acute groin pain were prospectively and consecutively included during three sports seasons. MRI was performed within 7 days of injury using a standardized protocol and a reliable assessment approach. All athletes with an MRI confirmed acute hip flexor muscle injury were included. A total of 156 athletes presented with acute groin pain of which 33 athletes were included, median age 26 years (range 18-35). There were 16 rectus femoris, 12 iliacus, 7 psoas major, 4 sartorius, and 1 tensor fascia latae injury. Rectus femoris injuries primarily occurred during kicking (10) and sprinting (4), whereas iliacus injuries most frequently occurred during change of direction (5). In 10 (63%) rectus femoris injuries, tendinous injury was observed. The iliacus and psoas major injuries were mainly observed at the musculotendinous junction (MTJ), and two included tendinous injury. We have illustrated specific injury locations within these muscles, which may be relevant for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of these injuries. Most proximal rectus femoris injuries included tendinous injury. In contrast, distinct acute iliacus and psoas injuries predominantly occurred at the MTJ. Only the iliacus or psoas major were injured during change of direction, whereas rectus femoris injuries occurred primarily during kicking and sprinting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Strength deficit of knee flexors is dependent on hip position in adults with chronic hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M. Michaelsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extent to which muscle length affects force production in paretic lower limb muscles after stroke in comparison to controls has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To investigate knee flexor strength deficits dependent on hip joint position in adults with hemiparesis and compare with healthy controls. METHOD: a cross-sectional study with ten subjects with chronic (63±40 months hemiparesis with mild to moderate lower limb paresis (Fugl-Meyer score 26±3 and 10 neurologically healthy controls. Isometric knee flexion strength with the hip positioned at 90° and 0° of flexion was assessed randomly on the paretic and non-paretic side of hemiparetic subjects and healthy controls. Subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric contraction sustained for four seconds and measured by a dynamometer. The ratio of knee flexor strength between these two hip positions was calculated: Hip 0°/Hip 90°. Also, locomotor capacity was evaluated by the timed up and go test and by walking velocity over 10 meters. RESULTS: In subjects with hemiparesis, absolute knee flexion torque decreased (p<0.001 with the hip in extension (at 0°. The ratio of knee flexor torque Hip 0°/Hip 90° on the paretic side in hemiparetics was lower than in controls (p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Weakness dependent on joint position is more significant in the paretic lower limb of adults with hemiparesis when compared to controls. More attention should be given to lower limb muscle strengthening exercises in individuals with stroke, with emphasis on the strengthening exercises in positions in which the muscle is shortened.

  17. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  18. Measuring force transfers in the deep flexors of the musician's hand: theoretical analysis, clinical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijnse, J N

    1997-09-01

    In the present paper the anatomical and functional interdependencies which regularly exist between the deep flexor tendons of the different fingers are modelled. The model results are validated by measurements on real hands. The results show that intertendinous force transfers may be caused by (i) coactivation of muscle fibres inserting in different tendons, and (ii) passive connections between tendons or muscle bellies. The coactivation is validated by the measuring results of a hand in which all intertendinous connections were surgically removed. The present models and measurements are currently used for diagnosis of hand problems in musicians at our hand clinic.

  19. Digital Necrosis After Lidocaine and Epinephrine Injection in the Flexor Tendon Sheath Without Phentolamine Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jacques X; Gray, Jason; Lalonde, Donald H; Carr, Nicholas

    2017-02-01

    The literature generally supports the safety of epinephrine injection in the digits, but recent case reports describe ischemic adverse events associated with the use of lidocaine and epinephrine in which phentolamine rescue was not performed. We present a case of finger necrosis and subsequent amputation in a patient after 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was injected in the fat and flexor sheaths in the palm for a 3-finger trigger release. Phentolamine rescue was not performed. All surgeons who use epinephrine in the finger should be prepared to reverse vasoconstriction with phentolamine rescue if there is persistently inadequate perfusion of the fingertip.

  20. Tipos de miosinas de linhagens de frangos de corte criados em sistemas de confinamento e semiconfinamento Types of myosin of chickens of different strains reared in confinement and semi-confinement systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Aparecida Madeira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo neste trabalho foi avaliar o peso vivo, o peso de pernas, os aspectos morfológicos das fibras musculares do músculo flexor longo do hálux e o perfil eletroforético das miosinas de cadeia pesada de quatro linhagens de frangos de corte criados nos sistemas de confinamento e semiconfinamento. Foram utilizados 1.440 pintos distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente casualisado em esquema fatorial 4 × 2, composto de quatro linhagens (Ross 305, Máster Gris, Label Rouge e Vermelhão Pesado e dois sistemas de criação (confinamento e semiconfinamento, cada combinação avaliada com quatro repetições. Aos 28 e 84 dias de idade, foram abatidas quatro aves por tratamento, totalizando 64 aves. A eletroforese identificou a presença das três isoformas de miosinas, tipo MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa e MyHC-IIb, no músculo flexor longo do hálux dos frangos de corte. Com aumento da idade, a isoforma de miosina MyHC-II aumenta, enquanto a MyHC-I diminui. Somente aos 84 dias de idade, a expressão das isoformas de miosina do tipo MyHC-II foram influenciadas pela linhagem, confirmando o reflexo da seleção na linhagem Ross no músculo mais glicolítico.A linhagem Ross apresenta maior peso vivo, peso de perna, peso e área do músculo flexor longo do hálux em comparação às linhagens tipo caipira.The objective was to evaluate body weight, leg weight and morphologic aspects of the muscle fibers of the flexor hallucis longus muscle and electrophoretic profile of myosin heavy chain of four strains of broilers, reared in confinement and semi-confinement systems. 1440 chicks were randomly assigned in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement: four strains (Ross 305, Master Gris, Label Rouge and Vermelhao Pesado, two production systems (confinement and semi-confinement, with four replicates for each treatment. Four birds were sacrificed for each treatment, at 28 and 84 d, totaling 64 animals. Electrophoresis technique identified the presence of three myosin heavy

  1. Clinical application of abductor hallucis flap in restoration of soft tissue defects in calcar pedis malignant%拇展肌肌皮瓣在足跟部恶性肿瘤软组织缺损修复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商冠宁; 孙平; 王玉名; 王巍; 赵岩

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨拇展肌肌皮瓣修复足跟部恶性肿瘤软组织缺损的临床疗效.方法 采用带血管神经蒂的拇展肌肌皮瓣修复足跟部恶性肿瘤广泛切除术的软组织缺损26例,其中伴有溃疡出血者9例.皮肤缺损面积(2~6)cm×(5~9)cm,肌皮瓣切取面积(4~8)cm×(7~11)cm,深层拇展肌肌肉面积3 cm×7 cm,供区全部应用中厚皮片游离植皮.结果 术后26例肌皮瓣完全存活,创面Ⅰ期愈合.随访时间7~37个月,平均22个月,局部无复发;肌皮瓣质地优良,外观满意,行走正常,皮肤感觉恢复良好.结论 拇展肌肌皮瓣血运可靠,转移方便,是修复足跟部位恶性肿瘤广泛切除软组织缺损的良好选择.%Objective To evaluate the clinical application of the abductor hallucis flap in restoration of the soft-tissue defects in calcar pedis malignant. Methods We utilized abductor hallucis flap with neurovascular pedicle to restore soft-tissue defects in 26 cases of calcar pedis Malignant. Among these cases, 9 cases were combined with ulcer and bleeding, the sizes of skin defects being 2~6 cm ×5~9 cm, myocutaneous flap were 4~8 cm ×7 ~11 cm,muscular of abductor hallucis 3 cm ×7 cm. Intermediate thickness free skin grafts were used in donor site. Results All 18 cases of musculo cutaneous flap survived after surgery. Wound healing were stage Ⅰ. After 7 ~ 36 months of follow-up, we observed no complications or local recurrence. The muscle flaps maintained good quality with satisfactory appearance of satisfaction, proper walk, comfort feel of musculocutaneous flap. Conclusion The abductor hallucis flap has advantages, such as reliable blood supply and easy to transfer. It is a good choice in restoration of soft tissue defects in calcar pedis malignant.

  2. Different sensitivity of miniature endplate currents of the rat extensor digitorum longus, soleus and diaphragm muscles to a novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, K A; Kovyazina, L V; Zobov, V V; Bukharaeva, E A; Nikolsky, E E; Vyskocil, F

    2006-01-01

    A novel derivative of 6-methyluracil, C-547, increased the amplitude and prolonged the duration of miniature endplate currents (MEPCs) which is typical for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In the soleus and extensor digitorum longus significant potentiation was detected at nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, in the diaphragm muscle, the increase in the amplitudes of the MEPCs and the decay time constant appeared only when the concentration of C-547 was elevated to 1 x 10(-7) M. Possible consequences for the exploitation of this drug, which can selectively inhibit AChE in particular synapses, are discussed.

  3. Using of Tendinous Plasty in Treatment of Patients with Flexor Tendons of 2–5 Fingers Injury in “Critical” Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kireev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Injury of both superficial and deep tendons of fingers flexors needs to carry out tendinous plasty with excision of distal part of superficial flexor muscle tendon. Use of length measuring method for tendinous transplant allows us to avoid the flexion contracture in future and appearance of functional insufficiency of flexion during postoperative period and rehabilitation of patient.

  4. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  5. Sensory feedback to ankle plantar flexors is not exaggerated during gait in spastic hemiplegic children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Andersen, Jacob Buus; Sinkjær, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that exaggerated stretch reflex activity and the resulting increased muscle tone in ankle plantar flexors contribute to reduced ankle joint movement during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). We investigated the contribution of sensory feedback mechanisms to ankle...... in a similar proportion in both groups. Shortening of the plantar flexors in swing caused a larger drop in Soleus EMG in control children than in children with CP. The lack of age related decline in stretch reflexes in the stance phase and the inability to suppress the reflex in the swing phase is likely...

  6. Removal of a silicone tendon prosthesis six years after insertion for flexor tendon reconstruction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Eryilmaz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-staged flexor tendon repair rely on the effect of the pseudo-tendon sheath that developed by the effect of the silicone tendon prosthesis. The second stage of the reconstruction is performed 1 to 6 months after the first operation by removal of the silicone tendon prosthesis and tendon grafting. In this study, we are presenting a removal of silicone prosthesis 6 years after insertion for flexor tendon reconstruction. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 40-42

  7. Reduced short-interval intracortical inhibition after eccentric muscle damage in human elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Bradley M; Semmler, John G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of eccentric exercise on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) after damage to elbow flexor muscles. Nine young (22.5 ± 0.6 yr; mean ± SD) male subjects performed maximal eccentric exercise of the elbow flexor muscles until maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force was reduced by ∼40%. TMS was performed before, 2 h after, and 2 days after exercise under Rest and Active (5% MVC) conditions with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded from the biceps brachii (BB) muscle. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the brachial plexus was used to assess maximal M-waves, and paired-pulse TMS with a 3-ms interstimulus interval was used to assess changes in SICI at each time point. The eccentric exercise resulted in a 34% decline in strength (P muscle strength (27%, P muscle soreness (P muscle damage. When the test MEP amplitudes were matched between sessions, we found that SICI was reduced by 27% in resting and 23% in active BB muscle 2 h after exercise. SICI recovered 2 days after exercise when muscle pain and soreness were present, suggesting that delayed onset muscle soreness from eccentric exercise does not influence SICI. The change in SICI observed 2 h after exercise suggests that eccentric muscle damage has widespread effects throughout the motor system that likely includes changes in motor cortex.

  8. Unilateral eccentric exercise of the knee flexors affects muscle activation during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dover, Geoffrey C; Legge, Laura; St-Onge, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Uni-lateral muscle soreness is common yet the effects on gait or electromyographic (EMG) activity are unknown. The purpose of our study was to induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the knee flexor group and measure the resultant change in EMG activity and knee motion during gait. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Measures of function, evoked tenderness of the biceps femoris, as well as knee angle, and EMG activity during gait were assessed prior and 48 h after an eccentric exercise protocol. DOMS was induced unilaterally in the knee flexors using an isokinetic dynamometer and subjects exercised until they could not generate 50% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). There was a significant decrease in biceps femoris activity after DOMS during the last phase of gait. Moreover, there was a day × phase interaction for gastrocnemius activity with the last two phases displaying an increase in activity. There was no significant change in knee angle during gait. The decrease in biceps femoris activity as well as the increase in gastrocnemius activity could be evidence of a protective mechanism designed to decrease activity of the sore muscle while increasing the activity of a synergistic muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Else; Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B; Little, Christopher B; Smith, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re-injury in clinical cases. Our data suggest that successful treatments of focal injuries will need to address pathology in the entire tendon, and that better methods to monitor the development and resolution of tendinopathy are required.

  10. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30 min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Lexell, Jan

    2010-06-01

    To assess the reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio. A test-retest reliability study. Thirty men and women (mean age 63 (standard deviation 6.4) years) with verified late effects of polio. Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in both lower limbs were measured twice 7 days apart using a Biodex dynamometer (isokinetic concentric contractions at 60 degrees /sec and isometric contractions with knee flexion angle 90 degrees) and a Leg Extension/Curl Rehab exercise machine with pneumatic resistance (HUR) (isotonic contractions). Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1,1), the mean difference between the test sessions (d) together with the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and Bland-Altman graphs. Test-retest agreements were high, (ICC1,1 0.93-0.99) and measurement errors generally small. The SEM% was 4-14% and the SRD% 11-39%, with the highest values for the isokinetic measurements. Knee muscle strength can be measured reliably and can be used to detect real changes after an intervention for a group of persons with late effects of polio, whereas the values may be too high for single individuals or to detect smaller short-term changes over time for a group of individuals.

  12. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P eccentric exercise.

  13. Strength deficit of knee flexors is dependent on hip position in adults with chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Stella M; Ovando, Angélica C; Bortolotti, Adriano; Bandini, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which muscle length affects force production in paretic lower limb muscles after stroke in comparison to controls has not been established. To investigate knee flexor strength deficits dependent on hip joint position in adults with hemiparesis and compare with healthy controls. a cross-sectional study with ten subjects with chronic (63±40 months) hemiparesis with mild to moderate lower limb paresis (Fugl-Meyer score 26±3) and 10 neurologically healthy controls. Isometric knee flexion strength with the hip positioned at 90° and 0° of flexion was assessed randomly on the paretic and non-paretic side of hemiparetic subjects and healthy controls. Subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric contraction sustained for four seconds and measured by a dynamometer. The ratio of knee flexor strength between these two hip positions was calculated: Hip 0°/Hip 90°. Also, locomotor capacity was evaluated by the timed up and go test and by walking velocity over 10 meters. In subjects with hemiparesis, absolute knee flexion torque decreased (phemiparesis when compared to controls. More attention should be given to lower limb muscle strengthening exercises in individuals with stroke, with emphasis on the strengthening exercises in positions in which the muscle is shortened.

  14. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle–tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schache, Anthony G.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Pandy, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle–tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s−1 (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  15. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs.

  16. The effect of keyboard keyswitch make force on applied force and finger flexor muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, D; Serina, E; Klinenberg, E; Martin, B J; Armstrong, T J; Foulke, J A; Natarajan, S

    1997-08-01

    The design of the force-displacement characteristics or 'feel' of keyboard keyswitches has been guided by preference and performance data; there has been very little information on how switch 'feel' alters muscle activity or applied force. This is a laboratory-based repeated measures design experiment to evaluate the effect of computer keyboard keyswitch design on applied finger force and muscle activity during a typing task. Ten experienced typists typed on three keyboards which differed in keyswitch make force (0.34, 0.47 and 1.02 N) while applied fingertip force and finger flexor electromyograms were recorded. The keyboard testing order was randomized and subjects typed on each keyboard for three trials, while data was collected for a minimum of 80 keystrokes per trial. No differences in applied fingertip force or finger flexor EMG were observed during typing on keyboards with switch make force of 0.34 or 0.47 N. However, applied fingertip force increased by approximately 40% (p < 0.05) and EMG activity increased by approximately 20% (p < 0.05) when the keyswitch make force was increased from 0.47 to 1.02 N. These results suggest that, in order to minimize the biomechanical loads to forearm tendons and muscles of keyboard users, keyswitches with a make force of 0.47 N or less should be considered over switches with a make force of 1.02 N.

  17. ACUTE EFFECTS OF TWO MASSAGE TECHNIQUES ON ANKLE JOINT FLEXIBILITY AND POWER OF THE PLANTAR FLEXORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant J.B. McKechnie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if three minutes of petrissage and tapotement forms of massage would influence plantar flexors' flexibility, and muscle power. Nineteen participants were randomly subjected to three conditions (control and two massages before performing two power tests. Prior to the intervention, subjects completed ankle joint flexibility assessments. The conditions were; (1 control, where subjects lay prone and had a therapist's hands resting, (2 vigorous petrissage, and (3 tapotement applied at a rate of 4Hz; all on the triceps surae. Following completion of the intervention, subjects immediately completed a post- ankle joint flexibility test, followed by a drop-jump and concentric calf raise. The power measures were; concentric peak force, rate of force development, and drop-jump height / contact time. The data showed a significant increase (p < 0.05 in ankle joint angle on the right leg and a corresponding tendency on the left. No significant change was seen with the power measures. Results suggest that massage can increase plantar flexors' flexibility without a change in power and thus may be an alternative to static stretching during an athletic warm-up

  18. A comparison of repair methods for gap healing in equine flexor tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, A L; Stashak, T S; Smith, F W; Norrdin, R W

    1990-01-01

    In nine horses (18 forelimbs), a 3 cm section of superficial digital flexor tendon was removed and the tendons were repaired with immobilization for 6 weeks and (1) no suture (n = 6); (2) a double locking loop tenorrhaphy with carbon fiber (n = 6); or (3) a double locking loop tenorrhaphy with size 2 nylon suture (n = 6). Clinical assessment, gross evaluation, morphometry, histology, and mechanical testing were performed on two limbs from each treatment group at weeks 6, 12, and 24. At weeks 6 and 12, the unsutured tissue was less mature than the tissue sutured with nylon. By week 24, the carbon fiber repair had breaking stress (mean, 12.5 M Pa) similar to the unsutured repair (mean, 10.6 M Pa). There was necrosis and a granulomatous foreign body reaction around the carbon fiber. The nylon suture repair had significantly greater strength per unit area (mean breaking stress, 20.4 M Pa) because of a smaller area of repair tissue in the gap (mean, 3.6 cm2). At week 24, the nylon suture repair tissue was the most mature with the least inflammation of the three repair methods. A nylon double locking loop suture was the preferred method for equine flexor tenorrhaphy of a tendon gap because of greater breaking stress, histologic maturity, biocompatibility, and the adequate functional and cosmetic outcome.

  19. Isometric torque-angle relationships of the elbow flexors and extensors in the transverse plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Ilona J; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, A J Knoek; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2010-10-01

    Maximal voluntary isometric torque-angle relationships of elbow extensors and flexors in the transverse plane (humerus elevation angle of 90 degrees ) were measured at two different horizontal adduction angles of the humerus compared to thorax: 20 degrees and 45 degrees . For both elbow flexors and extensors, the torque-angle relationship was insensitive to this 25 degrees horizontal adduction of the humerus. The peak in torque-angle relationship of elbow extensors was found at 55 degrees (0 degrees is full extension). This is closer to full elbow extension than reported by researchers who investigated this relationship in the sagittal plane. Using actual elbow angles during contraction, as we did in this study, instead of angles set by the dynamometer, as others have done, can partly explain this difference. We also measured electromyographic activity of the biceps and triceps muscles with pairs of surface electrodes and found that electromyographic activity level of the agonistic muscles was correlated to measured net torque (elbow flexion torque: Pearson's r=0.21 and extension torque: Pearson's r=0.53). We conclude that the isometric torque-angle relationship of the elbow extensors found in this study provides a good representation of the force-length relationship and the moment arm-angle relationship of the elbow extensors, but angle dependency of neural input gives an overestimation of the steepness. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Racing performance of Thoroughbreds with superficial digital flexor tendonitis treated with desmotomy of the accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon: 332 cases (1989-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Alaine J; Bramlage, Larry R

    2014-06-15

    To assess postoperative probability of racing, career longevity, and convalescent time in Thoroughbred racehorses with moderate to severe superficial digital flexor tendonitis (SDFT) in the forelimbs treated by desmotomy of the accessory ligament of the superficial digital flexor tendon (ie, superior check ligament desmotomy [SCLD]). Retrospective case series. 332 Thoroughbred racehorses with SDFT consecutively treated by means of SCLD. Medical records and racing records were reviewed to assess return to racing, number of races completed, time to first race, and lifetime performance. The horses were categorized as raced or unraced prior to and after surgery. Descriptive statistics including age and treated limb were also recorded. Of 332 horses, 228 (69%) returned to racing following injury and treatment. Seventy-eight of 118 (66%) horses that had not raced prior to injury and 150 of 214 (70%) horses that had raced prior to injury raced after treatment. Seventeen of 39 (44%) horses ≥ 5 years old raced following injury and treatment and 211 of 293 (72%) horses ≤ 4 years old returned to racing. There was no difference in the percentages of horses returning to racing for 2-, 3-, or 4-year olds. Postoperative infections occurred in 6 of the 332 (2%) horses. Median time to first race for horses that raced after surgery was 302 days (range, 48 to 1,120 days; mean ± SD, 341 ± 153 days), with a median of 8 starts/horse after surgery (range, 1 to 109 starts; mean ± SD, 14 ± 15.8 starts). Of 228 horses that returned to racing, 159 (70%) raced ≥ 5 times after surgery. Sex and treated limb did not have a significant effect on return to racing. However, horses ≥ 5 years old were significantly less likely to return to racing, compared with younger horses. In horses with unilateral SDFT and racing was not significantly different between horses treated bilaterally versus unilaterally. 228 of 332 (69%) horses with SDFT of the forelimb treated with SCLD successfully

  1. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatoprak O

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Omer Karatoprak,1 Sinan Karaca,2 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,3 Ozgur Karaman,2 Azmi Hamzaoglu41Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital Atasehir, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Kolan International Hospital Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul TurkeyBackground: Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils.Case presentations: In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection.Conclusion: Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections.Keywords: bupivacaine, calcification, great toe tendons, corticosteroid injection

  2. Flexor tendon injuries of hand: experience at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Hussain, Syed Shahid; Tariq, Farhan; Rafiq, Zulqarnain; Khan, M Ibrahim; Malik, Saleem A

    2007-01-01

    Flexor tendon injury is one of the most common hand injuries. This initial treatment is of the utmost importance because it often determines the final outcome; inadequate primary treatment is likely to give poor long tem results. Various suture techniques have been devised for tendon repair but the modified Kessler's technique is the most commonly used. This study was conducted in order to know the cause, mechanism and the effects of early controlled mobilization after flexor tendon repair and to assess the range of active motion after flexor tendon repair in hand. This study was conducted at the department of Plastic Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad from 1st March 2002 to 31st August 2003. Only adult patients of either sex with an acute injury were included in whom primary or delayed primary tendon repair was undertaken. In all the patients, modified Kessler's technique was used for the repair using non-absorbable monofilament (Prolene 4-0). The wound was closed with interrupted non-absorbable, polyfilament (Silk 4-0) suture. A dorsal splint extending beyond the finger tip to proximal forearm was used with wrist in 20-30 degrees palmer flexion, metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint flexed at 60 degrees. Passive movements of fingers were started from the first post operative day, and for controlled, active movements, a dynamic splint was applied. During this study, 33 patients with 39 digits were studies. 94% of the patients had right dominated hand involvement. 51% had the complete flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) injuries. Middle and ring fingers were most commonly involved. Thumb was involved in 9% of the patients. Zone III(46%) was the commonest to be involved followed by zone II (28%). Laceration with sharp object was the most frequent cause of injury. Finger tip to distal palmer crease distance (TPD) was < 2.0 cm in 71% cases (average 2.4cm) at the end of 2nd postoperative week. Total number of

  3. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    absence of dystrophin, the sarcolemma is damaged by the shearing force generated during force transmission. This membrane tearing initiates a chain reaction which leads to muscle cell death and loss of contractile machinery. As a consequence, muscle force is reduced and dead myofibers are replaced by fibrotic tissues (5). This later change increases muscle stiffness (6). Accurate measurement of these changes provides important guide to evaluate disease progression and to determine therapeutic efficacy of novel gene/cell/pharmacological interventions. Here, we present two methods to evaluate both contractile and passive mechanical properties of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the contractile properties of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle.

  4. Muscle force is determined also by muscle relative position: isolated effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Effects on force of changes of the position of extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) relative to surrounding tissues were investigated in rat. Connective tissue at the muscle bellies of tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and EDL was left intact, to allow myofascial force

  5. Myofascial force transmission between antagonistic rat lower limb muscles: Effects of single muscle or muscle group lengthening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M; Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M.; Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of lengthening of the whole group of anterior crural muscles (tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscles (TA + EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL)) on myofascial interaction between synergistic EDL and TA + EHL muscles, and on myofascial force transmission between anterior c

  6. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI, decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb. The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis.

  7. Effect of Electroacupuncture on the Expression of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase and Ultrastructure Changes in Atrophied Rat Peroneus Longus Muscle Induced by Sciatic Nerve Injection Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yang, Sheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the key enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Its mutations have been reported to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which demonstrates muscular atrophy in distal extremities, particularly manifested in peroneus muscles. In this situation, the dysfunctions of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) affect energy supply and excitation-contraction coupling of muscle fibers, therefore resulting in muscular atrophy. Although the treatment of muscular atrophy is a global urgent problem, it can be improved by electroacupuncture (EA) treatment. To investigate the mechanism underlying EA treatment improving muscular atrophy, we focused on the perspective of protein synthesis by establishing a penicillin injection-induced sciatic nerve injury model. In our model, injured rats without treatment showed decreased sciatic functional index (SFI), decreased peroneus longus muscle weight and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, aggregated mitochondria with vacuoles appearing, swollen SR, and downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of GlyRS and myosin heavy chain IIb (MHC-IIb). The injured rats with EA treatment showed significant recovery. These results indicated that EA stimulation can alleviate peroneus longus muscular atrophy induced by iatrogenic sciatic nerve injury through promoting the recovery of GlyRS and muscle ultrastructure and increasing muscle protein synthesis.

  8. Technical tip: Side-to-side tendon suture as escape plan during extensor indicis tendon plasty in distal extensor pollicis longus rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schleh, Andrea Christina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In case of a short distal recipient stump after extensor pollicis longus (EPL tendon rupture, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius (EIP tendon using a conventional Pulvertaft tendon-weaving technique may be difficult or impossible. The purpose of this paper is to provide a technical tip to manage this rare, but clinically important scenario of a very short distal EPL recipient tendon.Methods: A side-to-side tendon suture (SSTS was used for EIP transfer to restore thumb extension in 3 patients who had sustained a distal rupture of their extensor pollicis longus near the interphalangeal joint. The SSTS was performed with an overlap of 2 cm in 2 patients and in one patient.Results: A stable SSTS was achieved which allowed early active mobilization and resulted in good functional recovery of thumb extension after a mean follow-up of 8 months.Conclusion: Extensor indicis transfer using SSTS is a reliable and technically simple escape plan in a distal rupture of the EPL near the phalangeal joint. It provides very stable tendon-to-tendon attachment with high loading capacity and good gliding qualities.

  9. Rehabilitation and Return to Sport Following Surgical Repair of the Rectus Abdominis and Adductor Longus in a Professional Basketball Player: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Steven M; Anloague, Philip A; Strack, Donald S

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Acute traumatic avulsion of the rectus abdominis and adductor longus is rare. Chronic groin injuries, often falling under the athletic pubalgia spectrum, have been reported to be more common. There is limited evidence detailing the comprehensive rehabilitation and return to sport of an athlete following surgical or conservative treatment of avulsion injuries of the pubis or other sports-related groin pathologies. Case Description A 29-year-old National Basketball Association player sustained a contact injury during a professional basketball game. This case report describes a unique clinical situation specific to professional sport, in which a surgical repair of an avulsed rectus abdominis and adductor longus was combined with a multimodal impairment- and outcomes-based rehabilitation program. Outcomes The patient returned to in-season competition at 5 weeks postoperation. Objective measures were tracked throughout rehabilitation and compared to baseline assessments. Measures such as the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score and numeric pain-rating scale revealed progress beyond the minimal important difference. Discussion This case report details the clinical reasoning and evidence-informed interventions involved in the return to elite sport. Detailed programming and objective assessment may assist in achieving desired outcomes ahead of previously established timelines. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):697-706. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6352.

  10. Reconstruction of the dynamic velopharyngeal function by combined radial forearm-palmaris longus tenocutaneous free flap, and superiorly based pharyngeal flap in postoncologic total palatal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuri, Takashi; Ueda, Koichi; Yamada, Akira; Okada, Masashi; Hara, Mai

    2015-04-01

    We attempted to reconstruct dynamic palatal function using a radial forearm-palmaris longus tenocutaneous free flap in conjunction with a pharyngeal flap for a postoncologic total-palate defect in a 67-year-old male patient. This reconstruction involved 3 important tasks, namely, separating the oral and nasal cavities, preserving the velopharyngeal space to avoid sleep apnea, and maintaining velopharyngeal closure to avoid nasal regurgitation during swallowing. In our technique, the radial forearm flap separates the oral and nasal cavities with an open rhinopharyngeal space, and a superiorly based pharyngeal flap, which is sutured to the posterior end of the forearm flap, limits the rhinopharyngeal space, and forms the bilateral velopharyngeal port. Furthermore, the palmaris longus tendon, which is attached to the forearm flap, is secured to the superior constrictor muscle to create a horizontal muscle sling. Contraction of the superior constrictor muscle leads to shrinkage of the sling, resulting in velopharyngeal closure. Swallowing therapy was started 4 weeks after the surgery. The patient could resume oral intake without any difficulties 6 months after the surgery. Speech intelligibility changed from severe to minimal hypernasality.

  11. Effects of roxarsone and monensin on digital flexoral tendons of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, N C; Chapman, H D; Fitz-Coy, S H; Balog, J M; Huff, G R; Huff, W E

    1998-04-01

    Roxarsone and monensin are common poultry feed additives that are used alone or in combination with other drugs to improve growth and feed utilization in young birds. The effects of monensin and roxarsone on the physiology of flexoral tendons of broiler chickens were examined to understand their relationships to leg weakness that have been occasionally associated with these drugs. Day-old chickens were fed either roxarsone or monensin for a period of 6 wk with two regimens of each of the drugs (roxarsone, 45.4 or 90.8 g/ton feed; monensin, 100 or 150 g/ton feed). None of the treatments had any adverse effect on the growth of the birds or caused any significant leg problem. Roxarsone at 45.4 g/ton caused a significant gain in body weight. The biomechanical strength of digital flexoral tendons was measured in several ways. There were no statistical differences in load at break, the modulus of elasticity, or stress or strain levels between different treatment groups and birds that received no medication. There were no differences in collagen, proteoglycan, and pyridinoline content of tendons. Sequential extraction of tendons with different solvents revealed a significant increase in the percentage of guanidine HCl extractible collagens in monensin-treated birds, and a decrease in the acid extractible collagen in both roxarsone- and monensin-treated groups. The relative content of collagen in acid extractible collagens were significantly small relative to total collagen content. Majority of collagen (84 to 90%) was extractible with pepsin. About 8 to 11% of total collagen was resistant to pepsin that was extractible with collagenase; this did not differ between treatment groups. Roxarsone treatment had no effect on the guanidine soluble collagen pool. The effect of monensin on the increase in guanidine soluble pool of collagen may relate to its disruptive effects on cellular secretory processes, which may be of significance in modulating connective tissue function in

  12. Synergistic co-activation increases the extent of mechanical interaction between rat ankle plantar-flexors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Tijs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors has been found for physiological muscle lengths and relative positions, but only with all muscles maximally activated. The aims of this study were to assess intermuscular mechanical interactions between ankle plantar-flexors during (i fully passive conditions, (ii excitation of soleus (SO, (iii excitation of lateral gastrocnemius (LG, and (iv during co-activation of SO and LG (SO&LG. We assessed effects of proximal lengthening of LG and plantaris (PL muscles (i.e. simulating knee extension on forces exerted at the distal SO tendon (FSO and on the force difference between the proximal and distal LG+PL tendons (ΔFLG+PL of the rat. LG+PL lengthening increased FSO to a larger extent (p=0.017 during LG excitation (0.0026 N/mm than during fully passive conditions (0.0009 N/mm. Changes in FSO in response to LG+PL lengthening were lower (p=0.002 during SO only excitation (0.0056 N/mm than during SO&LG excitation (0.0101 N/mm. LG+PL lengthening changed ∆FLG+PL to a larger extent (p=0.007 during SO excitation (0.0211 N/mm than during fully passive conditions (0.0157 N/mm. In contrast, changes in ∆FLG+PL in response to LG+PL lengthening during LG excitation (0.0331 N/mm were similar (p=0.161 to that during SO&LG excitation (0.0370 N/mm. In all conditions, changes of FSO were lower than those of ∆FLG+PL. This indicates that muscle forces were transmitted not only between LG+PL and SO, but also between LG+PL and other surrounding structures. In addition, epimuscular myofascial force transmission between rat ankle plantar-flexors was enhanced by muscle activation. However, the magnitude of this interaction was limited.

  13. Inter-Rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in Assessing Poststroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Taciser; Goksel Karatepe, Altinay; Gunaydin, Rezzan; Koc, Aysegul; Altundal Ercan, Ulku

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is commonly used in clinical practice for grading spasticity. However, it was modified recently by omitting grade "1+" of the MAS and redefining grade "2". The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of MAS and modified MAS (MMAS) for the assessment of poststroke elbow flexor spasticity.…

  14. From collagen to tenocyte : How the equine superficial digital flexor tendon responds to physiologic challenges and physical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yi-Lo

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Injuries to the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) play a prominent role in the orthopaedic disorders and form an important threat to both the equine athletic potential and welfare. Therefore this thesis aims at in-depth understanding the development of ECM composition in

  15. Tendon elastic strain energy in the human ankle plantar-flexors and its role with increased running speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-09-01

    The human ankle plantar-flexors, the soleus and gastrocnemius, utilize tendon elastic strain energy to reduce muscle fiber work and optimize contractile conditions during running. However, studies to date have considered only slow to moderate running speeds up to 5 m s(-1). Little is known about how the human ankle plantar-flexors utilize tendon elastic strain energy as running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting. We used data obtained from gait experiments in conjunction with musculoskeletal modeling and optimization techniques to calculate muscle-tendon unit (MTU) work, tendon elastic strain energy and muscle fiber work for the ankle plantar-flexors as participants ran at five discrete steady-state speeds ranging from jogging (~2 m s(-1)) to sprinting (≥8 m s(-1)). As running speed progressed from jogging to sprinting, the contribution of tendon elastic strain energy to the positive work generated by the MTU increased from 53% to 74% for the soleus and from 62% to 75% for the gastrocnemius. This increase was facilitated by greater muscle activation and the relatively isometric behavior of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. Both of these characteristics enhanced tendon stretch and recoil, which contributed to the bulk of the change in MTU length. Our results suggest that as steady-state running speed is advanced towards maximum sprinting, the human ankle plantar-flexors continue to prioritize the storage and recovery of tendon elastic strain energy over muscle fiber work.

  16. Strength of knee flexors of the paretic limb as an important determinant of functional status in post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Joanna; Czernicki, Jan; Pruszyńska, Magdalena; Miller, Elżbieta

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the multi-modal exercise program (MMEP) in patients after stroke, and to identify muscles that are the best predictors of functional performance and changes in functional status in a 3-week rehabilitation program. Thirty-one post-stroke patients (60.6±12.7 years) participating in a 3-week MMEP took part in the study. Measurements of extensor and flexor strength of the knee (Fext, Fflex) were done. Functional performance was measured using Timed Up & Go test (TUG), 6-Minute Walk Test (6-MWT) and Tinetti Test. The rehabilitation program improved all the results of functional tests, as well as the values of strength in the patients. Both baseline and post-rehabilitation functional status was associated with knee flexor and extensor muscle strength of paretic but not of non-paretic limbs. At baseline examination muscle strength difference between both Fflexkg(-1) and Fextkg(-1) had an influence on functional status. After rehabilitation the effect of muscle strength difference on functional status was not evident for Fextkg(-1) and, interestingly, even more prominent for Fflexkg(-1). MMEP can effectively increase muscle strength and functional capacity in post-stroke patients. Knee flexor muscle strength of the paretic limb and the knee flexor difference between the limbs is the best predictor of functional performance in stroke survivors. Copyright © 2017 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. Bifurcated Bicipital Aponeurosis Giving Origin to Flexor and Extensor Muscles of the Forearm - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Swamy, Ravindra S; Shetty, Prakashchandra; Maloor, Prasad A; Dsouza, Melanie R

    2016-02-01

    Bicipital aponeurosis is usually attached to the antebrachial fascia on the medial side of forearm and to posterior border of ulna assisting in the supination of the forearm along with biceps brachii muscle. Variations in the bicipital aponeurosis may lead to neurovascular compression as reported earlier. In the present case, the bicipital aponeurosis had two slips i.e. medial and lateral. Medial slip gave origin to some fibers of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis and the lateral slip gave origin to some fibers of brachioradialis. Such unusual slips of bicipital aponeurosis may distribute the stress concentration and may work in different directions affecting the supination of forearm by biceps brachii muscle and bicipital aponeurosis.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoun-Seung Kang, MD, PhD, CPO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001 after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001. However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001. Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  19. Long-term follow-up of the flexor carpi ulnaris transfer in spastic hemiplegic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thometz, J G; Tachdjian, M

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 25 patients with cerebral palsy who underwent transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris to the radial wrist extendors. The mean age at the time of surgery was 8 years 1 month. The mean follow-up was 8 years 7 months. At follow-up, the mean active wrist dorsiflexion was 44.2 degrees, palmar flexion was 19.0 degrees, supination was 40.2 degrees, and pronation was 53.4 degrees. According to a modification of Green's evaluation system, there were six excellent, nine good, five fair, and five poor results. Two patients required further surgery to correct a supination, dorsiflexion contracture. We found the transfer to be quite effective in improving wrist dorsiflexion, although there was often a significant loss of active palmar flexion postoperatively. The patient therefore should have good digital extension (with the wrist extended passively above neutral) to be considered for the transfer.

  20. Plantar flexor stretch reflex responses to whole body loading/unloading during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; van Doornik, Johannes; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    was to investigate the contribution of load receptor feedback to the compensatory stretch reflex response. We examined the contribution of load receptor feedback to the magnitude of the short and medium latency components of the ankle plantar flexor stretch reflex responses following an unexpected dorsiflexion...... perturbation during human walking. Three body load conditions were investigated: normal body load, a 30% increase in body load, and a 30% decrease in body load. Healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.6 km/h with the left ankle attached to a portable stretching device. Dorsiflexion...... perturbations (8 degrees; 350-425 degrees/s) were generated during the late stance phase of gate (approximately 400 ms following heel contact). Electromyographic activity was recorded from the soleus, tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris muscles using bipolar surface...

  1. Anatomical reference point for harvesting a flexor graft during arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament

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    Clécio de Lima Lopes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of a vascular network adjacent to the insertion of the pes anserinus, so that it could be used as an anatomical reference point to facilitate harvesting flexor grafts for arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL.METHODS: Thirty patients with ACL tears who were going to undergo ACL reconstruction using the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles as grafts were selected randomly. During the harvesting of these tendons, the presence or absence of this anatomical reference point was noted.RESULTS: All the patients presented a vascular network of greater or lesser diameter.CONCLUSION: The vascular network seems to be a good reference point during harvesting of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, for facilitating graft harvesting.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeoun-Seung; Park, Yoon-Ghil; Lee, Bum-Suk; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2013-01-01

    The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO) is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001) after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001). However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001). Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  3. Retrieval of the retracted flexor tendons for long fingers: New tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahed, K; Moujtahid, M; Nechad, M

    2014-09-01

    Zone II flexor tendon injuries continue to be a challenge for hand surgeons. During the injury event, the tendon ends may retract towards the palm. Retrieval of these lacerated ends can be problematic because the tendon sheath is unstretchable. This demanding surgery requires a precise repair technique where the tendon stumps are handled in an atraumatic manner. Microtrauma to the tendon sheath must be avoided as this can induce adhesions and lead to poor functional outcomes. Several retrieval methods for retracted tendon ends have been described in published studies. In this technical note, we will describe a technical variation that streamlines the surgical procedure and uses commonly available materials. This simple trick makes the procedure easier and avoids having to suture the tendon to the tubing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Differences in activation patterns in elbow flexor muscles during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T; Yano, H; Miyashita, M

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relative activation of the synergistic muscles during three different types of muscle contraction, the electromyograms (EMG) of two elbow flexor muscles, the biceps brachii (BB) and the brachioradialis (BR), have been compared. To accomplish this eight healthy human subjects performed the following elbow flexions against the same load--concentric, eccentric and isometric contractions. The isometric contractions were performed at three elbow angles: 10, 45 and 90 degrees (0 degree equal to full extension). The EMG were recorded by bipolar surface electrodes, and the relative activation between the two muscles was evaluated as the quotient of mean EMG activities (BR/BB). For the isotonic elbow flexions, BR/BB were calculated at three angle divisions: 0-30 degrees, 30-60 degrees and 60-90 degrees. Results indicated that the relative activation of the BR during the concentric contractions was higher than that of the eccentric contraction, particularly at the extended elbow angles, i.e. the BR/BB of the concentric contractions for the elbow joint angles ranging from 0-30 degrees and 30-60 degrees were significantly greater (P contractions. During the isometric and eccentric contractions, the BR/BB at the flexed joint angles tended to be greater than those at the extended angles. In contrast, there were no angle-dependent BR/BB variations during the concentric elbow flexions. Further, changing patterns in the EMG power spectra due to the type of contraction were different between BB and BR. These results indicated that the activation pattern in the two elbow flexor muscles varied with the muscle contraction pattern.

  5. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-05

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  6. Contractile properties of muscle fibers from the deep and superficial digital flexors of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, M T; Chase, P B; Hermanson, J W; Clark, A N; Brunet, N M; Bertram, J E A

    2010-10-01

    Equine digital flexor muscles have independent tendons but a nearly identical mechanical relationship to the main joint they act upon. Yet these muscles have remarkable diversity in architecture, ranging from long, unipennate fibers ("short" compartment of DDF) to very short, multipennate fibers (SDF). To investigate the functional relevance of the form of the digital flexor muscles, fiber contractile properties were analyzed in the context of architecture differences and in vivo function during locomotion. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type was studied, and in vitro motility assays were used to measure actin filament sliding velocity (V(f)). Skinned fiber contractile properties [isometric tension (P(0)/CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V(US)), and force-Ca(2+) relationships] at both 10 and 30°C were characterized. Contractile properties were correlated with MHC isoform and their respective V(f). The DDF contained a higher percentage of MHC-2A fibers with myosin (heavy meromyosin) and V(f) that was twofold faster than SDF. At 30°C, P(0)/CSA was higher for DDF (103.5 ± 8.75 mN/mm(2)) than SDF fibers (81.8 ± 7.71 mN/mm(2)). Similarly, V(US) (pCa 5, 30°C) was faster for DDF (2.43 ± 0.53 FL/s) than SDF fibers (1.20 ± 0.22 FL/s). Active isometric tension increased with increasing Ca(2+) concentration, with maximal Ca(2+) activation at pCa 5 at each temperature in fibers from each muscle. In general, the collective properties of DDF and SDF were consistent with fiber MHC isoform composition, muscle architecture, and the respective functional roles of the two muscles in locomotion.

  7. Muscle fibre types of the lumbrical, interossei, flexor, and extensor muscles moving the index finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the fibre types of the muscles moving the index fingers in humans. Fifteen forearms of eight adult cadavers were used. The sampled muscles were the first lumbrical (LM), first volar interosseous (VI), first dorsal interosseus (DI), second flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), second flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), and extensor digitorum (ED). Six micrometer thick sections were stained for fast muscle fibres. The procedure was performed by applying mouse monoclonal anti-skeletal myosin antibody (fast) and avidin-biotin peroxidase complex staining. Rectangular areas (0.38 mm × 0.38 mm) were photographed and the boundaries of the muscle areas were marked on the translucent film. The numbers and sizes of the muscle fibres in each part were evaluated by the image analyser program and calculated per unit area (1 mm(2)). The proportion of the fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.012) greater in the intrinsic muscles (55.7 ± 17.1%) than in the extrinsic muscles (45.9 ± 17.1%). Among the six muscles, the VI had a significantly higher portion (59.3%) of fast fibres than the FDS (40.6%) (p = 0.005) or the FDP (45.1%) (p = 0.023). The density of the non-fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.015) greater in the extrinsic muscles (539.2 ± 336.8/mm(2)) than in the intrinsic muscles (383.4 ± 230.4/mm2). Since the non-fast fibres represent less fatigable fibres, it is thought that the extrinsic muscles have higher durability against fatigue, and the intrinsic muscles, including the LM, should move faster than the FDS or FDP because the MP joint should be flexed before the IP joint to grip an object.

  8. Enhanced expression of Wnt9a in the flexor tenosynovium in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Menuki, Kunitaka; Zenke, Yukichi; Hirasawa, Hideyuki; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the association between abnormal Wnt signaling and the cause of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (ICTS) and whether an association exists between Wnt signaling and cell proliferation in the flexor tenosynovium. The subjects included nine patients with ICTS; the controls were nine patients with distal radius fractures without any symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. We extracted mRNA from the flexor tenosynovium and compared the expression levels of genes encoding 17 types of Wnt in both subjects and controls via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels of factors involved in cell proliferation, such as estrogen-responsive finger protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparin binding-epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also measured using quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, we compared the Wnt and MIB-1 protein expression levels to clarify the effect of Wnt on cell proliferation. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater expression of the gene encoding Wnt9a in subjects with ICTS than in controls and also revealed a positive correlation between the expression of genes encoding Wnt9a and VEGF in subjects with ICTS. Quantitative evaluation using immunohistochemical staining also indicated more marked Wnt9a expression in subjects than in controls. However, there was no relationship between the expression of Wnt9a and the cell proliferation index MIB-1. These results indicate that Wnt9a expression is enhanced in ICTS and that Wnt9a may be involved in VEGF expression in ICTS.

  9. Unilateral Plantar Flexors Static-Stretching Effects on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Jump Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josinaldo Jarbas da Silva, David George Behm, Willy Andrade Gomes, Fernando Henrique Domingues de Oliveira Silva, Enrico Gori Soares, Érica Paes Serpa, Guanis de Barros Vilela Junior, Charles Ricardo Lopes, Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static-stretching (SS on the passive range of movement (ROM of the stretched limb, surface electromyography (sEMG and single-leg bounce drop jump (SBDJ performance measures of the ipsilateral stretched and contralateral non-stretched lower limbs. Seventeen young men (24 ± 5 years performed SBDJ before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch unilateral ankle plantar flexor SS (6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort. SBDJ performance measures included jump height, impulse, time to reach peak force, contact time as well as the sEMG integral (IEMG and pre-activation (IEMGpre-activation of the gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive ROM increased in the stretched limb after the SS (pre-test: 21 ± 4° and post-test: 26.5 ± 5°, p < 0.001. Post-stretching decreases were observed with peak force (p = 0.029, IEMG (P<0.001, and IEMGpre-activation (p = 0.015 in the stretched limb; as well as impulse (p = 0.03, and jump height (p = 0.032 in the non-stretched limb. In conclusion, SS effectively increased passive ankle ROM of the stretched limb, and transiently (less than 10 minutes decreased muscle peak force and pre-activation. The decrease of jump height and impulse for the non-stretched limb suggests a SS-induced central nervous system inhibitory effect.

  10. Further evaluation of an EMG technique for assessment of the deep cervical flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, D; Jull, G; O'Leary, S; Dall'Alba, P

    2006-12-01

    A novel surface electromyographic (EMG) technique was recently described for the detection of deep cervical flexor muscle activity. Further investigation of this technique is warranted to ensure EMG activity from neighbouring muscles is not markedly influencing the signals recorded. This study compared deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscle activity with the activity of surrounding neck and jaw muscles during various anatomical movements of the neck and jaw in 10 volunteer subjects. DCF EMG activity was recorded with custom electrodes inserted via the nose and fixed by suction to the posterior mucosa of the oropharynx. Surface electrodes were placed over the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, masseter and suprahyoid muscles. Positioned in supine, subjects performed isometric cranio-cervical flexion, cervical flexion, right and left cervical rotation, jaw clench and resisted jaw opening. Across all movements examined, EMG amplitude of the DCF muscles was greatest during neck movements that would require activity of the DCF muscles, particularly during cranio-cervical flexion, their primary anatomical action. The actions of jaw clench and resisted jaw opening demonstrated significantly less DCF EMG activity than the cranio-cervical flexion action (pEMG amplitude during their respective primary anatomical actions, which occurred in the absence of increased EMG amplitude recorded from the DCF muscles. The finding of substantial EMG activity of the DCF muscles only during neck actions that would require their activity, particularly cranio-cervical flexion, and not during actions involving the jaw, provide further assurance that the majority of myoelectric signals detected from the nasopharyngeal electrode are from the DCF muscles.

  11. Serial superficial digital flexor tendon biopsies for diagnosing and monitoring collagenase-induced tendonitis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. de Lacerda Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of a biopsy technique by performing serial evaluations of tissue samples of the forelimb superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT in healthy horses and in horses subjected to superficial digital flexor tendonitis induction. Eight adult horses were evaluated in two different phases (P, control (P1 and tendonitis-induced (P2. At P1, the horses were subjected to five SDFT biopsies of the left forelimb, with 24 hours (h of interval. Clinical and ultrasonographic (US examinations were performed immediately before the tendonitis induction, 24 and 48 h after the procedure. The biopsied tendon tissues were analyzed through histology. P2 evaluations were carried out three months later, when the same horses were subjected to tendonitis induction by injection of bacterial collagenase into the right forelimb SDFT. P2 clinical and US evaluations, and SDFT biopsies were performed before, and after injury induction at the following time intervals: after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, and after 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The biopsy technique has proven to be easy and quick to perform and yielded good tendon samples for histological evaluation. At P1 the horses did not show signs of localised inflammation, pain or lameness, neither SDFT US alterations after biopsies, showing that the biopsy procedure per se did not risk tendon integrity. Therefore, this procedure is feasible for routine tendon histological evaluations. The P2 findings demonstrate a relation between the US and histology evaluations concerning induced tendonitis evolution. However, the clinical signs of tendonitis poorly reflected the microscopic tissue condition, indicating that clinical presentation is not a reliable parameter for monitoring injury development. The presented method of biopsying SDFT tissue in horses enables the serial collection of material for histological analysis causing no clinical signs and tendon damage seen

  12. The Usefulness of the Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Evaluation of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Lee, Sheen Woo; Jeong, Yu Mi; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong Gi; Kwak, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to access the diverse conditions that lead to the clinical manifestations of tarsal tunnel syndrome and evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation. Thirty-three patients who underwent ankle MRI and surgery under the impression of tarsal tunnel syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The findings on ankle MRI were categorized into space occupying lesions within the tarsal tunnel, space occupying lesions of the tunnel wall, and non-space occupying lesions. Associated plantar muscle atrophy was also evaluated. Medical records were reviewed for correlation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and surgical findings. There were 21 space occupying lesions of the tarsal tunnel, and eight lesions of tarsal tunnel wall. There were three cases with accessory muscle, three with tarsal coalition, five with ganglion cysts, one neurogenic tumor, five flexor retinaculum hypertrophy, three varicose veins, and nine with tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis, flexor digitorum longus, or flexor hallucis longus tendon. One patient was found to have a deltoid ligament sprain. Of the 32, eight patients experienced fatty atrophic change within any one of the foot muscles. NCV was positive in 79% of the MRI-positive lesions. MRI provides detailed information on ankle anatomy, which includes that of tarsal tunnel and beyond. Pathologic conditions that cause or mimic tarsal tunnel syndrome are well demonstrated. MRI can enhance surgical planning by indicating the extent of decompression required, and help with further patient management. Patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome can greatly benefit from preoperative MRI. However, it should be noted that not all cases with tarsal tunnel syndrome have MRI-demonstrable causes.

  13. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a comparative biomechanical study of the palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction with other augmentative methods in cadaveric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acromioclavicular injuries are common in sports medicine. Surgical intervention is generally advocated for chronic instability of Rockwood grade III and more severe injuries. Various methods of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction and augmentation have been described. The objective of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of a novel palmaris-longus tendon reconstruction with those of the native AC+CC ligaments, the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction, the ACJ capsuloligamentous complex repair, screw and clavicle hook plate augmentation. Hypothesis There is no difference, biomechanically, amongst the various reconstruction and augmentative methods. Study Design Controlled laboratory cadaveric study. Methods 54 cadaveric native (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were tested using the Instron machine. Superior loading was performed in the 6 groups: 1 in the intact states, 2 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction (WD, 3 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with acromioclavicular joint capsuloligamentous repair (WD.ACJ, 4 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with clavicular hook plate augmentation (WD.CP or 5 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with coracoclavicular screw augmentation (WD.BS and 6 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with mersilene tape-palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction (WD. PLmt. Posterior-anterior (horizontal loading was similarly performed in all groups, except groups 4 and 5. The respective failure loads, stiffnesses, displacements at failure and modes of failure were recorded. Data analysis was carried out using a one-way ANOVA, with Student's unpaired t-test for unpaired data (S-PLUS statistical package 2005. Results Native ligaments were the strongest and stiffest when compared to other modes of reconstruction and augmentation except coracoclavicular screw, in both posterior-anterior and superior directions (p WD.ACJ provided additional

  14. A novel device using the Nordic hamstring exercise to assess eccentric knee flexor strength: a reliability and retrospective injury study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opar, David A; Piatkowski, Timothy; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2013-09-01

    Reliability and case-control injury study. To determine if a novel device designed to measure eccentric knee flexor strength via the Nordic hamstring exercise displays acceptable test-retest reliability; to determine normative values for eccentric knee flexor strength derived from the device in individuals without a history of hamstring strain injury (HSI); and to determine if the device can detect weakness in elite athletes with a previous history of unilateral HSI. HSI and reinjury are the most common cause of lost playing time in a number of sports. Eccentric knee flexor weakness is a major modifiable risk factor for future HSI. However, at present, there is a lack of easily accessible equipment to assess eccentric knee flexor strength. Thirty recreationally active males without a history of HSI completed the Nordic hamstring exercise on the device on 2 separate occasions. Intraclass correlation coefficients, typical error, typical error as a coefficient of variation, and minimal detectable change at a 95% confidence level were calculated. Normative strength data were determined using the most reliable measurement. An additional 20 elite athletes with a unilateral history of HSI within the previous 12 months performed the Nordic hamstring exercise on the device to determine if residual eccentric muscle weakness existed in the previously injured limb. The device displayed high to moderate reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.83-0.90; typical error, 21.7-27.5 N; typical error as a coefficient of variation, 5.8%-8.5%; minimal detectable change at a 95% confidence level, 60.1-76.2 N). Mean ± SD normative eccentric flexor strength in the uninjured group was 344.7 ± 61.1 N for the left and 361.2 ± 65.1 N for the right side. The previously injured limb was 15% weaker than the contralateral uninjured limb (mean difference, 50.3 N; 95% confidence interval: 25.7, 74.9; P<.01), 15% weaker than the normative left limb (mean difference, 50.0 N; 95

  15. Different sensitivity of miniature endplate currents in rat external and internal intercostal muscles to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 as compared with diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, K; Kovyazina, I; Zobov, V; Bukharaeva, E; Nikolsky, E E; Vyskocil, F

    2009-01-01

    Derivative of 6-methyluracil, selective cholinesterase inhibitor C-547 potentiates miniature endplate currents (MEPCs) in rat external intercostal muscles (external ICM) more effectively than in internal intercostal muscles (internal ICM). Effect of the C-547 on intercostal muscles was compared with those on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles. Half-effective concentrations for tau of MEPC decay arranged in increasing order were as follows: EDL, locomotor muscle, most sensitive = 1.3 nM, external ICM, inspiration muscle = 6.8 nM, diaphragm, main inspiration muscle = 28 nM, internal ICM, expiration muscle = 71 nM. External ICM might therefore be inhibited, similarly as the limb muscles, by nanomolar concentrations of the drug and do not participate in inspiration in the presence of the C-547. Moreover, internal ICM inhibition can hinder the expiration during exercise-induced fast breathing of C-547- treated experimental animals.

  16. Strengthening fibular muscle for children's congenital pes equinovarus%加强腓骨肌治疗小儿先天性马蹄内翻足

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高书林; 唐伟椿; 白德明

    2001-01-01

    目的介绍一种解决先天性马蹄内翻足肌力不平衡的手术方法和效果。方法在行足后内侧软组织松解术时,将长屈肌与腓骨长肌吻合,加强腓侧肌力。结果随访23足,22足外观满意。其中2足踝关节活动受限,1足畸形完全复发。结论畸形复发是由于腓骨肌持续无力造成的。加强腓侧肌的力量是治疗先天性马蹄内翻足的有效手术方式。%Objective To introduce a surgical treatment for muscular imbalance in congenital talipes equinovarus and its effects. Method Musculus flexor hallucis longus with musculus peroneus longus were anastomosed to strengthen fibular muscle producing posterointernal lysis for clubfoot. Results Among following up 23 feet , appearances of 22 feet were satisfactory, two feet of which were limited in motion of ankle joint, and one foot was relapsed. Conclusion Deformity recurrence results from persistent asthenia of fibular muscles. Strengthening fibular muscle is one of the effective surgical treatments for congenital talipes equinovarus.

  17. Anatomical Description of the Presence and Variability of the Digital Manica Flexoria in the Equine Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Cornillie, P; Oosterlinck, M; Simoens, P; Pille, F; Martens, A

    2017-02-01

    During endoscopy (tenoscopy) of the distal aspect of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS), the digital manica flexoria can be visualized connecting the distal branches of the superficial digital flexor tendon. However, this structure has been inconsistently described and variably named in the veterinary literature. The objectives of this study were to describe the presence, configuration and variability of the digital manica flexoria in the equine distal limb. Dissection of 144 equine cadaveric limbs revealed the presence of this structure in all the feet, although different types and conformations were identified. In the forelimbs, a membranous digital manica flexoria predominated (94%; P digital manica flexoria predominated (93%; P digital manica flexoria towards the distal DFTS was only possible in 22 of the 144 limbs, all forelimbs. Clinicians should be aware of the intra- and inter-individual anatomical variations of the digital manica flexoria to avoid misinterpretation during ultrasonographic and tenoscopic examinations of the DFTS.

  18. MRI findings in Kirner deformity: normal insertion of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon without soft-tissue enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaejoon; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Koh, Eun-Mi; Cha, Hoon-Suk [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Sang-Hee [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    Kirner deformity is characterized by volar and radial incurvature of the distal phalanx of the 5th finger. A proposed causative mechanism includes abnormal distal insertion of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon along the volar surface of the distal phalanx of the 5th finger. A chronic inflammatory process or altered vascularisation of the soft tissues has also been suggested as the underlying causative mechanism based on MRI findings. We present a teenage boy with Kirner deformity, along with supplementary imaging of his father who also has the deformity, to illustrate MRI findings that dispute the above hypotheses. MRI in both son and father show normal insertion of the deep flexor tendon and no signs of inflammation. (orig.)

  19. Epidemiology of Hip Flexor and Hip Adductor Strains in National Collegiate Athletic Association Athletes, 2009/2010-2014/2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckard, Timothy G; Padua, Darin A; Dompier, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    restriction time were examined. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) and proportion ratios were calculated to compare rates within and between sports by event type, sex, mechanism, recurrence, and participation restriction time. RESULTS: A total of 770 hip flexor and 621 hip adductor strains were reported, resulting...... sports teams, especially soccer and ice hockey, should place an emphasis on prevention programs for hip adductor strains. Secondary prevention programs involving thorough rehabilitation and strict return-to-play criteria should be developed and implemented to curb the high recurrence rate....../2010-2014/2015 academic years. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: Rates and patterns of hip flexor and adductor strains in collegiate sports were examined in a convenience sample of NCAA varsity teams from 25 sports. Rates and distributions of strains by mechanism, recurrence, and participation...

  20. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris causing acute compressive neuropathy of the ulnar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasen, Sam

    2012-12-01

    This study reports a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris in a 64-year-old woman. She presented with symptoms of acute ulnar nerve compression mimicking a volar compartment syndrome. Owing to rapidly progressive symptoms, emergency surgical exploration was carried out. Intra-operatively a large mass of calcium phosphate carbonate was noted in association with the flexor carpi ulnaris near its insertion at the wrist compressing the ulnar nerve and artery in Guyon's canal. Postoperatively the patient had complete resolution of symptoms. Conservative management with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, rest, splinting, and steroid therapy is recommended for acute calcific tendinitis, but this case suggests a role for surgical treatment when there is acute neural compression and severe pain.

  1. Focal experimental injury leads to widespread gene expression and histologic changes in equine flexor tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Jacobson

    Full Text Available It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3 cm regions for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry and gene expression (real time PCR analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03 with no differences between overstressed (medial and stress-deprived (lateral tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02, with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02 and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001. Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001, whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001. In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes

  2. Focal Experimental Injury Leads to Widespread Gene Expression and Histologic Changes in Equine Flexor Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Else; Dart, Andrew J.; Mondori, Takamitsu; Horadogoda, Neil; Jeffcott, Leo B.; Little, Christopher B.; Smith, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    It is not known how extensively a localised flexor tendon injury affects the entire tendon. This study examined the extent of and relationship between histopathologic and gene expression changes in equine superficial digital flexor tendon after a surgical injury. One forelimb tendon was hemi-transected in six horses, and in three other horses, one tendon underwent a sham operation. After euthanasia at six weeks, transected and control (sham and non-operated contralateral) tendons were regionally sampled (medial and lateral halves each divided into six 3cm regions) for histologic (scoring and immunohistochemistry) and gene expression (real time PCR) analysis of extracellular matrix changes. The histopathology score was significantly higher in transected tendons compared to control tendons in all regions except for the most distal (P ≤ 0.03) with no differences between overstressed (medial) and stress-deprived (lateral) tendon halves. Proteoglycan scores were increased by transection in all but the most proximal region (P < 0.02), with increased immunostaining for aggrecan, biglycan and versican. After correcting for location within the tendon, gene expression for aggrecan, versican, biglycan, lumican, collagen types I, II and III, MMP14 and TIMP1 was increased in transected tendons compared with control tendons (P < 0.02) and decreased for ADAMTS4, MMP3 and TIMP3 (P < 0.001). Aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and collagen types I and III expression positively correlated with all histopathology scores (P < 0.001), whereas lumican, ADAMTS4 and MMP14 expression positively correlated only with collagen fiber malalignment (P < 0.001). In summary, histologic and associated gene expression changes were significant and widespread six weeks after injury to the equine SDFT, suggesting rapid and active development of tendinopathy throughout the entire length of the tendon. These extensive changes distant to the focal injury may contribute to poor functional outcomes and re

  3. Strength characterization of knee flexor and extensor muscles in Prader-Willi and obese patients

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    Baccalaro Gabriele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background despite evidence of an obesity-related disability, there is a lack of objective muscle functional data in overweight subjects. Only few studies provide instrumental strength measurements in non-syndromal obesity, whereas no data about Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are reported. The aim of our study was to characterize the lower limb muscle function of patients affected by PWS as compared to non-syndromal obesity and normal-weight subjects. Methods We enrolled 20 obese (O females (age: 29.1 ± 6.5 years; BMI: 38.1 ± 3.1, 6 PWS females (age: 27.2 ± 4.9 years; BMI: 45.8 ± 4.4 and 14 healthy normal-weight (H females (age: 30.1 ± 4.7 years; BMI: 21 ± 1.6. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in both lower limbs at the fixed angular velocities of 60°/s, 180°/s, 240°/s was measured with a Cybex Norm dynamometer. Results the H, O and PWS populations appear to be clearly stratified with regard to muscle strength.: PWS showed the lowest absolute peak torque (PT for knee flexor and extensor muscles as compared to O (-55% and H (-47% (P = 0.00001. O showed significantly higher strength values than H as regard to knee extension only (P = 0.0014. When strength data were normalised by body weight, PWS showed a 50% and a 70% reduction in PT as compared to O and H, respectively. Knee flexors strength values were on average half of those reported for extension in all of the three populations. Conclusion the novel aspect of our study is the determination of objective measures of muscle strength in PWS and the comparison with O and H patients. The objective characterization of muscle function performed in this study provides baseline and outcome measures that may quantify specific strength deficits amendable with tailored rehabilitation programs and monitor effectiveness of treatments.

  4. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  5. Reliability of isokinetic evaluation in passive mode for knee flexors and extensors in healthy children

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    Adriana N. Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isokinetic dynamometer has been considered the gold-standard measurement of muscle performance. However, the reliability for the passive mode in children has not been reported to date. OBJECTIVES: The purpose was to evaluate the reliability of the isokinetic dynamometer in passive mode in children. METHOD: Twenty-one healthy children (ten girls, eleven boys, aged 5 to 12 years (age: 8.5±2.2 years, were evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer. Each participant was tested twice with a one-week interval and performed five consecutive cycles of knee extension and flexion. The test was performed at 60º/s in the concentric passive mode and the children performed maximal contractions. The measured variables were peak torque, average peak torque, total work, and average power, time to peak torque and angle of peak torque for dominant and non-dominant lower limbs. Reliabilities were determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1, standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%, and coefficient of variation (CV. RESULTS: We found good reliability in both lower limbs for peak torque, average peak torque, total work and average power of knee flexors and extensors, with ICC3,1 values greater than 0.80; SEM ranging from 6.7 to 79.2; SEM% ranging from 10.4% to 16.8%; CV lower than 15%. Bland-Altman analysis showed that the bias was low than 10% and limits of agreement (LOAs ranging from 33.9% to 59.2%, and -28.8% and -52.8%, showing that measures tended to disagree. However, time to peak torque (ICC3,1 0.34; SEM%>37.4%; CV>41.7%; bias >24.0%; LOA>101.0% and angle of peak torque (ICC3,19.3; SEM%>27.6%; CV>15.3%; bias>11.0%; LOA>61.0% were not reliable. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that isokinetic evaluation in passive mode for knee extensors and flexors of dominant and non-dominant lower limbs of children without disabilities was reliable for peak torque, average peak torque, work, and power. However, average time to peak

  6. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Plantar Flexor Muscle Spasticity and Walking Speed in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddha, Darshan; Ganesh, G Shankar; Pattnaik, Monalisa; Mohanty, Patitapaban; Mishra, Chittaranjan

    2016-12-01

    Spasticity is a major disabling symptom in patients post stroke. Although studies have demonstrated that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can reduce spasticity, the duration of single session TENS is a subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to determine the sustainability of the effects of TENS applied over common peroneal nerve in the reduction of ankle plantar-flexor spasticity and improving gait speed in patients post stroke. Thirty patients (11 women and 19 men) (mean age of 46.46 years) were randomly assigned to group 1 (task oriented exercises), group 2 (TENS for 30 min and task oriented exercises) and group 3 (TENS for 60 min and task oriented exercises) for a period of five sessions per week for 6 weeks. All patients were assessed for ankle plantar-flexor spasticity, passive ankle dorsi-flexion range of motion, clonus and timed up and go test at the time of recruitment to study, at 3 and 6 weeks of therapeutic intervention. The overall results of the study suggest that there was a decrease in ankle plantar flexor spasticity, ankle clonus and timed up and go score in all the groups. A greater reduction of spasticity was seen in TENS groups (groups 2 and 3) when compared to control. No significant improvement was found in timed up and go test (TUG) scores between groups. Both 30 min and 60 min of application of TENS are effective in reducing spasticity of ankle plantar flexors, improving walking ability and increase the effectiveness of task related training. Based on the effect size, we would recommend a longer duration application for the reduction of spasticity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Bifurcated Bicipital Aponeurosis Giving Origin to Flexor and Extensor Muscles of the Forearm – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Swamy, Ravindra S.; Shetty, Prakashchandra; Maloor, Prasad A; Dsouza, Melanie R

    2016-01-01

    Bicipital aponeurosis is usually attached to the antebrachial fascia on the medial side of forearm and to posterior border of ulna assisting in the supination of the forearm along with biceps brachii muscle. Variations in the bicipital aponeurosis may lead to neurovascular compression as reported earlier. In the present case, the bicipital aponeurosis had two slips i.e. medial and lateral. Medial slip gave origin to some fibers of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis and the lateral slip ...

  8. The Effects of Bio-Lubricating Molecules on Flexor Tendon Reconstruction in A Canine Allograft Model In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Wei, Zhuang; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Using allograft is an attractive alternative for flexor tendon reconstruction because of the lack of donor morbidity, and better matching to the intrasynovial environment. The purpose of this study was to use biolubricant molecules to modify the graft surface to decrease adhesions and improve digit function. Methods 28 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of 14 dogs were first lacerated and repaired to create a model with repair failure and scar digit for tendon reconstruction. Six weeks after the initial surgery, the tendons were reconstructed with FDP allograft tendons obtained from canine cadavers. One graft tendon in each dog was treated with saline as a control and the other was treated with gelatin, carbodiimide derivatized, hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin). Six weeks postoperatively, digit function, graft mechanics, and biology were analyzed. Results Allograft tendons treated with cd-HA-Lubricin had decreased adhesions at the proximal tendon/graft repair and within flexor sheath, improved digit function, and increased graft gliding ability. The treatment also reduced the strength at the distal tendon to bone repair, but the distal attachment rupture rate was similar for both graft types. Histology showed that viable cells migrated to the allograft, but these were limited to the tendon surface. Conclusion cd-HA-Lubricin treatment of tendon allograft improves digit functional outcomes after flexor tendon reconstruction. However, delayed bone-tendon healing should be a caution. Furthermore, the cell infiltration into the allograft tendons substance should be a target for future studies, to shorten the allograft self-regeneration period. PMID:24445876

  9. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Neziri, Burim; Mekaj, Agon Y; Lajqi, Shpetim; Shahini, Labinot

    2015-06-20

    The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force.

  10. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shkelzen B Duci; Hysni M Arifi; Hasan R Ahmeti; Suzana Manxhuka-Kerliu; Burim Neziri; Agon Y Mekaj; Shpetim Lajqi

    2015-01-01

    Background:The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding.Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair,and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions.Methods:We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg.The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits;thus,a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study.Results:Based on the results achieved in our experimental study,the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU.Conclusions:The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1 a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU.Therefore,these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath,which in this case required greater traction force.

  11. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Neziri, Burim; Mekaj, Agon Y; Lajqi, Shpetim; Shahini, Labinot

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. Methods: We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Results: Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Conclusions: The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force. PMID:26063369

  12. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen B Duci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs] following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. Methods: We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Results: Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Conclusions: The load (N significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force.

  13. Effects of two different deep digital flexor tenotomy techniques on distal articular angles of equine cadaver forelimbs

    OpenAIRE

    Dearo, Antonio Cezar de Oliveira; Rosa,Vitor Bruno Bianconi; Reichmann,Peter; Oliveira,Milton Luis Ribeiro de

    2012-01-01

    Deep digital flexor (DDF) tenotomy is a technique employed for years to treat selected disorders of the musculoskeletal system in horses. Although two different surgical approaches (i.e. mid-metacarpal and pastern) have been described for performing the procedure, in vitro quantitative data regarding the modifications induced by either technique on the distal articular angles is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the study reported here was to investigate the viability of a proposed biomechan...

  14. The effect of flexor tenotomy on healing and prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe

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    van Netten Jaap J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flexor tenotomy is a minimally invasive surgical alternative for the treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe. The influence of infection on healing and time to heal after flexor tenotomy is unknown. Flexor tenotomy can also be used as a prophylactic treatment. The effectiveness as a prophylactic treatment has not been described before. Methods A retrospective study was performed with the inclusion of all consecutive flexor tenotomies from one hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. Results From 38 ulcers, 35 healed (92%, with a mean time to heal of 22 ± 26 days. The longest duration for healing was found for infected ulcers that were penetrating to bone (35 days; p = .042. Cases of prophylactic flexor tenotomies (n=9 did not result in any ulcer or other complications during follow-up. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that flexor tenotomy may be beneficial for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe, with a high healing percentage and a short mean time to heal. Infected ulcers that penetrated to bone took a significantly longer time to heal. Prospective research, to confirm the results of this retrospective study, should be performed.

  15. Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is an effective method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in college students with forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Yeon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of deep cervical flexor training on maintaining forward head posture, muscular endurance, and cervical mobility. It also examined the effectiveness of deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty college students were recruited and randomly assigned to groups that underwent either deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit (experimental group, n=10) or conventional deep cervical flexor training (control group, n=10). The craniovertebral angle of each subject was measured with a lateral-view picture. Neck mobility was assessed using a cervical range of motion device and muscular endurance was measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. Both groups performed conventional deep cervical flexor exercises three times a week for six weeks. The experimental group underwent a pressure biofeedback unit training was 5 to10 minutes/day, thrice a week. [Results] Cervical range of motion in the experimental group increased significantly between the end of training and the end of the four week detraining period, compared to that in control group. [Conclusion] Deep cervical flexor training with a pressure biofeedback unit is a useful method for maintaining neck mobility and muscular endurance in people with forward head posture.

  16. Does the Length of Elbow Flexors and Visual Feedback Have Effect on Accuracy of Isometric Muscle Contraction in Men after Stroke?

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    Vilma Juodzbaliene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of different muscle length and visual feedback information (VFI on accuracy of isometric contraction of elbow flexors in men after an ischemic stroke (IS. Materials and Methods. Maximum voluntary muscle contraction force (MVMCF and accurate determinate muscle force (20% of MVMCF developed during an isometric contraction of elbow flexors in 90° and 60° of elbow flexion were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer in healthy subjects (MH, n=20 and subjects after an IS during their postrehabilitation period (MS, n=20. Results. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the isometric contraction of the elbow flexors absolute errors were calculated. The absolute errors provided information about the difference between determinate and achieved muscle force. Conclusions. There is a tendency that greater absolute errors generating determinate force are made by MH and MS subjects in case of a greater elbow flexors length despite presence of VFI. Absolute errors also increase in both groups in case of a greater elbow flexors length without VFI. MS subjects make greater absolute errors generating determinate force without VFI in comparison with MH in shorter elbow flexors length.

  17. Effect of an eccentrically biased hamstring strengthening home program on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orishimo, Karl F; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to document relative activation intensities of the hamstrings and gluteus maximus during 4 eccentric hamstring strengthening exercises and to assess the effects of a short-term strengthening program comprised of these exercises on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship. Twelve healthy subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities from the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and gluteus maximus were recorded as subjects performed (a) standing hip extension with elastic resistance, (b) trunk flexion in single limb stance (diver), (c) standing split (glider), and (d) supine sliding bridge (slider). Baseline isometric knee flexor strength was measured at 90, 70, 50, and 30° of flexion at the knee with the subject seated and the hip flexed to 50° from horizontal. After completing the 4-week training program, strength tests were repeated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to compare EMG activity between muscles and to assess angle-specific strength improvements. Hamstring activity exceeded gluteus maximus activity for resisted hip extension, glider, and slider exercises (p Knee flexor strength improved by 9.0% (p = 0.005) but was not angle specific (training by angle p = 0.874). The short-term home training program effectively targeted the hamstrings and resulted in strength gains that were similar at short and long muscle lengths. These data demonstrate that hamstring strength can be improved using eccentrically biased unilateral exercises without the use of weights or other equipments.

  18. Effects of eccentric exercise on optimum length of the knee flexors and extensors during the preseason in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Nosaka, Ken; Idoate, Fernando; Arcos, Asier Los; Cronin, John

    2010-05-01

    To assess the effects of eccentric exercise on optimum lengths of the knee flexors and extensors during the preseason in professional soccer. Twenty-eight athletes from a professional Spanish soccer team (Division II) were randomly assigned to an eccentric exercise intervention group (EG) or a control group (CG). Over the four-week period two athletes from the control group suffered RF injuries and two athletes were contracted by other clubs. After these exclusions, both groups (EG, n=13; and CG, n=11) performed regular soccer training during the four-week preseason period. After the four weeks, the optimum lengths of the knee flexors were significantly (Pknee extensors were significantly increased only in the EG by 6.5 degrees . Peak torque levels and ratios of quadriceps to hamstring (Q/H ratios) were not significantly altered throughout the study for either group. Eccentric exercise can increase the optimum lengths of both the knee extensors and knee extensors flexors during the preseason in professional soccer.

  19. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  20. Clinical use of a combined grasping and locking core suture technique for flexor tendon repair in zone II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2013-12-01

    Previous authors have used either a grasping or a locking technique for flexor tendon repair in zone II. A combined (grasping and locking) 10-strand repair was used by the author in 22 adults (n = 28 fingers) with lacerations of both flexor tendons in zone II. The combined repair is known to be strong (mean tensile strength of 164 N), and the technique was used in selected cases who were thought to be at higher risk of rupture either because of excessive digital oedema (in early tendon repairs) or because of tendon retraction (in late primary tendon repairs). The 10-strand repair was bulky and, hence, only the profundus tendon was repaired; and "venting" of the pulley system was done proximal to the repair site as recommended by other authors. Supervised early active mobilisation was done immediately after the operation. At final follow-up, the outcome was calculated using the original Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures and the final outcome was considered excellent in 19 patients (n = 25 fingers), good in two patients (n = 2 fingers), and fair in the remaining patient (n = 1 finger). It was concluded that the bulky 10-strand repair may be used for zone II finger flexor tendon lacerations as long as a profundus-(?) only repair and "venting" of the pulley system are performed.

  1. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2-4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from -0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option.

  2. Reconstruction of medial collateral ligament defects with a flexor-pronator fascia patch in complete open release of stiff elbows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Yan, Hede; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A; Fan, Cun-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Because medial elbow stability is essential for stiff elbow release, surgical techniques have been reported for reconstructing medial elbow stability. However, medial collateral ligament (MCL) defects, caused by inevitable detachment and resection performed for complete release, make the reconstruction more challenging. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the outcomes after using a flexor-pronator fascia patch in medial elbow reconstruction for open release of stiff elbows. We hypothesized that this technique is effective for repairing MCL defects. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10 patients. The MCL defects were all reconstructed with a flexor-pronator fascia patch. An external fixator was used in all patients. One patient could not be contacted and was thus excluded from the study. Outcome measures included stability, range of motion, Mayo Elbow Performance Score, ulnar nerve symptoms, power grip, and radiographic findings. The mean follow-up period was 19.6 months; all elbows were stable by the last follow-up. One patient presented with moderate elbow instability and then regained stability 3 months after the external fixator was removed. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 58 points to 94 points, and the mean flexion arc improved from 40° to 133°. No radiographic manifestations of elbow dislocation or suture anchor looseness were observed. A flexor-pronator fascia patch provides sufficient stability for repairing MCL defects without restricting the range of motion gained during arthrolysis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  3. DIFFERENCE IN THE MAGNITUDE OF MUSCLE DAMAGE BETWEEN ELBOW FLEXORS AND KNEE EXTENSORS ECCENTRIC EXERCISES

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    Tolga Saka

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between maximal eccentric exercises of the elbow flexors (EF and knee extensors (KE. Twelve sedentary male volunteers participated in the study. Range of motion (ROM, isometric peak torque (IPT, delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS, creatine kinase activity (CK, and myoglobin concentration (Mb were evaluated before, immediately after, and on the 1st , 2nd, 3rd , and 7th days following exercise. Total work (TW during exercises was recorded and corrected by muscle volume (TWc. TWc was greater (p < 0.01 for EF [24 (2 joule·cm-3] than for KE [7 (0.4 joule·cm-3]. Increases in CK on the 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days (p < 0.01 and increases in Mb on the 1st , 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days were significantly (p<0.01 larger for EF than for KE. The decline in IPT was greater (p < 0.05- 0.01 for EF at all test occasions compared with KE. The results of this study demonstrate that the magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males

  4. Walking phase modulates H-reflex amplitude in flexor carpi radialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Antoinette; Klimstra, Marc; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Lam, Tania; Hundza, Sandra R

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that remote whole-limb rhythmic movement (e.g., cycling or stepping) induces suppression of the Hoffman (H-) reflex evoked in stationary limbs. However, the dependence of reflex amplitude on the phase of the movement cycle (i.e., phase-dependence) has not been consistent across this previous research. The authors investigated the phase-dependence of flexor carpi radialis (FCR) H-reflex amplitudes during active walking and in kinematically matched static postures across the gait cycle. FCR H-reflexes were elicited in the stationary forearm with electrical stimulation to the median nerve. Significant phase-dependent modulation occurred during walking when the gait cycle was examined with adequate phase resolution. The suppression was greatest during midstance and midswing, suggesting increased ascending communication during these phases. There was no phase-dependent modulation in static standing postures and no correlation between lower limb background electromyography levels and H-reflex amplitude during active walking. This evidence, along with previous research demonstrating no phase modulation during passive walking, suggests that afferent feedback associated with joint position and leg muscle activation levels are not the sole source of the phase modulation seen during active walking. Possible sources of phase modulation include combinations of afferent feedback related to active movement or central motor commands or both.

  5. Recruitment of the deep cervical flexor muscles during a postural-correction exercise performed in sitting.

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    Falla, Deborah; O'Leary, Shaun; Fagan, Amy; Jull, Gwendolen

    2007-05-01

    Specific strategies to optimally facilitate postural muscles to retrain postural form are advocated in the clinical management of neck pain. The purpose of this study was to compare the activation of selected cervical, thoracic and lumbar muscles during independent and facilitated postural correction in sitting in 10 subjects with chronic neck pain. Deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscle activity was recorded with custom electrodes inserted via the nose and fixed by suction to the posterior mucosa of the oropharynx. Surface electrodes were placed over the thoracic erector spinae and lumbar multifidus muscles. Root-mean-square EMG amplitude was measured for each muscle across two conditions. In the first condition, subjects were instructed to spontaneously "sit up straight" from a slumped posture without any other guidance from the therapist. In the second condition the therapist provided specific manual and verbal facilitation to assist the patient to correct to an upright pelvic position with a neutral spinal lumbo-pelvic position. Activation of the DCF and lumbar multifidus muscles (Ppostural correction compared to independent sitting correction. Specific postural-correction strategies result in better facilitation of key postural muscles compared to non-specific postural advice. The results of this study highlight the need for clinical skill and precision in postural training of patients with neck pain.

  6. Computer aided quantification of pathological features for flexor tendon pulleys on microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chun; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Shih, Hui-Hsuan; Yang, Tai-Hua; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yang, Dee-Shan; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the pathological features of flexor tendon pulleys is essential for grading the trigger finger since it provides clinicians with objective evidence derived from microscopic images. Although manual grading is time consuming and dependent on the observer experience, there is a lack of image processing methods for automatically extracting pulley pathological features. In this paper, we design and develop a color-based image segmentation system to extract the color and shape features from pulley microscopic images. Two parameters which are the size ratio of abnormal tissue regions and the number ratio of abnormal nuclei are estimated as the pathological progression indices. The automatic quantification results show clear discrimination among different levels of diseased pulley specimens which are prone to misjudgments for human visual inspection. The proposed system provides a reliable and automatic way to obtain pathological parameters instead of manual evaluation which is with intra- and interoperator variability. Experiments with 290 microscopic images from 29 pulley specimens show good correspondence with pathologist expectations. Hence, the proposed system has great potential for assisting clinical experts in routine histopathological examinations.

  7. Central hyperexcitability as measured with nociceptive flexor reflex threshold in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Edwin Choon Wyn; Sterling, Michele; Stone, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal conditions are increasingly conceived as involving altered central nervous system processing, and impaired nociceptive flexor reflex (NFR) appears to reflect altered central nervous system processing. The primary objective was to synthesize the evidence for impaired NFR in these conditions. The secondary objective was to evaluate the NFR stimuli parameters employed by reviewed studies. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library were searched from the mid-1960s to June 2010. Experimental reports were systematically reviewed and meta-analysis (where possible) was performed. NFR thresholds and parameters of NFR stimuli were extracted. Sixteen trials were identified, 11 of which were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Compared to healthy controls, standardized mean differences in NFR threshold were significantly lower in subjects with primary headache (-0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.77 to -0.13, P=0.005), fibromyalgia (-0.63; 95% CI -0.93 to -0.34, Ppain (-1.51; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.93, Pcentral hyperexcitability in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Our review also suggests that shorter inter-pulse duration tends to yield smaller variability in NFR threshold. However, further research investigating optimal stimulation parameters is still warranted.

  8. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Morphological study of the Golgi tendon organ in equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

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    Watanabe, Takafumi; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Yamamoto, Etsuko; Ueda, Hiromi; Tangkawattana, Prasarn; Takehana, Kazushige

    2004-08-01

    The Golgi tendon organ (GTO) is an encapsulated fusiform mechanoreceptor siding in the musculo-tendinous junction of many animal species. Inhibitory function of afferent nerve fibers distributed from nearby motor units, the organ responds to active tension exerted onto the muscle. The morphological features of the equine GTO have not yet been elucidated. Additionally, there is some controversy regarding to the existence of the GTO in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Therefore, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy using alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining and the silver-enhanced colloidal gold method were carried out to determine both the location and characteristics of the GTO at the musculo-tendinous junction of the SDFT. A GTO with a fusiform structure of approximately 3 mm in length was found in the tendinous part. The lumen of the GTO was divided into compartments by septal cells. Each compartment contained collagen fibrils, nerve fibers and Schwann cells. This is the first report of the equine GTO.

  10. Enthesiopathy of the flexor carpi ulnaris at the pisiform: Findings of high-frequency sonography

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    Wick, Marius C., E-mail: marius.wick@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Weiss, Ruediger J., E-mail: rudiger.weiss@karolinska.se [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Arora, Rohit, E-mail: rohit.arora@uki.at [Department for Trauma Surgery and Sports Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gabl, Markus, E-mail: markus.gabl@uki.at [Department for Trauma Surgery and Sports Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gruber, Johann, E-mail: johann.gruber@uki.at [Department of Internal Medicine I, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.jaschke@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S., E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    Objectives: Acute or chronic pain at the pisiform may be due to tendinopathy of the flexor carpi ulnaris tendon (FCU) insertion, mechanical overuse, bony fractures, and osteoarthritis of the pisiform-triquetral joint. Enthesiopathy of the FCU at the pisiform might exhibit abnormalities assessable for sonographic characterization. This study aimed to determine the most relevant sonographic features of tendinopathy of the FCU insertion at the pisiform. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed radiological findings of 9 patients admitted for high-frequency sonographic evaluation of a painful pisiform FCU insertion. The FCU insertion was assessed for active enthesiopathy in terms of tendon thickening and hyperemia, peritendinous effusion, peritendinous hyperemia, peritendinous soft tissue thickening, cystic fluid collections, erosive cortical irregularities, and osteoproliferative alterations at the pisiform. Results: Of all patients, 5 had inflammatory rheumatic disorders and the remainder had a painful pisiform FCU insertion related to overuse. While peritendinous effusion, pisiform erosive cortical irregularities, and peritendinous soft tissue thickening at the FCU insertion were exclusively found in rheumatic patients, active enthesiopathy of the FCU tendon, pisiform osteoproliferative alterations, and hyperemia of the peritendinous soft tissue were inconsistent and found in both groups. Cystic fluid collections from the pisiform-triquetral joint were only seen in patients with overuse. Conclusions: In this small case series of patients with pain at the pisiform FCU insertion, we could reveal several typical sonographic features for insertion tendinopathy. Further studies should prove if these sonographic features could impact on the management of patients with pain at the pisiform.

  11. IS ENHANCED-ECCENTRIC RESISTANCE TRAINING SUPERIOR TO TRADITIONAL TRAINING FOR INCREASING ELBOW FLEXOR STRENGTH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Kaminski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for strengthening muscle are important for fitness, rehabilitation, and the prevention of myotendinous injuries. In trained individuals, the optimal method of increasing strength remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a traditional method of strengthening with a method that allowed for enhanced-eccentric training, on changes in elbow flexor strength in trained subjects. Thirty-nine (8 male, 31 female trained subjects with normal elbow function participated in this study. Subjects were rank-ordered according to isometric force production and randomly assigned to one of three training groups: control (CONT, traditional concentric/eccentric (TRAD, and concentric/enhanced-eccentric (NEG. The training groups completed 24 training sessions. An evaluator blinded to training group performed all testing. Mixed model ANOVA techniques were used to determine if differences existed in concentric one repetition maximum strength, and isometric force production among groups. Changes in peak and average isokinetic force production were also compared. Type 1 error was maintained at 5%. While both groups improved concentric one repetition maximum (NEG = 15.5%, TRAD = 13.8% neither training group statistically differed from changes demonstrated by the CONT group. Nor did either training group show significant improvements in isometric or isokinetic force production over the CONT group. These results do not support the superiority of enhanced-eccentric training for increasing force production in trained subjects.

  12. A review on animal models and treatments for the reconstruction of Achilles and flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B

    2017-03-01

    Tendon is a connective tissue mainly composed of collagen fibers with peculiar mechanical properties essential to functional movements. The increasing incidence of tendon traumatic injuries and ruptures-associated or not with the loss of tissue-falls on the growing interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of animal models is mandatory to deepen the knowledge of the tendon healing response to severe damages or acute transections. Thus, the selection of preclinical models is crucial to ensure a successful translation of effective and safe innovative treatments to the clinical practice. The current review is focused on animal models of tendon ruptures and lacerations or defective injuries with large tissue loss that require surgical approaches or grafting procedures. Data published between 2000 and 2016 were examined. The analyzed articles were compiled from Pub Med-NCBI using search terms, including animal model(s) AND tendon augmentation OR tendon substitute(s) OR tendon substitution OR tendon replacement OR tendon graft(s) OR tendon defect(s) OR tendon rupture(s). This article presents the existing preclinical models - considering their advantages and disadvantages-in which translational progresses have been made by using bioactive sutures or tissue engineering that combines biomaterials with cells and growth factors to efficiently treat transections or large defects of Achilles and flexor tendons.

  13. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  14. Computer Aided Quantification of Pathological Features for Flexor Tendon Pulleys on Microscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the pathological features of flexor tendon pulleys is essential for grading the trigger finger since it provides clinicians with objective evidence derived from microscopic images. Although manual grading is time consuming and dependent on the observer experience, there is a lack of image processing methods for automatically extracting pulley pathological features. In this paper, we design and develop a color-based image segmentation system to extract the color and shape features from pulley microscopic images. Two parameters which are the size ratio of abnormal tissue regions and the number ratio of abnormal nuclei are estimated as the pathological progression indices. The automatic quantification results show clear discrimination among different levels of diseased pulley specimens which are prone to misjudgments for human visual inspection. The proposed system provides a reliable and automatic way to obtain pathological parameters instead of manual evaluation which is with intra- and interoperator variability. Experiments with 290 microscopic images from 29 pulley specimens show good correspondence with pathologist expectations. Hence, the proposed system has great potential for assisting clinical experts in routine histopathological examinations.

  15. Effects of hip flexor training on sprint, shuttle run, and vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Russell S; Chow, John W; Tillman, Mark D; Fournier, Kim A

    2005-08-01

    Although hip flexion is integral in sports, hip flexion exercises are seldom emphasized in strength and conditioning for sports performance. This study aimed to determine whether a hip flexor resistance-training program could improve performance on a variety of tasks. Thirteen men and 11 women completed an 8-week hip flexion resistance-training program. Eleven men and 13 women served as controls. Isometric hip flexion strength, 40-yd dash time and the time for the first 10-yds, 4 x 5.8-m shuttle run time, and vertical jump height were evaluated at the beginning and end of the training and control period. Improvements were observed in the training group but not in the control group. Individuals in the training group improved hip flexion strength by 12.2% and decreased their 40-yd and shuttle run times by 3.8% and 9.0%, respectively. An increase in hip flexion strength can help to improve sprint and agility performance for physically active, untrained individuals.

  16. Biomechanical effects of steroid injections used to treat pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turvey Blake R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent study from our laboratory has demonstrated improved range of motion in the toes of broiler chickens afflicted with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis when treated with local antibiotic and corticosteroid injections, without surgical drainage. However, the use of corticosteroids as an adjunct treatment raised peer concern, as steroids are thought to have deleterious effects on tendon strength. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile strength of the aforementioned steroid treated tendons, to a group of tendons administered with the current standard treatment: systemic antibiotics, surgical drainage and no corticosteroids. Methods Twenty-three tendons’ structural and material properties were investigated (fifteen receiving the standard treatment, eight receiving the steroid treatment. The measurements from each group were interpreted via Student’s unpaired t-test and a post-hoc power analysis. Results The steroid treated tendons did demonstrate a trend toward decreased mechanical properties when compared with the standard treatment group, but the results were not statistically significant. Conclusions Treatment of septic tenosynovitis with local corticosteroid and local antibiotic injections resulted in better digital motion, without a significant loss of tendon strength, over a twenty-eight day recovery period.

  17. Increased rate of force development of elbow flexors by antagonist conditioning contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Takashi; Yoshioka, Koichi; Ito, Susumu; Kusakabe, Tatsumi

    2009-08-01

    The effects of isometric antagonist conditioning contraction (ACC) at various durations and intensities on the contractile force, electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and their rates of rise of elbow flexor muscles were examined in healthy participants. In particular, we focused on the change in the maximum rate of initial force development of agonists (dFagonist/dt(max)), which was evaluated by subtracting antagonist force decaying from apparent initial force development. While the ACC caused no statistically significant effect on the average force during elbow flexion, dFagonist/dt(max) was significantly increased by the ACC of short durations (1-2s) and large intensities. Similarly, the ACC did not affect the root mean square EMG amplitude of biceps brachii during elbow flexion, but significantly increased the maximum rate of rise of the absolute EMG amplitude (dE/dt(max)). These results suggested that facilitating effects of the ACC could be observed in the initial phase of agonist action in healthy participants, and ACC of shorter durations might be more effective. The increased dE/dt(max) suggested that increased neural activities might contribute to the antagonist conditioned facilitation of force development.

  18. Age and sex differences in steadiness of elbow flexor muscles with imposed cognitive demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hugo M; Spears, Vincent C; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Yoon, Tejin; Nielson, Kristy A; Hunter, Sandra K

    2015-06-01

    These studies determined (1) age- and sex-related differences in steadiness of isometric contractions when high cognitive demand was imposed across a range of forces with the elbow flexor muscles (study 1) and; (2) sex differences in steadiness among older adults when low cognitive demand was imposed (study 2). 36 young adults (18-25 years; 18 women) and 30 older adults (60-82 years; 17 women) performed isometric contractions at 5, 30 and 40 % of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Study 1 involved a high-cognitive demand session (serial subtractions by 13 during the contraction) and a control session (no mental math). Study 2 (older adults only) involved a low-cognitive demand session (subtracting by 1s). Older individuals exhibited greater increases in force fluctuations (coefficient of variation of force, CV) with high cognitive demand than young adults, with the largest age difference at 5 % MVC (P = 0.01). Older adults had greater agonist EMG activity with high-cognitive demand and women had greater coactivation than men (P demand for the older women but not for the older men (P = 0.03). Older adults had reduced steadiness and increased muscle activation when high cognitive demand was imposed while low cognitive demand induced increased force fluctuations in older women but not older men. These findings have implications for daily and work-related tasks that involve cognitive demand performed simultaneously during submaximal isometric contractions in an aging workforce.

  19. Effects of prior dynamic leg exercise on static effort of the elbow flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, J W; Gladden, L B; Cresanta, M K

    1983-09-01

    The isometric endurance of the elbow flexors was determined in a control condition and subsequent to a maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer in seven subjects. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), peak rate of tension development (+dP/dt), peak rate of tension relaxation (-dP/dt), one-half contraction time, and one-half relaxation time were also measured. Each subject was tested on four occasions: two control and two experimental sessions. During the control sessions each subject held 40% of MVC to exhaustion, whereas the experimental session included a 1-min maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer 6 min prior to the isometric endurance task. Arterialized blood samples were drawn and analyzed for lactate, pH, PCO2, and PO2. Plasma bicarbonate was calculated from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Subsequent to the cycle ergometer bout, blood lactate concentration rose from 0.8 to 11 mM, pH decreased from 7.43 to 7.20, PCO2 decreased from 40 to 32 Torr, and plasma bicarbonate decreased from 26 to 12 mM. When compared with the control values, no significant changes were evident for any muscle contractile properties following the cycle ergometer bout. However, isometric endurance was significantly reduced from 115.0 +/- 7.2 to 86.3 +/- 7.3 s.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The Babinski reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, J

    1995-11-01

    The plantar response is a reflex that involves not only the toes, but all muscles that shorten the leg. In the newborn the synergy is brisk, involving all flexor muscles of the leg; these include the toe 'extensors', which also shorten the leg on contraction and therefore are flexors in a physiological sense. As the nervous system matures and the pyramidal tract gains more control over spinal motoneurones the flexion synergy becomes less brisk, and the toe 'extensors' are no longer part of it. The toes then often go down instead of up, as a result of a segmental reflex involving the small foot muscles and the overlying skin, comparable to the abdominal reflexes. With lesions of the pyramidal system, structural or functional, this segmental, downward response of the toes disappears, the flexion synergy may become disinhibited and the extensor hallucis longus muscle is again recruited into the flexion reflex of the leg: the sign of Babinski. A true Babinski sign denotes dysfunction of the pyramidal tract, and should be clearly distinguished from upgoing toes that do not belong to the flexion synergy of the leg. Correct interpretation of the plantar response depends only to a minor degree on the method or site of stimulation of the foot. It is therefore most important to assess the response in the entire leg.

  1. The Effect of Body Mass on Eccentric Knee-Flexor Strength Assessed With an Instrumented Nordic Hamstring Device (Nordbord) in Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Cholley, Yannick; Nagel, Mark; Poulos, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    To examine the effect of body mass (BM) on eccentric knee-flexor strength using the Nordbord and offer simple guidelines to control for the effect of BM on knee-flexor strength. Data from 81 soccer players (U17, U19, U21, senior 4th French division, and professionals) and 41 Australian Football League (AFL) players were used for analysis. They all performed 1 set of 3 maximal repetitions of the bilateral Nordic hamstring exercise, with the greatest strength measure used for analysis. The main regression equation obtained from the overall sample was used to predict eccentric knee-flexor strength from a given BM (moderate TEE, 22%). Individual deviations from the BM-predicted score were used as a BM-free index of eccentric knee- flexor strength. There was a large (r = .55, 90% confidence limits .42;.64) correlation between eccentric knee-flexor strength and BM. Heavier and older players (professionals, 4th French division, and AFL) outperformed their lighter and younger (U17-U21) counterparts, with the soccer professionals presenting the highest absolute strength. Professional soccer players were the only ones to show strength values likely slightly greater than those expected for their BM. Eccentric knee-flexor strength, as assessed with the Nordbord, is largely BM-dependent. To control for this effect, practitioners may compare actual test performances with the expected strength for a given BM, using the following predictive equation: Eccentric strength (N) = 4 × BM (kg) + 26.1. Professional soccer players with specific knee-flexor-training history and enhanced neuromuscular performance may show higher than expected values.

  2. INDICATORS OF MAXIMAL FLEXOR FORCE OF LEFT AND RIGHT HAND FOR THE POLICE SELECTION CRITERIA PURPOSES

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    Milivoj Dopsaj

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of their professional responsibilities, police officers have authorization, in situation determined by law, to apply physical force or means of force. Due to given professional reasons, selection among the candidates as well as routine physical capability assessments, should have professional-methodological basis and scientific foundation. Muscle groups of particular reference in relationship to estimate general contraction characteristic in regard to force, and at the same time very easy to test are flexor muscles of fingers of the hand (test “hand squeeze”. The aim of this research is to define criterion characteristic for the population to function for selection and estimation of the hand squeeze force among policemen. This research had 723 participants, students of the Police Academy, as representatives of policemen between 19 and 24 years of age. In order to estimate force of hand grip (both right and left hand, we utilized tensiometric method, and standard procedure previously described (1. For the statistical analysis we used basic descriptive analysis, cluster analysis (defining 7 characteristic classes (clusters as a function of population tested –unacceptable, poor, below average, averaged, above average, excellent and superior, and factor analysis (definition of the selection test as a function of selection procedure (10. Our results indicate that averaged hand grip force among the tested population is 61.70±8.97 DaN (Min – Max=43.43-101.41 for left hand, and 65.11±9.34 DaN (Min – Max= 46.54-109.75 for right hand. The values for the force of defined cluster centers of left hand are: Cluster1-7=50.22, 55.76, 61.61, 67.84, 74.71, 84.02 and 97.15 DaN, and right hand are: Cluster1-7=53.40, 60.27, 66.10, 72.20, 79.70, 92.55 and 105.65 DaNFactor analysis results have shown that one factor has been isolated that accounted for 91.10 worthy variance. Regarding the individual variability, for the saturation of the isolated

  3. Low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors and flexors protect against muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min-Ju; Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Wu, Bo-Han; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the magnitude and duration of the protective effect of low-intensity eccentric contractions (LowEC) against damage induced by maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) of the knee flexors (KF) and extensors (KE). Young men were assigned to 8 experimental groups and 2 control groups (n = 13/group); the experimental groups performed LowEC of KF or KE 2 days (2d), 1 week (1wk), 2 weeks (2wk), or 3 weeks (3wk) before MaxEC, while the control groups performed MaxEC of KF or KE without LowEC. The 2d, 1wk, 2wk, and 3wk groups performed 30 LowEC of KF or 60 LowEC of KE with a load of 10% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength on a resistance-training machine, and all groups performed 30 MaxEC of KF or 60 MaxEC of KE on an isokinetic dynamometer. Several muscle damage markers were measured from before to 2 days after exercise (LowEC) or from before to 5 days after exercise (MaxEC). No significant changes in any variables were evident after LowEC. The changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (P < 0.05) for the 2d and 1wk groups (e.g., peak creatine kinase activity: 1002 ± 501 IU/L; peak muscle soreness: 13 ± 5 mm) than for the control group (peak creatine kinase activity: 3005 ± 983 IU/L; peak muscle soreness 28 ± 6 mm) for both KE and KF. There were no significant differences between the 2d and 1wk groups or among the 2wk, 3wk, and control groups. These results show that LowEC provided 30%-66% protection against damage induced by MaxEC of KF and KE, and the protective effect lasted 1 week.

  4. [Evaluation of perioperative analgesia by nociceptive flexor reflex in pigs under ketamine-azaperone-general anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintisch, Ulf; Baars, Jan; Lahrmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to evaluate quantitatively the analgesic efficacy of the Ketamine-Azaperone-general anesthesia during surgical procedures on pigs by nociceptive flexor reflexes (NFR). The study was performed in 30 four to five month old male pigs which were castrated. The NFR was evoked every minute over the N. ulnaris by multiple electrical stimulation consisting of five single stimuli (2 Hz). The reflex response was derived electromyographically (EMG) by surface electrodes placed over the M. deltoideus. The root-mean-square amplitude within the time interval of 80-240 ms after the last stimulus was calculated as measure for the reflex size. The threshold was fixed at 40 microV. Beside electrical NFR recording the surgical tolerance was determined by the traditional interdigital reflex and the defense reaction to defined surgical test stimuli which were incisisions in the scrotal skin, in the tunica vaginalis and in the testis, pulling off the spermatic cord, clamping and cutting off the spermatic cord and final wound disinfection. All surgical pain stimuli were performed simultaneously with the electrical stimuli. After induction of anesthesia the NFR amplitude declined from 3500 microV below the threshold of 40 microV. At 98% of the surgical stimuli without defense reaction were below the reflex threshold. At 93% with defense reactions demonstrated reflex amplitudes above the threshold. When the interdigital reflex was suppressed, 89% of the NFR values fell below the threshold of 40 microV. These findings demonstrate a good correlation of NFR-amplitudes with reactions to traditional controls of analgesia.

  5. Enhanced propriospinal excitation from hand muscles to wrist flexors during reach-to-grasp in humans.

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    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Burke, David; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    In humans, propriospinal neurons located at midcervical levels receive peripheral and corticospinal inputs and probably participate in the control of grip tasks, but their role in reaching movements, as observed in cats and primates, is still an open question. The effect of ulnar nerve stimulation on flexor carpi radialis (FCR) motor evoked potential (MEP) was tested during reaching tasks and tonic wrist flexion. Significant MEP facilitation was observed at the end of reach during reach-to-grasp but not during grasp, reach-to-point, or tonic contractions. MEP facilitation occurred at a longer interstimulus interval than expected for convergence of corticospinal and afferent volleys at motoneuron level and was not paralleled by a change in the H-reflex. These findings suggest convergence of the two volleys at propriospinal level. Ulnar-induced MEP facilitation was observed when conditioning stimuli were at 0.75 motor response threshold (MT), but not 1 MT. This favors an increased excitability of propriospinal neurons rather than depression of their feedback inhibition, as has been observed during tonic power grip tasks. It is suggested that the ulnar-induced facilitation of FCR MEP during reach may be due to descending activation of propriospinal neurons, assisting the early recruitment of large motoneurons for rapid movement. Because the feedback inhibitory control is still open, this excitation can be truncated by cutaneous inputs from the palmar side of the hand during grasp, thus assisting movement termination. It is concluded that the feedforward activation of propriospinal neurons and their feedback control may be involved in the internal model, motor planning, and online adjustments for reach-to-grasp movements in humans.

  6. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Resistance Training on Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscles.

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    Pantović, Milan; Popović, Boris; Madić, Dejan; Obradović, Jelena

    2015-07-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has recently drawn a lot of attention as means for strengthening of voluntary muscle contraction both in sport and rehabilitation. NMES training increases maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force output through neural adaptations. On the other hand, positive effects of resistance training (RT) on muscle strength are well known. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of a 5-week program of NMES compared to RT program of same duration. Sample of 15 students' of faculty of sport and physical education (age 22 ± 2) were randomized in two groups: NMES (N = 7) and RT (N = 8). NMES group performed NMES superimposed over voluntary muscle contraction, RT group performed resistance training with submaximal loads. Subjects were evaluated for knee isokinetic dynamometry on both sides (60° and 180° s). After intervention no significant difference between groups were observed in isokinetic dynamometry (p = 0.177). However, applying pair sample t test within each group revealed that peak torque increased in NMES-group (p = 0.002 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.003 for left, respectively, at 60° and p = 0.004 for left knee extensors muscles, at angular velocity 180°). In RT group (p = 0.033 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.029 for right knee flexor muscles, at angular velocity 60°). Our results indicate that NMES has equal potential if not in some way better than classical RT having in mind that overload on locomotor apparatus during NMES is minimal and force of muscle contraction is equal on both sides, for enhancement of knee muscles concentric peak torque.

  7. Resection of the flexor digitorum superficialis for trigger finger with proximal interphalangeal joint positional contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Yann; Kinnen, Louis

    2012-11-01

    Open release of the A1 pulley is a widely known procedure for the treatment of trigger finger. A subset of patients presents with both trigger finger and a positional contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. These patients usually have a long history of trigger finger or have already undergone a surgical release of the annular pulley. This study is a retrospective review of the outcomes of resection of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) for patients whose trigger finger was associated with a positional contracture of the PIP joint. Thirty-six patients (39 fingers) were treated by resection of the FDS after section of the A1 pulley. The mean age of the patients was 63 years (range, 45-90 y). Seven patients (19 %) had previously undergone an open release of the A1 pulley and had developed a positional contracture of the PIP joint 2 to 5 months afterward. We performed a retrospective review with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12-60 mo). No patient was lost to follow-up. The active range of motion was recorded at the PIP joint before and after surgery. The mean preoperative positional contracture of the PIP joint was 24° (range, 15°-30°). The mean postoperative positional contracture of the PIP joint was 4° (range, 0°-10°). The most commonly affected digit was the middle finger (26 fingers, 67%). In 28 fingers (72%), full extension was achieved following only the surgical procedure. The remaining 11 fingers (28%) had a postoperative residual positional contracture (range, 5°-10°). However, all fingers achieved a full range of motion after physical therapy and an injection of betamethasone. All of the resected tendons had histological damage. This technique is a useful treatment for selected patients whose trigger finger is associated with a positional contracture. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incomplete rupture of the gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor muscles in a Quarter Horse stallion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppin, D Scott; Lori, David N

    2006-12-01

    A 16-year-old 500-kg (1,100-lb) Quarter Horse stallion was examined because of acute severe lameness involving the left hind limb. Examination revealed signs of failure (concurrent flexion of the tarsus and extension of the stifle [femorotibial] joint) of the caudal component of the reciprocal apparatus. Results of radiographic evaluation ruled out fracture or joint injury as causes of the lameness. During the next 48 hours, the reciprocal apparatus on the left hind limb progressively deteriorated until the horse became non-weight bearing on the limb. The horse wore a full-limb splint over a Robert-Jones bandage on the plantar aspect of the limb for 30 days. Thirty-four days after the initial injury, the horse had weak function of the reciprocal apparatus and limited ability to bear weight. Six days after removal of the splint, laminitis developed in the contralateral hind limb. The horse was managed with a sling for 5 weeks, during which time deep digital flexor tendon contracture developed. Eleven weeks after the initial injury, the stallion was discharged from the hospital and walking comfortably with a 1-cm-high block under the heel of the left hind foot. Incomplete failure of the caudal component of the reciprocal apparatus is an unusual injury that likely occurs during a fall with a hind limb extended under the body, resulting in forced extension of the muscle while it is engaged in contraction. Conservative management of this injury in a heavily muscled adult horse is possible.

  9. Ex vivo penetration of low-level laser light through equine skin and flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Larson, Maureen K; Plant, Thomas K; Sundholm-Tepper, Andrea; Payton, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure penetration efficiencies of low-level laser light energy through equine skin and to determine the fraction of laser energy absorbed by equine digital flexor tendons (superficial [SDFT] and deep [DDFT]). SAMPLE Samples of skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs from 1 metacarpal area of each of 19 equine cadavers. PROCEDURES A therapeutic laser with wavelength capabilities of 800 and 970 nm was used. The percentage of energy penetration for each wavelength was determined through skin before and after clipping and then shaving of hair, through shaved skin over SDFTs, and through shaved skin, SDFTs, and DDFTs (positioned in anatomically correct orientation). Influence of hair color; skin preparation, color, and thickness; and wavelength on energy penetration were assessed. RESULTS For haired skin, energy penetration was greatest for light-colored hair and least for dark-colored hair. Clipping or shaving of skin improved energy penetration. Light-colored skin allowed greatest energy penetration, followed by medium-colored skin and dark-colored skin. Greatest penetration of light-colored skin occurred with the 800-nm wavelength, whereas greatest penetration of medium- and dark-colored skin occurred with the 970-nm wavelength. As skin thickness increased, energy penetration of samples decreased. Only 1% to 20% and 0.1% to 4% of energy were absorbed by SDFTs and DDFTs, respectively, depending on skin color, skin thickness, and applied wavelength. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that most laser energy directed through equine skin was absorbed or scattered by the skin. To achieve delivery of energy doses known to positively affect cells in vitro to equine SDFTs and DDFTs, skin preparation, color, and thickness and applied wavelength must be considered.

  10. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  11. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P stretching during both trials (P stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin.

  12. The effect of knee joint angle on plantar flexor power in young and old men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian H; Allen, Matti D; Power, Geoffrey A; Vandervoort, Anthony A; Rice, Charles L

    2014-04-01

    Human adult aging is associated with a loss of strength, contractile velocity and hence, power. The principal plantar flexors, consisting of the bi-articular gastrocnemeii and the mono-articular soleus, appear to be affected differently by the aging process. However, the age-related effect of knee joint angle on the torque-angular velocity relationship and power production of this functionally important muscle group is unknown. The purpose was to determine whether flexing the knee, thereby reducing the gastrocnemius contribution to plantar flexion, would exacerbate the age-related decrements in plantar flexion power, or shift the torque-angular velocity relationship differently in older compared with young men. Neuromuscular properties were recorded from 10 young (~25 y) and 10 old (~78 y) men with the knee extended (170°) and flexed (90°), in a randomized order. Participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs), followed by maximal velocity-dependent shortening contractions at pre-set loads, ranging from 15 to 75% MVC. The young men were ~20-25% stronger, ~12% faster and ~30% more powerful than the old for both knee angles (Ptorque was ~17% greater in the extended than flexed knee position, with no differences in voluntary activation (>95%). The young men produced 7-12% faster angular velocities in the extended knee position for loads ≤30% MVC, but no differences at higher loads; whereas there were no detectable differences in angular velocity between knee positions in the old across all relative loads. For both knee angles, young men produced peak power at 43.3±9.0% MVC, whereas the old men produced peak power at 54.8±7.9% MVC. These data indicate that the young, who have faster contracting muscles compared with the old, can rely more on velocity than torque for generating maximal power.

  13. Diffusion of mepivacaine to adjacent synovial structures after intrasynovial analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Haspeslagh, M; Vanderperren, K; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists about the specificity of diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) in horses. To evaluate the degree of diffusion of mepivacaine from the equine DFTS to adjacent synovial structures. Crossover experiment. Under general anaesthesia, the DFTS of one front and one hindlimb of 8 horses were injected simultaneously with mepivacaine. Synovial fluid samples of the injected DFTS, the adjacent metacarpo-/metatarsophalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, distal interphalangeal joint, navicular bursa and contralateral MCP/MTP joint were collected 15 min post injection (T15) from one of the injected limbs and 60 min post injection (T60) from the other limb. Venous blood samples were obtained at T0, T15 and T60 to evaluate systemic distribution of mepivacaine. After a 2-week washout period, the procedure was repeated using the same limbs but reversing the time of sampling (front vs. hindlimbs). The concentration of mepivacaine in samples was measured with a commercial ELISA kit. Mepivacaine concentrations in the DFTS samples, at both T15 (5077 mg/l) and T60 (3503 mg/l), exceeded those estimated sufficient to produce synovial analgesia (100 mg/l or 300 mg/l). Mepivacaine was found in all synovial structures adjacent to the injected DFTS and in the contralateral MCP/MTP joints, but concentrations were low, with a maximum value of only 3.2 mg/l. With the exception of the navicular bursa samples, the mepivacaine concentrations in the adjacent synovial structures were significantly higher at T60 than at T15 (Pmepivacaine concentrations were found in the ipsilateral than the contralateral MCP/MTP joints at T60 (Pmepivacaine concentrations at T15 and T60 than at T0 (PMepivacaine injected into the DFTS of horses diffuses towards adjacent synovial structures without achieving clinically relevant concentrations. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Eccentric muscle damage has variable effects on motor unit recruitment thresholds and discharge patterns in elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnall, Tamara J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Nordstrom, Michael A; Semmler, John G

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of eccentric muscle damage on recruitment threshold force and repetitive discharge properties of low-threshold motor units. Ten subjects performed four tasks involving isometric contraction of elbow flexors while electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from human biceps brachii and brachialis muscles. Tasks were 1) maximum voluntary contraction (MVC); 2) constant-force contraction at various submaximal targets; 3) motor unit recruitment threshold task; and 4) minimum motor unit discharge rate task. These tasks were performed on three separate days before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise of elbow flexor muscles. MVC force declined (42%) immediately after exercise and remained depressed (29%) 24 h later, indicative of muscle damage. Mean motor unit recruitment threshold for biceps brachii was 8.4+/-4.2% MVC, (n=34) before eccentric exercise, and was reduced by 41% (5.0+/-3.0% MVC, n=34) immediately after and by 39% (5.2+/-2.5% MVC, n=34) 24 h after exercise. No significant changes in motor unit recruitment threshold were observed in the brachialis muscle. However, for the minimum tonic discharge rate task, motor units in both muscles discharged 11% faster (10.8+/-2.0 vs. 9.7+/-1.7 Hz) immediately after (n=29) exercise compared with that before (n=32). The minimum discharge rate variability was greater in brachialis muscle immediately after exercise (13.8+/-3.1%) compared with that before (11.9+/-3.1%) and 24 h after exercise (11.7+/-2.4%). No significant changes in minimum discharge rate variability were observed in the biceps brachii motor units after exercise. These results indicate that muscle damage from eccentric exercise alters motor unit recruitment thresholds for >or=24 h, but the effect is not the same in the different elbow flexor muscles.

  15. Assessing the Level of Disability, Deep Cervical Flexor Endurance and Fear Avoidance Beliefs in Bankers with Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deptee Warikoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of disability, the deep cervical flexor endurance and fear avoidance beliefs (FAB in bankers with neck pain and to find a correlation between disability and deep cervical muscle endurance, FAB and disability, FAB and deep flexor muscle endurance. Methods: It ws an observational study. The Subjects who had neck pain and minimum 5 years’ experience as a Banker participated in the study. Total 100 subjects were selected. All the subjects were assessed for their disability by the neck pain and disability score (NPDI, their deep cervical flexor endurance using Pressure Biofeedback using Cranio-Cervical flexion test (CCFT and Fear Avoidance Belief by using questionnaire( FABQ. Results: It was found that bankers have a moderate level of disability. The results showed an elevated fear avoidance belief with a mean value of FABQ-PA 21.61±4.42 and FABQ-W 37.81± 5.69. The results indicated that a negative correlation was found between NPDI and CCFT (r=0.855. A positive correlation was found between NPDI and FABQ-PA(r=0.337, FABQ-W(r=0.500. In the present study a negative correlation was found between CCFT and FABQ-W(r=0.553, FABQ-PA (0.348 and positive correlation (r=0.540 was found between FABQ-PA and FABQ-W. Conclusion: The present study concluded that there was a significant level of disability and significantly decreased endurance level and increased fear avoidance beliefs (both work and physical activity related among bankers with neck pain. In addition to that there was a significant correlation found between NPDI and CCFT, NPDI and FABQ, CCFT and FABQ, FABQ-W and FABQ-PA.

  16. L-5-HTP facilitates the electrically stimulated flexor reflex in pithed rats: evidence for 5-HT2-receptor mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarsfeldt, T; Arnt, J; Hyttel, J

    1990-02-06

    Different serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonists were tested on the electrically stimulated flexor reflex in pithed rats. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist, (1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane) [+/-)DOI), the mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor agonist, quipazine, and the 5-HT precursor, l-5-HTP, showed agonistic activity upon intravenous injection while 5-HT was without effect. A combination of the peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, Ro 4-4602 (benzerazide), the specific 5-HT-uptake inhibitor, citalopram, and l-5-HTP induced a prolonged (greater than 3 h) increase of the flexor reflex in pithed rats. Different compounds were tested for an inhibitory effect against this l-5-HTP-induced flexor reflex. The 5-HT2 antagonists (ketanserin, methergoline and methiothepin) were potent antagonists. (-)Alprenolol (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor antagonist) and the 5-HT3-receptor antagonist, ICS 205-930, were without an antagonistic effect. The inhibitory potencies in the reflex model (l-5-HTP, citalopram and Ro 4-4602) were significantly correlated (r = 0.83, P less than 0.01, r2 = 0.69) with the potencies to inhibit l-5-HTP-induced head twitches and quipazine-induced head twitches (r = 0.81, P less than 0.01, r2 = 0.66). There was less correlation (r = 0.75, P less than 0.01, r2 = 0.56) with the affinities for 5-HT2 receptors in vitro. There was no significant correlation between inhibitory potencies in the reflex model and affinities for dopamine (DA) D-2 receptors or alpha 1-adrenoceptors (r2 = 0.13 and 0.14, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Isokinetic and isometric muscle function of the knee extensors and flexors during simulated soccer activity: effect of exercise and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dehydration during soccer-type intermittent exercise on isokinetic and isometric muscle function. Eight soccer players performed two 90-min high-intensity intermittent shuttle-running trials without (NF) or with (FL) fluid ingestion (5 ml · kg(-1) before and 2 ml · kg(-1) every 15 min). Isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of knee flexors and knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, at half-time and post-exercise using isokinetic dynamometry. Sprint performance was monitored throughout the simulated-soccer exercise. Isokinetic knee strength was reduced at faster (3.13 rad · s(-1); P = 0.009) but not slower (1.05 rad · s(-1); P = 0.063) contraction speeds with exercise; however, there was no difference between FL and NF. Peak isometric strength of the knee extensors (P = 0.002) but not the knee flexors (P = 0.065) was significantly reduced with exercise with no difference between FL and NF. Average muscular power was reduced over time at both 1.05 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.01) and 3.14 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.033) but was not different between FL and NF. Mean 15-m sprint time increased with duration of exercise (P = 0.005) but was not different between FL and NF. In summary, fluid ingestion during 90 min of soccer-type exercise was unable to offset the reduction in isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of the knee extensors and flexors.

  18. Prevalence of the absence of palmaris longus muscle assessed by a new examination test (Hiz-Ediz Test in the population residing in the area of Van, Turkey

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    Metin Erden

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary goal of this trial was to show the compatibility between a new test technique (Hiz-Ediz test for detection of palmaris longus muscle (PLM agenesis, which we recently developed, and the former tests, the Schaeffer and Mishra’s second tests.Materials and methods: One thousand cases were enrolled in this trial. Schaeffer’s test, Mishra’s second test and Hiz-Ediz tests were applied to all cases. Examinations were performed to determine differences between genders and both hands. Consistency between all three tests was investigated.Results: In the Hiz-Ediz test, PLM agenesis was determined in 15.1%. No significant difference was found between the rates of unilateral and bilateral tendon agenesis determined by three tests (p>0.05. When the consistency of the three tests was evaluated using the kappa test, full consistency was determined between Mishra’s second and the Hiz-Ediz test; however, full consistency was not determined between the Schaffer’s and the other two tests. But, no statistical difference was found between the three tests.Conclusion: Our results indicate that the prevalence of PLM agenesis is consistent with the available data. The Hiz-Ediz test can be applied easily and safely to determine and to visualize the PLM agenesis, when compared to the Mishra’s second test and the Schaeffer’s test. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 254-259.

  19. STUDY OF COMPLICATIONS OF COLLES FRACTURE TO FIND OUT THE TRUE INCIDENCE OF EXTENSOR POLLICIS LONGUS TENDON RUPTURE AND CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME IN INDIAN POPULATION

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    Kulkarni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Colles‟ fracture is confined to adult and usually is seen in women over the age of fifty who have fallen on the outstretched hand. EPL tendon is the most common extensor tendon to rupture after colles‟ fracture. To our belief the incidenc e of median nerve injury and EPL tendon rupture given in literature are much higher than what we see now a days, so with this aim we carried this study to find out the true incidence of CTS and EPL tendon rupture in Indian population. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study 100 patients with colles‟ fracture for true incidence of Extensor Pollicis Longus (EPL Tendon rupture and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS in Indian Population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In our study 100 patients with colles fracture were followed up at regural intervals and were evaluated clinically and radiogrphically to rule out complications like EPL tendon rupture and CTS. OBSERVATION AND RESULTS: In our study, we found 0% incidence of CTS and EPL tendon rupture. CONCLUS ION: Proper division of patients into displaced and un displaced fracture and treatment of displaced fracture being closed reduction and internal fixation with „K‟ wires and then cast application in neutral position i.e. supination without flexion at wrist joint and properly advised physiotheraphy after cast removal at one and half month should be advocated

  20. Changes in antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in extensor digitorum longus muscles of streptozotocin-diabetic rats may contribute to muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Koji; Une, S; Tatsuta, N; Ito, K; Akiyama, J

    2014-12-01

    We investigated muscle atrophy, major antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, predominantly fast fibers) and soleus (predominantly slow fibers) muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into a control (n = 5) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group (n = 5). Eight weeks after diabetes induction the EDL and soleus muscles were removed and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels measured. The CAT activity increased in both the EDL and soleus muscles of the diabetic rats (p muscle (p muscle of the diabetic rats (p muscles showed significant atrophy but the EDL muscle elicited the greatest atrophy. In conclusion, it appears that adaptive responses to oxidative stress were adequate in the soleus muscle, but not in the EDL muscle, of diabetic rats. Thus fast twitch muscle fibers may be more susceptible to oxidative stress than slow twitch muscle fibers and this may contribute to muscle atrophy under diabetic conditions.

  1. Differential effect of chronic undernutrition on the fiber type composition of fascicles in the extensor digitorum longus muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Mendoza, Enrique; Rodríguez-Torres, Erika Elizabeth; López-García, Kenia; Hinojosa-Rodríguez, Cindy Xilonen; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have shown that chronic low food consumption alters the composition and metabolism of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDLm) fiber types. EDLm is constituted by four independent fascicles (F2-F5) of different sizes; their constitution and metabolism, however, as well as how chronic undernourishment affects these is virtually unknown. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the relative fiber type composition and metabolism of each independent fascicle in the EDLm, using control and chronically undernourished young male rats by using the alkaline ATPase and NADH-TR histochemical techniques. Our results indicate that all control fascicles showed a higher percentage of intermediate fibers (P0.05), except for F3, in which oxidative fibers increased (P<0.05). After determining the possible predominant metabolism expressed in intermediate fibers, we propose that chronic undernutrition induces the transformation of fast-glycolytic to intermediate-oxidative/glycolytic fibers, mainly in F3 and F5. Our observations confirm that chronic undernourishment differentially affects the fiber types of each fascicle in the EDLm, which could alter their individual physiological contractile properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in the Capillarity of the Rat Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscle 4 Weeks after Nerve Injury Studied by 2D Measurement Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čebašek, Vita; Ribarič, Samo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown by 3D study that 2 weeks after nerve injury there was no change in the length of capillaries per muscle fibre length in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL). The primary goal of the present 2D study was to determine the capillarity of rat EDL 4 weeks after various modes of nerve injury. Additionally, we wished to calculate the same capillary/fibre parameters that were used in our 3D stereological study. EDL muscles derived from denervated (4 weeks after nerve injury), re-innervated (4 weeks after two successive nerve crushes) and age-matched controls from the beginning (CON-1) and the end (CON-2) of the experiment were analysed in two ways. Global indices of capillarity, such as capillary density (CD) and capillary/fibre (C/F) ratio, were determined by automatic analysis, local indices as the number (CAF) and the length of capillaries around individual muscle fibres (Lcap) in relation to muscle fibre size were estimated manually by tracing the muscle fibre outlines and the transversally and longitudinally cut segments of capillaries seen in 5-µm-thin muscle cross sections. Four weeks after both types of nerve injury, CD increased in comparison to the CON-2 group (p value to the adapted 2D method used in this study.

  3. Sensitivity of different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm to corticosteroid-induced skin blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E; Smith, E W; Haigh, J M

    1992-10-01

    The intensity of corticosteroid-induced blanching has been found to vary at different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm. A retrospective analysis of 38,880 observations of skin blanching in 56 volunteers was conducted to assess the sensitivity of forearm skin to betamethasone 17-valerate. The mid-forearm appears to be more sensitive to the blanching response than do the areas close to the wrist or elbow. These results indicate that each preparation under evaluation should be applied to several sites along the forearm when using the human skin blanching assay in order to obtain an accurate comparative assessment of corticosteroid release from topical delivery vehicles.

  4. The localization of the distal perforators of posterior tibial artery: a cadaveric study for the correct planning of medial adipofascial flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, A; De Luca, L; Campus, G V; Rubino, C; Montella, A; Casoli, V

    2015-01-01

    The adipofascial flap, introduced by Lin in 1994, has many advantages compared to fasciocutaneous or free flaps. Its dissection is relatively easy and fast with low donor-site morbidity, and it does not alter the shape of the leg. The aim of this dissection study is to evaluate the anatomic localization of the most distal perforator of the posterior tibial vessels to provide an anatomical rationale for the safe harvesting of distally based medial adipofascial flaps of the leg. 30 Lower limbs from 15 cadavers were used for this study. The most distal perforator from posterior tibial perforator artery, accompanied by at least one vein, was identified and its distance from the medial malleolus was noted. A distal perforator was found in all specimens; the mean caliber was 0.77 mm. In all cases, the perforator artery passed in the septum between flexor hallucis longus m. and flexor digitorum longus m. and was accompanied by two veins. In our series, the distance between the lowest perforator and the medial malleolus ranged from 3.5 to 8.2 cm. The median was 6.75 cm, the 5th percentile 4 cm and the 95th percentile 8.1 cm. The mean distance of the perforator from the medial tibial border was 1.23 cm. The mean ratio between the distance of perforator from the medial malleolus and the total leg length was 21%. Compared to all previous researches, our study has found more distal perforators from posterior tibial perforator artery. This fact may have important clinical consequences, because the anteromedial adipofascial flap would cover more distal soft tissue defects. Moreover, our data suggest some safety parameters to make the rising of a medial adipofascial leg flap safer in surgical practice.

  5. Lesões crônicas de tendões flexores na mão: reconstrução em dois estágios Chronic flexor tendon lesions: reconstruction in two stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam resultados de tratamento de lesões crônicas dos tendões flexores na mão, usando técnica em dois estágios. O primeiro pelo implante de prótese de silicone e o segundo com enxerto de tendão. Dão detalhes de técnica, e analisam seus resultados comparando-os com os da literatura. Chegam a conclusão que a técnica dá resultados satisfatórios na maioria dos casos.The authors present the results of a two-stage treatment of chronic flexor tendon injuries of the hand. In the first stage a silicone prosthesis is implanted and in the second stage a tendon graft. Details of the technique and results of the analysis are presented and compared with the scientific literature. The authors concluded that satisfactory results were achieved in most of the cases.

  6. Repopulation of Intrasynovial Flexor Tendon Allograft with Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: An Ex Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed healing is a common problem whenever tendon allografts are used for tendon or ligament reconstruction. Repopulating the allograft with host cells may accelerate tendon regeneration, but cell penetration into the allograft tendon is limited. Processing the tendon surface with slits that guide cells into the allograft substrate may improve healing. The purpose of this study was to describe a surface modification of allograft tendon that includes slits to aid cell repopulation and lubrication to enhance tendon gliding. Methods: Canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were used for this study. Cyclic gliding resistance was measured over 1000 cycles. Tensile stiffness was assessed for normal tendon, tendon decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100 (decellularized group), tendon decellularized and perforated with multiple slits (MS group) and tendon decellularized, perforated with slits and treated with a carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd-HA-gelatin) surface modification (MS-SM group). To assess tendon repopulation, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were used in the decellularized and MS groups. DNA concentration and histology were evaluated and compared to normal tendons and nonseeded decellularized tendons. Results: The gliding resistance of the decellularized and MS groups was significantly higher compared with the normal group. There was no significant difference in gliding resistance between the decellularized and MS group. Gliding resistance of the normal group and MS-SM group was not significantly different. The Young's modulus was not significantly different among the four groups. The DNA concentration in the MS group was significantly lower than in normal tendons, but significantly higher than in decellularized tendons, with or without BMSCs. Viable BMSCs were found in the slits after 2 weeks in tissue culture. Conclusions: Tendon slits can successfully harbor BMSCs without compromising their survival and without

  7. Plantar flexor muscle weakness and fatigue in spastic cerebral palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyroud, Daria; Armand, Stéphane; De Coulon, Geraldo; Sarah R Dias Da Silva; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy develop an important muscle weakness which might affect the aetiology and extent of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. This study evaluated the aetiology and extent of plantar flexor neuromuscular fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy. Ten patients with cerebral palsy and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals (∼20 years old, 6 females) performed four 30-s maximal isometric plantar flexions interspaced by a resting period of 2-3s to elicit a resting twitch. Maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level and peak twitch were quantified before and immediately after the fatiguing task. Before fatigue, patients with cerebral palsy were weaker than healthy individuals (341±134N vs. 858±151N, pcerebral palsy following the fatiguing task (-10±23%, p>0.05), whereas it decreased by 30±12% (pcerebral palsy were weaker than their healthy peers but showed greater fatigue resistance. Cerebral palsy is a widely defined pathology that is known to result in muscle weakness. The extent and origin of muscle weakness were the topic of several previous investigations; however some discrepant results were reported in the literature regarding how it might affect the development of exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue. Importantly, most of the studies interested in the assessment of fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy did so with general questionnaires and reported increased levels of fatigue. Yet, exercise-induced neuromuscular fatigue was quantified in just a few studies and it was found that young patients with cerebral palsy might be more fatigue resistant that their peers. Thus, it appears that (i) conflicting results exist regarding objectively-evaluated fatigue in patients with cerebral palsy and (ii) the mechanisms underlying this muscle fatigue - in comparison to those of healthy peers - remain poorly understood. The present study adds important knowledge to the field as it shows that when young adults with

  8. Plantar flexor muscle architecture changes as a result of eccentric exercise in patients with Achilles tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Matthew T; Berlet, Gregory; Hyer, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Eccentric training for Achilles tendinosis (AT) has been reported to significantly improve patient symptoms. There has been no biomechanical explanation on the mechanism for specific rehabilitation technique. The purpose of this study was to determine changes in muscle architecture that occurred as a result of Achilles tendinosis injury and a subsequent eccentric rehabilitation program. Twenty-five patients (age, 53.3 ± 17.5 years) diagnosed with AT participated in 6 weeks of rehabilitation. Specific exercises for the ankle plantar flexors consisted of maximal load eccentric muscle action using 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Patients also completed a protocol for AT, which consisting of traditional rehabilitation. Medial gastrocnemius (GM) and lateral gastrocnemius (GL) muscle fascicle length and thickness were measured with ultrasound at 2-week intervals from initial treatment day to the end of 6 weeks of rehabilitation. Medial gastrocnemius fascicle length increased (45.1 ± 10.5 mm to 51.4 ± 10.5 mm; P = .22) between the initial day of rehabilitation and after 6 weeks of rehabilitation. But, GM thickness (16.3 ± 3.5 mm to 16.8 ± 2.0 mm), GL fascicle length (47.2 ± 10.0 mm to 47.1 ± 7.4 mm), and GL thickness (14.9 ± 5.2 mm to 14.4 ± 2.7 mm) did not change as a result of rehabilitation. A 6-week eccentric-biased exercise increased the GM muscle fascicle length by 12%, but GM thickness, GL fascicle length, and GL thickness did not change as a result of rehabilitation. Eccentric training for the treatment of AT is well recognized, but the mechanism of action has not been previously reported. A 6-week eccentric training protocol increased the GM muscle fascicle length by 12%, and this correlated with improvement in a validated patient outcome scoring system. Further study is warranted to determine a predictive relationship between improvement of GM fascicle length and outcome scores. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  9. Short biceps femoris fascicles and eccentric knee flexor weakness increase the risk of hamstring injury in elite football (soccer): a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Ryan G; Bourne, Matthew N; Shield, Anthony J; Williams, Morgan D; Lorenzen, Christian; Opar, David A

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the role of eccentric knee flexor strength, between-limb imbalance and biceps femoris long head (BFlh) fascicle length on the risk of future hamstring strain injury (HSI). Elite soccer players (n=152) from eight different teams participated. Eccentric knee flexor strength during the Nordic hamstring exercise and BFlh fascicle length were assessed at the beginning of preseason. The occurrences of HSIs following this were recorded by the team medical staff. Relative risk (RR) was determined for univariate data, and logistic regression was employed for multivariate data. Twenty seven new HSIs were reported. Eccentric knee flexor strength below 337 N (RR=4.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 17.5) and possessing BFlh fascicles shorter than 10.56 cm (RR=4.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 8.7) significantly increased the risk of a HSI. Multivariate logistic regression revealed significant effects when combinations of age, history of HSI, eccentric knee flexor strength and BFlh fascicle length were explored. From these analyses the likelihood of a future HSI in older athletes or those with a HSI history was reduced if high levels of eccentric knee flexor strength and longer BFlh fascicles were present. The presence of short BFlh fascicles and low levels of eccentric knee flexor strength in elite soccer players increases the risk of future HSI. The greater risk of a future HSI in older players or those with a previous HSI is reduced when they have longer BFlh fascicles and high levels of eccentric strength. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Knee extensor and flexor muscle power explains stair ascension time in patients with unilateral late-stage knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Anu M; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Manninen, Mikko; Heinonen, Ari; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the extent of asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor muscles, and to examine whether asymmetrical muscle deficits are associated with mobility limitations in persons with late-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional. Research laboratory. A clinical sample (N=56; age range, 50-75y) of eligible persons with late-stage knee OA awaiting knee replacement. Not applicable. Knee extensor and flexor power and torque assessed isokinetically; thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed by computed tomography; mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascension time; and pain assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. The asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor power and torque were between 18% and 29% (Pmuscle CSA, the asymmetrical deficit was 4% (Ppower deficits and weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the contralateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Moreover, weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the ipsilateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Greater knee pain in the OA joint was independently associated with slower stair ascending time in both models. The knee extensor and flexor muscle power of both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides and the pain in the OA knee were independently associated with stair ascension times. These results highlight the importance of assessing muscle power on both sides and knee pain in the prevention of mobility limitations in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of recurrent branch of median nerve (Thenar's muscular branch in relation to the flexor retinaculum and median in 64 hands (32 Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirsadri R

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation of recurred branch of median nerve in relation to the median and flexor retinaculum are significant for both hand surgeons and specialists always. In this study, 64 cadaver hands (32 men have been dissected. The median nerve was identified at the proximal edge of the flexor retinaculum, and in order to expose carpal tunnel the ligament was divided, and the above subjects were studied. The results are: 1 The relation of recurrent nerve to the flexor retinaculum was classified into 4 types: A In (53.1% of subjects, this branch arises from the median after the flexor retinaculum. B In (31.3% of subjects, it arises from the median in the carpal tunnel and the moves around the lower edge of flexor retinaculum and enters the thenar region. C In (14.1% of subjects, it arises from the median in the carpal tunnel and pierces the flexor retinaculum. D In (1.56% of subjects it arises, in the carpal tunnel and it divides into two subbranches here. One follows pattern A and the other pattern C. 2 In this step, the relation of the recurrent branch to the median nerve was studied. The results show that inspite of this image even though most often the recurrent branch arises from the lateral side of median, in (68.75% of subjects it arises from it's anterior surface. The MC Nemar test reveals that there is no relation between manifestation of mentioned patterns with right or left hands.

  12. Strength training for the intrinsic flexor muscles of the foot: effects on muscle strength, the foot arch, and dynamic parameters before and after the training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Sakuraba, Keishoku

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify the effects of intrinsic foot flexor strength training. [Subjects] The subjects were 12 healthy males without motor system disease. [Methods] A training method that involved flexion of all toe interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints against a 3-kg load was implemented and was performed for 200 repetitions once per day, three times per week, for a period of eight weeks. [Results] Significant changes were observed for intrinsic foot flexor strength scores, foot arches, vertical jumping, 1-legged long jumping, and 50-m dash time. [Conclusion] This muscle strength training method significantly improved muscle strength scores, foot arch shape, and movement performance.

  13. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pelozo Gomes Júnior

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  14. Stress examination of flexor tendon pulley rupture in the crimp grip position: a 1.5-Tesla MRI cadaver study

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    Bayer, Thomas; Janka, Rolf [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Fries, Simon [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Orthopaedic Department, Wolhusen (Switzerland); Schweizer, Andreas [University of Zurich, Department of Orthopaedics, Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoeffl, Isabelle [Klinikum Bamberg, Department of Pediatrics, Bamberg (Germany); Bongartz, Georg [University Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    The objectives of this study were the evaluation of flexor tendon pulley rupture of the fingers in the crimp grip position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the comparison of the results with MRI in the neutral position in a cadaver study. MRI in the crimp grip position and in the neutral position was performed in 21 cadaver fingers with artificially created flexor tendon pulley tears (combined pulley rupture, n = 14; single pulley rupture, n = 7). Measurement of the distance between the tendon and bone was performed. Images were evaluated by two readers, first independently and in cases of discrepancy in consensus. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley ruptures were calculated. Tendon bone distances were significantly higher in the crimp grip position than in the neutral position. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley rupture were 92.86 % and 100 % respectively in the crimp grip position and 78.57 % and 85.71 % respectively in the neutral position. Kappa values for interobserver reliability were 0.87 in the crimp grip position and 0.59 in the neutral position. MRI examination in the crimp grip position results in higher tendon bone distances by subjecting the pulleys to a higher strain, which facilitates image evaluation with higher interobserver reliability, higher sensitivity, and higher specificity for combined pulley rupture compared with examination in the neutral position. (orig.)

  15. Augmented Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture Using the Flexor Digitorum Lateralis Tendon in a Toy Poodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Masaaki

    2016-11-01

    To report appositional augmentation of Achilles tendon rupture in a toy breed dog with an intact flexor digitorum lateralis (FDL) muscle tendon. Clinical case report. Two-year-old spayed female Toy Poodle with Achilles tendon rupture. The Achilles tendon was accidentally ruptured by hair clippers during grooming. The dog demonstrated a plantigrade stance without digital flexion of the right hind limb. The ruptured gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendons were sutured to their respective cut ends using a simple locking loop pattern under a surgical microscope. The repair site was appositionally augmented by the caudally retracted intact FDL. An aluminum splint was applied on the plantar aspect to immobilize the tarsal joint for the first 2 weeks, after which a soft bandage was applied for another 2 weeks. At the 7 month follow-up no lameness was detected during walking and no complications associated with decreased FDL function such as digital contracture were observed. The range of motion of the tarsal joint had improved and could be flexed to ∼60° and extended fully. Use of the FDL is feasible for augmenting Achilles tendon repair in toy breed dogs. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Muscle oxygenation of superficial and deep regions in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in muscle oxygenation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated muscle contractions under the same condition. In addition, we compared changes in muscle oxygenation between superficial and deep regions of both muscles. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During repeated knee extensions and plantar flexions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3 s relaxations), blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO₂) of the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles (superficial and deep region of each muscle) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. The decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in plantar flexor muscle than in knee extensor muscle (Pmuscles, the decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in the deep region than in the superficial one (both Pmuscle and deep regions of each muscle were higher than that of knee extensor muscle and superficial regions of each muscle.

  17. Impaired neuromuscular function during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions after exercise-induced damage to elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tanya S; Tucker, Kylie J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Semmler, John G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise-induced damage of the elbow flexor muscles on steady motor performance during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions. Ten healthy individuals (age 22+/-4 yr) performed four tasks with the elbow flexor muscles: a maximum voluntary contraction, a one repetition maximum (1 RM), an isometric task at three joint angles (short, intermediate, and long muscle lengths), and a constant-load task during slow (approximately 7 degrees/s) shortening and lengthening contractions. Task performance was quantified as the fluctuations in wrist acceleration (steadiness), and electromyography was obtained from the biceps and triceps brachii muscles at loads of 10, 20, and 40% of 1 RM. Tasks were performed before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise that resulted in indicators of muscle damage. Maximum voluntary contraction force and 1-RM load declined by approximately 45% immediately after exercise and remained lower at 24 h ( approximately 30% decrease). Eccentric exercise resulted in reduced steadiness and increased biceps and triceps brachii electromyography for all tasks. For the isometric task, steadiness was impaired at the short compared with the long muscle length immediately after exercise (Pshortening compared with the lengthening contractions after exercise (P=0.01), and steadiness remained impaired for shortening contractions 24 h later (P=0.01). These findings suggest that there are profound effects for the performance of these types of fine motor tasks when recovering from a bout of eccentric exercise.

  18. Bundles of spider silk, braided into sutures, resist basic cyclic tests: potential use for flexor tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hennecke

    Full Text Available Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials.

  19. Bundles of Spider Silk, Braided into Sutures, Resist Basic Cyclic Tests: Potential Use for Flexor Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennecke, Kathleen; Redeker, Joern; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Strauss, Sarah; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials. PMID:23613793

  20. Specific modulation of spinal and cortical excitabilities during lengthening and shortening submaximal and maximal contractions in plantar flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2014-12-15

    This study investigated the influence of the torque produced by plantar flexor muscles on cortical and spinal excitability during lengthening and shortening voluntary contractions. To that purpose, modulations of motor-evoked potential (MEP) and Hoffmann (H) reflex were compared in the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) during anisometric submaximal and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar flexor muscles. For the submaximal shortening and lengthening contractions, the target torque was set at 50% of their respective MVC force. The results indicate that the amplitudes of both MEP and H-reflex responses, normalized to the maximal M wave, were significantly (P 0.05) was observed for MG. In addition, the silent period in the ongoing electromyogram (EMG) activity following the MEP was significantly (P 0.05) between contraction intensities and muscles. Together, these results indicate that cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulation of muscle activation during shortening and lengthening contractions differ between synergistic muscles according to the torque produced. Data further document previous studies reporting that the specific modulation of muscle activation during lengthening contraction is not torque dependent.

  1. Moments of muscular strength of knee joint extensors and flexors during physiotherapeutic procedures following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamara, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate maximal muscular strength moments of knee joint extensors and flexors in males subjected to physiotherapeutic procedures. 120 males were selected for the study. The first group consisted of 54 patients who underwent a 6 month physiotherapy programme following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The control group comprised 54 males without knee joint injuries. The measurement of muscular strength moments was performed in healthy and affected knee joint flexor and extensor muscles postoperatively, during the 13th and 21st week of physiotherapy. The patients' results were next compared with the results obtained in the control group. During the 13th week of physiotherapy, the values of postoperative maximal strength moments in knee joints were significantly lower compared to the results obtained in non-operated limbs and in the control group. The introduction of individual loads adjusted to the course of ACL graft reconstruction and fixation in the bone tunnel resulted in the improvement of maximal muscle strength values in the patients' knee joints from 13 to 21 weeks postoperatively. During the 21st week of physiotherapy, the values of the muscular strengths in the operated limbs were similar to those obtained in non-operated limbs of the patients and in the control group.

  2. Work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with osteoarthritis and after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani, Denise; Ritzel, Cintia Helena; Bortoluzzi, Silvia Manfrin; Vaz, Marco Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory manifestations of knee osteoarthritis (OA) lead to muscle inhibition and hypotrophy, resulting in a reduction in total muscle work and muscle power. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most adequate surgery for the treatment of advanced OA. However, its effects on muscle functional behavior have not been well understood. To compare the total work and power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles in patients with OA (20) and in patients post-TKA (12) at two angular velocities (60º/sec and 240º/sec). An isokinetic Biodex dynamometer was used to assess muscle power and total work during isokinetic contractions. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare total muscle work and muscle power between the groups (SPSS software, version 13.0; significance level, P 0.05). In addition, no difference was observed in the muscle power of the knee extensors and flexors (P > 0.05). Total work and power were similar in the OA and TKA groups, suggesting that TKA did not improve functional capacity, which was similar in both groups.

  3. Planovalgus foot deformity in cerebral palsy corrected by botulinum toxin injection in the peroneus longus: Clinical and radiological evaluations in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, C; Jacquemier, M; Castanier, E; Giorgi, H; Authier, G; Pomero, V; Chabrol, B; Jouve, J-L; Bollini, G; Viehweger, E

    2015-12-01

    In children with cerebral palsy (CP), overactivity of the peroneus longus (PL) muscle is a major contributor to pes planovalgus. This retrospective study assessed whether abobotulinumtoxinA injections into a PL showing premature activity on electromyography (EMG) clinically improved foot morphology in children with CP. Study participants were treatment. Mean pre-and post-treatment angles in clinical assessment of dorsiflexion of the talocrural articulation did not differ with both knees flexed (24.4±7.5 vs. 22.2±8.0 degrees; P=0.19) or extended (17.2±8.0 vs. 16.6±6.8 degrees; P=0.36). Radiographic data pre-treatment versus reference data revealed forefoot pronation (metatarsal stacking angle 2.1±8.3 vs. 8.0±2.9 degrees; P=0.002), midfoot planus (lateral talo-first metatarsal 28.5±15.0 vs. 13.0±7.5 degrees; Ptreatment, the metatarsal stacking angle did not differ from reference values (P=0.15). As compared with before treatment, treatment improved mean angles for metatarsal stacking (2.1±8.3 vs. 7.1±3.9 degrees, respectively, P=0.002), lateral talo-first metatarsal and talocalcaneal (both Pearly target for abobotulinumtoxinA treatment in pes planovalgus associated with premature PL activity in children with CP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuromuscular partitioning in the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis based on intramuscular nerve distribution patterns: A three-dimensional modeling study.

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    Ravichandiran, Mayoorendra; Ravichandiran, Nisanthini; Ravichandiran, Kajeandra; McKee, Nancy H; Richardson, Denyse; Oliver, Michele; Agur, Anne M

    2012-04-01

    Differential activation of specific regions within a skeletal muscle has been linked to the presence of neuromuscular compartments. However, few studies have investigated the extra- or intramuscular innervation throughout the muscle volume of extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of neuromuscular partitions in ECRL and ECRB based on the extra- and intramuscular innervation using three-dimensional modeling. The extra- and intramuscular nerve distribution was digitized and reconstructed in 3D in all the muscle volumes using Autodesk Maya in seven formalin embalmed cadaveric specimens (mean age, 75.7 ± 15.2 years). The intramuscular nerve distribution was modeled in all the muscle volumes. ECRL was found to have two neuromuscular compartments, superficial and deep. One branch from the radial nerve proper was found to innervate ECRL. This branch was divided into anterior and posterior branches to the superficial and deep compartments, respectively. Five innervation patterns were identified in ECRB with partitioning of the muscle belly into two, three, or four compartments, in a proximal to distal direction depending on the number of nerve branches entering the muscle belly. The ECRL and ECRB both demonstrated neuromuscular compartmentalization based on intramuscular innervation. According to the partitioning hypothesis, a muscle may be differentially activated depending on the required function of the muscle, thus allowing multifunctional muscles to contribute to a variety of movements. Therefore, the increased number of neuromuscular partitions in ECRB when compared with ECRL could be due to the need for more differential recruitment in the ECRB depending on force requirements.

  5. The passive mechanical properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle are compromised in 2- to 20-mo-old mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Grange, Robert W; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-06-01

    Muscle rigidity and myotendinous junction (MTJ) deficiency contribute to immobilization in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal disease caused by the absence of dystrophin. However, little is known about the muscle passive properties and MTJ strength in a diseased muscle. Here, we hypothesize that dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology renders skeletal muscle stiffer and MTJ weaker. To test our hypothesis, we examined the passive properties of an intact noncontracting muscle-tendon unit in mdx mice, a mouse model for DMD. The extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle-tendon preparations of 2-, 6-, 14-, and 20-mo-old mdx and normal control mice were strained stepwisely from 110% to 160% of the muscle optimal length. The stress-strain response and failure position were analyzed. In support of our hypothesis, the mdx EDL preparation consistently developed higher stress before muscle failure. Postfailure stresses decreased dramatically in mdx but not normal preparations. Further, mdx showed a significantly faster stress relaxation rate. Consistent with stress-strain assay results, we observed significantly higher fibrosis in mdx muscle. In 2- and 6-mo-old mdx and 20-mo-old BL10 mice failure occurred within the muscle (2- to 14-mo-old BL10 preparations did not fail). Interestingly, in ≥14-mo-old mdx mice the failure site shifted toward the MTJ. Electron microscopy revealed substantial MTJ degeneration in aged but not young mdx mice. In summary, our results suggest that the passive properties of the EDL muscle and the strength of MTJ are compromised in mdx in an age-dependent manner. These findings offer new insights in studying DMD pathogenesis and developing novel therapies.

  6. Relevância da ultra-sonografia dos tendões flexores em cavalos Puro Sangue de corrida na adaptação ao treinamento Significance of flexor tendon ultrasonography in training thoroughbred horses

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    Carolina Roxana Greig

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Vinte e quatro potros Puro Sangue de Corrida (PSC, com dois anos de idade foram avaliados ultra-sonograficamente, durante o período final da doma e início de treinamento, através da imagem transversal dos tendões flexor digital superficial (TFDS e profundo (TFDP. As avaliações foram realizadas com intervalos de 15 dias. A área transversal (AT, a textura dos ecos e a ecogenicidade dos tendões foram avaliadas nas sete zonas da região metacarpiana através de um programa de mensuração de imagens do próprio aparelho de ultra-sonografia. Durante a doma e treinamento, houve diminuição da AT na zona IA e IIIA (PThe cross-sectional area (CSA of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT and deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT of twenty four thoroughbreds was ultrasonographically evaluated before and during their initial training to determine the effect of exercise on the tendon CSA, texture and echogenicity to characterize the response to training. Ultrasonographic transverse images of the left forelimb were obtained every fifteen days. The SDFT CSA of zones IA and IIIA showed a decrease (P<0.05, f=0.010 e f=0.023 res. during the breaking and training period and an increase (P< 0.05 of zone IIIC (f=0.039. Evaluating just the training period, SDFT CSA results of zones IA, IIIA and IIIC were similar. The DDFT showed no variation during the breaking phase but when the training phase was evaluated there was a decrease (P<0.05 in zones IA (f=0.006 and IIIA (f=0.006. Evaluating both breaking and training periods the DDFT showed a decrease (P<0.05 in zones IA (f=0.027, IIIA (f=0.0001 and IIIB (f=0.0031. Fiber texture and tendon echogenicity showed no significant difference between breaking and last reading during training. This study provides evidence of variation of adaptation among the ultrasonographic zones of both SDFT and DDFT to exercise during training of thoroughbred horses. Ultra-sonography is not the most indicated method to evaluate the

  7. Teste de força de preensão manual: estudo da fadiga mioelétrica do flexor radial do carpo e flexor superficial dos dedos

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    Marco Tulio Baptista

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Um protocolo de força de preensão manual (FPM em degraus de intensidade foi empregado para estudo da fadiga dos músculos flexor radial do carpo (FRC e flexor superficial dos dedos (FSD por meio do registro da força de preensão sustentada. Foi feita a análise do sinal eletromiográfico de superfície destes músculos no domínio do tempo e da frequência de 2kHz. Foi utilizado um dinamômetro eletrônico e um conversor analógico-digital de 16 bits. Participaram deste estudo 12 indivíduos saudáveis, ativos e destros, com média de idade 21,53 ± 1,26 anos, percentual de gordura 7,76 ± 3,53%, peso corporal 74,9 ± 10,36 kg e estatura 180,69 ± 7,14 cm. Os indivíduos realizaram o teste de contração isométrica voluntária máxima (CIVM da mão dominante seguido do protocolo de degraus submáximos em 20%, 40% e 60% da CIVM por 10 segundos cada. O processamento dos sinais envolveu a filtragem passa banda e o cálculo dos valores de raiz média quadrática (RMS e frequência mediana (FM em cada degrau de contração submáxima. A análise de variância "two-way" foi aplicada para os valores de RMS e FM. O teste proposto não gerou queda do rendimento de força nos degraus submáximos estabelecidos e a instauração do processo de fadiga do FSD. Por outro lado, o FRC apresentou sinais de fadiga mioelétrica sugerindo o processo de falência da FPM. Estes dados sugerem que a fadiga mioelétrica dos flexores dos dedos durante a FPM é um processo tardio à fadiga dos estabilizadores do punho. O protocolo em degrau de 60% parece desencadear o processo de fadiga mioelétrica do músculo FRC, mas não do FSD, baseado na análise da ativação muscular nos domínios do tempo e frequência.

  8. The effect of muscle length on transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced relaxation rate in the plantar flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacyshyn, Alexandra F; Nettleton, Jane; Power, Geoffrey A; Jakobi, Jennifer M; McNeil, Chris J

    2017-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex during a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) permits functionally relevant measurements of muscle group relaxation rate (i.e., when muscles are actively contracting under voluntary control). This study's purpose was twofold: (1) to explore the impact of muscle length on TMS-induced plantar flexor relaxation rate; and (2) to incorporate ultrasonography to measure relaxation-induced lengthening of medial gastrocnemius (MG) fascicles and displacement of the muscle-tendon junction (MTJ). Eleven males (24.8 ± 7.0 years) performed 21 brief isometric plantar flexor MVCs. Trials were block-randomized every three MVCs among 20° dorsiflexion (DF), a neutral ankle position, and 30° plantar flexion (PF). During each MVC, TMS was delivered and ultrasound video recordings captured MG fascicles or MTJ length changes. Peak relaxation rate was calculated as the steepest slope of the TMS-induced drop in plantar flexor torque or the rate of length change for MG fascicles and MTJ Torque relaxation rate was slower for PF (-804 ± 162 Nm·s(-1)) than neutral and DF (-1896 ± 298 and -2008 ± 692 Nm·s(-1), respectively). Similarly, MG fascicle relaxation rate was slower for PF (-2.80 ± 1.10 cm·s(-1)) than neutral and DF (-5.35 ± 1.10 and -4.81 ± 1.87 cm·s(-1), respectively). MTJ displacement rate showed a similar trend (P = 0.06), with 3.89 ± 1.93 cm·s(-1) for PF compared to rates of 6.87 ± 1.55 and 6.36 ± 2.97 cm·s(-1) for neutral and DF, respectively. These findings indicate muscle length affects the torque relaxation rate recorded after TMS during an MVC Comparable results were obtained from muscle fascicles, indicating ultrasound imaging is suitable for measuring evoked contractile properties during voluntary contraction. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  9. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate for improvement of hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery: randomized controlled trial.

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    Monica E Wiig

    Full Text Available Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery.This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery.The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.016 in PPAS. The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p = 0.0499 in PPAS. Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.048 in PPAS. Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p = 0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p = 0.016. At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p = 0.086 in PPAS. The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture.Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the most efficient dose and

  10. PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate for improvement of hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Monica E; Dahlin, Lars B; Fridén, Jan; Hagberg, Lars; Larsen, Sören E; Wiklund, Kerstin; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery. This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery. The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.016 in PPAS). The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p = 0.0499 in PPAS). Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p = 0.048 in PPAS). Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p = 0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p = 0.016). At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p = 0.086 in PPAS). The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture. Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the most efficient dose and health

  11. Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture due to an insufficiency fracture of the hamate hook in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report

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    Toshihiro Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When we encounter a case of spontaneous flexor tendon rupture in a patient with systemic disease such as SLE or long-term steroid use, attention should be paid to the state of the carpal bones and joints as they sometimes accompany unexpected causes.

  12. The use of electromyography interference pattern analysis to determine muscle force of the deep digital flexor muscle in healthy and laminitic horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, I.D.; Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Back, Willem; Kolk, van der, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In equine laminitis, the deep digital flexor muscle (DDFM) appears to have increased muscle force, but evidence-based confirmation is lacking. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to test if the DDFM of laminitic equines has an increased muscle force detectable by needle

  13. Isokinetic assessment of knee flexor/extensor muscular strength in elderly women Avaliação isocinética do torque muscular flexor-extensor do joelho em mulheres com idade entre 75-83 anos

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    Marcos de Amorim Aquino

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess knee flexor-extensor muscular strength in elderly women with no previous history of musculoskeletal disorders on the lower limbs using an isokinetic dynamometer, in order to obtain data that could be used as a comparative parameter in the evaluation of elderly women with knee disorders, thus facilitating a better rehabilitation of these patients. METHODS: Twenty-six volunteers aged 75 to 83 years were studied using a Cybex® 6000 isokinetic dynamometer. The chosen angular velocity was 60 º/s, and concentric exercise was used for either flexion or extension. The studied parameters were: peak torque, angle of peak torque, and flexor-extensor torque rate. RESULTS: There were no differences between dominant (D and nondominant (ND knee peak torque values. This was true for both flexor (D = 42.46 ± 9.09 Nm / ND = 40.65 ± 9.38 Nm and extensor (D = 76.92 ± 13.97 Nm / ND = 77.65 ± 15.21 Nm movements. The descriptive statistical analysis of the values obtained for the flexor-extensor peak torque rate and for the angle of occurrence of peak torque was the same for the dominant and nondominant sides. CONCLUSIONS: The values of peak torque for the contralateral side can be used as a reference during rehabilitation of elderly women with acute disease of the knee, and the angular velocity of 60 º/s is proper and safe for isokinetic assessment of elderly people.OBJETIVO: Avaliar, isocineticamente, o torque dos músculos flexores e extensores dos joelhos de mulheres idosas sem afecções do sistema músculo-esquelético em membros inferiores, obtendo dados que possam servir como parâmetro de comparação na avaliação de mulheres idosas portadoras de afecções nos joelhos, colaborando para uma melhor reabilitação dessas pacientes. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Vinte e seis voluntárias foram avaliadas. O estudo foi realizado através de um dinamômetro isocinético marca CYBEXâ modelo 6000 na velocidade angular de 60º/s. O tipo do

  14. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  15. Isokinetic dynamometry of knee flexors and extensors: comparative study among non-athletes, jumper athletes and runner athletes

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    Siqueira Cássio Marinho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in intensive sports activities leads to muscular specializations that may generate alterations in involved articular forces and cause static (posture and dynamic changes (alterations of articular stability, coordination, etc.. Prevention of injury requires specific functional muscular evaluation in all athletes and for any kind of sport. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically evaluate, through isokinetic tests, the peak torque, total work, and average power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of jumper and runner athletes and compare them to those of a non-athletic population, evaluating dominance and balance between agonistic and antagonistic muscle groups. RESULTS: In the non-athlete group, we noted a higher asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant members. The jumpers had the highest values of the evaluated parameters of all groups, whereas parameters for the runners were intermediate between non-athletes and jumpers.

  16. [Electrophysiological and morphological changes in muscle-flexors of the fingers after injuries of the tendons in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, A A; Sokoliuk, A M; Boiko, N A; Kutsenko, P I

    1989-01-01

    The investigation of bioelectrical activity of flexors of the fingers in children at different terms after the injury and subsequent restoration of the tendons allowed to determine the dynamics of bioelectrogenesis of the muscles. Decrease in bioelectrical activity of the muscles was most expressed and stable during the first 6 months after the injury. The morphological studies carried out at that time demonstrated presence of lysis of some muscle fibers. Complete restoration of bioelectrical activity of the muscles was observed after suture of the tendons and autotendoplastn which was performed not later thay 4-6 months after the trauma. The investigation of dynamics of restoration of bioelectrical activity of the muscles allowed to determine the optimal terms for performing tendolysis.

  17. Influence of dorsiflexion shoes on neuromuscular fatigue of the plantar flexors after combined tapping-jumping exercises in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said; Gaillien, Benjamin; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2013-07-01

    Dorsiflexion shoes could be useful to increase jumping performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of wearing shoes inducing moderate dorsiflexion (2°) on neuromuscular fatigue induced by volleyball exercises involving multiple stretch-shortening cycles. Squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance, and plantar flexors isometric voluntary and evoked contractile properties were assessed in 10 unfamiliarized trained volleyball players before and after a 10-minute intensive combined tapping-jumping volleyball exercise performed, in blinded randomized conditions, with neutral (0°) or moderate dorsiflexion (2°). No significant difference was observed on SJ performance in neutral and moderate dorsiflexion conditions. However, CMJ height was initially lower with 2° dorsiflexion compared with 0° (p volleyball exercise also induced a significant decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (p volleyball players.

  18. Bifurcated Bicipital Aponeurosis Giving Origin to Flexor and Extensor Muscles of the Forearm – A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Shetty, Prakashchandra; Maloor, Prasad A; Dsouza, Melanie R

    2016-01-01

    Bicipital aponeurosis is usually attached to the antebrachial fascia on the medial side of forearm and to posterior border of ulna assisting in the supination of the forearm along with biceps brachii muscle. Variations in the bicipital aponeurosis may lead to neurovascular compression as reported earlier. In the present case, the bicipital aponeurosis had two slips i.e. medial and lateral. Medial slip gave origin to some fibers of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis and the lateral slip gave origin to some fibers of brachioradialis. Such unusual slips of bicipital aponeurosis may distribute the stress concentration and may work in different directions affecting the supination of forearm by biceps brachii muscle and bicipital aponeurosis. PMID:27042440

  19. The effects of mouth opening on changes in the thickness of deep cervical flexors in normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Lee, Jaehong; Kim, Hansoo; Yang, KyungHan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the thickness of the deep cervical flexors (DCFs) according to the degree of mouth opening (MO) in normal adults. [Subjects] The study's subjects were 50 normal adults (30 men, 20 women). [Methods] Ultrasound was used to obtain images of muscles, and the NIH ImageJ software was used to measure the thickness of each muscle. [Results] An increase in MO resulted in a corresponding increase in the thickness of the DCFs, and in isometric exercises (IEs), the thickness of the DCFs further increased during MO. [Conclusion] During MO, the thickness of the DCFs increased. This may be due to correlations between mandibular movements and DCFs. Therefore, the results are likely to be utilized as new clinical research data.

  20. Contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss induced by passive stretch of the human plantar flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, Gabriel S; Seitz, Laurent; Nosaka, Kasunori; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2013-07-15

    The purpose of the present research was to identify the contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss after passive muscle stretching. Thirteen men randomly performed both a 5-min constant-torque stretch of the plantar flexors on an isokinetic dynamometer and a resting condition on 2 separate days. The triceps surae electromyogram (EMG) was recorded simultaneously with plantar flexor isometric torque. Measures of central drive, including the EMG amplitude normalized to the muscle compound action potential amplitude (EMG/M), percent voluntary activation and first volitional wave amplitude, and measures of peripheral function, including the twitch peak torque, 20-to-80-Hz tetanic torque ratio and torque during 20-Hz stimulation preceded by a doublet, were taken before and immediately and 15 min after each condition. Peak torque (-15.7%), EMG/M (-8.2%), and both twitch (-9.4%) and 20-Hz peak torques (-11.5%) were reduced immediately after stretch but recovered by 15 min. There were strong correlations between the torque loss and the reductions in central drive parameters (r = 0.65-0.93). Torque recovery was also strongly correlated with the recovery in EMG/M and percent voluntary activation (r = 0.77-0.81). The moderate decreases in measures of peripheral function were not related to the torque loss or recovery. These results suggest that 1) central factors were strongly related to the torque reduction immediately after stretch and during torque recovery; and 2) the muscle's contractile capacity was moderately reduced, although these changes were not associated with the torque reduction, and changes in excitation-contraction coupling efficiency were not observed.

  1. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A; Syme, Douglas A; Hermanson, John W; Chase, P Bryant

    2014-10-01

    The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5-16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01-0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002-0.05 Wkg(-1)) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4-7 Hz), SDF (4-5 Hz) and SOL (0.5-1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross-bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  2. Influence of musculo-tendinous stiffness of the plantar ankle flexor muscles upon maximal power output on a cycle ergometre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss, Tarak; Lambertz, Daniel; Rouis, Majdi; Vandewalle, Henry

    2012-11-01

    The importance of maximal voluntary torque (T (MVC)), maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) and musculo-tendinous stiffness of the triceps surae for maximal power output on a cycle ergometre (Pmax) was studied in 21 healthy subjects by studying the relationships between maximal cycling power related to body mass (Pmax BM(-1)) with T (MVC), MRTD and different indices of musculo-tendinous stiffness of the ankle flexor. Pmax BM(-1) was calculated from the data of an all-out force-velocity test on a Monark cycle ergometre. T (MVC) and MRTD were measured on a specific ankle ergometre. Musculo-tendinous stiffness was estimated by means of quick releases at 20, 40, 60 and 80% T (MVC) on the same ankle ergometre. Pmax BM(-1) was significantly and positively correlated with MRTD related to body mass but the positive correlation between Pmax BM(-1) and T (MVC) did not reach the significance level (0.05). Pmax BM(-1) was significantly and positively correlated with the estimation of stiffness at 40% T (MVC) (S(0.4)), but not with stiffness at 20, 60 and 80% T (MVC). The results of the present study suggest that maximal power output during cycling is significantly correlated with the level of musculo-tendinous stiffness which corresponds to torque range around peak torque at optimal pedal rate. However, the low coefficient of determination (r2 = 0.203) between Pmax BM(-1) and S (0.4) BM(-1) suggested that Pmax BM(-1) largely depended on other factors than the musculo-tendinous stiffness of the only plantar flexors.

  3. Evaluation of Tensile Strength of the Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon in Horses Subjected to Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation Therapeutic Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to sincerely express our gratitude to the university of Tehran and faculty of veterinary medicine research council for approval and financial support for this extensive evaluation of tensile strength of the superficial digital flexor tendon in horses subjected to Transcutaneous Electrical Neural Stimulation (TENS therapeutic regimen Problems statement: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TENS on the tensile strength of experimentally traumatized SDFT in horses. Approach: Eight adult castrated horses between 4-9 years -old and 310- 395 Kg body - weight were considered. The left fore -limb superficial digital flexor tendon of each horse was splitted longitudinally in the middle portion in full thickness of 10 cm in length using B.P. blade (15 Times strike, then the connective tissue and skin were approximated using No 2 Nylon. Horses were divided into two groups of control and treated with 4 horses each. No treatment was given to control one, whereas treated group was subjected to the transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (Newtens 900c therapeutic regimens10 min daily with intensity of 80 µs, 100 Hz frequency for 14 days. After 60 days, the full length of SDFT (20 cm was removed from the right normal countralaleral and left traumatized tendon of control and treated limbs of all horses to be subjected to test of tensile strength using Zwick/Roell MDTL Machine with speed of 0.07 mM sec-1 having Proportional Integral Deferential (PID controller. In assessing the variation obtained data was analyzed using paired-t-test. Results: Data of the tensile strength was revealed an average 0.6625 KN for normal SDFT, 0.6375 KN for treated tendon and 0.6175 KN for control tendon .There was significant improvement in regaining tensile strength in treated tendons comparison to control ones in Conclusion: TENS significantly accelerated healing and remodeling of traumatized tendon to regain its tensile strength.

  4. Sensitivity of dynamic simulations of gait and dynamometer experiments to hill muscle model parameters of knee flexors and extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, F; Van Campen, A; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2010-07-20

    We assessed and compared sensitivities of dynamic simulations to musculotendon (MT) parameters for gait and dynamometer experiments. Our aim with this comparison was to investigate whether dynamometer experiments could provide information about MT-parameters that are important to reliably study MT-function during gait. This would mean that dynamometer experiments could be used to estimate these parameters. Muscle contribution to the joint torque (MT-torque) rather than relative MT-force primarily affects the resulting gait pattern and torque measured by the dynamometer. In contrast to recent studies, therefore, we assessed the sensitivity of the MT-torque, rather than the sensitivity of the relative MT-force. Based on sensitivity of the MT-torque to a parameter perturbation, MT-parameters of the knee flexors and extensors were classified in three categories: low, medium, and high. For gait, classification was based on the average sensitivity during a gait cycle. For isometric and isokinetic dynamometer experiments, classification was based on the highest sensitivity found in the experiments. The calculated muscle contributions to the knee torque during gait and dynamometer experiments had a high sensitivity to only a limited number of MT-parameters of the knee flexors and extensors, suggesting that not all MT-parameters need to be estimated. In general, the highest sensitivity was found for tendon slack length. However, for some muscles the sensitivity to the optimal fibre length or the maximal isometric muscle force was also high or medium. The classification of the individual MT-parameters for gait and dynamometer experiments was largely similar. We therefore conclude that dynamometer experiments provide information about MT-parameters important to reliably study MT-function during gait, so that subject-specific estimates of MT-parameters could be made based on dynamometer experiments.

  5. PET/CT imaging in polymyalgia rheumatica: praepubic 18F-FDG uptake correlates with pectineus and adductor longus muscles enthesitis and with tenosynovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprlakova-Pukova, Andrea; Bortlicek, Zbynek; Fojtik, Zdenek; Kazda, Tomas; Joukal, Marek; Koukalova, Renata; Vasina, Jiri; Eremiasova, Jana; Nemec, Petr

    2017-01-01

    diminished in all patients (15/15, 100%) after treatment with steroids. Conclusions Increased praepubic 18F-FDG uptake in patients with PMR is relatively common and this region should be systematically evaluated during differential diagnosis of rheumatic and malignant disease. Praepubic inflammation is probably related to enthesitis and tenosynovitis at the origin of pectineus and adductor longus muscles ventrally from the pubis. PMID:28265227

  6. The effect of hip abduction on the EMG activity of vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis longus and vastus lateralis obliquus in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakaki Juliano

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Controlled laboratory study. Objectives The purposes of this paper were to investigate (d whether vastus medialis obliquus (VMO, vastus lateralis longus (VLL and vastus lateralis obliquus (VLO EMG activity can be influenced by hip abduction performed by healthy subjects. Background Some clinicians contraindicate hip abduction for patellofemoral patients (with based on the premise that hip abduction could facilitate the VLL muscle activation leading to a VLL and VMO imbalance Methods and measures Twenty-one clinically healthy subjects were involved in the study, 10 women and 11 men (aged X = 23.3 ± 2.9. The EMG signals were collected using a computerized EMG VIKING II, with 8 channels and three pairs of surface electrodes. EMG activity was obtained from MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in a seated position and MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° with patients in side-lying position with the knee in full extension. The data were normalized in the MVIC knee extension at 50° of flexion in a seated position, and were submitted to ANOVA test with subsequent application of the Bonferroni multiple comparisons analysis test. The level of significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Results The VLO muscle demonstrated a similar pattern to the VMO muscle showing higher EMG activity in MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion compared with MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction for male (p Conclusion The results showed that no selective EMG activation was observed when comparison was made between the VMO, VLL and VLO muscles while performing MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction and MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in both male and female subjects. Our findings demonstrate that hip abduction do not facilitated VLL and VLO activity in relation to the VMO, however, this study included only healthy subjects performing maximum voluntary isometric contraction contractions, therefore much remains to be discovered by

  7. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P muscles have different cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  8. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis.

  9. Postoperative rehabilitation of tendon of flexor digitorum after injury%显微外科修复屈指肌腱损伤术后的康复治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方军; 高克海; 李华壮

    2002-01-01

    Background: Muscle tendon healing and peritendinous tissue adhesion are major contradictions after operation of tendon injury of flexor digitorum.Best recovery of the finger function results from effective prevention of tendon adhesion.

  10. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual's maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p single twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise.

  11. Evaluation of the peak torque, total work, average power of flexor-estensor and prono-supinator muscles of the elbow in baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Cosimo; Vaienti, Enrico; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    The Authors, after a short analysis on biomechanics of the elbow during throwing in baseball, show the movements of the elbow during the different phases of the throw and the stabilizing action of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor-pronator muscles of the wrist, anconeus and brachial triceps muscles. Aim of this study is the evaluation of the peak torque, total work and average power of the flexor-extensor and pronator-supinator muscles of the elbows in professional baseball players. Isokinetic test data show that a mayor peak torque in flexo-extension at power and resistance test in the pitchers compared to the strikers. Whereas the strikers show a higher peak torque in pronation at the resistance test. This may happen because during a baseball match the ball is hit many times by the bat and the pronator muscle of the wrist are notably stimulated and reinforced.

  12. Flexor tendon repair: a comparative study between a knotless barbed suture repair and a traditional four-strand monofilament suture repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, C W

    2014-01-01

    We compared the tensile strength of a novel knotless barbed suture method with a traditional four-strand Adelaide technique for flexor tendon repairs. Forty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and randomly assigned to one of the repair groups before repair. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the tensile strengths between both tendon groups were very similar. However, less force was required to create a 2 mm gap in the four-strand repair method compared with the knotless barbed technique. There was a significant reduction in the cross-sectional area in the barbed suture group after repair compared with the Adelaide group. This would create better gliding within the pulley system in vivo and could decrease gapping and tendon rupture.

  13. Short Term Effects of Mobilization Techniques on Neck Pain and Deep Neck Flexor Muscle Endurance in Patients with Mechanical Chronic Neck Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kılınç, Hasan Erkan; Harput, Gülcan; Baltacı, Gül; İnce, Deniz İnal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate short term effects of cervical and scapular mobilization techniques on neck pain and deep cervical muscles endurance in chronical mechanical neck pain patients. Methods: 22 chronical mechanic neck pain patients four male 18 female (mean age: mean±sd 35.59± 15.85) were included. Before treatment, neck pain level (visual analog scale) and deep neck flexor muscles endurance (in supine position with digital chronometer) of all patients were eval...

  14. The effect of the PostureJac on deep cervical flexor endurance: implications in the management of cervicogenic headache and mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makofsky, Howard W; Douris, Peter; Goldstein, Leonard B; Discepolo, Adam; Grion, Kelly; Kushnir, Garry; Malner, Stacie; Singh, Jessica; Urgolites, Lisa; Zic, Frank; Oricchio, Jacqueline

    2011-07-01

    The convergence of cervical and trigeminal afferents on second-order neurons in the trigeminocervical nucleus may refer pain from the upper cervical spine into the head and face. Furthermore, "bi-directional interactions" between trigeminal and upper cervical afferents may also explain neck symptoms of trigeminal origin (e.g., migraine). It is known that cervicogenic headache sufferers present with several musculoskeletal changes including poor endurance of the deep cervical flexor muscles. These intrinsic muscles of the neck contribute to stabilization and protection of the cervical spine and are critical for the control of both intervertebral motion and the cervical lordosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of the PostureJac (SomatoCentric Systems, Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a posture support and exercise jacket, was effective in enhancing deep cervical muscle endurance. Forty-five (45) female subjects, between the ages of 18 and 40 years, were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of the no-treatment control, the treatment-control (table stabilization), and the experimental (PostureJac) group. The outcome measure of deep cervical flexor muscle endurance was based on the Flexor Endurance Test and was recorded in seconds. The results indicated that the PostureJac group was superior to the no-treatment control (p=.001) and the treatment-control (p=.004) groups in terms of increasing endurance of the deep cervical flexors. Consequently, the PostureJac may be a useful therapeutic tool in the management of cervicogenic headache and mechanical neck pain.

  15. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  16. Inter-machine reliability of the Biodex and Cybex isokinetic dynamometers for knee flexor/extensor isometric, concentric and eccentric tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Ribeiro Alvares, João Breno; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; de Azevedo Franke, Rodrigo; da Silva, Bruna Gonçalves Cordeiro; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2015-02-01

    To assess the inter-machine reliability of the Biodex System 3 Pro and Cybex Humac Norm Model 770 dynamometers for knee extensor and knee flexor peak torque measurements in isometric, concentric and eccentric tests. Randomized/crossover. Exercise Research Laboratory, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil). 25 healthy male subjects. Isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor and knee flexor peak torques recorded in the same test procedure performed on both isokinetic dynamometers. One-way ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used to verify significant differences, relative and absolute reliability between devices. No significant differences were found between tests performed on Biodex and Cybex (p > 0.05). ICC values indicated a high to very high reproducibility for isometric, concentric and eccentric peak torques (0.88-0.92), and moderate to high reliability for agonist-antagonist strength ratios (0.62-0.73). Peak torque did not show great difference between dynamometers for SEM (3.72-11.27 Nm) and CV (5.27-7.77%). Strength ratios presented CV values of 8.57-10.72%. Maximal knee extensor and knee flexor tests performed in isometric (60° of knee flexion), concentric and eccentric modes at 60°/s in Biodex and Cybex dynamometers present similar values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extensor and flexor digit synovial sheath, sac and synovial capsule in the distal part of the limbs in buffalos and camels and its relation of surgical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. AL-sadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one samples of the distal parts of limbs were obtained from different ages of buffalo and camels of both sex to study the synovial structures to determine the suitable sites for injection of surgical interference. The result showed that extensor digit synovial sheath was extend between middle or distal part of metacarpal (metatarsal to the extensor processes and this formed with synovial capsule dorsal pouches which serve in surgical interference. The flexor digit synovial sheath extended to palmar (planter between distal extremity of metacarpal (metatarsal to the middle of second phalanx in buffalo while in camel it extended to the proximal extremity of second phalanx, that sheath was formed with suspensory ligament and sessamoid bone palmar or planter pouches which were serve the surgical interference. Fourth synovial bursa observed situated dorsally between the extensor digit laterals tendon and capsule of fetlock joint, forms site of injection during surgical interference, while the other two synovial bursa were located to palmer (planter between deep flexor tendon and distal sessamoid bone in buffalo while in camel these bursa were located between deep flexor tendon and cartilage of the second phalanx, these bursa were served for surgical interference. The synovial capsule which serve the surgical interference through digit cushion these were shown extended from the claw capsule. The result show that surgical interference was form six pouches in buffalo and eight pouches in camel, which formed by synovial structures and the tissue associated with them.

  18. Individual flexor tendon identification within the carpal tunnel: A semi-automated analysis method for serial cross-section magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Kunze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Kunze1, Jessica E Goetz2, Daniel R Thedens3, Thomas E Baer2, Ericka A Lawler2, Thomas D Brown21Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, 3Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Carpal tunnel syndrome is commonly viewed as resulting from chronic mechanical insult of the median nerve by adjacent anatomical structures. Both the median nerve and its surrounding soft tissue structures are well visualized on magnetic resonance (MR images of the wrist and hand. Addressing nerve damage from impingement of flexor digitorum tendons co-occupying the tunnel is attractive, but to date has been restricted by a lack of means for making individual identifications of the respective tendons. In this image analysis work, we have developed a region-growing method to positively identify each individual digital flexor tendon within the carpal tunnel by tracking it from a more distal MR section where the respective tendon identities are unambiguous. Illustratively, the new method was applied to MRI scans from four different subjects in a variety of hand poses. Conventional shape measures yielded less discriminatory information than did evaluations of individual tendon location and arrangement. This new method of rapid identification of individual tendons will facilitate analysis of tendon/nerve interactions within the tunnel, thereby providing better information about mechanical insult of the median nerve.Keywords: carpal tunnel syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging, region growing, digital flexor tendons

  19. TO COMPARE THE EFFECTS OF DEEP NECK FLEXORS STRENGHTNING EXERCISE AND McKENZIE NECK EXERCISE IN SUBJECTS WITH FORWARD NECK POSTURE: A RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

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    Vijay Kage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forward Neck Posture also called as Protracted neck, is one in which the head is positioned anteriorly and the normal anterior cervical convexity is increased with the apex of the lordotic cervical curve at a considerable distance from the LOG in comparison with optimal posture.Nowadays texting may play a significant role in forward neck posture. According to Wellness Centre “It is the repetition of forward head movements combined with poor ergonomic postures and/or trauma that causes the body to adapt to forward head posture. Purpose: To compare effects of deep flexor strengthening exercises and McKenzie neck exercises in subjects with forward neck posture. Materials and Methods: 30 Subjects clinically diagnosed with FNP meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned into three groups. Group A received McKenzie neck exercises, Group B received Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises and both the groups commonly went for pectoralis minor stretching respectively for once daily for a total of 6 sessions. Results: The results suggested that all the outcome measure i.e Forward Neck Posture, flexibility of pectoralis minor and CROM values showed significant differences among both the groups. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the comparison of McKenzie neck Exercises and Deep Neck Flexor Strengthening Exercises revealed no statistically significant differences, However each group showed improvement in cervical range of motion and forward neck posture with increase in the pectoralis minor flexibility.

  20. Influence of ankle plantar flexor muscle architecture and strength on gait in boys with haemophilia in comparison to typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephensen, D; Drechsler, W I; Scott, O M

    2014-05-01

    Altered gait patterns, muscle weakness and atrophy have been reported in young boys with severe haemophilia when compared to unaffected peers. The aim of this study was to determine whether lateral gastrocnemius muscle size and architecture influenced biomechanical walking patterns of boys with haemophilia and if these relationships differed from age-matched typically developing boys. Biomechanical function of the knee and ankle during level walking, lateral gastrocnemius anatomical cross-sectional area, thickness, width, fascicle length and pennation angle and ankle plantar flexor muscle strength were recorded in 19 typically developing boys aged 7-12 years and 19 age-matched haemophilic boys with a history of ankle joint bleeding. Associations between gait, strength and architecture were compared using correlations of peak gait values. Haemophilic boys walked with significantly larger (P muscles of haemophilic boys were significantly weaker and smaller when compared to typically developing peers. In the typically developing boys there was no apparent association between muscle architecture, strength and walking patterns. In haemophilic boys maximum muscle strength and ACSA normalized torque of the ankle plantar flexors together with the muscle width, thickness, fascicle length and angulation (P Muscle strength deficits of the ankle plantar flexors and changes in muscle size and architecture may underpin the key biomechanical alterations in walking patterns of haemophilic boys with a history of ankle joint bleeding.