WorldWideScience

Sample records for fleas siphonaptera pulicidae

  1. Infestation with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) among students in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Heo Chong; Ahmad, Nazni Wasi; Lim, Lee Han; Jeffery, John; Hadi, Azahari Abdul; Othman, Hidayatulfathi; Omar, Baharudin

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports six male undergraduate students living at a local university hostel who were infested with cat fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae: Ctenocephalides felis felis) in February 2009. All of them suffered from maculopapular rashes and severe pruritus after the bites. Investigation revealed the presence of a stray cat in the hostel building; five of the students had a history of contact with the cat. Six cat fleas were collected at the hostel and identified as C. felis felis. Most of the students were not aware of this infestation and did not seek medical treatment.

  2. Water uptake in the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis (Pulicidae: Siphonaptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, T; Fielden, L J; Kelrick, M I

    2003-12-01

    To counteract water loss due to excretion, cuticular transpiration and respiration, various groups of arthropods have developed mechanisms for active uptake of water vapor from unsaturated air. In this study, active uptake capabilities and water loss rates were examined in the various developmental stages of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis. To determine critical equilibrium humidity, the lowest relative humidity at which active water uptake can occur, pre-desiccated immature and adult fleas were placed in a series of humidity regimes ranging from 44 to 93% RH. Active uptake occurred in larval stages at relative humidities above 53% and in pre-pupae at 75-93% RH. Pupae and adults did not demonstrate active uptake at any humidity. Optimal uptake for larvae occurred between 20 and 30 degrees C. When placed over Drierite (water loss than pre-pupal and pupal stages. Active water uptake is necessary to ensure proper development of the larvae of C. felis. Active uptake ceases after the larval-pupal ecdysis and it appears that adults have lost the ability to actively uptake water.

  3. Water balance in two species of desert fleas, Xenopsylla ramesis and X. conformis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Laura J; Krasnov, Boris R; Still, Kelly M; Khokhlova, Irina S

    2002-11-01

    The role of water balance capabilities of fleas was examined in desert habitats. The fleas studied were Xenopsylla ramesis Rothschild and Xenopsylla conformis Wagner. Both fleas occur on Sundevall's jird, Meriones crassus, in the Negev Highlands of Israel but in different macro- and microhabitats. Because M. crassus occurs in several habitats of the highlands, it was used as a model for investigating the effect of habitat parameters on species composition of fleas within a host species. Water balance parameters investigated were the range of humidities over which active water uptake occurs in the larvae and prepupae of X. ramesis and X. conformis. Critical equilibrium humidity estimates were close to 65% RH for larvae and prepupae of both species. Water loss rates were determined for each life stage, except eggs, and represented water loss from cuticular, respiratory, and other body openings) under conditions of little or no bulk air movement. When converted to a proportional rate (1.44 -2.37% mass loss h(-1)) water loss rates did not differ significantly between stages or species. Thus, geographic separation of X. ramesis and X. conformis could not be explained by any difference in water uptake capabilities or water loss rates. Other factors that may be important include interspecific competition for resource availability among larval fleas and effect of soil texture on cocoon construction.

  4. Susceptibility of cat fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) to fipronil and imidacloprid using adult and larval bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, M K; Vetter, R; Denholm, I; Blagburn, B; Williamson, M S; Kopp, S; Coleman, G; Hostetler, J; Davis, W; Mencke, N; Rees, R; Foit, S; Tetzner, K

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of the susceptibility offleas to insecticides has typically been conducted by exposing adults on treated surfaces. Other methods such as topical applications of insecticides to adults and larval bioassays on treated rearing media have been developed. Unfortunately, baseline responses of susceptible strains of cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouchè), except for imidacloprid, have not been determined for all on-animal therapies and new classes of chemistry now being used. However, the relationship between adult and larval bioassays of fleas has not been previously investigated. The adult and larval bioassays of fipronil and imidacloprid were compared for both field-collected isolates and laboratory strains. Adult topical bioassays of fipronil and imidacloprid to laboratory strains and field-collected isolates demonstrated that LD50s of fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.11 to 0.40 nanograms per flea and 0.02 to 0.18 nanograms per flea, respectively. Resistance ratios for fipronil and imidacloprid ranged from 0.11 to 2.21. Based on the larval bioassay published for imidacloprid, a larval bioassay was established for fipronil and reported in this article. The ranges of the LC50s of fipronil and imidacloprid in the larval rearing media were 0.07-0.16 and 0.11-0.21 ppm, respectively. Resistance ratios for adult and larval bioassays ranged from 0.11 to 2.2 and 0.58 to 1.75, respectively. Both adult and larval bioassays provided similar patterns for fipronil and imidacloprid. Although the adult bioassays permitted a more precise dosage applied, the larval bioassays allowed for testing isolates without the need to maintain on synthetic or natural hosts.

  5. On-host viability and fecundity of Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), using a novel chambered flea technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R E; Wallenfels, L; Popiel, I

    1996-03-01

    The on-host viability and fecundity of cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché), confined within a novel chambering system are described. Using this system, all fleas and flea eggs are recovered from chambers after fleas have fed on cats. Thus, accurate calculations of both adult flea survival and female flea fecundity can be made. The technique provides a microenvironment in which adult fleas exhibit > 90% survival over 14 d. Female fleas lay an average of 9.5 eggs per day on the 2nd d of feeding, 22.1 eggs per day between days 3 and 7, and 19.6 eggs per day between days 3 and 14. These numbers are similar to values previously reported for studies in which fleas were not confined. The technique permits accurate, multiple sampling of experimental flea populations during a study, and does not require the use of pesticides or extensive combing to collect surviving fleas at the end of a study. Moreover, the technique does not require that cats be caged or prevented from grooming. Collecting data from fleas confined in chambers is much less time consuming and labor intensive than studies with free-roaming fleas.

  6. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLIV. Fleas (Insecta : Siphonaptera : Pulicidae collected from 15 carnivore species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Horak

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Fleas were collected from 61 wild carnivores belonging to 13 species in various nature reserves and on farms, two feral domestic cats in a nature reserve and a domestic dog in the city of Johannesburg. Eleven flea species, including two subspecies of one of these, belonging to six genera were recovered. Amongst these only Ctenocephalides felis felis and Ctenocephalides felis strongylus are considered specific parasites of carnivores. The remaining ten species normally infest the prey animals of the various carnivores.

  7. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Boyer

    Full Text Available The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae, to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%: only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down and KD90 (90% Knock-Down times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar.

  8. A gregarine from the gut of cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) in Taiwan: dynamic of infection patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Mauricio E; Huang, Chin-Gi; Dubey, Anil Kumar; Benítez, Hugo A

    2013-02-18

    An understanding on host-parasite interaction is essential for control of disease causing organisms in domestic animals. The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) is the predominant flea infesting dogs and cats in Taiwan. It was collected from 933 dogs and 197 cats from Taiwan. A total of 5878 C. felis adults were recovered; 14.6% fleas were observed to harbor Steinina ctenocephali. Female fleas were more susceptible to gregarine infection than males. Further, fleas were more likely to be infected with the gregarine at high temperatures, particularly during March-July with high parasite prevalence and intensity. Fleas harboring gregarines infection were higher in dogs than cats. Our study may help in development and application of appropriate flea control measures in Taiwan.

  9. Present susceptibility status of rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), vector of plague against organochlorine, organophosphate and synthetic pyrethroids 1. The Nilgiris District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamal, Biswas; Ravi Kumar, R; Sohan, Lal; Balakrishnan, N; Veena, Mittal; Shiv, Lal

    2008-03-01

    The susceptibility status of Xenopsylla cheopis, the efficient vector of human plague in India was assessed in erstwhile plague endemic areas of Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu following standard WHO techniques. The studies revealed the development of resistance in rat fleas to DDT--4.0%, Malathion--5.0%, Deltamethrin--0.05% and tolerance to Permethrin--0.75% in all the four blocks of Nilgiris hill district. Development of resistance may be due to the extensive use of insecticides in tea plantations and agricultural sectors where the domestic/peri-domestic rodents find their natural habitats and intermingle with each other.

  10. The Fleas (Siphonaptera) in Iran: Diversity, Host Range, and Medical Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh; Solhjouy-Fard, Samaneh; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Laudisoit, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Flea-borne diseases have a wide distribution in the world. Studies on the identity, abundance, distribution and seasonality of the potential vectors of pathogenic agents (e.g. Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and Rickettsia felis) are necessary tools for controlling and preventing such diseases outbreaks. The improvements of diagnostic tools are partly responsible for an easier detection of otherwise unnoticed agents in the ectoparasitic fauna and as such a good taxonomical knowledge of the potential vectors is crucial. The aims of this study were to make an exhaustive inventory of the literature on the fleas (Siphonaptera) and range of associated hosts in Iran, present their known distribution, and discuss their medical importance. Methodology/Principal Findings The data were obtained by an extensive literature review related to medically significant fleas in Iran published before 31st August 2016. The flea-host specificity was then determined using a family and subfamily-oriented criteria to further realize and quantify the shared and exclusive vertebrate hosts of fleas among Iran fleas. The locations sampled and reported in the literature were primarily from human habitation, livestock farms, poultry, and rodents’ burrows of the 31 provinces of the country. The flea fauna were dominated by seven families, namely the Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllidae, Pulicidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Coptopsyllidae, Ischnopsyllidae and Vermipsyllidae. The hosts associated with Iran fleas ranged from the small and large mammals to the birds. Pulicidae were associated with 73% (56/77) of identified host species. Flea-host association analysis indicates that rodents are the common hosts of 5 flea families but some sampling bias results in the reduced number of bird host sampled. Analyses of flea-host relationships at the subfamily level showed that most vertebrates hosted fleas belgonging to 3 subfamilies namely Xenopsyllinae (n = 43), Ctenophthalminae (n = 20) and

  11. Detecting Burrowing Owl Bloodmeals in Pulex irritans (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christine B; Eisen, Rebecca J; Belthoff, James R

    2016-03-01

    Pulex irritans L. is a cosmopolitan flea species that infests a wide variety of hosts. In North America it generally parasitizes large wild mammals, but in the Pacific Northwest an association has emerged between P. irritans and the western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea). While investigators have recognized this association for decades, it has not been clear if P. irritans feeds on burrowing owls, or if the owls serve exclusively as phoretic hosts. Here we describe using a real-time assay that was originally developed to identify bloodmeals in Ugandan cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis Bouché) to detect burrowing owl DNA in P. irritans collected from burrowing owls in southern Idaho. Of 50 fleas tested, 12 had no detectable vertebrate bloodmeal. The remaining 38 (76%) contained burrowing owl DNA. The assay did not detect vertebrate DNA in unfed fleas exposed to owl or mouse pelts and is therefore unlikely to detect DNA in fleas from vertebrates that have served exclusively as phoretic hosts. We conclude that P. irritans feeds on burrowing owls. We discuss the potential implications of this finding for burrowing owl conservation and enzootic plague dynamics.

  12. Siphonaptera (Pulicidae) in dogs and cats of Colombia: Clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Franco, William Alberto; Pérez-Bedoya, José Leandro

    2010-10-29

    Flea infestation is a common worldwide problem, its effective control results in high costs and difficult implementation. During February to August 2007, an epidemiological study of Siphonaptera order in dogs and cats admitted at the University of Caldas-Colombia - Veterinary Hospital (UCVH), was carried out by corporal examination and recording epidemiological variables. Overall, 3698 fleas were collected from 140 dogs and 30 cats. Two main species were identified: Ctenocephalides felis (94.2%) and Pulex irritans (5.8%) and a single specimen of Xenopsylla cheopis were also collected. Owners also considered some products as improper or of doubtful efficacy and employed schedules defined as inadequate, both because of a poor choice and an erroneous use of the product. Epidemiological factors associated with flea infestation allowed estimating the effect of variables such as locality, sleeping area, preferred place, type of floor, presence of other animals, and type of hair. Performing epidemiological studies on canine and feline populations in other areas of the country is required for an adequate implementation of strategies for flea control in pets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of the fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareschi, Marcela; Sanchez, Juliana; Autino, Analía

    2016-04-13

    The Order Siphonaptera comprises cosmopolitan haematophagous ectoparasites of birds and mammals. More than ten years have past since the last list of species known for Argentina. Herein we provide a review of the fleas from the country, which includes an updated list, host species and geographical distribution for each taxa, as well as some comments. We report 127 species and subspecies belonging to eleven different families; 42 of these species are endemic. Four genera (Adoratopsylla, Cleopsylla, Ctenidiosomus, and Nonnapsylla) and six species and subspecies (Adoratopsylla (Adoratopsylla) antiquorum antiquorum, Agastopsylla pearsoni, Polygenis (Polygenis) roberti beebei, Plocopsylla (Plocopsylla) silewi, Plocopsylla (Plocopsylla) wilesi and Tunga terasma) are added to the list for Argentina. Nine species new to science are included, described on the bases of specimens collected from Argentina (Ctenidiosomus austrinus, Ectinorus (Ectinorus) lareschiae, Ectinorus (Ectinorus) spiculatus, Ectinorus (Ectinorus) morenoi, Hectopsylla narium, Plocopsylla (Plocopsylla) linardii, Neotyphloceras crackensis, Neotyphloceras pardinasii and Tunga perforans). Information provided herein contributes to the knowledge of the fleas from Argentina, necessary to a better understanding of their role as parasites themselves and vectors of zoonotic importance.

  14. Fleas (Siphonaptera) in the Nests of Dormice (Gliridae: Rodentia) in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatova, I; Stanko, M; Paulauskas, A; Spakovaite, S; Gedminas, V

    2015-05-01

    Negative effects of flea (Siphonaptera) parasitism on the host may be expressed in different ways. The aim of this study was to assess distribution of the flea fauna in nests of dormice in Lithuania. Nests of Glis glis (L.), Dryomys nitedula (Pallas), and Muscardinus avellanarius (L.) were collected from nest boxes in 2012 and 2013. Fleas were collected from nests in the laboratory and put into plastic tubes with 70% ethanol. Flea species were identified using morphological keys. From 400 nest boxes, 112 nests of dormice were collected from eight sites from mixed forests of central Lithuania. Twenty-three nests of G. glis were collected from nest boxes, with 16 of them containing 286 fleas belonging to four species: Ceratophyllus sciurorum (Schrank) (259), C. gallinae (Schrank) (23), Hystrichopsylla talpae (Curtis) (3), and Megabothris turbidus (Rothschild) (1). Fourteen nests of M. avellanarius were collected from nest boxes, 4 of which contained 224 fleas belonging to two species: C. sciurorum (221) and C. gallinae (3). Twenty-four nests of D. nitedula were collected from nest boxes, including 17 containing 207 fleas belonging to two species: C. sciurorum (205) and C. gallinae (2). Fifty-one nests of undetermined dormice species also were collected from nest boxes, 12 of them contained 395 fleas belonging to three species: C. sciurorum (374), Ctenophthalmus agyrtes (Heller) (19), and Ctenophthalmus assimilis (Taschenberg) (2). C. sciurorum was a predominant species in the nests of dormice. The occurrence of C. gallinae was documented in Lithuania for the first time.

  15. Treatment of black-tailed prairie dog burrows with deltamethrin to control fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) and plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, David B; Biggins, Dean E; Montenieri, John A; Enscore, Russell E; Tanda, Dale T; Gage, Kenneth L

    2003-09-01

    Burrows within black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, were dusted with deltamethrin insecticide to reduce flea (Insecta: Siphonaptera) abundance. Flea populations were monitored pre- and posttreatment by combing prairie dogs and collecting fleas from burrows. A single application of deltamethrin significantly reduced populations of the plague vector Oropsylla hirsuta, and other flea species on prairie dogs and in prairie dog burrows for at least 84 d. A plague epizootic on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge caused high mortality of prairie dogs on some untreated colonies, but did not appear to affect nearby colonies dusted with deltamethrin.

  16. Xenopsylla spp. (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae in murid rodents from the Canary Islands: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The geographical and host distributions of Xenopsylla fleas parasitizing murid rodents on the Canary Islands have been reported. Three Xenopsylla species, X. cheopis, X. brasiliensis and X. guancha, have been detected on two rodents species, Mus musculus and Rattus rattus. X. guancha has been the most prevalent species detected, specifically on M. musculus, the most abundant rodent, but it has been detected only on three eastern islands, where the species is endemic. X. cheopis has been shown to be the most widely distributed species throughout the archipelago and the species most frequently found on R. rattus. X. brasiliensis has been shown to be the least prevalent Xenopsylla species, with the lowest geographical distribution on the Canary Islands and focused only on R. rattus. The detection of both X. cheopis and X. brasiliensis on the island of Lanzarote, and of X. guancha on the island of Fuerteventura and the islet of La Graciosa represents the first report of these species on those particular Canary Islands.

  17. Effectiveness of Fipronil as a Systemic Control Agent Against Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajonhson, D M; Miarinjara, A; Rahelinirina, S; Rajerison, M; Boyer, S

    2017-03-01

    Fipronil was evaluated as a systemic control agent for the rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Rothschild), the main vector of Yersinia pestis (Yersin), the causative agent of plague, in Madagascar. The effectiveness of fipronil as a systemic control agent against X. cheopis was assessed by determining the toxicity values of the "Lethal Dose 50" (LD50). Two techniques were used to evaluate the systemic action of the insecticide on the vector: 1) an artificial feeding device filled with blood-fipronil mixture from which X. cheopis was fed and 2) rodent hosts, Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout) and Rattus rattus (L.), which fed on fipronil-treated bait. As a standardized control method, the susceptibility of X. cheopis to fipronil was evaluated by exposure to impregnated paper within World Health Organization (WHO) insecticide test protocol to compare its effect to the systemic activity of the studied insecticide. Results showed that when administered in a systemic way, fipronil appears to be more effective: the toxicity level was evaluated to be ninefold higher compared with the WHO test. Compared with other methods, which require indiscriminate dusting of rodent burrows and human dwellings, fipronil applied in a systemic way enables the direct targeting of the plague vector. Thus, this method appears to be a superior alternative to fipronil-dusting for the control of the main plague vector in Madagascar. However, subsequent tests in the field are necessary to confirm the suitability of fipronil administration in a systemic way on large scales. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 猫蚤的交配习性及雄蚤对雌蚤提取物的反应%MATING BEHAVIOR OF THE CAT FLEA, CTENOCEPHALIDES FELIS BOUCHE ( SIPHONAPTERA: PULICIDAE) AND MALE RESPONSE TO FEMALE EXTRACT ON AN ARTIFICIAL FEEDING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳碧松; 邹方东; 孙奇志; 李静

    2002-01-01

    The mating behavior of cat flea, Ctenocephalidesfelis (Bouche) was studied on an artificial feeding de-.vice. Male and female can mate repeatedly with same partner or different ones. In the situation of male: female ratio of1: 5, each mating lasted an average of 6.6 min, with a mean interval between matings at 2.5 min., compared to 11.1 min and 12.1 min respectively in a cell with 5 males and 1 female. As many as 48 mating events were observed forone male during.an 8 h period. One female mated 27 times in 7 h with 5 males in the same cell. Newly emerged malesand females can not mate before blood meal and about 24 h blood feeding is required for successful mating. Newlyemerged males can not mate with fed females (fed for 48 h), but fed males can mate with newly emerged females whoare feeding the blood. Significantly more male contacts and male-male mating attempts were observed after the papertreated with female extract was introduced into the cell. The paper contacts and mating attempts were 16.75 - 32.25times and 15.75 -31.38 times, respectively, on average during a period of 20 min when different doses (FE) of ex-tract were provided.%在人工饲喂系统上研究了猫蚤的交配习性及雄蚤对雌蚤化学提取物的发应.结果表明,当5雌1雄在饲养盒内时,该雄虫可与其他雌虫进行多次交配,连续8小时内交配达48次,交配时间平均持续6.6分钟,两次交配的间隔时间平均为2.5分钟.当1雌5雄时,交配时间平均持续11.1分钟,交配间隔时间为12.1分钟,连续7小时内,该雌虫与雄虫交配27次.新羽化的雌雄虫吸血前不能交配.当把用雌虫提取物处理过的黑色滤纸片放进只有雄虫的饲养盒时,雄虫接触纸片的次数及雄-雄交配企图明显增加.

  19. An update on the distribution and nomenclature of fleas (Order Siphonaptera) of bats (Order Chiroptera) and rodents (Order Rodentia) from La Rioja Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrizbeitia, M. Fernanda López; Sánchez, R. Tatiana; Barquez, Ruben M.; Díaz, M. Monica

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mammalian and flea fauna of La Rioja Province is one of the least known from northwestern Argentina. In this study, the distribution and nomenclature of 13 species of fleas of bats and rodents from La Rioja Province are updated. Four species of fleas are recorded for the first time in La Rioja Province including a new record for northwestern Argentina, and two new flea-host associations. An identification key and distribution map are included for all known species of Siphonaptera of bats and rodents from La Rioja Province, Argentina. PMID:28769701

  20. Molecular Survey of Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Rodent Fleas (Siphonaptera) From Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Adriana M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Rubio, André V; Graham, Christine B; Montenieri, John A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Bai, Ying; Acosta-Gutiérrez, Roxana; Ávila-Flores, Rafael; Gage, Kenneth L; Suzán, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Rodent fleas from northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed for the presence of Bartonella and Yersinia pestis. In total, 760 fleas belonging to 10 species were tested with multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis targeting the gltA (338-bp) and pla genes (478-bp) of Bartonella and Y. pestis, respectively. Although none was positive for Y. pestis, 307 fleas were infected with Bartonella spp., resulting in an overall prevalence of 40.4%. A logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of Bartonella is more likely to occur in some flea species. From a subset of Bartonella-positive fleas, phylogenetic analyses of gltA gene sequences revealed 13 genetic variants clustering in five phylogroups (I–V), two of which were matched with known pathogenic Bartonella species (Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis and Bartonella washoensis) and two that were not related with any previously described species or subspecies of Bartonella. Variants in phylogroup V, which were mainly obtained from Meringis spp. fleas, were identical to those reported recently in their specific rodent hosts (Dipodomys spp.) in the same region, suggesting that kangaroo rats and their fleas harbor other Bartonella species not reported previously. Considering the Bartonella prevalence and the flea genotypes associated with known pathogenic Bartonella species, we suggest that analysis of rodent and flea communities in the region should continue for their potential implications for human health. Given that nearby locations in the United States have reported Y. pestis in wild animals and their fleas, we suggest conducting larger-scale studies to increase our knowledge of this bacterium.

  1. The influence of life history characteristics on flea (Siphonaptera) species distribution models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mescht, Luther; le Roux, Peter C; Matthee, Conrad A; Raath, Morgan J; Matthee, Sonja

    2016-03-29

    Ectoparasites exhibit pronounced variation in life history characteristics such as time spent on the host and host range. Since contemporary species distribution (SD) modelling does not account for differences in life history, the accuracy of predictions of current and future species' ranges could differ significantly between life history groups. SD model performance was compared between 21 flea species that differ in microhabitat preferences and level of host specificity. Distribution models generally performed well, with no significant differences in model performance based on either microhabitat preferences or host specificity. However, the relative importance of predictor variables was significantly related to host specificity, with the distribution of host-opportunistic fleas strongly limited by thermal conditions and host-specific fleas more associated with conditions that restrict their hosts' distribution. The importance of temperature was even more pronounced when considering microhabitat preference, with the distribution of fur fleas being strongly limited by thermal conditions and nest fleas more associated with variables that affect microclimatic conditions in the host nest. Contemporary SD modelling, that includes climate and landscape variables, is a valuable tool to study the biogeography and future distributions of fleas and other parasites taxa. However, consideration of life history characteristics is cautioned as species may be differentially sensitive to environmental conditions.

  2. Detection of Rickettsia felis, Rickettsia typhi, Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Fleas (Siphonaptera from Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Leulmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the presence/absence and prevalence of Rickettsia spp, Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis in domestic and urban flea populations in tropical and subtropical African countries.Fleas collected in Benin, the United Republic of Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo were investigated for the presence and identity of Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis using two qPCR systems or qPCR and standard PCR. In Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Cotonou (Benin, Rickettsia typhi was detected in 1% (2/199, and an uncultured Bartonella sp. was detected in 34.7% (69/199. In the Lushoto district (United Republic of Tanzania, R. typhi DNA was detected in 10% (2/20 of Xenopsylla brasiliensis, and Rickettsia felis was detected in 65% (13/20 of Ctenocephalides felis strongylus, 71.4% (5/7 of Ctenocephalides canis and 25% (5/20 of Ctenophthalmus calceatus calceatus. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, R. felis was detected in 56.5% (13/23 of Ct. f. felis from Kinshasa, in 26.3% (10/38 of Ct. f. felis and 9% (1/11 of Leptopsylla aethiopica aethiopica from Ituri district and in 19.2% (5/26 of Ct. f. strongylus and 4.7% (1/21 of Echidnophaga gallinacea. Bartonella sp. was also detected in 36.3% (4/11 of L. a. aethiopica. Finally, in Ituri, Y. pestis DNA was detected in 3.8% (1/26 of Ct. f. strongylus and 10% (3/30 of Pulex irritans from the villages of Wanyale and Zaa.Most flea-borne infections are neglected diseases which should be monitored systematically in domestic rural and urban human populations to assess their epidemiological and clinical relevance. Finally, the presence of Y. pestis DNA in fleas captured in households was unexpected and raises a series of questions regarding the role of free fleas in the transmission of plague in rural Africa, especially in remote areas where the flea density in houses is high.

  3. Detection of Rickettsia felis, Rickettsia typhi, Bartonella Species and Yersinia pestis in Fleas (Siphonaptera) from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leulmi, Hamza; Socolovschi, Cristina; Laudisoit, Anne; Houemenou, Gualbert; Davoust, Bernard; Bitam, Idir; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the presence/absence and prevalence of Rickettsia spp, Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis in domestic and urban flea populations in tropical and subtropical African countries. Fleas collected in Benin, the United Republic of Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo were investigated for the presence and identity of Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp. and Yersinia pestis using two qPCR systems or qPCR and standard PCR. In Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Cotonou (Benin), Rickettsia typhi was detected in 1% (2/199), and an uncultured Bartonella sp. was detected in 34.7% (69/199). In the Lushoto district (United Republic of Tanzania), R. typhi DNA was detected in 10% (2/20) of Xenopsylla brasiliensis, and Rickettsia felis was detected in 65% (13/20) of Ctenocephalides felis strongylus, 71.4% (5/7) of Ctenocephalides canis and 25% (5/20) of Ctenophthalmus calceatus calceatus. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, R. felis was detected in 56.5% (13/23) of Ct. f. felis from Kinshasa, in 26.3% (10/38) of Ct. f. felis and 9% (1/11) of Leptopsylla aethiopica aethiopica from Ituri district and in 19.2% (5/26) of Ct. f. strongylus and 4.7% (1/21) of Echidnophaga gallinacea. Bartonella sp. was also detected in 36.3% (4/11) of L. a. aethiopica. Finally, in Ituri, Y. pestis DNA was detected in 3.8% (1/26) of Ct. f. strongylus and 10% (3/30) of Pulex irritans from the villages of Wanyale and Zaa. Most flea-borne infections are neglected diseases which should be monitored systematically in domestic rural and urban human populations to assess their epidemiological and clinical relevance. Finally, the presence of Y. pestis DNA in fleas captured in households was unexpected and raises a series of questions regarding the role of free fleas in the transmission of plague in rural Africa, especially in remote areas where the flea density in houses is high.

  4. Evaluation of speed and duration of efficacy of spinosad tablets for treatment and control of Ctenocephalides canis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae infestations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc M.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled clinical trial was performed to determine the duration of efficacy of a new oral insecticide formulation of spinosad for the control of experimentally induced Ctenocephalides canis infestations in dogs. Twelve Beagle dogs (two groups of six were used in the study. Dogs in the treated group received spinosad tablets per os on D0 at the commercial dosage. All dogs were infested with 100 fleas on Days – 7, – 1, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. The dogs were combed four hours after each infestation and fleas were counted and replaced on the coat. 24 hours after each infestation fleas were combed, counted and removed. The efficacy of the formulation was calculated four and 24 hours after the treatment and then four and 24 hours after each new infestation. The mean number of fleas on the control dogs was respectively between 65.1 and 83.3 at four hour counts and between 58.3 and 75.3 at 24 hour counts. The product was well tolerated. The treatment controlled the fleas already present on the skin with 81% efficacy at four hours and 100% efficacy at 24 hours. For the weekly infestations, the speed of action of the product was high: at four hours the efficacy was 100% at D7, 96% at D14, 74% at D21, 42% at D28, 12.90% at D35 and 12.8% at D42. The efficacy evaluated 24 hours after each infestation was approximately 100% during three weeks then 90% at D39, 81.4% at D36 and 80.4% at D43. A single dose of the new spinosad tablet formulation should control flea populations in dogs for four weeks as indicated in the claim (evaluation performed at 48 h for the registration. Spinosad tablet is the first product administered per os which acts so long and so quickly against adult fleas.

  5. Techniques of DNA-studies on prehispanic ectoparasites (Pulex sp., Pulicidae, Siphonaptera from animal mummies of the Chiribaya Culture, Southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Dittmar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a paleoparasitological survey of several animal mummies (Cavia aperea f. porcellus and Canis familiaris from Chiribaya Baja, an archaeological site in Southern Peru, an unexpected find was made. In the well preserved fur, large numbers of mummified fleas (Pulex simulans/irritansthat parasitized the animals during life were encountered. Due to the relative recent event of the host mummification and the outstanding preservation of the fleas, an attempt for the retrieval of DNA was made. A DNA extraction and sequencing protocol for archaeological ectoparasitic remains has been established, taking additional studies for tissue and protein preservation into account. Tissue preservation was assessed with transmission electron microscopy and the protein preservation was tested through the racemisation ratios of aspartic acid. Regions of the 28S rDNA gene were successfully amplified and sequenced. Further research perspectives are outlined.

  6. Ectoparasites in urban stray cats in Jerusalem, Israel: differences in infestation patterns of fleas, ticks and permanent ectoparasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, H; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Baneth, G

    2014-09-01

    In a period cross-sectional study performed to examine ectoparasites on 340 stray cats in Jerusalem, Israel, 186 (54.7%) were infested with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), 49 (14.4%) with the cat louse, Felicola subrostratus (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae), 41 (12.0%) with the ear mite, Otodectes cynotis (Astigmata: Psoroptidae), three (0.9%) with the fur mite, Cheyletiella blakei (Trobidiformes: Cheyletidae), two (0.6%) with the itch mite Notoedres cati (Astigmata: Sarcoptidae), and 25 (7.3%) with ticks of the species Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae), Rhipicephalus turanicus or Haemaphysalis adleri (Ixodida: Ixodidae). A higher number of flea infestations was observed in apparently sick cats (P < 0.05) and in cats aged < 6 months (P < 0.05). The proportion of flea-infested cats (P < 0.01), as well as the number of fleas per infested cat (P < 0.01), was higher in autumn than in other seasons. By contrast with findings in cats with flea infestations, rates of infestation with ticks were higher amongst cats with clinical signs (P < 0.01) and cats aged ≥ 6 months (P < 0.05). The high rates of ectoparasite infestation in the cats studied constitute a risk for the spread of vector-borne infections of zoonotic and veterinary importance. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society.

  7. Description of Medwayella independencia (Siphonaptera, Stivaliidae, a new species of flea from Mindanao Island, the Philippines and their phoretic mites, and miscellaneous flea records from the Malay Archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hastriter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Medwayella independencia, a new species of flea, is described from the tupaiid host Urogale everetti (Thomas from Mindanao Island, Philippines. Several other species of fleas are also recorded from the Philippines including a single male of Lentistivalius philippinensis Hastriter & Bush, 2013 (previously known only from two males, the bat fleas Thaumapsylla breviceps orientalis Smit and Thaumapsylla longiforceps Traub, a single unidentified female species of Macrostylophora Ewing collected from the murid Bullimus bagobos Mearns, and a pair of Medwayella robinsoni ssp. from Sundasciurus hoogstraali (Sanborn from Busuanga Island, Philippines. Representatives of Medwayella Traub, 1972 and Macrostylophora have not previously been recorded from the Philippines. A key to the male sex of Medwayella is provided. Phoretic mites of the genus Psylloglyphus (family Winterschmidtiidae were present under the abdominal sclerites of several male and female specimens of M. independencia. This is the second report of a phoretic mite on a species of Medwayella Traub. The co-evolutionary implications between phoretic mites and fleas are discussed.

  8. Uninvited guests: traditional insect repellents in Estonia used against the clothes moth Tineola bisselliella, human flea Pulex irritons and bedbug Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sõukand, Renata; Kalle, Raivo; Svanberg, Ingvar

    2010-01-01

    Extensive folklore records from pre-modern Estonia give us an excellent opportunity to study a variety of local plant knowledge and plant use among the peasantry in various parts of the country. One important biocultural domain where plant knowledge has been crucial was in the various methods of combating different ectoparasites that cohabited and coexisted with humans and their domestic animals. Some of these methods were widely known (world-wide, Eurasia, Europe, Baltic Rim), while others were more local. Here we discuss ways of reducing clothes moths Tineola bisselliella (Hummel) (Lepidoptera: Tineidae), human fleas Pulex irritons L. (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) and bedbugs Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) with the help of plants. Various taxa used as traditional repellents have been identified. The use of plants as repellents and their toxic principles are also discussed from a comparative perspective.

  9. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae and a redescription of the bat flea Lagaropsylla signata (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Hastriter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903, previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo. Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea (Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958 on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of L. signata with A. esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of L. turba, A. esau, and C. torquatus. The evidence suggests that L. turba and L. signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on A. esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of L. signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of L. signata attached to A. esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912, often associated with A. esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts.

  10. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae) and a redescription of the bat flea Lagaropsylla signata (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastriter, Michael W.; Miller, Kelly B.; Svenson, Gavin J.; Martin, Gavin J.; Whiting, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903), previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo). Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea (Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958) on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of Lagaropsylla signata with Arixenia esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of Lagaropsylla turba, Arixenia esau, and Cheiromeles torquatus. The evidence suggests that Lagaropsylla turba and Lagaropsylla signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on Arixenia esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of Lagaropsylla signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of Lagaropsylla signata attached to Arixenia esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912), often associated with Arixenia esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts. PMID:28331409

  11. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae) and a redescription of the bat flea Lagaropsylla signata (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastriter, Michael W; Miller, Kelly B; Svenson, Gavin J; Martin, Gavin J; Whiting, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903), previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo). Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea (Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958) on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of Lagaropsylla signata with Arixenia esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of Lagaropsylla turba, Arixenia esau, and Cheiromeles torquatus. The evidence suggests that Lagaropsylla turba and Lagaropsylla signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on Arixenia esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of Lagaropsylla signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of Lagaropsylla signata attached to Arixenia esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912), often associated with Arixenia esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts.

  12. Infection Rates of Wolbachia sp. and Bartonella sp. in Different Populations of Fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Sara García; Cutillas, Cristina

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, a molecular detection of Bartonella sp. and Wolbachia sp. in Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) isolated from Canis lupus familiaris from different geographical areas of Spain, Iran and South Africa, and in Stenoponia tripectinata tripectinata isolated from Mus musculus from the Canary Islands has been carried out by amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA partial gene of Wolbachia sp. and intergenic spacer region (its region) of Bartonella sp. A total of 70 % of C. felis analysed were infected by W. pipientis. This percentage of prevalence was considerably higher in female fleas than in male fleas. Bartonella DNA was not detected in C. felis from dogs, while Bartonella elizabethae was detected and identified in S. t. tripectinata from M. musculus from the Canary Islands representing 43.75 % prevalence. This report is the first to identify B. elizabethae in S. t. tripectinata collected in M. musculus from the Canary Islands. Thus, our results demonstrate that this flea is a potential vector of B. elizabethae and might play roles in human infection. The zoonotic character of this bartonellosis emphasizes the need to alert public health authorities and the veterinary community of the risk of infection.

  13. Comparative analysis of storage conditions and homogenization methods for tick and flea species for identification by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbak, A; El Hamzaoui, B; Berenger, J-M; Bitam, I; Raoult, D; Almeras, L; Parola, P

    2017-07-19

    Ticks and fleas are vectors for numerous human and animal pathogens. Controlling them, which is important in combating such diseases, requires accurate identification, to distinguish between vector and non-vector species. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was applied to the rapid identification of arthropods. The growth of this promising tool, however, requires guidelines to be established. To this end, standardization protocols were applied to species of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Ixodida: Ixodidae) Latreille and Ctenocephalides felis felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) Bouché, including the automation of sample homogenization using two homogenizer devices, and varied sample preservation modes for a period of 1-6 months. The MS spectra were then compared with those obtained from manual pestle grinding, the standard homogenization method. Both automated methods generated intense, reproducible MS spectra from fresh specimens. Frozen storage methods appeared to represent the best preservation mode, for up to 6 months, while storage in ethanol is also possible, with some caveats for tick specimens. Carnoy's buffer, however, was shown to be less compatible with MS analysis for the purpose of identifying ticks or fleas. These standard protocols for MALDI-TOF MS arthropod identification should be complemented by additional MS spectrum quality controls, to generalize their use in monitoring arthropods of medical interest. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. [Fleas (Siphonaptera) in the human environment. Analytic findings between 1961-1983 in the district of Leipzig (East Germany). II. Spacial and temporal distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, G; Vater, A

    1985-03-01

    During the last 20 years there has been very little infestation with fleas in the district of Leipzig. Out of the 8 species only Pulex irritans and Ctenocephalides felis are of hygienic concern. Greater numbers of them were found in densely populated urban districts. Origins of infestation were mainly dogs and cats kept in unhygienic conditions, and retreats of feral cats. There have been changes in the dominance of fleas associated with man. P. irritans probably had been the dominant species for centuries. About the turn of the 19th century Ctenocephalides canis attained codominance. Since the 1960s C. felis has been dominating.

  15. Distributional data and taxonomic notes on the flea Strepsylla (Siphonaptera: Ctenophthalmidae: Neopsyllinae: Phalacropsyllini Datos de distribución y notas taxonómicas de las especies de Strepsylla (Siphonaptera: Ctenophthalmidae: Neopsyllinae: Phalacropsyllini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Acosta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Strepsylla Traub, 1950 is considered a New World flea genus, parasitizing, in most cases, species of Muridae, particularly peromyscines. Thirteen species of Strepsylla are addressed with respect to their taxonomic characters, host preferences and geographic distribution. A detailed list of material is included.Strepsylla Traub, 1950 es considerado un género de pulgas del nuevo mundo, que en la mayoría de los casos parasitan múridos, particularmente peromisinos. Se comentan algunos de los caracteres taxonómicos, preferencia de huéspedes, distribución geográfica y el material examinado de las 13 especies del género.

  16. Fleas and flea control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dautović Živomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fleas as hemeatophagous arthropodes take part in the spreading of certain diseases such as bubonic plague, murine typhus, tick-borne typhus tularaemia, or can be transitory hosts for certain species of cestodes for dogs and cats. Depending on the type of host on which fleas persist and the habitat, measures that can be taken to control them can be only sanitary-hygiene, individual, or treatment of the habitat. Sanitary-hygiene measures mostly consist of regular cleaning. Individual protection implies the use of insecticides for re-impregnating clothing, spraying clothing and the use of repellents. Treatment of habitats comprises the use of insecticides of the group of organophosphates, metyl-carbamates, pyrethroids and organo-chlorine compounds, instruments for dusting and spraying. In addition to these compounds, preparations based on imidaclopride, fipronyl and inhibitors of insect growth (IGRs and development (IDIs are also used. Flea control in household pets is implemented using measures of individual protection and treatment of their habitats.

  17. Rickettsia species in fleas collected from small mammals in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špitalská, Eva; Boldiš, Vojtech; Mošanský, Ladislav; Sparagano, Olivier; Stanko, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological and epizootiological studies of Rickettsia felis and other Rickettsia spp. are very important, because their natural cycle has not yet been established completely. In total, 315 fleas (Siphonaptera) of 11 species of Ceratophyllidae, Hystrichopsyllidae and Leptopsyllidae families were tested for the presence of Rickettsia species and Coxiella burnetii with conventional and specific quantitative real-time PCR assays. Fleas were collected from five rodent hosts (Myodes glareolus, Apodemus flavicollis, Apodemus agrarius, Microtus subterraneus, Microtus arvalis) and three shrew species (Sorex araneus, Neomys fodiens, Crocidura suaveolens) captured in Eastern and Southern Slovakia. Overall, Rickettsia spp. was found in 10.8% (34/315) of the tested fleas of Ctenophthalmus agyrtes, Ctenophthalmus solutus, Ctenophthalmus uncinatus and Nosopsyllus fasciatus species. Infected fleas were coming from A. flavicollis, A. agrarius, and M. glareolus captured in Eastern Slovakia. C. burnetii was not found in any fleas. R. felis, Rickettsia helvetica, unidentified Rickettsia, and rickettsial endosymbionts were identified in fleas infesting small mammals in the Košice region, Eastern Slovakia. This study is the first report of R. felis infection in C. solutus male flea collected from A. agrarius in Slovakia.

  18. Ticks and Fleas Infestation on East Hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor in Van Province, Eastern Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Goz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ixodid ticks (Acari: İxodidae and fleas (Siphonaptera are the major vectors of pathogens threatening animals and human healths. The aim of our study was to detect the infestation rates of East Hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor with ticks and fleas in Van Province, eastern region of Turkey.Methods: We examined fleas and ticks infestation patterns in 21 hedgehogs, collected from three suburbs with the greater of number gardens. In order to estimate flea and tick infestation of hedgehogs, we immobilized the ectoparasites by treatment the body with a insecticide trichlorphon (Neguvon®-Bayer.Results: On the hedgehogs, 60 ixodid ticks and 125 fleas were detected. All of the ixodid ticks were Rhipicephalus turanicus and all of the fleas were Archaeopsylla erinacei. Infestation rate for ticks and fleas was detected 66.66 % and 100 %, respectively.Conclusion: We detected ticks (R. turanicus and fleas (A. erinacei in hedgehogs at fairly high rates. Since many ticks and fleas species may harbor on hedgehogs and transmit some tick-borne and flea-borne patogens, this results are the important in terms of veterinary and public health. 

  19. Prevalence and abundance of fleas in black-tailed prairie dog burrows: implications for the transmission of plague (Yersinia pestis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Dan J; Stapp, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on North American wildlife. Epizootics, or die-offs, in prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) occur sporadically and fleas (Siphonaptera) are probably important in the disease's transmission and possibly as maintenance hosts of Y. pestis between epizootics. We monitored changes in flea abundance in prairie dog burrows in response to precipitation, temperature, and plague activity in shortgrass steppe in northern Colorado. Oropsylla hirsuta was the most commonly found flea, and it increased in abundance with temperature. In contrast, Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris declined with rising temperature. During plague epizootics, flea abundance in burrows increased and then subsequently declined after the extirpation of their prairie dog hosts.

  20. Does hair coat length affect flea infestation in naturally infested dogs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Araujo Collares da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract The Siphonaptera are parasitic insects of endothermic animals and Ctenocephalides felis and Pulex irritans are important parasites of dogs. This study evaluated the effect of hair coat length and time of year on the population size of C. felis and P. irritans in naturally infested dogs. Fleas were collected from 14 dogs on a monthly basis for a year (February 2015 to January 2016 at a rural property in Bagé, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The dogs were divided into two groups based on hair coat length: short coat (coat length 5.0 cm, n= 7. In total, 2057 fleas were collected, 1541 of which were C. felis (74.91% and 516 were P. irritans (25.08%. The number of C. felis and P. irritans individuals was significantly affected by hair coat length and time of year. The variation in flea numbers over the study months was higher in long-coated than in short-coated dogs for the two flea species and flea numbers increased with increasing mean monthly temperatures. The results provide a better understanding of behavioral aspects of flea communities in dogs and may help develop control strategies targeting these parasites.

  1. PRECIPITATION, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND PARASITISM OF PRAIRIE DOGS BY FLEAS THAT TRANSMIT PLAGUE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David; Hoogland, John

    2017-03-30

    Fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) are hematophagous ectoparasites that can reduce the fitness of vertebrate hosts. Laboratory populations of fleas decline under dry conditions, implying that populations of fleas will also decline when precipitation is scarce under natural conditions. If precipitation and hence vegetative production are reduced, however, then herbivorous hosts might suffer declines in body condition and have weakened defenses against fleas, so that fleas will increase in abundance. We tested these competing hypotheses using information from 23 yr of research on 3 species of colonial prairie dogs in western USA: Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni, 1989-1994), Utah prairie dogs (C. parvidens, 1996-2005), and white-tailed prairie dogs (C. leucurus, 2006-2012). For all 3 species, flea-counts per individual varied inversely with the number of days in the prior growing season with >10 mm of precipitation, an index of the number of precipitation events that might have caused a substantial, prolonged increase in soil moisture and vegetative production. Flea-counts per Utah prairie dog also varied inversely with cumulative precipitation of the prior growing season. Further, flea-counts per Gunnison's and white-tailed prairie dog varied inversely with cumulative precipitation of the just-completed January and February. These results complement research on black-tailed prairie dogs (C. ludovicianus) and might have important ramifications for plague, a bacterial disease, transmitted by fleas, that devastates populations of prairie dogs. In particular, our results might help to explain why, at some colonies, epizootics of plague, which can kill >95% of prairie dogs, are more likely to occur during or shortly after periods of reduced precipitation. Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of droughts in the grasslands of western North America. If so, then climate change might affect the occurrence of plague epizootics among prairie dogs and other

  2. Prevalence of the generalist flea Pulex simulans on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in New Mexico, USA: the importance of considering imperfect detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E; Antolin, Michael F; Long, Dustin H; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Gage, Kenneth L

    2015-04-01

    If a parasite is not detected during a survey, one of two explanations is possible: the parasite was truly absent or it was present but not detected. We fit occupancy models to account for imperfect detection when combing fleas (Siphonaptera) from black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) during June-August 2012 in the Vermejo Park Ranch, New Mexico, USA. With the use of detection histories from combing events during monthly trapping sessions, we fit occupancy models for two flea species: Oropsylla hirusta (a prairie dog specialist) and Pulex simulans (a generalist). Detection probability was plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, and even function as a reservoir of Y. pestis between outbreaks.

  3. Ctenocephalides felis felis vs. Ctenocephalides canis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae: some issues in correctly identify these species Ctenocephalides felis felis vs. Ctenocephalides canis: (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae: algumas questões para identificar corretamente estas espécies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marcos Linardi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ctenocephalides felis felis is one of the most important ectoparasites of dogs and cats throughout the world, because of its geographical distribution, dual parasitological action as an infesting agent and a vector of diseases, the economic losses and the acquired resistance against common insecticides. In Brazil, it surpasses Ctenocephalides canis in distribution, number of host species infested, prevalence and epidemiological importance. However, in some studies the species have been misidentified on the basis of their morphological characters included in taxonomic keys. The morphological variations of chaetotaxy, especially those on the dorsal margin of the hind tibia and lateral metanotal area (LMA, found in certain specimens, have sometimes been erroneously treated as hybrids, in spite of the nonexistence of the two species of Ctenocephalides in the same municipality or region. This review focuses on the characteristics used for interspecific diagnosis and intraspecific variations found between the species. Data on distribution, hosts, prevalence and parasitological action are also presented as an auxiliary means for recognizing the species.Ctenocephalides felis felis é um dos mais importantes ectoparasitos de cães e gatos no mundo inteiro, em virtude de sua distribuição geográfica, dupla ação parasitológica como agente infestante e vetor de doenças, perdas econômicas e resistência adquirida contra inseticidas comuns. No Brasil, ela sobrepuja Ctenocephalides canis em distribuição, número de espécies de hospedeiros infestadas, prevalência e importância epidemiológica. Todavia, em alguns estudos, as espécies têm sido incorretamente identificadas pelos caracteres morfológicos incluídos em chaves taxonômicas. As variações morfológicas de quetotaxia, especialmente aquelas da margem dorsal da tibia posterior e área metanotal lateral (LMA encontradas em certos exemplares, algumas vezes têm sido erroneamente consideradas como híbridas, a despeito da inexistência das duas espécies em um mesmo município ou região. Esta revisão aborda as características utilizadas para o diagnóstico interespecífico e variações intra-específicas encontradas entre as espécies. Dados sobre distribuição, hospedeiros, prevalência e atuação parasitológica são também apresentados como um meio auxiliar para o reconhecimento das espécies.

  4. First report of Siphonaptera infesting Microtus (Microtus cabrerae (Rodentia-Muridae-Arvicolinae in Cuenca , Spain and notes about the morphologic variability of Ctenophthalmus (Ctenophthalmus apertus personatus (Insecta-Siphonaptera-Ctenophthalmidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez M.S.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The fleas infesting Microtus (Microtus cabrerae from three different areas of Cuenca province (Spain have been studied. It is the first time that an ectoparasitological study of this badly known rodent has been done. Four Siphonaptera species have been detected : Rhadinopsylla (Actenophthalmus pentacantha, Peromyscopsylla spectabilis spectabilis, Nosopsyllus fasciatus and Ctenophthalmus (Ctenophthalmus apertus personatus, which was the most abundant species (26 males and 31 females of a total of 28 males and 35 females. Considering the great morphologic variability within the male processus basimerus ventralis (p.b.v. of segment IX of C. personatus subspecies, three morphotypes have been recognised. The male polymorphism detected, would be the result of both host confinement and genetic selection acting on the parasite. It should be pointed out that C. (C. apertus personatus is not narrowly host-specific, therefore further studies are required to clarify this taxonomic situation.

  5. The Fleas of Endemic and Introduced Small Mammals in Central Highland Forests of Madagascar: Faunistics, Species Diversity, and Absence of Host Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven M; Randrenjarison Andriniaina, H Rico; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Data are presented on the flea species of the genera Paractenopsyllus (Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllinae) and Synopsyllus (Pulicidae, Xenopsyllinae) obtained from small mammals during two 2014 seasonal surveys at a montane humid forest site (Ambohitantely) in the Central Highlands of Madagascar. The mammal groups included the endemic family Tenrecidae (tenrecs) and subfamily Nesomyinae (rodents) and two introduced families Muridae (rodents) and Soricidae (shrews); no fleas were recovered from the latter family. The surveys were conducted at the end of the wet and dry seasons with 288 individual small mammals captured, including 12 endemic and four introduced species. These animals yielded 344 fleas, representing nine species endemic to Madagascar; no introduced species was collected. Some seasonal variation was found in the number of trapped small mammals, but no marked difference was found in species richness. For flea species represented by sufficient samples, no parasite-host specificity was found, and there is evidence for considerable lateral exchange in the local flea fauna between species of tenrecs and the two rodent families (endemic and introduced). The implications of these results are discussed with regards to small mammal species richness and community structure, as well as a possible mechanism for the maintenance of sylvatic cycles of bubonic plague in the montane forests of Madagascar.

  6. A Molecular survey of Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Ehrlichia canis and Babesia microti in foxes and fleas from Sicily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torina, A; Blanda, V; Antoci, F; Scimeca, S; D'Agostino, R; Scariano, E; Piazza, A; Galluzzo, P; Giudice, E; Caracappa, S

    2013-11-01

    Fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) are obligate bloodsucking insects, which parasitize birds and mammals, and are distributed throughout the world. Several species have been implicated in pathogen transmission. This study aimed to monitor red foxes and the fleas isolated from them in the Palermo and Ragusa provinces of Sicily, Italy, as these organisms are potential reservoirs and vectors of pathogens. Thirteen foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 110 fleas were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect DNA of the pathogens Ehrlichia canis, Babesia microti, Rickettsia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma ovis. In the foxes, A. ovis was detected in only one animal, whereas the prevalence of the E. canis pathogen was 31%. B. microti and Rickettsia spp. were not detected. Of all of the collected fleas, 75 belonged to the species Xenopsylla cheopis, 32 belonged to Ctenocephalides canis, two belonged to Ctenocephalides felis and one belonged to Cediopsylla inaequalis. In the fleas, the following pathogens were found: A. ovis (prevalence 25%), A. marginale (1%), A. phagocytophilum (1%), Rickettsia felis (2%) and E. canis (3%). X. cheopis was the flea species most frequently infected with Anaplasma, in particular A. ovis (33%), A. marginale (1%) and A. phagocytophilum (1%). Both C. felis exemplars were positive for R. felis. E. canis was found in the lone C. inaequalis and also in 3% of the X. cheopis specimens. No fleas were positive for B. microti or A. platys. As foxes often live in proximity to domestic areas, they may constitute potential reservoirs for human and animal parasites. Further studies should be performed on fleas to determine their vectorial capacity.

  7. Using occupancy models to investigate the prevalence of ectoparasitic vectors on hosts: an example with fleas on prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Doherty, Paul F.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Huyvaert, Kathryn P.; Long, Dustin H.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites are often difficult to detect in the field. We developed a method that can be used with occupancy models to estimate the prevalence of ectoparasites on hosts, and to investigate factors that influence rates of ectoparasite occupancy while accounting for imperfect detection. We describe the approach using a study of fleas (Siphonaptera) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). During each primary occasion (monthly trapping events), we combed a prairie dog three consecutive times to detect fleas (15 s/combing). We used robust design occupancy modeling to evaluate hypotheses for factors that might correlate with the occurrence of fleas on prairie dogs, and factors that might influence the rate at which prairie dogs are colonized by fleas. Our combing method was highly effective; dislodged fleas fell into a tub of water and could not escape, and there was an estimated 99.3% probability of detecting a flea on an occupied host when using three combings. While overall detection was high, the probability of detection was always dogs, flea occupancy was heightened in old/natural colonies of prairie dogs, and on hosts that were in poor condition. Occupancy was initially low in plots with high densities of prairie dogs, but, as the study progressed, the rate of flea colonization increased in plots with high densities of prairie dogs in particular. Our methodology can be used to improve studies of ectoparasites, especially when the probability of detection is low. Moreover, the method can be modified to investigate the co-occurrence of ectoparasite species, and community level factors such as species richness and interspecific interactions.

  8. Primeiro registro de Rhynchopsyllus pulex (Siphonaptera: Tungidae em Nyctinomops laticaudatus (Chiroptera: Molossidae no Brasil First record of Rhynchopsyllus pulex (Siphonaptera: Tungidae in Nyctinomops laticaudatus (Chiroptera: Molossidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Gonzalez Monteiro

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se o parasitismo de Rhynchopsyllus pulex (Siphonaptera: Tungidae em Nyctinomops laticaudatus (Chiroptera no município de Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.The parasitism of Rhynchopsyllus pulex (Siphonaptera: Tungidae is described in Nyctinomops laticaudatus (Chiroptera in the county of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

  9. Hey! A Flea Bit Me!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you think you've been bitten by a flea, wash the bite with soap and water. Put on some calamine lotion to help with the itching, or an adult can find an anti-itch cream at the drugstore for you. Try ... from scratching flea bites, a doctor will need to prescribe medication ...

  10. Eficácia do fipronil em cães infestados com diferentes cargas parasitárias de Ctenocephalides felis felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Nunes Coelho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar através de teste in vivo, a eficácia e o período residual de proteção do fipronil 10% "top spot" em cães infestados com diferentes cargas parasitárias de Ctenocephalides felis felis. Foram utilizados 24 cães da raça Beagle, compondo seis animais por grupo. Os cães foram divididos em quatro grupos. Os cães dos grupos controles I e II não receberam tratamento, enquanto que os cães dos grupos tratados I e II receberam tratamento com formulação de fipronil 10% "top spot". Os cães dos grupos controle I e tratado I foram infestados com 100 pulgas adultas não alimentadas, e os cães dos grupos controle II e tratado II foram infestados com 300 pulgas adultas não alimentadas. As infestações foram realizadas nos dias, -2, +5, +12, +19, +26, +33 e +40 e nos dias +2, +7, +14, +21, +28, +35 e +42 foi realizada retirada mecânica e contagem de pulgas para avaliação. As eficácias pulguicidas, para o grupo tratado I, nos dias +2, +7, +14, +21, +28, +35 e +42, foram respectivamente 99,36%; 99,73%; 99,48%; 99,74%; 99,75%; 95,06% e 67,62%. As eficácias pulguicidas, para o grupo tratado II, avaliadas nos mesmos dias, foram respectivamente 100%; 100%; 100%; 100%; 99,91%; 95,60% e 68,55%. O fipronil mostrou-se eficaz na eliminação das pulgas em cães até o dia +35. A análise estatística comparativa entre as médias de pulgas vivas, entre os grupos controle I e tratado I, demonstrou que ocorreu diferença significativa (p≤0,05 para os desafios em todos os dias experimentais, após o tratamento. Os grupos controle II e tratado II também apresentaram diferença significativa (p≤0,05 para os desafios em todos os dias experimentais, após o tratamento. A análise estatística entre os grupos tratados I e II demonstrou que não ocorreu diferença significativa (p≥0,05 para os desafios em todos os dias experimentais. O desafio foi encerrado no dia +42 já que a eficácia do fipronil nos grupos tratados I e II foram inferiores 70%. O produto em teste mostrou-se eficaz na eliminação das pulgas em cães até o dia + 35, não apresentando mais efeito residual de proteção quando os animais foram reinfestados. Não houve diferença significativa nos níveis de eficácia entre os grupos infestados com 100 e 300 exemplares adultos de C. felis felis ao longo do período experimental.

  11. Influence de la température sur le développement de la puce africaine du chat Ctenocephalides felis strongylus (Jordan, 1925 (Siphonaptera : Pulicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao K.P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché, 1835 communément appelée “puce du chat” présente deux sous-espèces reconnues : Ctenocephalides felis strongylus (Jordan, 1925 inféodée au continent africain et Ctenocephalides felis felis (Bouché, 1835 présente dans les zones à climat tempéré (Afrique du Nord, Europe et Amérique (Ménier et Beaucournu, 1999. En Afrique subsaharienne, la principale puce retrouvée chez les animaux de compagnie et chez certains animaux d’élevage (ovins, caprins et bovins appartient à la sous-espèce C. f. strongylus. Quelques paramètres bio-écologiques de C. f. strongylus ont été étudiés dans différentes conditions d’élevage. Les résultats ont été comparés à ceux de C. f. felis actuellement disponibles. À 75% ± 5 d’humidité relative, le cycle de développement de C. f. strongylus dure 20-21 jours à 27 °C et de 16 à 17 jours à 29 °C. Ainsi, la sousespèce africaine de la puce du chat (C. f. strongylus se développe moins vite que C. f. felis à températures identiques. Cette différence pourrait s’expliquer par l’influence du climat de leurs aires de distribution respectives sur leur cycle de développement. À 75% ± 5 d’humidité relative, les adultes de C. f. strongylus ne peuvent survivre plus de 14 jours dans l’environnement à des températures comprises entre 27 et 29 °C, lorsqu’elles n’ont jamais pris de repas sanguin. Dans ces mêmes conditions, la durée de survie n’excède pas 16 jours à 19 °C. Mais lorsque C. f. strongylus a pris un premier repas de sang, elle a une durée de vie beaucoup plus courte lorsqu’elle est hors de son hôte. En effet, aucun individu n’est retrouvé vivant trois jours passé hors de la fourrure de son hôte à 29 °C, cinq jours à 27 °C et huit jours à 19 °C. Il en est de même pour C. f. felis. Ces données sur la bio-écologie de C. f. strongylus permettent de comprendre l’influence de la température sur son cycle de développement et d’envisager des stratégies de lutte plus efficientes.

  12. Three new species of fleas belonging to the genus Macrostylophora from the three-striped ground squirrel, Lariscus insignis, in Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, L A; Beaucournu, J-C

    2014-12-01

    Three new species of fleas belonging to the genus Macrostylophora (Siphonaptera, Ceratophyllidae) are described from the three-striped ground squirrel, Lariscus insignis, from Tjibodas, West Java (Jawa Barat), Indonesia at an elevation of 1500 m. Macrostylophora larisci sp. n. is described from three male specimens, Macrostylophora debilitata sp. n. is described from one male and Macrostylophora wilsoni sp. n. is described from one female. Non-genital morphological characters of the female specimen, including ctenidial spine shapes and lengths, show that it is not the corresponding female for either M. larisci sp. n. or M. debilitata sp. n. It is unusual for three different species of congeneric fleas to parasitize the same host species in the same geographical location. These three new species represent the first known records of Macrostylophora from Java and they could be enzootic vectors between rodents of flea-borne zoonotic pathogens such as Rickettsia typhi and Yersinia pestis, both of which are established on Java. A list is provided of the 43 known species and 12 subspecies of Macrostylophora together with their known geographical distributions and hosts. A map depicting the distributions of known Indonesian (and Bornean) species of Macrostylophora is also included.

  13. On the probability of dinosaur fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Katharina; Zhu, Qiyun; Hastriter, Michael W; Whiting, Michael F

    2016-01-11

    Recently, a set of publications described flea fossils from Jurassic and Early Cretaceous geological strata in northeastern China, which were suggested to have parasitized feathered dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and early birds or mammals. In support of these fossils being fleas, a recent publication in BMC Evolutionary Biology described the extended abdomen of a female fossil specimen as due to blood feeding.We here comment on these findings, and conclude that the current interpretation of the evolutionary trajectory and ecology of these putative dinosaur fleas is based on appeal to probability, rather than evidence. Hence, their taxonomic positioning as fleas, or stem fleas, as well as their ecological classification as ectoparasites and blood feeders is not supported by currently available data.

  14. Plague and the Human Flea, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Makundi, Rhodes H

    2007-01-01

    Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least 6 of the 17 plague seasons between 1986 and 2004. In the remaining 5 villages with low plague...... frequency, plague was either rare or unrecorded. Pulex irritans, known as the human flea, was the predominant flea species (72.4%) in houses. The density of P. irritans, but not of other domestic fleas, was significantly higher in villages with a higher plague frequency or incidence. Moreover, the P....... irritans index was strongly positively correlated with plague frequency and with the logarithmically transformed plague incidence. These observations suggest that in Lushoto District human fleas may play a role in plague epidemiology. These findings are of immediate public health relevance because...

  15. Fleas as parasites of the family Canidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeffer Martin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, flea-borne diseases are among the most important medical diseases of humans. Plague and murine typhus are known for centuries while the last years brought some new flea-transmitted pathogens, like R. felis and Bartonella henselae. Dogs may play an essential or an accidental role in the natural transmission cycle of flea-borne pathogens. They support the growth of some of the pathogens or they serve as transport vehicles for infected fleas between their natural reservoirs and humans. More than 15 different flea species have been described in domestic dogs thus far. Several other species have been found to be associated with wild canids. Fleas found on dogs originate from rodents, birds, insectivores and from other Carnivora. Dogs therefore may serve as ideal bridging hosts for the introduction of flea-borne diseases from nature to home. In addition to their role as ectoparasites they cause nuisance for humans and animals and may be the cause for severe allergic reactions.

  16. Short report: Exposing laboratory-reared fleas to soil and wild flea feces increases transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Vetter, Sara M; Gage, Kenneth L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-reared Oropsylla montana were exposed to soil and wild-caught Oropsylla montana feces for 1 week. Fleas from these two treatments and a control group of laboratory-reared fleas were infected with Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague. Fleas exposed to soil transmitted Y. pestis to mice at a significantly greater rate (50.0% of mice were infected) than control fleas (23.3% of mice were infected). Although the concentration of Y. pestis in fleas did not differ among treatments, the minimum transmission efficiency of fleas from the soil and wild flea feces treatments (6.9% and 7.6%, respectively) were more than three times higher than in control fleas (2.2%). Our results suggest that exposing laboratory-reared fleas to diverse microbes alters transmission of Y. pestis.

  17. Serological, intradermal and live flea challenge tests in the assessment of hypersensitivity to flea antigens in cats (Felis domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Ross; Hutchinson, Melanie J; Loeffler, Anette

    2006-09-01

    The results of intradermal testing with three commercial flea antigens and a serological test for IgE antibodies to flea antigens were compared with live flea challenge in cats. Eight control cats with no prior flea exposure had negative serological test and flea challenge results. By contrast, 17 out of 27 cats with previous flea exposure showed immediate reactivity to flea challenge; reactivity at 6, 24 and 48 h after flea exposure was noted in 12, 16 and 21 cats, respectively. Seventeen of these cats had positive serological test results. Seven cats showed immediate intradermal test reactions to the ARTU allergen, six reacted to the Biophady allergen, and six reacted to the Greer allergen. Intradermal test reactivity was less frequent at the other time points. Using the results of the flea challenge as the 'gold standard' for the presence or absence of sensitisation to fleas, the sensitivity and specificity of the serological test was 0.88 and 0.77, respectively. Sensitivities of the intradermal tests at the four time points ranged from 0 to 0.33, whereas the specificities ranged from 0.78 to 1.0. Live flea challenge is better able to detect cats with hypersensitivity to fleas than either intradermal or serological testing.

  18. Fleas and Flea-Associated Bartonella Species in Dogs and Cats from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, M F; Billeter, S A; Osikowicz, L; Luna-Caipo, D V; Cáceres, A G; Kosoy, M

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated 238 fleas collected from cats and dogs in three regions of Peru (Ancash, Cajamarca, and Lima) for the presence of Bartonella DNA. Bartonella spp. were detected by amplification of the citrate synthase gene (16.4%) and the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (20.6%). Bartonella rochalimae was the most common species detected followed by Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae. Our results demonstrate that dogs and cats in Peru are infested with fleas harboring zoonotic Bartonella spp. and these infected fleas could pose a disease risk for humans.

  19. Bartonella infection in rodents and their flea ectoparasites: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella-rodent-flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized.

  20. DDO 68: A Flea with Smaller Fleas that on Him Prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, Francesca; Nipoti, Carlo; Ciotti, Luca; Tosi, Monica; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bellazzini, Michele; Cignoni, Michele; Cusano, Felice; Paris, Diego; Sacchi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    We present new photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 68, one of the most metal-poor and least massive dwarfs, located in the Lynx-Cancer Void. The images were acquired with the Large Binocular Telescope in the g and r passbands and show unequivocally that DDO 68 has previously unknown stellar streams related to the accretion of at least two smaller companions: a flea with smaller fleas biting it, to put it in Jonathan Swift’s words (from Jonathan Swift’s On Poetry: a Rhapsody: So, naturalists observe, a flea/has smaller fleas that on him prey/and these have smaller still to bite em/and so proceed ad infinitum). Our data provide direct observational evidence of multiple galaxy merging occurring at very low galactic mass scales. We present the results of an N-body simulation of the interaction of three dwarf galaxies that reproduce well the main morphological features of DDO 68.

  1. Plague and the Human Flea, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Makundi, Rhodes H

    2007-01-01

    Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least 6 of the 17 plague seasons between 1986 and 2004. In the remaining 5 villages with low plague...

  2. Leptopsylla algira costai (Siphonaptera: Leptopsyllidae: New host and new geographical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yousefi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To access the emerging ectoparasites associated with shrews in Hamedan Province of Iran. Methods: We have captured bicoloured white-toothed shrews [Crocidura leucodon (C. leucodon] using the live traps in April 2014. Ectoparasites collected by brushing the skins were removed and preserved in 70% ethanol containing 5% glycerin, and subsequently they were sent to the parasitology laboratory and processed. The fleas isolated from infested specimen were cleared in 10% aqueous potassium hydroxide, dehydrated in ethanol, cleared in xylene, mounted in Canada balsam and identified using reliable keys. Results: In general, eight fleas (one male, seven females were collected from C. leucodon in Hamedan Province, Western Iran. The fleas were identified as Leptopsylla algira costai Smit, 1955. Conclusions: Fleas are medically important because they transmit a wide variety of diseases to their hosts. In addition, this aricle reports Leptopsylla algira costai for the first time in new host (C. leucodon and new geographical region (Iran.

  3. Water-flea males from the netherworld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Simple treatments with hormones could unlock the expression of complex phenotypes not known to occur in nature. Using this method, Kim et al. recently obtained males from all-female populations of water fleas. The novel characters revealed by this work can be used in taxonomic identification and phylogenetic inference. Additionally, these "resurrected" males offer insights into the conservation of traits that are not exposed to natural selection.

  4. Flea Infestation in Farm Animals and Its Health Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ebrahimzadeh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most fleas infest their host temporarily then pass to another of the same kind, while others move from one to a different host species. Although the comprehensive list of fleas reported from Iran, but there still exists considerable gap in our knowledge of zoonotic aspect of flea infestation. The present study was undertaken to determine correlation between domestic animals and man as host of fleas. Methods: The questionnaires on the base of flea infestation of animals flock and animal care- man were prepared and distributed to veterinary stations of all provinces. A total of 553 questionnaires sheets and 168 flea samples were collected from sixteen provinces. Results: One hundred fifty six specimens of Pulex irritans were collected from sheep, goats, cattle, chicken and human, which consisted of 92.8% of all recovered fleas. Chickens infested by three species of fleas including Pulex irritans (84.6%, Ctenocephalides canis (12.9% and Ceratophilus gallinae (2.5%. Two hundred and eighty nine cases of animal and 244 cases of human infestation were recorded among the suspicious populations, the most prevalence of infestation was found in sheep and goat herds whilst chicken flocks infested with the"nlowest rate and cattle were infested moderately. The major health problem was occurred in farmers, animal care-men and their relatives. The observations showed they had different skin reactions to flea's bites. Conclusion: The results showed that fleas are approximately a widespread parasite of farm animals and it seems that they may play an important role in occurring of zoonotic infestation in Iran. Keywords: Flea, Farm animal, Human, Iran.

  5. Anatomy of Tunga trimamillata Pampiglione et al., 2002 (Insecta, Siphonaptera, Tungidae and developmental phases of the gravid female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampiglione S.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some internal anatomical features observed in histological sections and freshly dissected mounts of Tunga trimamillata, a Siphonaptera recently discovered in Andean regions of Ecuador from several mammals, including man. It was possible to study in males and also non-gravid and gravid females, the location and anatomy of several organs not previously described for this species: the testes, epididymis, ganglia, Malpighian tubules, eyes, rectal ampulla with one of its pads and structures which could be interpreted as midgut diverticula, whose presence has not been recorded in the Siphonaptera. The process of neosomy in the female during pregnancy is illustrated by photographs of the consecutive developmental phases, taken at the stereomicroscope. Furthermore, some details of the exoskeleton, spermatheca during different phases of pregnancy of the gravid female and the presence of a foreign body (parasite? within the haemocoel have been displayed in specimens cleared with Hoyer’s medium.

  6. Predictors for abundance of host flea and floor flea in households of villages with endemic commensal rodent plague, Yunnan Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Xiang Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: From 1990 to 2006, fifty-five natural villages experienced at least one plague epidemic in Lianghe County, Yunnan Province, China. This study is aimed to document flea abundance and identify predictors in households of villages with endemic commensal rodent plague in Lianghe County. METHODS: Trappings were used to collect fleas and interviews were conducted to gather demography, environmental factors, and other relevant information. Multivariate hurdle negative binomial model was applied to identify predictors for flea abundance. RESULTS: A total of 344 fleas were collected on 101 small mammals (94 Rattus flavipectus and 7 Suncus murinus. R. flavipectus had higher flea prevalence and abundance than S. murinus, but the flea intensities did not differ significantly. A total of 315 floor fleas were captured in 104 households. Xenopsylla cheopis and Ctenocephalides felis felis were the predominant flea species on the host and the floor flea, respectively. The presence of small mammal faeces and R. flavipectus increased host flea prevalence odds 2.9- and 10-fold, respectively. Keeping a dog in the house increased floor flea prevalence odds 2-fold. Keeping cattle increased floor flea intensity by 153%. Villages with over 80% of houses raising chickens had increased prevalence odds and intensity of floor flea about 2.9- and 11.6-fold, respectively. The prevalence and intensity of floor flea in brick and wood houses were decreased by 60% and 90%, respectively. Flea prevalences of host and floor flea in the households that were adjacent to other houses were increased 7.4- and 2.2-fold, respectively. Houses with a paddy nearby decreased host flea intensity by 53%, while houses with an outside toilet increased host flea intensity by 125%. CONCLUSION: Rodent control alone may not be sufficient to control plague risk in these areas. In order to have successful results, plague control programs should pay attention to ecological and hygiene factors

  7. Notas sobre Tungidae, I. Novos dados sobre a biologia e morfologia de Tunga penetrans (L., 1758 Jarocki, 1838 (Siphonaptera, Tungidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roséli Azi Nascimento

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available New data on the biology and morphology of Tunga penetrans (L., 1758 Jarocki, 1838 (Siphonaptera-Tungidae are presented. In this paper is given a comparision between those points found at the literature with the new ones which have been pointed out, such as different aspects of the larval structural, a particular description of the egg-breaker, and morphobgical details of adults obtained by using scanning electron microscope. New data about evolution period are given.

  8. Selective isolation of Yersinia pestis from plague-infected fleas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarovich, Derek S.; Colman, Rebecca E.; Price, Erin P.; Chung, Wai Kwan; Lee, Judy; Schupp, James M.; Alexander, James; Keim, Paul; Wagner., David M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated Yersinia CIN agar for the isolation of Yersinia pestis from infected fleas. CIN media is effective for the differentiation of Y. pestis from flea commensal flora and is sufficiently inhibitory to other bacteria that typically outcompete Y. pestis after 48 hours of growth using less selective media. PMID:20385178

  9. Human infestation by pigeon fleas (Ceratophyllus columbae) from feral pigeons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag-Wackernagel, D; Spiewak, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The report concerns a married couple who were repeatedly invaded by pigeon fleas (Ceratophyllus columbae) over a period of 2 months. The source of the fleas was a pair of breeding feral pigeons (Columba livia). The birds' nest was located in the attic immediately above the couple's apartment, and th

  10. A review of plague persistence with special emphasis on fleas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.

    2009-01-01

    Sylvatic plague is highly prevalent during infrequent epizootics that ravage the landscape of western North America. During these periods, plague dissemination is very efficient. Epizootics end when rodent and flea populations are decimated and vectored transmission declines. A second phase (enzootic plague) ensues when plague is difficult to detect from fleas, hosts or the environment, and presents less of a threat to public health.

  11. Siphonaptera parasites of wild rodents and marsupials trapped in three mountain ranges of the Atlantic Forest in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bianco de Moraes

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A study of the associations between small mammals and fleas was undertaken in three areas of the Atlantic Forest in Souhtheastern Brazil: Serra da Fartura, SP, Serra da Bocaina, SP, and Itatiaia, RJ. Trapping of small rodents and marsupials was done every 3 months during 2 years, from June 1999 to May 2001. A total 502 rodents (13 species and 50 marsupials (7 species were collected, and 185 hosts out of 552 (33.5% captured in the traps were parasitized by 327 fleas belonging to 11 different species. New host records were determined for several flea species, and 5 significant associations between fleas and hosts were also found.

  12. Presence of Coxiella burnetii in fleas in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaroulaki, Anna; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Ioannou, Ioannis; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Tselentis, Yannis

    2014-09-01

    Over 40 tick species are naturally infected by Coxiella burnetii. However, little is known about the presence of C. burnetii in other ectoparasites such as fleas. During a 6-year (2000-2006) study, 1147 fleas were collected from 652 animals (252 rats, 118 foxes, and 282 hares) captured from different areas of Cyprus. Three flea species-Xenopsylla cheopis, Ctenocephalides felis, and C. canis-were identified. Fleas were pooled (153 pools) and tested by PCR for the presence of C. burnetii. The pathogen was identified in 25 (16.3%) pools. None of the fleas parasitizing hares was positive for C. burnetii, as opposed to fleas collected from rats (12% pool positivity) and foxes (47.6% pool positivity). The highest prevalence of positive pools was recorded in C. canis (38%) compared to C. felis (16.6%) and X. cheopis (10.8%). All pools of C. canis positive for C. burnetii were removed from foxes (44.4%), whereas all positive X. cheopis (10.8%) were removed from rats. The role of fleas in the maintenance and transmission of C. burnetii among wild vertebrates remains to be determined.

  13. Caracterización y control de especies de pulgas de importancia veterinaria para la salud animal y pública (Characterization and control of flea veterinary importance to animal and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez Fernández Yolanda E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl presente artículo de revisión es una contribución al estudio ycaracterización de especies de pulgas con interés veterinario, por su papel en la transmisión de enfermedades zoonóticas y su importancia para la salud animal y pública. Dentro del gran phylum de los artrópodos, podemos citar el orden Siphonaptera, encontrándose en este las pulgas y constituyendo los ectoparásitos más frecuentes en los animales. Las pulgas son insectos achatados lateralmente, con un tamaño de 3,5 mm como máximo, que se alimentan de la sangre de los animales sobre los que viven. Existen unas 2.400 especies de pulgas, pero solo 6 infestan a los animales domésticos en especial a los usados como mascotas, la más conocida es Ctenocephalides felis, que parasita a perros, gatos y al hombre. Presentan un grupo de características que las diferencian de su orden por su rapidez con sus patas traseras muy largas, y adaptadas para el realizar grandes saltos. Estos ectoparásitos al igual que la mayoría de los parásitos necesitan de un huésped para depositar sus huevos y podercompletar su ciclo biológico. Trasmiten diferentes enfermedades entre las que encontramos la peste (Yersinia pestis, y la dermatitis alérgica. Su diagnóstico es complejo debido a su tamaño pues no se observan fácilmente. Su control gira fundamentalmente sobre el animaldirectamente y el medio donde se desarrolla, siendo este último fundamental para evitar la proliferación del ectoparásito.SummaryThese article is a contribution to studied and characterized species of fleas to veterinary impact because the role of zoonoses transmission and them, the importance of human and animal health and animal welfare. Within the large phylum of arthropods, we can cite the order Siphonaptera, fleas were found in this, are the most common ectoparasites in animals. Fleas are insects flattened laterally, with a size of 3.5 mm, which feed on the blood of animals on which they live. There are

  14. DDO 68: A flea with smaller fleas that on him prey

    CERN Document Server

    Annibali, F; Ciotti, L; Tosi, M; Aloisi, A; Bellazzini, M; Cignoni, M; Cusano, F; Paris, D; Sacchi, E

    2016-01-01

    We present new photometry of the dwarf irregular galaxy DDO 68, one of the most metal-poor and least massive dwarfs, located in the Lynx-Cancer Void. The images were acquired with the Large Binocular Telescope in the g and r passbands, and show unequivocally that DDO 68 has previously unknown stellar streams related to the accretion of at least two smaller companions: a flea with smaller fleas biting it, to put it in Jonathan Swift's words. Our data provide direct observational evidence of multiple merging occurring at very low galactic mass scales. We present the results of an N-body simulation of the interaction of three dwarf galaxies which reproduces well the main morphological features of DDO 68.

  15. Detection of multiple Bartonella species in digestive and reproductive tissues of fleas collected from sympatric mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Kabeya, Hidenori; Inoue, Kai; Bai, Ying; Maruyama, Soichi

    2010-07-01

    At least 12 species in the genus Bartonella are zoonotic pathogens that may be transmitted among mammalian hosts by fleas or other arthropods. Apparent host specificity by some Bartonella species to mammalian hosts has been observed, and the detection of multiple Bartonella species in mammalian fleas suggests that fleas take bloodmeals from a variety of host species. However, many flea species are observed to parasitize a narrow host range. Therefore, we suspect that fleas may acquire Bartonella by a mechanism other than ingesting infectious blood. We found that detection of multiple Bartonella genotypes and species is apparently common in fleas and that the majority of fleas tested (5/9) carried Bartonella species atypical of their hosts. We also detected Bartonella DNA in flea reproductive tissues, suggesting that vertical transmission of this organism in vectors is possible, potentially leading to the accumulation of Bartonella diversity over time within fleas.

  16. Rickettsia felis, an emerging flea-transmitted human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Graves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsia felis was first recognised two decades ago and has now been described as endemic to all continents except Antarctica. The rickettsiosis caused by R. felis is known as flea-borne spotted fever or cat-flea typhus. The large number of arthropod species found to harbour R. felis and that may act as potential vectors support the view that it is a pan-global microbe. The main arthropod reservoir and vector is the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, yet more than 20 other species of fleas, ticks, and mites species have been reported to harbour R. felis. Few bacterial pathogens of humans have been found associated with such a diverse range of invertebrates. With the projected increase in global temperature over the next century, there is concern that changes to the ecology and distribution of R. felis vectors may adversely impact public health.

  17. [The history of the flea in art and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncalli Amici, R

    2004-06-01

    The flea has been, indirectly, one of the protagonists in the history of man. As one of the two vectors of Yersinia pestis, the etiological agents of the Black Death, the flea (Xenopsylla cheopis) has contributed, over the centuries, to the death of millions of people in many countries. Galileo Galilei was the first to observe the flea with a microscope (1624), but the credit of depicting it with a stunning drawing goes to the Britisher Robert Hooke in 1665. A number of zoologists, including Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek and Diacinto Cestoni, well described and illustrated the life cycle of the flea in the XVII century. Some of these reports inspired scholars such as J. Swift and J. Donne for the composition of classic poems. Also, the flea, alone and with its hosts, has inspired a number of artists to create fine paintings; among them: G. M. Crespi, G. B. Piazzetta, G. de la Tour and others. Colorful sonnets on the flea in the Roman dialect were written by G. Belli and Trilussa. The flea also, as a theme, inspired musicians such as G. F. Ghedini and M. Mussorgsky, play writers such as Feydeau and moviemakers such as Charlie Chaplin. The flea is, indissolubly, connected with the history of Black Death. This disease in man is, in fact, caused--as demonstrated by Yersin and Simond--by the triad: bacterium (Yersinia pestis)/rat/flea (Xenopsylla cheopis). Over the centuries, Black Death has had a deep impact on both the visual arts and literature and, as a result, a very large number of paintings and other works of art have been produced to remember these tragic episodes. In the field of literature, Black Death has been skillfully described by writers such as Boccaccio, Manzoni and Camus. Finally, in recent years, following the discovery of the existence of a large market for the control of fleas in small animals, the interest in this minute insect has been resurrected and, parallel to that, the rebirth of the flea iconography, through electromicroscopy, has also taken place.

  18. Evaluation of afoxolaner chewables to control flea populations in naturally infested dogs in private residences in Tampa FL, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Michael W.; Smith, Vicki; Chwala, Monica; Jones, Emery; Crevoiserat, Lisa; McGrady, Jennifer C.; Foley, Kaitlin M.; Patton, Paula R.; Hawkins, Anthony,; Carithers, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of afoxolaner chewables to control flea populations in naturally infested dogs in private residences in Tampa FL, USA. Evaluations of on-animal and premises flea burdens, flea sex structure and fed-unfed premises flea populations were conducted to more accurately assess flea population dynamics in households. Methods Thirty seven naturally flea infested dogs in 23 homes in Tampa, FL were enrolled in the study and treated with afox...

  19. Molecular characterization of Tunga trimamillata and T. penetrans (Insecta, Siphonaptera, Tungidae: taxonomy and genetic variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchetti A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Tunga, T. trimamillata has recently been described on the basis of several morphological traits. To explore the taxonomic status of this flea with respect to T. penetrans, we undertook a molecular analysis of cytochrome oxydase II and 16S rDNA mitochondrial genes and of the internal transcribed spacer 2 nuclear marker on samples of both species. Maximum Parsimony evaluations of the three data set indicate a differentiation compatible with a specific rank between the two fleas with very high levels of divergence. Both mitochondrial and nuclear data are in line with a recent bottleneck in the Malagasy population of T. penetrans, possibly due to the recent colonisation of Africa via human transportation. Further, significantly lower mitochondrial variability in the Ecuadorian populations of T. penetrans with respect to the T. trimamillata ones is also evidenced.

  20. Flea abundance on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) increases during plague epizootics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Gage, Kenneth L; Montenieri, John A; Antolin, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) on the Great Plains of the United States are highly susceptible to plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, with mortality on towns during plague epizootics often approaching 100%. The ability of flea-borne transmission to sustain disease spread has been questioned because of inefficiency of flea vectors. However, even with low individual efficiency, overall transmission can be increased if flea abundance (the number of fleas on hosts) increases. Changes in flea abundance on hosts during plague outbreaks were recorded during a large-scale study of plague outbreaks in prairie dogs in north central Colorado during 3 years (2004-2007). Fleas were collected from live-trapped black-tailed prairie dogs before and during plague epizootics and tested by PCR for the presence of Y. pestis. The predominant fleas were two prairie dog specialists (Oropsylla hirsuta and Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris), and a generalist flea species (Pulex simulans) was also recorded from numerous mammals in the area. The three species differ in seasonal abundance, with greatest abundance in spring (February and March) and fall (September and October). Flea abundance and infestation intensity increased during epizootics and were highest on prairie dogs with Y. pestis-infected fleas. Seasonal occurrence of epizootics among black-tailed prairie dogs was found to coincide with seasonal peaks in flea abundance. Concentration of infected fleas on surviving animals may account for rapid spread of plague during epizootics. In particular, the role of the generalist flea P. simulans was previously underappreciated.

  1. Molecular detection of Rickettsia typhi in cats and fleas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mercedes Nogueras

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsiatyphi is the etiological agent of murine typhus (MT, a disease transmitted by two cycles: rat-flea-rat, and peridomestic cycle. Murine typhus is often misdiagnosed and underreported. A correct diagnosis is important because MT can cause severe illness and death. Our previous seroprevalence results pointed to presence of human R. typhi infection in our region; however, no clinical case has been reported. Although cats have been related to MT, no naturally infected cat has been described. The aim of the study is to confirm the existence of R. typhi in our location analyzing its presence in cats and fleas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 221 cats and 80 fleas were collected from Veterinary clinics, shelters, and the street (2001-2009. Variables surveyed were: date of collection, age, sex, municipality, living place, outdoor activities, demographic area, healthy status, contact with animals, and ectoparasite infestation. IgG against R. typhi were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Molecular detection in cats and fleas was performed by real-time PCR. Cultures were performed in those cats with positive molecular detection. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Thirty-five (15.8% cats were seropositive. There were no significant associations among seropositivity and any variables. R. typhi was detected in 5 blood and 2 cultures. High titres and molecular detection were observed in stray cats and pets, as well as in spring and winter. All fleas were Ctenocephalides felis. R. typhi was detected in 44 fleas (55%, from shelters and pets. Co-infection with R. felis was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although no clinical case has been described in this area, the presence of R. typhi in cats and fleas is demonstrated. Moreover, a considerable percentage of those animals lived in households. To our knowledge, this is the first time R. typhi is detected in naturally infected cats.

  2. Myxomatosis: the emergence of male and female European rabbit fleas Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale) from laboratory cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, R C; Edmonds, J W

    1980-01-01

    The sex ratios and the emergence patterns of the European rabbit flea bred under animal house conditions were examined. An overall preponderance of female fleas was found. This was due to the greater preponderance of female fleas in the primary emergence, whereas the sex ratios in the secondary emergence were about 1:1.

  3. Rickettsia felis infection in cat fleas Ctenocephalides felis felis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio C. Horta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the rickettsial infection in a laboratory colony of cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis felis (Bouche in Brazil. All flea samples (30 eggs, 30 larvae, 30 cocoons, 30 males, and 30 females tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR were shown to contain rickettsial DNA. PCR products, corresponding to the rickettsial gltA, htrA, ompA and ompB gene partial sequences were sequenced and showed to correspond to Rickettsia felis, indicating that the flea colony was 100% infected by R. felis. The immunofluorescence assay (IFA showed the presence of R. felis-reactive antibodies in blood sera of 7 (87.5% out of 8 cats that were regularly used to feed the flea colony. From 15 humans that used to work with the flea colony in the laboratory, 6 (40.0% reacted positively to R. felis by IFA. Reactive feline and human sera showed low endpoint titers against R. felis, varying from 64 to 256. With the exception of one human serum, all R. felis-reactive sera were also reactive to Rickettsia rickettsii and/or Rickettsia parkeri antigens at similar titers to R. felis. The single human serum that was reactive solely to R. felis had an endpoint titer of 256, indicating that this person was infected by R. felis.

  4. wFleaBase: the Daphnia genome database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singan Vasanth R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background wFleaBase is a database with the necessary infrastructure to curate, archive and share genetic, molecular and functional genomic data and protocols for an emerging model organism, the microcrustacean Daphnia. Commonly known as the water-flea, Daphnia's ecological merit is unequaled among metazoans, largely because of its sentinel role within freshwater ecosystems and over 200 years of biological investigations. By consequence, the Daphnia Genomics Consortium (DGC has launched an interdisciplinary research program to create the resources needed to study genes that affect ecological and evolutionary success in natural environments. Discussion These tools include the genome database wFleaBase, which currently contains functions to search and extract information from expressed sequenced tags, genome survey sequences and full genome sequencing projects. This new database is built primarily from core components of the Generic Model Organism Database project, and related bioinformatics tools. Summary Over the coming year, preliminary genetic maps and the nearly complete genomic sequence of Daphnia pulex will be integrated into wFleaBase, including gene predictions and ortholog assignments based on sequence similarities with eukaryote genes of known function. wFleaBase aims to serve a large ecological and evolutionary research community. Our challenge is to rapidly expand its content and to ultimately integrate genetic and functional genomic information with population-level responses to environmental challenges. URL: http://wfleabase.org/.

  5. Candidatus ‘Rickettsia senegalensis’ in cat fleas in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Mediannikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of Rickettsia felis and related bacteria are very important, because the natural cycle of this important infection has not yet been established. The recent emergence of R. felis-associated febrile diseases in West and East Africa demands insightful epidemiological studies of the vectors and reservoirs of this bacterium in Africa. Twenty-nine cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, were tested for the presence of rickettsiae, including R. felis, bartonellae, and borreliae, with specific quantitative real-time PCR assays. Supporting our previous studies, R. felis was not detected in the fleas collected. In addition, neither Bartonella nor Borrelia was found. In five (17% examined fleas, we found another species of rickettsia. We isolated three rickettsial strains, and genetic analysis demonstrated that these strains represent a probable new species, provisionally called Candidatus Rickettsia senegalensis here.

  6. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Beugnet Frédéric; deVos Christa; Liebenberg Julian; Halos Lénaïg; Fourie Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard®) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day −1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated gro...

  7. Integrated morphological and molecular identification of cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) and dog fleas (Ctenocephalides canis) vectoring Rickettsia felis in central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Andrea L; Hii, Sze-Fui; Jirsová, Dagmar; Panáková, Lucia; Ionică, Angela M; Gilchrist, Katrina; Modrý, David; Mihalca, Andrei D; Webb, Cameron E; Traub, Rebecca J; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-06-15

    Fleas of the genus Ctenocephalides are the most common ectoparasites infesting dogs and cats world-wide. The species Ctenocephalides felis and Ctenocephalides canis are competent vectors for zoonotic pathogens such as Rickettsia felis and Bartonella spp. Improved knowledge on the diversity and phylogenetics of fleas is important for understanding flea-borne pathogen transmission cycles. Fleas infesting privately owned dogs and cats from the Czech Republic (n=97) and Romania (n=66) were subjected to morphological and molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis. There were a total of 59 (60.82%) cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis), 30 (30.93%) dog fleas (Ctenocephalides canis), 7 (7.22%) European chicken fleas (Ceratophyllus gallinae) and 1 (1.03%) northern rat flea (Nosopsyllus fasciatus) collected in the Czech Republic. Both C. canis and C. felis felis were identified in Romania. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing at the cox1 gene on a cohort of 40 fleas revealed the cosmopolitan C. felis felis clade represented by cox1 haplotype 1 is present in the Czech Republic. A new C. felis felis clade from both the Czech Republic and Romania is also reported. A high proportion of C. canis was observed from dogs and cats in the current study and phylogeny revealed that C. canis forms a sister clade to the oriental cat flea Ctenocephalides orientis (syn. C. felis orientis). Out of 33 fleas tested, representing C. felis felis, C. canis and Ce. gallinae, 7 (21.2%) were positive for R. felis using diagnostic real-time PCR targeting the gltA gene and a conventional PCR targeting the ompB gene. No samples tested positive for Bartonella spp. using a diagnostic real-time PCR assay targeting ssrA gene. This study confirms high genetic diversity of C. felis felis globally and serves as a foundation to understand the implication for zoonotic disease carriage and transmission by the flea genus Ctenocephalides.

  8. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnet, Frédéric; deVos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Fourie, Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day -1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p 97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study.

  9. Seasonal and habitat dependence of fleas parasitic on small mammals in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Makundi, Rhodes

    2009-01-01

    We investigated host and flea species composition across different habitats during dry and rainy seasons in the Western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. During both seasons, similarity in flea species composition increased with an increase in the similarity in host species composition. Nevertheless......, between-season within-habitat as well as within-season between-habitat similarity in host species composition was higher than similarity in flea species composition. Ordination of habitats according to their host and flea species composition demonstrated that the pattern of between-habitat similarity...... in both host and flea species composition varied seasonally. Despite the relatively rich mammal and flea fauna of the study region, the major contribution to variation in species composition between seasons and among habitats was due to a few species only. Flea assemblages on Lophuromys kilonzoi Verheyen...

  10. Ectoparasitos de cães e gatos da cidade de Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil Ectoparasites on cats and dogs from Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cutrim Moreira de Castro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados resultados da coleta de ectoparasitos em cães e gatos entre agosto de 2001 e maio de 2002 em diferentes bairros da cidade Manaus. No cão foram encontrados: Ctenocephalides f. felis (Bouché, 1835 (Siphonaptera, Pulicidae, Heterodoxus spiniger (Enderlein, 1909(Phthiraptera, Boopidae, Trichodectes canis (De Geer, 1778 (Phthiraptera, Trichodectidae e Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille,1806 (Acari, Ixodidae. No gato foi coletado C. f. felis. A prevalência de ectoparasitos foi de 80,8% para cães e 72,7% para gatos. Para a pulga C. f. felis foi de 28,7% para cães e 72,7% para gatos. Para o piolho H. spiniger foi de 12,3% para cães. Para o piolho T. canis foi de 0,1% para cães e para o carrapato R. sanguineus foi de 63% para cães. A média de infestaçãode pulga foi de 1,26 para cães e 1,27 para gatos. A proporção sexual fêmea/macho foi de 1,96:1 no cão e de 3,66:1 no gato. A pulga C. canis (Curtis, 1826, registrada em 1922, não foi coletada.Ectoparasites from different neighborhood of Manaus were collected from august 2001 to May 2002. On dogs it was found: Ctenocephalides f. felis (Bouché, 1835 (Siphonaptera, Pulicidae, Heterodoxus spiniger (Enderlein, 1909(Phthiraptera, Boopidae, Trichodetes canis (De Geer, 1778 (Phthiraptera, Trichodectidae and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille,1806 (Acari, Ixodidae. On cats: C. f. felis. The prevalence of ectoparasites was 80.8% to dogs and 72.7% to cats. For the flea C. f. felis was 28.7% to dogs and 72.7% to cats. For the lice H. spiniger was 12.3% for dogs. For the lice T. canis was 0.1% for dogs and for the tick R. sanguineus was 63% for dogs. The infestation index for fleas was 1.26 to dogs and 1.27 to cats. The sexual ratio obtained was 1.96:1 to dogs and 3.66:1 to cats. The flea C. canis (Curtis, 1826 registered in 1922 was not found.

  11. The Relationship and Covariance Trend of Species Richness between Mammals and Parasitic Fleas in China%中国哺乳类动物和寄生蚤类的丰富度关系及其协同变化趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连宏宇; 龚正达; 张丽云; 臧颖慧; 边长玲; 李栋; 琚俊科

    2011-01-01

    为研究和探讨中国陆生哺乳类动物、蚤类寄生虫多样性的相互关系及其协同变化趋势,本文引用近年出版、能代表和反映我国哺乳动物和蚤类区系概貌的和两专著物种区系分布的数据,按我国行政区划将不同陆生哺乳类动物和蚤目昆虫的各科、属、种(不包含亚种)的地理分布资料和数据进行整理和统计后,应用Pearson线性相关分析法分别对我国陆生哺乳动物、小型兽类、啮齿类、蚤类之间的科-科、属-属、种-种及其物种-科和物种-属丰富度之间的相关性进行了比较和分析.结果发现:(1)在各类哺乳动物和寄生蚤类中的科-科、属-属、种-种丰富度之间为显著正相关关系;(2)从陆生哺乳类动物→小型兽类→啮齿类→蚤类,随着分类阶元及类群的改变,其科与科、属与属、种与种丰富度的相关性指数总体呈逐渐减小的变化趋势;(3)陆生哺乳类动物、小型兽类、啮齿类、蚤类的物种与科丰富度相关性指数均小于物种与属的相关性指数,它们共同反映了随着分类阶元或类群的变小和近缘,丰富度相关性指数总体呈增大的变化趋势;(4)蚤类与各类哺乳动物的相关关系中,啮齿类动物与蚤类寄生虫之间的属-属(r>0.803)、种-种(r>0.768)相关性最大.因而,从大空间尺度上证实了哺乳类动物与蚤类寄生虫高级分类阶元丰富度之间为正相关关系.其中,啮齿类动物与蚤类之间属-属、种-种的相关性最大,这反映了它们之间的长期选择、协同进化及其相互适应.%To study and explore the relationship and the trend of species diversity between mammals and parasitic fleas in China. Citing the recent publications (including: 'a complete checklist of mammal species and subspecies in China' and 'Fauna Sinica·Insecta · Siphonaptera ( second edition) ' ) which reflected the profile of the mammalian and flea fauna,and then coUecting and counting

  12. Efficacy of a new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner for cats against adult Ctenocephalides felis, flea egg production and adult flea emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, Adriano F; Everett, William R; Holzmer, Susan J; Cherni, Judith A; King, Vickie L; Rugg, Douglas; Geurden, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    A new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner was evaluated against fleas for adulticidal efficacy, and for the effect on egg production and hatching when applied to flea-infested cats. Ten male and ten female adult domestic shorthair cats were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups based on pre-treatment flea counts. Cats received topical treatment on Day 0 in a single spot to the dorsal scapular area with either a placebo formulation or with the combination formulation at the minimal dose of 6.0mg selamectin plus 1.0mg sarolaner per kg bodyweight. On Days -1, 5, 12, 19, 26 and 33, cats were infested with approximately 100 (±5) unfed Ctenocephalides felis fleas. At 24h after treatment or 48h after subsequent flea infestation, cats were housed for a 20-h period in a cage to allow collection of flea eggs. At the end of this period, flea eggs were collected from the cages and cats were combed to remove and count live fleas. Emerged viable larvae and emerged adult fleas were counted 3days and 35days, respectively, after egg collection. The new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner provided 100% efficacy against adult fleas up to Day 36 following a single application. Fleas on placebo-treated cats produced large numbers of eggs throughout the study, with individual counts ranging from 110 to 1256 eggs. Following treatment, four flea eggs were collected from a single selamectin/sarolaner-treated cat on Day 29, but there were no eggs collected from any other selamectin/sarolaner-treated animal during the study. No larvae or adult fleas developed from these four eggs. From the eggs collected from the placebo-treated cats, the mean percentage of live larvae and adults that emerged ranged from 67.3% to 84.2% and from 50.7% to 81.8%, respectively. A single topical treatment with a new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner at the minimum label dose thus controlled fleas on cats and was 100% effective in preventing flea reproduction

  13. Flea species infesting dogs in Florida and Bartonella spp. prevalence rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, K; DiGangi, B; Brewer, M; Balakrishnan, N; Breitschwerdt, E B; Lappin, M

    2014-01-31

    Several Bartonella spp. associated with fleas can induce a variety of clinical syndromes in both dogs and humans. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence of Bartonella in the blood of dogs and their fleas. The objectives of this study were to determine the genera of fleas infesting shelter dogs in Florida, the prevalence of Bartonella spp. within the fleas, and the prevalence of Bartonella spp. within the blood of healthy dogs from which the fleas were collected. Fleas, serum, and EDTA-anti-coagulated whole blood were collected from 80 healthy dogs, and total DNA was extracted for PCR amplification of Bartonella spp. The genera of fleas infesting 43 of the dogs were determined phenotypically. PCR amplicons from blood and flea pools were sequenced to confirm the Bartonella species. Amplicons for which sequencing revealed homology to Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (Bvb) underwent specific genotyping by targeting the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. A total of 220 fleas were collected from 80 dogs and pooled by genus (43 dogs) and flea species. Bartonella spp. DNA was amplified from 14 of 80 dog blood samples (17.5%) and from 9 of 80 pooled fleas (11.3%). B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii DNA was amplified from nine dogs and five of the flea pools. Bartonella rochalimae (Br) DNA was amplified from six dogs and two flea pools. One of 14 dogs was co-infected with Bvb and Br. The dog was infested with Pulex spp. fleas containing Br DNA and a single Ctenocephalides felis flea. Of the Bvb bacteremic dogs, five and four were infected with genotypes II and I, respectively. Of the Bvb PCR positive flea pools, three were Bvb genotype II and two were Bvb genotype I. Amplification of Bvb DNA from Pulex spp. collected from domestic dogs, suggests that Pulex fleas may be a vector for dogs and a source for zoonotic transfer of this pathogen from dogs to people. The findings of this study provide evidence to support the hypothesis that flea-infested dogs may be a

  14. Oropsylla hirsuta (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae) can support plague epizootics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) by early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Aryn P; Eisen, Rebecca J; Bearden, Scott W; Montenieri, John A; Gage, Kenneth L; Antolin, Michael F

    2008-06-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, often leads to rapid decimation of black-tailed prairie dog colonies. Flea-borne transmission of Y. pestis has been thought to occur primarily via blocked fleas, and therefore studies of vector efficiency have focused on the period when blockage is expected to occur (> or =5 days post-infection [p.i.]). Oropsylla hirsuta, a prairie dog flea, rarely blocks and transmission is inefficient > or =5 days p.i.; thus, this flea has been considered incapable of explaining rapid dissemination of Y. pestis among prairie dogs. By infecting wild-caught fleas with Y. pestis and exposing naïve mice to groups of fleas at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h p.i., we examined the early-phase (1-4 days p.i.) efficiency of O. hirsuta to transmit Y. pestis to hosts and showed that O. hirsuta is a considerably more efficient vector at this largely overlooked stage (5.19% of fleas transmit Y. pestis at 24 h p.i.) than at later stages. Using a model of vectorial capacity, we suggest that this level of transmission can support plague at an enzootic level in a population when flea loads are within the average observed for black-tailed prairie dogs in nature. Shared burrows and sociality of prairie dogs could lead to accumulation of fleas when host population is reduced as a result of the disease, enabling epizootic spread of plague among prairie dogs.

  15. Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague, is transmitted to mammals by infected fleas. Y. pestis exhibits a distinct life stage in the flea, where it grows in the form of a cohesive biofilm that promotes transmission. After transmission, the temperature shift to 37 degrees C induces many known virulence factors of Y. pestis that confer resistance to innate immunity. These factors are not produced in the low-temperature environment of the flea, however, suggesting that Y. pestis is vulnerable to the initial encounter with innate immune cells at the flea bite site. In this study, we used whole-genome microarrays to compare the Y. pestis in vivo transcriptome in infective fleas to in vitro transcriptomes in temperature-matched biofilm and planktonic cultures, and to the previously characterized in vivo gene expression profile in the rat bubo. In addition to genes involved in metabolic adaptation to the flea gut and biofilm formation, several genes with known or predicted roles in resistance to innate immunity and pathogenicity in the mammal were upregulated in the flea. Y. pestis from infected fleas were more resistant to phagocytosis by macrophages than in vitro-grown bacteria, in part attributable to a cluster of insecticidal-like toxin genes that were highly expressed only in the flea. Our results suggest that transit through the flea vector induces a phenotype that enhances survival and dissemination of Y. pestis after transmission to the mammalian host.

  16. Host gender and offspring quality in a flea parasitic on a rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Irina S; Serobyan, Vahan; Degen, A Allan; Krasnov, Boris R

    2010-10-01

    The quality of offspring produced by parent fleas (Xenopsylla ramesis) fed on either male or female rodent hosts (Meriones crassus) was studied. The emergence success, duration of development, resistance to starvation upon emergence and body size of the flea offspring were measured. It was predicted that offspring of fleas produced by parents that fed on male hosts (i) will survive better as pre-imago, (ii) will develop faster, (iii) will live longer under starvation after emergence and (iv) will be larger than offspring of fleas fed on female hosts. The emergence success of pre-imaginal fleas was relatively high, ranging from 46.9% to 100.0% and averaging 78.4±3.0%, and was not affected by host gender. The duration of development of pre-imaginal fleas depended on the gender of the host of parents and differed between male and female offspring, with female fleas developing faster. Furthermore, male fleas developed faster if their parents fed on female rather than on male hosts, whereas no difference in the duration of development between host genders was found in female fleas. The time to death under starvation did not depend on the gender of either the flea or the host. A newly emerged flea, on average, lived 31.9±1.0 days without access to food. The relationship between host gender and body size of male flea offspring was the only effect that supported the predictions. An increase in body size in male fleas could increase their mating success and, ultimately, their fitness.

  17. The chiggerflea Hectopsylla pulex (Siphonaptera: Tungidae as an ectoparasite of free-tailed bats (Chiroptera: Molossidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Lins Luz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the prevalence and intensity of Hectopsylla pulex infection in Molossus rufus and Molossus molossus, the parasite's choice of attachment site, and whether this host-parasite system varies with host size. Twenty-four bats were captured by hand from the roof of a house in Southeastern Brazil. M. rufus exhibited a prevalence of 71.4% and the mean intensity averaged 5 ectoparasites per bat. M. molossus exhibited a prevalence of 90%, and the average mean intensity was 2.11 ectoparasites. The attachment sites were: ear, tragus, shoulder blade and tibia, anus, wing, axilla, mouth and dactylopatagium. A positive correlation was observed between the bats' weight and the number of fleas.

  18. Gymnomeropsylla n. gen. (Siphonaptera: Pygiopsyllidae from Sulawesi, Indonesia, with the description of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durden L.A.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Compared to related genera, this new flea genus is characterized by the absence, or presence of very few, bristles on the external surface of femur I and especially by the morphology of the apex of sternite IX in the male, which is hyaline and lacks spiniform bristles. The two new species, G. bunomydis and G. margaretamydis, are distinguished from each other by the structure of the genitalia, and the presence of numerous erect bristles on the thorax and abdominal tergites of the latter species. Both of these new species parasitize murine rodents that are endemic to Sulawesi; G. bunomydis was collected mainly from Bunomys chrysocomus and G. margaretamydis only from Margaretamys parvus.

  19. FLEAS OF BLACK-FOOTED FERRETS (MUSTELA NIGRIPES) AND THEIR POTENTIAL ROLE IN THE MOVEMENT OF PLAGUE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Erica L; Grassel, Shaun M; Britten, Hugh B

    2017-07-01

    Sylvatic plague is one of the major impediments to the recovery of the black-footed ferret ( Mustela nigripes ) because it decimates their primary prey species, prairie dogs ( Cynomys spp.), and directly causes mortality in ferrets. Fleas are the primary vector of Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of sylvatic plague. The goal of this research was to better understand the flea fauna of ferrets and the factors that might influence flea abundance on ferrets. Fleas from ferrets were tested for Y. pestis in a post hoc assessment to investigate the plausibility that some ferrets could act as incidental transporter hosts of fleas infected with Y. pestis . Fleas were collected from ferrets captured on the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in central South Dakota, US from 2009 to 2012. A total of 528 fleas collected from 67 individual ferrets were identified and tested for the presence of Y. pestis with a nested PCR assay. The predominant flea recovered from ferrets was Oropsylla hirsuta , a species that comprises 70-100% of the fleas recovered from prairie dogs and their burrows in the study area. Yersinia pestis was detected at low levels in fleas collected from ferrets with prevalence ranging from 0% to 2.9%; male ferrets harbored significantly more fleas than female ferrets. Six of 67 ferrets vaccinated against plague carried fleas that tested positive for Y. pestis , which suggests ferrets vaccinated against plague could inadvertently act as incidental transporter hosts of Y. pestis -positive fleas.

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: common water flea [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available common water flea Daphnia pulex Arthropoda Daphnia_pulex_L.png Daphnia_pulex_NL.png... Daphnia_pulex_S.png Daphnia_pulex_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=L... http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daphnia+pulex&t=NS ...

  1. Zoonotic Bartonella species in fleas collected on gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Mourad W; Henn, Jennifer; Foley, Janet E; Brown, Richard N; Kasten, Rickie W; Foley, Patrick; Chomel, Bruno B

    2009-12-01

    Bartonella spp. are fastidious, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria and are usually vector-borne. However, the vector has not been definitively identified for many recently described species. In northern California, gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) are infected with two zoonotic Bartonella species, B. rochalimae and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Fleas (range 1-8 fleas per fox) were collected from 22 (41.5%) of 54 gray foxes from urban and backcountry zones near Hoopa, California. The flea species were determined, and DNA was individually extracted to establish the Bartonella species harbored by these fleas. Of the 108 fleas collected, 99 (92%) were identified as Pulex simulans. Overall, 39% (42/108) of the fleas were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for Bartonella, with B. rochalimae and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii identified in 34 (81%) and 8 (19%) of the PCR-positive fleas, respectively. There was no difference between the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in P. simulans for the urban and backcountry zones. Fourteen (64%) of the 22 foxes were Bartonella bacteremic at one or more of the capture dates. In 10 instances, both the foxes and the fleas collected from them at the same blood collection were Bartonella-positive. B. rochalimae was the predominant species identified in both foxes and fleas. The competency of Pulex fleas as a vector of B. rochalimae has not been confirmed and will need to be demonstrated experimentally. Pulex spp. fleas readily feed on humans and may represent a source of human exposure to zoonotic species of Bartonella.

  2. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard® against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day −1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p  97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study.

  3. Flea-Associated Bacterial Communities across an Environmental Transect in a Plague-Endemic Region of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Jones

    Full Text Available The vast majority of human plague cases currently occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary route of transmission of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is via flea bites. Non-pathogenic flea-associated bacteria may interact with Y. pestis within fleas and it is important to understand what factors govern flea-associated bacterial assemblages. Six species of fleas were collected from nine rodent species from ten Ugandan villages between October 2010 and March 2011. A total of 660,345 16S rRNA gene DNA sequences were used to characterize bacterial communities of 332 individual fleas. The DNA sequences were binned into 421 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs based on 97% sequence similarity. We used beta diversity metrics to assess the effects of flea species, flea sex, rodent host species, site (i.e. village, collection date, elevation, mean annual precipitation, average monthly precipitation, and average monthly temperature on bacterial community structure. Flea species had the greatest effect on bacterial community structure with each flea species harboring unique bacterial lineages. The site (i.e. village, rodent host, flea sex, elevation, precipitation, and temperature also significantly affected bacterial community composition. Some bacterial lineages were widespread among flea species (e.g. Bartonella spp. and Wolbachia spp., but each flea species also harbored unique bacterial lineages. Some of these lineages are not closely related to known bacterial diversity and likely represent newly discovered lineages of insect symbionts. Our finding that flea species has the greatest effect on bacterial community composition may help future investigations between Yersinia pestis and non-pathogenic flea-associated bacteria. Characterizing bacterial communities of fleas during a plague epizootic event in the future would be helpful.

  4. Prevalence of Rickettsia and Bartonella species in Spanish cats and their fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, María Jesús; Marcén, José Miguel; Pinal, Rocio; Calvete, Carlos; Rodes, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Bartonella henselae, Rickettsia felis, and Rickettsia typhi in fleas and companion cats (serum and claws) and to assess their presence as a function of host, host habitat, and level of parasitism. Eighty-nine serum and claw samples and 90 flea pools were collected. Cat sera were assayed by IFA for Bartonella henselae and Rickettssia species IgG antibodies. Conventional PCRs were performed on DNA extracted from nails and fleas collected from cats. A large portion (55.8%) of the feline population sampled was exposed to at least one of the three tested vector-borne pathogens. Seroreactivity to B. henselae was found in 50% of the feline studied population, and to R. felis in 16.3%. R. typhi antibodies were not found in any cat. No Bartonella sp. DNA was amplified from the claws. Flea samples from 41 cats (46%) showed molecular evidence for at least one pathogen; our study demonstrated a prevalence rate of 43.3 % of Rickettsia sp and 4.4% of Bartonella sp. in the studied flea population. None of the risk factors studied (cat's features, host habitat, and level of parasitation) was associated with either the serology or the PCR results for Bartonella sp. and Rickettsia sp.. Flea-associated infectious agents are common in cats and fleas and support the recommendation that stringent flea control should be maintained on cats.

  5. Genetic differentiation between resistance phenotypes in the phytophagous flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de P.W.; Breuker, C.J.; Vos, de H.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Oku, K.; Verbaarschot, P.G.H.; Nielsen, J.K.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is genetically polymorphic for resistance against the defences of one of its host plants, Barbarea vulgaris R.Br. (Brassicales: Brassicaceae). Whereas resistant flea beetles are able to use B. vulgaris as well as other cruciferous pl

  6. Howardula dominicki n. sp. infesting the tobacco flea bettle in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, K D

    1977-10-01

    Howardula dominicki n. sp. is described from specimens collected from the tobacco flea beetle, Epitrix hirtipennis (Melsheimer), at Oxford, North Carolina , and is distinguished from other members of the genus . Parasitism by H. dominicki sterilized female flea beetles and often led to the death of larvae.

  7. Bartonella species in wild rodents and fleas from them in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeya, Hidenori; Inoue, Kai; Izumi, Yasuhito; Morita, Tatsushi; Imai, Soichi; Maruyama, Soichi

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of fleas for transmission of Bartonella species among wild rodents in Japan. Flea samples were collected from wild rodents and examined genetically for Bartonella infection. Bartonella DNA was detected from 16 of 40 (40.0%) flea samples. Sequence analysis demonstrated that 3 of 16 (18.8%) of the Bartonella-positive animals were infested with fleas from which the closely related Bartonella DNA sequence was detected, indicating that the fleas acquired Bartonella from the infested rodents. The DNA was detected in hemolymph, the midgut and the ovary (only in female), indicating that Bartonella might be colonized through the midgut and distributed into the body.

  8. Myxomatosis: some observations on breeding the European rabbit flea Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale) in an animal house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobey, W. R.; Menzies, W.; Conolly, Dorothy

    1974-01-01

    Rabbit fleas for use in Myxomatosis investigations have been successfully bred on rabbits in an animal house. The timing of emergence appeared to be governed by a biological timing control interacting with different forms of disturbance. Yield was found to be related to litter size, the time the doe and her kittens were removed from the nest, the number of fleas put onto a doe before littering and the mean ambient temperature to which the doe was exposed in the week pre-partum. The survival rate of fleas in storage was affected by temperature, the degree of crowding, moisture content of the containers, whether fleas were fed or unfed and the source of fleas in terms of emergence times. PMID:4526409

  9. Predictors for Abundance of Host Flea and Floor Flea in Households of Villages with Endemic Commensal Rodent Plague, Yunnan Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Xiang Yin; Alan Geater; Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong; Xing-Qi Dong; Chun-Hong Du; You-Hong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From 1990 to 2006, fifty-five natural villages experienced at least one plague epidemic in Lianghe County, Yunnan Province, China. This study is aimed to document flea abundance and identify predictors in households of villages with endemic commensal rodent plague in Lianghe County. METHODS: Trappings were used to collect fleas and interviews were conducted to gather demography, environmental factors, and other relevant information. Multivariate hurdle negative binomial model was ...

  10. Dermal neutrophil, macrophage and dendritic cell responses to Yersinia pestis transmitted by fleas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G Shannon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is typically transmitted by the bite of an infected flea. Many aspects of mammalian innate immune response early after Y. pestis infection remain poorly understood. A previous study by our lab showed that neutrophils are the most prominent cell type recruited to the injection site after intradermal needle inoculation of Y. pestis, suggesting that neutrophil interactions with Y. pestis may be important in bubonic plague pathogenesis. In the present study, we developed new tools allowing for intravital microscopy of Y. pestis in the dermis of an infected mouse after transmission by its natural route of infection, the bite of an infected flea. We found that uninfected flea bites typically induced minimal neutrophil recruitment. The magnitude of neutrophil response to flea-transmitted Y. pestis varied considerably and appeared to correspond to the number of bacteria deposited at the bite site. Macrophages migrated towards flea bite sites and interacted with small numbers of flea-transmitted bacteria. Consistent with a previous study, we observed minimal interaction between Y. pestis and dendritic cells; however, dendritic cells did consistently migrate towards flea bite sites containing Y. pestis. Interestingly, we often recovered viable Y. pestis from the draining lymph node (dLN 1 h after flea feeding, indicating that the migration of bacteria from the dermis to the dLN may be more rapid than previously reported. Overall, the innate cellular host responses to flea-transmitted Y. pestis differed from and were more variable than responses to needle-inoculated bacteria. This work highlights the importance of studying the interactions between fleas, Y. pestis and the mammalian host to gain a better understanding of the early events in plague pathogenesis.

  11. Effects of temperature on the transmission of Yersinia Pestis by the flea, Xenopsylla Cheopis, in the late phase period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotthoefer, Anna M; Bearden, Scott W; Holmes, Jennifer L; Vetter, Sara M; Montenieri, John A; Williams, Shanna K; Graham, Christine B; Woods, Michael E; Eisen, Rebecca J; Gage, Kenneth L

    2011-09-29

    Traditionally, efficient flea-borne transmission of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was thought to be dependent on a process referred to as blockage in which biofilm-mediated growth of the bacteria physically blocks the flea gut, leading to the regurgitation of contaminated blood into the host. This process was previously shown to be temperature-regulated, with blockage failing at temperatures approaching 30°C; however, the abilities of fleas to transmit infections at different temperatures had not been adequately assessed. We infected colony-reared fleas of Xenopsylla cheopis with a wild type strain of Y. pestis and maintained them at 10, 23, 27, or 30°C. Naïve mice were exposed to groups of infected fleas beginning on day 7 post-infection (p.i.), and every 3-4 days thereafter until day 14 p.i. for fleas held at 10°C, or 28 days p.i. for fleas held at 23-30°C. Transmission was confirmed using Y. pestis-specific antigen or antibody detection assays on mouse tissues. Although no statistically significant differences in per flea transmission efficiencies were detected between 23 and 30°C, efficiencies were highest for fleas maintained at 23°C and they began to decline at 27 and 30°C by day 21 p.i. These declines coincided with declining median bacterial loads in fleas at 27 and 30°C. Survival and feeding rates of fleas also varied by temperature to suggest fleas at 27 and 30°C would be less likely to sustain transmission than fleas maintained at 23°C. Fleas held at 10°C transmitted Y. pestis infections, although flea survival was significantly reduced compared to that of uninfected fleas at this temperature. Median bacterial loads were significantly higher at 10°C than at the other temperatures. Our results suggest that temperature does not significantly effect the per flea efficiency of Y. pestis transmission by X. cheopis, but that temperature is likely to influence the dynamics of Y. pestis flea-borne transmission, perhaps by affecting

  12. EKTOPARASIT (FLEAS PADA RESERVOIR DI DAERAH FOKUS PEST DI KABUPATEN BOYOLALI PROVINSI JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Ramadhani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTRat is a rodent (rodensia which cannot be separated from parasitic organism attacks the ectoparasites(fleas. In the presence of fleas plague focus areas need to watch out, for no increase in cases of plague(outbreak. Pest is a zoonosis in rat that can be transmitted to humans through the bite of fleas Xenopsyllacheopsis containing Yersinia pestis. Boyolali District is one of the plague focus areas in Central Java. Thisstudy aims to identify the species of rats and fleas, trap succes, flea infestation in rats and flea index as anindicator of vulnerability to transmission of plague. The study is a descriptive survey with cross sectionaldesign. The population is all the rats and fleas in Boyolali district. Samples are rats and fleas that werecaught using live trap with coconut roasted and salted fish is placed inside and outside the home (each 2trap. Rat combed for fleas. The results showed the number of mouses caught were 245. There are 4 speciesrats and small mammals found in R. tanezumi, R. tiomanicus, R. exulans, N. fulvescens and S.murinus withsucces trap at 5.71%. Only 3 species and S.murinus of infected fleas. Species of flea is X. cheopis and S.cognatus. Specific flea index: Xenopsylla cheopis by 1.67; flea index cognatus Stavilus common flea indexof 0.88 and 2.55. Based on the warning system indicator about the bubonic plague spreading,which isspecific flea index of X.cheopis >1 and fleas index >2, Selo sub distric should be aware to the spreading ofbubonic plague in its area, so that it is important to carry out the controlling of rat and flea population.Keyword: ectoparasite, reservoir, fleas, plague. ABSTRAK Tikus adalah hewan mengerat (rodensiayang tidak lepas dari serangan organisme parasit yaitu ektoparasit (pinjal.Pada daerah fokus pestt keberadaan pinjal perlu diwaspadai,agar tidak terjadi peningkatan kasus pestt (KLB. Pest merupakan zoonosispada tikusyang dapat ditularkan kepada manusia melalui gigitan pinjal Xenopsylla

  13. Prevalence of Bartonella species, hemoplasmas, and Rickettsia felis DNA in blood and fleas of cats in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assarasakorn, S; Veir, J K; Hawley, J R; Brewer, M M; Morris, A K; Hill, A E; Lappin, M R

    2012-12-01

    Flea infestations are common in Thailand, but little is known about the flea-borne infections. Fifty flea pools and 153 blood samples were collected from client-owned cats between June and August 2009 from veterinary hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand. Total DNA was extracted from all samples, and then assessed by conventional PCR assays. The prevalence rates of Bartonella spp. in blood and flea samples were 17% and 32%, respectively, with DNA of Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae being amplified most commonly. Bartonella koehlerae DNA was amplified for the first time in Thailand. Hemoplasma DNA was amplified from 23% and 34% of blood samples and flea pools, respectively, with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and Mycoplasma haemofelis being detected most frequently. All samples were negative for Rickettsia felis. Prevalence rate of B. henselae DNA was increased 6.9 times in cats with flea infestation. Cats administered flea control products were 4.2 times less likely to be Bartonella-infected.

  14. Molecular Detection of Bartonella Species in Fleas Collected from Dogs and Cats from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Norman; Troyo, Adriana; Castillo, Daniela; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial genus Bartonella includes several species with zoonotic potential, some of which are common in domestic dogs and cats, as well as in their fleas. Because there is no previous information about the presence of Bartonella species in fleas from Central America, this study aimed at evaluating the presence of Bartonella spp. in fleas collected from dogs and cats in Costa Rica. A total 72 pools of Ctenocephalides felis and 21 pools of Pulex simulans were screened by conventional PCR to detect Bartonella DNA fragments of the citrate synthase (gltA) and the β subunit RNA polymerase (rpoB) genes. Three (4.2%) pools of C. felis and five pools (22.7%) of P. simulans were found positive for Bartonella DNA. Sequences corresponding to Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii strain Winnie, B. rochalimae, and an undescribed Bartonella sp. (clone BR10) were detected in flea pools from dogs, whereas Bartonella henselae and B. clarridgeiae sequences were identified in flea pools from cats. The detection of zoonotic Bartonella spp. in this study should increase the awareness to these flea-borne diseases among physicians and public health workers and highlight the importance of flea control in the region.

  15. Detection of flea-borne Rickettsia species in the Western Himalayan region of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Chahota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human infections by various rickettsial species are frequently reported globally. We investigated a flea-borne rickettsial outbreak infecting 300 people in Western Himalayan region of India. Arthropod vectors (ticks and fleas and animal and human blood samples from affected households were analysed by gltA and ompB genes based polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Rat flea (Ceratophyllus fasciatus samples were found harbouring a Rickettsia sp. Phylogenetic analysis based on gltA gene using PHYLIP revealed that the detected Rickettsia sp. has 100% identity with SE313 and RF2125 strains of Rickettsia sp. of flea origin from Egypt and Thai-Myanmar border, respectively and cf1 and 5 strains from fleas and lice from the USA. But, the nucleotide sequence of genetically variable gene ompB of R14 strain was found closely related to cf9 strain, reported from Ctenocephalides felis fleas. These results highlight the public health importance of such newly discovered or less recognised Rickettsia species/strains, harboured by arthropod vectors like fleas.

  16. Detection of flea-borne Rickettsia species in the Western Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahota, R; Thakur, S D; Sharma, M; Mittra, S

    2015-01-01

    Human infections by various rickettsial species are frequently reported globally. We investigated a flea-borne rickettsial outbreak infecting 300 people in Western Himalayan region of India. Arthropod vectors (ticks and fleas) and animal and human blood samples from affected households were analysed by gltA and ompB genes based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Rat flea (Ceratophyllus fasciatus) samples were found harbouring a Rickettsia sp. Phylogenetic analysis based on gltA gene using PHYLIP revealed that the detected Rickettsia sp. has 100% identity with SE313 and RF2125 strains of Rickettsia sp. of flea origin from Egypt and Thai-Myanmar border, respectively and cf1 and 5 strains from fleas and lice from the USA. But, the nucleotide sequence of genetically variable gene ompB of R14 strain was found closely related to cf9 strain, reported from Ctenocephalides felis fleas. These results highlight the public health importance of such newly discovered or less recognised Rickettsia species/strains, harboured by arthropod vectors like fleas.

  17. An insight into the sialotranscriptome of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M C Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Saliva of hematophagous arthropods contains a diverse mixture of compounds that counteracts host hemostasis. Immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory components are also found in these organisms' saliva. Blood feeding evolved at least ten times within arthropods, providing a scenario of convergent evolution for the solution of the salivary potion. Perhaps because of immune pressure from hosts, the salivary proteins of related organisms have considerable divergence, and new protein families are often found within different genera of the same family or even among subgenera. Fleas radiated with their vertebrate hosts, including within the mammal expansion initiated 65 million years ago. Currently, only one flea species-the rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis-has been investigated by means of salivary transcriptome analysis to reveal salivary constituents, or sialome. We present the analysis of the sialome of cat flea Ctenocephaides felis. METHODOLOGY AND CRITICAL FINDINGS: A salivary gland cDNA library from adult fleas was randomly sequenced, assembled, and annotated. Sialomes of cat and rat fleas have in common the enzyme families of phosphatases (inactive, CD-39-type apyrase, adenosine deaminases, and esterases. Antigen-5 members are also common to both sialomes, as are defensins. FS-I/Cys7 and the 8-Cys families of peptides are also shared by both fleas and are unique to these organisms. The Gly-His-rich peptide similar to holotricin was found only in the cat flea, as were the abundantly expressed Cys-less peptide and a novel short peptide family. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fleas, in contrast to bloodsucking Nematocera (mosquitoes, sand flies, and black flies, appear to concentrate a good portion of their sialome in small polypeptides, none of which have a known function but could act as inhibitors of hemostasis or inflammation. They are also unique in expansion of a phosphatase family that appears to be deficient of enzyme activity and has an

  18. Feeding Behavior Modulates Biofilm-Mediated Transmission of Yersinia pestis by the Cat Flea, Ctenocephalides felis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Bland

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is prevalent worldwide, will parasitize animal reservoirs of plague, and is associated with human habitations in known plague foci. Despite its pervasiveness, limited information is available about the cat flea's competence as a vector for Yersinia pestis. It is generally considered to be a poor vector, based on studies examining early-phase transmission during the first week after infection, but transmission potential by the biofilm-dependent proventricular-blocking mechanism has never been systematically evaluated. In this study, we assessed the vector competence of cat fleas by both mechanisms. Because the feeding behavior of cat fleas differs markedly from important rat flea vectors, we also examined the influence of feeding behavior on transmission dynamics.Groups of cat fleas were infected with Y. pestis and subsequently provided access to sterile blood meals twice-weekly, 5 times per week, or daily for 4 weeks and monitored for infection, the development of proventricular biofilm and blockage, mortality, and the ability to transmit. In cat fleas allowed prolonged, daily access to blood meals, mimicking their natural feeding behavior, Y. pestis did not efficiently colonize the digestive tract and could only be transmitted during the first week after infection. In contrast, cat fleas that were fed intermittently, mimicking the feeding behavior of the efficient vector Xenopsylla cheopis, could become blocked and regularly transmitted Y. pestis for 3-4 weeks by the biofilm-mediated mechanism, but early-phase transmission was not detected.The normal feeding behavior of C. felis, more than an intrinsic resistance to infection or blockage by Y. pestis, limits its vector competence. Rapid turnover of midgut contents results in bacterial clearance and disruption of biofilm accumulation in the proventriculus. Anatomical features of the cat flea foregut may also restrict transmission by both early-phase and

  19. Tick- and flea-borne rickettsial emerging zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parola, Philippe; Davoust, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Between 1984 and 2004, nine more species or subspecies of spotted fever rickettsiae were identified as emerging agents of tick-borne rickettsioses throughout the world. Six of these species had first been isolated from ticks and later found to be pathogenic to humans. The most recent example is Rickettsia parkeri, recognized as a human pathogen more than 60 years after its initial isolation from ticks. A new spotted fever rickettsia, R. felis was also found to be associated with fleas and to be a human pathogen. Similarly, bacteria within the family Anaplasmataceae have been considered to be of veterinary importance only, yet three species have been implicated in human diseases in recent years, including Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the agent of human anaplasmosis (formerly known as "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent", E. equi and E. phagocytophila), and finally Ehrlichia ewingii, which causes granulocytic ehrlichiosis in humans. We present here an overview of the various tick- and flea-borne rickettsial zoonoses described in the last 20 years, focusing on the ecological, epidemiological and clinical aspects.

  20. Isolation of Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis from Ctenocephalides Fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce-Fedrow, Alison; Maina, Alice N; Otiang, Elkanah; Ade, Fredrick; Omulo, Sylvia; Ogola, Eric; Ochieng, Linus; Njenga, M Kariuki; Richards, Allen L

    2015-04-01

    Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified molecularly in fleas collected in 2009 from Asembo, Kenya. Multilocus sequence typing using the 17-kD antigen gene, rrs, gltA, ompA, ompB, and sca4 demonstrated that Candidatus R. asemboensis is closely related to Rickettsia felis but distinct enough to be considered for separate species classification. Following this molecular characterization of Candidatus R. asemboensis, the in vitro cultivation of this bacterium was then performed. We used Ctenocephalides canis and Ctenocephalides felis fleas removed from dogs in Kenya to initiate the in vitro isolation of Candidatus R. asemboensis. Successful cultures were obtained using Drosophila melanogaster S2 and Aedes albopictus C6/36 cell lines. Cytological staining and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were used to visualize/confirm the culture of the bacteria in both cell lines. Sequencing of fragments of the 17-kD antigen gene, gltA, and ompB genes confirmed the identity of our Candidatus R. asemboensis isolates. To date, we have passaged Candidatus R. asemboensis 12 times through S2 and C6/36 cells, and active and frozen cultures are currently being maintained. This is the first time that a R. felis-like organism has been grown and maintained in culture and is therefore the first time that one of them, Candidatus R. asemboensis, has been characterized beyond molecular typing.

  1. Efficacy of Spinosad Tablets Administered to a Colony of 15 Indoor Cats Naturally Infested with Fleas

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Christine Cadiergues; Charline Pressanti

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were (i) to describe adult fleas distribution in a strictly indoor cat colony composed of cats with flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) and non-FAD cats and (ii) to evaluate the efficacy of spinosad used alone. Skin lesions were scored according to the SCORing Feline Allergic Dermatitis lesion severity scale (SCORFAD) on days 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90. Cats were combed prior to the treatment (days 0, 30, and 60) and on days 15, 45, and 90; collected fleas were replaced on the ...

  2. Long-term dynamics of leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) and its biocontrol agent, flea beetles in the genus Aphthona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Diane L.; Grace, James B.; Larson, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Three flea beetle species (Aphthona spp.), first introduced into North America in 1988, have come to be regarded as effective biological control organisms for leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula). The black flea beetles (Aphthona lacertosa and A. czwalinae) in particular have been shown to cause reductions in leafy spurge stem counts in the northern Great Plains, while the brown flea beetle (A. nigriscutis) has persisted and spread, but has not been found to be as effective at controlling leafy spurge. The ability of black flea beetles to control leafy spurge in any given year, however, has been found to vary. To better understand the long-term effects of flea beetle herbivory on leafy spurge, we monitored stem counts of leafy spurge and numbers of black and brown flea beetles at three sites on two National Wildlife Refuges in east-central North Dakota, USA, from 1998 to 2006. Brown flea beetle numbers were observed to be negligible on these sites. Over the 9 years of the study, black flea beetles were seen to spread over the three study sites and leafy spurge stem counts declined substantially on two of the three sites. Even at low densities of spurge, black flea beetle populations persisted, a necessary prerequisite for long-term control. We used structural equation models (SEM) to assess the yearly effects of black flea beetles, soil texture, and refuge site on leafy spurge stem counts over this time period. We then used equations developed from the SEM analysis to explore flea beetle–leafy spurge dynamics over time, after controlling for soil texture and refuge. Yearly effect strength of black flea beetles on leafy spurge was found to be modest, largely owing to substantial spatial variability in control. However, simulation results based on prediction coefficients revealed leafy spurge to be highly responsive to increases in flea beetle populations on average.

  3. Occurrence of ectoparasitic arthropods associated with rodents in Hail region northern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Khalid A; Fetoh, Badr El-Sabah A

    2014-09-01

    Ectoparasitic arthropods are a diverse element of the Saudi fauna. Due to this, a survey of ectoparasites associated with rodents was conducted as a preliminary study in five districts of Hail region of northern Saudi Arabia for the first time. Ectoparasites extracted from 750 rodents were sampled and identified by recording their frequency of appearance. Results revealed that 1,287 ectoparasites infested 316 of the captured rodent hosts. These ectoparasites parasitized on four species of rodents including three species of rats Rattus rattus rattus, Rattus rattus frugivorus, and Rattus rattus alexandrinus and one species of mouse Acomys dimidiatus (Rodentia: Muridae). The ectoparasites belong to four different groups: ticks, fleas, lice, and mites. Ticks were the highest in the number, while fleas were the lowest among all the extracted ectoparasite groups. The collected ectoparasitic arthropods consisted of seven species. Ticks were of two species: Rhipicephalus turanicus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae), fleas were of two species: Xenopsylla cheopis and Xenopsyllus conformis mycerini (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), lice was a single species: Polyplax serrata (Anoplura: Hoplopleuridae), and mites were of two species: Laelaps nuttali and Laelaps echidninus (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae). The findings of the study showed that the intensity of infestation was varied between rodent host sexes, wherein females had the highest rate of parasitic infestation, and the parasitic index of appearance was very high for one group of parasites (i.e., ticks). The parasitic prevalence was 42.13 % on rodents, and mites were the most prevalent parasite species. Overall, this study was carried out to establish baseline data for ectoparasite-infested rodents in Hail region, Saudi Arabia, and may help for appropriate planning to control zoonotic diseases in this area.

  4. 1 Contribution of land use to rodent flea load distribution in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Land use and human activities have been reported to be important ... affect the ecology of fleas living on and momentarily off-host is still lacking (Hubbart et al., 2011). ...... marine metapopulations: modelling infectious diseases on coral reefs.

  5. Molecular Detection of Rickettsia felis in Humans, Cats, and Cat Fleas in Bangladesh, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Hossain, Muhammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Muhammad Chand; Nasreen, Syeda Anjuman; Ferdouse, Faria; Sharmi, Rumana Hasan; Ahamed, Farid; Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Aung, Meiji Soe; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2016-05-01

    High prevalence of Rickettsia felis in patients with fever of unknown origin was revealed in the north-central Bangladesh from 2012 to 2013. Subsequently, in this study, prevalence of R. felis in cats and cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), together with febrile patients, was studied by PCR detection of 17 kDa antigen gene and DNA sequencing. R. felis was detected in 28% (28/100) and 21% (14/68) of cat blood and cat flea samples, respectively, whereas 42% (21/50) of patients were positive for R. felis. R. felis-positive cat fleas were detected at significantly higher rate on R. felis-positive cats. The results suggested a potential role of cats and cat fleas for transmission of R. felis to humans in Bangladesh.

  6. Rodent and flea abundance fail to predict a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, Robert Jory; Collinge, Sharon K; Ray, Chris; Gage, Ken L

    2010-01-01

    Small rodents are purported to be enzootic hosts of Yersinia pestis and may serve as sources of infection to prairie dogs or other epizootic hosts by direct or flea-mediated transmission. Recent research has shown that small rodent species composition and small rodent flea assemblages are influenced by the presence of prairie dogs, with higher relative abundance of both small rodents and fleas at prairie dog colony sites compared to grasslands without prairie dogs. However, it is unclear if increased rodent or flea abundance predisposes prairie dogs to infection with Y. pestis. We tracked rodent and flea occurrence for 3 years at a number of prairie dog colony sites in Boulder County, Colorado, before, during, and after a local plague epizootic to see if high rodent or flea abundance was associated with plague-affected colonies when compared to colonies that escaped infection. We found no difference in preepizootic rodent abundance or flea prevalence or abundance between plague-positive and plague-negative colonies. Further, we saw no significant before-plague/after-plague change in these metrics at either plague-positive or plague-negative sites. We did, however, find that small rodent species assemblages changed in the year following prairie dog die-offs at plague-affected colonies when compared to unaffected colonies. In light of previous research from this system that has shown that landscape features and proximity to recently plagued colonies are significant predictors of plague occurrence in prairie dogs, we suggest that landscape context is more important to local plague occurrence than are characteristics of rodent or flea species assemblages.

  7. Sex-biased parasitism is not universal: evidence from rodent-flea associations from three biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffner, Christian; Stanko, Michal; Morand, Serge; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Hawlena, Hadas; Krasnov, Boris R

    2013-11-01

    The distribution of parasites among individual hosts is characterised by high variability that is believed to be a result of variations in host traits. To find general patterns of host traits affecting parasite abundance, we studied flea infestation of nine rodent species from three different biomes (temperate zone of central Europe, desert of Middle East and tropics of East Africa). We tested for independent and interactive effects of host sex and body mass on the number of fleas harboured by an individual host while accounting for spatial clustering of host and parasite sampling and temporal variation. We found no consistent patterns of the effect of host sex and body mass on flea abundance either among species within a biome or among biomes. We found evidence for sex-biased flea infestation in just five host species (Apodemus agrarius, Myodes glareolus, Microtus arvalis, Gerbillus andersoni, Mastomys natalensis). In six rodent species, we found an effect of body mass on flea abundance (all species mentioned above and Meriones crassus). This effect was positive in five species and negative in one species (Microtus arvalis). In M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis, and M. arvalis, the relationship between body mass and flea abundance was mediated by host sex. This was manifested in steeper change in flea abundance with increasing body mass in male than female individuals (M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis), whereas the opposite pattern was found in M. arvalis. Our findings suggest that sex and body mass are common determinants of parasite infestation in mammalian hosts, but neither of them follows universal rules. This implies that the effect of host individual characteristics on mechanisms responsible for flea acquisition may be manifested differently in different host species.

  8. Rapid evolution of thermal tolerance in the water flea Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, A. N.; Vanoverbeke, J.; Vanschoenwinkel, B.; van Doorslaer, W.; Feuchtmayr, H.; Atkinson, D.; Moss, B.; Davidson, T. A.; Sayer, C. D.; De Meester, L.

    2015-07-01

    Global climate is changing rapidly, and the degree to which natural populations respond genetically to these changes is key to predicting ecological responses. So far, no study has documented evolutionary changes in the thermal tolerance of natural populations as a response to recent temperature increase. Here, we demonstrate genetic change in the capacity of the water flea Daphnia to tolerate higher temperatures using both a selection experiment and the reconstruction of evolution over a period of forty years derived from a layered dormant egg bank. We observed a genetic increase in thermal tolerance in response to a two-year ambient +4 °C selection treatment and in the genotypes of natural populations from the 1960s and 2000s hatched from lake sediments. This demonstrates that natural populations have evolved increased tolerance to higher temperatures, probably associated with the increased frequency of heat waves over the past decades, and possess the capacity to evolve increased tolerance to future warming.

  9. Flea diversity as an element for persistence of plague bacteria in an East African plague focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Eisen

    Full Text Available Plague is a flea-borne rodent-associated zoonotic disease that is caused by Yersinia pestis and characterized by long quiescent periods punctuated by rapidly spreading epidemics and epizootics. How plague bacteria persist during inter-epizootic periods is poorly understood, yet is important for predicting when and where epizootics are likely to occur and for designing interventions aimed at local elimination of the pathogen. Existing hypotheses of how Y. pestis is maintained within plague foci typically center on host abundance or diversity, but little attention has been paid to the importance of flea diversity in enzootic maintenance. Our study compares host and flea abundance and diversity along an elevation gradient that spans from low elevation sites outside of a plague focus in the West Nile region of Uganda (~725-1160 m to higher elevation sites within the focus (~1380-1630 m. Based on a year of sampling, we showed that host abundance and diversity, as well as total flea abundance on hosts was similar between sites inside compared with outside the plague focus. By contrast, flea diversity was significantly higher inside the focus than outside. Our study highlights the importance of considering flea diversity in models of Y. pestis persistence.

  10. High-frequency conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to Yersinia pestis in the flea midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Rosso, Marie-Laure; Schwan, Tom G; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2002-10-01

    The acquisition of foreign DNA by horizontal transfer from unrelated organisms is a major source of variation leading to new strains of bacterial pathogens. The extent to which this occurs varies widely, due in part to lifestyle factors that determine exposure to potential donors. Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus, infects normally sterile sites in its mammalian host, but forms dense aggregates in the non-sterile digestive tract of its flea vector to produce a transmissible infection. Here we show that unrelated co-infecting bacteria in the flea midgut are readily incorporated into these aggregates, and that this close physical contact leads to high-frequency conjugative genetic exchange. Transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from an Escherichia coli donor to Y. pestis occurred in the flea midgut at a frequency of 10-3 after only 3 days of co-infection, and after 4 weeks 95% of co-infected fleas contained an average of 103 antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis transconjugants. Thus, transit in its arthropod vector exposes Y. pestis to favourable conditions for efficient genetic exchange with microbial flora of the flea gut. Horizontal gene transfer in the flea may be the source of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains recently isolated from plague patients in Madagascar.

  11. Water flea Moina macrocopa as a novel biocarrier of norfloxacin in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn; Padoongsombat, Narubodee; Choochom, Titima; Tang, Saipin; Chaimongkol, Atra

    2002-09-18

    The potential of using water flea Moina macrocopa as a novel live drug carrier to freshwater aquatic animals has been evaluated. The incorporation of antibacterial, norfloxacin into Moina and subsequently into fish was quantified. The efficiency of drug incorporation into water flea depends on both drug concentration in enrichment medium and incubation time. The maximum drug level in Moina following bioencapsulation technique was reached at 4 h of exposure at drug concentrations of 10-20% (w/w) (0.70-0.90 mg/g dry weight of water flea). Significant higher drug uptake was obtained (1.902+/-0.228 mg/g dry weight of water flea) in 2 h at the drug concentration of 40%. A marked decrease of norfloxacin percentage level upon storage of the Moina in water was observed and the survival of the Moina up to 2 h was satisfactory. It was suggested that medicated water flea should be either administered freshly enriched to fish or after short duration of storage. Following oral administration of medicated water flea to fish, the level of drug in fish body tissue increased as the number of doses increased, and the drug level was highest after a three-dose feeding. This primary food source appears to be a promising drug delivery system to aquatic animals. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Flea outbreak at United Nations base in South Sudan: A public health challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Bhatnagar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number Indian troops are deployed in International Peacekeeping Missions Worldwide and are exposed to emerging and re-emerging vectors and diseases in unfamiliar terrain. This article describes the experience of a flea outbreak among Indian UN Peacekeepers in a remote part of South Sudan. Methods: Health visits to the area confirmed presence of dog fleas. Flea bites disrupted daily routine of the unit and many troopers reported to medical facilities with severe dermatitis. Death of a field rat in the immediate vicinity along with detection of rat fleas was cause for worry as Plague and other flea-borne diseases are known to occur in the country in sylvatic form. Result: Conventional vector control measures had limited impact and unconventional measures had to be devised due to limited capacity in the inaccessible area. Severity of the problem, potential to cause flea-borne diseases and unavailability of conventional insecticides prompted the author to use Aviation Turbine Fuel (ATF for area spray in the UN base. Conclusion: Healthcare providers in fast-evolving operational situations such as Peacekeeping Missions need to maintain high index of suspicion and often adopt innovative methods to ensure effective public health cover to troops.

  13. Five-month comparative efficacy evaluation of three ectoparasiticides against adult cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), flea egg hatch and emergence, and adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato) on dogs housed outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varloud, Marie; Hodgkins, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of three topical combinations on dogs in outdoor conditions against adult cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), flea egg hatch and emergence, and against adult brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato). Treatment was performed on day 0 with a placebo; dinotefuran, pyriproxifen and permethrin (DPP); fipronil and (S)-methoprene (FM) or imidacloprid and permethrin (IP). Dogs (n = 32), housed outdoors for 7 months, were treated monthly for four consecutive months (on days 0, 30, 60 and 90) and infested with ~100 unfed adult fleas on days 14, 55, 74, 115 and 150 and with ~50 unfed adult ticks on days 28, 44, 88 and 104. Adult fleas were counted and removed 24 h after infestation. Immediately after flea removal, dogs were reinfested with ~100 new adult fleas 72 h prior to egg collection for up to 48 h. Flea eggs were incubated for 32 days, and newly emerged adults were counted. Ticks were counted and removed 48 h after each infestation. FM had >90 % efficacy against fleas at each time point and variable efficacy against ticks (38.0-99.6 %). Efficacy of IP was 60 days after the last treatment. Despite challenging weather conditions, DPP was highly effective, providing >90 % efficacy against adult ticks as well as adult and immature fleas at every time point of the study.

  14. Genetic characterization of flea-derived Bartonella species from native animals in Australia suggests host-parasite co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; McInnes, Linda M; Burmej, Halina; Bennett, Mark D; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-12-01

    Fleas are important arthropod vectors for a variety of diseases in veterinary and human medicine, and bacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella are among the organisms most commonly transmitted by these ectoparasites. Recently, a number of novel Bartonella species and novel species candidates have been reported in marsupial fleas in Australia. In the present study the genetic diversity of marsupial fleas was investigated; 10 species of fleas were collected from seven different marsupial and placental mammal hosts in Western Australia including woylies (Bettongia penicillata), western barred bandicoots (Perameles bougainville), mardos (Antechinus flavipes), bush rats (Rattus fuscipes), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), feral cats (Felis catus) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). PCR and sequence analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and the 18S rRNA genes from these fleas was performed. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis of the COI and 18S rRNA genes revealed a close genetic relationship between marsupial fleas, with Pygiopsylla hilli from woylies, Pygiopsylla tunneyi from western barred bandicoots and Acanthopsylla jordani from mardos, forming a separate cluster from fleas collected from the placental mammals in the same geographical area. The clustering of Bartonella species with their marsupial flea hosts suggests co-evolution of marsupial hosts, marsupial fleas and Bartonella species in Australia.

  15. Relationship between the Presence of Bartonella Species and Bacterial Loads in Cats and Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) under Natural Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-08-15

    Cats are considered the main reservoir of three zoonotic Bartonella species: Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) have been experimentally demonstrated to be a competent vector of B. henselae and have been proposed as the potential vector of the two other Bartonella species. Previous studies have reported a lack of association between the Bartonella species infection status (infected or uninfected) and/or bacteremia levels of cats and the infection status of the fleas they host. Nevertheless, to date, no study has compared the quantitative distributions of these bacteria in both cats and their fleas under natural conditions. Thus, the present study explored these relationships by identifying and quantifying the different Bartonella species in both cats and their fleas. Therefore, EDTA-blood samples and fleas collected from stray cats were screened for Bartonella bacteria. Bacterial loads were quantified by high-resolution melt real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results indicated a moderate correlation between the Bartonella bacterial loads in the cats and their fleas when both were infected with the same Bartonella species. Moreover, a positive effect of the host infection status on the Bartonella bacterial loads of the fleas was observed. Conversely, the cat bacterial loads were not affected by the infection status of their fleas. Our results suggest that the Bartonella bacterial loads of fleas are positively affected by the presence of the bacteria in their feline host, probably by multiple acquisitions/accumulation and/or multiplication events.

  16. Transmission efficiency of two flea species (Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris and Oropsylla hirsuta) involved in plague epizootics among prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Aryn P; Eisen, Rebecca J; Bearden, Scott W; Montenieri, John A; Tripp, Daniel W; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Gage, Kenneth L; Antolin, Michael F

    2008-06-01

    Plague, caused by Yersinia pestis, is an exotic disease in North America circulating predominantly in wild populations of rodents and their fleas. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are highly susceptible to infection, often experiencing mortality of nearly all individuals in a town as a result of plague. The fleas of black-tailed prairie dogs are Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris and Oropsylla hirsuta. We tested the efficiency of O. tuberculata cynomuris to transmit Y. pestis daily from 24 to 96 h postinfection and compared it to previously collected data for O. hirsuta. We found that O. tuberculata cynomuris has over threefold greater transmission efficiency (0.18 infected fleas transmit Y. pestis at 24 h postinfection) than O. hirsuta (0.05 fleas transmit). Using a simple model of flea-borne transmission, we combine these laboratory measurements with field data on monthly flea loads to compare the seasonal vectorial capacity of these two flea species. Coinciding with seasonal patterns of flea abundance, we find a peak in potential for flea-borne transmission in March, during high O. tuberculata cynomuris abundance, and in September-October when O. hirsuta is common. Our findings may be useful in determining the timing of insecticidal dusting to slow plague transmission in black-tailed prairie dogs.

  17. Positive co-occurrence of flea infestation at a low biological cost in two rodent hosts in the Canary archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S; Serrano, E; Gómez, M S; Feliu, C; Morand, S

    2014-04-01

    Non-random assemblages have been described as a common pattern of flea co-occurrence across mainland host species. However, to date, patterns of flea co-occurrence on islands are unknown. The present work investigates, on one hand, whether the decrease in the number of species on islands affects the pattern of flea co-occurrence, and on the other hand, how the cost of higher flea burdens affects host body mass. The study was carried out in the Canary Islands (Spain) using null models to analyse flea co-occurrence on Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. Results supported aggregation of flea species in Mus but not in Rattus, probably due to the relationship between abundance and both prevalence and intensity of infection of the main flea species parasitizing Mus. In addition, heavy individuals of both rodent species showed the highest flea burdens as well as higher species richness, probably due to the continued accumulation of fleas throughout life and/or immunological resistance mechanisms. Whatever the mechanisms involved, it is clear that co-occurrence and high parasite intensities do not imply a detrimental biological cost for the rodents of the Canary Islands.

  18. Efficacy of an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar against fleas, ticks, mites and lice on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanneck Dorothee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The studies reported here were conducted to ascertain the efficacy of imidacloprid/flumethrin incorporated in a slow-release matrix collar, against infestations of dogs by fleas, ticks, mites and lice. Efficacy was evaluated against the flea Ctenocephalides felis felis, the ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes ricinus, Ixodes scapularis, Dermacentor reticulatus and Dermacentor variabilis, the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and the biting louse Trichodectes canis. Methods Groups of collar-treated dogs (n = 7–10 were infested with fleas and/or ticks at monthly intervals at least, over a period of up to 8 months. Efficacy against fleas was evaluated 24 to 48 h after treatment and 24 h after each re-infestation. Efficacy against ticks was evaluated at 48 h (acaricidal, 6 h (repellent and 48 h (sustained after infestation. The effect of regular shampooing or immersion in water on the efficacy of the collars was also tested. Efficacy against flea larvae was assessed by incubating blanket samples after dog contact with viable flea eggs. Effectiveness against lice and mites was evaluated after treatment of naturally infested animals. With the exception of the mites, efficacy was calculated by comparison with untreated negative control groups. Results Efficacy against fleas (24 h generally exceeded 95%, and against flea larvae it exceeded 99% for 8 months. Sustained acaricidal (48 h efficacy, covering a period of 8 months was 100% against I. ricinus, starting 2 days after treatment (in vivo, and 100% against I. scapularis (in vitro, above 97% against R. sanguineus, generally above 97% against D. reticulatus and above 90% for D. variabilis. Repellent (6 h efficacy 2 days after treatment and continuing for 8 months was consistently 100% against I. ricinus, and above 90% against R. sanguineus. Regular shampooing affected efficacy against fleas and ticks to a lesser extent than regular immersion in water. The

  19. Speed of flea knockdown of spinosad compared to afoxolaner, and of spinosad through 28 days post-treatment in controlled laboratory studies

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Daniel E.; Rumschlag, Anthony J.; Young, Lisa Marie; Ryan, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The speed of flea knockdown by different products and their duration of effectiveness are factors which affect veterinarian prescribing decisions. To further validate the month-long pulicidal effectiveness of spinosad and determine its rate of flea knockdown to that of afoxolaner, three studies were conducted in two laboratories in the United States, utilizing flea infestations from colonies which are regularly refreshed through introduction of locally caught fleas. Methods All stu...

  20. Differentiation of flea communities infesting small mammals across selected habitats of the Baltic coast, central lowlands, and southern mountains of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Krzysztof; Eichert, Urszula; Bogdziewicz, Michał; Rychlik, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    Only a few studies comparing flea composition on the coast and in the mountains have been conducted. We investigated differences in flea communities infesting small mammals in selected habitats in northern, central, and southern Poland. We predicted (1) a greater number of flea species in the southeastern Poland and a lower number in the north, (2) a greater number of flea species in fertile and wet habitats than in poor and arid habitats, and (3) a low similarity of flea species between flea communities in western and eastern Poland. We found a negative effect of increasing latitude on flea species richness. We suppose that the mountains providing a variety of environments and the limits of the geographic ranges of several flea subspecies in southeastern Poland result in a higher number of flea species. There was a positive effect of increasing wetness of habitat on flea species richness. We found a high diversity in flea species composition between western and eastern Poland (beta diversity = 11) and between central and eastern Poland (beta diversity = 12). Re-colonization of Poland by small mammals and their ectoparasites from different (western and eastern) refugees can affect on this high diversity of flea species.

  1. Efficacy of an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar against fleas and ticks on cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanneck Dorothee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of the studies listed here were to ascertain the therapeutic and sustained efficacy of 10% imidacloprid (w/w and 4.5% flumethrin (w/w incorporated in a slow-release matrix collar, against laboratory-infestations of fleas and ticks on cats. Efficacy was evaluated against the flea Ctenocephalides felis felis, and the ticks Ixodes ricinus, Amblyomma americanum and Rhipicephalus turanicus. The number of studies was so large that only a general overview can be presented in this abstract. Methods Preventive efficacy was evaluated by infesting groups of cats (n = 8-10 with C. felis felis and/or I. ricinus, A. americanum or R. turanicus at monthly intervals at least, for a period of up to 8 months. Efficacy against fleas was evaluated 24 to 48 h after treatment and 24 h after infestation, and against ticks at 6 h (repellent or 48 h (acaricidal after infestation. Efficacy against flea larvae was evaluated over a period of 8 months by incubating viable flea eggs on blanket samples after cat contact. In all cases efficacy was calculated by comparison with untreated negative control groups. Results Efficacy against fleas (24 h generally exceeded 95% until study termination. In vitro efficacy against flea larvae exceeded 92% until Day 90 and then declined to 67% at the conclusion of the study on Day 230. Sustained acaricidal (48 h efficacy over a period of eight months was consistently 100% against I. ricinus from Day 2 after treatment, 100% against A. americanum, except for 98.5% and 97.7% at two time-points, and between 94% and 100% against R. turanicus. From Day 2 until 8 months after treatment the repellent (6 h, efficacy was consistently 100% against I. ricinus, and between 54.8% and 85.4% against R. turanicus. Conclusion The rapid insecticidal and acaricidal properties of the medicated collars against newly- acquired infestations of fleas and ticks and their sustained high levels of preventive efficacy have been

  2. Market Hydraulics and Subjectivities in the "Wild": Circulations of the Flea Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hansson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since consumer researchers started paying attention to flea markets they represent common consumer and market research objects. Arguably, in the "natural laboratory" of the flea market, researchers can observe and theorize market and consumer processes "in the wild", as forms of direct marketing and consumption. We build on existing flea market research through adopting a circulatory approach, inspired by actor-network theory (ANT. Rather than presenting a theory of (flea markets, ANT is useful for studying markets from the perspective of grounded market-making processes. Consumption is understood as the interplay of consumers, marketers, retailers, and a wide array of artifacts and market mediators like products, economic theories and ideas, packaging, market space (in the physical sense and furniture, etc. Our results point out that not only does such an approach enable analysis of features commonly studied within consumer research such as calculative action and social interaction, but also issues more rarely in focus in such research, such as cognitive patterns of consumer curiosity, emotions, senses, and affect. Furthermore, even though flea markets foremost are places of commerce and exchange of second hand goods, there is a large variety of other forms of flows or circulations going on "backstage" that enable the surface phenomena of second hand consumption to come into being. Many of these circulations, we argue, are material rather than immaterial Vendor and buyer subjectivities are thus understood as outcomes of circulatory dynamism that involves a range of material and immaterial flows.

  3. Susceptibility of brassicaceous plants to feeding by flea beetles, Phyllotreta spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Juliana; Grenkow, Larry

    2013-12-01

    Crucifer-feeding flea beetles, Phyllotreta spp., are chronic insect pests in Canadian prairie canola production. Multiple laboratory and field feeding bioassays were conducted to determine the susceptibility of a wide range of crucifer species, cultivars, and accessions to feeding by flea beetles with the goal of discovering sources of resistant germplasm. In 62 bioassays of 218 entries, no consistent decreased feeding by flea beetles was seen on any entries of Brassica carinata A. Braun, Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., Brassica napus L., or Brassica rapa L. There was reduced feeding on condiment mustard Sinapis alba L. lines but not on canola-quality lines with reduced amounts of glucosinolates, which were fed on at levels equal to B. napus. Analyses of glucosinolate content found decreased quantities of hydroxybenzyl and butyl glucosinolates in preferred canola-quality S. alba lines and increased levels of hydroxybutenyl glucosinolates compared with levels in condiment S. alba lines. Eruca sativa Mill. was an excellent flea beetle host; Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz lines experienced little feeding. Lines of Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex R. E. Fries and Crambe hispanica L. had reduced feeding levels compared with Brassica entries, but Crambe glabrata DC did not. The results indicate possible sources of resistance to Phyllotreta flea beetles, while highlighting the complicated roles that glucosinolates may play in Phyllotreta host preference.

  4. Tungiasis (sand flea disease): a parasitic disease with particular challenges for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeier, H; Sentongo, E; Krantz, I

    2013-01-01

    Tungiasis (sand flea disease) is caused by the penetration of females of Tunga penetrans into the skin of the feet. Within 2 weeks of penetration the burrowed flea increases its volume by a factor of 2,000. This is paralleled by intense inflammation of the surrounding tissue. Acute and chronic inflammation leads to the development of painful and debilitating clinical pathology. This results in impaired physical fitness and mobility. The social implications of tungiasis-associated morbidity are multifold. Children with tungiasis are teased and ridiculed, adults feel ashamed and stigmatized. There is anecdotal evidence that tungiasis negatively affects educational achievements. Impaired mobility and physical fitness will have a negative impact on household economics. Sand flea disease is common in resource-poor communities in South America and in sub-Saharan Africa with prevalence in the general population of up to 60%. In East Africa, it has re-emerged in epidemic dimensions in recent years. Hitherto, no effective drug treatment has been at hand. Traditional treatment, i.e., the manipulation of burrowed sand fleas with blunt and inappropriate instruments may facilitate the transmission of blood-derived pathogens. Prevention is feasible through regular application of a repellent based on coconut oil. Owing to its strong association with poverty, sand flea disease would be an excellent starting point for a community-based fight against rural poverty.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Entomoparasitic Nematodes, Potential Control Agents of Flea Populations in Natural Foci of Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, E. I.; Aleshin, V. V.; Eroshenko, G. A.; Kutyrev, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Entomoparasitic nematodes are natural control agents for many insect pests, including fleas that transmit Yersinia pestis, a causative agent of plague, in the natural foci of this extremely dangerous zoonosis. We examined the flea samples from the Volga-Ural natural focus of plague for their infestation with nematodes. Among the six flea species feeding on different rodent hosts (Citellus pygmaeus, Microtus socialis, and Allactaga major), the rate of infestation varied from 0 to 21%. The propagation rate of parasitic nematodes in the haemocoel of infected fleas was very high; in some cases, we observed up to 1,000 juveniles per flea specimen. Our study of morphology, life cycle, and rDNA sequences of these parasites revealed that they belong to three distinct species differing in the host specificity. On SSU and LSU rRNA phylogenies, these species representing three genera (Rubzovinema, Psyllotylenchus, and Spilotylenchus), constitute a monophyletic group close to Allantonema and Parasitylenchus, the type genera of the families Allantonematidae and Parasitylenchidae (Nematoda: Tylenchida). We discuss the SSU-ITS1-5.8S-LSU rDNA phylogeny of the Tylenchida with a special emphasis on the suborder Hexatylina. PMID:24804197

  6. Evidence of Yersinia pestis DNA from fleas in an endemic plague area of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang'ombe Bernard M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia pestis is a bacterium that causes plague which infects a variety of mammals throughout the world. The disease is usually transmitted among wild rodents through a flea vector. The sources and routes of transmission of plague are poorly researched in Africa, yet remains a concern in several sub-Saharan countries. In Zambia, the disease has been reported on annual basis with up to 20 cases per year, without investigating animal reservoirs or vectors that may be responsible in the maintenance and propagation of the bacterium. In this study, we undertook plague surveillance by using PCR amplification of the plasminogen activator gene in fleas. Findings Xenopsylla species of fleas were collected from 83 rodents trapped in a plague endemic area of Zambia. Of these rodents 5 had fleas positive (6.02% for Y. pestis plasminogen activator gene. All the Y. pestis positive rodents were gerbils. Conclusions We conclude that fleas may be responsible in the transmission of Y. pestis and that PCR may provide means of plague surveillance in the endemic areas of Zambia.

  7. A model of myxomatosis based on hormonal control of rabbit-flea reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, P L; Seymour, R M

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional first-order nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients is constructed to model the rabbit/flea dynamics of the European rabbit viral disease known as myxomatosis. It is proved that infected fleas induce stable oscillations of small amplitude for a range of coefficient values when the Rothschild coupling coefficient r, which models biochemical control of flea reproduction by the rabbit, attains a critical (Hopf) value rO. These oscillations may lead to rapid local extinction of rabbits depending on the virulence gamma 2 of myxoma. The coefficient gamma 1 = r gamma 2 measures the effect on the fleas. Since the four determining coefficients may change over evolutionary time-scales, the mathematical results together with a natural selection argument proves that virulence gamma 2 attenuates. This has been observed both in Australia and in Great Britain. However, the rabbit flea Spilopsyllus cuniculi is not an effective vector for myxoma in Australia, but is the principal vector in Britain, as verified by R. Muirhead-Thomson at the suggestion of M. Rothschild. This preliminary model assumes density-independent rabbit reproductivity pR, but the qualitative results hold for a wider class of density-dependent models. Yet, the former condition is basic for the technique of parameter reduction used to simplify statistical estimation of the more general density-dependent model.

  8. Droughts may increase susceptibility of prairie dogs to fleas: Incongruity with hypothesized mechanisms of plague cycles in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David; Biggins, Dean E.; Long, Dustin H.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a reemerging, rodent-associated zoonosis caused by the flea-borne bacterium Yersinia pestis. As a vector-borne disease, rates of plague transmission may increase when fleas are abundant. Fleas are highly susceptible to desiccation under hot-dry conditions; we posited that their densities decline during droughts. We evaluated this hypothesis with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in New Mexico, June–August 2010–2012. Precipitation was relatively plentiful during 2010 and 2012 but scarce during 2011, the driest spring–summer on record for the northeastern grasslands of New Mexico. Unexpectedly, fleas were 200% more abundant in 2011 than in 2010 and 2012. Prairie dogs were in 27% better condition during 2010 and 2012, and they devoted 287% more time to grooming in 2012 than in 2011. During 2012, prairie dogs provided with supplemental food and water were in 23% better condition and carried 40% fewer fleas. Collectively, these results suggest that during dry years, prairie dogs are limited by food and water, and they exhibit weakened defenses against fleas. Long-term data are needed to evaluate the generality of whether droughts increase flea densities and how changes in flea abundance during sequences of dry and wet years might affect plague cycles in mammalian hosts.

  9. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sex

  10. Induction of feline flea allergy dermatitis and the incidence and histopathological characteristics of concurrent indolent lip ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, S; Hodgin, E C; Foil, C S; Hosgood, G; Foil, L D

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the role of intermittent vs. continual flea exposure in the development of flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) in cats, assess the accuracy of intradermal skin testing (IDST) and in vitro testing, and document the incidence and histopathological features of indolent lip ulcers. Ten flea-naive cats were divided into two groups. One group received intermittent flea exposure for 120 days. Thereafter, both groups of cats received continuous flea exposure for 120 days. In vitro testing for flea salivary antibody and IDST utilizing both whole flea antigen and flea salivary antigen were performed. Eight of 10 cats developed clinical signs of FAD within 3 months and five of these eight cats developed lip ulcers which where characterized histopathologically by ulceration with predominantly neutrophilic inflammation and surface bacterial colonization. There was no association between the presence or absence of clinical signs and positive IDST or in vitro results, and no difference in the development of clinical signs was noted between the two groups of cats.

  11. Early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis by unblocked fleas as a mechanism explaining rapidly spreading plague epizootics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca J.; Bearden, Scott W.; Wilder, Aryn P.; Montenieri, John A.; Antolin, Michael F.; Gage, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    Plague is a highly virulent disease believed to have killed millions during three historic human pandemics. Worldwide, it remains a threat to humans and is a potential agent of bioterrorism. Dissemination of Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, by blocked fleas has been the accepted paradigm for flea-borne transmission. However, this mechanism, which requires a lengthy extrinsic incubation period before a short infectious window often followed by death of the flea, cannot sufficiently explain the rapid rate of spread that typifies plague epidemics and epizootics. Inconsistencies between the expected rate of spread by blocked rat fleas and that observed during the Black Death has even caused speculation that plague was not the cause of this medieval pandemic. We used the primary vector to humans in North America, Oropsylla montana, which rarely becomes blocked, as a model for studying alternative flea-borne transmission mechanisms. Our data revealed that, in contrast to the classical blocked flea model, O. montana is immediately infectious, transmits efficiently for at least 4 d postinfection (early phase) and may remain infectious for a long time because the fleas do not suffer block-induced mortality. These factors match the criteria required to drive plague epizootics as defined by recently published mathematical models. The scenario of efficient early-phase transmission by unblocked fleas described in our study calls for a paradigm shift in concepts of how Y. pestis is transmitted during rapidly spreading epizootics and epidemics, including, perhaps, the Black Death. PMID:17032761

  12. Early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis by unblocked fleas as a mechanism explaining rapidly spreading plague epizootics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Bearden, Scott W; Wilder, Aryn P; Montenieri, John A; Antolin, Michael F; Gage, Kenneth L

    2006-10-17

    Plague is a highly virulent disease believed to have killed millions during three historic human pandemics. Worldwide, it remains a threat to humans and is a potential agent of bioterrorism. Dissemination of Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, by blocked fleas has been the accepted paradigm for flea-borne transmission. However, this mechanism, which requires a lengthy extrinsic incubation period before a short infectious window often followed by death of the flea, cannot sufficiently explain the rapid rate of spread that typifies plague epidemics and epizootics. Inconsistencies between the expected rate of spread by blocked rat fleas and that observed during the Black Death has even caused speculation that plague was not the cause of this medieval pandemic. We used the primary vector to humans in North America, Oropsylla montana, which rarely becomes blocked, as a model for studying alternative flea-borne transmission mechanisms. Our data revealed that, in contrast to the classical blocked flea model, O. montana is immediately infectious, transmits efficiently for at least 4 d postinfection (early phase) and may remain infectious for a long time because the fleas do not suffer block-induced mortality. These factors match the criteria required to drive plague epizootics as defined by recently published mathematical models. The scenario of efficient early-phase transmission by unblocked fleas described in our study calls for a paradigm shift in concepts of how Y. pestis is transmitted during rapidly spreading epizootics and epidemics, including, perhaps, the Black Death.

  13. Effects of weather and plague-induced die-offs of prairie dogs on the fleas of northern grasshopper mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Stapp, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus Ord). Other mammal hosts living on prairie dog colonies may be important in the transmission and maintenance of plague. We examined the flea populations of northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster Wied) before, during, and after plague epizootics in northern Colorado and studied the influence of host and environmental factors on flea abundance patterns. Grasshopper mice were frequently infested with high numbers of fleas, most commonly Pleochaetis exilis Jordan and Thrassis fotus Jordan. Flea loads changed in response to both environmental temperature and rainfall. After plague-induced prairie dog die-offs, flea loads and likelihood of infestation were unchanged for P. exilis, but T. fotus loads declined.

  14. Molecular detection and identification of Bartonella species in rat fleas from northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, Sarah A; Colton, Leah; Sangmaneedet, Somboon; Suksawat, Fanan; Evans, Brian P; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2013-09-01

    The presence of Bartonella species in Xenopsylla cheopis fleas collected from Rattus spp. (R. exulans, R. norvegicus, and R. rattus) in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand was investigated. One hundred ninety-three fleas obtained from 62 rats, were screened by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region, and the presence of Bartonella DNA was confirmed by using the citrate synthase gene. Bartonella DNA was detected in 59.1% (114 of 193) of fleas examined. Sequencing demonstrated the presence of Bartonella spp. similar to B. elizabethae, B. rattimassiliensis, B. rochalimae, and B. tribocorum in the samples tested with a cutoff for sequence similarity ≥ 96% and 4 clustered together with the closest match with B. grahamii (95.5% identity). If X. cheopis proves to be a competent vector of these species, our results suggest that humans and animals residing in this area may be at risk for infection by several zoonotic Bartonella species.

  15. Bartonella species in fleas from Palestinian territories: prevalence and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasereddin, A; Risheq, A; Harrus, S; Azmi, K; Ereqat, S; Baneth, G; Salant, H; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Abdeen, Z

    2014-12-01

    Bartonellosis is an infectious bacterial disease. The prevalence and genetic characteristics of Bartonella spp. in fleas of wild and domestic animals from Palestinian territories are described. Flea samples (n=289) were collected from 121 cats, 135 dogs, 26 hyraxes and seven rats from northern (n=165), central (n=113), and southern Palestinian territories (n=11). The prevalent flea species were: Ctenocephalides felis (n=119/289; 41.2%), Ctenocephalides canis (n=159/289; 55%), and Xenopsylla sp. (n=7/289; 2.4%). Targeting the Intergenic Transcribed Spacer (ITS) locus, DNA of Bartonella was detected in 22% (64/289) of all fleas. Fifty percent of the C. felis and 57% of the Xenopsylla sp. contained Bartonella DNA. DNA sequencing showed the presence of Bartonella clarridgeiae (50%), Bartonella henselae (27%), and Bartonella koehlerae (3%) in C. felis. Xenopsylla sp. collected from Rattus rattus rats were infected with Bartonella tribocorum, Bartonella elizabethae, and Bartonella rochalimae. Phylogenetic sequence analysis using the 16S ribosomal RNA gene obtained four genetic clusters, B. henselae and B. koehlerae as subcluster 1, B. clarridgeiae as cluster 2, while the rat Bartonella species (B. tribocorum and B. elizabethae) were an outgroup cluster. These findings showed the important role of cat and rat fleas as vectors of zoonotic Bartonella species in Palestinian territories. It is hoped that this publication will raise awareness among physicians, veterinarians, and other health workers of the high prevalence of Bartonella spp. in fleas in Palestinian territories and the potential risk of these pathogens to humans and animals in this region.

  16. Sticktight fleas associated with fowl pox in a backyard chicken flock in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, C R; Bickford, A A; Cooper, G L; Charlton, B R

    1997-01-01

    A mixed breed rooster, from a backyard flock of 13 chickens, was received at California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Turlock Branch for postmortem examination. The bird presented with thickened, featherless, scab-encrusted skin around the head region. Numerous sticktight fleas were found attached to the encrusted skin. Microscopic evaluation of the skin revealed a lymphoplasmacytic reaction in the dermis with visible embedded flea mouthparts. Also noted histologically in this region were epidermal hyperplasia and ballooned epidermal cells containing intracytoplasmic inclusions indicative of fowl poxvirus.

  17. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from cats and dogs in New Zealand: Molecular characterisation, presence of Rickettsia felis and Bartonella clarridgeiae and comparison with Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Shona; Forsyth, Maureen; Lawrence, Andrea L; Emery, David; Šlapeta, Jan

    2017-01-30

    The cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) is the most common flea species parasitising both domestic cats and dogs globally. Fleas are known vectors of zoonotic pathogens such as vector borne Rickettsia and Bartonella. This study compared cat fleas from domestic cats and dogs in New Zealand's North and South Islands to Australian cat fleas, using the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and II (cox1, cox2). We assessed the prevalence of Rickettsia and Bartonella using genus specific multiplexed real-time PCR assays. Morphological identification confirmed that the cat flea (C. felis) is the most common flea in New Zealand. The examined fleas (n=43) at cox1 locus revealed six closely related C. felis haplotypes (inter-haplotype distance 1.1%) across New Zealand. The New Zealand C. felis haplotypes were identical or near identical with haplotypes from southern Australia demonstrating common dispersal of haplotype lineage across both the geographical (Tasman Sea) and climate scale. New Zealand cat fleas carried Rickettsia felis (5.3%) and Bartonella clarridgeiae (18.4%). To understand the capability of C. felis to vector zoonotic pathogens, we determined flea cox1 and cox2 haplotype diversity with the tandem multiplexed real-time PCR and sequencing for Bartonella and Rickettsia. This enabled us to demonstrate highly similar cat fleas on cat and dog populations across Australia and New Zealand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of immature stages of the flea Ctenocephalides felis(Bouché in carpets exposed to cats treated with imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.J. Fourie

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Fleas cause allergic dermatitis in cats and dogs and therefore warrant control. It has been demonstrated previously that there is marked inhibition of the development of the immature stages of the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis on fleece blankets exposed to cats treated with imidacloprid. This study reports on the efficacy of imidacloprid in suppressing adult flea emergence in carpet exposed to treated cats. Circular discs of carpet pre-seeded with flea eggs and larvae were exposed to 6 untreated control and 6 topically treated (imidacloprid 10 % m/v cats 1 to 2 days after treatment and subsequently fortnightly for 6 weeks. Exposure times on alternate days were either 1 or 6 hours. Adult flea yield from carpets was determined 35 days after exposure. Differences between flea yield on control carpets and those exposed for 1 hour were significant only for days +1 and +14. For the 6-hour exposure, differences were significant at all times except on Day +43. The ability of imidacloprid to suppress the yield of adult fleas on carpets (6-hour exposure steadily declined from 82 % (Day +2 to 12 %(Day +43. For the 1-hour exposure it varied inconsistently between 0 and 83 % over the 6-week study period.

  19. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia.

  20. Comparative Ability of Oropsylla montana and Xenopsylla cheopis Fleas to Transmit Yersinia pestis by Two Different Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Joseph Hinnebusch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of Yersinia pestis by flea bite can occur by two mechanisms. After taking a blood meal from a bacteremic mammal, fleas have the potential to transmit the very next time they feed. This early-phase transmission resembles mechanical transmission in some respects, but the mechanism is unknown. Thereafter, transmission occurs after Yersinia pestis forms a biofilm in the proventricular valve in the flea foregut. The biofilm can impede and sometimes completely block the ingestion of blood, resulting in regurgitative transmission of bacteria into the bite site. In this study, we compared the relative efficiency of the two modes of transmission for Xenopsylla cheopis, a flea known to become completely blocked at a high rate, and Oropsylla montana, a flea that has been considered to rarely develop proventricular blockage.Fleas that took an infectious blood meal containing Y. pestis were maintained and monitored for four weeks for infection and proventricular blockage. The number of Y. pestis transmitted by groups of fleas by the two modes of transmission was also determined. O. montana readily developed complete proventricular blockage, and large numbers of Y. pestis were transmitted by that mechanism both by it and by X. cheopis, a flea known to block at a high rate. In contrast, few bacteria were transmitted in the early phase by either species.A model system incorporating standardized experimental conditions and viability controls was developed to more reliably compare the infection, proventricular blockage and transmission dynamics of different flea vectors, and was used to resolve a long-standing uncertainty concerning the vector competence of O. montana. Both X. cheopis and O. montana are fully capable of transmitting Y. pestis by the proventricular biofilm-dependent mechanism.

  1. Coexistence of Bartonella henselae and B. clarridgeiae in populations of cats and their fleas in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying; Rizzo, Maria Fernanda; Alvarez, Danilo; Moran, David; Peruski, Leonard F; Kosoy, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cats and their fleas collected in Guatemala were investigated for the presence of Bartonella infections. Bartonella bacteria were cultured from 8.2% (13/159) of cats, and all cultures were identified as B. henselae. Molecular analysis allowed detection of Bartonella DNA in 33.8% (48/142) of cats and in 22.4% (34/152) of cat fleas using gltA, nuoG, and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer targets. Two Bartonella species, B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae, were identified in cats and cat fleas by molecular analysis, with B. henselae being more common than B. clarridgeiae in the cats (68.1%; 32/47 vs 31.9%; 15/47). The nuoG was found to be less sensitive for detecting B. clarridgeiae compared with other molecular targets and could detect only two of the 15 B. clarridgeiae-infected cats. No significant differences were observed for prevalence between male and female cats and between different age groups. No evident association was observed between the presence of Bartonella species in cats and in their fleas.

  2. Prostatitis, steatitis, and diarrhea in a dog following presumptive flea-borne transmission of Bartonella henselae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Pritchard, Jessica; Ericson, Marna; Grindem, Carol; Phillips, Kathryn; Jennings, Samuel; Mathews, Kyle; Tran, Huy; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2014-09-01

    Bartonella henselae is increasingly associated with a variety of pathological entities, which are often similar in dogs and human patients. Following an acute flea infestation, a dog developed an unusual clinical presentation for canine bartonellosis. Comprehensive medical, microbiological, and surgical interventions were required for diagnosis and to achieve a full recovery. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Flea-borne transmission model to evaluate vaccine efficacy against naturally acquired bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Clayton O; Sebbane, Florent; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J; Andrews, Gerard P; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2004-04-01

    A flea-to-mouse transmission model was developed for use in testing new candidate vaccines for the ability to protect against flea-borne plague. The model was used to evaluate a recombinant fusion protein vaccine consisting of the Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens. After one to three challenges with Y. pestis-infected fleas, 14 of 15 unvaccinated control mice developed plague, with an average septicemia level of 9.2 x 10(8) Y. pestis CFU/ml. None of 15 vaccinated mice developed the disease after similar challenges, and serological testing indicated that transmitted bacteria were eliminated by the immune system before extensive replication and systemic infection could occur. The transmission and development of disease in control mice correlated with the number of bites by blocked fleas but not with the total number of fleabites. The model provides a means to directly assess the efficacy of new vaccines to prevent naturally acquired bubonic plague and to study events at the vector-host interface that lead to dissemination and disease.

  4. Volatiles emissions from the flea beetle Altica litigata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) associated with invasive Ludwigia hexapetala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The water primrose flea beetle Altica litigata (family Chrysomelidae) is a known insect pest to several nursery plants due to its aggressive feeding behavior – typically carried out in significant numbers. This aggregate feeding usually results in severe defoliation of their host plant. However, bec...

  5. Development and Evaluation of a ZigFlea-based Wireless Transceiver Board for CUI32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresen, Jim; Hauback, Øyvind; Overholt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present a new wireless transceiver board for the CUI32 sensor interface, aimed at creating a solution that is flexible, reliable, and with little power consumption. Communica- tion with the board is based on the ZigFlea protocol and it has been evaluated on a CUI32 using the StickOS oper- atin...

  6. Isolation of polymorphic microsatellite loci from the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaarschot, P.G.H.; Calvo, D.; Esselink, G.D.; Molina, J.M.; Vrieling, K.; Jong, de P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Ten microsatellite markers for the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum were developed using di- and trinucleotide repeat-enriched libraries. Each of these primer pairs were characterized on 96 individuals. Expected heterozygosities ranged between 0.11 and 0.84 and the number of alleles ranged between tw

  7. Survival of cabbage stem flea beetle larvae, Psylliodes chrysocephala, exposed to low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle; Bligaard, J.; Esbjerg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of winter oilseed rape. The larvae live throughout winter in leaf petioles and stems. Winter temperatures might play an important role in survival during winter and hence population dynamics...

  8. Biological Aspects for Forecasting of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle

    Summary The cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB), Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest in winter oilseed rape (WOSR) Brassica napus L. with variation in abundance and damage between years. The adult beetles invade fields at the time of crop emergence and cause...

  9. TOXICITY OF FIPRONIL ENANTIOMERS TO THE WATER FLEA AND BLACK FLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this research, we analyzed the enantiomer-specific toxicity of fipronil using two aquatic invertebrate species. Acute toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (water flea) indicated that the (+) enantiomer was significantly more toxic than the (-) enantiomer, with about a 3-fold differ...

  10. Population genetic structure of the prairie dog flea and plague vector, Oropsylla hirsuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Martin, Andrew P; Jones, Ryan T; Collinge, Sharon K

    2011-01-01

    Oropsylla hirsuta is the primary flea of the black-tailed prairie dog and is a vector of the plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis. We examined the population genetic structure of O. hirsuta fleas collected from 11 prairie dog colonies, 7 of which had experienced a plague-associated die-off in 1994. In a sample of 332 O. hirsuta collected from 226 host individuals, we detected 24 unique haplotype sequences in a 480 nucleotide segment of the cytochrome oxidase II gene. We found significant overall population structure but we did not detect a signal of isolation by distance, suggesting that O. hirsuta may be able to disperse relatively quickly at the scale of this study. All 7 colonies that were recently decimated by plague showed signs of recent population expansion, whereas 3 of the 4 plague-negative colonies showed haplotype patterns consistent with stable populations. These results suggest that O. hirsuta populations are affected by plague-induced prairie dog die-offs and that flea dispersal among prairie dog colonies may not be dependent exclusively on dispersal of prairie dogs. Re-colonization following plague events from plague-free refugia may allow for rapid flea population expansion following plague epizootics.

  11. Effects of seed coatings with thiamethoxam on germination and flea beetle control in flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiting, H F; Ester, A

    2007-01-01

    Flea beetles damage the seedlings before and after emergence and later the top of the plants as well, resulting in forking of the stem. This is unacceptable for the flax fibre industry, since it influences fibre quality negatively. Five field trials were carried out in 2001, 2003 and 2004 to assess the control of the flax flea beetles Longitarsus parvulus (Payk) and the large flax flea beetle Aphthona euphorbiae (Schrank) by film coating the seeds with thiamethoxam in fibre flax crops (Linum usitatissimum L.). Seed treatments were compared with untreated seeds and standard post emergence sprays with deltamethrin or parathion-methyl. Film coatings of the seeds with thiamethoxam formulated as 280 g/l, 350 g/l and 600 g/l were used. Thiamethoxam 350 g/l at rates of 9.1 and 18.2 g a.i./kg seed resulted in phytotoxicity, shown by a decrease of emergence. Application of thiamethoxam 350 g/l and 600 g/l at rates of 1.1 g a.i./kg seed and higher resulted in excellent flea beetle control. Application of thiamethoxam 280 g/l at a rate of 1.1 g a.i./kg seed showed no decrease of attack in comparison with the standard spray treatment. Seed treatment with thiamethoxam 600 g/l at 0.6 g a.i./kg showed insufficient protection.

  12. Prostatitis, Steatitis, and Diarrhea in a Dog following Presumptive Flea-Borne Transmission of Bartonella henselae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Pritchard, Jessica; Ericson, Marna; Grindem, Carol; Phillips, Kathryn; Jennings, Samuel; Mathews, Kyle; Tran, Huy; Birkenheuer, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Bartonella henselae is increasingly associated with a variety of pathological entities, which are often similar in dogs and human patients. Following an acute flea infestation, a dog developed an unusual clinical presentation for canine bartonellosis. Comprehensive medical, microbiological, and surgical interventions were required for diagnosis and to achieve a full recovery. PMID:24920774

  13. Characterization of a Pantoea stewartii TTSS gene required for persistence in its flea beetle vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart's bacterial wilt of maize is caused by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), a bacterium that is transmitted by the flea beetle, Chaetocnema pulicaria. Few studies have focused on the molecular basis of the interactions of Pnss with its vector. Genome analyses indicated that Pnss carri...

  14. Retracing the evolutionary path that led to flea-borne transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Cheng; Jarrett, Clayton O; Bosio, Christopher F; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2014-05-14

    Yersinia pestis is an arthropod-borne bacterial pathogen that evolved recently from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, an enteric pathogen transmitted via the fecal-oral route. This radical ecological transition can be attributed to a few discrete genetic changes from a still-extant recent ancestor, thus providing a tractable case study in pathogen evolution and emergence. Here, we determined the genetic and mechanistic basis of the evolutionary adaptation of Y. pestis to flea-borne transmission. Remarkably, only four minor changes in the bacterial progenitor, representing one gene gain and three gene losses, enabled transmission by flea vectors. All three loss-of-function mutations enhanced cyclic-di-GMP-mediated bacterial biofilm formation in the flea foregut, which greatly increased transmissibility. Our results suggest a step-wise evolutionary model in which Y. pestis emerged as a flea-borne clone, with each genetic change incrementally reinforcing the transmission cycle. The model conforms well to the ecological theory of adaptive radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing plague risk and presence through surveys of small mammal flea communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. M. Friggens; P. L. Ford; R. R. Parmenter; M. Boyden; K. Gage

    2011-01-01

    Plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, remains a threat to human and wildlife populations in the Western United States (Gage and Kosoy 2005). Several rodent species have been implicated as important maintenance hosts in the U.S., including Peromyscus maniculatus and Dipodomys spp. Fleas are a critical component of plague foci (Gage and Kosoy 2005)....

  16. Prevalence of Fleas and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Free-Roaming Cats in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantó, Germinal J.; Guerrero, Roberto I.; Olvera-Ramírez, Andrea M.; Milián, Feliciano; Mosqueda, Juan; Aguilar-Tipacamú, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of fleas and gastrointestinal parasites in free-roaming and domestic cats in central Mexico was evaluated. Three hundred and fifty eight cats captured in the street or brought in by owners to the Animal Control Center Unit, a unit of State Government, from June 2010 to May 2011, were included in the study. All cats were examined for the presence of fleas and gastrointestinal worms. One-hundred and ninety (53%) cats were infested with at least one flea species. Single infestations were observed in 106 (30%) cats and mixed infestations in 84 (23%) cats. Four species of fleas were recovered: Ctenocephalides felis in 53% of the cats, C. canis in 18%, Echidnophaga gallinacea in 7% and Pulex irritans in 1%. One-hundred and sixty three (45%) cats were infected with one or more species of gastrointestinal parasites: 48 (13%) with nematodes, 145 (40%) with cestodes, and one animal presented Moniliformis moniliformis. Prevalences and mean intensity of infection were: Physaloptera praeputialis 7 and 18; T. cati 3 and 2; Ancylostoma tubaeforme 2.5 and 2; Toxascaris leonina 0.5 and 2; Dipylidium caninum 36 and 32; Taenia taeniformis 4 and 3 and Moniliformis moniliformis 0.3 and 106, respectively. There was significant association (P0.05). The correlation between the total number of ectoparasites and endoparasites was not significant (r = 0.089, P = 0.094). PMID:23573282

  17. Evaluation of the murine immune response to Xenopsylla cheopis flea saliva and its effect on transmission of Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bosio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne pathogens are transmitted into a unique intradermal microenvironment that includes the saliva of their vectors. Immunomodulatory factors in the saliva can enhance infectivity; however, in some cases the immune response that develops to saliva from prior uninfected bites can inhibit infectivity. Most rodent reservoirs of Yersinia pestis experience fleabites regularly, but the effect this has on the dynamics of flea-borne transmission of plague has never been investigated. We examined the innate and acquired immune response of mice to bites of Xenopsylla cheopis and its effects on Y. pestis transmission and disease progression in both naïve mice and mice chronically exposed to flea bites.The immune response of C57BL/6 mice to uninfected flea bites was characterized by flow cytometry, histology, and antibody detection methods. In naïve mice, flea bites induced mild inflammation with limited recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages to the bite site. Infectivity and host response in naïve mice exposed to flea bites followed immediately by intradermal injection of Y. pestis did not differ from that of mice infected with Y. pestis without prior flea feeding. With prolonged exposure, an IgG1 antibody response primarily directed to the predominant component of flea saliva, a family of 36-45 kDa phosphatase-like proteins, occurred in both laboratory mice and wild rats naturally exposed to X. cheopis, but a hypersensitivity response never developed. The incidence and progression of terminal plague following challenge by infective blocked fleas were equivalent in naïve mice and mice sensitized to flea saliva by repeated exposure to flea bites over a 10-week period.Unlike what is observed with many other blood-feeding arthropods, the murine immune response to X. cheopis saliva is mild and continued exposure to flea bites leads more to tolerance than to hypersensitivity. The immune response to flea saliva had no detectable effect on Y

  18. Detection of Rickettsia in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks and Ctenocephalides felis fleas from southeastern Tunisia by reverse line blot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrouf, Fatma; M'Ghirbi, Youmna; Znazen, Abir; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Hammami, Adnene; Bouattour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Ticks (n = 663) and fleas (n = 470) collected from domestic animals from southeastern Tunisia were screened for Rickettsia infection using reverse line blot assay. Evidence of spotted fever group Rickettsia was obtained. We detected Rickettsia felis in fleas, Rickettsia massiliae Bar 29 and the Rickettsia conorii Israeli spotted fever strain in ticks, and Rickettsia conorii subsp. conorii and Rickettsia spp. in both arthropods. The sensitivity of the adopted technique allowed the identification of a new association between fleas and R. conorii subsp. conorii species. The presence of these vector-borne Rickettsia infections should be considered when diagnosing this disease in humans in Tunisia.

  19. Molecular detection of Rickettsia felis and Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis in fleas from human habitats, Asembo, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ju; Maina, Alice N; Knobel, Darryn L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Laudisoit, Anne; Wamburu, Kabura; Ogola, Eric; Parola, Philippe; Breiman, Robert F; Njenga, M Kariuki; Richards, Allen L

    2013-08-01

    The flea-borne rickettsioses murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and flea-borne spotted fever (FBSF) (Rickettsia felis) are febrile diseases distributed among humans worldwide. Murine typhus has been known to be endemic to Kenya since the 1950s, but FBSF was only recently documented in northeastern (2010) and western (2012) Kenya. To characterize the potential exposure of humans in Kenya to flea-borne rickettsioses, a total of 330 fleas (134 pools) including 5 species (Xenopsylla cheopis, Ctenocephalides felis, Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, and Echidnophaga gallinacea) were collected from domestic and peridomestic animals and from human dwellings within Asembo, western Kenya. DNA was extracted from the 134 pooled flea samples and 89 (66.4%) pools tested positively for rickettsial DNA by 2 genus-specific quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays based upon the citrate synthase (gltA) and 17-kD antigen genes and the Rfelis qPCR assay. Sequences from the 17-kD antigen gene, the outer membrane protein (omp)B, and 2 R. felis plasmid genes (pRF and pRFd) of 12 selected rickettsia-positive samples revealed a unique Rickettsia sp. (n=11) and R. felis (n=1). Depiction of the new rickettsia by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) targeting the 16S rRNA (rrs), 17-kD antigen gene, gltA, ompA, ompB, and surface cell antigen 4 (sca4), shows that it is most closely related to R. felis but genetically dissimilar enough to be considered a separate species provisionally named Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis. Subsequently, 81 of the 134 (60.4%) flea pools tested positively for Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis by a newly developed agent-specific qPCR assay, Rasemb. R. felis was identified in 9 of the 134 (6.7%) flea pools, and R. typhi the causative agent of murine typhus was not detected in any of 78 rickettsia-positive pools assessed using a species-specific qPCR assay, Rtyph. Two pools were found to contain both R. felis and Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis DNA and 1 pool

  20. Host range and distribution of small mammal fleas in South Africa, with a focus on species of medical and veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN DER Mescht, L; Matthee, S

    2017-07-10

    The host range and distribution of flea species on rodents and insectivores across multiple vegetation types in South Africa were investigated. Habitat suitability for flea species considered as important vectors of disease in humans and domestic animals was modelled. Data originated from fleas that were recovered from small mammals captured at 29 localities during 2009-2013 and published literature searched for flea records. Climate-based predictor variables, widely used in arthropod vector distribution, were selected and habitat suitability modelled for 10 flea vector species. A total of 2469 flea individuals representing 33 species and subspecies were collected from 1185 small mammals. Ten of each of the flea and rodent species are plague vectors and reservoirs, respectively. Multiple novel flea-host associations and locality records were noted. Three vector species were recorded from insectivores. Geographic distributions of flea species ranged from broad, across-biome distributions to narrower distributions within one or two biomes. Habitat suitability models performed excellently for the majority of flea vectors and identified regions of summer and all-year rainfall as representing suitable habitats for most vector species. Current knowledge of vector and disease ecology can benefit from similar sampling approaches that will be important not only for South Africa, but also for the sub-region. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  1. Prevalence of fleas and gastrointestinal parasites in free-roaming cats in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantó, Germinal J; Guerrero, Roberto I; Olvera-Ramírez, Andrea M; Milián, Feliciano; Mosqueda, Juan; Aguilar-Tipacamú, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of fleas and gastrointestinal parasites in free-roaming and domestic cats in central Mexico was evaluated. Three hundred and fifty eight cats captured in the street or brought in by owners to the Animal Control Center Unit, a unit of State Government, from June 2010 to May 2011, were included in the study. All cats were examined for the presence of fleas and gastrointestinal worms. One-hundred and ninety (53%) cats were infested with at least one flea species. Single infestations were observed in 106 (30%) cats and mixed infestations in 84 (23%) cats. Four species of fleas were recovered: Ctenocephalides felis in 53% of the cats, C. canis in 18%, Echidnophaga gallinacea in 7% and Pulex irritans in 1%. One-hundred and sixty three (45%) cats were infected with one or more species of gastrointestinal parasites: 48 (13%) with nematodes, 145 (40%) with cestodes, and one animal presented Moniliformis moniliformis. Prevalences and mean intensity of infection were: Physaloptera praeputialis 7 and 18; T. cati 3 and 2; Ancylostoma tubaeforme 2.5 and 2; Toxascaris leonina 0.5 and 2; Dipylidium caninum 36 and 32; Taenia taeniformis 4 and 3 and Moniliformis moniliformis 0.3 and 106, respectively. There was significant association (Pseason and ectoparasites load, more fleas were obtained in the summer and autumn than in the winter and spring; however, no statistical difference was observed for endoparasites load (P>0.05). The correlation between the total number of ectoparasites and endoparasites was not significant (r = 0.089, P = 0.094).

  2. Role of the Yersinia pestis yersiniabactin iron acquisition system in the incidence of flea-borne plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbane, Florent; Jarrett, Clayton; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2010-12-17

    Plague is a flea-borne zoonosis caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mutants lacking the yersiniabactin (Ybt) siderophore-based iron transport system are avirulent when inoculated intradermally but fully virulent when inoculated intravenously in mice. Presumably, Ybt is required to provide sufficient iron at the peripheral injection site, suggesting that Ybt would be an essential virulence factor for flea-borne plague. Here, using a flea-to-mouse transmission model, we show that a Y. pestis strain lacking the Ybt system causes fatal plague at low incidence when transmitted by fleas. Bacteriology and histology analyses revealed that a Ybt-negative strain caused only primary septicemic plague and atypical bubonic plague instead of the typical bubonic form of disease. The results provide new evidence that primary septicemic plague is a distinct clinical entity and suggest that unusual forms of plague may be caused by atypical Y. pestis strains.

  3. Role of the Yersinia pestis yersiniabactin iron acquisition system in the incidence of flea-borne plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Sebbane

    Full Text Available Plague is a flea-borne zoonosis caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mutants lacking the yersiniabactin (Ybt siderophore-based iron transport system are avirulent when inoculated intradermally but fully virulent when inoculated intravenously in mice. Presumably, Ybt is required to provide sufficient iron at the peripheral injection site, suggesting that Ybt would be an essential virulence factor for flea-borne plague. Here, using a flea-to-mouse transmission model, we show that a Y. pestis strain lacking the Ybt system causes fatal plague at low incidence when transmitted by fleas. Bacteriology and histology analyses revealed that a Ybt-negative strain caused only primary septicemic plague and atypical bubonic plague instead of the typical bubonic form of disease. The results provide new evidence that primary septicemic plague is a distinct clinical entity and suggest that unusual forms of plague may be caused by atypical Y. pestis strains.

  4. The fate of the embedded virgin sand flea Tunga penetrans: hypothesis, self-experimentation and photographic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielecke, Marlene; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    We describe the morphological development of a single penetrated female sand flea (Tunga penetrans) in a medical expatriate working in Madagascar. The embedded parasite developed abnormally in two aspects. First, it lived twice as long as usually. Second, it did not expel a single egg during a period of two months. We explain these abnormalities by the fact that the female sand flea remained virgin after the penetration into the skin and, therefore, mature eggs did not develop. Our observations are seminal findings in a long dispute between entomologists and suggest that normally the fertilization of a female sand flea takes place on-host when it is already embedded in the epidermis. We conclude that a single sand flea lesion in a traveller may develop in a different way as compared to parasites penetrating into the skin of inhabitants living in endemic areas. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Blood meal identification in off-host cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from a plague-endemic region of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christine B; Borchert, Jeff N; Black, William C; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph T; Boegler, Karen A; Moore, Sean M; Gage, Kenneth L; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2013-02-01

    The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is an inefficient vector of the plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) and is the predominant off-host flea species in human habitations in the West Nile region, an established plague focus in northwest Uganda. To determine if C. felis might serve as a Y. pestis bridging vector in the West Nile region, we collected on- and off-host fleas from human habitations and used a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assay to estimate the proportion of off-host C. felis that had fed on humans and the proportion that had fed on potentially infectious rodents or shrews. Our findings indicate that cat fleas in human habitations in the West Nile region feed primarily on domesticated species. We conclude that C. felis is unlikely to serve as a Y. pestis bridging vector in this region.

  6. Transmission efficiency of the plague pathogen (Y. pestis) by the flea, Xenopsylla skrjabini, to mice and great gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujiang; Dai, Xiang; Wang, Qiguo; Chen, Hongjian; Meng, Weiwei; Wu, Kemei; Luo, Tao; Wang, Xinhui; Rehemu, Azhati; Guo, Rong; Yu, Xiaotao; Yang, Ruifu; Cao, Hanli; Song, Yajun

    2015-05-01

    Plague, a zoonotic disease caused by Yersinia pestis, is characterized by its ability to persist in the plague natural foci. Junggar Basin plague focus was recently identified in China, with Rhombomys opimus (great gerbils) and Xenopsylla skrjabini as the main reservoir and vector for plague. No transmission efficiency data of X. skrjabini for Y. pestis is available till now. In this study, we estimated the median infectious dose (ID50) and the blockage rates of X. skrjabini with Y. pestis, by using artificial feeders. We then evaluated the flea transmission ability of Y. pestis to the mice and great gerbils via artificial bloodmeal feeding. Finally, we investigated the transmission of Y. pestis to mice with fleas fed by infected great gerbils. ID50 of Y. pestis to X. skrjabini was estimated as 2.04 × 10(5) CFU (95% CI, 1.45 × 10(5) - 3.18 × 10(5) CFU), around 40 times higher than that of X. cheopis. Although fleas fed by higher bacteremia bloodmeal had higher infection rates for Y. pestis, they lived significantly shorter than their counterparts. X. skrjabini could get fully blocked as early as day 3 post of infection (7.1%, 3/42 fleas), and the overall blockage rate of X. cheopis was estimated as 14.9% (82/550 fleas) during the 14 days of investigation. For the fleas infected by artificial feeders, they seemed to transmit plague more efficiently to great gerbils than mice. Our single flea transmission experiments also revealed that, the transmission capacity of naturally infected fleas (fed by infected great gerbils) was significantly higher than that of artificially infected ones (fed by artificial feeders). Our results indicated that ID50 of Y. pestis to X. skrjabini was higher than other fleas like X. cheopis, and its transmission efficiency to mice might be lower than other flea vectors in the artificial feeding modes. We also found different transmission potentials in the artificially infected fleas and the naturally infected ones. Further studies are

  7. The control of ticks, fleas and lice on dogs by means of a Sendran--impregnated collar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, I G

    1976-03-01

    Plastic collars impregnated with 9,4% Sendran effectively controlled adult Rhipicephalus sanguineus for a period of 49 days and immature ticks for a period possibly in excess of 70 days when fitted to four dogs. Four uncollared dogs served as controls. Although flea burdens were extremely low the collars were apparently effective for a period in excess of 70 days. A medicated collar killed all the ticks, fleas and lice on a severely parasited dog within a period of 48 hours.

  8. Contribution of land use to rodent flea load distribution in the plague endemic area of Lushoto District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronimo, Proches; Kihupi, Nganga I; Kimaro, Didas N; Gulinck, Hubert; Mulungu, Loth S; Msanya, Balthazar M; Leirs, Herwig; Deckers, Jozef A

    2014-07-01

    Fleas associated with different rodent species are considered as the major vectors of bubonic plague, which is still rampant in different parts of the world. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of land use to rodent flea load distribution at fine scale in the plague endemic area of north-eastern Tanzania. Data was collected in three case areas namely, Shume, Lukozi and Mwangoi, differing in plague incidence levels. Data collection was carried out during both wet and dry seasons of 2012. Analysis of Variance and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) statistical methods were used to clarify the relationships between fleas and specific land use characteristics. There was a significant variation (P ≤ 0.05) of flea indices in different land use types. Fallow and natural forest had higher flea indices whereas plantation forest mono-crop and mixed annual crops had the lowest flea indices among the aggregated land use types. The influence of individual land use types on flea indices was variable with fallow having a positive effect and land tillage showing a negative effect. The results also demonstrated a seasonal effect, part of which can be attributed to different land use practices such as application of pesticides, or the presence of grass strips around fields. These findings suggest that land use factors have a major influence on rodent flea abundance which can be taken as a proxy for plague infection risk. The results further point to the need for a comprehensive package that includes land tillage and crop type considerations on one hand and the associated human activities on the other, in planning and implementation of plague control interventions.

  9. Possible living fossil in Bolivia: A new genus of flea beetles with modified hind legs (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    A new genus (Chanealtica) with three new species (Chanealtica cuevas, Chanealtica ellimon, and Chanealtica maxi) from Bolivia is described and illustrated. It is compared with Aphthonoides Jacoby, 1885, Argopistes Motschulsky, 1860, Metroserrapha Bechyne, 1958, Psylliodes Berthold, 1827 and Psyllototus Nadein, 2010. Remarkably, based on the available characters, among all the flea beetles, Chanealtica is mostly similar to an extinct genus Psyllototus. A discussion of diversity and function of the hind leg in flea beetles is provided.

  10. The water flea (Daphnia magna) as a sensitive indicator for the assessment of toxicity of synthetic detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, H; Misra, V; Viswanathan, P N; Murti, C R

    1984-10-01

    The water flea (Daphnia magna) was used as a sensitive indicator for assessing the toxicity due to synthetic detergents. Acute and chronic toxicity of detergents to the water flea was studied under laboratory conditions by following the median tolerance limit (TLM) at 48 hr and the rate of survival. A significant decrease in the rate of reproduction (number of hatching and neonates produced) were found at 21 days. During acute toxicity studies behavioural changes were also noticed.

  11. Molecular and serological evidence of flea-associated typhus group and spotted fever group rickettsial infections in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonanahary, Rado J L; Harrison, Alan; Maina, Alice N; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Telfer, Sandra

    2017-03-04

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for many febrile syndromes around the world, including in sub-Saharan Africa. Vectors of these pathogens include ticks, lice, mites and fleas. In order to assess exposure to flea-associated Rickettsia species in Madagascar, human and small mammal samples from an urban and a rural area, and their associated fleas were tested. Anti-typhus group (TGR)- and anti-spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR)-specific IgG were detected in 24 (39%) and 21 (34%) of 62 human serum samples, respectively, using indirect ELISAs, with six individuals seropositive for both. Only two (2%) Rattus rattus out of 86 small mammals presented antibodies against TGR. Out of 117 fleas collected from small mammals, Rickettsia typhi, a TGR, was detected in 26 Xenopsylla cheopis (24%) collected from rodents of an urban area (n = 107), while two of these urban X. cheopis (2%) were positive for Rickettsia felis, a SFGR. R. felis DNA was also detected in eight (31%) out of 26 Pulex irritans fleas. The general population in Madagascar are exposed to rickettsiae, and two flea-associated Rickettsia pathogens, R. typhi and R. felis, are present near or in homes. Although our results are from a single district, they demonstrate that rickettsiae should be considered as potential agents of undifferentiated fever in Madagascar.

  12. Efficacy of a fipronil bait in reducing the number of fleas (Oropsylla spp.) infesting wild black-tailed prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poché, David M; Hartman, Daniel; Polyakova, Larisa; Poché, Richard M

    2017-06-01

    Bubonic plague (Yersinia pestis) is a deadly zoonosis with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) as a reservoir host in the United States. Systemic insecticides are a promising means of controlling the vectors, Oropsylla spp. fleas, infesting these prairie dogs, subsequently disrupting the Y. pestis cycle. The objective of this study was to conduct a field trial evaluating the efficacy of a grain rodent bait containing fipronil (0.005%) against fleas infesting prairie dogs. The study was performed in Larimer County, CO, where bait was applied to a treatment area containing a dense prairie dog population, three times over a three-week period. Prairie dogs were captured and combed for fleas during four study periods (pre-, mid-, 1(st) post-, and 2(nd) post-treatment). Results indicated the use of bait containing fipronil significantly reduced flea burden. The bait containing fipronil was determined to reduce the mean number of fleas per prairie dog >95% for a minimum of 52 days post-initial treatment application and 31 days post-final treatment application. These results suggest the potential for this form of treatment to reduce flea population density on prairie dogs, and subsequently plague transmission, among mammalian hosts across the United States and beyond. © 2017 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  13. Rickettsial Infections among Ctenocephalides felis and Host Animals during a Flea-Borne Rickettsioses Outbreak in Orange County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Carrie; Krueger, Laura; Macaluso, Kevin R.; Odhiambo, Antony; Nguyen, Kiet; Farris, Christina M.; Luce-Fedrow, Alison; Bennett, Stephen; Jiang, Ju; Sun, Sokanary; Cummings, Robert F.; Richards, Allen L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to a resurgence of flea-borne rickettsioses in Orange County, California, we investigated the etiologies of rickettsial infections of Ctenocephalides felis, the predominant fleas species obtained from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and domestic cats (Felis catus), collected from case exposure sites and other areas in Orange County. In addition, we assessed the prevalence of IgG antibodies against spotted fever group (SFGR) and typhus group (TGR) rickettsiae in opossum sera. Of the 597 flea specimens collected from opossums and cats, 37.2% tested positive for Rickettsia. PCR and sequencing of rickettsial genes obtained from C. felis flea DNA preparations revealed the presence of R. typhi (1.3%), R. felis (28.0%) and R. felis-like organisms (7.5%). Sera from opossums contained TGR-specific (40.84%), but not SFGR-specific antibodies. The detection of R. felis and R. typhi in the C. felis fleas in Orange County highlights the potential risk for human infection with either of these pathogens, and underscores the need for further investigations incorporating specimens from humans, animal hosts, and invertebrate vectors in endemic areas. Such studies will be essential for establishing a link in the ongoing flea-borne rickettsioses outbreaks. PMID:27537367

  14. Ecological Opportunity, Evolution, and the Emergence of Flea-Borne Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Chouikha, Iman; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    The plague bacillus Yersinia pestis is unique among the pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae in utilizing an arthropod-borne transmission route. Transmission by fleabite is a recent evolutionary adaptation that followed the divergence of Y. pestis from the closely related food- and waterborne enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis A combination of population genetics, comparative genomics, and investigations of Yersinia-flea interactions have disclosed the important steps in the evolution and emergence of Y. pestis as a flea-borne pathogen. Only a few genetic changes, representing both gene gain by lateral transfer and gene loss by loss-of-function mutation (pseudogenization), were fundamental to this process. The emergence of Y. pestis fits evolutionary theories that emphasize ecological opportunity in adaptive diversification and rapid emergence of new species. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Efficacy of Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Sprayable Polymer Gel Against Crucifer Flea Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on Canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Frank B; Reddy, Gadi V P

    2016-08-01

    The crucifer flea beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze), is a key pest of canola (Brassica napus L.) in the northern Great Plains of North America. The efficacies of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp.), a sprayable polymer gel, and a combination of both were assessed on canola for flea beetle management. Plots were treated soon after colonization by adult flea beetles, when canola was in the cotyledon to one-leaf stage. Ten plants along a 3.6-m section of row were selected and rated at pre-treatment and 7 and 14 d post treatment using the damage-rating scheme advanced by the European Plant Protection Organization, where 1 = 0%, 2 = 2%, 3 = 5%, 4 = 10%, and 5 = 25% leaf area injury. Under moderate flea beetle feeding pressure (1-3.3% leaf area damaged), seeds treated with Gaucho 600 (Bayer CropScience LP Raleigh, NC) (imidacloprid) produced the highest yield (843.2 kg/ha). Meanwhile, Barricade (Barricade International, Inc. Hobe Sound, FL) (polymer gel; 1%) + Scanmask (BioLogic Company Inc, Willow Hill, PA) (Steinernema feltiae) resulted in the highest yields: 1020.8 kg/ha under high (2.0-5.3% leaf area damaged), and 670.2 kg/ha at extremely high (4.3-8.6 % leaf area damaged) feeding pressure. Our results suggest that Barricade (1%) + Scanmask (S. feltiae) can serve as an alternative to the conventional chemical seed treatment. Moreover, Scanmask (S. feltiae) can be used to complement the effects of seed treatment after its protection has run out.

  16. Antifreeze Production and Cold-Tolerance in Overwintering Purple Martin Fleas, Ceratophyllus idius Jordan and Rothschild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    Bombyx mori, isotope [ 14C] studies showed that about 1/3 of the free glycerol pool came from lipids (Yaginuma and Yamashita 1980). However, the same...inactivated within the lipid phase of their cell membranes (Baust and Zachariassen 1983). Baust and Morrissey (1975) reported the possible masking of INAs...ambient or freezer-held regimens. Throughout the cooling process and all subsequent aspects of the project, fleas were held in total darkness

  17. Morphological evidence of mechanoreceptive gravity perception in a water flea - Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Hair-like structures or setae located in the basal membrane of the swimming antennae of the water flea, D. magna, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and compared to mechanoreceptors in the Higher Order Crustacea. Similarities in anatomy, size, attachment, number, length, and orientation support the hypothesis that the setae are rheoceptive mechanoreceptors which mediate gravity perception through deflection by water currents during the sink phase of hop-and-sink swimming behavior.

  18. Zoonotic Bartonella species in fleas and blood from red foxes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; Fleming, Patricia A; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-12-01

    Bartonella are arthropod-borne, fastidious, Gram-negative, and aerobic bacilli distributed by fleas, lice, sand flies, and, possibly, ticks. The zoonotic Bartonella species, Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae, which are the causes of cat scratch disease and endocarditis in humans, have been reported from cats, cat fleas, and humans in Australia. However, to date, there has been no report of B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae in Australian wild animals and their ectoparasites. B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae were detected in fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), an introduced pest animal species in Australia, and only B. clarridgeiae was detected in blood from one red fox. Phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal intergenic spacer region revealed that the B. henselae detected in the current study were related to B. henselae strain Houston-1, a major pathogenic strain in humans in Australia, and confirmed the genetic distinctness of B. clarridgeiae. The identification and characterization of Bartonella species in red foxes in the Southwest of Western Australia suggests that red foxes may act as reservoirs of infection for animals and humans in this region.

  19. Molecular Detection of Rickettsia felis in Different Flea Species from Caldas, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Hernández, Alejandro; Montoya, Viviana; Martínez, Alejandra; Pérez, Jorge E.; Mercado, Marcela; de la Ossa, Alberto; Vélez, Carolina; Estrada, Gloria; Correa, Maria I.; Duque, Laura; Ariza, Juan S.; Henao, Cesar; Valbuena, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsioses caused by Rickettsia felis are an emergent global threat. Historically, the northern region of the province of Caldas in Colombia has reported murine typhus cases, and recently, serological studies confirmed high seroprevalence for both R. felis and R. typhi. In the present study, fleas from seven municipalities were collected from dogs, cats, and mice. DNA was extracted and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify gltA, ompB, and 17kD genes. Positive samples were sequenced to identify the species of Rickettsia. Of 1,341 fleas, Ctenocephalides felis was the most prevalent (76.7%). Positive PCR results in the three genes were evidenced in C. felis (minimum infection rates; 5.3%), C. canis (9.2%), and Pulex irritans (10.0%). Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analyses of sequences showed high identity values (> 98%) with R. felis, and all were highly related by phylogenetic analyses. This work shows the first detection of R. felis in fleas collected from animals in Colombia. PMID:23878183

  20. Rickettsial infections of fleas collected from small mammals on four islands in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Kathryn A; Farzeli, Arik; Ibrahim, Ima N; Antonjaya, Ungke; Yunianto, Andre; Winoto, Imelda; Ester; Perwitasari, Dian; Widjaya, Susana; Richards, Allen L; Williams, Maya; Blair, Patrick J

    2010-11-01

    Ectoparasites were sampled from small mammals collected in West Java, West Sumatra, North Sulawesi, and East Kalimantan, Indonesia, in 2007-2008 and were screened for evidence of infection from bacteria in the Rickettsaceae family. During eight trap nights at eight sites, 208 fleas were collected from 96 of 507 small mammals trapped from four orders (379 Rodentia; 123 Soricomorpha; two Carnivora; three Scandentia). Two species of fleas were collected: Xenopsylla cheopis (n = 204) and Nosopsyllus spp. (n = 4). Among the 208 fleas collected, 171 X. cheopis were removed from rats (Rattus spp.) and 33 X. cheopis from shrews (Suncus murinus). X. cheopis were pooled and tested for DNA from rickettsial agents Rickettsia typhi, Rickettsia felis, and spotted fever group rickettsiae. R. typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was detected in X. cheopis collected from small mammals in West Java and East Kalimantan. R. felis was detected in X. cheopis collected from small mammals in Manado, North Sulawesi. R. felis and spotted fever group rickettsiae were detected in a pool of X. cheopis collected from an animal in East Kalimantan. Sixteen percent of the X. cheopis pools were found positive for Rickettsia spp.; four (10.8%) R. typhi, one (2.7%) R. felis, and one (2.7%) codetection of R. felis and a spotted fever group rickettsia. These data suggest that rickettsial infections remain a threat to human health across Indonesia.

  1. Predicting small mammal and flea abundance using landform and soil properties in a plague endemic area in Lushoto District, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliyo, Joel L; Kimaro, Didas N; Msanya, Balthazar M; Mulungu, Loth S; Hieronimo, Proches; Kihupi, Nganga I; Gulinck, Hubert; Deckers, Jozef A

    2014-07-01

    Small mammals particularly rodents, are considered the primary natural hosts of plague. Literature suggests that plague persistence in natural foci has a root cause in soils. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between on the one hand landforms and associated soil properties, and on the other hand small mammals and fleas in West Usambara Mountains in Tanzania, a plague endemic area. Standard field survey methods coupled with Geographical Information System (GIS) technique were used to examine landform and soils characteristics. Soil samples were analysed in the laboratory for physico-chemical properties. Small mammals were trapped on pre-established landform positions and identified to genus/species level. Fleas were removed from the trapped small mammals and counted. Exploration of landform and soil data was done using ArcGIS Toolbox functions and descriptive statistical analysis. The relationships between landforms, soils, small mammals and fleas were established by generalised linear regression model (GLM) operated in R statistics software. Results show that landforms and soils influence the abundance of small mammals and fleas and their spatial distribution. The abundance of small mammals and fleas increased with increase in elevation. Small mammal species richness also increases with elevation. A landform-soil model shows that available phosphorus, slope aspect and elevation were statistically significant predictors explaining richness and abundance of small mammals. Fleas' abundance and spatial distribution were influenced by hill-shade, available phosphorus and base saturation. The study suggests that landforms and soils have a strong influence on the richness and evenness of small mammals and their fleas' abundance hence could be used to explain plague dynamics in the area.

  2. Flea and Small Mammal Species Composition in Mixed-Grass Prairies: Implications for the Maintenance of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Lauren P; Britten, Hugh B

    2017-07-01

    Maintenance of sylvatic plague in prairie dogs (Cynomis spp.) was once thought unlikely due to high mortality rates; yet more recent findings indicate that low-level enzootic plague may be maintained in susceptible prairie dog populations. Another hypothesis for the maintenance of sylvatic plague involves small mammals, other than prairie dogs, as an alternative reservoir in the sylvatic plague system. These hypotheses, however, are not mutually exclusive, as both prairie dogs and small mammals could together be driving sylvatic cycles of plague. The concept of a bridging vector has been used to explain the transmission of pathogens from one host species to another. In the case of sylvatic plague, this would require overlap in fleas between small mammals and prairie dogs, and potentially other species such as carnivores. Our goal was to evaluate the level of flea sharing between black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomis ludovicianus) and other small mammals in a mixed-grass prairie in South Dakota. We investigated the species richness of small mammals and small-mammal fleas in a mixed-grass prairie system and compared findings with previous studies from a short-grass ecosystem in Colorado. Over the summer field seasons 2014-2016 we live-trapped small mammals, collected fleas, and showed differences between both the flea and small mammal composition of the two systems. We also recorded higher densities of deer mice and lower densities of northern grasshopper mice in mixed versus shortgrass prairies. We confirmed, as is the case in shortgrass prairies, a lack of substantial flea species overlap on small mammal hosts and fleas from prairie dogs and their burrows. Moreover this study demonstrates that although small mammals may not play a large part in interepizootic plague cycling in shortgrass prairie ecosystems, their role in mixed-grass prairies requires further evaluation.

  3. Real-time PCR of the mammalian hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS gene for analysis of flea (Ctenocephalides felis feeding patterns on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chengming

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise data on quantitative kinetics of blood feeding of fleas, particularly immediately after contact with the host, are essential for understanding dynamics of flea-borne disease transmission and for evaluating flea control strategies. Standard methods used are inadequate for studies that simulate early events after real-life flea access to the host. Methods Here, we developed a novel quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting mammalian DNA within fleas to quantify blood consumption with high sensitivity and specificity. We used primers and fluorescent probes that amplify the hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS gene, an evolutionary divergent gene that is unlikely to be detected in insects by mammalian-specific primers and probes. To validate this assay, fleas were placed on dogs, allowed to distribute in the hair, and removed at specific time points with single-use combs. Fleas were then immediately homogenized by vigorous shaking with ceramic beads in guanidinium-based DNA preservation buffer for DNA extraction. Results The specificity of this assay was ascertained by amplification of canine, feline and equine blood with differential product melting temperatures (Tm, and lack of amplification of bovine and porcine blood and of adult fleas reared from larvae fed with bovine blood. Sensitivity of the assay was established by limiting dilution and detection of single copies of HMBS DNA equivalent to 0.043 nL blood. Application of the assay indicated that after 15 minutes on a dog, male and female fleas had ingested low, but similar amounts of approximately 1.1. nL blood. Saturation uptake of 118 and 100 nL blood per flea was found at 30 and 60 min on the dog, respectively. Conclusions The HMBS PCR method developed here offers the advantages of both exquisite sensitivity and specificity that make it superior to other approaches for quantification of blood ingested by fleas. The capability to detect minute quantities of

  4. Occurrence of Dipylidium caninum in fleas from client-owned cats and dogs in Europe using a new PCR detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnet, Frédéric; Labuschagne, Michel; Fourie, Josephus; Jacques, Guillot; Farkas, Robert; Cozma, Vasile; Halos, Lénaïg; Hellmann, Klaus; Knaus, Martin; Rehbein, Steffen

    2014-09-15

    Ctenocephalides fleas are not only the most prevalent ectoparasites of dogs and cats but also the intermediate host of the cestode Dipylidium caninum. Due to the poor sensitivity of coproscopy to diagnose cat and dog infestation by Dipylidium, few epidemiological data are available on its prevalence among pet populations. A new PCR method was developed to specifically identify D. caninum rDNA inside single fleas. The PCR test was then applied to 5529 fleas of Ctenocephalides genus, 2701 Ctenocephalides felis fleas (1969 collected on 435 cats and 732 on 178 dogs) and 2828 Ctenocephalides canis fleas collected from 396 dogs. Precisely, 4.37% of cats were infested by a flea population infected with D. caninum. Out of the 1969 C. felis from cats, 2.23% were found to be infected with Dipylidium. From the 396 dogs infested with C. canis, 9.1%% were infested with the Dipylidium infected fleas, which is significantly higher than the observation made in cats (p=0.03). Moreover, 3.1% of the C. canis fleas were found to be infected with Dipylidium, which is not significantly different than in C. felis. Looking at the number of infected fleas in the positive samples (at least one PCR positive flea in a sample), the infestation rate in samples was varied from 3 to 100% with an average of 19.7% which is in favour of easy and regular Dipylidium reinfestations of both cats and dogs in households. For the first time, the spread of D. caninum between fleas and dogs and cats is confirmed throughout Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of ecological and temporal factors on the composition of Bartonella infection in rodents and their fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Morick, Danny; Cohen, Carmit; Hawlena, Hadas; Harrus, Shimon

    2014-08-01

    The composition of Bartonella infection was explored in wild Gerbillus andersoni rodents and their Synosternus cleopatrae fleas. Rodent blood samples and fleas were collected in two periods (two different seasons; 4 months apart) from juveniles and adult hosts, and their bartonellae lineages were identified by a 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting a specific Bartonella citrate synthase gene (gltA) fragment. The rate of Bartonella spp. co-infection was estimated and the assemblage and distribution of bartonellae lineages across the samples with respect to ecological and phylogenetic distance similarities were analyzed. Moreover, environmental factors that could explain potential differences between samples were investigated. Out of the 91 bartonellae-positive samples, 89% were found to be co-infected with more than two phylogenetically distant Bartonella genotypes and additional closely related (but distinguishable) variants. These bartonellae lineages were distributed in a non-random manner, and a negative interaction between lineages was discovered. Interestingly, the overall composition of those infections greatly varied among samples. This variability was partially explained by factors, such as type of sample (blood versus fleas), flea sex and period of collection. This investigation sheds light on the patterns of Bartonella infection and the organization of Bartonella lineages in fleas and rodents in nature.

  6. Surveillance of Egyptian fleas for agents of public health significance: Anaplasma, Bartonella, Coxiella, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Amanda D; Reeves, Will K; Szumlas, Daniel E; Abbassy, Magda M; Helmy, Ibrahim M; Moriarity, John R; Dasch, Gregory A

    2006-07-01

    Serologic surveys in Egypt have documented human and animal exposure to vector-borne bacterial pathogens, but the presence and distribution of these agents in arthropods has not been determined. Between July 2002 and July 2003, fleas were collected from 221 mammals trapped in 17 cities throughout Egypt. A total of 987 fleas were collected, representing four species (Ctenocephalides felis, Echidnophaga gallinacea, Leptopsylla segnis, and Xenopsylla cheopis); 899 of these fleas were X. cheopis from rats (Rattus spp.). Fleas were tested for DNA from Anaplasma spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, Ehrlichia spp., Rickettsia spp., and Yersinia pestis. Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was detected in X. cheopis and L. segnis from rats from nine cities. A spotted-fever group Rickettsia sp. similar to "RF2125" was detected in E. gallinacea, and two unidentified spotted fever group Rickettsia were detected in two X. cheopis. Novel Bartonella genotypes were detected in X. cheopis and L. segnis from three cities. Coxiella burnetii was detected in two fleas. Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Y. pestis were not detected.

  7. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsse-Klasen, E.; Fonville, M.; Gassner, F.; Nijhof, A.M.; Hovius, E.K.; Jongejan, F.; Takken, F.; Reimerink, J.R.; Overgaauw, P.A.M.; Sprong, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Awareness for flea- and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The

  8. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsse-Klasen, E.; Fonville, M.; Gassner, F.; Nijhof, A.M.; Hovius, E.K.E.; Jongejan, F.; Takken, W.; Reimerink, J.R.; Overgaauw, P.A.M.; Sprong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Awareness for flea-and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The r

  9. Flea abundance, diversity, and plague in Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) and their burrows in montane grasslands in northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan M. Friggens; Robert R. Parmenter; Michael Boyden; Paulette L. Ford; Kenneth Gage; Paul Keim

    2010-01-01

    Plague, a flea-transmitted infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is a primary threat to the persistence of prairie dog populations (Cynomys spp.). We conducted a 3-yr survey (2004-2006) of fleas from Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) and their burrows in montane grasslands in Valles Caldera National Preserve in New Mexico. Our...

  10. Small todents fleas from the bubonic plague focus located in the Serra dos Órgãos Mountain Range, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Wilson de Carvalho

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Eleven species of fleas were collected from 601 small rodents, from November 1995 to October 1997, in areas of natural focus of bubonic plague, including the municipalities of Nova Friburgo, Sumidouro and Teresópolis, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Among 924 fleas collected, Polygenis (Polygenis rimatus (Rhopalopsyllidae was the predominant species regarding the frequency, representing 41.3% (N:382, followed by P. (Neopolygenis pradoi, representing 20% (N:185 and Craneopsylla minervaminerva (Stephanocircidae, representing 18.9% (N:175. The host Akodon cursor harbored 47.9% of these fleas. Other six host species were infested by 52.1% of the remaining fleas. Fleas were found on hosts and in places within the focus not previously reported by the literature.

  11. Use of Insecticide Delivery Tubes for Controlling Rodent-Associated Fleas in a Plague Endemic Region of West Nile, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegler, Karen A; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph Tendo; Clark, Rebecca J; Delorey, Mark J; Gage, Kenneth L; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2014-11-01

    Plague is a primarily flea-borne rodent-associated zoonosis that is often fatal in humans. Our study focused on the plague-endemic West Nile region of Uganda where affordable means for the prevention of human plague are currently lacking. Traditional hut construction and food storage practices hinder rodent exclusion efforts, and emphasize the need for an inexpensive but effective host-targeted approach for controlling fleas within the domestic environment. Here we demonstrate the ability of an insecticide delivery tube that is made from inexpensive locally available materials to reduce fleas on domestic rodents. Unbaited tubes were treated with either an insecticide alone (fipronil) or in conjunction with an insect growth regulator [(S)-methoprene], and placed along natural rodent runways within participant huts. Performance was similar for both treatments throughout the course of the study, and showed significant reductions in the proportion of infested rodents relative to controls for at least 100 d posttreatment.

  12. Autolabelling of gamasid mites and fleas in nests of red voles in winter (according to radioisotope labelling data)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al' bov, S.A.; Lavrenchenko, L.A.; Nikolaeva, G.A.

    Data concerning trophic associations between gamasid mites and fleas in cohabitation with red voles in nests in winter were presented and discussed. Red voles (Cl. glareolus) were trapped, labelled with radioactive cobalt and radioactive glycine, released and traced with the aid of radiometers. H. nidi and C. penicilliger were found to be the most numerous among the mites and fleas in the winter nests of the voles and were the most actively feeding species. H. nidi and C. penicilliger numbers increased with the increase of time of use of the nests by the voles and had little relationship to the abundance of these species in the nests. Other species assumed that the connection between the gamasid mites, fleas and voles was topical rather than trophic. 11 references, 4 figures.

  13. The Bartonella henselae SitABCD transporter is required for confronting oxidative stress during cell and flea invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, MaFeng; Bouhsira, Emilie; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Biville, Francis

    2013-10-01

    Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen that possesses a flea-cat-flea transmission cycle and causes cat scratch disease in humans via cat scratches and bites. In order to establish infection, B. henselae must overcome oxidative stress damage produced by the mammalian host and arthropod vector. B. henselae encodes for putative Fe²⁺ and Mn²⁺ transporter SitABCD. In B. henselae, SitAB knockdown increases sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. We consistently show that SitAB knockdown decreases the ability of B. henselae to survive in both human endothelial cells and cat fleas, thus demonstrating that the SitABCD transporter plays an important role during the B. henselae infection cycle. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. FleaTickRisk: a meteorological model developed to monitor and predict the activity and density of three tick species and the cat flea in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Beugnet

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modelling is quite a recent tool in epidemiology. Geographical information system (GIS combined with remote sensing (data collection and analysis provide valuable models, but the integration of climatologic models in parasitology and epidemiology is less common. The aim of our model, called “FleaTickRisk”, was to use meteorological data and forecasts to monitor the activity and density of some arthropods. Our parasitological model uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF meteorological model integrating biological parameters. The WRF model provides a temperature and humidity picture four times a day (at 6:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00 hours. Its geographical resolution is 27 x 27 km over Europe (area between longitudes 10.5° W and 30° E and latitudes 37.75° N and 62° N. The model also provides weekly forecasts. Past data were compared and revalidated using current meteorological data generated by ground stations and weather satellites. The WRF model also includes geographical information stemming from United States Geophysical Survey biotope maps with a 30’’ spatial resolution (approximately 900 x 900 m. WRF takes into account specific climatic conditions due to valleys, altitudes, lakes and wind specificities. The biological parameters of Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor reticulatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis felis were transformed into a matrix of activity. This activity matrix is expressed as a percentage, ranging from 0 to 100, for each interval of temperature x humidity. The activity of these arthropods is defined by their ability to infest hosts, take blood meals and reproduce. For each arthropod, the matrix was calculated using existing data collected under optimal temperature and humidity conditions, as well as the timing of the life cycle. The mathematical model integrating both the WRF model (meteorological data + geographical data and the biological matrix provides two indexes: an

  15. Potential Roles of Pigs, Small Ruminants, Rodents, and Their Flea Vectors in Plague Epidemiology in Sinda District, Eastern Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Stanley S; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Kilonzo, Bukheti S; Kangwa, Henry L; Mulenga, Evans; Moonga, Ladslav

    2017-05-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Eastern part of Zambia that previously reported a plague outbreak. The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential role of pigs, goats, and sheep as sero-surveillance hosts for monitoring plague, and to investigate the flea vectors and potential reservoir hosts to establish the current status of plague endemicity in the district. Serum samples were collected from 96 rodents, 10 shrews, 245 domestic pigs, 232 goats, and 31 sheep, whereas 106 organs were eviscerated from rodents and shrews. As for fleas, 1,064 Echidnophaga larina Jordan & Rothschild, 7 Xenopsylla cheopis (Rothschild), and 382 Echidnophaga gallinacea (Westwood) were collected from these animals in 34 villages. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests were performed on serum, and organs and fleas to determine IgG antibodies against Fraction 1 antigen and pla gene of Yersinia pestis, respectively. ELISA results showed that 2.83% (95% CI = 0.59-8.05) rodents, 9.0% (95% CI = 5.71-13.28) domestic pigs, 4.7% (95% CI = 2.39-8.33) goats, and 3.2% (95% CI = 0.08-16.70) sheep were positive for IgG antibodies against Fra1 antigen of Y. pestis. On PCR, 8.4% (95% CI = 3.96-15.51) of the rodents were detected with Y. pestis pla gene, whereas all fleas were found negative. The common fleas identified were E. larina from pigs, whereas X. cheopis were the only fleas collected from rodents. The presence of sero-positive animals as well as the occurrence of X. cheopis on local rodents suggests that Y. pestis remains a risk in the district. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Prophylactic treatment of flea-infested cats with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar to forestall infection with Dipylidium caninum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fourie Josephus J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study was to determine the sustained effectiveness of 10% imidacloprid (w/w and 4.5% flumethrin (w/w incorporated in a slow-release matrix collar in preventing Dipylidium caninum infection in cats following repeated laboratory-infestations with fleas infected with metacestodes. Methods Efficacy against infection with D. caninum was evaluated by infesting 16 cats with the flea Ctenocephalides felis felis infected with metacestodes of the tapeworm. Medicated collars were fitted to 8 of the cats and infestation of each cat with 200 fleas from a suitably infected batch commenced 7 days later and continued at weekly intervals until Day 28. Efficacy against fleas was evaluated 24 h after each infestation. Infection of the cats with D. caninum was verified by daily examination of the cats’ faeces and immediate surroundings for proglottids from Day 21 to Day 60. Calculation of the prophylactic effectiveness of the collars in preventing infection of the cats with D. caninum was based on the difference in the geometric mean number of scoleces recovered from the gastrointestinal tracts of collared compared to untreated cats at necropsy on Day 61. Results Efficacy of the collars against infestation of the cats with fleas was 99.9% on Day 7 and 100% at each subsequent weekly assessment. Infection of the fleas with metacestodes was ≥40% in 7 to 13 day old fleas, but progressively decreased thereafter. At necropsy all the control cats were infected with D. caninum and harboured between 19 and 346 scoleces with a geometric mean of 58.3. A single treated cat was infected and harboured 2 scoleces. Effective prevention of infection with D. caninum, based on a comparison of the geometric mean numbers of scoleces recovered from control and treated cats, was 99.7%. Conclusion The insecticidal components of the medicated collars are capable of rapidly eliminating newly-acquired infestations of fleas that are infected

  17. Assessing transferable residues from intermittent exposure to flea control collars containing the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Janice E; Boone, J Scott; Davis, M Keith; Moran, John E; Tyler, John W

    2007-11-01

    Children can be exposed to pesticides from numerous residential sources such as carpet, house dust, toys and clothing from treated homes, and flea control remedies on pets. In the present studies, 48 pet dogs (24 in each of two studies) of different breeds and weights were treated with over-the-counter flea collars containing chlorpyrifos (CP), an organophosphorus insecticide. Transferable insecticide residues were quantified on cotton gloves used to rub the dogs for 5 min and on cotton tee shirts worn by a child (Study 2 only). First morning urine samples were also obtained from adults and children in both studies for metabolite (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) quantification. Blood samples were obtained from treated dogs in Study 1 and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was monitored. Transferable residues on gloves for all compounds were highest near the neck of the dogs and were lowest in areas most distant from the neck. Rubbing samples (over the collar) at two weeks post-collar application contained 447+/-57 microg CP/glove while samples from the fur of the back contained 8+/-2 microg CP/glove. In Study 2, cotton tee shirts worn by children at 15 days post-collar application for 4 h showed CP levels of 134+/-66 ng/g shirt. There were significant differences between adults and children in the levels of urinary metabolites with children generally having higher urinary levels of metabolites than adults (grand mean+/-SE; 11.6+/-1.1 and 7.9+/-0.74 ng/mg creatinine for children and adults, respectively, compared to 9.4+/-0.8 and 6.9+/-0.5 ng/mg creatinine before collar placement). Therefore, there was little evidence that the use of this flea collar contributed to enhanced CP exposure of either children or adults.

  18. Presence of Chlamydiales DNA in ticks and fleas suggests that ticks are carriers of Chlamydiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, Antony; Rieille, Nadia; Kernif, Tahar; Bitam, Idir; Aeby, Sébastien; Péter, Olivier; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-06-01

    The Chlamydiales order includes the Chlamydiaceae, Parachlamydiaceae, Waddliaceae, Simkaniaceae, Criblamydiaceae, Rhabdochlamydiaceae, Clavichlamydiaceae, and Piscichlamydiaceae families. Members of the Chlamydiales order are obligate intracellular bacteria that replicate within eukaryotic cells of different origins including humans, animals, and amoebae. Many of these bacteria are pathogens or emerging pathogens of both humans and animals, but their true diversity is largely underestimated, and their ecology remains to be investigated. Considering their potential threat on human health, it is important to expand our knowledge on the diversity of Chlamydiae, but also to define the host range colonized by these bacteria. Thus, using a new pan-Chlamydiales PCR, we analyzed the prevalence of Chlamydiales DNA in ticks and fleas, which are important vectors of several viral and bacterial infectious diseases. To conduct this study, 1340 Ixodes ricinus ticks prepared in 192 pools were collected in Switzerland and 55 other ticks belonging to different tick species and 97 fleas belonging to different flea species were harvested in Algeria. In Switzerland, the prevalence of Chlamydiales DNA in the 192 pools was equal to 28.1% (54/192) which represents an estimated prevalence in the 1340 individual ticks of between 4.0% and 28.4%. The pan-Chlamydiales qPCR was positive for 45% (25/55) of tick samples collected in Algeria. The sequencing of the positive qPCR amplicons revealed a high diversity of Chlamydiales species. Most of them belonged to the Rhabdochlamydiaceae and Parachlamydiaceae families. Thus, ticks may carry Chlamydiales and should thus be considered as possible vectors for Chlamydiales propagation to both humans and animals.

  19. New Flea and Tick Records for Mountain Lions in Southwestern Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Krausman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of ectoparasite ecology in wild felid populations is limited in free-ranging species and in regions such as Arizona. As part of a larger study, we collected ectoparasites from 4 radio-collared mountain lions (Puma concolor in Tucson, Arizona (32.189N -110.881E between January 2006 and December 2007. Ectoparasites were identified as Pulex, a genus of flea not commonly reported on mountain lions. The tick was a nymph of Argas (Alveonasus cooleyi, a species about which little is known.

  20. Speed of kill efficacy and efficacy of flavored spinosad tablets administered orally to cats in a simulated home environment for the treatment and prevention of cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Daniel E; Meyer, Katherine A; Wiseman, Scott; Trout, Candace M; Young, David R

    2013-09-23

    The efficacy of spinosad against adult fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) on cats was evaluated in two separate controlled, blinded studies-one to determine flea knockdown and speed of flea kill (SOFK) on experimentally infested cats, another to assess the ability of spinosad to prevent flea infestations in a simulated home environment (SHE) study design. In each study, pre-treatment live flea counts were used as a blocking factor to randomize cats to treatment, and treated in the fed state, with flavored tablets containing either no active ingredient (control) or spinosad (50-100mg/kg in the SOFK study; 50-75 mg/kg body weight in the SHE study). In the SOFK study, 6 cats per group were infested with unfed adult fleas on Day -1. Groups 1-5 received control tablets; groups 6-10 received spinosad tablets. Flea counts were conducted at 0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24h post-dosing. In the SHE study, 12 flea-free cats per group, treated on Days 0, 30 and 60, were maintained in solid-sided cages with solid carpeted floors. Each cat was infested on Days 1, 7 and 14 with 100 unfed adult fleas. Individual flea comb counts were performed on Days 3, 9, 16, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, 70, 77, 84, 91 and 95. After each count, except Day 95, up to 300 live fleas were replaced on each cat. To augment flea challenge, the carpeted area in each cage was sprinkled weekly with larval flea growth media (dried blood, yeast). In the SOFK study, reductions in mean flea counts in the spinosad groups were observed at all post-treatment assessments, beginning at 0.5h post-infestation with significant differences (p90%, through the final flea counts 24h post-infestation when no fleas were found on spinosad treated cats. In the SHE study, GM post-treatment flea counts in the control group ranged between 38.9 and 107.0 (arithmetic means 58.8-118.1); no live fleas were combed from spinosad-treated cats (100% effectiveness) at any time point post-treatment. No adverse events that were attributable to the

  1. The absence of concordant population genetic structure in the black-tailed prairie dog and the flea, Oropsylla hirsuta, with implications for the spread of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip H; Britten, Hugh B

    2010-05-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a keystone species on the mid- and short-grass prairies of North America. The species has suffered extensive colony extirpations and isolation as a result of human activity including the introduction of an exotic pathogen, Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of sylvatic plague. The prairie dog flea, Oropsylla hirsuta, is the most common flea on our study colonies in north-central Montana and it has been shown to carry Y. pestis. We used microsatellite markers to estimate the level of population genetic concordance between black-tailed prairie dogs and O. hirsuta in order to determine the extent to which prairie dogs are responsible for dispersing this potential plague vector among prairie dog colonies. We sampled fleas and prairie dogs from six prairie dog colonies in two regions separated by about 46 km. These colonies were extirpated by a plague epizootic that began months after our sampling was completed in 2005. Prairie dogs showed significant isolation-by-distance and a tendency toward genetic structure on the regional scale that the fleas did not. Fleas exhibited higher estimated rates of gene flow among prairie dog colonies than the prairie dogs sampled from the same colonies. While the findings suggested black-tailed prairie dogs may have contributed to flea dispersal, we attributed the lack of concordance between the population genetic structures of host and ectoparasite to additional flea dispersal that was mediated by mammals other than prairie dogs that were present in the prairie system.

  2. Efficacy of a Novel Topical Combination of Fipronil 9.8% and (S)-Methoprene 8.8% against Ticks and Fleas in Naturally Infested Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambi, Ayyanampakkam Pandurangan; Rathi, Badal; S, Kavitha; Dudhatra, Ghanshyam; Yamini, Hamsa S; Ali Bhat, Abid

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of a novel topical combination of fipronil 9.8% (w/v) and (S)-methoprene 8.8% (w/v) (Fiprofort® Plus) was tested against ticks and fleas in naturally infested dogs. A total of fifty dogs were allocated in the study with ticks infestation (n = 35) and fleas infestation (n = 15). On day 0, thirty-five tick and fifteen flea infested dogs received the test formulation, a combination of fipronil 9.8% (w/v) and (S)-methoprene 8.8% (w/v) spot-on solution. Ticks and flea counts were taken on days 0 (pretreatment) and 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 after treatment. Blood samples were collected for evaluation of haematological parameters on days 0 (pretreatment) and 7, 21, and 35 after treatment. All the adult ticks and fleas collected were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis, respectively. The efficacy of spot-on formulation against ticks was 34.00% (day 3), 53.14% (day 7), 62.71% (day 14), 65.48% (day 21), 59.80% (day 28), and 58.82% (day 35), whereas against fleas it was 38.00% (day 3), 64.34% (day 7), 89.67% (day 14), 95.40% (day 21), 100.00% (day 28), and 100.00% (day 35). Haematological parameters for ticks and fleas infested dogs were statistically nonsignificant as compared to control. The combination of fipronil and (S)-methoprene eliminated the existing ticks and fleas infestation and prevented the dogs from flea and tick infestation for four weeks.

  3. Efficacy of a Novel Topical Combination of Fipronil 9.8% and (S-Methoprene 8.8% against Ticks and Fleas in Naturally Infested Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyanampakkam Pandurangan Nambi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of a novel topical combination of fipronil 9.8% (w/v and (S-methoprene 8.8% (w/v (Fiprofort® Plus was tested against ticks and fleas in naturally infested dogs. A total of fifty dogs were allocated in the study with ticks infestation (n=35 and fleas infestation (n=15. On day 0, thirty-five tick and fifteen flea infested dogs received the test formulation, a combination of fipronil 9.8% (w/v and (S-methoprene 8.8% (w/v spot-on solution. Ticks and flea counts were taken on days 0 (pretreatment and 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 after treatment. Blood samples were collected for evaluation of haematological parameters on days 0 (pretreatment and 7, 21, and 35 after treatment. All the adult ticks and fleas collected were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis, respectively. The efficacy of spot-on formulation against ticks was 34.00% (day 3, 53.14% (day 7, 62.71% (day 14, 65.48% (day 21, 59.80% (day 28, and 58.82% (day 35, whereas against fleas it was 38.00% (day 3, 64.34% (day 7, 89.67% (day 14, 95.40% (day 21, 100.00% (day 28, and 100.00% (day 35. Haematological parameters for ticks and fleas infested dogs were statistically nonsignificant as compared to control. The combination of fipronil and (S-methoprene eliminated the existing ticks and fleas infestation and prevented the dogs from flea and tick infestation for four weeks.

  4. Neuroanatomy of the optic ganglia and central brain of the water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Timm; Harzsch, Steffen; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2016-03-01

    We reveal the neuroanatomy of the optic ganglia and central brain in the water flea Daphnia magna by use of classical neuroanatomical techniques such as semi-thin sectioning and neuronal backfilling, as well as immunohistochemical markers for synapsins, various neuropeptides and the neurotransmitter histamine. We provide structural details of distinct neuropiles, tracts and commissures, many of which were previously undescribed. We analyse morphological details of most neuron types, which allow for unravelling the connectivities between various substructural parts of the optic ganglia and the central brain and of ascending and descending connections with the ventral nerve cord. We identify 5 allatostatin-A-like, 13 FMRFamide-like and 5 tachykinin-like neuropeptidergic neuron types and 6 histamine-immunoreactive neuron types. In addition, novel aspects of several known pigment-dispersing hormone-immunoreactive neurons are re-examined. We analyse primary and putative secondary olfactory pathways and neuronal elements of the water flea central complex, which displays both insect- and decapod crustacean-like features, such as the protocerebral bridge, central body and lateral accessory lobes. Phylogenetic aspects based upon structural comparisons are discussed as well as functional implications envisaging more specific future analyses of ecotoxicological and endocrine disrupting environmental chemicals.

  5. Comparison of Two Techniques for the Detection of Flea Faeces in Canine and Feline Coat Brushings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Cadiergues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flea infestation is diagnosed after the detection of either adult parasites or flea faeces in the fur. The latter is generally tested with the wet blotting paper technique (WBPT. However, microscopical examination (MT of the coat brushing material is sometimes suggested as an alternative. This study aimed to compare the efficiency of the two techniques. In dogs, the entire body was hand-brushed and cats were combed. One half of the collected material was mounted in liquid paraffin on a glass slide and examined microscopically at low magnification. The second half was placed on a blotting paper and sterile water was added. After drying, reddish aureoles were counted. 255 animals (158 dogs and 97 cats were included. 119 (47% and 94 (37% samples were revealed to be positive with WBPT and MT, respectively. 13 cases (5% were positive with MT only and 38 cases (15% were positive with WBPT only. 81 cases (32% were positive and 123 (48% were negative with both techniques. More positive cases were detected by WBPT than MT (P<0.001. Amongst the 51 samples which were found positive with a sole technique, infestation was considered low in 43 cases and WBPT detected significantly more positive samples (31 than MT (12, P<0.01.

  6. High prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella species in rats and fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laudisoit, A.; Falay, D.; Amundala, N.; de Bellock, J.G.; van Houtte, N.; Breno, M.; Verheven, E.; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, P.; Raoult, D.; C., Socolovschi

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the co

  7. Assessment of the onset of action of afoxolaner against existing adult flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestations on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Bruce N; Drag, Marlene D; Chester, Theodore S; Larsen, Diane L

    2014-04-02

    The speed of kill of afoxolaner against experimental infestations by Ctenocephalides felis was evaluated after oral administration of afoxolaner in a soft chew (NEXGARD(®)) at a dose to achieve 2.5mg/kg bodyweight. Forty beagles were allocated to two treatment groups. Dogs in Treatment Group 1 were untreated controls. Dogs in Treatment Group 2 were treated on Day-0 with afoxolaner, according to their pre-treatment bodyweight. All dogs were infested with approximately 100 C. felis on Day-1. Live fleas were counted upon removal at 5 time points after treatment (i.e., 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24h after treatment). For each time point, counts were performed on 4 dogs from each of the treated and the untreated groups. Early curative flea killing efficacy was evaluated with respect to the untreated control group. The afoxolaner treated group had significantly fewer fleas than the untreated control group at 8, 12, and 24h (pafoxolaner were 15.0%, 87.8%, 99.5%, 100.0%, and 100.0% at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24h, respectively. In this study, afoxolaner began killing fleas by 2h after treatment with increasing efficacy at subsequent time points and had >99.5% efficacy at 8, 12, and 24h after treatment demonstrating an early onset of action.

  8. Pleiotropic effects associated with an allele enabling the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum to use Barbarea vulgaris as a host plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuker, C.J.; Jong, de P.W.; Victoir, K.; Vrieling, K.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Danish region of Kværkeby, a mutation in an, as yet, unknown single autosomal gene has resulted in a dominant resistance (R-) allele in the flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae). It enables the beetle to overcome the defences of Barbarea vulgaris ssp. arcua

  9. Effect of temperature on reproduction and embryonic development of the cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L., (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle; Sørensen, Helle; Bligaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of winter oilseed rape. Despite the importance of this pest, detailed information on reproduction to predict risk of crop damage is lacking. This study investigates the effect of temperature...

  10. AFLP markers for the R-gene in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum, conferring resistance to defenses in Barbarea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuker, C.J.; Victoir, K.; Jong, de P.W.; Meijden, van der E.; Brakefield, P.M.; Vrieling, K.

    2005-01-01

    A so-called R-gene renders the yellow-striped flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae) resistant to the defenses of the yellow rocket Barbarea vulgaris R.Br. (Brassicacea) and enables it to use it as a host plant in Denmark. In this study, genetic markers for an auto

  11. Integrated control of ticks and fleas on dogs with particular reference to the prevention of vector-borne diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Because dogs are such loved companion animals, their health and wellbeing is of great importance to their human companions. Moreover, controlling ticks and fleas on dogs is also important in respect of the zoonotic risk that some of these parasites pose to their human companions. Numerous products a

  12. Evaluation of fluralaner and afoxolaner treatments to control flea populations, reduce pruritus and minimize dermatologic lesions in naturally infested dogs in private residences in west central Florida USA

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Michael W.; Canfield, Michael S.; Kalosy, Kimberly; Smith, Amber; Crevoiserat, Lisa; McGrady, Jennifer C.; Foley, Kaitlin M.; Green, Kathryn; Tebaldi, Chantelle; Smith, Vicki; Bennett, Tashina; Heaney, Kathleen; Math, Lisa; Royal, Christine; Sun, Fangshi

    2016-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two different oral flea and tick products to control flea infestations, reduce pruritus and minimize dermatologic lesions over a 12 week period on naturally infested dogs in west central FL USA. Methods Thirty-four dogs with natural flea infestations living in 17 homes were treated once with a fluralaner chew on study day 0. Another 27 dogs living in 17 different homes were treated orally with an afoxolaner chewable...

  13. A field trial of a fixed combination of permethrin and fipronil (Effitix(®)) for the treatment and prevention of flea infestation in dogs living with sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzis, Manolis K; Psemmas, Dimitris; Papadopoulos, Elias; Navarro, Christelle; Saridomichelakis, Manolis N

    2017-04-28

    A large number of fleas parasitize dogs living with sheep in Greece. The primary aim of this randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to examine the efficacy of a permethrin-fipronil combination (Effitix(®)) for the treatment and prevention of flea infestation in dogs living with sheep and the secondary aim was to examine the efficacy of this intervention on flea infestation, pruritus and skin lesions of the people in contact with these dogs. Thirty dogs living with sheep and infested by at least 10 fleas and all 80 sheep living on the same premises were randomly allocated into equal groups. Group A dogs were treated three times, every 4 weeks, with a spot-on containing 54.5% permethrin and 6.1% fipronil, group A sheep were treated, on the same days, with a pour-on containing 1% deltamethrin, whereas group B dogs were sham-treated and group B sheep were placebo-treated. Flea counting was performed at the beginning of the trial (day 0) and after 14, 28, 56 and 84 days and the first five fleas from each animal were used for species identification. At the same time points, flea infestation, pruritus and skin lesions of the people in contact with the dogs were assessed. The percentage of dogs with zero flea counts was significantly higher in group A than in group B on days 14, 28, 56 and 84 and flea counts were significantly lower in group A dogs than in group B dogs at the same time points. The percent efficacy of the permethrin-fipronil combination was higher than 78% (arithmetic means) or than 96% (geometric means) throughout the study. No adverse reactions were recorded. Between the two flea species found on dogs, Ctenocephalides canis was predominant over C. felis. Flea-infected sheep were not found at the beginning or during the study and no significant changes in flea infestation, pruritus and skin lesions of the people in contact with the dogs were witnessed throughout the study. A spot-on solution containing 54.5% permethrin and 6.1% fipronil is

  14. Probing the spatial cluster of Meriones unguiculatus using the nest flea index based on GIS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Dafang; Du, Haiwen; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Xiaosan; Shi, Xianming; Yan, Dong

    2016-11-01

    The nest flea index of Meriones unguiculatus is a critical indicator for the prevention and control of plague, which can be used not only to detect the spatial and temporal distributions of Meriones unguiculatus, but also to reveal its cluster rule. This study used global spatial autocorrelation and spatial hot spot detection methods to describe the relationship between different years and the autocorrelation coefficient of nest flea indexes; it also used a spatial detection method and GIS technology to detect the spatial gathered hot spot of Meriones unguiculatus in the epidemic areas. The results of this study showed that (1) there were statistically significant spatial autocorrelations in the nest flea indexes in 2006, 2012, 2013 and 2014. (2) Most of the distribution patterns of Meriones unguiculatus were statistically significant clusters of high values. (3) There were some typical hot spot regions of plague distributed along the Inner Mongolia plateau, north of China. (4) The hot spot regions of plague were gradually stabilized after increasing and decreasing repeatedly. Generally speaking, the number of hot spot regions showed an accelerated increase from 2005 to 2007, decreased slowly from 2007 to 2008, rapidly increased again after decreasing slowly from 2008 to 2010, showed an accelerated decrease from 2010 to 2011, and ultimately were stabilized after rapidly increasing again from 2011 to 2014. (5) The migration period of the hot spot regions was 2-3 years. The epidemic area of plague moved from southwest to east during 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2010, from east to southwest during 2007 and 2008, from east to west during 2010 and 2011, and from Midwest to east during 2011 and 2014. (6) Effective factors, such as temperature, rainfall, DEM, host density, and NDVI, can affect the spatial cluster of Meriones unguiculatus. The results of this study have important implications for exploring the temporal and spatial distribution law and distribution of the hot spot

  15. Assessing intermittent pesticide exposure from flea control collars containing the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M Keith; Boone, J Scott; Moran, John E; Tyler, John W; Chambers, Janice E

    2008-11-01

    Fleas are a persistent problem for pets that require implementation of control measures. Consequently, pesticide use by homeowners for flea control is common and may increase pesticide exposure for adults and children. Fifty-five pet dogs (23 in study 1; 22 in study 2) of different breeds and weights were treated with over-the-counter flea collars containing tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP). During study 1, fur of treated dogs was monitored for transferable TCVP residues using cotton gloves to pet the dogs during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was also measured in treated dogs. Average amounts of TCVP transferred from the fur of the neck (rubbing over the collar) and from the back to gloves at 3 days post-collar application were 23,700+/-2100 and 260+/-50 microg/glove, respectively. No inhibition of plasma ChE was observed. During study 2, transferable TCVP residues to cotton gloves were monitored during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Transferable residues were also monitored on cotton tee shirts worn by children and in the first morning urine samples obtained from adults and children. Average amounts of TCVP transferred to gloves at 5 days post-collar application from the neck (over the collar) and from the back were 22,400+/-2900 and 80+/-20 microg/glove, respectively. Tee shirts worn by children on days 7-11 contained 1.8+/-0.8 microg TCVP/g shirt. No significant differences were observed between adults and children in urinary 2,4,5-trichloromandelic acid (TCMA) levels; however, all TCMA residues (adults and children) were significantly greater than pretreatment concentrations (alpha=0.05). The lack of ChE inhibition in dogs and the low acute toxicity level of TCVP (rat oral LD(50) of 4-5 g/kg) strongly suggest that TCVP is rapidly detoxified and excreted and therefore poses a very low toxicological risk, despite these high residues.

  16. A randomized, blinded, controlled and multi-centered field study comparing the efficacy and safety of Bravecto (fluralaner) against Frontline (fipronil) in flea- and tick-infested dogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohdich, Nadja; Roepke, Rainer K A; Zschiesche, Eva

    2014-01-01

    ...) formulated as a chewable tablet or with three sequential topical Frontline (fipronil) treatments. Individual dogs were the experimental unit for ticks and households were the experimental unit for fleas...

  17. Myxomatosis: passive immunity in the offspring of immune rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) infested with fleas (Spilopsyllus cuniculi Dale) and exposed to myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobey, W R; Conolly, D

    1975-02-01

    Kittens with maternal antibodies to myxoma virus, the offspring of rabbits which had recovered from myxomatosis, were exposed to fleas contaminated with myxoma virus and/or contact with infected rabbits from birth. All kittens died or became infected before 8 weeks of age. When compared with adult animals similarly infected the kittens showed no advantage in terms of survival time or recovery rate attributable to maternal antibodies. Flea transmission of virus was found more effective than contact transmissions.

  18. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimerink Johan R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Awareness for flea- and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The role of Ixodes ricinus ticks in the natural cycle of Bartonella spp. and the transmission of these bacteria to humans is unclear. Rickettsia spp. have also been reported from as well ticks as also from fleas. However, to date no flea-borne Rickettsia spp. were reported from the Netherlands. Here, the presence of Bartonellaceae and Rickettsiae in ectoparasites was investigated using molecular detection and identification on part of the gltA- and 16S rRNA-genes. Results The zoonotic Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis were detected for the first time in Dutch cat fleas. B. henselae was found in cat fleas and B. schoenbuchensis in ticks and keds feeding on deer. Two Bartonella species, previously identified in rodents, were found in wild mice and their fleas. However, none of these microorganisms were found in 1719 questing Ixodes ricinus ticks. Notably, the gltA gene amplified from DNA lysates of approximately 10% of the questing nymph and adult ticks was similar to that of an uncultured Bartonella-related species found in other hard tick species. The gltA gene of this Bartonella-related species was also detected in questing larvae for which a 16S rRNA gene PCR also tested positive for "Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii". The gltA-gene of the Bartonella-related species found in I. ricinus may therefore be from this endosymbiont. Conclusions We conclude that the risk of acquiring Cat Scratch Disease or a related bartonellosis from questing ticks in the Netherlands is negligible. On the other hand fleas and deer keds are probable vectors for associated Bartonella species between animals and might also transmit Bartonella spp. to humans.

  19. Myxomatosis: passive immunity in the offspring of immune rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) infested with fleas (Spilopsyllus cuniculi Dale) and exposed to myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobey, W. R.; Conolly, D.

    1975-01-01

    Kittens with maternal antibodies to myxoma virus, the offspring of rabbits which had recovered from myxomatosis, were exposed to fleas contaminated with myxoma virus and/or contact with infected rabbits from birth. All kittens died or became infected before 8 weeks of age. When compared with adult animals similarly infected the kittens showed no advantage in terms of survival time or recovery rate attributable to maternal antibodies. Flea transmission of virus was found more effective than contact transmissions. PMID:1054058

  20. A LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator, RovM, Senses Nutritional Cues Suggesting that It Is Involved in Metabolic Adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the Flea Gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has evolved as a clonal variant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause flea-borne biofilm-mediated transmission of the bubonic plague. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, RovM, is highly induced only during Y. pestis infection of the flea host. RovM homologs in other pathogens regulate biofilm formation, nutrient sensing, and virulence; including in Y. pseudotuberculosis, where RovM represses the major virulence factor, RovA. Here the role that RovM plays during flea infection was investigated using a Y. pestis KIM6+ strain deleted of rovM, ΔrovM. The ΔrovM mutant strain was not affected in characteristic biofilm gut blockage, growth, or survival during single infection of fleas. Nonetheless, during a co-infection of fleas, the ΔrovM mutant exhibited a significant competitive fitness defect relative to the wild type strain. This competitive fitness defect was restored as a fitness advantage relative to the wild type in a ΔrovM mutant complemented in trans to over-express rovM. Consistent with this, Y. pestis strains, producing elevated transcriptional levels of rovM, displayed higher growth rates, and differential ability to form biofilm in response to specific nutrients in comparison to the wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that rovA was not repressed by RovM in fleas, but that elevated transcriptional levels of rovM in vitro correlated with repression of rovA under specific nutritional conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that RovM likely senses specific nutrient cues in the flea gut environment, and accordingly directs metabolic adaptation to enhance flea gut colonization by Y. pestis.

  1. Analysis of expressed sequence tags of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hajime; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Oda, Shigeto; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Morita, Masatoshi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2005-08-01

    To study gene expression in the water flea Daphnia magna we constructed a cDNA library and characterized the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of 7210 clones. The EST sequences clustered into 2958 nonredundant groups. BLAST analyses of both protein and DNA databases showed that 1218 (41%) of the unique sequences shared significant similarities to known nucleotide or amino acid sequences, whereas the remaining 1740 (59%) showed no significant similarities to other genes. Clustering analysis revealed particularly high expression of genes related to ATP synthesis, structural proteins, and proteases. The cDNA clones and EST sequence information should be useful for future functional analysis of daphnid biology and investigation of the links between ecology and genomics.

  2. First report for the seasonal and annual prevalence of flea-borne bartonella from rodents and soricomorphs in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Baek-Jun; Kim, Su-Jin; Kang, Jun-Gu; Ko, Sungjin; Won, Sohyun; Kim, Hyewon; Kim, Heung-Chul; Kim, Myung-Soon; Chong, Sung-Tae; Klein, Terry A; Lee, Sanghun; Chae, Joon-Seok

    2013-07-01

    Rodents and soricomorphs are animal hosts of fleas and associated zoonotic microbial pathogens. A total of 4,889 small mammals were collected from Gyeonggi and Gangwon Provinces, Republic of Korea, from 2008 through 2010, including: Apodemus agrarius (4,122, 84.3%), followed by Crocidura lasiura (282, 5.8%), Microtus fortis (257, 5.3%), Myodes regulus (77, 1.6%), Micromys minutus (71, 1.5%), Mus musculus (63, 1.3%), and 4 other species (17, 0.3%). A total of 1,099 fleas belonging to 10 species and 7 genera were collected. Ctenophthalmus congeneroides (724, 65.9%) was the most commonly collected flea, followed by Stenoponia sidimi (301, 27.4%), Neopsylla bidentatiformis (29, 2.6%), and Rhadinopsylla insolita (25, 2.3%). The remaining species accounted for only 1.8% (20, range 1-6) of all fleas collected. The 2 dominant flea species, C. congeneroides and S. sidimi, showed an inverse seasonal pattern, with higher populations of C. congeneroides from January-September, whereas S. sidimi was more frequently collected during October-December. The overall flea infestation rates (FIR) and flea indices (FI) were 14.1% and 0.22, respectively, and were highest during April-June (19.7% and 0.30, respectively). A total of 735 of the 1,099 fleas were assayed for the detection of Bartonella spp. by PCR using Bartonella-specific primers, of which 515 were positive for Bartonella, with an overall maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of 700.7/1,000. The highest MLE values were observed during April-June (899.2) and July-September (936.2) trapping periods and, although lower, were similar for January-March (566.7) and October-December (574.1). C. congeneroides demonstrated high MLEs for all seasons (range 752.5-934.8), while S. sidimi was positive for Bartonella only during January-March (MLE=342.1) and October-December (MLE=497.2) collection periods. Continued long-term surveillance of small mammals and associated ectoparasites is needed to improve our understanding of the prevalence

  3. Preventive efficacy of Frontline® Combo and Certifect® against Dipylidium caninum infestation of cats and dogs using a natural flea (Ctenocephalides felis infestation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of two monthly topical anti-flea products for the prevention of Dipylidium caninum infestations in cats and dogs. A single treatment with Frontline® Combo spot-on for cats (fipronil-(S-methoprene and two successive monthly treatments of Certifect® for dogs (fipronil-amitraz-(S-methoprene were assessed for the prevention of D. caninum infestations following weekly challenges of treated cats or dogs with metacestode naturally-infected fleas. The rate of infestations using the model in cats versus dogs explains the choice of a 1-month trial in cats and a 2-month trial in dogs. The experimental flea-infection model resulted in a range of 22–53% of the fleas being infected by Dipylidium cysticercoids. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated cats ranged from 51.2 to 68. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Frontline Combo treated cats differed significantly (p < 0.05 from those of the untreated control cats on all assessment days. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated dogs ranged from 166.6 to 238.6. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Certifect treated dogs differed significantly (p < 0.001 from those of the untreated group on all assessment days. Frontline Combo treatment on cats provided ≥99.8% persistent anti-flea efficacy throughout the 30-day treatment period. In the dog study, the two Certifect treatments provided ≥97% persistent efficacy throughout the 60-day study. Based on the collection of expelled D. caninum proglottids by cats, 100% (6/6 of the control cats and 0% (0/6 of Frontline Combo treated cats were infested with D. caninum. Frontline Combo spot-on for cats was therefore 100% effective in preventing infection with D. caninum. In dogs, 7 out of the 8 control group dogs (87.5% produced proglottids following infestation of infected fleas, whereas 0 out of 8 dogs (0% in the treated group were infected. The

  4. Preventive efficacy of Frontline® Combo and Certifect® against Dipylidium caninum infestation of cats and dogs using a natural flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnet, Frederic; Delport, Peet; Luus, Hermann; Crafford, Dione; Fourie, Josephus

    2013-01-01

    Two studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of two monthly topical anti-flea products for the prevention of Dipylidium caninum infestations in cats and dogs. A single treatment with Frontline® Combo spot-on for cats (fipronil-(S)-methoprene) and two successive monthly treatments of Certifect® for dogs (fipronil-amitraz-(S)-methoprene) were assessed for the prevention of D. caninum infestations following weekly challenges of treated cats or dogs with metacestode naturally-infected fleas. The rate of infestations using the model in cats versus dogs explains the choice of a 1-month trial in cats and a 2-month trial in dogs. The experimental flea-infection model resulted in a range of 22–53% of the fleas being infected by Dipylidium cysticercoids. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated cats ranged from 51.2 to 68. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Frontline Combo treated cats differed significantly (p cats on all assessment days. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated dogs ranged from 166.6 to 238.6. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Certifect treated dogs differed significantly (p cats provided ≥99.8% persistent anti-flea efficacy throughout the 30-day treatment period. In the dog study, the two Certifect treatments provided ≥97% persistent efficacy throughout the 60-day study. Based on the collection of expelled D. caninum proglottids by cats, 100% (6/6) of the control cats and 0% (0/6) of Frontline Combo treated cats were infested with D. caninum. Frontline Combo spot-on for cats was therefore 100% effective in preventing infection with D. caninum. In dogs, 7 out of the 8 control group dogs (87.5%) produced proglottids following infestation of infected fleas, whereas 0 out of 8 dogs (0%) in the treated group were infected. The infection rates of the two groups were significantly different. The percent effectiveness for the Certifect treatment group for the prevention of D

  5. High prevalence of Rickettsia typhi and Bartonella species in rats and fleas, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudisoit, Anne; Falay, Dadi; Amundala, Nicaise; Akaibe, Dudu; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy; Van Houtte, Natalie; Breno, Matteo; Verheyen, Erik; Wilschut, Liesbeth; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; Socolovschi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence and identity of Rickettsia and Bartonella in urban rat and flea populations were evaluated in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by molecular tools. An overall prevalence of 17% Bartonella species and 13% Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in the cosmopolitan rat species, Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus that were infested by a majority of Xenopsylla cheopis fleas. Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella elizabethae, and three Bartonella genotypes were identified by sequencing in rat specimens, mostly in R. rattus. Rickettsia typhi was detected in 72% of X. cheopis pools, the main vector and reservoir of this zoonotic pathogen. Co-infections were observed in rodents, suggesting a common mammalian host shared by R. typhi and Bartonella spp. Thus, both infections are endemic in DRC and the medical staffs need to be aware knowing the high prevalence of impoverished populations or immunocompromised inhabitants in this area.

  6. Feeding by flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; Phyllotreta spp.) is decreased on canola (Brassica napus) seedlings with increased trichome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Juliana J; Holowachuk, Jennifer M; Gruber, Margaret Y; Grenkow, Larry F

    2011-02-01

    Laboratory and field studies were undertaken to determine the effects of increased numbers of trichomes on seedling stems, petioles, and first true leaves of Brassica napus L., canola, on the feeding and behavior of the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Seedlings of 'Westar' canola with genes inserted from Arabidopsis thaliana L. for increased trichome production, called Hairyl, were tested against Westar seedlings in no-choice and choice laboratory tests, and against parental plants and other cultivars grown from seed with and without insecticide in field trials at Saskatoon and Lethbridge, Canada. Analyses ofprefeeding and feeding behavior in no-choice tests of first true leaves found that flea beetles interacted with their host while off Hairyl leaves more so than beetles presented with leaves of Westar. Beetles required twice as much time to reach satiation when feeding on leaves with increased pubescence than on Westar leaves. In laboratory choice tests, flea beetles fed more on cotyledons and second true leaves of Westar than on comparable tissues of the transgenic line. In field trials, variations in feeding patterns were seen over time on cotyledons of the line with elevated trichomes. However, all four young true leaves of Hairyl seedlings were fed upon less than were the parental lines. Feeding on Hairyl plants frequently occurred at levels equal to or less than on cultivars grown from insecticide-treated seed. This study highlights the first host plant resistance trait developed in canola, dense pubescence, with a strong potential to deter feeding by crucifer flea beetles.

  7. First Record of the European Rusted Flea Beetle, Neocrepidodera ferruginea (Scopoli, 1763, in North America (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent LeSage

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The European rusted flea beetle Neocrepidodera ferruginea (Scopoli, 1763 is reported for the first time from Québec and Ontario, Canada. It was likely introduced into southern Ontario at an international port on the Great Lakes in early 1970s, or possibly earlier in the 1960s. However, the exact location and date of introduction could not be precisely determined. The flea beetle has since dispersed northeastwards and reached Aylmer, north of Ottawa River, in Québec, by 2003. This is about 375 km from Niagara Falls, where the oldest known specimens were collected in 1977. In 2009, various wild habitats and cultivated areas of Aylmer were surveyed. The host plants of the larvae could not be determined, but adults were swept from many plant species including various weeds and cultivated grasses: Alopecurus pratense (meadow foxtail, Dactylis glomerata (orchard-grass, Festuca rubra (red fescue-grass, and Poa pratensis (Kentucky blue-grass. Adults were also collected from flowers of several weeds: Aster sp. (undetermined species, Aster novae-angliae (New England aster, Ambrosia artemisiifolia (small ragweed, Echium vulgare (viper’s bugloss, Nasturtium officinale (water cress, Melilotus alba (white sweet-clover, Hypericum perforatum (common St. John’s-wort, Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife, Ranunculus acris (buttercup, and Solidago spp. (goldenrods. Since larvae are known to develop inside the roots and central stems of cereals, this new alien species represents a threat to Canadian agriculture, particularly if it reaches the Prairies in western Canada, where cereals represent a considerable part of their economy. European rusted flea beetle and Altise ferrugineuse européenne are suggested for the English and French common names of this flea beetle, respectively.

  8. Pulga (Flea Market) Contributions to the Retail Food Environment of Colonias in the South Texas Border Region

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Wesley R; Joseph R. Sharkey; St. John, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Accounts of the retail food environment have been limited by research that focused on supermarkets, grocery stores and restaurants as the principal food sources for consumers. Little is known about alternative retail food-sources, especially in rural and underserved areas such as the colonias along the South Texas border with Mexico. Many colonias are located near pulgas (flea markets). This is the first study to examine this alternative food source for colonia residents. This study's purpose...

  9. Monitoring field susceptibility to imidacloprid in the cat flea: a world-first initiative twelve years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Steven; Blagburn, Byron; Coleman, Glen; Davis, Wendell; Denholm, Ian; Field, Chris; Hostetler, Joe; Mencke, Norbert; Rees, Robert; Rust, Michael; Schroeder, Iris; Tetzner, Kathrin; Williamson, Martin

    2013-08-01

    In 2001, an international surveillance initiative was established, utilising a validated larval development inhibition assay to track the susceptibility of cat flea isolates to imidacloprid. In 2009, an Australian node was incorporated into the programme, joining laboratories in the United States and Europe. Field isolates of Ctenocephalides felis eggs were submitted to participating laboratories and, where egg quantity and quality was sufficient, were placed in the imidacloprid discriminating dose bioassay for evaluation. Between 2002 and 2012, a total of 2,307 cat flea isolates were received across all sites; 1,685 submissions (73 %) were suitable for placement into the bioassay. In the Northern Hemisphere, isolate submission rate was influenced by season, with highest numbers submitted between June and October. In Australia, pets with flea infestations could be sourced year-round, and submission rate was largely influenced by programme factors and not climate. A total of 1,367 valid assays were performed between 2002 and 2012 (assay validity data was not recorded in 2001); adult flea emergence 5 % or greater at 3 ppm imidacloprid was observed in 38 of these assays (2.8 %). For these isolates that reached the threshold for further investigation, re-conduct of the assay using either a repeat challenge dose of 3 ppm of imidacloprid or a dose response probit analysis confirmed their susceptibility to imidacloprid. From 2009 to 2012, the Australian node performed valid assays on 97 field isolates from a total of 136 submissions, with no adult emergence observed at the 3-ppm imidacloprid discriminating dose. In addition to reviewing the data generated by this twelve-year initiative, this paper discusses lessons learned from the coordination and evolution of a complex project across geographically dispersed laboratories on three continents.

  10. Silencing urease: a key evolutionary step that facilitated the adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the flea-borne transmission route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouikha, Iman; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2014-12-30

    The arthropod-borne transmission route of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, is a recent evolutionary adaptation. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the closely related food-and water-borne enteric species from which Y. pestis diverged less than 6,400 y ago, exhibits significant oral toxicity to the flea vectors of plague, whereas Y. pestis does not. In this study, we identify the Yersinia urease enzyme as the responsible oral toxin. All Y. pestis strains, including those phylogenetically closest to the Y. pseudotuberculosis progenitor, contain a mutated ureD allele that eliminated urease activity. Restoration of a functional ureD was sufficient to make Y. pestis orally toxic to fleas. Conversely, deletion of the urease operon in Y. pseudotuberculosis rendered it nontoxic. Enzymatic activity was required for toxicity. Because urease-related mortality eliminates 30-40% of infective flea vectors, ureD mutation early in the evolution of Y. pestis was likely subject to strong positive selection because it significantly increased transmission potential.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Heather A; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-12-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North American Great Plains whose populations are extirpated by plague, a flea-vectored, bacterial disease. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, we determined that fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta) associated with prairie dogs feed upon northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster), a rodent that has been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of plague in prairie-dog colonies. Our results definitively show that grasshopper mice not only share fleas with prairie dogs during plague epizootics, but also provide them with blood meals, offering a mechanism by which the pathogen, Yersinia pestis, may be transmitted between host species and maintained between epizootics. The lack of identifiable host DNA in a significant fraction of engorged Oropsylla hirsuta collected from animals (47%) and prairie-dog burrows (100%) suggests a rapid rate of digestion and feeding that may facilitate disease transmission during epizootics but also complicate efforts to detect feeding on alternative hosts. Combined with other analytical approaches, e.g., stable isotope analysis, molecular genetic techniques can provide novel insights into host-parasite feeding relationships and improve our understanding of the role of alternative hosts in the transmission and maintenance of disease. © 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  12. Silencing urease: A key evolutionary step that facilitated the adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the flea-borne transmission route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouikha, Iman; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The arthropod-borne transmission route of Yersinia pestis, the bacterial agent of plague, is a recent evolutionary adaptation. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, the closely related food-and water-borne enteric species from which Y. pestis diverged less than 6,400 y ago, exhibits significant oral toxicity to the flea vectors of plague, whereas Y. pestis does not. In this study, we identify the Yersinia urease enzyme as the responsible oral toxin. All Y. pestis strains, including those phylogenetically closest to the Y. pseudotuberculosis progenitor, contain a mutated ureD allele that eliminated urease activity. Restoration of a functional ureD was sufficient to make Y. pestis orally toxic to fleas. Conversely, deletion of the urease operon in Y. pseudotuberculosis rendered it nontoxic. Enzymatic activity was required for toxicity. Because urease-related mortality eliminates 30–40% of infective flea vectors, ureD mutation early in the evolution of Y. pestis was likely subject to strong positive selection because it significantly increased transmission potential. PMID:25453069

  13. Impact of decreasing ratios of insecticide-treated seed on flea beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Phyllotreta spp.) feeding levels and canola seed yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Juliana J; Grenkow, Larry F; Irvine, R Byron

    2008-12-01

    Field studies were conducted at two locations on the Canadian prairies to investigate use of reduced ratios of insecticide-treated seed in controlling flea beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Phyllotreta spp.) damage to canola (Brassica napus L. and Brassica rapa L.). Five treatments were evaluated: bare seed control, fungicide-only (0X), and three ratios of insecticide plus fungicide in proportions of all (1X), two thirds (0.67X), or one third (0.33X) of the seeds coated with insecticide. Decreasing treated seed ratios by one third had no consistent deleterious effects on flea beetle damage, seedling growth, plant density, seed yield, or net cash return. Flea beetle injury to seedlings in the 1X treatment was similar to that of seedlings in the 0.67X treatment, with only two exceptions, and it was almost always lower than that of seedlings without insecticide. The 0.33X treatment generally had flea beetle feeding levels between those of the two high and the two noninsecticide treatments. Plant stand and seedling growth rates with 1X and 0.67X treatments were similar and higher than with bare seed or fungicide-alone treatments. Seed yields were inversely proportional to flea beetle feeding levels. Under very heavy flea beetle feeding, seed yields and net cash returns were highest in 1X plots, but when flea beetle feeding pressure was less extreme and canola growing conditions were favorable, 0.67X seed yields and profits from them were comparable to those in 1X treatments. On an economic basis, currently there is no advantage to decreasing the level of insecticide treated canola seed, but other considerations may affect this assessment.

  14. Assessment of the efficacy of a topical combination of fipronil-permethrin (Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect® against egg laying and adult emergence of the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the prevention of egg laying and the inhibition of the emergence of the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis resulting from the application of a combination of fipronil and permethrin (Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect®, Merial on dogs. Sixteen healthy dogs were included after pre-treatment live flea counts and randomly allocated to two groups. Eight dogs served as untreated controls and 8 dogs were treated on Day 0 and Day 30 with topical application of fipronil/permethrin at the minimum dose of 6.76 mg/kg fipronil and 50.48 mg/kg permethrin. On days −2, 7, 21, 28, 42 and 56, each dog was infested with 100 fleas. Flea eggs were collected from each dog in individual trays from 12 to 36 h after treatment or each flea re-infestation. All fleas were removed by combing and counted 36 h after treatment or infestations. The collected eggs were counted and incubated for 28 days for larval development and adult emergence assessment. The curative efficacy of Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect® against adult fleas 36 h after treatment was 95.3% and the efficacy remained 100% after subsequent flea infestations for 8 weeks. Compared to the control group, the treatment reduced egg laying by 84.5% within 36 h after first treatment and was 99.9%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 100% on collection days 7, 21, 29, 43 and 57, respectively. Frontline Tri-Act®/Frontect® reduced by 28.7% the emergence of new adult fleas from eggs laid during the 48 h of pre-treatment infestation. The inhibition of adult emergence from incubated flea eggs could not be assessed after flea re-infestation in the treated group as no eggs were collected.

  15. Efficacy of imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin topical solutions against the KS1 Ctenocephalides felis flea strain infesting cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dryden Michael W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two studies were conducted to evaluate and compare the efficacy of imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin topical solutions against the KS1 flea strain infesting cats. In both studies the treatment groups were comprised of non-treated controls, 6% w/v selamectin (Revolution®; Pfizer Animal Health topical solution and 10% w/v imidacloprid + 1% w/v moxidectin (Advantage Multi® for Cats, Bayer Animal Health topical solution. All cats were infested with 100 fleas on Days -2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. The difference in the studies was that in study #1 efficacy evaluations were conducted at 24 and 48 hours post-treatment or post-infestation, and in study #2 evaluations were conducted at 12 and 24 hours. Results In study #1 imidacloprid + moxidectin and the selamectin formulation provided 99.8% and 99.0% efficacy at 24 hours post-treatment. On day 28, the 24 hour efficacy of the selamectin formulation dropped to 87.1%, whereas the imidacloprid + moxidectin formulation provided 98.9% efficacy. At the 48 hour assessments following the 28 day infestations, efficacy of the imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin formulations was 96.8% and 98.3% respectively. In study # 2 the efficacy of the imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin formulations 12 hours after treatment was 100% and 69.4%, respectively. On day 28, efficacy of the imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin formulations 12 hours after infestation was 90.2% and 57.3%, respectively. In study #2 both formulations provided high levels of efficacy at the 24 hour post-infestation assessments, with selamectin and imidacloprid + moxidectin providing 95.3% and 97.5% efficacy, following infestations on day 28. Conclusions At the 24 and 48 hour residual efficacy assessments, the imidacloprid + moxidectin and selamectin formulations were similarly highly efficacious. However, the imidacloprid + moxidectin formulation provided a significantly higher rate of flea kill against the KS1 flea

  16. SURVEILLANCE OF TRYPANOSOMA SPP OF RODENTS AND STUDIES IN THEIR TRANSMISSION PROBABILITY BY FLEAS IN SOME RURAL EGYPTIAN AREAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahesh, Salwa M A; Mikhail, Micheal W

    2016-04-01

    A new public health problem arises from animal trypanosomes that afflict human by a disease called atypical human trypanosomiasis. Although humans have an innate protection against most Trypanosoma species, nineteen cases of atypical human trypanosomiasis caused by the animal trypanosome as T. b. brucei, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. evansi and T. lewisi have been recorded. Some of theserecorded cases were transient, six required trypanocidal treatments however two patients died. Rodent trypanosome, T. lewisi is transmitted via ingestion of fleas or their feces containing the infective stage, the metacyclic trypomastigote. Because of the high densities of various species of rodents and their distribution all over the country especially in rural areas, the present work aimed to evaluate the trypanosomiasis among rodents collected from November to March 2016 and study transmission probability by their fleas in some rural areas in Abu Alnomros Center, Giza. The overall trypanosomiasis prevalence among the different rodent species was (21 rats) 24.7%. All the infected rats belonged to Rattus r. spp where the prevalence of infection with Trypanosoma lewisi among that species was very high 51.2% while none of rats belonged to Rattus norvegicus were infected. That may be attributed to the solid immunity gained by the R. norvegicus where most of the collected norvegicus were aged and weighed more than 200 grams. There was an inverse significant correlation between the densities of parasites and the weights of the losts. The rat which recorded the highest parasite density (60,000 parasites/microliter) was a female Rattus r. captured indoor (inside house). As to sex of Rattus rattus spp no significant difference was found between males and females in trypanosomiasis. Also there was no significant correlation between the densities of parasites and the number of white blood cells among Rattus rattus spp. All positive rats were collected indoors (from houses) and all the rats

  17. Differential diagnosis between Tunga penetrans (L, 1758 and T. trimamillata Pampiglione et al., 2002 (Insecta, Siphonaptera, the two species of the genus Tunga parasitic in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampiglione S.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Of the ten currently known species of sand fleas, only two, Tunga penetrans and Tunga trimamillata, are known to be parasites of man, besides other warm blooded animals, most of which are peridomestic. The hosts of the other eight are limited to a few genera of wild mammals. T. trimamillata was only recently identified and differentiated from T. penetrans by features of the gravid female phase. In the present paper the different morphological characters of both for non-gravid females and males of the two species are described. In the non-gravid-females the distinguishing characters are : a differences in the length of the first two segments of the maxillary palps (the first is the longest in T. trimamillata, whereas the second is the longest in T. penetrans, this feature is associated with another character i.e. the presence of short, thick spines in addition to the bristles on the surface of the segments only in T. trimamillata ; b the presence, only in T. trimamillata, of a row of spines on the antero-medial surface of the tibia of the 3rd pair of legs ; c the last abdominal spiracle protrudes in T. trimamillata but not in T. penetrans ; d the hood of the hilla in spermatheca is surrounded by a papilla only in T. penetrans. The following morphological characters differentiate males of T. trimamillata and T. penetrans ; a T. trimamillata has a row of spines on the antero-medial surface of the tibia of the 3rd pair of legs ; b the diameter of the abdominal spiracles of T. trimamillata is smaller than that of T. penetrans and the edges of the spiracles are more regular ; c the claspers and aedeagus of T. trimamillata are shorter than those of T. penetrans ; d the profile of the aedeagal apodeme differs between the two species.

  18. Evaluation of the curative and preventive efficacy of a single oral administration of afoxolaner against cat flea Ctenocephalides felis infestations on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, James S; Dumont, Pascal; Chester, Theodore S; Young, David R; Fourie, Josephus J; Larsen, Diane L

    2014-04-02

    The efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner for treatment and prevention of repeated infestations with adult Ctenocephalides felis on dogs was evaluated in two studies after administration of a beef-flavored soft chew. In each study, 32 dogs were divided randomly into four equal groups. Dogs in Groups 1 and 3 were not treated and served as controls. Dogs in Groups 2 and 4 were treated on Day 0 with a combination of chewable tablets to be as close as possible to the minimum therapeutic dose of 2.5mg/kg. All animals were infested experimentally with unfed C. felis (100 ± 5) on Days -1, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Flea killing efficacy was evaluated in both studies while, efficacy against flea egg production was assessed in Study 1. Live fleas were counted at 12 (Groups 1 and 2) and 24h (Groups 3 and 4), after treatment or after weekly infestations. In Study 1, flea eggs were collected and counted at either 12 or 24h after each flea infestation on Days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. The results of both studies demonstrate the long lasting and rapid efficacy of afoxolaner against C. felis, when administered as a single oral dose to dogs. For flea counts conducted 24h after treatment or infestation, efficacy was 100% for all time points up to Day 36 in both studies, except for one time point (99.9% on Day 22) for Study 2. For flea counts performed 12h after treatment or infestation, efficacy was ≥ 95.2% until Day 21 in both studies. Efficacy at 12h was ≥ 93.0% on Day 35 in Study 1 and ≥ 89.7% on Day 35 in Study 2. The treated groups had significantly fewer fleas than untreated control dogs in both studies for all flea counts (p=0.003 Study 1, p=0.0006 Study 2). In Study 1, for all egg counts performed at or beyond Day 7, efficacy in egg reduction was >99% for all time points between Days 7 and 35.

  19. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Bala; Bai, Ying; Gage, Kenneth L; Cully, Jack F

    2008-07-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off.

  20. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, B.; Bal, Y.; Gage, K.L.; Cully, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  1. Managing iron supply during the infection cycle of a flea borne pathogen, Bartonella henselae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis eBiville

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella are hemotropic bacteria responsible for emerging zoonoses. Most Bartonella species appear to share a natural cycle that involves an arthropod transmission, followed by exploitation of a mammalian host in which they cause long-lasting intra-erythrocytic bacteremia. Persistence in erythrocytes is considered an adaptation to transmission by bloodsucking arthropod vectors and a strategy to obtain heme required for Bartonella growth. Bartonella genomes do not encode for siderophore biosynthesis or a complete iron Fe3+ transport system. Only genes, sharing strong homology with all compounds of a Fe2+ transport system, are present in Bartonella genomes. Also, Bartonella genomes encode for a complete heme transport system. Bartonella must face various environments in their hosts and vectors. In mammals, free heme and iron are rare and oxygen concentration is low. In arthropod vectors, toxic heme level is found in the gut where oxygen concentration is high. Bartonella genomes encode for three to five heme binding proteins. In Bartonella henselae heme binding proteins were shown to be involved in heme uptake process, oxidative stress response and survival inside endothelial cells and in the flea. In this report, we discuss the use of the heme uptake and storage system of B. henselae during its infection cycle. Also, we establish a comparison with the use of the iron and heme uptake systems by Yersinia pestis during its infection cycle.

  2. Detection of Bartonellaspp. and Rickettsiaspp. in fleas, ticks and lice collected in rural areas of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham G. Cáceres

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bartonellosis and rickettsiosis are commonly reported in Peru. In order to detect Bartonella sp. and Rickettsiasp. in fleas, ticks and lice, specimens from five distinct locations in Peru (Marizagua, Cajaruro, Jamalca, Lonya Grande and El Milagro were collected and screened for the presence of these bacteria using PCR and later confirmation by DNA sequencing. The specimens collected were distributed in 102 pools (76 Ctenocephalides felis, 2 Ctenocephalides canis, 16 Pulex irritans, 5 Pediculus humanus, 2 Rhiphicephalus sanguineus, and 1 Boophilus spp., where Bartonellawas detected in 17 pools (6 of C. felis, 9 of P. irritans, 1 of C. canis, and 1 P. humanus. Also, Rickettsiawas detected in 76 pools (62 C. felis, 10 P. irritans, 2 P. humanus, and 2 C. canis. Bartonella clarridgeiaewas detected in C. felis, C. canisand P. irritanspools at 5.3%, 50% and 12.5%, respectively.Bartonella rochalimaewas detected in one C. felisand two P. irritanspools at 1.3% and 12.5%, respectively. Furthermore, B. henselaewas detected in one C. felispool and one P. humanuspool corresponding to 1.3% and 20%, respectively; and Bartonella spp.was also found in 5 pools of P. irritansat 31.3%. Additionally, R. feliswas detected in C. felis, C. canisand P. irritanspools at 76.3%, 100% and 37.5%, respectively; and Rickettsia spp. was detected in C. felis, P. irritansand P. humanuspools at 5.3%, 25% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate the circulation of these bacteria in Peru.

  3. Thermal genetic adaptation in the water flea Daphnia and its impact: an evolving metacommunity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, Luc; Van Doorslaer, Wendy; Geerts, Aurora; Orsini, Luisa; Stoks, Robby

    2011-11-01

    Genetic adaptation to temperature change can impact responses of populations and communities to global warming. Here we integrate previously published results on experimental evolution trials with follow-up experiments involving the water flea Daphnia as a model system. Our research shows (1) the capacity of natural populations of this species to genetically adapt to changes in temperature in a time span of months to years, (2) the context-dependence of these genetic changes, emphasizing the role of ecology and community composition on evolutionary responses to climatic change, and (3) the impact of micro-evolutionary changes on immigration success of preadapted genotypes. Our study involves (1) experimental evolution trials in the absence and presence of the community of competitors, predators, and parasites, (2) life-table and competition experiments to assess the fitness consequences of micro-evolution, and (3) competition experiments with putative immigrant genotypes. We use these observations as building blocks of an evolving metacommunity to understand biological responses to climatic change. This approach integrates both local and regional responses at both the population and community levels. Finally, we provide an outline of current gaps in knowledge and suggest fruitful avenues for future research. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  5. Effect of salinity on the swimming velocity of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillieul, M; De Wachter, B; Blust, R

    1998-01-01

    The swimming velocity of the water flea Daphnia magna is dependent on its body size. Therefore, environmental factors that influence growth also influence swimming velocity. This study examined whether exposure to increased salinity reduces swimming velocity only through its effect on body size or whether it also reduces size-specific swimming velocity. Initially, size-specific swimming velocity decreased in a salinity-dependent way. Thereafter, swimming velocities gradually returned to their expected values in all treatments. This acclimation coincided with considerable mortality in the highest-salinity treatment, indicating that daphnids in this treatment either acclimated or died. The initial decrease in size-specific swimming velocity could not be explained by decreased uptake of food. Thus, the results indicate that salinity temporarily impaired physiology. The experiment illustrates how size effects can be accounted for in swimming-velocity analysis and how size-specific swimming-velocity analysis can be used as a non-invasive method to detect stress-induced deviations from normal physiology.

  6. Toxicity Thresholds for Diclofenac, Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen in the Water Flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Mei, Cheng-Fang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Xu, Mei-Ying

    2016-07-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been frequently detected in aquatic ecosystem and posed a huge risk to non-target organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of three typical NSAIDs, diclofenac (DFC), acetaminophen (APAP) and ibuprofen (IBP), toward the water flea Daphnia magna. All three NSAIDs showed remarkable time-dependent and concentration-dependent effects on D. magna, with DFC the highest and APAP the lowest toxic. Survival, growth and reproduction data of D. magna from all bioassays were used to determine the LC10 and LC50 (10 % lethal and median lethal concentrations) values of NSAIDs, as well as the EC10 and EC50 (10 % effect and median effect concentrations) values. Concentrations for the lethal and sublethal toxicity endpoints were mainly in the low ppm-range, of which reproduction was the most sensitive one, indicating that non-target organisms might be adversely affected by relevant ambient low-level concentrations of NSAIDs after long-time exposures.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the ecdysone receptor and ultraspiracle protein from the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuhiko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Oda, Shigeto; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Watanabe, Hajime; Iguchi, Taisen

    2007-04-01

    cDNAs encoding the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultra spiracle (USP) protein were cloned from the water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera). The deduced EcR and USP amino acid sequences showed a high degree of homology to those of other crustaceans as well as insects. We isolated three isoforms of EcR that differ in the A/B domain. Quantitative PCR analysis indicated differing temporal expression patterns of the EcR isoforms during the molting period and demonstrated that the expression of one subtype correlated well with the timing of molt. Using cDNAs encoding EcR and USP, we constructed a Daphnia EcR/USP reporter based on a two-hybrid system. The gene fusions encoded the EcR ligand-binding domain (LBD) fused to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain, and the USP-LBD fused to the Vp16 activation domain. These chimeric genes were transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. Dose-dependent activation of the reporter gene could be observed when transfectants were exposed to Ec and other chemicals known to have Ec-like activities. This two-hybrid system may represent a useful reporter system for further examination of hormonal and chemical effects on Daphnia at the molecular level.

  8. The screening of chemicals for juvenoid-related endocrine activity using the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helen Ying; Olmstead, Allen W; Li, Hong; Leblanc, Gerald A

    2005-09-10

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is charged with developing a screening and testing paradigm for detecting endocrine toxicity of chemicals that are subject to regulation under the Food Quality Protection and the Safe Drinking Water Acts. In this study, we developed and evaluated a screening assay that could be employed to detect juvenoid-related endocrine-modulating activity in an invertebrate species. Juvenoid activity, anti-juvenoid activity, and juvenoid potentiator activity of chemicals was assessed using the water flea Daphnia magna. Male sex determination is under the regulatory control of juvenoid hormone, presumably methyl farnesoate, and this endpoint was used to detect juvenoid modulating activity of chemicals. Eighteen chemicals were evaluated for juvenoid agonist activity. Positive responses were detected with the juvenoid hormones methyl farnesoate and juvenile hormone III along with the insect growth regulating insecticides pyriproxyfen, fenoxycarb, and methoprene. Weak juvenoid activity also was detected with the cyclodiene insecticide dieldrin. Assays performed repetitively with compounds that gave either strong positive, weak positive, or negative response were 100% consistent indicating that the assay is not prone to false positive or negative responses. Five candidate chemicals were evaluated for anti-juvenoid activity and none registered positive. Four chemicals (all trans-retinoic acid, methoprene, kinoprene, bisphenol A) also were evaluated for their ability to potentiate the activity of methyl farnesoate. All registered positive. Results demonstrate that an in vivo assay with a crustacean species customarily employed in toxicity testing can be used to effectively screen chemicals for juvenoid-modulating activity.

  9. Pilot biomonitoring of adults and children following use of chlorpyrifos shampoo and flea collars on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyk, Melinda Bigelow; Chen, Zhenshan; Mosadeghi, Sasan; Vega, Helen; Krieger, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pesticide handlers and pet owners who use products such as shampoos and dips and insecticide-impregnated collars to treat and control fleas on companion animals are exposed to a variety of active ingredients. Chlorpyrifos exposures of adults and children were measured using urine biomonitoring following use of over-the-counter products on dogs. Age and gender-specific measurements of urinary 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) revealed modest elevations of biomarker excretion following shampoo/dips. Smaller TCPy increments were measured following application of impregnated dog collars. The extent of indoor activity and potential pet contact were important determinants of urine biomarker level. Children without direct pet contact excreted more TCPy following collar application. Pet collars may be a source of indoor surface contamination and human exposure. Children excreted up to 4 times more TCPy than adults when urine volumes were adjusted using age-specific creatinine excretion levels. Although chlorpyrifos is no longer used in the United States in pet care products, results of this research provide perspective on the extent of human exposure from similar pet care products. These pilot studies demonstrated that pet care products such as insecticidal shampoos and dips and impregnated collars may expose family members to low levels of insecticide relative to toxic levels of concern.

  10. Development and validation of an arthropod maceration protocol for zoonotic pathogen detection in mosquitoes and fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Genelle F; Scheirer, Jessica L; Melanson, Vanessa R

    2015-06-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases remain a pressing international public health concern. While progress has been made in the rapid detection of arthropod-borne pathogens via quantitative real-time (qPCR), or even hand-held detection devices, a simple and robust maceration and nucleic acid extraction method is necessary to implement biosurveillance capabilities. In this study, a comparison of maceration techniques using five types of beads followed by nucleic acid extraction and detection were tested using two morphologically disparate arthropods, the Aedes aegypti mosquito and Xenopsylla spp. flea, to detect the zoonotic diseases dengue virus serotype-1 and Yersinia pestis. Post-maceration nucleic acid extraction was carried out using the 1-2-3 Platinum-Path-Sample-Purification (PPSP) kit followed by qPCR detection using the Joint Biological Agent Identification and Diagnostic System (JBAIDS). We found that the 5mm stainless steel beads added to the beads provided in the PPSP kit were successful in macerating the exoskeleton for both Ae. aegypti and Xenopsylla spp. Replicates in the maceration/extraction/detection protocol were increased in a stepwise fashion until a final 128 replicates were obtained. For dengue virus detection there was a 99% positivity rate and for Y. pestis detection there was a 95% positive detection rate. In the examination of both pathogens, there were no significant differences between qPCR instruments, days ran, time of day ran, or operators. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  11. Induced ice melting by the snow flea antifreeze protein from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todde, Guido; Whitman, Christopher; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-11-26

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) allow different life forms, insects as well as fish and plants, to survive in subzero environments. AFPs prevent freezing of the physiological fluids. We have studied, through molecular dynamics simulations, the behavior of the small isoform of the AFP found in the snow flea (sfAFP), both in water and at the ice/water interface, of four different ice planes. In water at room temperature, the structure of the sfAFP is found to be slightly unstable. The loop between two polyproline II helices has large fluctuations as well as the C-terminus. Torsional angle analyses show a decrease of the polyproline II helix area in the Ramachandran plots. The protein structure instability, in any case, should not affect its antifreeze activity. At the ice/water interface the sfAFP triggers local melting of the ice surface. Bipyramidal, secondary prism, and prism ice planes melt in the presence of AFP at temperatures below the melting point of ice. Only the basal plane is found to be stable at the same temperatures, indicating an adsorption of the sfAFP on this ice plane as confirmed by experimental evidence.

  12. Results of a European multicentric field efficacy study of fipronil-(S methoprene combination on flea infestation of dogs and cats during 2009 summer*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet F.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing number of ectoparasiticides for pets and their use, flea infestations of cats and dogs are still widespread in Europe. It is therefore important to assess the maintenance of efficacy of the ectoparasiticides for cats and dogs. The present studies aimed to evaluate the efficacy of monthly treatments using a fipronil/(S-methoprene combination spot-on (Frontline Combo® on dogs and cats from private veterinary clinics located in seven European countries. The survey was conducted for three months during the flea season 2009. A total of 233 dogs and 180 cats were included. Each animal was treated at Days 0 (Day 0, 30 (D30 and 60 (D60 at the vet clinics. For each animal, at least three flea counts were performed at D0, D30 and/or D60 and/or day 90 (Day 90 in order to evaluate the prevalence of flea infestation and the efficacy of control. At the beginning of the study the prevalence of infested animals was 41.63 % (97/233 in dogs and 47.22 % (85/180 in cats. At D90, the number of dogs remaining infested fell to 8/211 therefore 91.75 % became flea-free. The number of infested cats fell from 85 to 9/173 at D90 therefore 89.41 % were cured. All animals still infested at Day 90 were living under epidemiological conditions that favour heavy flea burdens. These results are similar or better to previous studies, indicating the continuous high level of efficacy for fipronil 10 years after launch.

  13. Anthropogenic soils and land use patterns in relation to small mammal and flea abundance in plague endemic area of Western Usambara Mountains, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimaro, Didas N; Msanya, Balthazar M; Meliyo, Joel; Hieronimo, Proches; Mwango, Sibaway; Kihupi, Nganga I; Gulinck, Hubert; Deckers, Jozef A

    2014-07-01

    Heterogeneity in the landscapes of West Usambara Mountains on land use and human activities has been reported. However, the interface of land use patterns and human modified soils with small mammal and flea abundance for possible explanation of plague has not been explored. This study was carried out to determine the link between anthropogenic soils and land use patterns on small mammal and flea abundance and the occurrence of reported plague in the Western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Standard soil survey methods were used to identify and describe soils and land use patterns on lower slopes and valley bottoms on which the surrounding villages are reported to have high and medium plague frequencies. The identified soils were characterised in terms of their morphological and physico-chemical properties and classified according to FAO-World Reference Base for Soil Resources. Small mammals were trapped on the same landscape positions and identified to genus/species level. Fleas were removed from the trapped small mammals, counted and identified to species level. In total 57 small mammals were captured from which 32 fleas were collected. Results show that human settlements and mixed cultivation on lower slopes and continuous vegetable cropping in the valley bottoms are dominant land use types. Intensive use of forest soils, manuring and irrigation on farms in the studied landscapes have contributed to the development of uniquely human modified soils namely Hortic Anthrosols in the lower slopes and Plaggic Irragric Hortic Anthrosols in valley bottoms. The identified anthropogenic soils and land use patterns are associated with high abundance of small mammals (Mastomys natalensis) and flea species (Xenopsylla brasiliensis and Dinopsyllus lypusus). This phenomenon is vividly apparent in the villages with medium to high plague frequencies. The study suggests that plague surveillance programmes should consider the existing relationship between anthropogenic soils, land

  14. Efficacy and safety of sarolaner (Simparica(®)) in the treatment and control of naturally occurring flea infestations in dogs presented as veterinary patients in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packianathan, Raj; Colgan, Sally; Hodge, Andrew; Davis, Kylie; Six, Robert H; Maeder, Steven

    2017-08-16

    The efficacy and safety of a novel isoxazoline compound, sarolaner (Simparica(®), Zoetis) and spinosad (Comfortis(®), Elanco) as a positive control were evaluated for the treatment and control of natural flea infestations on dogs in two randomised, blinded, multi-centric clinical trials conducted in 11 veterinary clinics in northeastern and southeastern states of Australia. A total of 162 client-owned dogs (80 in northern study and 82 in southern study) from 105 households were enrolled. Each household was randomly allocated to receive either sarolaner (Simparica(®), Zoetis) or spinosad (Comfortis(®), Elanco). Dogs were dosed on Days 0, 30 and 60 and physical examinations and flea counts were conducted on Days 0, 14, 30, 60 and 90. Efficacy assessments were based on the percentage reduction in live flea counts post-treatment compared to Day 0. In the northern study, at enrolment, primary dogs had flea counts ranging from 5 to 772. At the first efficacy assessment on Day 14, sarolaner resulted in 99.3% mean reduction in live flea counts relative to Day 0, compared to 94.6% in the spinosad group. On Day 30, the sarolaner-treated group had mean efficacy of 99.2% compared to 95.7% in the spinosad-treated group, and on days 60 and 90, both groups had mean efficacies of ≥ 98.8%. In the southern study, at enrolment, primary dogs had flea counts ranging from 5 to 156. Both sarolaner and spinosad resulted in ≥ 96.7% mean reduction in live flea counts on Day 14. On Day 30, the sarolaner-treated group had mean efficacy of 99.5% compared to 89.7% in the spinosad-treated group, and on days 60 and 90, both groups had mean efficacies of ≥ 98.6%. No treatment-related adverse events were observed in either study. A single monthly dose of sarolaner (Simparica(®)) administered orally at 2-4 mg/kg for three consecutive months was well tolerated and provided excellent efficacy against natural infestations of fleas under a range of Australian field conditions including

  15. Yersinia pestis insecticidal-like toxin complex (Tc family proteins: characterization of expression, subcellular localization, and potential role in infection of the flea vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinner Justin L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxin complex (Tc family proteins were first identified as insecticidal toxins in Photorhabdus luminescens and have since been found in a wide range of bacteria. The genome of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, contains a locus that encodes the Tc protein homologues YitA, YitB, YitC, and YipA and YipB. Previous microarray data indicate that the Tc genes are highly upregulated by Y. pestis while in the flea vector; however, their role in the infection of fleas and pathogenesis in the mammalian host is unclear. Results We show that the Tc proteins YitA and YipA are highly produced by Y. pestis while in the flea but not during growth in brain heart infusion (BHI broth at the same temperature. Over-production of the LysR-type regulator YitR from an exogenous plasmid increased YitA and YipA synthesis in broth culture. The increase in production of YitA and YipA correlated with the yitR copy number and was temperature-dependent. Although highly synthesized in fleas, deletion of the Tc proteins did not alter survival of Y. pestis in the flea or prevent blockage of the proventriculus. Furthermore, YipA was found to undergo post-translational processing and YipA and YitA are localized to the outer membrane of Y. pestis. YitA was also detected by immunofluorescence microscopy on the surface of Y. pestis. Both YitA and YipA are produced maximally at low temperature but persist for several hours after transfer to 37°C. Conclusions Y. pestis Tc proteins are highly expressed in the flea but are not essential for Y. pestis to stably infect or produce a transmissible infection in the flea. However, YitA and YipA localize to the outer membrane and YitA is exposed on the surface, indicating that at least YitA is present on the surface when Y. pestis is transmitted into the mammalian host from the flea.

  16. Efficacy of orally administered powdered aloe juice (Aloe ferox against ticks on cattle and ticks and fleas on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Fourie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of orally administered powdered aloe juice (Aloe ferox was evaluated against ticks on cattle and against ticks and fleas on dogs. Twelve calves were each infested over a 25-day period with approximately 4000 larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus and allocated to 3 groups of 4 calves each. Three days after the last larval infestation and daily for 22 days thereafter, the calves in 1 group were fed 5 mg / kg body weight and those in another 25 mg / kg body weight of powdered aloe juice incorporated in game maintenance pellets, while the animals in the 3rd group received only pellets. Detached female ticks were collected daily and counted and the weights and the fertility of groups of 50 engorged female ticks collected from the animals were ascertained. The powdered aloe juice in the game maintenance pellets had no effect on the tick burdens of the calves or on the fertility of the ticks. Six dogs, in each of 2 groups, were treated daily for 15 consecutive days, commencing on Day -5 before the 1st tick infestation, with either 0.39 g or 0.74 g of powdered aloe juice, administered orally in gelatin capsules, while a 3rd group of 6 dogs served as untreated controls. All the dogs were challenged with Haemaphysalis leachi on Days 0 and +7, and with Ctenocephalides felis on Days+1and +8, and efficacy assessments were made 1 day after flea and 2 days after tick challenge, respectively. Treatment was not effective against ticks or fleas on the dogs.

  17. Sucinolivolia torpida--a new genus and species of flea-beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) from Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukejs, Andris; Biondi, Maurizio; Alekseev, Vitalii I

    2015-12-15

    Sucinolivolia torpida gen. nov. et sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) is described and illustrated from Eocene Baltic amber. The new monotypic genus is compared with fossil and extant flea-beetle genera. Sucinolivolia gen. nov. is similar to the extant Livolia Jacoby and Orthaltica Crotch, but difference include the absence of an antebasal pronotal sulcus, not crenulate lateral pronotal margins, possessing very short genae, more robust legs, and the shape of tibiae. Including this new record, six described species of Alticini are known from Baltic amber.

  18. Jumping mechanisms and performance in beetles. I. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadein, Konstantin; Betz, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The present study analyses the anatomy, mechanics and functional morphology of the jumping apparatus, the performance and the kinematics of the natural jump of flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini). The kinematic parameters of the initial phase of the jump were calculated for five species from five genera (average values from minimum to maximum): acceleration 0.91-2.25 (×10(3)) m s(-2), velocity 1.48-2.80 m s(-1), time to take-off 1.35-2.25 ms, kinetic energy 2.43-16.5 µJ, G: -force 93-230. The jumping apparatus is localized in the hind legs and formed by the femur, tibia, femoro-tibial joint, modified metafemoral extensor tendon, extensor ligament, tibial flexor sclerite, and extensor and flexor muscles. The primary role of the metafemoral extensor tendon is seen in the formation of an increased attachment site for the extensor muscles. The rubber-like protein resilin was detected in the extensor ligament, i.e. a short, elastic element connecting the extensor tendon with the tibial base. The calculated specific joint power (max. 0.714 W g(-1)) of the femoro-tibial joint during the jumping movement and the fast full extension of the hind tibia (1-3 ms) suggest that jumping is performed via a catapult mechanism releasing energy that has beforehand been stored in the extensor ligament during its stretching by the extensor muscles. In addition, the morphology of the femoro-tibial joint suggests that the co-contraction of the flexor and the extensor muscles in the femur of the jumping leg is involved in this process.

  19. Toxic effects of chemical dispersant Corexit 9500 on water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; McNabb, Nicole A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Iguchi, Taisen; Kohno, Satomi

    2017-02-01

    In 2010, approximately 2.1 million gallons of chemical dispersants, mainly Corexit 9500, were applied in the Gulf of Mexico to prevent the oil slick from reaching shorelines and to accelerate biodegradation of oil during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Recent studies have revealed toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on marine microzooplankton that play important roles in food chains in marine ecosystems. However, there is still little known about the toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on freshwater zooplankton, even though oil spills do occur in freshwater and chemical dispersants may be used in response to these spills. The cladoceran crustacean, water flea Daphnia magna, is a well-established model species for various toxicological tests, including detection of juvenile hormone-like activity in test compounds. In this study, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the acute and chronic toxicity of Corexit 9500 using D. magna. The acute toxicity test was conducted according to OECD TG202 and the 48 h EC50 was 1.31 ppm (CIs 0.99-1.64 ppm). The reproductive chronic toxicity test was performed following OECD TG211 ANNEX 7 and 21 days LOEC and NOEC values were 4.0 and 2.0 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that Corexit 9500 has toxic effects on daphnids, particularly during the neonatal developmental stage, which is consistent with marine zooplankton results, whereas juvenile hormone-like activity was not identified. Therefore, our findings of the adverse effects of Corexit 9500 on daphnids suggest that application of this type of chemical dispersant may have catastrophic impacts on freshwater ecosystems by disrupting the key food chain network. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Sodium uptake in different life stages of crustaceans: the water flea Daphnia magna Strauss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2008-02-01

    The concentration-dependent kinetics and main mechanisms of whole-body Na+ uptake were assessed in neonate and adult water flea Daphnia magna Strauss acclimated to moderately hard water (0.6 mmol l(-1) NaCl, 1.0 mmol l(-1) CaCO3 and 0.15 mmol l(-1) MgSO4.7H2O; pH 8.2). Whole-body Na+ uptake is independent of the presence of Cl(-) in the external medium and kinetic parameters are dependent on the life stage. Adults have a lower maximum capacity of Na+ transport on a mass-specific basis but a higher affinity for Na+ when compared to neonates. Based on pharmacological analyses, mechanisms involved in whole-body Na+ uptake differ according to the life stage considered. In neonates, a proton pump-coupled Na+ channel appears to play an important role in the whole-body Na+ uptake at the apical membrane. However, they do not appear to contribute to whole-body Na+ uptake in adults, where only the Na+ channel seems to be present, associated with the Na+/H+ exchanger. In both cases, carbonic anhydrase contributes by providing H+ for the transporters. At the basolateral membrane of the salt-transporting epithelia of neonates, Na+ is pumped from the cells to the extracellular fluid by a Na+, K+-ATPase and a Na+/Cl(-) exchanger whereas K+ and Cl(-) move through specific channels. In adults, a Na+/K+/2Cl(-) cotransporter replaces the Na+/Cl(-) exchanger. Differential sensitivity of neonates and adults to iono- and osmoregulatory toxicants, such as metals, are discussed with respect to differences in whole-body Na+ uptake kinetics, as well as in the mechanisms of Na+ transport involved in the whole-body Na+ uptake in the two life stages.

  1. Propulsion of the Water Flea, Daphnia magna: Experiments, Scaling, and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2016-02-01

    The freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is a widely studied zooplankton in relation to food webs, predator-prey interactions, and other biological/ecological considerations; however, their locomotion is poorly quantified and understood. These water fleas utilize a hop-and-sink mechanism that consists of making quick, impulsive jumps by beating their antennae to propel themselves forward ( 1 body length). The animals then sink for a period, during which they stretch out their antennae to increase drag and thereby reduce their sinking velocity. Time-resolved three-dimensional flow fields surrounding the animals were quantified with a unique infrared tomographic particle image velocity (tomo-PIV) system. Three-dimensional kinematics data were also extracted from the image sequences. In the current work, we compared body kinematics and flow disturbance among organisms of size in the range of 1.3 to 2.8 mm. The stroke cycle averaged 150 ms in duration, ranging from 100 to 180 ms; this period is generally evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. The range of peak hop velocity was 27.2 to 32.5 mm/s, and peak acceleration was in the range of 0.68 to 1.8 m/s2. The results showed a distinct relationship between peak hop speed (Vmax 14 BL/s) and body size; these data collapsed onto a single time-record curve during the power stroke when properly non-dimensionalized. The fluid flow induced by each antennae consisted of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrated a slow decay in the wake. The strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings were compared as a function of organism size. Finally, the viscous vortex rings were analyzed in the context of a double Stokeslet model that consisted of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  2. Gene expression profiling of three different stressors in the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vandenbrouck, Tine; Knapen, Dries; Dom, Nathalie; Spanier, Katina I; Cielen, Anke; De Meester, Luc

    2013-07-01

    Microarrays are an ideal tool to screen for differences in gene expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. However, often commercial arrays are not available. In this study, we performed microarray analyses to evaluate patterns of gene transcription following exposure to two natural and one anthropogenic stressor. cDNA microarrays compiled of three life stage specific and three stressor-specific EST libraries, yielding 1734 different EST sequences, were used. We exposed juveniles of the water flea Daphnia magna for 48, 96 and 144 h to three stressors known to exert strong selection in natural populations of this species i.e. a sublethal concentration of the pesticide carbaryl, infective spores of the endoparasite Pasteuria ramosa, and fish predation risk mimicked by exposure to fish kairomones. A total of 148 gene fragments were differentially expressed compared to the control. Based on a PCA, the exposure treatments were separated into two main groups based on the extent of the transcriptional response: a low and a high (144 h of fish or carbaryl exposure and 96 h of parasite exposure) stress group. Firstly, we observed a general stress-related transcriptional expression profile independent of the treatment characterized by repression of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, signal transduction and energy metabolism. Secondly, we observed treatment-specific responses including signs of migration to deeper water layers in response to fish predation, structural challenge of the cuticle in response to carbaryl exposure, and disturbance of the ATP production in parasite exposure. A third important conclusion is that transcription expression patterns exhibit stress-specific changes over time. Parasite exposure shows the most differentially expressed gene fragments after 96 h. The peak of differentially expressed transcripts came only after 144 h of fish exposure, while carbaryl exposure induced a more stable number of differently expressed gene

  3. Cryptic intercontinental colonization in water fleas Daphnia pulicaria inferred from phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Silvia; Dufresne, France; Rees, David J; Cerný, Martin; Kotlík, Petr

    2007-07-01

    The water fleas of the Daphnia pulex complex play a key role in freshwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. Despite the fact that they have been the subject of study for numerous biological disciplines, their phylogeny and species delimitation remain controversial. We used DNA sequence variation of the mitochondrial ND5 gene to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of D. pulicaria Forbes, a widespread member of this complex from North America and Europe. Populations from the two continents respectively split into two evolutionary lineages, Eastern Nearctic and European, which each belong to another main clade within the D. pulex complex (the pulicaria and tenebrosa groups, respectively). Unexpectedly, melanin and carotenoid pigmented D. pulicaria populations from European high-mountain lakes were not allied with the transparent populations inhabiting the same lakes and the lowland ponds and reservoirs throughout Europe, but were included with the samples from Canada and Greenland in the Eastern Nearctic lineage. Until now populations belonging to this lineage were known only from Canada and North Atlantic islands, but not from mainland Europe. Independent data from microsatellite markers supported the genetic distinctiveness of the sympatric carotenoid pigmented and transparent populations and suggested that they may have undergone transition to obligate parthenogenesis, possibly as a consequence of past introgressive hybridization. Two different taxa are therefore confused under the name D. pulicaria in Europe. The close phylogenetic relationships of European populations with those from Canada and Greenland suggest that the Nearctic lineage is of recent origin in Europe via intercontinental dispersal from the North America. It has evolved melanin and carotenoid pigmentation as adaptations against the UV light stress, which enable it to share habitat occupied by the transparent European species. The Nearctic D. pulicaria thus provides a new model

  4. Synergy between dinotefuran and fipronil against the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis): improved onset of action and residual speed of kill in adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcombel, Romain; Karembe, Hamadi; Nare, Bakela; Burton, Audrey; Liebenberg, Julian; Fourie, Josephus; Varloud, Marie

    2017-07-19

    The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis felis (C. felis), is a cosmopolitan hematophagous ectoparasite, and is considered to be the most prevalent flea species in both Europe and the USA. Clinical signs frequently associated with flea bites include pruritus, dermatitis and in severe cases even pyodermatitis and alopecia. Ctenocephalides felis is also a vector for several pathogens and is an intermediate host for the cestode Dipylidium caninum. Treatment of cats with a fast-acting pulicide, that is persistently effective in protecting the animal against re-infestation, is therefore imperative to their health. In addition, a rapid onset of activity ("speed of kill") may also reduce the risks of disease transmission and flea allergic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro insecticidal activity and potential synergism between dinotefuran and fipronil against C. felis. A further aim was to evaluate the onset of activity and residual speed of kill of the combination in vivo on cats artificially infested with C. felis. In the first study, the insecticidal activity of dinotefuran and fipronil separately and dinotefuran/fipronil (DF) in combination, at a fixed ratio (2:1), was evaluated using an in vitro coated-vial bioassay. In the second study, the onset of activity against existing flea infestations and residual speed of kill of DF against artificial flea infestations on cats was assessed in vivo. Onset of activity against existing flea infestations was assessed in terms of knock-down effect within 2 h post-treatment and onset of speed of kill assessed at 3 h, 6 h and 12 h post-treatment. Residual speed of kill was evaluated 6 h and 48 h after infestation, over a period of six weeks post-treatment. In vitro results revealed that the DF combination was synergistic and more potent against fleas than either compound alone. The combination also proved effective when tested in vivo. Efficacy was > 97% [geometric mean (GM) and arithmetic mean (AM

  5. Comparative efficacy on dogs of a single topical treatment with fipronil/(S-methoprene or weekly physiological hygiene shampoos against Ctenocephalides felis in a simulated flea-infested environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet F.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Flea infestations of pets continue to persist due to the lack of knowledge of flea biology and ecology. It is not unusual that pet owners believe regular hygiene, such as shampooing their dogs can replace regular insecticidal treatment. The objective of this study was to compare in a flea simulated environment, modelling exposure similar to that found in a home, that the use of regular physiological shampoo does not control fleas adequately when compared to a long acting topical formulation. Three groups of six dogs were formed: one untreated control group, one group treated monthly with the topical formulation of fipronil/(S-methoprene, and a third group treated weekly with a hygiene shampoo. All dogs were infested with adult unfed Ctenocephalides felis fleas (200 ± 5 on Days -28 and -21. Each animal’s sleeping box was fitted with a plastic cup mounted to the inside roof of the box. The sleeping bench of each animal was covered with a carpet to accommodate flea development. The dogs were maintained in their kennels throughout the study. In order to maintain the environmental flea challenge, C. felis pupae (100 ± 5 were placed in the plastic cup in each animal’s sleeping box on Days -14, -7, 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. The dogs were combed and fleas counted weekly on Days -1, 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 38, 45, and 51. The fleas were placed immediately back on the dogs. On Day 60, fleas were counted and removed. Flea infestations in the untreated control group at each count averaged between 46.2 and 74.2 fleas throughout the study. The average number of fleas infesting dogs was significantly different (p < 0.05 between the untreated and the two treatment groups and between the two treatment groups at all counts throughout the two months study (Days 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 38, 45, 51 and 60. The efficacy was never below 99.1% in the fipronil/(S-methoprene group, and efficacy in the shampoo group was never above 79.2%. Weekly shampooing in treatment

  6. Toxicity, persistence, and efficacy of spinosad, chlorfenapyr, and thiamethoxam on eggplant when applied against the eggplant flea beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Paul; Diaz, Francisco J; Johnson, Donn T

    2002-04-01

    A laboratory bioassay was developed for determining the toxicity of spinosad, chlorfenapyr, and thiamethoxam against the eggplant flea beetle, Epitrix fuscula Crotch, on eggplant foliage. Four days after initial exposure, LC50 values were 1.99, 2.50, and 0.88 ppm for spinosad, chlorfenapyr, and thiamethoxam, respectively. By dividing the recommended field rate in ppm by the LC50 value, a field toxicity ratio was determined and ranged from 13.5 for spinosad to 73.9 for thiamethoxam. The high ratios suggest that field rates for all three insecticides could likely be reduced. This was supported by field studies in 2000 in which reduced rates of spinosad and thiamethoxam significantly reduced flea beetle numbers on eggplant. Mortality produced by thiamethoxam occurred more quickly than that for the other tested materials as shown with LT50 values of 1.8, 3.0, and 3.6 and days for thiamethoxam, chlorfenapyr, and spinosad, respectively. Persistence studies indicated that while all three of the tested compounds initially produced high levels of mortality, chlorfenapyr and thiamethoxam produced 50% or greater mortality after 6 d. Our data suggest that future management strategies for E. fuscula on eggplant can be successfully altered to meet the changing needs of the producer. Spinosad was recently registered, is effective against the E. fuscula, and offers a viable alternative to carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides. Thiamethoxam and chlorfenapyr offer high levels of toxicity to E. fuscula and upon registration will offer additional effective tools for management.

  7. Analysis and comparison of a set of expressed sequence tags of the parthenogenetic water flea Daphnia carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoqian; Song, Shuhui; Wang, Qun; Qin, Fen; Liu, Kan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Zhao, Yunlong

    2009-08-01

    The water flea Daphnia carinata (D. carinata) reproduces both sexually and parthenogenetically, yet little is known about the genes involved in these processes. To further clarify the reproductive biology of Daphnia and elucidate their unique mechanism of reproductive transformation, we have generated and characterized an expressed sequence tag (EST) data set from D. carinata. A set of 1,495 clusters were generated from sequencing 3,072 randomly chosen clones from a parthenogenetic, juvenile water flea cDNA library. The nucleic acid and deduced amino acid sequences were compared with known GenBank sequences. Functional annotation found that 959 clusters showed significant homology with known genes involved in a broad range of activities, including metabolism, translation, development and reproduction, as well as genes involved in sensing environmental factors. We speculate that genes involved in development and reproduction, along with genes that allow the organism to sense changes in the environment, play important roles in the process of parthenogenetic reproduction and could be markers of the early steps of sexual differentiation. Additionally, 86% of the D. Carinata unique sequences could be stringently mapped to the D. pulex genome, of which 125 mapped to intergenic and intronic regions on the current assembly. Our results provide practical insight into crustacean reproductive biology, in addition to establishing a new animal model for reproductive and developmental biology.

  8. Male-produced aggregation pheromone compounds from the eggplant flea beetle (Epitrix fuscula): identification, synthesis, and field biossays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkowski, Bruce W; Bartelt, Robert J; Cossé, Allard A; Petroski, Richard J

    2006-11-01

    Volatiles from the eggplant flea beetle, Epitrix fuscula Crotch (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), feeding on host foliage, were investigated. Six male-specific compounds were detected and were identified through the use of mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, chiral and achiral gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, electrophysiology (gas chromatography-electroantennography, GC-EAD), and microchemical tests. The two most abundant of the six compounds were (2E,4E,6Z)-2,4,6-nonatrienal (1) and (2E,4E,6E)-2,4,6-nonatrienal (2). The other four compounds, present in minor amounts, were identified as himachalene sesquiterpenes; two of these, 3 and 4, were hydrocarbons and two, 5 and 6, were alcohols. All four sesquiterpenes were previously encountered from male flea beetles of Aphthona spp. and Phyllotreta cruciferae. Synthetic 1 and 2 matched the natural products by GC retention times, mass spectra, and NMR spectra. Sesquiterpenes 3-6 similarly matched synthetic standards and natural samples from the previously studied species in all ways, including chirality. Both natural and synthetic 1 and 2 gave positive GC-EAD responses, as did sesquiterpenes 3, 5, and 6. Field trials were conducted with a mixture of 1 and 2, and the baited traps were significantly more attractive than control traps to both male and female E. fuscula. The E. fuscula pheromone has potential for monitoring or controlling these pests in eggplants.

  9. Role of the Yersinia pestis plasminogen activator in the incidence of distinct septicemic and bubonic forms of flea-borne plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbane, Florent; Jarrett, Clayton O; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2006-04-04

    Yersinia pestis is transmitted by fleas and causes bubonic plague, characterized by severe local lymphadenitis that progresses rapidly to systemic infection and life-threatening septicemia. Here, we show that although flea-borne transmission usually leads to bubonic plague in mice, it can also lead to primary septicemic plague. However, intradermal injection of Y. pestis, commonly used to mimic transmission by fleabite, leads only to bubonic plague. A Y. pestis strain lacking the plasmid-encoded cell-surface plasminogen activator, which is avirulent by intradermal or s.c. injection, was able to cause fatal primary septicemic plague at low incidence, but not bubonic plague, when transmitted by fleas. The results clarify a long-standing uncertainty about the etiology of primary septicemic plague and support an evolutionary scenario in which plague first emerged as a flea-borne septicemic disease of limited transmissibility. Subsequent acquisition of the plasminogen activator gene by horizontal transfer enabled the bubonic form of disease and increased the potential for epidemic spread.

  10. Immunofluorescence localization and ultrastructure of Stewart’s wilt disease bacterium Pantoea stewartii in maize leaves and in its flea beetle vector Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea stewartii is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, the most serious bacterial disease of sweet corn and maize in the North-Central and Eastern USA. P. stewartii is transmitted mainly by the corn flea beetle Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and this bacterium is a...

  11. Target-site resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in German populations of the cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christoph T; Müller, Andreas; Heimbach, Udo; Nauen, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a major pest of winter oilseed rape in several European countries particularly attacking young emerging plants in autumn. Over the last several decades, pyrethroid insecticides have been foliarly applied to control flea beetle outbreaks. Recent control failures in northern Germany suggested pyrethroid resistance development in cabbage stem flea beetles, which were confirmed by resistance monitoring bioassays using lambda-cyhalothrin in an adult vial test. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of polymorphisms in the para-type voltage-gated sodium channel gene of P. chrysocephala known to be involved in knock-down resistance (kdr). By using a degenerate primer approach we PCR amplified part of the para-type sodium channel gene and identified in resistant flea beetles a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in an L1014F (kdr) mutation within domain IIS6 of the channel protein, known as one of the chief pyrethroid target-site resistance mechanisms in several other pest insects. Twenty populations including four archived museum samples collected between 1945 and 1958 were analyzed using a newly developed pyrosequencing diagnostic assay. The assay revealed a kdr allele frequency of 90-100% in those flea beetle populations expressing high-level cross-resistance in discriminating dose bioassays against different pyrethroids such as lambda-cyhalothrin, tau-fluvalinate, etofenprox and bifenthrin. The presence of target-site resistance to pyrethroids in cabbage stem flea beetle is extremely worrying considering the lack of effective alternative modes of action to control this pest in Germany and other European countries, and is likely to result in major control problems once it expands to other geographies. The striking fact that cabbage stem flea beetle is next to pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus the second coleopteran pest in European winter oilseed rape resisting

  12. An open, self-controlled study on the efficacy of topical indoxacarb for eliminating fleas and clinical signs of flea-allergy dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisara, Petr; Sargent, Roger M; Shipstone, Michael; von Berky, Andrew; von Berky, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine flea-allergy dermatitis (FAD), a hypersensitivity response to antigenic material in the saliva of feeding fleas, occurs worldwide and remains a common presentation in companion animal veterinary practice despite widespread availability of effective systemic and topical flea-control products. Hypothesis/Objectives To evaluate the clinical response in dogs with FAD treated topically with indoxacarb, a novel oxadiazine insecticide. Animals Twenty-five client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia diagnosed with pre-existing FAD on the basis of clinical signs, flea-antigen intradermal and serological tests. Methods An open-label, noncontrolled study, in which all dogs were treated with topical indoxacarb at 4 week intervals, three times over 12 weeks. Results Twenty-four dogs completed the study. Complete resolution of clinical signs of FAD was observed in 21 cases (87.5%), with nearly complete resolution or marked improvement in the remaining three cases. Mean clinical scores (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index-03) were reduced by 93.3% at week 12. Mean owner-assessed pruritus scores were reduced by 88% by week 12. Mean flea counts reduced by 98.7 and 100% in weeks 8 and 12, respectively. Conclusions and clinical importance Topical indoxacarb treatment applied every 4 weeks for 12 weeks, without concomitant antipruritic or ectoparasiticide therapy, completely alleviated flea infestations in all dogs and associated clinical signs of FAD in a high proportion of this population of dogs in a challenging flea-infestation environment. Résumé Contexte La dermatite par allergie aux piqures de puces (FAD), une hypersensibilité aux antigènes salivaires des puces, est décrite dans le monde entier et reste une présentation fréquente en médicine vétérinaire des animaux de compagnie malgré une large gamme d'antiparasitaires topiques et systémiques efficaces disponibles. Hypothèses/Objectifs Estimer la réponse clinique des chiens

  13. The Yersinia pestis caf1M1A1 fimbrial capsule operon promotes transmission by flea bite in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbane, Florent; Jarrett, Clayton; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2009-03-01

    Plague is a zoonosis transmitted by fleas and caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis. During infection, the plasmidic caf1M1A1 operon that encodes the Y. pestis F1 protein capsule is highly expressed, and anti-F1 antibodies are protective. Surprisingly, the capsule is not required for virulence after injection of cultured bacteria, even though it is an antiphagocytic factor and capsule-deficient Y. pestis strains are rarely isolated. We found that a caf-negative Y. pestis mutant was not impaired in either flea colonization or virulence in mice after intradermal inoculation of cultured bacteria. In contrast, absence of the caf operon decreased bubonic plague incidence after a flea bite. Successful development of plague in mice infected by flea bite with the caf-negative mutant required a higher number of infective bites per challenge. In addition, the mutant displayed a highly autoaggregative phenotype in infected liver and spleen. The results suggest that acquisition of the caf locus via horizontal transfer by an ancestral Y. pestis strain increased transmissibility and the potential for epidemic spread. In addition, our data support a model in which atypical caf-negative strains could emerge during climatic conditions that favor a high flea burden. Human infection with such strains would not be diagnosed by the standard clinical tests that detect F1 antibody or antigen, suggesting that more comprehensive surveillance for atypical Y. pestis strains in plague foci may be necessary. The results also highlight the importance of studying Y. pestis pathogenesis in the natural context of arthropod-borne transmission.

  14. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo, E-mail: anyjoo@konkuk.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Trophic transfer of silver nanowires (AgNWs) was studied in an aquatic food chain. • The transfer of AgNWs from algae to fish via water fleas was observed. • Toxicity of long AgNWs on aquatic organisms is higher than that of short ones. • AgNWs damage the gut of water fleas and may cause undernourishment. • Quantity of lipid droplets increased with increasing exposure concentration. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20 μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10 μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health.

  15. Differential control of Yersinia pestis biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector by two c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Sun

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis forms a biofilm in the foregut of its flea vector that promotes transmission by flea bite. As in many bacteria, biofilm formation in Y. pestis is controlled by intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. Two Y. pestis diguanylate cyclase (DGC enzymes, encoded by hmsT and y3730, and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, encoded by hmsP, have been shown to control biofilm production in vitro via their opposing c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation activities, respectively. In this study, we provide further evidence that hmsT, hmsP, and y3730 are the only three genes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism in Y. pestis and evaluated the two DGCs for their comparative roles in biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector. As with HmsT, the DGC activity of Y3730 depended on a catalytic GGDEF domain, but the relative contribution of the two enzymes to the biofilm phenotype was influenced strongly by the environmental niche. Deletion of y3730 had a very minor effect on in vitro biofilm formation, but resulted in greatly reduced biofilm formation in the flea. In contrast, the predominant effect of hmsT was on in vitro biofilm formation. DGC activity was also required for the Hms-independent autoaggregation phenotype of Y. pestis, but was not required for virulence in a mouse model of bubonic plague. Our results confirm that only one PDE (HmsP and two DGCs (HmsT and Y3730 control c-di-GMP levels in Y. pestis, indicate that hmsT and y3730 are regulated post-transcriptionally to differentially control biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector, and identify a second c-di-GMP-regulated phenotype in Y. pestis.

  16. Biology of Blepharida-group flea beetles with first notes on natural history of Podontia congregata Baly, 1865 an endemic flea beetle from southern India (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathapan, Kaniyarikkal Divakaran; Chaboo, Caroline Simmrita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The biology, host plants, and pest status of Podontia Dalman, 1824 species are reviewed. Natural history of Podontia congregata Baly, 1865 a flea beetle endemic to southern India, is reported for the first time. It is distributed from the Western Ghats Mountains westward to the plains. Clusiaceae is reported as a new host plant family for Blepharida-group species, with Garcinia gummi-gutta (L.) N. Robson (Clusiaceae) as the host plant for Podontia congregata. Pentatomid bugs attack the larvae but not eggs, pupae, or adults. A new egg parasitoid species, Ooencyrtus keralensis Hayat and Prathapan, 2010 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), was discovered. Aspects of Podontia congregata host selection, life cycle, and larval fecal defenses are consistent with its inclusion in the Blepharida-genus group. PMID:22303106

  17. Parasite Genotypically Related to a Monoxenous Trypanosomatid of Dog's Flea Causing Opportunistic Infection in an HIV Positive Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel S Pacheco

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available An HIV positive patient presenting a clinical picture of visceral leishmaniasis co-infection was submitted to a bone marrow aspiration after admission to hospital. Amastigotes forms were seen in the bone marrow aspirate and the parasite grew in culture as promastigotes. Molecular analyses showed that the flagellates isolated did not belong to the genera Leishmania, Trypanosoma or Sauroleishmania. It was not possible to establish infection in laboratory animals. In vitro culture of mouse peritoneal macrophages revealed the invasion of the host cells by the flagellates and their killing 48 hr after infection. Opportunistic infection with an insect trypanosomatid was suspected. Further hybridization analyses against a pannel of different monoxenous and heteroxenous trypanosomatids showed kDNA cross-homology with Leptomonas pulexsimulantis a trypanosomatid found in the dog's flea

  18. Tick and flea infestation in a captive Margay Leopardus wiedii (Schinz, 1821 (Carnivora: Felidae: Felinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Quevedo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between wild and domestic animals can increase the risk for transmission of parasites in both directions, and thus, affects the ecology of diseases. Wild felids have been proven to be sensitive to infectious agents commonly found in domestic animals, and those agents have had detrimental effects on wildlife conservation. A margay Leopardus wiedii which had been kept captive as a pet for about fifteen days, was found moderately infested with the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis. Considering that the captive Margay lived close to domestic dogs and cats, this interaction might be the source of that infestation. Based on this finding, careful attention should be paid to wildlife and domestic animals interactions as ectoparasites can be easily transmitted and new host-pathogen interactions are possible.

  19. A plant needs ants like a dog needs fleas: Myrmelachista schumanni ants gall many tree species to create housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David P; Frederickson, Megan E; Shepard, Glenn H; Yu, Douglas W

    2009-11-01

    Hundreds of tropical plant species house ant colonies in specialized chambers called domatia. When, in 1873, Richard Spruce likened plant-ants to fleas and asserted that domatia are ant-created galls, he incited a debate that lasted almost a century. Although we now know that domatia are not galls and that most ant-plant interactions are mutualisms and not parasitisms, we revisit Spruce's suggestion that ants can gall in light of our observations of the plant-ant Myrmelachista schumanni, which creates clearings in the Amazonian rain forest called "supay-chakras," or "devil's gardens." We observed swollen scars on the trunks of nonmyrmecophytic canopy trees surrounding supay-chakras, and within these swellings, we found networks of cavities inhabited by M. schumanni. Here, we summarize the evidence supporting the hypothesis that M. schumanni ants make these galls, and we hypothesize that the adaptive benefit of galling is to increase the amount of nesting space available to M. schumanni colonies.

  20. Myxomatosis: changes in the epidemiology of myxomatosis coincident with the establishment of the European rabbit flea Spilopsyllus cuniculi (Dale) in the Mallee region of Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, R C; Edmonds, J W

    1978-12-01

    Outbreaks of myxomatosis during the winter or spring have coincided with the establishment of the European rabbit flea in the Mallee region. The severity of these outbreaks has varied from causing complete suppression of the normal spring increase in rabbit numbers to being completely ineffective in a year in which late spring rains allowed rabbit breeding to extend into the early summer.In 1973 and 1974 effective spring myxomatosis caused heavy mortality in kittens before they emerged from the warrens. The age of the population increased as the result of few young rabbits coming into the population and of the lessened stress on old rabbits in a low summer-autumn population. This effect was reversed in the late-breeding year, 1976, when flea numbers were apparently too low to maintain a spring outbreak and rabbit numbers increased rapidly.

  1. Effect of nitrogen and water treatment on leaf chemistry in horsenettle (Solanum carolinense), and relationship to herbivory by flea beetles (Epitrix spp.) and tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Martin L; Paulk, Eric; Cipollini, Donald F

    2002-12-01

    We studied the interaction between plants (horsenettle; Solanum carolinense) and herbivorous insects (flea beetles; Epitrix spp., and tobacco hornworm; Manduca sexta) by focusing on three questions: (1) Does variation in nitrogen availability affect leaf chemistry as predicted by the carbon-nutrient balance (CNB) hypothesis? (2) Does variation in plant treatment and leaf chemistry affect insect feeding? (3) Is there an interaction between the insect herbivores that is mediated by variation in leaf chemistry? For three successive years (1998-2001), we grew a set of clones of 10 maternal plants under two nitrogen treatments and two water treatments. For each plant in the summer of 2000, we assayed herbivory by hornworms in both indoor (detached leaf) and outdoor (attached leaf) assays, as well as ambient flea beetle damage. Estimates of leaf material consumed were made via analysis of digitized leaf images. We also assayed leaves for total protein, phenolic, and glycoalkaloid content, and for trypsin inhibitor, polyphenol oxidase, and peroxidase activity. Despite strong effects of nitrogen treatment on growth and reproduction, only total protein responded as predicted by CNB. Leaf phenolic levels were increased by nitrogen treatment, polyphenol oxidase activity was decreased, and other leaf parameters were unaffected. Neither hornworm nor flea beetle herbivory could be related to plant treatment or genotype or to variation in any of the six leaf chemical parameters. A negative relationship between flea beetle and hornworm herbivory was found, but was not apparently mediated by any of the measured leaf chemicals. Because leaf resistance was maintained in low nitrogen plants at the apparent expense of growth and reproduction, our results support the concept of a fitness cost of defense, as predicted by the optimal defense hypothesis.

  2. Results of a European multicentric field efficacy study of fipronil-(S) methoprene combination on flea infestation of dogs and cats during 2009 summer*

    OpenAIRE

    Beugnet F.; Franc M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of ectoparasiticides for pets and their use, flea infestations of cats and dogs are still widespread in Europe. It is therefore important to assess the maintenance of efficacy of the ectoparasiticides for cats and dogs. The present studies aimed to evaluate the efficacy of monthly treatments using a fipronil/(S)-methoprene combination spot-on (Frontline Combo®) on dogs and cats from private veterinary clinics located in seven European countries. The survey was co...

  3. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (W.A.A.V.P.) second edition: guidelines for evaluating the efficacy of parasiticides for the treatment, prevention and control of flea and tick infestations on dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiondo, A A; Holdsworth, P A; Fourie, L J; Rugg, D; Hellmann, K; Snyder, D E; Dryden, M W

    2013-05-01

    These second edition guidelines, updated from the 2007 version (Marchiondo et al., 2007), are intended to assist the planning and conduct of laboratory and clinical studies to assess the efficacy of ectoparasiticides applied to dogs or cats for the purpose of treating, preventing and controlling flea and tick infestations. Major revisions to this second edition include guidelines on the assessment of systemic flea and tick products, an update of the geographical distribution of the common fleas and ticks species on dogs and cats, determination of flea and tick efficacy based on geometric versus arithmetic means with respect to geographic regulatory agencies, modification of tick categorization in the assessment of efficacy, expanded guidelines on repellency and anti-feeding effects, enhanced practical field study guidance, and considerations on the ranges of flea and ticks for infestations in laboratory studies. The term ectoparasiticide includes insecticidal and acaricidal compounds, as well as insect growth regulators. The range of biological activities from animal treatment that are considered include: repellency and anti-feeding effects, knockdown, speed of kill, immediate and persistent lethal effects, and interference with egg fertility and subsequent development of off-host life cycle stages. Information is provided on the selection of animals, dose determination, dose confirmation and field studies, record keeping, interpretation of results and animal welfare. These guidelines are also intended to assist regulatory authorities involved in the approval and registration of new topical or systemic ectoparasiticides, and to facilitate the worldwide adoption of harmonized procedures.

  4. X-ray Structure of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein Determined by Racemic Crystallization of Synthetic Protein Enantiomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentelute, Brad L.; Gates, Zachary P.; Tereshko, Valentina; Dashnau, Jennifer L.; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H. (UPENN); (UC)

    2008-08-20

    Chemical protein synthesis and racemic protein crystallization were used to determine the X-ray structure of the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP). Crystal formation from a racemic solution containing equal amounts of the chemically synthesized proteins d-sfAFP and l-sfAFP occurred much more readily than for l-sfAFP alone. More facile crystal formation also occurred from a quasi-racemic mixture of d-sfAFP and l-Se-sfAFP, a chemical protein analogue that contains an additional -SeCH2- moiety at one residue and thus differs slightly from the true enantiomer. Multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from quasi-racemate crystals was then used to determine the X-ray structure of the sfAFP protein molecule. The resulting model was used to solve by molecular replacement the X-ray structure of l-sfAFP to a resolution of 0.98 {angstrom}. The l-sfAFP molecule is made up of six antiparallel left-handed PPII helixes, stacked in two sets of three, to form a compact brick-like structure with one hydrophilic face and one hydrophobic face. This is a novel experimental protein structure and closely resembles a structural model proposed for sfAFP. These results illustrate the utility of total chemical synthesis combined with racemic crystallization and X-ray crystallography for determining the unknown structure of a protein.

  5. Common volatiles are major attractants for neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle Altica koreana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Huai-Jun; Yang, Xing-Ke

    2008-07-01

    Olfactory stimuli play an important role in the host searching of larval phytophagous insects. Previous studies indicate that larvae that have to find feeding sites after hatching are generally attracted to host volatiles. However, there are few studies on the olfactory responses of neonate larvae to host volatiles in cases when those larvae hatched on the host plant. In the present study, we determined the olfactory responses of neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle, Altica koreana Ogloblin, to host and six non-host plants, using a static-air “arena.” Larvae responded significantly to the host plant Potentilla chinensis Ser. and five of six non-host plants, compared to the control. Larvae did not prefer the host plant over the non-host plants (except Artemisia sp.) when offered a choice. Additionally, odours of a non-host plant, which were unattractive to neonate larvae, may have masked the attractive odour of the host plant. These results indicate that common volatiles can play a major role in attracting larvae of this specialist to plants, but attraction to such odours may not be the major mechanism of host choice.

  6. Identification and Expression Analysis of Upregulated Genes in the Resting Egg-Producing Water Flea (Daphnia pulex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomoko; Ohnuma, Masaaki

    2016-02-01

    Water fleas (Daphnia pulex) normally produce subitaneous eggs that initiate development immediately after oviposition. However, in response to habitat degradation, resting eggs are produced, which are enclosed in a sturdy outer envelope (ephippium) and can survive in harsh environments for an extended time. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying resting egg production in D. pulex, we investigated the genes whose expression patterns played a role in the production and identified the following six candidate genes: Dpfa-1, Dpfa-2, Dpep-1, Dpep-2, Dpep-3, and Dpep-4. These six genes displayed > 40-fold higher expression levels in resting egg-producing animals compared with those in subitaneous egg-producing animals at the period when the ovaries were mature. Dpfa-1 and Dpfa-2 were expressed in the fat cells, and their expression patterns were synchronized with the development of resting egg oocytes in the ovary. In contrast, Dpep-1-4 were expressed in the morphologically altered epidermal cells of the brood chamber with the formation of the ephippium, and their expression patterns were also related to ephippium formation. Our results suggest that the former two genes encode the resting egg-specific components produced by fat cells and that the latter four genes encode the components related to the ephippium formation synthesized by epidermal cells.

  7. Coping with predator stress: interclonal differences in induction of heat-shock proteins in the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, K; Stoks, R; de Meester, L

    2005-07-01

    Although predation is a strong selection pressure, little is known about the molecular mechanisms to cope with predator stress. This is crucial to understanding of the mechanisms and constraints involved in the evolution of antipredator traits. We quantified the expression of heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a potential marker for predator stress, in four clones of the water flea Daphnia magna, when exposed to fish kairomones. Expression of Hsp60 induction increased after 6 h and returned to base levels after 24 h of predator stress. This suggests that it is a costly transient mechanism to temporarily cope with novel predator stress, before other defences are induced. We found genetic variation in the fixed levels and in the fish-induced levels of Hsp60, which seemed to be linked to each clone's history of fish predation. Our data suggest that Hsp60 can be considered part of a multiple-trait antipredator defence strategy of Daphnia clones to cope with predator stress.

  8. Invasion of an asexual American water flea clone throughout Africa and rapid displacement of a native sibling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergeay, Joachim; Verschuren, Dirk; De Meester, Luc

    2006-11-22

    The huge ecological and economic impact of biological invasions creates an urgent need for knowledge of traits that make invading species successful and factors helping indigenous populations to resist displacement by invading species or genotypes. High genetic diversity is generally considered to be advantageous in both processes. Combined with sex, it allows rapid evolution and adaptation to changing environments. We combined paleogenetic analysis with continent-wide survey of genetic diversity at nuclear and mitochondrial loci to reconstruct the invasion history of a single asexual American water flea clone (hybrid Daphnia pulexxDaphnia pulicaria) in Africa. Within 60 years of the original introduction of this invader, it displaced the genetically diverse, sexual population of native D. pulex in Lake Naivasha (Kenya), despite a formidable numerical advantage of the local population and continuous replenishment from a large dormant egg bank. Currently, the invading clone has spread throughout the range of native African D. pulex, where it appears to be the only occurring genotype. The absence of genetic variation did not hamper either the continent-wide establishment of this exotic lineage or the effective displacement of an indigenous and genetically diverse sibling species.

  9. TiO2 Nanoparticle Uptake by the Water Flea Daphnia magna via Different Routes is Calcium-Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ling-Yan; Huang, Bin; Xu, Shen; Wei, Zhong-Bo; Yang, Liu-Yan; Miao, Ai-Jun

    2016-07-19

    Calcium plays versatile roles in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we investigated its effects on the uptake of polyacrylate-coated TiO2 nanoparticles (PAA-TiO2-NPs) by the water flea (cladoceran) Daphnia magna. Particle distribution in these daphnids was also visualized using synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. At low ambient Ca concentrations in the experimental medium ([Ca]dis), PAA-TiO2-NPs were well dispersed and distributed throughout the daphnid; the particle concentration was highest in the abdominal zone and the gut, as a result of endocytosis and passive drinking of the nanoparticles, respectively. Further, Ca induced PAA-TiO2-NP uptake as a result of the increased Ca influx. At a high [Ca]dis, the PAA-TiO2-NPs formed micrometer-sized aggregates that were ingested by D. magna and concentrated only in its gut, independent of the Ca influx. Our results demonstrated the multiple effects of Ca on nanoparticle bioaccumulation. Specifically, well-dispersed nanoparticles were taken up by D. magna through endocytosis and passive drinking whereas the uptake of micrometer-sized aggregates relied on active ingestion.

  10. Genetic and maternal effects on tail spine and body length in the invasive spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehls, Andrea L J; Peacor, Scott D; McAdam, Andrew G

    2012-04-01

    Interest in the evolution of invasive species has grown in recent years, yet few studies have investigated sources of variation in invasive species traits experiencing natural selection. The spiny water flea, Bythotrephes longimanus, is an invasive zooplankton in the Great Lakes that exhibits seasonal changes in tail spine and body length consistent with natural selection. Evolution of Bythotrephes traits, however, depends on the presence and magnitude of quantitative genetic variation, which could change within or across years. Clonal analysis of wild-captured Bythotrephes indicated that variance components for distal spine length were variable among but not within years. Spine length was always heritable but was not always influenced by maternal effects. In contrast, variance components for body length varied both within and among years, but likewise body length was always heritable and not always influenced by maternal effects. Results indicate that important Bythotrephes traits have heritable variation comparable to native species and other invasive species that would enable an evolutionary response to natural selection. This evolutionary capacity could contribute to the widespread success and dramatic effects of Bythotrephes invasion in systems with diverse biotic and abiotic conditions.

  11. Early embryonic expression of a putative ecdysteroid-phosphate phosphatase in the water flea, Daphnia magna (Cladocera: Daphniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Miki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Ecdysteroids, known as molting hormones, play central roles in the onset of molting, metamorphosis, and reproduction in arthropods. The ecdysteroids stored in eggs also play an important role in embryogenesis. In insects, ecdysteroids are stored as phosphate esters, which are converted to an active form by ecdysteroid-phosphate phosphatase (EPPase). Although EPPase is believed to be widely conserved in the Ecdysozoa, little is known about its expression in clades other than Insecta. In this study, we cloned a putative EPPase gene from a small fresh water crustacean known as a water flea, Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera: Daphniidae), and examined its expression during embryogenesis. The amino acid sequence of the putative crustacean EPPase cDNA showed high similarity to insect EPPase and human suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling-1. We also found that the D. magna EPPase was highly expressed during early embryogenesis; its expression rapidly decreased 6 h after oviposition. This timing corresponds to the onset of organogenesis in D. magna. The expression of EPPase could not be detected in diapaused eggs. This is the first report of an EPPase from crustaceans, and the results suggest that the function of EPPase is conserved between insects and crustaceans. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  12. Exploring embryonic germ line development in the water flea, Daphnia magna, by zinc-finger-containing VASA as a marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Kazunori; Yamagata, Hideo; Shiga, Yasuhiro

    2005-06-01

    VASA is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase belonging to the DEAD-box family that, in many organisms, is specifically expressed in germ line cells throughout the life cycle, making it a powerful molecular marker to study germ line development. To obtain further information on germ line development in crustaceans, we cloned VASA cDNAs from three branchiopod species: water fleas Daphnia magna and Moina macrocopa, and brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. RNA helicase domains in branchiopod VASA were highly conserved among arthropod classes. However, N-terminal RNA-binding domains in branchiopod VASA were highly diverged and, unlike other arthropod VASA reported so far, possessed repeats of retroviral-type zinc finger (CCHC) motifs. Raising specific antibodies against Daphnia VASA revealed that the primordial germ cells (PGCs) in this organism segregate at a very early cleavage stage of embryogenesis in parthenogenetic and sexual eggs. Clusters of PGCs then start to migrate inside the embryo and finally settle at both sides of the intestine, the site of future gonad development. RNA analyses suggested that maternally supplied vasa mRNA was responsible for early VASA expression, while zygotic expression started during blastodermal stage of development.

  13. Analysis of 2,4,6-nonatrienal geometrical isomers from male flea beetles, Epitrix hirtipennis and E. fuscula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkowski, Bruce W; Bartelt, Robert J; Vermillion, Karl

    2008-07-09

    Geometrical isomers of 2,4,6-nonatrienal have been reported from a variety of food- and insect-related sources. It was discovered recently that the eggplant flea beetle, Epitrix fuscula, uses the (2 E,4 E,6 Z) and (2 E,4 E,6 E) isomers as components of its male-produced aggregation pheromone. Here, we learned that the related species, E. hirtipennis, also emits a blend of 2,4,6-nonatrienals, including isomers not previously characterized. Patterns in emission and response suggest a pheromonal function. In an effort to acquire standards to aid in identification, we found that exposing (2 E,4 E,6 E)-2,4,6-nonatrienal (or other available 2,4,6-nonatrienals) to light readily generated a mixture of six geometrical isomers. Configurations of these were determined by NMR, and chromatographic properties (GC and HPLC) were documented. On the basis of chromatographic comparison to these standards, the most abundant, new compound from E. hirtipennis was concluded to be (2 E,4 Z,6 Z)-2,4,6-nonatrienal. Minor components from both E. hirtipennis and E. fuscula were also characterized. The analytical approach given here would also be of use in the food industry, where 2,4,6-nonatrienals are important as aroma compounds.

  14. Deltamethrin flea-control preserves genetic variability of black-tailed prairie dogs during a plague outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P.H.; Biggins, D.E.; Eads, D.A.; Eads, S.L.; Britten, H.B.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variability and structure of nine black-tailed prairie dog (BTPD, Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies were estimated with 15 unlinked microsatellite markers. A plague epizootic occurred between the first and second years of sampling and our study colonies were nearly extirpated with the exception of three colonies in which prairie dog burrows were previously dusted with an insecticide, deltamethrin, used to control fleas (vectors of the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis). This situation provided context to compare genetic variability and structure among dusted and non-dusted colonies pre-epizootic, and among the three dusted colonies pre- and post-epizootic. We found no statistical difference in population genetic structures between dusted and non-dusted colonies pre-epizootic. On dusted colonies, gene flow and recent migration rates increased from the first (pre-epizootic) year to the second (post-epizootic) year which suggested dusted colonies were acting as refugia for prairie dogs from surrounding colonies impacted by plague. Indeed, in the dusted colonies, estimated densities of adult prairie dogs (including dispersers), but not juveniles (non-dispersers), increased from the first year to the second year. In addition to preserving BTPDs and many species that depend on them, protecting colonies with deltamethrin or a plague vaccine could be an effective method to preserve genetic variability of prairie dogs. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Pulga (flea market) contributions to the retail food environment of colonias in the South Texas border region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Wesley R; Sharkey, Joseph R; St John, Julie

    2011-05-01

    Accounts of the retail food environment have been limited by research that focused on supermarkets, grocery stores, and restaurants as the principal food sources for consumers. Little is known about alternative retail food sources, especially in rural and underserved areas such as the colonias along the South Texas border with Mexico. Many colonias are located near pulgas (flea markets). This is the first study to examine this alternative food source for colonia residents. This study's purpose is to provide preliminary data on food availability in this unstudied element of the retail food environment. Five pulgas were identified for study by local informants. Two separate teams of two promotores (indigenous community health workers) conducted observations, wrote field notes, and surveyed vendors in each pulga. Traditional foods, prepared foods, and fresh fruits and vegetables were available in the observed pulgas. Traditional foods included staples, meal items, and snacks and sweets. Prepared foods were available in small stands run by independent operators, and each pulga had permanent restaurants that served prepared foods. A large variety of fresh fruits and vegetables were also available. An emphasis on supermarkets and grocery stores will provide an incomplete account of the retail food environment. Further studies should attempt to provide a more complete account by identifying alternative retail sources used by local residents. One such alternative retail food source, the pulga, provides a range of traditional food stuffs, prepared food items, and fruits and vegetables that complement conventionally studied aspects of the retail food environment.

  16. Effects of fasting time on food selectivity of water fleas Daphnia magna%饥饿时间对大型溞摄食行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玮; 杜蓓蓓; 刘钢; 殷旭旺

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we evaluated the influence of fasting time on foraging behavior of water fleas Daphnia magna. The water fleas were fasted for 0, 0. 25, 1, 4, or 8 d, and then were allowed to graze on a mixture of al-gae Chlamydomonas sajao ( Cs) and Chlorella pyrenoidosa ( Cp) with a proportion of 5í104 cells/mL ( Cs):35í104 cells/mL (Cp), 20í104 cells/mL(Cs):20í104 cells/mL(Cp)and 35í104 cells/mL(Cs):5í104 cells/mL ( Cp) for three hours. Then the ingestion rate, filtration rate and food selectivity coefficient of water fleas on the two algae were analyzed and evaluated. The results showed that significantly high ingestion rate and filtration rate on Chlorella pyrenoidosa and significantly low ingestion rate and filtration rate on Chlamydomonas sajao were found in the water fleas fasted for long period ( 4 , and 8 d ) . In satiation or short fasting period ( 0 . 25 , and 1 d ) ( P<0. 05), however, the water fleas was found to prefer to Cs, and prefer Cp in long fasting period (4, and 8 d)(P<0. 05). Moreover, the foraging behaviors were not influenced by the relative food abundance of each green alga and the mechanisms of feeding selectivity were discussed based on the optimal foraging theory. The findings indicate that starvation affects the selectivity of wate fleas for algal food.%研究了不同饥饿时间下大型溞Daphnia magna (体长约3 mm)对沙角衣藻Chlamydomonas sajao和蛋白核小球藻Chlorella pyrenoidos的摄食选择性。沙角衣藻与蛋白核小球藻相比,具有较高的适口性,但营养价值相对较低。按照沙角衣藻和蛋白核小球藻的比例分别为5×104.35×104、20×104.20×104、35×104.5×104 cells/mL混合投喂饥饿0、0·25、1、4、8 d的大型溞,3 h后测定大型溞的摄食率、滤水率和食物选择系数。结果表明:与饱食组和短时间饥饿(0·25、1 d)组相比,长时间饥饿(4、8 d)导致大型溞对蛋白核小球藻的摄食率和滤水率显著增加(P<0·05),而对沙角

  17. Determination of the effective dose of a novel oral formulation of sarolaner (Simparica™) for the treatment and month-long control of fleas and ticks on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTier, Tom L; Six, Robert H; Fourie, Josephus J; Pullins, Aleah; Hedges, Laura; Mahabir, Sean P; Myers, Melanie R

    2016-05-30

    Three laboratory studies were conducted to determine the appropriate dose of sarolaner, a novel isoxazoline, for the treatment and month-long control of infestations of fleas and ticks on dogs. In the first study, dogs were treated orally with sarolaner suspension formulations at 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0mg/kg, and infested with Dermacentor reticulatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks and with Ctenocephalides felis felis (cat flea) prior to treatment and then weekly for up to 8 weeks. Fleas and ticks were counted 48h after treatment and after each subsequent infestation at 24h for fleas and 48h for ticks. The lowest dose of sarolaner (1.25mg/kg) provided 100% efficacy against fleas from treatment through Day 35 and 98.4% at Day 56. This dose of sarolaner resulted in 99.7-100% control of both species of ticks through Day 28. In Study 2, dogs were dosed orally with placebo or sarolaner suspension formulations at 0.625, 1.25 or 2.5mg/kg and infested with Ixodes scapularis prior to treatment and weekly for 6 weeks, Amblyomma americanum (pretreatment and Day 26), Dermacentor variabilis (Day 33) and A. maculatum (Day 41). Ixodes scapularis was the most susceptible; the lowest dose (0.625mg/kg) providing>95% efficacy through Day 43. Efficacy against D. variabilis on Day 35 was>95% at 1.25 and 2.5mg/kg, whereas the 0.625mg/kg dose gave only 61.4% efficacy. Amblyomma spp. were the least susceptible ticks; efficacy of the 1.25mg/kg dose at Day 28 for A. americanum was markedly lower (88.5%) than achieved for D. reticulatus (100%) at Day 28 and also lower than for D. variabilis at Day 35 (96.2%). In Study 3, dogs were dosed orally with placebo or sarolaner in the proposed commercial tablet (Simparica™) at 1.0, 2.0 or 4.0mg/kg, and infested with A. maculatum, one of the ticks determined to be dose limiting, prior to treatment and then weekly for 5 weeks. All doses gave 100% control of the existing infestation. The two highest dosages resulted in >93% control of subsequent challenges

  18. [The duration of preservation of plague pathogen strains with a different plasmid kit from a Central Caucasian high-altitude natural focus in the organism of citellophilus tesquorum fleas and the possibility of their transmission to laboratory animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharinova, N V; Zhilchenko, E B; Koniaeva, O A; Serdiuk, N S; Zaĭtseva, O A

    2013-01-01

    Two plasmid variants of the main subspecies of the plague microbe circulate in a Central Caucasian high-altitude natural focus of plague. The strains of one plasmid variant fully correspond to the main subspecies of the plague pathogen in their characteristics. Those of the other are auxotrophic for proline, weakly virulent to one or both species of laboratory animals. The mountain subspecies of Citellophilus tesquorum fleas excretes the greatest quantity of plague microbe strains so the investigation of whether unblocked fleas can transmit the plague microbe is of interest.

  19. Research on the Development and Practice of the Flea Market%高校跳蚤市场的发展现状研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余箭; 高素勤; 盛亚丹

    2014-01-01

    随着中国经济的不断发展,跳蚤市场作为一种新的经济现象在中国高校内出现并逐渐发展起来。它具有其他市场所没有的特点,如市场主体稳定性、商品廉价性、商品比例变动性以及“地摊式”经营主导性。然而,跳蚤市场依然存在商品质量难以保证、市场秩序不规范、销售方式单一性等问题。因此,要从规范经营者自身行为、建立规范统一的市场秩序、搭建网络交易平台、构建“双轨制”售后服务体系等方面促进高校跳蚤市场健康、有序地发展。%With the continuous development of our economy,the flea market as a new economic phenomenon in China’s colleges and universities appeared and developed gradually.It has the characteristics of other market doesn’t have,such as market stability,cheapness, change in the proportion of commoditygoods as well as the“spread”operation domination.However,the flea market is still difficult to guarantee the quality of goods,the market order is not standard,the sale of a single such problems.Therefore,from the standardoperators of their own behavior,establishing the unified market order,to build the network trading platform,construction of the“dual track”after sale servicesystem,promote the flea market healthy,orderly development.

  20. Ixodes ricinus ticks are reservoir hosts for Rickettsia helvetica and potentially carry flea-borne Rickettsia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaasenbeek Cor

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hard ticks have been identified as important vectors of rickettsiae causing the spotted fever syndrome. Tick-borne rickettsiae are considered to be emerging, but only limited data are available about their presence in Western Europe, their natural life cycle and their reservoir hosts. Ixodes ricinus, the most prevalent tick species, were collected and tested from different vegetation types and from potential reservoir hosts. In one biotope area, the annual and seasonal variability of rickettsiae infections of the different tick stages were determined for 9 years. Results The DNA of the human pathogen R. conorii as well as R. helvetica, R. sp. IRS and R. bellii-like were found. Unexpectedly, the DNA of the highly pathogenic R. typhi and R. prowazekii and 4 other uncharacterized Rickettsia spp. related to the typhus group were also detected in I. ricinus. The presence of R. helvetica in fleas isolated from small rodents supported our hypothesis that cross-infection can occur under natural conditions, since R. typhi/prowazekii and R. helvetica as well as their vectors share rodents as reservoir hosts. In one biotope, the infection rate with R. helvetica was ~66% for 9 years, and was comparable between larvae, nymphs, and adults. Larvae caught by flagging generally have not yet taken a blood meal from a vertebrate host. The simplest explanation for the comparable prevalence of R. helvetica between the defined tick stages is, that R. helvetica is vertically transmitted through the next generation with high efficiency. The DNA of R. helvetica was also present in whole blood from mice, deer and wild boar. Conclusion Besides R. helvetica, unexpected rickettsiae are found in I. ricinus ticks. We propose that I. ricinus is a major reservoir host for R. helvetica, and that vertebrate hosts play important roles in the further geographical dispersion of rickettsiae.

  1. Imidacloprid/moxidectin topical solution for the prevention of heartworm disease and the treatment and control of flea and intestinal nematodes of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arther, R G; Charles, S; Ciszewski, D K; Davis, W L; Settje, T S

    2005-10-24

    Sixteen controlled laboratory studies, involving 420 kittens and cats, were conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topically applied formulations of imidacloprid and moxidectin for the prevention of feline heartworm disease, treatment of flea infestations and treatment and control of intestinal nematodes. Unit-dose applicators and the dosing schedule used in these studies were designed to provide a minimum of 10mg imidacloprid and 1mg moxidectin/kg. Treatments were applied topically by parting the hair at the base of the skull and applying the solution on the skin. Imidacloprid treatment alone did not display activity against Dirofilaria immitis or intestinal nematodes and moxidectin treatment alone provided little or no activity against adult Ctenocephalides felis infestations. The formulation containing 10% imidacloprid and 1% moxidectin was 100% efficacious against the development of adult D. immitis infections when cats were treated 30 days after inoculation with third-stage larvae. A single treatment with this formulation also provided 88.4-100% control of adult C. felis for 35 days. Imidacloprid/moxidectin was 100% efficacious against adult Toxocara cati and 91.0-98.3% efficacious against immature adults and fourth-stage T. cati larvae. The formulation provided 98.8-100% efficacy against adult Ancylostoma and immature adults and third-stage A. tubaeforme larvae. Monthly topical application with 10% imidacloprid/1% moxidectin is convenient, efficacious and safe for the prevention of feline heartworm disease, treatment of flea infestation and for the treatment and control of intestinal nematode infections of cats.

  2. Identification of Ctenocephalides felis fleas as a host of Rickettsia felis, the agent of a spotted fever rickettsiosis in Yucatań, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Velázquez, J E; Zavala-Castro, J E; Vado-Solís, I; Ruiz-Sosa, J A; Moron, C G; Bouyer, D H; Walker, D H

    2002-01-01

    In search for the vector of the recently recognized spotted fever rickettsiosis of the Yucatán, ticks, fleas, and lice were collected from vegetation and dogs in localities where seropositive persons had been found. The arthropods were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers for the genus-specific 17-kDa protein gene followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing. Eleven (20%) of 54 pools of Ctenocephalides felis fleas contained DNA of Rickettsia felis. None of 219 Amblyomma cajennense, 474 Rhiphicephalus sanguineus, 258 Boophilus sp. ticks, and 33 Poliplax species lice contained DNA of Rickettsia. The identity of the rickettsial DNA was confirmed as R. felis by PCR/RFLP for the citrate synthase and outer membrane protein A genes and by DNA sequencing. The results indicate that the host of R. felis in Yucatán is C. felis and suggest that the spotted fever rickettsiosis that has infected >5% of the population of the Yucatán and can present as a dengue-like illness is likely to be caused by R. felis.

  3. Rickettsia typhi IN RODENTS AND R. felis IN FLEAS IN YUCATÁN AS A POSSIBLE CAUSAL AGENT OF UNDEFINED FEBRILE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar PENICHE-LARA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsia typhi is the causal agent of murine typhus; a worldwide zoonotic and vector-borne infectious disease, commonly associated with the presence of domestic and wild rodents. Human cases of murine typhus in the state of Yucatán are frequent. However, there is no evidence of the presence of Rickettsia typhi in mammals or vectors in Yucatán. The presence of Rickettsia in rodents and their ectoparasites was evaluated in a small municipality of Yucatán using the conventional polymerase chain reaction technique and sequencing. The study only identified the presence of Rickettsia typhi in blood samples obtained from Rattus rattus and it reported, for the first time, the presence of R. felis in the flea Polygenis odiosus collected from Ototylomys phyllotis rodent. Additionally, Rickettsia felis was detected in the ectoparasite Ctenocephalides felis fleas parasitizing the wild rodent Peromyscus yucatanicus. This study’s results contributed to a better knowledge of Rickettsia epidemiology in Yucatán.

  4. Evidence for a role of the host-specific flea (Paraceras melis in the transmission of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum pestanai to the European badger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lizundia

    Full Text Available We investigated the epidemiology of Trypanosoma pestanai infection in European badgers (Meles meles from Wytham Woods (Oxfordshire, UK to determine prevalence rates and to identify the arthropod vector responsible for transmission. A total of 245 badger blood samples was collected during September and November 2009 and examined by PCR using primers derived from the 18S rRNA of T. pestanai. The parasite was detected in blood from 31% of individuals tested. T. pestanai was isolated from primary cultures of Wytham badger peripheral blood mononuclear cells and propagated continually in vitro. This population was compared with cultures of two geographically distinct isolates of the parasite by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP and PCR analysis of 18S rDNA and ITS1 sequences. High levels of genotypic polymorphism were observed between the isolates. PCR analysis of badger fleas (Paraceras melis collected from infected individuals at Wytham indicated the presence of T. pestanai and this was confirmed by examination of dissected specimens. Wet smears and Giemsa-stained preparations from dissected fleas revealed large numbers of trypanosome-like forms in the hindgut, some of which were undergoing binary fission. We conclude that P. melis is the primary vector of T. pestanai in European badgers.

  5. Effects of iron sulfate dosage on the water flea (Daphnia magna Straus) and early development of carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Anholt, R D; Spanings, F A T; Knol, A H; van der Velden, J A; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    2002-02-01

    Adult water fleas, Daphnia magna Straus, and the early life stages of carp, Cyprinus carpio L., were exposed to river water near an iron sulfate dosage installation to determine the effects of phosphate precipitation with iron(II)sulfate. Tests were conducted during two consecutive dosage periods of 3,000 and 5,000 kg/day iron sulfate (520 and 620 microg/L total Fe respectively) at the dosage site and at a reference site (60 microg/L total Fe) further downstream. Though survival remained unaffected, the filter-feeding D. magna accumulated iron and other metals at the dosage site. Viability of offspring was strongly reduced at the highest dose of iron sulfate compared to the lower dose and the reference site. Specific staining of microscopic sections revealed a strong accumulation of iron(III) in the digestive tract. The egg membranes of the carp embryos accumulated not only substantial amounts of iron but also other metals, including cadmium and aluminium. Hardly any of the metals passed the egg membranes and reached the embryos. After hatching the accumulation of cadmium by the larvae increased rapidly and iron levels were elevated at the highest dose of iron sulfate, parallel with the onset of exogenous feeding. Iron(III) particles were observed in the intestines at histological examination. In addition, at 620 microg/L total Fe a strong increase in whole-body levels of the stress hormone cortisol was observed in the carp larvae, indicating a physiological response to adverse conditions. The results indicate that the rapid oxidation of free Fe2+ into iron(III) forms and the precipitation of iron(III) into larger particles resulted in a low acute toxicity of the river water directly at the iron sulfate dosage site. The observed chronic and sublethal effects at the dosage site probably resulted from the intestinal uptake of iron(III) and other toxic metals associated with the food particles. However, these effects could no longer be observed at the reference site

  6. External parasites of raptors (Falconiformes and Strigiformes: identification in an ex situ population from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JaquelineB de Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raptorial birds harbor a variety of ectoparasites and the mayority of them are host specific. The aim of this study was to identify the ectoparasites of captive birds of prey from Mexico, as well as to verify their impact in the health of infested birds. Raptorial birds were confiscated and kept in captivity at the Centro de Investigación y Conservación de Vida Silvestre (CIVS in Los Reyes La Paz, Mexico State. Seventy-four birds of prey (66 Falconiformes and eigth Strigiformes of 15 species were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. We examined both juvenile and adult birds from both sexes. The overall prevalence was 16.2%; 66.7% of raptors were infested with a single type of external parasite. Lice were the most prevalent ectoparasites (91.7%, followed by feather mites and fleas (8.3%. Degeeriella fulva (72.7%, Craspedorrhynchus sp. (45.4% and Strigiphilus aitkeni (9.1% (Ischnocera, Philopteridae were recovered from wings, head and neck regions of red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis, Swainson’s hawk (B. swainsoni, Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus and Barn owl (Tyto alba. Low lice infestation level was observed. Nymphs and females of feather mites Kramerella sp. (Pterolichoidea, Kramerellidae were recovered solely from Barn owl (T. alba; while one Caracara (Caracara cheriway was infested by the sticktight flea Echidnophaga gallinacea (Siphonaptera, Pulicidae. No clinical signs were observed in any infested bird. Probably the periodic use of organophosphorates was responsible of the low prevalence and lice infestation levels. The diversity of external parasites illustrates the importance of detailed revision of incoming and long-term captive raptors as part of responsible captive management. Five new hosts and geographic records are presented. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 1257-1264. Epub 2011 September 01.Las aves rapaces albergan una gran variedad de ectoparásitos y la mayoría de ellos son específicos de acogida. El objetivo de este

  7. Seasonal fluctuations of small mammal and flea communities in a Ugandan plague focus: evidence to implicate Arvicanthis niloticus and Crocidura spp. as key hosts in Yersinia pestis transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sean M; Monaghan, Andrew; Borchert, Jeff N; Mpanga, Joseph T; Atiku, Linda A; Boegler, Karen A; Montenieri, John; MacMillan, Katherine; Gage, Kenneth L; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2015-01-08

    The distribution of human plague risk is strongly associated with rainfall in the tropical plague foci of East Africa, but little is known about how the plague bacterium is maintained during periods between outbreaks or whether environmental drivers trigger these outbreaks. We collected small mammals and fleas over a two year period in the West Nile region of Uganda to examine how the ecological community varies seasonally in a region with areas of both high and low risk of human plague cases. Seasonal changes in the small mammal and flea communities were examined along an elevation gradient to determine whether small mammal and flea populations exhibit differences in their response to seasonal fluctuations in precipitation, temperature, and crop harvests in areas within (above 1300 m) and outside (below 1300 m) of a model-defined plague focus. The abundance of two potential enzootic host species (Arvicanthis niloticus and Crocidura spp.) increased during the plague season within the plague focus, but did not show the same increase at lower elevations outside this focus. In contrast, the abundance of the domestic rat population (Rattus rattus) did not show significant seasonal fluctuations regardless of locality. Arvicanthis niloticus abundance was negatively associated with monthly precipitation at a six month lag and positively associated with current monthly temperatures, and Crocidura spp. abundance was positively associated with precipitation at a three month lag and negatively associated with current monthly temperatures. The abundance of A. niloticus and Crocidura spp. were both positively correlated with the harvest of millet and maize. The association between the abundance of several small mammal species and rainfall is consistent with previous models of the timing of human plague cases in relation to precipitation in the West Nile region. The seasonal increase in the abundance of key potential host species within the plague focus, but not outside of

  8. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae collected by malaise trap method in Gölcük Natural Park (Isparta, Turkey, with a new record for Turkish fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Gül E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on Alticinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae material collected by Malaise trapping which is different from other standardized collecting methods. A total of 19 flea beetle species belonging to 6 genera were collected from Gölcük Natural Park, Isparta (Turkey during 2009. The species are listed in a table together with distributional data in Turkey. Among them, Longitarsus curtus (Allard, 1860 is recorded for the first time in Turkey. L. monticola Kutschera, 1863 and L. curtus are recently separated synonyms and thus all data referring to the distribution of both species are currently important. Hence, the zoogeographical distribution of the new record is reviewed with some remarks; habitus and genitalia are illustrated.

  9. Candidatus Bartonella antechini: a novel Bartonella species detected in fleas and ticks from the yellow-footed antechinus (Antechinus flavipes), an Australian marsupial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; Owen, Helen; Fleming, Patricia A; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-05-05

    Bartonella are fastidious, Gram-negative, aerobic bacilli belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria group. In the last ten years, the discovery of new Bartonella species from a variety of mammalian hosts, arthropod vectors and geographical areas has increased. More than 20 species of Bartonella have been identified, of which approximately thirteen are associated with disease in humans and animals. Recently, four novel species of Bartonella were isolated from mammalian hosts in Australia: Bartonella australis from eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and Bartonella rattaustraliani, Bartonella queenslandensis and Bartonella coopersplainsensis from rodents. Bartonella-like organisms have also been detected from Ixodes tasmani ticks collected from koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). However, very little is known about Bartonella spp. in other marsupials in Australia. We report the identification of a novel Bartonella species detected from fleas (Acanthopsylla jordani) and ticks (Ixodes antechini) collected from a small carnivorous marsupial, Antechinus flavipes (Mardos or Yellow-footed antechinus) in the southwest of Western Australia. New nested-PCRs targeting the gltA gene and the ribosomal ITS region were developed as part of the present study. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA, gltA, ftsZ and rpoB genes and the ribosomal ITS region revealed that this detection is a distinct Bartonella species and is related to B. australis isolated from kangaroos. This is the first report of two different possible arthropod vectors in Australia (ticks and fleas) being infected with the same species of Bartonella. We propose the name Candidatus Bartonella antechini n. sp. for the recently characterized organism.

  10. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    Hasok Chang (Sci Educ 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life sciences (HPLS). The project focuses on the study and use of descriptions, observations, experiments, and recording techniques used by early microscopists to classify various species of water flea. The first published illustrations and descriptions of the water flea were included in the Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam's, Historia Insectorum Generalis (1669) (Algemeene verhandeling van de bloedeloose dierkens. t'Utrrecht, Meinardus van Dreunen, ordinaris Drucker van d'Academie). After studying these, we first used the descriptions, techniques, and nomenclature recovered to observe, record, and classify the specimens collected from our university ponds. We then used updated recording techniques and image-based keys to observe and identify the specimens. The implementation of these newer techniques was guided in part by the observations and records that resulted from our use of the recovered historical methods of investigation. The series of HPLS labs constructed as part of this interdisciplinary project provided a space for students to consider and wrestle with the many philosophical issues that arise in the process of identifying an unknown organism and offered unique learning opportunities that engaged students' curiosity and critical thinking skills.

  11. Plague studies in California: a review of long-term disease activity, flea-host relationships and plague ecology in the coniferous forests of the Southern Cascades and northern Sierra Nevada mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles R; Tucker, James R; Wilson, Barbara A; Clover, James R

    2010-06-01

    We review 28 years of long-term surveillance (1970-1997) for plague activity among wild rodents from ten locations within three coniferous forest habitat types in the northern Sierra Nevada and the Southern Cascade mountains of northeastern California. We identify rodent hosts and their fleas and document long-term plague activity in each habitat type. The highest seroprevalence for Yersinia pestis occurred in the chipmunks, Tamias senex and T. quadrimaculatus, and the pine squirrel, Tamiasciurus douglasii. The most commonly infected fleas were Ceratophyllus ciliatus and Eumolpianus eumolpi from chipmunks and Oropsylla montana and O. idahoensis from ground squirrels. Serological surveillance demonstrated that populations of T. senex, T. quadrimaculatus and T. douglasii are moderately resistant to plague, survive infection, and are, therefore, good sentinels for plague activity. Recaptured T. senex and T. quadrimaculatus showed persistence of plague antibodies and evidence of re-infection over a two year period. These rodent species, their fleas, and the ecological factors common to the coniferous forest habitats likely promote the maintenance of plague foci in northeastern California.

  12. Transfer and spread of fleas and relating effects on plague epidemic in west China%中国西部蚤类的转移和扩散及其对鼠疫流行的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎唯; 梁继红

    2010-01-01

    Flea,known as a vector of plague,is an ectozoa of warm-blood animals.The transfer or exchange of flea among the hosts has played an important role in the natural plasuc epidemic.Furthermore,the transfer or exchange of flea between the primary and potential hosts not only has effects on natural plague epidemic,but also plays a supplementary and consolidating mh in nature location and preservation of plague.To prevent the plague epidemic,we should keep away from the sick or dead animals,such as some herbivores (sheep,red deer,roe,rabbit,etc.)and predators(fox,ferretai,tigerferret,lynx,etc.).In the event of an epidemic,we should focus on the location,eliminate rodents and fleas to avoid further spread of plague by infected fleas.%蚤类是温血动物的体外寄生虫,又是鼠疫的特异性媒介.蚤类在宿主动物种群内的转移或交换,是保存鼠疫自然疫源性动物疾病流行的一个重要环节.主要宿主或多宿主疫源地与次要宿主和偶然宿主之间蚤类的转移或交换,不仅对动物间鼠疫的流行起到推波助澜的作用,而且对鼠疫自然疫源地的性质和鼠疫菌的长期保存亦起到补充和巩固的作用.为防制人间鼠疫的发生,除不接触病、死疫源动物外,尤应禁止剥食自毙草食动物(羊、马鹿、狍、兔等)及食肉动物(狐、艾鼬、虎鼬、猞猁等).一旦发生人间鼠疫,应就地扑灭.在处理疫区(点)时,必须同时灭鼠灭蚤,以防止疫蚤的转移和扩散,达到控制疫源蔓延,进而避免发生人间鼠疫的目的 .

  13. Field Evaluation of Two Different Treatment Approaches and Their Ability to Control Fleas and Prevent Canine Leishmaniosis in a Highly Endemic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Ettore; Gaglio, Gabriella; Falsone, Luigi; Giannetto, Salvatore; Solari Basano, Fabrizio; Nazzari, Roberto; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Annoscia, Giada; Tarallo, Viviana Domenica; Stanneck, Dorothee; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of two collars for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations. Additionally the effect of these collars on the incidence of Leishmania infantum infection as compared with a group of vaccinated dogs was evaluated. A total of 224 young dogs from private animal shelters were enrolled in April/May into four groups: G1, 55 dogs treated with 10% imidacloprid + 4.5% flumethrin collar (Seresto, Bayer Animal Health); G2, 60 dogs treated with 4% deltamethrin collar (Scalibor protector band, MSD Animal Health); G3, 54 dogs vaccinated with CaniLeish (Virbac Animal Health); and G4, 55 dogs left non-treated as controls. Dogs were followed up at days 120 (September), 210 (December), and 360 (April-May). At those time points, clinical assessments, ectoparasite counts and blood, bone marrow and skin samples, to detect the presence of L. infantum, were performed. The efficacy of Seresto in protecting dogs from flea infestation was 100% (P < 0.01) on day 120 and 210, while animals treated with Scalibor showed a prevalence of the infestation ranging from 23.3% to 33.3% on day 120 and 210, respectively. At the end of the study, the incidence of L. infantum infection in collared dogs—based on animals being positive in any of the tests—was 5.5% in Seresto-treated dogs and 20% in Scalibor-treated dogs, resulting in overall efficacy of prevention of 88.3% for Seresto and 61.8% for Scalibor. No statistical difference was detected in L. infantum positive dogs for bone marrow PCR and/or cytology at day 360 between the CaniLeish (15.4%) and non-treated control dogs (10.0%). Both collars proved to be effective (P < 0.01) in preventing L. infantum infection throughout one transmission season, whereas no significant difference was recorded in the frequency of active infections between dogs vaccinated with CaniLeish and control dogs, emphasizing the importance of using repellent/insecticide actives as a priority measure for protection against canine

  14. Efficacy and safety of a new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner in the treatment of naturally occurring flea and tick infestations in cats presented as veterinary patients in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurden, Thomas; Becskei, Csilla; Farkas, Robert; Lin, Dan; Rugg, Douglas

    2017-04-01

    Two randomised, blinded, multi-centre field studies were conducted in Europe (Germany, Italy, France, Hungary) to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of three monthly applications of a new spot-on formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner (Stronghold(®) Plus, Zoetis) against natural flea or tick infestations in cats presented as veterinary patients. The spot-on formulation was administered at the commercial dose range of 6.0-12.0mg selamectin and 1.0-2.0mg sarolaner per kg bodyweight. In the flea study, the improvement in clinical signs associated with flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) was also monitored. Imidacloprid plus moxidectin (Advocate(®) for Cats, Bayer) and fipronil (Frontline(®) Spot on, Merial) were used as positive control products in the flea and tick studies, respectively. Treatments were administered on Days 0, 30 and 60. Efficacy was calculated based on the mean percent reduction of live parasite counts on post-treatment days 14, 30, 60 and 90 versus the pre-treatment count on Day 0. Non-inferiority of selamectin/sarolaner to the control products was assessed at each time-point using a non-inferiority margin of 15% at the one-sided 0.025 significance level. Cats were enrolled in a 2:1 ratio (selamectin/sarolaner:comparator). In the flea study, 277 cats were assessed for efficacy and safety, and an additional 170 cats were assessed for safety only. On days 14, 30, 60 and 90, efficacy against fleas was 97.4%, 97.3%, 98.8% and 99.4% in the selamectin/sarolaner-treated group and was 90.0%, 83.6%, 87.7% and 96.3% in the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group, respectively. Selamectin/sarolaner was non-inferior to imidacloprid/moxidectin at all time-points. For the 16 cats identified as having FAD at enrolment, clinical signs related to FAD improved following treatment administration. In the tick study, 200 cats were assessed for efficacy and safety, and a further 70 cats were assessed for safety only. Four tick species were identified. Overall efficacy

  15. Formation and structure of the ephippium (resting egg case) in relation to molting and egg laying in the water flea Daphnia pulex De Geer (Cladocera: Daphniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Tochinai, Shin

    2014-07-01

    Resting eggs produced by daphnid species in response to environmental deterioration play an important role in colonizing new habitats or in re-establishing extinct populations. Females lay resting eggs into the space within the dorsal part of their carapace and form an egg case called the ephippium to protect them. Previous studies mainly reported the morphology of the completely formed ephippium and/or the forming ephippium of an uncertain stage. To understand ephippium formation and to clarify key transitions in the formation of resting eggs, we examined the structure and formation of the ephippium in the water flea Daphnia pulex De Geer (Cladocera: Daphniidae) by stereomicroscopy, histology, and scanning electron microscopy. The females used in this study produced resting eggs by obligate parthenogenesis. We divided ephippium formation into four stages based on two molts and a single ovulation, as follows. Stage I begins 13 min after molting in adult females that do not ovulate. In Stage II, immediately after the first molt, a protuberance appears beneath the neck region and the carapace begins to thicken. In Stage III, the resting eggs ovulate and the carapace in the area of the forming ephippium becomes much thicker than the normal carapace and accumulates dark pigmentation. In Stage IV, following the second molt, the female sheds the ephippium with the enclosed resting eggs and forms a new carapace. These stages will provide a useful reference for future studies on resting egg formation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Spindle assembly and spatial distribution of γ-tubulin during abortive meiosis and cleavage division in the parthenogenetic water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Tochinai, Shin

    2012-11-01

    In most animal species, centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers, usually disintegrate in oocytes during meiosis and are reconstructed from sperm-provided centrioles before the first cleavage division. In parthenogenetic oocytes, however, no sperm-derived centrosome-dependent microtubule nucleation is expected, as fertilization does not occur. The water flea Daphnia pulex undergoes parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction differentially in response to environmental cues. We used immunofluorescence microscopy with anti-α-tubulin and anti-γ-tubulin antibodies to examine spindle formation and the occurrence of centrosomes during parthenogenetic oogenesis and the subsequent cleavage division in D. pulex. The spindle formed in abortive meiosis in parthenogenesis is barrel-shaped and lacks centrosomes, whereas the spindle in the subsequent cleavage division is typically spindle-shaped, with centrosomes. During abortive meiosis, γ-tubulin is localized along the spindle, while in the first cleavage division it is localized only at the spindle poles. Thus, D. pulex should provide a useful comparative model system for elucidating mechanisms of spindle formation and improving our understanding of how evolutionary modification of these mechanisms is involved in the switch from sexual to parthenogenetic reproduction.

  17. Elaborate regulations of the predator-induced polyphenism in the water flea Daphnia pulex: kairomone-sensitive periods and life-history tradeoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Maki; Naraki, Yuka; Tochinai, Shin; Miura, Toru

    2009-12-01

    Adaptive polyphenism produces alternative phenotypes depending on environmental stimuli. The water flea Daphnia pulex shows predator-induced polyphenism, facultatively forming neckteeth in response to kairomones released by Chaoborus larvae. This study was designed to reveal the regulatory systems producing the defensive morph during embryonic and postembryonic development. As noted previously, the crest epithelium at the site of neckteeth is shown to thicken earlier the neckteeth formation, and the neckteeth number increased until the third instar, and later disappeared. Exposure to kairomone at various time points and intervals during development showed that the signal was required even at early postembryonic stages to maintain neckteeth. Moreover, two different induction methods, i.e. embryonic and maternal exposures, enabled us to discriminate maternal and zygotic effects in response to kairomone. Direct embryonic exposure is shown to be sufficient to form neckteeth without maternal effect although their growth was diminished; namely, there is a trade-off for neckteeth production. However, maternal exposures resulted in larger progenies in smaller numbers, suggesting that the mother daphnids change their reproductive strategy depending on kairomone signals. Taken together, the developmental responses to the presence of predators are regulated elaborately at various levels.

  18. Assessment of predatory ability of native and non-native freshwater gammaridean species: A rapid test with water fleas as prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.E.M.W. STOFFELS, J.S. TUMMERS, G. VAN DER VELDE, D. PLATVOET, H.W.M. HENDRIKS, R.S.E.W. LEUVEN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Predation rate with relation to species, sex and water temperature was tested among four different gammaridean species: Dikerogammarus villosus, Gammarus roeselii, Gammarus pulex and Gammarus fossarum. Tests were performed in microcosms in climate-controlled rooms at five different temperatures. Daphnia magna, a common water flea, served as prey. On ave- rage D. villosus showed the highest consumption rate of Daphnia magna over the entire temperature range, followed in decreasing order by G. pulex, G. roeselii and G. fossarum. The predation rate of all species showed a distinct peak at 20°C. Correction of predation rates for body size gave somewhat different results. D. villosus is then still the most predatory of all gammaridean species tested followed by G. pulex, G. fossarum and G. roeselii. The outcome of the Daphnia tests is consistent with results of other studies with different prey. This supports that the Daphnia test is a good and quick indicator of the predatory abilities in gammaridean species at varying temperatures, and allows the prediction of how changing temperature regimes influence invasion impacts [Current Zoology 57 (6: 836–843, 2011].

  19. The water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) as a test species for screening and evaluation of chemicals with endocrine disrupting effects on crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarazako, Norihisa; Oda, Shigeto

    2007-02-01

    The water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) is a cyclical parthenogen, which can reproduce both by parthenogenesis and by sexual reproduction. With its ease of handling in the laboratory, several testing methods using D. magna exist for regulatory toxicity testing. Recently, several studies revealed that one of the major hormone groups in insects and crustaceans, juvenile hormones, are involved in the shift of reproductive mode from parthenogenesis to sexual reproduction (production of male neonates). Using offspring sex ratio as a new endpoint has made it possible to identify chemicals with juvenile hormone-like effects on crustaceans. The testing method using D. magna, in which offspring sex ratio is incorporated as a new endpoint, is now being proposed to the OECD as an enhanced version of the existing OECD Test Guideline 211: Daphnia magna reproduction test. No other clear-cut endpoint for identifying juvenile-hormone disrupting effects has ever been found in crustaceans than the induction of male neonates production in cladocerans. In this regard, it is expected that testing methods using D. magna are suitable for screening and risk assessment of chemicals with juvenile-hormone disrupting effects.

  20. Assessment of predatory ability of native and non-native freshwater gammaridean species: A rapid test with water fleas as prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.E.M.W. STOFFELS; J.S. TUMMERS; G. VAN DER VELDE; D. PLAT-VOET; H.W.M. HENDRIKS; R.S.E.W. LEUVEN

    2011-01-01

    Predation rate with relation to species,sex and water temperature was tested among four different gammaridean species:Dikerogammarus villosus,Gammarus roeselii,Gammarus pulex and Gammarus fossarum.Tests were performed in microcosms in climate-controlled rooms at five different temperatures.Daphnia magna,a common water flea,served as prey.On average D.villosus showed the highest consumption rate of Daphnia magna over the entire temperature range,followed in decreasing order by G.pulex,G.roeselii and G.fossarum.The predation rate of all species showed a distinct peak at 20℃.Correction of predation rates for body size gave somewhat different results.D.villosus is then still the most predatory of all gammaridean species tested followed by G.pulex,G.fossarum and G.roeselii.The outcome of the Daphnia tests is consistent with results of other studies with different prey.This supports that the Daphnia test is a good and quick indicator of the predatory abilities in gammaridean species at varying temperatures,and allows the prediction of how changing temperature regimes influence invasion impacts [Current Zoology 57 (6):836-843,2011 ].

  1. Comparative Global Gene Expression Profiles of Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant at Flea and Human Body Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp is involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. We previously characterized a Δlpp mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 and found that this mutant was defective in surviving in macrophages and was attenuated in a mouse inhalation model of plague when compared to the highly virulent wild-type (WT bacterium. We performed global transcriptional profiling of WT Y. pestis and its Δlpp mutant using microarrays. The organisms were cultured at 26 and 37 degrees Celsius to simulate the flea vector and mammalian host environments, respectively. Our data revealed vastly different effects of lpp mutation on the transcriptomes of Y. pestis grown at 37 versus 26C. While the absence of Lpp resulted mainly in the downregulation of metabolic genes at 26C, the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant cultured at 37C exhibited profound alterations in stress response and virulence genes, compared to WT bacteria. We investigated one of the stress-related genes (htrA downregulated in the Δlpp mutant relative to WT Y. pestis. Indeed, complementation of the Δlpp mutant with the htrA gene restored intracellular survival of the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant. Our results support a role for Lpp in Y. pestis adaptation to the host environment, possibly via transcriptional activation of htrA.

  2. Y型嗅觉仪在蚤类对宿主选择性研究中的应用%Application of Y-tube olfactometer in the study of host selection behaviors of fleas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杰; 孟凤霞; 吴丹丹

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish the method for the detection of host odor selection of fleas using the Y-tube olfactometer, and to learn the host selecting behaviors of Ctenocephalides felis felis, Xenopsylla cheopis and Leptopsylla segnis between white rat and white mice, providing evidence for the study of flea host selection and the relationship of "fleas-host/human-diseases". Methods With X. cheopis used as the test insect and Y-tube olfactometer as the test device, the effect of Y-tube wind speed, the arm-tube position of the Y-tube olfactometer and test room light on the flea host selection behaviors were studied.With this method, the host selection behaviors between rats and mice of C. felis felis, X. cheopis and L. segnis laboratory populations were measured. Results It was found that in the period of detection that lasted for 20 min there was no significant differences in the selection behaviors of X. cheopis when the air flow rate was 0.6-1.5 L/min, neither were the arm-tube position of the Y-tube offactometer and the changes in light. C. felisfelis was found to have significant selectivity for rats by the established method, while X. cheopis and L. segnis had no significantly different behavior response to the rats and mice.Conclusion The host selection behaviors of fleas can be measured with Y-tube offactometer. Host selection behaviors are helpful in understanding their host specificity and in learning the correlation of "flea-host/human-diseases".%目的 应用Y型嗅觉仪,建立蚤类对宿主动物气味选择的测定方法,并研究猫栉首蚤、印鼠客蚤和缓慢细蚤对大白鼠和小白鼠的选择行为,为探究不同蚤种对不同宿主动物的特异性选择和了解"蚤类-宿主动物或人-相关传染病"的关系提供理论依据.方法 以印鼠客蚤为试虫,用Y型嗅觉仪测定风速、Y型管臂管的几何位置、光照对其选择行为的影响,以猫栉首蚤、印鼠客蚤和缓慢细蚤成蚤为试虫分别测定对大

  3. Structure and Function of FS50, a salivary protein from the flea Xenopsylla cheopis that blocks the sodium channel NaV1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueqing; Zhang, Bei; Yang, Shilong; An, Su; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring toxins have been invaluable tools for the study of structural and functional relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Few studies have been made of potential channel-modulating substances from blood-feeding arthropods. He we describe the characterization FS50, a salivary protein from the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, that exhibits an inhibitory activity against the NaV1.5 channel with an IC50 of 1.58 μM. The pore-blocking mechanism of this toxin is evident from the kinetics of activation and inactivation suggesting that FS50 does not interfere with the voltage sensor of NaV1.5. FS50 exhibits high specificity for NaV1.5, since 10 μM FS50 had no discernable effect on voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglia or VGSC forms individually expressed in HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, intravenous injection of FS50 into rats and monkeys elicited recovery from arrhythmia induced by BaCl2, as would be expected from a blockade of NaV1.5. The crystal structure of FS50 revealed a βαββ domain similar to that of scorpion β toxin and a small N-terminal βαβ domain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments have implicated a basic surface including the side chains of Arg 6, His 11 and Lys 32 as potentially important in the FS50 NaV1.5 interaction. PMID:27819327

  4. Incidence, Spread and Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Resistance in European Populations of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorte H Højland

    Full Text Available Cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae is a major early season pest of oilseed rape throughout Europe. Pyrethroids have been used for controlling this pest by foliar application, but in recent years control failures have occurred, particularly in Germany due to the evolution of knock-down resistance (kdr. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence and spread of pyrethroid resistance in CSFB collected in Germany, Denmark and the United Kingdom during 2014. The level of pyrethroid resistance was measured in adult vial tests and linked to the presence of kdr genotypes.Although kdr (L1014F genotypes are present in all three countries, marked differences in pyrethroid efficacy were found in adult vial tests. Whereas Danish CSFB samples were in general susceptible to recommended label rates, those collected in the UK mostly resist such rates to some extent. Moderately resistant and susceptible samples were found in Germany. Interestingly, some of the resistant samples from the UK did not carry the kdr allele, which is in contrast to German CSFB. Pre-treatment with PBO, prior to exposure to λ-cyhalothrin suggested involvement of metabolic resistance in UK samples.Danish samples were mostly susceptible with very low resistance ratios, while most other samples showed reduced sensitivity in varying degrees. Likewise, there was a clear difference in the presence of the kdr mutation between the three countries. In the UK, the presence of kdr genotypes did not always correlate well with resistant phenotypes. This appears to be primarily conferred by a yet undisclosed, metabolic-based mechanism. Nevertheless our survey disclosed an alarming trend concerning the incidence and spread of CSFB resistance to pyrethroids, which is likely to have negative impacts on oilseed production in affected regions due to the lack of alternative modes of action for resistance management purposes.

  5. 云南香格里拉山地自然风景区蚤类多样性的研究%FLEAS FAUNA ON SMALL MAMMALS IN FIVE NATURAL LANDSCAPE AREAS OF SHANGRI-LA,YUNNAN,CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛军旗; 龚正达; 栗冬梅; 刘起勇; 和耀兰

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are considered as the most common and important external parasites on small mammals , which can spread a variety of viral, bacterial and rickettsial diseases to humans, such as bubonic plague and typhus.Investigation of flea fauna is an important work in natural landscape area for their biting on visitors which may raise the risk of spreading vector-borne diseases.To investigate the flea fauna and distinguish the differences among different natural landscape areas, researches were performed during autumn of 2005 in five main mountain areas: Hutiao Gorge, Haba Snow Mountain, Baishuitai Terraces, Qianhu Mountain and Red mountain.The results showed: (1) A total of 633 fleas identified as 34 species belonging to 4 genera and 19 families were collected from small rodents trapped , including 10 new recorded species (subspecies) in Shangri-La, among which Stenoponia and Stenoponia himalayana are first trapped in Yunnan province, implying that there existed abundant species of fleas in natural landscape areas in Shangri-La.(2) Both the species richness and Shannon-Wienor index of fleas increased along with the increase of altitude, which were highest in Red mountain with an altitude of 3 500-4 200 m, and lowest in Hutiao Gorge with an altitude of 1 800-1 900 m.(3) The 5 natural landscape areas were classified into two groups based on the Jaccard indexes and cluster analysis, one is Hutiao Gorge, Haba Snow Mountain and Baishuitai Terraces, another one is Qianhu Mountain and Red mountain.It is indicated that, compared with the vegetation and humidity , human disturbance may play a more important role in flea diversity of natural landscape areas . (4) Both the species richness and Shannon-Wienor index of fleas showed no relation with that of small mammal, the Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were 0.24 and 0.60, respectively.%蚤类是传播多种自然疫源性疾病的重要媒介昆虫,人类在自然风景区户外活动时存在被其叮咬而感染虫媒

  6. The sustained speed of kill of ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) and fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) on dogs by a spot-on combination of fipronil and permethrin (Effitix(®)) compared with oral afoxolaner (NexGard(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvejić, Dejan; Schneider, Claudia; Neethling, Willem; Hellmann, Klaus; Liebenberg, Julian; Navarro, Christelle

    2017-08-30

    The rapid speed of kill of a spot-on, combination of fipronil-permethrin (Effitix(®), Virbac) was shown against infestations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ctenocephalides felis on dogs. Efficacy was determined against new infestations at weekly intervals for one month after treatment. Dogs were allocated randomly to either an untreated control or to a single administration, given on Day 0, of either topical fipronil-permethrin (6.7-13.4mg/kg and 60-120mg/kg, respectively) or oral afoxolaner (2.72-6.8mg/kg), based on pre-treatment, host-suitability flea counts. Dogs were infested with 50, unfed, adult R. sanguineus on Days 7, 14, 21 and 28, and with 100C. felis on Days 8, 15, 22 and 29. Tick counts were performed 0.5, 2, 6, 12 and 24h, and flea counts were performed 0.5 and 24h after each infestation. No treatment-related adverse reactions occurred. Dogs in the untreated group maintained viable infestations throughout the study. Following infestation, live tick and flea counts for dogs treated with fipronil-permethrin compared with untreated dogs were rapidly and significantly reduced with efficacy apparent at 0.5h after infestation. Flea efficacies (arithmetic mean counts) at 0.5h after infestation on Day 7 (Day 28) were significantly greater for fipronil-permethrin, 70% (34%) compared with 8% (18%) for afoxolaner (P≤0.05). Tick efficacies at 2h on Day 7 (Day 28) were 74% (63%) for fipronil-permethrin compared with 10% (0%) for afoxolaner (P≤0.05). Efficacies for tick repellency as indicated by counts of ticks off the dogs at 2h on Day 7 (Day 28) were greater for fipronil-permethrin, 32% (22%) compared with afoxolaner, 0% (0%) (P≤0.05). Anti-attachment efficacies at 12h were greater for fipronil-permethrin compared with afoxolaner. Tick efficacies at 24h, based on arithmetic (geometric) means, were significantly greater on Day 28 for fipronil-permethrin compared with afoxolaner (P≤0.05), 74% (87%) and 45% (60%), respectively, and were similar (P >0

  7. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (W.A.A.V.P.) guidelines for evaluating the efficacy of parasiticides for the treatment, prevention and control of flea and tick infestation on dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiondo, A A; Holdsworth, P A; Green, P; Blagburn, B L; Jacobs, D E

    2007-04-30

    These guidelines are intended to assist the planning and conduct of laboratory and clinical studies to assess the efficacy of ectoparasiticides applied to dogs or cats for the purpose of treating, preventing and controlling flea and tick infestations. The term ectoparasiticide includes insecticidal and acaricidal compounds, as well as insect growth regulators. The range of biological activities accruing from animal treatment that are considered include: repellency and anti-feeding effects, knockdown, speed of kill, immediate and persistent lethal effects, and interference with egg fertility and subsequent development of off-host life cycle stages. Information is provided on the selection of animals, dose determination, dose confirmation and field studies, record keeping, interpretation of results and animal welfare. These guidelines are also intended to assist registration authorities involved in the approval and registration of new parasiticides, and to facilitate the worldwide adoption of harmonized procedures.

  8. Evaluation of the long-term efficacy and safety of an imidacloprid 10%/flumethrin 4.5% polymer matrix collar (Seresto® in dogs and cats naturally infested with fleas and/or ticks in multicentre clinical field studies in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanneck Dorothee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of these two GCP multicentre European clinical field studies was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of a new imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto®, Bayer AnimalHealth, Investigational Veterinary Product(IVP in dogs and cats naturally infested with fleas and/or ticks in comparison to a dimpylat collar ("Ungezieferband fuer Hunde/fuer Katzen", Beaphar, Control Product (CP. Methods 232 (IVP and 81 (CP cats and 271(IVP and 129 (CP dogs were treated with either product according to label claims and formed the safety population. Flea and tick counts were conducted in monthly intervals for up to 8 months in the efficacy subpopulation consisting of 118 (IVP + 47 (CP cats and 197 (IVP + 94 (CP dogs. Efficacy was calculated as reduction of infestation rate within the same treatment group and statistically compared between the two treatment groups. Results Preventive efficacy against fleas in cats/dogs varied in the IVP group between 97.4%/94.1% and 100%/100% (overall mean: 98.3%/96.7% throughout the 8 month period and in the CP group between 57.1%/28.2% and 96.1%/67.8% (overall mean: 79.3%/57.9%. Preventive efficacy against ticks in cats/dogs varied in the IVP group between 94.0%/91.2% and 100%/100% (overall mean: 98.4%/94.7% throughout the 8 month period and in the CP group between 90.7%/79.9% and 100%/88.0% (overall mean: 96.9%/85.6%. The IVP group was statistically non-inferior to the CP group, and on various assessment days, statistical superiority was proven for flea and tick count reduction in dogs and cats. Both treatments proved to be safe in dogs and cats with mainly minor local observations at the application site. There was moreover, no incidence of any mechanical problem with the collar in dogs and cats during the entire study period. Conclusions The imidacloprid/flumethrin collar proved to reduce tick counts by at least 90% and flea counts by at least 95% for a period of at least 7-8 months in

  9. Evaluation of the long-term efficacy and safety of an imidacloprid 10%/flumethrin 4.5% polymer matrix collar (Seresto®) in dogs and cats naturally infested with fleas and/or ticks in multicentre clinical field studies in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of these two GCP multicentre European clinical field studies was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of a new imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto®, Bayer AnimalHealth, Investigational Veterinary Product(IVP)) in dogs and cats naturally infested with fleas and/or ticks in comparison to a dimpylat collar ("Ungezieferband fuer Hunde/fuer Katzen", Beaphar, Control Product (CP)). Methods 232 (IVP) and 81 (CP) cats and 271(IVP) and 129 (CP) dogs were treated with either product according to label claims and formed the safety population. Flea and tick counts were conducted in monthly intervals for up to 8 months in the efficacy subpopulation consisting of 118 (IVP) + 47 (CP) cats and 197 (IVP) + 94 (CP) dogs. Efficacy was calculated as reduction of infestation rate within the same treatment group and statistically compared between the two treatment groups. Results Preventive efficacy against fleas in cats/dogs varied in the IVP group between 97.4%/94.1% and 100%/100% (overall mean: 98.3%/96.7%) throughout the 8 month period and in the CP group between 57.1%/28.2% and 96.1%/67.8% (overall mean: 79.3%/57.9%). Preventive efficacy against ticks in cats/dogs varied in the IVP group between 94.0%/91.2% and 100%/100% (overall mean: 98.4%/94.7%) throughout the 8 month period and in the CP group between 90.7%/79.9% and 100%/88.0% (overall mean: 96.9%/85.6%). The IVP group was statistically non-inferior to the CP group, and on various assessment days, statistical superiority was proven for flea and tick count reduction in dogs and cats. Both treatments proved to be safe in dogs and cats with mainly minor local observations at the application site. There was moreover, no incidence of any mechanical problem with the collar in dogs and cats during the entire study period. Conclusions The imidacloprid/flumethrin collar proved to reduce tick counts by at least 90% and flea counts by at least 95% for a period of at least 7-8 months in cats and dogs

  10. 简易包种法防治油菜跳甲的初报%A Preliminary Study on Control Rape Flea Beetle with Simple Packeting Seeds Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来有鹏; 张登峰

    2012-01-01

    [Aims] The paper aims to use the simple packeting seeds method to screen out the chemical pesticides for control rape flea beetle. [Results] The average ratio of rape seeding conserving reached over 83% with monosultap, but the control efficiency of imidacloprid was the worst with the ratio of low than 45%. The ratio was up to 85% on the 9rd day after rape emergence with triazophos. The ratio was up to 88.79% on the 9rd day after rape emergence with mixture of inridacloprid and malathion.The ratio achieved 89.64% on the 3rd day after rape emergence with mixture of fipronil and triazophos. The ratio reached over 85% except fipronil and phoxim mixture. The ratio achieved over 84% with monosultap and phoxim mixture. The ratio reached 93.43% on the 9th day after rape emergence with monosultap and fipronil mixture. [Conclusions] There was some application value in production with monosultap, triazophos, imidacloprid and malathion mixture, fipronil and triazophos mixture, monosultap and fipronil mixture, monosultap and phoxim mixture.%[目的]采用简易包种法筛选有效防治油菜跳甲的化学药剂.[结果]杀虫单处理后平均保苗率在83%以上,而吡虫啉的防治效果最差,平均保苗率低于45%;三唑磷处理后出苗第9天,平均保苗率达85%;出苗第9天经吡虫啉·马拉硫磷的处理平均保苗率达88.79%;出苗第3天,氟虫腈·三唑磷混配剂处理后平均保苗率达89.64%;出苗第9天除氟虫腈·辛硫磷混配剂外,其余氟虫腈的混配剂处理后,平均保苗率在85%以上;杀虫单·辛硫磷混配剂处理后平均保苗率高于84%;出苗后第9天杀虫单·氟虫腈混配剂平均保苗率为93.43%.[结论]杀虫单和三唑磷单剂、吡虫啉·马拉硫磷混配剂、氟虫腈·三唑磷、氟虫腈·马拉硫磷、氟虫腈·杀虫单、杀虫单·辛硫磷的种衣剂对防治油菜跳甲在生产上有一定的应用价值.

  11. Smaller Fleas: Viruses of Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Hyman; Stephen T. Abedon

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world’s most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain B...

  12. Case report: pulicosis por Ctenocephalides felis felis en ovinos y caprinos en la sabana de Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraín Benavides Ortiz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia the rearing of hair sheep and goats are expanding in various regions for being an alternative for meat and milk production at competitive prices due to their adaptability and easiness to digest rough fodder. Among the ectoparasites that affect small ruminants traditionally are recognized the lice and the sheep keds Melophagus ovinus (Díptera: Hippoboscidae, however fleas are not included. Here the occurrence of the common cat flea Ctenocephalides felis felis (Díptera: Siphonaptera affecting sheep and goats in a farm at the Sabana de Bogotá are described an so there was performed an epidemiological and parasitological evaluation. The barn maintained animals in rotational grazing at an approximated stocking rate of 25 head/ha, receiving additional supplements of hay and silage. The presence of the flea was confirmed in sheep and goats, young and adult, as well as in dogs. Diverse degrees of anemia were evidenced but the association between flea infestation and anemia, or the presence of other anemia producing agents could not be studied. In the farm synthetic parasiticides are not used, extracts of Ruda (Ruta graveolens are administered to mitigate parasitosis, without major efficacy. Sheep and goat breeders in the tropics should consider flea infestation as an agent causing adverse animal welfare situations in their farms. Control should start from the knowledge of the life cycle of the flea, trying to interrupt it.

  13. Preliminary research on community and evolution ecology of fleas on small mammals of 19 counties in Yunnan,China%云南省19县市小兽体表蚤类群落和进化生态的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜勇; 吴滇; 郭宪国; 门兴元

    2007-01-01

    目的 了解云南省19县(市)的小兽体表蚤类不同生境的群落多样性,并对其协同进化进行研究.方法 运用群落生态学常用的丰富度指数、均匀度指数、多样性指数、生态优势度、种间随机相遇率指数和构成比进行分析研究.结果 本次研究共捕获小兽10 856只,分别隶属于10科,27属,47种.从这些小兽体表采获9 532只蚤类,分别隶属于5科,22属,39种.5种优势小兽分别是黄胸鼠、大绒鼠、齐氏姬鼠、褐家鼠和锡金小鼠(占总数的71.69%);5种优势蚤类分别是方叶栉眼蚤、印鼠客蚤、缓慢细蚤、无值大椎蚤、和特新蚤(占总数的74.33%).结论 不同生境中蚤类群落与小兽群落的多样性指数有一致的变化趋势.不同生境中优势蚤类与优势小兽亦有相对应关系.在一定生境中的优势蚤类也是小兽宿主体表的优势蚤种.研究结果可能是蚤类与小兽宿主间协同进化的一个证据.%Objective To investigate the community and evolution ecology of fleas on small mammals of 19 counties in Yunnan. Methods The parameters of community ecology: richness (S), evenness (J),diversity index (H), dominance index (C), PIE and constituent ratios (Cr) were used for analyses in this paper. Results 10 856 small mammals were captured, which belong to 10 families, 27 genera and 47 species. A total of 9 532 fleas were collected from the small mammal hosts and were identified into 5 families, 22 genera and 39 species. Five dominant small mammals are Rattus flavipectus, Eothenomys miletus, Apodemus chevrieri, Rattus norvegicus and Mus pahari which account for 71.69% of the total individuals, while the dominant fleas are Ctenophthalmus quadratus, Xenopsylla cheopis, Leptopsylla segnis, Macrostylophora euteles and Neopsylla specialis specialis (74.33% out of the total). Conclusion The diversity index of flea community was consistent with that of small mammal community in different habitats. The dominant species of

  14. Deux nouveaux Ctenophthalmus (Insecta : Siphonaptera : Ctenophthalmidae de Tanzanie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laudisoit A.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Lors d’une étude épidémiologique du foyer pesteux de Lushoto, quelques puces rares ou nouvelles ont été collectées. Nous décrivons ici l’une d’entre elles, Ctenophthalmus (Ethioctenophthalmus teucqae n. sp. L’examen de spécimens de comparaison déposés au National History Museum (Londres, nous permet d’en créer une sous-espèce, C. (E. teucqae shumeensis n. ssp.

  15. “Campus Flea Market”Mobile Terminal App Based on Android%基于Android的“校园跳蚤市场”移动端App的设计❋

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任培花; 宣昱如

    2016-01-01

    论文对二手市场进行现状分析,调研了大学生对二手交易平台的功能需求,提取出产品展示、产品推荐的主要功能需求点,结合当前大学生使用智能手机和网购意识强这些特点,将传统的校园跳蚤市场迁移到移动互联网上,并对整体系统规划设计,构建了一个服务于学生的“校园跳蚤市场”移动端 App。该系统采用 Eclipse 为运行平台,以 Android 为框架,运用Java语言,Bmob后台管理数据库等关键技术开发而成。实现了手机移动客户端的用户登录与注册、用户商品信息发布、商品信息首页展示、商品分类浏览、管理员后台管理等功能。%The paper analyzes the current situation of the secondary market,researchs the functional requirements of the secondary trading platform for college students.Product display and recommendation function are extracted mainly. Combined with strong sense of using smartphones and online shopping awareness for the college students,the traditional campus flea market is migrated to the mobile internet,and the planning and design of the overall system construct a service in the student's campus flea market mobile terminal App.The system uses Eclipse as the operating platform,and uses Java de-velopment language,the Android framework based on Java,Bmob background management database and so on.It Imple-ments user login and registration,user commodity information,commodity information page display,commodity classifica-tion browsing,administrator background management functions.

  16. Larvicidal activity of ajowan ( Trachyspermum ammi ) and Peru balsam ( Myroxylon pereira ) oils and blends of their constituents against mosquito, Aedes aegypti , acute toxicity on water flea, Daphnia magna , and aqueous residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Park, Hye-Mi; Park, Il-Kwon

    2012-06-13

    This study evaluated the larvicidal activity of 20 plant essential oils and components from ajowan ( Trachyspermum ammi ) and Peru balsam ( Myroxylon pereira ) oils against the mosquito, Aedes aegypti . Of the 20 plant essential oils, ajowan and Peru balsam oils at 0.1 mg/mL exhibited 100 and 97.5% larval mortality, respectively. At this same concentration, the individual constituents, (+)-camphene, benzoic acid, thymol, carvacrol, benzyl benzonate, and benzyl trans-cinnamate, caused 100% mortality. The toxicity of blends of constituents identified in two active oils indicated that thymol and benzyl benzoate were major contributors to the larvicidal activity of the artificial blend. This study also tested the acute toxicity of these two active oils and their major constituents against the water flea, Daphnia magna . Peru balsam oil and benzyl trans-cinnamate were the most toxic to D. magna. Two days after the treatment, residues of ajowan and Peru balsalm oils in water were 36.2 and 85.1%, respectively. Less than 50% of benzyl trans-cinnamate and thymol were detected in the water at 2 days after treatment. The results show that the essential oils of ajowan and Peru balsam and some of their constituents have potential as botanical insecticides against Ae. aegypti mosquito larvae.

  17. Application of a stable isotope technique to determine the simultaneous uptake of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc by the water flea Daphnia magna from water and the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjarova, Irina; Blust, Ronny

    2009-08-01

    Accumulation and toxicological effects of water and dietary metals in aquatic organisms can potentially be very different. Therefore, it is important to know the relative contribution of these different sources to metal exposure, availability, and accumulation. In the present study, a stable isotope technique was applied to investigate the uptake of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the water flea Daphnia magna during simultaneous exposure to the five metals at environmentally realistic concentrations from separate water and dietary routes. Green algae take up Cu faster compared to Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn, and the distribution of metals between the external and internal compartments is dependent on metal and population growth stage. The metal accumulation reached a steady state within 24 to 48 h for all metals. Metal uptake rate constants from water were highest for Cu and lowest for Ni. Metal assimilation efficiencies from the food source varied with metal, ranging from approximately 80% in the case of Cd to near 0% in the case of Ni. Because the data for the different metals were obtained on the same multimetal-exposed organisms, the results are directly comparable among the metals. For all five metals studied, water appeared to be the most important route of uptake by D. magna.

  18. Use of vendedores (mobile food vendors), pulgas (flea markets), and vecinos o amigos (neighbors or friends) as alternative sources of food for purchase among Mexican-origin households in Texas border colonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Joseph R; Dean, Wesley R; Johnson, Cassandra M

    2012-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies acknowledging the existence of alternative food sources, and factors associated with food purchasing from three common alternative sources: vendedores (mobile food vendors), pulgas (flea markets), and vecinos/amigos (neighbors/friends). This analysis aims to examine the use of alternative food sources by Mexican-origin women from Texas-border colonias and determine factors associated with their use. The design was cross-sectional. Promotora-researchers (promotoras de salud trained in research methods) recruited 610 Mexican-origin women from 44 colonias and conducted in-person surveys. Surveys included participant characteristics and measures of food environment use and household food security. Statistical analyses included separate logistic regressions, modeled for food purchase from mobile food vendors, pulgas, or neighbors/friends. Child food insecurity was associated with purchasing food from mobile food vendors, while household food security was associated with using pulgas or neighbors/friends. School nutrition program participants were more likely to live in households that depend on alternative food sources. Efforts to increase healthful food consumption such as fruits and vegetables should acknowledge all potential food sources (traditional, convenience, nontraditional, and alternative), especially those preferred by colonia residents. Current findings support the conceptual broadening of the retail food environment, and the importance of linking use with spatial access (proximity) to more accurately depict access to food sources.

  19. 蚤休和古拉定联用治疗妊娠合并病毒性肝炎临床体会%Clinical Experience of Fleas Hugh Combined with Gluthion in the Treatment of Viral Hepatitis Complicating Pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘爱菊; 赵建夫; 陈淑彦; 张丽娟; 耿娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy,adverse reactions,complications of the Fleas Hugh combined with Gluthion in the treatment of viral hepatitis complicating pregnancy.Method:A retrospective analysis of 78 patients with viral hepatitis complicating pregnancy who were treated with Fleas Hugh combined with Gluthion in our hospital from January 2004 to June 2012,treatment of liver function,serum viral markers measured values,clinical efficiency,adverse reactions and the incidence of complications were summarized.Result:78 patients after treatment,40 patients were cured(51.28%),25 cases were markedly improved(32.05%),improved in 7 cases(8.97%),6 cases of invalid(7.69%),the total effective rate was 92.31%,invalid rate was 7.69%,78 cases had no adverse reactions and complications obviously.After the treatment of liver ALT, AST,TBIL values returned to normal,compared with before treatment,the difference had statistical significance(P0.05).Conclusion:The clinical application of the results are satisfactory,no adverse reactions and complications,clinical,social benefits are good,worthy of clinical application.%目的:探讨蚤休和古拉定联用治疗妊娠合并病毒性肝炎的临床有效性、不良反应和合并症。方法:回顾性分析2004年1月-2012年6月在本院用蚤休和古拉定治疗的78例妊娠合并病毒性肝炎患者,总结治疗后肝功能、血清病毒性标志物测定值、临床有效率、不良反应发生率和并发症发生率。结果:78例患者经过治疗后,基本治愈40例(51.28%),显效25例(32.05%),好转7例(8.97%),无效6例(7.69%),总有效率92.31%,无效率7.69%,78例均无明显的不良反应和并发症的发生。治疗后肝功能ALT、AST、TBIL值恢复正常,与治疗前比较差异均有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论:蚤休和古拉定联用治疗妊娠合并病毒性肝炎效果理想,无不良反应及并发症的发生,临床、社会效益良好,值得临床推广应用。

  20. The effect of water and shampooing on the efficacy of a pyriprole 12.5% topical solution against brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) and cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestations on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuele, G; Barnett, S; Bapst, B; Cavaliero, T; Luempert, L; Strehlau, G; Young, D R; Moran, C; Junquera, P

    2008-02-14

    The efficacy of a single treatment with a 12.5% pyriprole spot-on formulation against induced infestations with R. sanguineus ticks and cat fleas (C. felis) as well as its persistence after repeated washing and shampooing was investigated in four separate studies. In a first study on R. sanguineus involving 32 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 99.3%. No engorged ticks, alive or dead, were found in the treated animals. Shampooing 2 days after treatment and weekly washings did not affect the efficacy. In a second study on R. sanguineus involving 32 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 96.8%. Single washing 8h after treatment and single shampooing 24 h after treatment had no negative impact on the efficacy of the product. In a third study on C. felis involving 28 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 30 days that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation was always 100% and weekly washings did not diminish the efficacy. In a last study on C. felis involving 24 beagle dogs, the efficacy at various time-points during the 5 weeks that followed treatment assessed 48 h after re-infestation ranged from 100% to 99.8%, and shampooing 24 h after treatment did not reduce the efficacy. The product was well tolerated by the dogs.

  1. “陌生化”技巧的典范——约翰·邓恩和他的《跳蚤》%Model of "Defamiliarization"——John Donne and His The Flea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛然

    2012-01-01

    什克洛夫斯基提出的"陌生化"是俄国形式主义文评一个十分重要的概念,它强调新鲜的感受,强调事物的质感,强调艺术的具体形式。而早在17世纪,以约翰.邓恩为代表的玄学派就已把"奇思妙喻"、各种怪诞的意象和戏剧化手法运用到了诗歌创作当中。这种背离传统的情感表达与形式主义"陌生化"原则不谋而合。此处选取邓恩的名诗《跳蚤》为研究对象,从思维模式和语言形式两方面对诗中"陌生化"技巧的运用进行探讨和分析。%"Defamiliarization" is a very important concept of Russian Formalism put forward by Shklovsky.It emphasizes fresh feelings,the simple texture of things and the particular form of art.However,earlier in the 17th century,John Donne,as a representative of the Metaphysical School,has already used conceits,all kinds of weird images and dramatic techniques in his poetry writing.His unconventional creation happens to have the same view with the "defamiliarization" principle of the formalists.This thesis will take Donne's The Flea as the research object,discussing and analyzing how "defamiliarization" has been put into use in this poem.

  2. 莲草直胸跳甲生殖系统与繁殖特性研究%The reproductive system and reproductive biology of the alligatorweed flea beetle,Agasicles hygrophila (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈磊; 蔡笃程; 陈青; 唐超; 冯岗; 彭正强; 金启安; 温海波

    2009-01-01

    为了解与莲草直胸跳甲Agasicles hygrophila繁殖密切相关的结构与行为特性,结合显微解剖和室内观察,对该跳甲雌雄成虫的生殖系统构造、雌成虫卵巢发育进度以及繁殖特性进行了研究.结果表明:莲草直胸跳甲雌性生殖系统包括卵巢、侧输卵管、中输卵管、受精囊及其附腺,左右卵巢一般不对称,单侧有12~16根卵巢管,受精囊豆芽状,卵巢管为端滋式;雄性生殖系统由睾丸、侧输精管及附腺、射精管和阳茎及附属器官组成,阳基叉式.根据相关形态特征,卵巢发育进度可分为发育初期(1级)、卵黄沉积前期(Ⅱ级)、成熟待产期(Ⅲ级)、产卵盛期(Ⅳ级)和产卵末期(V级)5个级别,各等级在卵巢分区长度(原卵区、生长区和成熟区)及怀卵量上存在显著差异.成虫羽化2 d后即可进行交配,16:00-18:00时为交配高峰期,雌成虫产卵高峰期12:00-16:00时,且偏好在寄主植株中部偏上叶片背部产卵;22-32℃时,雌性成虫的寿命和产卵总量随温度的上升而逐渐下降,25-30℃间差异不显著,但32℃时产卵前期延长至7.2 d,寿命和产卵量显著下降,表明32℃不利于莲草直胸跳甲繁殖.因此,推测32℃及以上持续高温造成的子代卵量急剧减少,可能是该跳甲夏季田间种群数量下降的原因之一.%In order to identify organs and behavior closely related to reproduction, observations on reproductive system and reproductive biology of the alligatorweed flea beetle, Agasicles hygrophila were conducted in the laboratory. The results showed that the female adult have 2 ovaries, each of which contains 12 -16 telotrophic ovarioles, spermatheca is in the shape of bean sprout, and the aedeagus is fork-type. Ovarian development can be divided into 5 grades based on the morphological characteristics of ovaries: stage Ⅰ (No oocyte stage), stage Ⅱ (Previtellogenic stage), stage Ⅲ (Egg maturation stage), stage Ⅳ (Ovipositing

  3. Survey on rodents and their parasitic fleas at Yili Dulata Port of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region%新疆伊犁都拉塔口岸啮齿类动物及体外寄生蚤调查报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁世荣; 谢伟; 徐琪毅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To find out the species and distribution of rodents and their parasitic fleas at the Dulata Port, as well as the trend of change in amount of the different species, and to provide evidence for prediction and prevention and control of the plague at Port. Methods Route hole group method and clip catch method for rhombomys opimus and clip night method for small rodents were used. Results A total of 304 rodents were collected and subjected to 3 families 8 genera 10 species, 2 215 flea specimens were collected and subjected to 5 families 12 genera 13 species at Dulata Port. Mus musculus.cricetidus migratorius and apodemus sylvaticus were the major species in residential area; Meriones erythrourus was the major species in the road, in the field and around the ditch; Rhombomys opimus was the major species in the wilderness abounded with vegetable layer of bush. The phenomenon occurred that meriones erythrourus and rhombomys opimus live together and the flea parasitizing in them exchange each other. Xenopsylla minax was the major parasitic fleas in rhombomys opimus. No Plague Fl antibody was detected. Conclusion Rat plague was not found in the Port. It is significant to conduct surveillance on rat plague epide miolopy in the Port.As Natural Rat Plague Focus exist in the wilderness southeast Balkhash Lake within Kazakhstan; the epidemic focus of rhombomys opimus plague was found in Junggar Basin of Xinjiang in 2005. further more, the Port and the border of Kazakhstan are similar in the ecological condition for rat survival. It is necessary to strengthen the surveillance and prevention on plague in the Port area, especially the surveillance among rhombomys opimus.%目的 掌握伊犁都拉塔口岸啮齿类动物及体外寄生蚤种类、分布、种群动态情况,为口岸鼠疫预测预报和防治工作提供依据.方法 采用路线洞群法和夹捕法捕获大沙鼠;采用夹夜法捕获小型啮齿类动物.结果 都拉塔口岸收集到啮齿

  4. Dipylidium (Dog and Cat Flea Tapeworm) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the most common kind of tapeworm dogs and cats get? The most common tapeworm of dogs and ... kind of problems do tapeworms cause for the dog? Tapeworms are not usually harmful to your pet. ...

  5. Production parameters of the large-scale culture of water fleas Daphniopsis tibetana in seawater%海水中规模化培养西藏拟溞的技术优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由志欣; 赵文; 魏杰; 王珊; 刘钢

    2015-01-01

    为了给北方海水鱼虾蟹类育苗增添一种新的生物活饵料,利用循环水培养装置研究了西藏拟溞Daphniopsis tibetana Sars在稀释海水(盐度为18~20)中规模化培养的技术工艺参数,即起始放养密度、充纯氧和日采收率。结果表明:起始放养密度对西藏拟溞种群增长和日产量影响显著(P<0.05),不同起始放养密度(200、550、900、1250 ind./L)培养试验中,放养密度为1250 ind./L时,培养第33天时种群密度达最高,为(9500±550.73) ind./L,平均日产量为(125.00±8.35) g/(m3·d);充纯氧与充空气相比较,充纯氧能显著提高种群密度和日产量(P<0.05),当放养密度为1250 ind./L、充纯氧时,西藏拟溞种群密度最高达(11600±560.45) ind./L,平均日产量为(156.82±8.49) g/(m3·d);日采收率对西藏拟溞的种群增长和日产量也有显著影响(P<0.05),日采收率为20%时最佳,放养密度为1250 ind./L、日采收率为20%时,西藏拟溞种群密度最高为( 12900±995.04) ind./L,平均日产量为( 176.52±15.08) g/( m3·d)。%In order to supply a new live animal food for the marine fish larvae, shrimps and crabs, in this study, process parameters of the large-scale culture of water fleas Daphniopsis tibetana in dilute seawater(salinity 18-20) was studied by a circle water culture device, including the initial stock density, pure oxygen and daily harvesting ratio. The results showed that initial stock density had a major influence on population growth and daily production (P<0. 05), under the different stock density culture condition(200, 550, 900, 1250 ind. /L), the maximal den-sity of D. tibetana population was (9500±550. 73)ind. /L in 33 d when the initial density was 1250 ind. /L and the average daily production was (125.00±8.35)g/(m3·d). Comparison of pure oxygen and air, filling with pure oxygen significantly improved the population density and daily production ( P<0 . 05 ) , with the maximal density of (11 600±560. 45)ind. /L

  6. Ectoparasitos de roedores da região urbana de Belo Horizonte, MG: III. Indices pulicidianos, anoplurianos e acarianos em Rattus Norvegicus norvegicus Ectoparasites in rodents of the urban region of Belo Horizonte, MG: III. Fleas, anoplura and acari indices in Rattus norvegicus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Marcos Linardi

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available Indices pulicidianos, anoplurianos e acarianos, globais e específicos foram determinados para os ectoparasitos de Rattus norvegicus norvegicus capturados em zona urbana de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, no período de junho de 1980 a setembro de 1982. Tendo-se em vista os valores limites ou críticos atribuídos aos índices pulicidianos, sobretudo ao índice "cheopis" e propostos por diversos autores como medida complementar de vigilância epidemiológica para peste bubônica, a comunidade de Belo Horizonte poderia ter estado exposta a esta infecção, uma vez que os índices globais anuais de 0,3 a 2,4 e a pulga prevalente foi Xenopsylla cheopis (99,2%, com os maiores índices coincidindo com o final da estação seca-fria. Em duas ocasiões, a comunidade poderia ter permanecido altamente exposta à infecção, já que os índices-limites tolerados foram suplantados: 8,8 (outubro 1980 e 6,2 (setembro 1982. Sugere-se que medidas profiláticas como anti-ratização e desinsetização sejam eficazmente aplicadas ao final da estação seca-fria, ou anteriormente à chegada das chuvas, sendo sucedidas pela desratização. Informações sobre índices anoplurianos e acarianos são importantes para que se possa, no exclusivas de roedoresThe total and specific indices of fleas, lice and mites were determined for ectoparasites on Rattus norvegicus norvegicus capture in urban areas of Belo Horizonte, Minas state, Brazil, from June 1980 to September 1982. In view of the limiting or critical values attributed to flea indices above all the [quot ]cheopis[quot ] index, proposed by several authors as a complementary measure for bubonic plague surveillance, the community of Belo Horizonte would have been exposed to this infection. The annual total indices ranged from 0.3 to 2.4 and the prevalent flea was Xenopsylla cheopis (99.2%, with the highest indices coinciding with the late dry-cool season. On two occasions, in this period, the community would

  7. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Consumption and Biochemical Substances of Flea Beetle, Agasicles hygrophila%高 CO2浓度对莲草直胸跳甲幼虫取食量及其体内生化物质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史梦竹; 傅建炜; 李建宇; 王婷; 郑丽祯; 游泳; 林涛; 吴刚

    2015-01-01

    在实验室条件下,分别测定了高 CO2浓度(750μL·L-1)和对照 CO2浓度(370μL·L-1)2个不同 CO2浓度下莲草直胸跳甲幼虫取食量的变化,比较3龄幼虫体内营养物质含量和消化酶活性等指标的变化。结果表明,高 CO2浓度处理下,莲草直胸跳甲幼虫取食量显著增加;3龄幼虫体内蛋白含量较对照 CO2浓度处理幼虫的蛋白显著增加,总氨基酸含量差异不显著;莲草直胸跳甲3龄幼虫体内消化酶(淀粉酶和胃蛋白酶)的酶活力显著降低。高 CO2浓度影响莲草直胸跳甲幼虫的取食量、营养物质含量和消化酶活性,对其生长发育有一定的影响。%The consumption of flea beetle,A.hygrophila,was examined in different CO2 concentration (750 μL·L-1 and 370 μL·L-1 )in closed-dynamic CO2 chamber.And the nutrient compositions and digestive enzymes activities of flea beetle were both measured and analyzed.The results showed that significantly higher consumption of A.hygrophila larva was observed in elevated CO2 relative to 370 μL·L-1 .The protein increased in the 3th star larva of A.hygrophila in750μL·L-1 compared with 370 μL·L-1 significantly,and there was no significant difference in total amino acid between the two treatments.However,the activities of amylase and pepsin activities were both declined in elevated CO2 compared with 370 μL· L-1 .Elevated CO2 can affect the consumption,nutrient compositions and digestive enzymes activities of A. hygrophila larva,and also on the growth and development of A.hygrophila.

  8. Insect ectoparasites from wild passerine birds in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychra O.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild passerine birds (Passeriformes from northeastern part of the Czech Republic were examined for ectoparasites. Three species of louse-flies of the genus Ornithomya (Diptera: Hippoboscidae, two species of fleas of the genera Ceratophyllus and Dasypsyllus (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae, and 15 species of chewing lice belonging to the genera Myrsidea, Menacanthus (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae, Brueelia, Penenirmus, Philopterus (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae were found on 82 birds of 23 species. New chewing louse-host records are Hippolais icterina for Menacanthus currucae; Motacilla cinerea for Menacanthus pusillus; Turdus philomelos and Motacilla cinerea for Brueelia merulensis; and Sylvia atricapilla for Menacanthus eurysternus. Brueelia neoatricapillae is cited for the first time for the Czech Republic. Parasitological parameters such as prevalence, intensity and abundance are also discussed.

  9. Insects as vectors: systematics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-04-01

    Among the many complex relationships between insects and microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, some have resulted in the establishment of biological systems within which the insects act as a biological vector for infectious agents. It is therefore advisable to understand the identity and biology of these vectors in depth, in order to define procedures for epidemiological surveillance and anti-vector control. The following are successively reviewed in this article: Anoplura (lice), Siphonaptera (fleas), Heteroptera (bugs: Cimicidae, Triatoma, Belostomatidae), Psychodidae (sandflies), Simuliidae (black flies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Tabanidae (horseflies) and Muscidae (tsetse flies, stable flies and pupipara). The authors provide a rapid overview of the morphology, systematics, development cycle and bio-ecology of each of these groups of vectors. Finally, their medical and veterinary importance is briefly reviewed.

  10. [Cockroaches and co. The role of health pests as allergen source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulf, M; Sander, I; Gonnissen, D; Zahradnik, E; Brüning, T

    2014-05-01

    In most of the cases health pests are carriers of pathogens or parasites which have a negative impact on human health or affect the health of other mammals. What is lesser known is that they can also act as allergens. Most of the health pests in this sense belong to the arthropods, such as cockroaches (Blattaria), mosquitos (Culiciformia), lice (Pediculus humanus corporis), fleas (Siphonaptera) and ticks (Argasidae). In the group of vertebrates rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus), house mice (Mus musculus) and pigeons (Columba livia domestica) are also classified as health pests. Also storage pests which are not carriers of pathogens can induce secondary infestation with hygiene pests or molds and have an underestimated impact on human health. In this article selected examples of health pests and also storage pests as an allergen source are described, taking into account the sensitization prevalence and identified single allergens.

  11. Trial on Prevention of Spring Rapeseed Striped Flea Beetle by 70% Thiamethoxam Seed Treatment Dispersible Powder%70%噻虫嗪种子处理可分散粉剂防治春油菜黄条跳甲试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张登峰; 来有鹏; 咸文荣; 王信

    2012-01-01

    Application of 70% thiamethoxam seed treatment dispersible powder(WS),rape seed coating treatment,the effect of two years,the two spring rapeseed flea beetle prevention,560g/100Kg seed 63.62%t-67.4%,77.5%-78.52% for the 840g/100kg seed,20-30 percentage points higher than 5% of the long-term application of phorate granules,no adverse effects on the seedlings of rape stem weevil certain kaneharu effect.%应用70%噻虫嗪种子处理可分散粉剂(WS),对油菜种子进行包衣处理,两年两地对春油菜苗期跳甲的防治效果,560g/100kg种子时为63.62%-67.47%,840g/100kg种子时为77.55%-78.52%,比长期应用的5%甲拌磷颗粒剂高出20-30个百分点,对幼苗无不良影响,对油菜茎象甲有一定的兼治效果。

  12. ECTOFAUNA PARASITÁRIA DE CÃES URBANOS DOMICILIADOS ATENDIDOS EM CLÍNICAS VETERINÁRIAS PARTICULARES NA CIDADE DE LAVRAS, MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcos Guimarães

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of ectoparasites in urban domiciled dogs treated at nine private veterinary clinics in the city of Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Visible and palpable ectoparasites specimens were collected manually from 67 dogs during the period of September 2004 to May 2005, kept in flasks with ethanol 70º GL and identified under a stereomicroscope. In the case of mites that cause mange, performed the analysis of the results obtained from 155 skin scrapings of the same number of dogs with clinical suspicion of parasitic dermatosis was performed, and sent to diagnostic at the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases of Federal University of Lavras (UFLA, during the period of September 2002 to July 2007. A total of 540 ectoparasites were recorded, and four species were identified: Rhipicephalus sanguineus (60%, Ctenocephalides canis and C. felis (both 36%, and Dermatobia hominis larvae (4%. In scraped skin, positive results were verified in 12.9% (20/155, of which 80.0% with Demodex canis (16/20 and 20.0% with Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis (4/20. After ectoparasites identification a database with the dogs´medical records was made and analyzed by SPSS 12.0. It can be concluded that the predominant species of ectoparasites in dogs treated at private veterinary clinics in the city of Lavras, MG, were Ctenocephalides canis and C. felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae and R. sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae and Demodex canis (Acari: Demodecidae that had a significant predominance (p<0.05 on scraped skin of young animals with suspicion of canine demodicosis.

  13. Distribución y Hospederos de pulgas (Siphonaptera en la Provincia de Ayabaca, Piura - 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar J Pozo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudio descriptivo transversal realizado en la provincia de Ayabaca (zona endémica de peste bubónica, departamento de Piura, Perú; con el objetivo de ampliar los conocimientos sobre las especies de pulgas presentes. Fueron colectados 10 152 especimenes de pulgas en 46 localidades pertenecientes a seis distritos de la provincia de Ayabaca (Suyo, Sapillica, Montero, Paimas, Lagunas y Ayabaca, entre los meses de enero a julio de 1999. El muestreo se realizó seleccionando para cada vivienda un mínimo de cinco ropas de cama y cinco cuyes (Cavia porcellus además de la totalidad de los roedores capturados en las viviendas y en el área silvestre. Ocho especies de pulgas fueron identificadas (Pulex irritans, Tiamastus cavicola, Polygenis litargus, Xenopsylla cheopis, Ctenocephalides felis, Craneopsylla minerva, Leptopsylla segnis y Cediopsylla spillmanni de éstas, P. irritans se reportó en todos los distritos muestreados, seguida de X. cheopis y P. litargus, encontradas en cinco de los seis distritos.

  14. Description de trois nouvelles especes de Paractenopsyllus (Siphonaptera : Leptopsyllinae de Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchemin J.B.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Les mâles de trois nouvelles espèces rares de Paractenopsyllus Wagner, 1938, genre endémique de Madagascar, sont décrits. Paractenopsyllus beaucournui, P. oconnori et P. raxworthyi ont été collectés à partir de micromammifères endémiques de Madagascar (excepté un rat noir et, comme les autres espèces du genre, les biotopes de récolte se situent au sein des forêts des hautes terres centrales ou des massifs du Nord de l'île. Deux des trois espèces décrites ont été récoltées à des altitudes relativement basses pour le genre, à la limite de la zone écoclimatique des hautes terres. Les affinités morphologiques entre ces nouvelles espèces et celles déjà décrites permettent des rapprochements taxonomiques. Une clef de détermination des 20 espèces de Leptopsyllinae malgaches est présentée.

  15. Deux nouvelles espèces de Dasypsyllus (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae au Chili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.-C.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available De nouveaux taxa de Puces, seulement connus par le mâle, sont ajoutés à la faune chilio-andine. Il s’agit de représentants du sousgenre Neornipsyllus, inféodé aux Oiseaux, essentiellement Passériformes. D. (N. huinayensis sp. n., est, inter alia, caractérisé par la disposition des fortes soies du télomère ; D. (N. tapaculensis sp. n. montre un tergite X (ou proctiger original pour l’Ordre entier par sa forme et sa chetotaxie en grande partie formée de soies bifides.

  16. Primera cita de Sternopsylla distincta speciosa (Siphonaptera: Ischnopsyllidae para la provincia de Jujuy, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía G. AUTINO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez para Jujuy la presencia de pulgas ectoparásitas de murciélagos, habiéndose registrado a Sternopsylla distincta speciosa Johnson sobre Tadarida brasiliensis (Geoffroy (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae. Además se presentan comentarios sobre caracteres de morfología externa y estructuras genitales de las subespecies Sternopsylla distincta speciosa Johnson y Sternopsylla distincta distincta (Rothschild.

  17. Leptopsyllines from Madagascar (Insecta: Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae: description of five new species of Paractenopsyllus Wagner, 1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchemin J.B.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Five new species of the malagasy endemic genus Paractenopsyllus Wagner, 1938, are described. Paractenopsyllus rouxi, P. ratovonjatoi, P. duplantieri, P. juliamarinus and P. gemelli have been collected on endemic small mammals and the black rat. Biotopes are mid-elevation rain-forests of the central highlands or the northern mountains of Madagascar. Morphological affinities between these new species and those already known provide taxonomic links within the genus. Differences in the spatial and altitudinal distributions and host ranges allow discussion of the potential factors important in the species distribution of this genus.

  18. Control Effect of Different Extracts on the Striped Flea Beetle [ Phyllotreta striolata (F.) ] in the Fields%不同提取物对黄曲条跳甲种群的忌避作用及其保苗效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖建辉; 赖荣泉; 赖成连; 曾文龙; 钟秀金

    2012-01-01

    Control effects of 15% nicotinamide, Nicotiana tabacum L. and Duranta repens L. against the striped flea beetle (SFB), Phyllotreta striolala (F. ) were investigated in the fields. The results of this trial showed that 15% nicotinamide had a better control effect than N. tabacum L. and D. repens L. in the fields. The deterrent rates and protecting seeding rates of 15% nicotinamide were 62. 14% and between 10. 22% and 23. 81% , respectively. However, the deterrent or protecting seeding rates of Nicotiana tabacum L. and Duranta repens L. were between 45. 60% and 50. 72% or between 8.73% and 18. 13% , respectively. In a word, the results of the trials suggest that it may be a very useful material to protect vegetable or other plants by the use of Nicotinamide in fields.%研究通过田间试验评价了15%烟碱、烟草提取物和假莲翘提取物对黄曲条跳甲种群的田间控制作用.结果表明,15%烟碱,烟草提取物和假莲翘提取物对黄曲条跳甲种群均有明显的忌避作用、控制效应或保苗效果.其中,15%烟碱对黄曲条跳甲的田间控制效果较好,其忌避率和保苗效果分别为62.14%,10.22%~23.81%;烟草提取物次之,其忌避率和保苗效果分别为50.72%,9.25%~ 16.42%,假连翘提取物的控制效果最差,其忌避率和保苗效果分别为45.60%,8.73% ~ 18.13%.结果表明,15%烟碱,烟草提取物和假连翘提取物中含有对黄曲条跳甲种群明显起忌避作用的活性物质.因此,可尝试在蔬菜感虫敏感初期利用烟碱防控黄曲条跳甲,以降低其大田危害.同时,减少化学农药的使用,提高蔬菜的安全性,保护环境.

  19. A Flea on Schrödinger's Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, N. P. (Klaas); Reuvers, Robin

    2013-03-01

    We propose a technical reformulation of the measurement problem of quantum mechanics, which is based on the postulate that the final state of a measurement is classical; this accords with experimental practice as well as with Bohr's views. Unlike the usual formulation (in which the post-measurement state is a unit vector in Hilbert space), our version actually opens the possibility of admitting a purely technical solution within the confines of conventional quantum theory (as opposed to solutions that either modify this theory, or introduce unusual and controversial interpretative rules and/or ontologies). To that effect, we recall a remarkable phenomenon in the theory of Schrödinger operators (discovered in 1981 by Jona-Lasinio, Martinelli, and Scoppola), according to which the ground state of a symmetric double-well Hamiltonian (which is paradigmatically of Schrödinger's Cat type) becomes exponentially sensitive to tiny perturbations of the potential as ħ→0. We show that this instability emerges also from the textbook wkb approximation, extend it to time-dependent perturbations, and study the dynamical transition from the ground state of the double well to the perturbed ground state (in which the cat is typically either dead or alive, depending on the details of the perturbation). Numerical simulations show that adiabatically arising perturbations may (quite literally) cause the collapse of the wave-function in the classical limit. Thus, at least in the context of a simple mathematical model, we combine the technical and conceptual virtues of decoherence (which fails to solve the measurement problem but launches the key idea that perturbations may come from the environment) with those of dynamical collapse models à la grw (which do solve the measurement problem but are ad hoc), without sharing their drawbacks: single measurement outcomes are obtained (instead of merely diagonal reduced density matrices), and no modification of quantum mechanics is needed.

  20. Lactose causes heart arrhythmia in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anthony K; Wann, Kenneth T; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2004-10-01

    The cladoceran Daphnia pulex is well established as a model for ecotoxicology. Here, we show that D. pulex is also useful for investigating the effects of toxins on the heart in situ and the toxic effects in lactose intolerance. The mean heart rate at 10 degrees C was 195.9+/-27.0 beats/min (n=276, range 89.2-249.2, >80% 170-230 beats/min). D. pulex heart responded to caffeine, isoproteronol, adrenaline, propranolol and carbachol in the bathing medium. Lactose (50-200 mM) inhibited the heart rate by 30-100% (K(1/2)=60 mM) and generated severe arrhythmia within 60 min. These effects were fully reversible by 3-4 h. Sucrose (100-200 mM) also inhibited the heart rate, but glucose (100-200 mM) and galactose (100-200 mM) had no effect, suggesting that the inhibition by lactose or sucrose was not simply an osmotic effect. The potent antibiotic ampicillin did not prevent the lactose inhibition, and two diols known to be generated by bacteria under anaerobic conditions were also without effect. The lack of effect of l-ribose (2 mM), a potent inhibitor of beta-galactosidase, supported the hypothesis that lactose and other disaccharides may affect directly ion channels in the heart. The results show that D. pulex is a novel model system for studying effects of agonists and toxins on cell signalling and ion channels in situ.

  1. Epitrix flea beetles: new threats to potato production in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Dominic; Giltrap, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Epitrix tuberis and E. cucumeris are major pests of potatoes in North America. E. tuberis causes the most serious damage because the larval feeding can cause superficial serpentine tunnelling on the surface of tubers as well as deeper pits. This damage can make crops unmarketable. By contrast, E. cucumeris mainly damages the foliage, and yield losses can occur when the adults reach high densities. In 2004, potato tuber damage characteristic of E. tuberis was seen in Portugal. In 2008, damage was more widespread and severe. E. cucumeris and a lesser known species, E. similaris, were recorded in affected fields. E. similaris has since been found across Galicia, Spain. E. similaris is thought to be the most likely cause of the tuber damage in Portugal, but it is possible that E. cucumeris or an as yet undetected Epitrix species is causing the damage. In 2010, a pest risk assessment for the Euro-Mediterranean area identified the movement of adults and pupae with seed or ware potatoes and associated soil as being the highest-risk pathways for the spread of Epitrix. In 2012, EU emergency measures were agreed to reduce the risk of further introductions and the rate of spread of these pests.

  2. 1 Predicting small mammal and flea abundance using landform and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies in the West Usambara Mountains in Lushoto ... influence presence, reproduction of hosts and vectors and their interactions with humans. .... the fur using ethanol, counted, recorded and stored for identification in the laboratory. .... Table 3: Soil and landform predictors for small mammals' distribution along the ...

  3. Les puces (Insecta : Siphonaptera parasites d’oiseaux : diversité taxonomique et dispersion biogéographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Si les Mammifères sont bien les hôtes primitifs des Siphonaptères, 6 % de ces ectoparasites ont dévié leur appétence trophique vers les Oiseaux. Quelles peuvent en être les raisons, quelles adaptations les Puces doivent-elles adopter, quelles sont les familles ou groupes d’espèces de Puces concernés, quelles sont enfin les familles-hôtes d’accueil ? Pour cette dernière interrogation, il est clair que la déviance fut d’ordre écologique et non phylétique.

  4. A survey of ectoparasites, cestodes and management of free-range indigenous chickens in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, S; Hove, T

    2009-09-01

    A survey of ectoparasites, cestodes and husbandry aspects of indigenous free-range chickens was carried out in selected districts from the highveld and lowveld of rural Zimbabwe. The survey recorded infection with 4 species from the order Phthiraptera (lice), 1 species from the order Siphonaptera (fleas), 6 species from the order Acarina (ticks and mites) and 9 species of cestodes. Among the ectoparasites, the most prevalent was Menacanthus stramineus (87.7%) followed by Echidinophaga gallinacea (71.9%). Chickens in the Mazowe district had the highest number of ectoparasites species (10 of 11) followed by Goromonzi district (9 of 11) both these districts are situated in the highveld of Zimbabwe. The most prevalent cestode species was Raillietina tetragona (84.4%), followed by Raillietina echinobothrida (32.2%). Chickens in the Goromonzi district had the highest number of cestode species (7 of 9), followed by Mazowe district (one subgenus and 5 of 9). In all the districts sampled the main purpose of keeping free-range chickens was for meat for the household, with few households using the birds as a source of income. The majority of households kept their birds extensively with barely any appropriate housing, and supplementary feeding was only occasionally practised.

  5. A survey of ectoparasites, cestodes and management of free-range indigenous chickens in rural Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaratirwa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey of ectoparasites, cestodes and husbandry aspects of indigenous free-range chickens was carried out in selected districts from the highveld and lowveld of rural Zimbabwe. The survey recorded infection with 4 species from the order Phthiraptera (lice, 1 species from the order Siphonaptera (fleas, 6 species from the order Acarina (ticks and mites and 9 species of cestodes. Among the ectoparasites, the most prevalent was Menacanthus stramineus (87.7 % followed by Echidinophaga gallinacea (71.9 %. Chickens in the Mazowe district had the highest number of ectoparasites species (10 of 11 followed by Goromonzi district (9 of 11 both these districts are situated in the highveld of Zimbabwe. The most prevalent cestode species was Raillietina tetragona (84.4 %, followed by Raillletina echinobothrida (32.2 %. Chickens in the Goromonzi district had the highest number of cestode species (7 of 9, followed by Mazowe district (one subgenus and 5 of 9. In all the districts sampled the main purpose of keeping free-range chickens was for meat for the household, with few households using the birds as a source of income. The majority of households kept their birds extensively with barely any appropriate housing, and supplementary feeding was only occasionally practised.

  6. Possible living flea beetle fossil in Bolivia: A new genus of flea beetles with modified hind legs (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new genus (Chanealtica) with three new species (C. cuevas, C. ellimon, and C. maxi) from Bolivia is described and illustrated. It is compared with Aphthonoides Jacoby 1885, Argopistes Motschulsky 1860, Metroserrapha Bechyne 1958, Psylliodes Berthold 1827 and Psyllototus Nadein 2010. Remarkably, ba...

  7. [Record of Dasypus novemcinctus (Mammalia: Xenarthra) parasited by Tunga terasma (Siphonaptera: Tungidae) in Alegre, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, João Marcelo A P; Demoner, Larissa de C; Martins, Isabella V F; Zanini, Marcos S; Deps, Patrícia D; Pujol-Luz, José R

    2006-01-01

    During a survey of Mycobacterium leprae in wild armadillos in the State of Espírito Santo, thirty-four armadillos were captured in the municipality of Alegre (20 degrees 45'S, 41 degrees 29'W, 150m). The armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus were examined by clinical and macroscopic examination. In four armadillos (11.7%), were found nodes in the abdomen. The nodules were identified as Tunga terasma. This is the first report of T. terasma in D. novemcinctus armadillos in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil.

  8. Pulgas (Siphonaptera parásitas de roedores (Rodentia: Cricetidae de la provincia de Salta, Argentina: nuevos registros de distribución

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fernanda LÓPEZ BERRIZBEITIA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se mencionan nuevos registros de distribución geográfica y hospeda - toria para pulgas parásitas de roedores sigmodontinos de la provincia de Salta, Ar - gentina. Se reportan por primera vez en Salta las siguientes especies: Craneopsylla minerva minerva (Rothschild; Agastopsylla pearsoni Traub; y Neotyphloceras cras - sispina hemisus Jordan; así como los géneros Cleopsylla Rothschild y Plocopsylla Jordan . Agastopsylla pearsoni se cita por primera vez para la Argentina. También se aumenta el número de especies de parásitos conocidos para cinco especies de roedores y se registran ocho nuevas asociaciones parásito-hospedador.

  9. Le genre Tunga Jarocki, 1838 (Siphonaptera : Tungidae. I – Taxonomie, phylogénie, écologie, rôle pathogène

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.-C.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pour la première fois, les 12 espèces actuellement décrites dans le genre Tunga sont étudiées sur le plan de la taxonomie et de la répartition. Divers aspects de leur biologie et leur rôle pathogène sont également envisagés, et en particulier leur phylogénie, leur chorologie, leur phénologie, leur sexe-ratio et leurs dermecos.

  10. Le genre Tunga Jarocki, 1838 (Siphonaptera : Tungidae). I – Taxonomie, phylogénie, écologie, rôle pathogène

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucournu, J.-C.; Degeilh, B.; Mergey, T.; Muñoz-Leal, S.; González-Acuña, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pour la première fois, les 12 espèces actuellement décrites dans le genre Tunga sont étudiées sur le plan de la taxonomie et de la répartition. Divers aspects de leur biologie et leur rôle pathogène sont également envisagés, et en particulier leur phylogénie, leur chorologie, leur phénologie, leur sexe-ratio et leurs dermecos. PMID:23193514

  11. Redescription de Macrostylophora borneensis (Jordan, 1926 (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae : Ceratophyllinae, puce de la sous-région malaise et description d’une espèce affine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.C.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Cette note redécrit M. borneensis et décrit M. traubi n. sp. à partir des exemplaires provenant des deux stations connues (Mont Murud, station type, et Mont Kinabalu, station citée et découverte par Traub. Les deux taxa, correspondant aux deux stations, sont apparentés certes, mais distincts.

  12. Contribution à l'étude de la peste au Vietnam : historique et inventaire des puces signalées (Insecta - Siphonaptera en zones anthropisées

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.-C.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Dix espèces de puces sont connues au Vietnam en zones anthropisées. Xenopsylla vexabilis est incluse dans cette liste en raison de son rôle dans d'autres foyers pesteux. La seule puce selvatique connue comme pouvant parasiter des rats synanthropes est Lentistivalius klossi, dont nous mettons en synonymie la sous-espèce bispiniformis (Li et Wang, 195 (syn. nov. décrite de Chine.

  13. Macrostylophora kinabaluae n. sp. (Insecta : Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae, puce nouvelle de Sabah (Île de Bornéo, Malaisie Orientale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.C.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cette espèce, seulement connue par un mâle, est décrite du Mont Kinabalu et est donc en sympatrie avec Macrostylophora borneensis (Jordan, 1926, teste Traub (1972. Elle se caractérise par l’absence de soies érigées sur le thorax et les premiers tergites abdominaux, la forme de ses segments terminaux et le phallosome. Macrostylophora kinabaluae a été trouvé sur le rongeur Sciuridae Callosciurus prevostii, répandu dans la plus grande partie de la sous-région malaise.

  14. Une nouvelle puce du genre Allopsylla Beaucournu et Fain, 1982 (Siphonaptera : Ischnopsyllidae en République Centrafricaine, sur un chiroptère Molossidae méconnu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrière P.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Un couple d'Allopsylla lobayensis Beaucournu et Barrière sp. n. a été récolté le 1er novembre 1999 en forêt de Ngotto, dans la partie sud-ouest du bassin de la Lobaye, République Centrafricaine (RCA. Le spécimen hôte, un chiroptère molossidé méconnu (Myopterus whitleyi, constitue la première collecte de l'espèce en RCA. La nouvelle puce s'apparente à A. hetera Beaucournu et Fain, 1982, l'une des deux autres espèces du genre Allopsylla connues jusqu'alors de régions fauniques distinctes (A. alloides au Nigéria et A. hetera en République Démocratique du Congo. L'identification de trois hôtes parmi les trois espèces d'Allopsylla interpelle sur la spécificité hôte-parasite au sein de ce groupe.

  15. Description of a new species of Ectinorus (E. spiculatus (Siphonaptera, Rhopalopsyllidae from Argentina and a review of the subgenus Ichyonus Smit, 1987

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hastriter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new species, Ectinorus spiculatus, is described from Phyllotis xanthopygus (Waterhouse and Akodon iniscatus Thomas from Neuquén Province, Argentina. Habitat characteristics are presented for the type locality. A change in status of four additional subspecies of the Ectinorus subgenus Ichyonus Smit is provided. Ectinorus onychius onychius Jordan & Rothschild, E. onychius deplexus Smit and E. onychius angularis Smit and Rosický were elevated to specific status. Ectinorus (Ichyonus onychius fueginus was relegated as a junior synonym of the nominate species. Phyllotis xanthopygus, Abrothrix olivaceus xanthorhinus, Loxodontomys micropus Waterhouse, and Euneomys chinchilloides (Waterhouse are new host records for E. onychius. A key to the three species of Ichyonus is included.

  16. Considerações sobre pulgas (Siphonaptera da raposa Cerdocyon thous (Canidae da área endêmica de leishmaniose visceral de Jacobina, Bahia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerqueira Elúzio J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available No período de julho a setembro de 1998 foram coletadas 152 pulgas em 18 exemplares da raposa Cerdocyon thous capturados na área endêmica de leishmaniose visceral de Jacobina, Estado da Bahia. As pulgas foram identificadas como: 136 Rhopalopsyllus lutzi lutzi, 11 Pulex irritans, 2 Ctenocephalides canis, 1 Ctenocephalides felis felis e 2 Xenopsylla cheopis.

  17. Description de Trochilopsylla torresmurai n. gen., n. sp. (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae du Chili, première mention d'une puce parasite d’oiseau-mouche (Aves : Trochilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Un genre et une espèce nouveaux sont décrits à partir de puces trouvées dans un nid habité d’oiseau-mouche Oreotrichulus estella (d’Orbigny & Lafresnaye, 1838. Ce taxon montre des affinités en particulier avec Dasypsyllus Baker, 1908, parasite d’oiseaux, cosmopolite sauf en régions afrotropicale et australe, et Smitipsylla Lewis, 1971, parasite d’écureuils volants (Anomaluridae en région orientale.

  18. Trois espèces nouvelles du genre Medwayella Traub, 1972 (Insecta : Siphonaptera : Pygiopsyllidae de Sabah (Malaisie Orientale, Île de Bornéo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaucournu J.C.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Medwayella traubiana n. sp., M. pfeifferi n. sp. et M. sabahae n. sp. (Pygiopsyllidae sont décrites de Sabah (nord de l'île de Bornéo; les deux premières sur Tupaia tana (Scandentia, la troisième sur Sundasciurus lowii (Rodentia. Seuls les mâles peuvent être séparés, ces puces ayant été récoltées en sympatrie, voire en syntopie. Leur détermination est basée sur le segment IX et l'aedeagus ; si les deux premières sont affiliées à des espèces déjà connues, M. sabahae est nettement séparée des autres Medwayella

  19. Dicty_cDB: VFA784 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available HQIDIILSIVTFVRLLITNQPRPTFTWDITYXEXLXSGTXVLTXPXGGIIPXK VKVWTAVTEXTTXXXFRIITXMDIXXXIQFIIWDPXDITPTSXGXYSIXLSKPX...FVRLLITNQPRPTFTWDITYXEXLXSGTXVLTXPXGGIIPXK VKVWTAVTEXTTXXXFRIITXMDIXXXIQFIIWDPXDITPTSXGXYSIXLSKPXAGWXAX FLEA

  20. Jumping performance of flea hoppers and other mirid bugs (Hemiptera, Miridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, M; Dorosenko, M

    2017-02-13

    The order Hemiptera includes jumping insects with the fastest take-off velocities, all generated by catapult mechanisms. It also contains the large family Miridae or plant bugs. Here we analysed the jumping strategies and mechanisms of six mirid species from high speed videos and from the anatomy of their propulsive legs and conclude that they use a different mechanism in which jumps are powered by the direct contractions of muscles. Three strategies were identified. First, jumping was propelled only by movements of the middle and hind legs which were respectively 140% and 190% longer than the front legs. In three species with masses ranging from 3.4 to 12.2 mg, depression of the coxo-trochanteral and extension of femoro-tibial joints accelerated the body in 8-17 ms to take-off velocities of 0.5 to 0.8 m s(- 1) The middle legs lost ground contact 5-6 ms before take-off so that the hind legs generated the final propulsion. The power requirements could be met by the direct muscle contractions so that catapult mechanisms are not implicated. Second, other species combined the same leg movements with wing beating to generate take-off during a wing downstroke. In the third strategy, up to four wing beat cycles preceded take-off and were not assisted by leg movements. Take-off velocities were reduced and acceleration times lengthened. Other species from the same habitat did not jump. The lower take-off velocities achieved by powering jumping by direct muscle contractions may be offset by eliminating the time taken to load catapult mechanisms.

  1. Characterization of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Flea and Tick Specimens From Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    this assay; but those of DNA from R. typhi Wilmington or Museibov strains, R. prowazekii, 11 species of SFG rickettsiae, Orientia, Ehrlichia , Bartonella...Ctenocephalides canis 6 (10.2) 0 Pulex irritan 11 (18.6) 0 Neotyphloceras crassispina 2 (3.4) 0 Xenopsylla cheopis 5 (8.5) 0 a The percentage based on the total...thase gene sequence: a new tool for phylogenetic analysis and identification of Ehrlichia . J. Clin. Microbiol. 39:3031–3039. 25. Jensenius, M., P. E

  2. Methyl farnesoate synthesis is necessary for the environmental sex determination in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Hiruta, Chizue; Furuta, Kenjiro; Ogino, Yukiko; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Shaw, Joseph R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-09-01

    Sex-determination systems can be divided into two groups: genotypic sex determination (GSD) and environmental sex determination (ESD). ESD is an adaptive life-history strategy that allows control of sex in response to environmental cues in order to optimize fitness. However, the molecular basis of ESD remains largely unknown. The micro crustacean Daphnia pulex exhibits ESD in response to various external stimuli. Although methyl farnesoate (MF: putative juvenile hormone, JH, in daphnids) has been reported to induce male production in daphnids, the role of MF as a sex-determining factor remains elusive due to the lack of a suitable model system for its study. Here, we establish such a system for ESD studies in D. pulex. The WTN6 strain switches from producing females to producing males in response to the shortened day condition, while the MFP strain only produces females, irrespective of day-length. To clarify whether MF has a novel physiological role as a sex-determining factor in D. pulex, we demonstrate that a MF/JH biosynthesis inhibitor suppressed male production in WTN6 strain reared under the male-inducible condition, shortened day-length. Moreover, we show that juvenile hormone acid O-methyltransferase (JHAMT), a critical enzyme of MF/JH biosynthesis, displays MF-generating activity by catalyzing farnesoic acid. Expression of the JHAMT gene increased significantly just before the MF-sensitive period for male production in the WTN6 strain, but not in the MFP strain, when maintained under male-inducible conditions. These results suggest that MF synthesis regulated by JHAMT is necessary for male offspring production in D. pulex. Our findings provide novel insights into the genetic underpinnings of ESD and they begin to shed light on the physiological function of MF as a male-fate determiner in D. pulex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase sensitivity in the next generation of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Bundschuh

    Full Text Available The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC(50 values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols.

  4. Tephrosia vogelii for control of fleas in free-range poultry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Ectoparasites ranked second, after predators, in causing losses in poultry. The ... effects, and the required precautions of handling the drugs. .... hand, fresh T. vogelii leaves were .... their homesteads belonged to children. ... Smoke dry fruit on.

  5. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Miyakawa

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH, which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the recognition of environmental changes, which form the basis of phenotypic plasticity.

  6. Gene up-regulation in response to predator kairomones in the water flea, Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous cases of predator-induced polyphenisms, in which alternate phenotypes are produced in response to extrinsic stimuli, have been reported in aquatic taxa to date. The genus Daphnia (Branchiopoda, Cladocera provides a model experimental system for the study of the developmental mechanisms and evolutionary processes associated with predator-induced polyphenisms. In D. pulex, juveniles form neckteeth in response to predatory kairomones released by Chaoborus larvae (Insecta, Diptera. Results Previous studies suggest that the timing of the sensitivity to kairomones in D. pulex can generally be divided into the embryonic and postembryonic developmental periods. We therefore examined which of the genes in the embryonic and first-instar juvenile stages exhibit different expression levels in the presence or absence of predator kairomones. Employing a candidate gene approach and identifying differentially-expressed genes revealed that the morphogenetic factors, Hox3, extradenticle and escargot, were up-regulated by kairomones in the postembryonic stage and may potentially be responsible for defense morph formation. In addition, the juvenile hormone pathway genes, JHAMT and Met, and the insulin signaling pathway genes, InR and IRS-1, were up-regulated in the first-instar stage. It is well known that these hormonal pathways are involved in physiological regulation following morphogenesis in many insect species. During the embryonic stage when morphotypes were determined, one of the novel genes identified by differential display was up-regulated, suggesting that this gene may be related to morphotype determination. Biological functions of the up-regulated genes are discussed in the context of defense morph formation. Conclusions It is suggested that, following the reception of kairomone signals, the identified genes are involved in a series of defensive phenotypic alterations and the production of a defensive phenotype.

  7. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF PHENYL QUINOLINE ON WATER FLEA DAPHNIA MAGNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrando Ayala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic ecotoxicological determination of phytonematicide products using the zooplanktonic cladoceran Daphnia magna is important for environmental risk assessment. Evaluations were made of the acute median lethal concentration (LC50 of phenyl quinoline on D. magna, that was 4.12 ug i.a. L-1 at 48 h of exposure. The chronic effects of phenyl quinoline in the mortality rate of the cladoceran D. magna at 17 d of exposure, with 0.18 ug ai L-1 of LOEC (Lowest Observed Effect Concentration and 0.072 ug ai L-1 of NOEC (No Observed Effect Concentration were determined. Evaluations of the chronic effect of phenyl quinoline on three parameters of growth of D. magna (total length, antenna length and caudal length to 17 d of exposure, only showed significant differences in length of the antenna between the control and 0.072 ug ai L-1 been this the value of LOEC and thus the lower concentration 0.0288 ug ai L-1, the NOEC value for phenyl quinoline. The ratio between acute and chronic toxicity (RAC for the relationship showed acute 48 h exposure on mortality NOEC 17 d a value of 57.22, and for the ratio of acute NOEC on of the length of the antenna to 17 d was a value of 143. The environmental risk assessment (ERA shows that the PEC (Probable Effect Concentration / PNEC (Predicted No-Effect Concentration for acute assay was 582 524 and for the PEC / PNEC for chronic test was 83 333 333. These results demonstrate that phenyl quinoline has a high impact on aquatic biota represented by the trophic level that belongs to D. magna, and therefore shows that the substance is a candidate for a comprehensive ecotoxicological assessment.

  8. Photoperiodism of Male Offspring Production in the Water Flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2017-08-01

    Photoperiodism is a biological seasonal timing system utilized to regulate development and reproduction in organisms. The freshwater micro-crustacean Daphnia pulex displays environmental sex determination, the precise physiological mechanisms of which are largely unknown due to the lack of an experimental system to induce female or male offspring production by alterations of the rearing environment. We recently found that D. pulex, WTN6 strain, produces female or male offspring in response to long-day or short-day conditions, respectively. Taking advantage of this system, here we report the photoperiodic response curve for male offspring production, showing 12 hours as natural critical daylength (50% incidence of male-producing mothers), and that male offspring inducibility is highly sensitive to photoperiodic alterations. By using monochromatic light emitting diode (LED) devices, we found that the effective wavelength is red-light (627 nm), which stably induces male offspring production. This suggests that the red-light photoreceptor may be decisive in the primary step of sex determination process in this strain. Our findings provide the first insights into photoperiodism and red-light as key factors in triggering male offspring production in daphnids.

  9. Effects of Microcystis aeruginosa on life history of water flea Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Li, Kang; Chen, Taoying; Dai, Xilin; Jiang, Min; Diana, James S.

    2011-07-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater systems are a worldwide problem, creating adverse effects for many aquatic organisms by producing toxic microcystins and deteriorating water quality. In this study, microcystins (MCs) in Microcystis aeruginosa, and Daphnia magna exposed to M. aeruginosa, were analyzed by HPLC-MS, and the effects of M. aeruginosa on D. magna were investigated. When D. magna was exposed to M. aeruginosa for more than 2 h, Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was detected. When exposed to 1.5 × 106, 3 × 106, 0.75 × 107, and 1.5 × 107 cell/mL of M. aeruginosa for 96 h, average survival of D. magna for treatments were 23.33%, 33.33%, 13.33%, 16.67%, respectively, which were significantly lower than the average 100% survival in the control group ( P water bodies.

  10. Effect of juvenoids on predator-induced polyphenism in the water flea, Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Gotoh, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Naoki; Miura, Toru

    2013-10-01

    In Daphnia pulex, juveniles form "neckteeth" a defensive structure on their heads, in response to predatory kairomones released by Chaoborus larvae. This phenomenon provides a model experimental system for the study of developmental mechanisms and evolutionary processes in predator-induced polyphenisms. Although it is thought that kairomone signals are sensed and converted into physiological signals resulting in morphological changes, little is known about the endocrine and physiological mechanisms of this process. Juvenile hormones and related chemicals, that is, juvenoids, are key hormones responsible for various physiological events in insects, including polyphenisms. In some crustaceans, methyl farnesoate (MF) is known to act as a juvenoid. In order to investigate the functions of juvenoids in defense morph formation, we treated daphnids with MF as well as JHIII (Juvenile Hormone III, an insect juvenoid) and fenoxycarb (a synthetic juvenile hormone analog) during their developmental stages. Strikingly, in the first-instar juveniles, all examined juvenoids stimulated the formation of neckteeth only in the presence of kairomones, not by themselves. This juvenoid effect on the neckteeth formation might be due to disturbance of the JH pathway. Juvenoid treatments reduced tail-spine length, whereas predatory kairomones are known to elongate tail spine. These results suggest that other physiological factors are responsible for the tail-spine elongation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Masanao; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH), which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the recognition of environmental changes, which form the basis of phenotypic plasticity.

  12. Molecular cloning of doublesex genes of four cladocera (water flea) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Sato, Masaru; Sugiura, Naomi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hajime; Oda, Shigeto; Ogino, Yukiko; Hiruta, Chizue; Mizutani, Takeshi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Paland, Susanne; Jackson, Craig; Colbourne, John K; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-04-10

    The gene doublesex (dsx) is known as a key factor regulating genetic sex determination in many organisms. We previously identified two dsx genes (DapmaDsx1 and DapmaDsx2) from a freshwater branchiopod crustacean, Daphnia magna, which are expressed in males but not in females. D. magna produces males by parthenogenesis in response to environmental cues (environmental sex determination) and we showed that DapmaDsx1 expression during embryonic stages is responsible for the male trait development. The D. magna dsx genes are thought to have arisen by a cladoceran-specific duplication; therefore, to investigate evolutionary conservation of sex specific expression of dsx genes and to further assess their functions in the environmental sex determination, we searched for dsx homologs in four closely related cladoceran species. We identified homologs of both dsx genes from, D. pulex, D. galeata, and Ceriodaphnia dubia, yet only a single dsx gene was found from Moina macrocopa. The deduced amino acid sequences of all 9 dsx homologs contained the DM and oligomerization domains, which are characteristic for all arthropod DSX family members. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggested that the dsx gene duplication likely occurred prior to the divergence of these cladoceran species, because that of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon is rooted ancestrally to both DSX1 and DSX2 of cladocerans. Therefore, this result also suggested that M. macrocopa lost dsx2 gene secondarily. Furthermore, all dsx genes identified in this study showed male-biased expression levels, yet only half of the putative 5' upstream regulatory elements are preserved in D. magna and D. pulex. The all dsx genes of five cladoceran species examined had similar amino acid structure containing highly conserved DM and oligomerization domains, and exhibited sexually dimorphic expression patterns, suggesting that these genes may have similar functions for environmental sex determination in cladocerans.

  13. The water flea Daphnia--a 'new' model system for ecology and evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollewerk, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. Availability of the genome sequence will have implications for research in aquatic ecology and evolution in particular, as addressed by a series of papers published recently in BMC Evolutionary Biology and BMC Genomics.

  14. Time-resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Hopping: Body Size Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, A. N.; Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2014-11-01

    The flow field of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna is quantified with time-resolved tomographic PIV. In the current work, we compare body kinematics and flow disturbance between organisms of small (body length = 1.8 mm) versus medium (2.3 mm) versus large (2.65 mm) size. These plankters are equipped with a pair of antennae that are biramous such that the protopodite splits or branches into an exopodite and an endopodite. They beat the antennae pair synchronously to impulsively propel themselves, or `hop,' through the water. The stroke cycle of Daphnia magna is roughly 80 ms in duration and this period is evenly split between the power and recovery strokes. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. Unlike copepod escape motion, no body vortex is observed in front of the animal. Rather, the flow induced by each antennae consists of a viscous vortex ring that demonstrates a slow decay. The time-record of velocity (peak of 40 mm/s for the medium specimen) and hop acceleration (1.8 m/s2 for the medium specimen) are compared, as well as the strength, size, and decay of the induced viscous vortex rings. The viscous vortex ring analysis will be presented in the context of a double Stokeslet model consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width.

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase sensitivity in the next generation of the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Seitz, Frank; Rosenfeldt, Ricki R; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nanoparticle industry is expected to become a trillion dollar business in the near future. Therefore, the unintentional introduction of nanoparticles into the environment is increasingly likely. However, currently applied risk-assessment practices require further adaptation to accommodate the intrinsic nature of engineered nanoparticles. Combining a chronic flow-through exposure system with subsequent acute toxicity tests for the standard test organism Daphnia magna, we found that juvenile offspring of adults that were previously exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit a significantly increased sensitivity to titanium dioxide nanoparticles compared with the offspring of unexposed adults, as displayed by lower 96 h-EC(50) values. This observation is particularly remarkable because adults exhibited no differences among treatments in terms of typically assessed endpoints, such as sensitivity, number of offspring, or energy reserves. Hence, the present study suggests that ecotoxicological research requires further development to include the assessment of the environmental risks of nanoparticles for the next and hence not directly exposed generation, which is currently not included in standard test protocols.

  16. Development of a microinjection system for RNA interference in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Shaw, Joseph R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-11-05

    The ubiquitous, freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex provides a model system for both human health research and monitoring ecosystem integrity. It is the first crustacean to have a well annotated, reference genome assembly that revealed an unusually high gene count highlighted by a large gene orphanage,-i.e., previously uncharacterized genes. Daphnia are capable of either clonal or sexual reproduction, making them ideally suited for genetic manipulation, but the establishment of gene manipulation techniques is needed to accurately define gene functions. Although previous investigations developed an RNA interference (RNAi) system for one congener D. magna, these methods are not appropriate for D. pulex because of the smaller size of their early embryos. In these studies, we develop RNAi techniques for D. pulex by first determining the optimum culture conditions of their isolated embryos and then applying these conditions to the development of microinjection techniques and proof-of-principle RNAi experiments. We found that isolated embryos were best cultured on a 2% agar plate bathed in 60 mM sucrose dissolved in M4 media, providing optimal conditions for microinjections. Then, we injected double-stranded (ds)RNA specific to the Distal-less gene (Dll), which is a homeobox transcription factor essential for limb development in invertebrates and vertebrates. Injected embryos presented with defects in the second antenna and appendage development, and dsRNA induced the degradation of Dll mRNAs, indicating that this technique successfully inhibited transcription of the target gene. We developed a microinjection system for RNAi studies in D. pulex. These techniques add to the growing genomic toolbox and enhance the genetic tractability of this important model for environmental, evolutionary, and developmental genomics.

  17. Physiology of immunity in the water flea Daphnia magna: environmental and genetic aspects of phenoloxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucklow, Patrick T; Ebert, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the ecological correlates of immunocompetence in Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera), we tested for variation in immune function in relation to feeding conditions, host conditions, and host genotype. We investigated both phenotypic (environmental dependent and condition dependent) as well as genotypic aspects of the prophenoloxidase activating system (Pro-POAS), which has been described as a key factor in invertebrate immunity. Daphnia magna is an ideal study system to disentangle phenotypic and genetic variation because females can reproduce clonally. Well-fed Daphnia showed higher phenoloxidase (PO) activity than Daphnia kept at a low food level. Wounding provoked a higher level of PO activity, indicating that the Pro-POAS was condition dependent. Further, we found clonal variation in PO activity among four clones of D. magna isolated from four different populations. The same four clones were tested for their resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. High resistance corresponded to high PO activity. Our results suggest adaptive variation in PO activity and suggest that its expression is costly. These costs may influence the evolution of the PO activity level and the maintenance of its genotypic variation.

  18. Introduction of foreign DNA into the water flea, Daphnia magna, by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuhiko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Hajime; Iguchi, Taisen

    2010-03-01

    Daphnids inhabit a diverse array of aquatic environments and they are a good model for understanding response and adaptation to environmental changes and they have been used one of standard organisms in ecotoxicology. Recent progress of genomics changed the tools for analyzing responses of daphnids, because gene expression changes can be observed before the emergence of prominent adverse effect such as immobility of the organism. Thus understanding of biological changes from gene expression level can be one of the sensitive tools for the evaluation of environmental response of organisms. However, there was no technique for genetic manipulation in daphnids. Hence, we have developed a gene introduction technique based on electroporation. There are two critical points for the successful introduction of foreign DNA into D. magna. (1) Injection of DNA into blood stream. (2) Usage of very low voltage for the electroporation. The injected DNA containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) could be introduced daphnids and the expression of GFP could be detected in living daphnids. This is the first report of gene introduction to daphnids and, together with the emerging genome sequences, will be useful for the expanding our use of daphnid in ecotoxicology.

  19. Gravity receptors in a microcrustacean water flea - Sensitivity of antennal-socket setae in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, D. G.; Farmer, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Gravity receptors of Dephnia magna were discovered on the basal segment of the swimming antennae and were shown to respond to upward water currents that pass the animal as it sinks between swimming strokes. Sensitivity of the gravity perceiving mechanism was tested by subjecting daphnids to a series of five decreasingly dense aqueous solutions (neutral density to water) in darkness (to avoid visual cues). Three-dimensional, video analysis of body position (pitch, yaw and roll) and swimming path (hop and sink, vertical and horizontal patterns) revealed a gradual threshold that occurred near a density difference between the animal and its environment of less than 0.25%. Because daphnids do not sink but continue to slide after stroking in the increased density solutions, gravity perception appears to occur during a vertical swing of the longitudinal body axis to the vertical plane, about their center of gravity, and, thereby, implies a multidirectional sensitivity for the antennal-socket setae.

  20. Temporal Expression of the Clock Genes in the Water Flea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea: Cladocera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Piotr P; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Joachimiak, Ewa; Sikora, Anna; Polanska, Marta A; Pijanowska, Joanna; Bębas, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The timekeeping mechanisms that operate at the core of circadian clocks (oscillators) are based on interacting molecular feedback loops consisting of clock and clock-associated genes. However, there is a lack of comprehensive studies on the expression of clock genes (particularly those forming its core) in single crustacean species at the mRNA and protein levels, and these studies could serve as a basis for constructing a model of the crustacean molecular oscillator. Studies on Daphnia pulex are well suited to fill this gap because this species is the only representative crustacean whose genome has been sequenced. We analyzed the abundance of 20 gene transcripts throughout the day in the whole bodies of D. pulex (single clone); we found that 15 of these genes were transcriptionally active, and most had daily expression level changes. According to the functional classification of their homologues in insects, these genes may represent elements of the Daphnia molecular oscillator core and its input and output pathways. Studies of PERIOD (PER) protein, one of the main clock components, revealed its rhythmic expression pattern in the epidermis, gut, and ovaries. Finally, the cycling levels of many of these clock components observed in animals reared in continuous light led to the conclusion that the Daphnia oscillator, even if it is structurally similar to the oscillators of other arthropods, can be considered a particularly important adaptive mechanism for living in environments with extreme photoperiods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gene up-regulation in response to predator kairomones in the water flea, Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Imai, Maki; Sugimoto, Naoki; Ishikawa, Yuki; Ishikawa, Asano; Ishigaki, Hidehiko; Okada, Yasukazu; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Cornette, Richard; Miura, Toru

    2010-04-30

    Numerous cases of predator-induced polyphenisms, in which alternate phenotypes are produced in response to extrinsic stimuli, have been reported in aquatic taxa to date. The genus Daphnia (Branchiopoda, Cladocera) provides a model experimental system for the study of the developmental mechanisms and evolutionary processes associated with predator-induced polyphenisms. In D. pulex, juveniles form neckteeth in response to predatory kairomones released by Chaoborus larvae (Insecta, Diptera). Previous studies suggest that the timing of the sensitivity to kairomones in D. pulex can generally be divided into the embryonic and postembryonic developmental periods. We therefore examined which of the genes in the embryonic and first-instar juvenile stages exhibit different expression levels in the presence or absence of predator kairomones. Employing a candidate gene approach and identifying differentially-expressed genes revealed that the morphogenetic factors, Hox3, extradenticle and escargot, were up-regulated by kairomones in the postembryonic stage and may potentially be responsible for defense morph formation. In addition, the juvenile hormone pathway genes, JHAMT and Met, and the insulin signaling pathway genes, InR and IRS-1, were up-regulated in the first-instar stage. It is well known that these hormonal pathways are involved in physiological regulation following morphogenesis in many insect species. During the embryonic stage when morphotypes were determined, one of the novel genes identified by differential display was up-regulated, suggesting that this gene may be related to morphotype determination. Biological functions of the up-regulated genes are discussed in the context of defense morph formation. It is suggested that, following the reception of kairomone signals, the identified genes are involved in a series of defensive phenotypic alterations and the production of a defensive phenotype.

  2. Genetic estimates of population age in the water flea, Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John D; Haag, Christoph R; Hall, David W; Pajunen, V Ilmari; Wares, John P

    2012-01-01

    Genetic datasets can be used to date evolutionary events, even on recent time scales if sufficient data are available. We used statistics calculated from multilocus microsatellite datasets to estimate population ages in data generated through coalescent simulations and in samples from populations of known age in a metapopulation of Daphnia magna in Finland. Our simulation results show that age estimates improve with additional loci and define a time frame over which these statistics are most useful. On the most recent time scales, assumptions regarding the model of mutation (infinite sites vs. stepwise mutation) have little influence on estimated ages. In older populations, size homoplasy among microsatellite alleles results in a downwards bias for estimates based on the infinite sites model (ISM). In the Finnish D. magna metapopulation, our genetically derived estimated ages were biased upwards. Potential sources of this bias include the underlying model of mutation, gene flow, founder size, and the possibility of persistent source populations in the system. Our simulated data show that genetic age estimation is possible, even for very young populations, but our empirical data highlight the importance of factors such as migration when these statistics are applied in natural populations.

  3. Toxicity Assessment of Titanium (IV) Oxide Nanoparticles Using Daphnia magna (Water Flea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Le, Thai-Hoang; Lee, Sung Kyu; Kim, Pil; Kim, Jong Soo; Min, Jiho

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), a common nanoparticle widely used in industrial production, is one of nano-sized materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of TiO(2) using different size and various concentrations on Daphnia magna. In the acute toxicity test, four concentrations (0, 0.5, 4, and 8 mM) for TiO(2) with 250 or 500 nm and five concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 mM) for TiO(2) with 21 nm were selected to analyze the toxic effect to three groups of ten daphnia neonates over 96 hours. In addition, to better understand their toxicity, chronic toxicity was examined over 21 days using 0, 1, and 10 mM for each type of TiO(2). Our results showed that all organisms died before the reproduction time at a concentration of 10 mM of TiO(2). In addition, the exposure of anatase (21 nm) particles were more toxic to D. magna, comparing with that of anatase (250 nm) and rutile (500 nm) particles. This study indicated that TiO(2) had adverse impacts on the survival, growth and reproduction of D. magna after the 21days exposure. In addition, the number of test organisms that were able to reproduce neonates gradually were reduced as the size of TiO(2) tested was decreased.

  4. [The application value of water flea Daphnia pulex for hypoxia model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Sheng, Bo; Yang, Lei; Zuo, Yunxia; Lin, Jin; Li, Guohua

    2011-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is an important transcription factor under hypoxic condition in many organisms, and plays a key role in the induction of hypoxia tolerance. It is necessary to establish a hypoxia model for HIF and to perform further hypoxia tolerance research. To investigate the value of Daphnia as a model organism in hypoxia precondition, we developed a preconditioning protocol with a model organism, Daphnia pulex. We found that two episodes of exposure to hypoxic solution resulted in enhanced hypoxia tolerance which is dependent on HIF. Comparative genomic analysis was also made to highlight the homology of HIF-related genes among Daphnia, fruitfly and human. We found that Daphnia is suitable for the study of human hypoxic injury as a model organism.

  5. Molecular identification of Epitrix potato flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Europe and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Jean-François; Chatot, Catherine; Meusnier, Isabelle; Artige, Emmanuelle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Cruaud, Astrid

    2013-06-01

    Epitrix species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feed mostly on plants from the family Solanaceae and some of them are major pests of potato crops. All Epitrix species are morphologically highly similar, which makes them difficult to identify and limits their study and management. Identification of species is mostly based on the observation of the genitalia and requires a high level of expertise. Here, we propose a tool to reliably identify all developmental stages of the most economically important Epitrix species feeding on potato in Europe and North America (Epitrix cucumeris, Epitrix similaris, Epitrix tuberis, Epitrix subcrinita and Epitrix hirtipennis). We first sequenced two DNA markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)) to test their effectiveness in differentiating among six Epitrix species (126 specimens). Morphospecies of Epitrix were well-differentiated by both DNA barcodes and no mitochondrial introgression was detected. Then, we developed an RFLP-based diagnostic method and showed that unambiguous species discrimination can be achieved by using the sole restriction enzyme TaqI on COI polymerase chain reaction products. The tool proposed here should improve our knowledge about Epitrix species biology, distribution and host range, three capacities that are particularly important in the detection and management of these pest species. Specifically, this tool should help prevent the introduction of E. tuberis and E. subcrinita in Europe and limit the spread of the recently introduced E. cucumeris and E. similaris, with minimal disruption to Solanaceae trade.

  6. flea beetle populations and economic yield of okra as influenced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    plant performance and plant susceptibility to insect pests and diseases when applied together. The performance ... Incidence of mosaic disease was suppressed with increasing doses of carbofuran ..... human gastric mucosa. Journal of.

  7. Comparative Developmental Staging of Female and Male Water Fleas Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna During Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Hiruta, Chizue; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Okamura, Tetsuro; Onishi, Yuta; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-02-01

    The freshwater crustacean genus Daphnia has been used extensively in ecological, developmental and ecotoxicological studies. Daphnids produce only female offspring by parthenogenesis under favorable conditions, but in response to various unfavorable conditions and external stimuli, they produce male offspring. Although we reported that exogenous exposure to juvenile hormones and their analogs can induce male offspring even under female-producing conditions, we recently established a male induction system in the Daphnia pulex WTN6 strain simply by changing day-length. This male and female induction system is suitable for understanding the innate mechanisms of sexual dimorphic development in daphnids. Embryogenesis has been described as a normal plate (developmental staging) in various daphnid species; however, all studies have mainly focused on female development. Here, we describe the developmental staging of both sexes during embryogenesis in two representative daphnids, D. pulex and D. magna, based on microscopic time-course observations. Our findings provide the first detailed insights into male embryogenesis in both species, and contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying sexual differentiation in daphnids.

  8. Biological Aspects for Forecasting of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle

    a mostly minor damage by feeding on the leaves of young plants. The main damage is caused by the larvae mining the petioles and later stems from the autumn to following spring. Forecasting is widely based on monitoring the activity density of the adult beetles with yellow water traps in the main period...... of field invasion. Uncertainties are attached to this forecasting as it is based on monitoring of a non-damaging stage. Further, there is not always a direct correlation between trap catches and subsequent larval density since temperature influences the number of eggs laid as well as the number of eggs...... hatching in the autumn. The focus of this project is the problematic aspect of the existing monitoring of the activity density as the only basis of forecasting and the variation in abundance between years. The main focus has been on the influence of temperature on five parameters of reproduction (the...

  9. Mystery of the Toxic Flea Dip: An Interactive Approach to Teaching Aerobic Cellular Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, A. T.; McVey, M.; Rybarczyk, B.; Thompson, J. T.; Wilkins, H. R.

    2004-01-01

    We designed an interrupted case study to teach aerobic cellular respiration to major and nonmajor biology students. The case is based loosely on a real-life incident of rotenone poisoning. It places students in the role of a coroner who must determine the cause of death of the victim. The case is presented to the students in four parts. Each part…

  10. Fate and distribution of fipronil on companion animals and in their indoor residences following spot-on flea treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow Dyk, Melinda; Liu, Yu; Chen, Zhenshan; Vega, Helen; Krieger, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    Use of fipronil {5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile CAS 120068-37-3} topical pet products on dogs and cats introduces low level residues into residences. Distribution and fate studies of fipronil on pets and in residences were performed to evaluate potential determinants of human exposure. Fipronil, desulfinyl fipronil, fipronil sulfone and fipronil sulfide were measured on hair clippings and brushed hair. The derivatives usually represented fipronil applied. Cotton gloves worn over impervious nitrile gloves, cotton cloths placed indoors in locations frequented by pets, and cotton socks worn by residents as direct dosimeters collected fipronil and its derivatives listed above in low amounts during 4-week study periods. Subsequent acid hydrolysis urine biomonitoring did not reveal significant excretion of biomarkers at ppb levels. The human exposure potential of fipronil is low relative to levels of health concern.

  11. FIELD TRIALS OF FENITROTHION, MALATHION, AND DDT DUSTS AGAINST FLEAS ON RATTUS RATTUS DIARDII IN CILOTO, WEST JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Boo Liat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebuah percobaan penanggulangan pinjal Xenopsyll cheopis dari tikus Rattus rattus diardii dilaku­kan di Ciloto dari bulan Februari sampai Nopember 1978. Racun serangga yang digunakan 50 % mala-thion wdp, 40 % fenitrothion wdp dan 75 % DDT wdp. dicampur dengan serbuk bedak sehingga ter­dapat 5 % zat racun aktif (active ingredient. Percobaan dilakukan pada 3 dusun. Pengamatan dilakukan dari bulan Februari sampai Nopember 1978 di daerah percobaan dan daerah kontrol DDT 5 % tidak effektif untuk pemberantasan pinjal, malathion 5 % effektif sampai 15 minggu dan Fenitrothion 5 % sampai 19 minggu sesudah perlakuan pertama. Ketiga racun serangga juga effektif untuk tungau dan kutu, tapi tidak demikian untuk tungau dewasa mesostigmatik (mesostigmatic mites.

  12. FIELD TRIALS OF FENITROTHION, MALATHION, AND DDT DUSTS AGAINST FLEAS ON RATTUS RATTUS DIARDII IN CILOTO, WEST JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Boo Liat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebuah percobaan penanggulangan pinjal Xenopsyll cheopis dari tikus Rattus rattus diardii dilaku­kan di Ciloto dari bulan Februari sampai Nopember 1978. Racun serangga yang digunakan 50 % mala-thion wdp, 40 % fenitrothion wdp dan 75 % DDT wdp. dicampur dengan serbuk bedak sehingga ter­dapat 5 % zat racun aktif (active ingredient. Percobaan dilakukan pada 3 dusun. Pengamatan dilakukan dari bulan Februari sampai Nopember 1978 di daerah percobaan dan daerah kontrol DDT 5 % tidak effektif untuk pemberantasan pinjal, malathion 5 % effektif sampai 15 minggu dan Fenitrothion 5 % sampai 19 minggu sesudah perlakuan pertama. Ketiga racun serangga juga effektif untuk tungau dan kutu, tapi tidak demikian untuk tungau dewasa mesostigmatik (mesostigmatic mites.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, Heather A.; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North

  14. Targeted gene disruption by use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Ogino, Yukiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Toyota, Kenji; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-11-18

    The cosmopolitan microcrustacean Daphnia pulex provides a model system for both human health research and monitoring ecosystem integrity. It is the first crustacean to have its complete genome sequenced, an unprecedented ca. 36% of which has no known homologs with any other species. Moreover, D. pulex is ideally suited for experimental manipulation because of its short reproductive cycle, large numbers of offspring, synchronization of oocyte maturation, and other life history characteristics. However, existing gene manipulation techniques are insufficient to accurately define gene functions. Although our previous investigations developed an RNA interference (RNAi) system in D. pulex, the possible time period of functional analysis was limited because the effectiveness of RNAi is transient. Thus, in this study, we developed a genome editing system for D. pulex by first microinjecting transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNAs into early embryos and then evaluating TALEN activity and mutation phenotypes. We assembled a TALEN construct specific to the Distal-less gene (Dll), which is a homeobox transcription factor essential for distal limb development in invertebrates and vertebrates, and evaluated its activity in vitro by single-strand annealing assay. Then, we injected TALEN mRNAs into eggs within 1 hour post-ovulation. Injected embryos presented with defects in the second antenna and altered appendage development, and indel mutations were detected in Dll loci, indicating that this technique successfully knocked out the target gene. We succeeded, for the first time in D. pulex, in targeted mutagenesis by use of Platinum TALENs. This genome editing technique makes it possible to conduct reverse genetic analysis in D. pulex, making this species an even more appropriate model organism for environmental, evolutionary, and developmental genomics.

  15. Rheoceptive mediators of graviperception in a water flea: Morphological implications of antennal-socket setae in daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Aquatic microcrustaceans of the genus Daphnia are known to orient to light during the day. At night, in the absence of visual cues, daphnids were suspected of maintaining equilibrium by monitoring the direction of gravity through their swimming antennae. Recent investigations using simulated, weightlessness conditions coupled with absence of illumination revealed hair like structures or setae on the basal, articulating socket of the antennae that, when surgically removed, resulted in disorientation. Given the simulated weightlessness or neutrally buoyant condition that eliminated sinking of the normally negatively buoyant Daphnia, it was proposed that the antennal socket setae function as rheoceptors stimulated by the upward rush of water currents during gravity induced, sinking phase of daphnid swimming movements. This rheoceptively mediated, gravity perception hypothesis is further supported by morphological investigations. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that antennal socket setae are anatomically similar to proprioceptors used by higher crustaceans to monitor gravitational direction.

  16. Cloning, expression and cellular localization of the Doublesex gene in the water flea, Daphnia carinata, during different developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingqing; Li, Haixia; Liu, Ajing; Wu, Donglei; Wang, Danli; Zhao, Yunlong

    2014-10-25

    In this study, one of Doublesex genes from the common freshwater cladoceran Daphnia carinata, designated DapcaDsx1, was cloned using primers based on homologous sequences and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). qPCR was employed to quantify differences in DapcaDsx1 expression between the different sexual phases, with expression levels being higher in sexual females. The role of DapcaDsx1 in the reproductive transformation was further investigated in parthenogenetic-phase females and sexual-phase females using whole-mount in situ hybridization. This cellular localization study showed specific expression of DapcaDsx1 in the thoracic segments, second antenna and part of the ventral carapace. Higher expression levels were exhibited in sexual females compared to parthenogenetic females. This suggests that the DapcaDsx1 gene plays significant roles in switching modes of reproduction and during sexual differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-metal interactions between Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in water flea Daphnia magna, a stable isotope experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjarova, I; Blust, R

    2008-11-11

    Metal interaction effects were investigated in Daphnia magna during a simultaneous exposure to essential (Cu, Ni and Zn) and non-essential (Cd and Pb) metals at environmentally relevant concentrations using a stable isotope technique. The metals were applied in the following concentration ranges: 0.0125-0.2 microM for (106)Cd, 0.025-0.25 microM for (65)Cu and (204)Pb, 0.1-1.25 microM for (62)Ni and (67)Zn. Cadmium and copper exhibited a suppressing effect on the uptake rates of all other metals present in the mixture with the exception to lead at all studied concentrations. The effect was already pronounced at low Cd and Cu concentrations and reached a maximum at the higher concentrations. Nickel and zinc showed weaker interactions with cadmium and between each other, while having no effect on copper and lead uptake. There was a high degree of correlation between Cd, Ni and Zn uptake rates indicating that these metals share in part common uptake or interaction pathways. Moreover, a significant correlation between Zn and Cu uptake processes suggests that more than one mechanism is involved in Zn accumulation since Cu is known to interact with Na uptake sites. The uptake of lead was marked by a high initial rate, but the uptake process reached saturation within 24 h. Cd applied at a concentration of 0.2 microM was the only metal which affected the lead uptake process by stimulation of the Pb uptake. Added to the medium at a concentration of 0.25 microM, lead in turn, increased copper uptake. Current work illustrates that metal interactions are significant and occur at low environmentally realistic concentrations affecting bioavailability of both toxic and essential metals.

  18. Development and staging of the water flea Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820; Cladocera, Daphniidae) based on morphological landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Beate; Ungerer, Petra; Klann, Marleen; Stollewerk, Angelika; Wolff, Carsten

    2014-03-18

    Crustaceans of the genus Daphnia are one of the oldest model organisms in ecotoxicology, ecology and evolutionary biology. The publication of the Daphnia pulex genome has facilitated the development of genetic tools to answer long-standing questions in these research fields (Science 331: 555-561, 2011). A particular focus is laid on understanding the genetic basis of the striking ability of daphnids to change their phenotype in response to environmental stressors. Furthermore, Daphnia have recently been developed into crustacean model organisms for EvoDevo research, contributing to the ongoing attempt to resolve arthropod phylogeny. These problems require the comparative analyses of gene expression and functional data, which in turn require a standardized developmental staging system for Daphnia. Here we provide a detailed staging system of the embryonic development of Daphnia magna based on morphological landmarks. The staging system does not rely on developmental hours and is therefore suitable for functional and ecological experiments, which often cause developmental delays in affected embryos and thus shifts in time reference points. We provide a detailed description of each stage and include schematic drawings of all stages showing relevant morphological landmarks in order to facilitate the application of this staging scheme. We present here a staging system for Daphnia magna, which is based on morphological landmarks. The staging system can be adopted for other daphnids with minor variations since the sequence of development is highly conserved during early stages and only minor heterochronic shifts occur in late embryonic stages.

  19. Read-Across Prediction of the Acute Toxicity of Organic Compounds toward the Water Flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; von der Ohe, Peter C; Ulrich, Nadin; Brack, Werner; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    According to the European REACH Directive, the acute daphnid toxicity needs to be assessed for industrial chemicals with market volumes ≥1 t/a. Employing a data set of 1365 organic compounds with experimental 48-h LC50 data for Daphnia magna, a read-across approach has been developed that makes use of the atom-centered fragment (ACF) method as quantitative measure for structural similarity. Both quantitative log LC50 predictions and a discrimination between narcosis-level and excess toxicity can be obtained, augmented by similarity-triggered information that characterizes a compound as inside or outside the quantitative or qualitative model domain. Reading across proceeds as interpolation of the toxicity enhancement (Te ) over predicted narcosis-level toxicity, taking experimental log Te values from similarity-selected reference compounds as input. The resultant decision tree model yields r(2) =0.85 and rms=0.66 for the subset of 757 compounds (56 %) identified as inside the quantitative model domain, and can handle further 318 compounds (23 %) with the categorical submodel, with 290 compounds (21 %) being outside its domain. The new in silico approach appears useful as ITS (Integrated Testing Strategy) tool for the daphnid toxicity assessment. The discussion includes a comparison of Kow - and LSER-predicted narcosis-level toxicity in the read-across context. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Inbreeding and adaptive plasticity: an experimental analysis on predator-induced responses in the water flea Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillen, Ine; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have emphasized that inbreeding depression (ID) is enhanced under stressful conditions. Additionally, one might imagine a loss of adaptively plastic responses which may further contribute to a reduction in fitness under environmental stress. Here, we quantified ID in inbred families of the cyclical parthenogen Daphnia magna in the absence and presence of fish predation risk. We test whether predator stress affects the degree of ID and if inbred families have a reduced capacity to respond to predator stress by adaptive phenotypic plasticity. We obtained two inbred families through clonal selfing within clones isolated from a fish pond. After mild purging under standardized conditions, we compared life history traits and adaptive plasticity between inbred and outbred lineages (directly hatched from the natural dormant egg bank of the same pond). Initial purging of lineages under standardized conditions differed among inbred families and exceeded that in outbreds. The least purged inbred family exhibited strong ID for most life history traits. Predator-induced stress hardly affected the severity of ID, but the degree to which the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity was retained varied strongly among the inbred families. The least purged family overall lacked the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity, whereas the family that suffered only mild purging exhibited a potential for adaptive plasticity that was comparable to the outbred population. We thus found that inbred offspring may retain the capacity to respond to the presence of fish by adaptive phenotypic plasticity, but this strongly depends on the parental clone engaging in selfing.

  1. Uptake visualization of deltamethrin by NanoSIMS and acute toxicity to the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eybe, T; Bohn, T; Audinot, J N; Udelhoven, T; Cauchie, H M; Migeon, H N; Hoffmann, L

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the uptake of deltamethrin, an insecticide, by Daphnia magna neonates by SIMS and to compare these findings with results based on established toxicity tests. Young daphnids (aged <24 h) were exposed to 0, 50 and 200 microg L(-1) (ppb) deltamethrin. Mobile, immobile and dead animals were enumerated after 24 and 48 h following OECD 202 [OECD 202, 2004. Daphnia sp., acute immobilisation test, guideline for testing of chemicals] guidelines. The animals were embedded in epoxy resin, cut into semi-thin sections (500 nm) and placed on silicon supporters. NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca) images were made from tissues of the intestine for carbon, nitrogen (measured as CN), phosphorus and bromine. To distinguish between relative concentrations of bromine in the guts from different exposure concentrations of deltamethrin, a carbon normalization method was carried out. Both deltamethrin concentrations and time showed a significant effect on immobilization and mortality of the daphnids (P<0.0001). Bromine from deltamethrin could be visualized by NanoSIMS in all exposed gut tissues (gut wall, microvilli layer, perithropic membrane). Highest deltamethrin concentrations following (12)C normalization were found in animals exposed to 200 microg L(-1) deltamethrin, followed by 50 microg L(-1) and the control. NanoSIMS 50 was successfully used as a supplemental technique for elucidating the relation between the uptake and localization of deltamethrin and its toxicity to D. magna. These results highlight the potential usefulness of NanoSIMS to detect marker elements of xenobiotic compounds within exposed organisms, to compare relative exposure concentrations, and to locate these compounds at their original tissue location.

  2. Comparative ovarian microarray analysis of juvenile hormone-responsive genes in water flea Daphnia magna: potential targets for toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Williams, Timothy D; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2017-03-01

    The freshwater zooplankton Daphnia magna has been extensively employed in chemical toxicity tests such as OECD Test Guidelines 202 and 211. Previously, it has been demonstrated that the treatment of juvenile hormones (JHs) or their analogues to female daphnids can induce male offspring production. Based on this finding, a rapid screening method for detection of chemicals with JH-activity was recently developed using adult D. magna. This screening system determines whether a chemical has JH-activity by investigating the male offspring inducibility. Although this is an efficient high-throughput short-term screening system, much remains to be discovered about JH-responsive pathways in the ovary, and whether different JH-activators act via the same mechanism. JH-responsive genes in the ovary including developing oocytes are still largely undescribed. Here, we conducted comparative microarray analyses using ovaries from Daphnia magna treated with fenoxycarb (Fx; artificial JH agonist) or methyl farnesoate (MF; a putative innate JH in daphnids) to elucidate responses to JH agonists in the ovary, including developing oocytes, at a JH-sensitive period for male sex determination. We demonstrate that induction of hemoglobin genes is a well-conserved response to JH even in the ovary, and a potential adverse effect of JH agonist is suppression of vitellogenin gene expression, that might cause reduction of offspring number. This is the first report demonstrating different transcriptomics profiles from MF and an artificial JH agonist in D. magna ovary, improving understanding the tissue-specific mode-of-action of JH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Neurogenesis in the water flea Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) suggests different mechanisms of neuroblast formation in insects and crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Petra; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2011-09-01

    Within euarthropods, the morphological and molecular mechanisms of early nervous system development have been analysed in insects and several representatives of chelicerates and myriapods, while data on crustaceans are fragmentary. Neural stem cells (neuroblasts) generate the nervous system in insects and in higher crustaceans (malacostracans); in the remaining euarthropod groups, the chelicerates (e.g. spiders) and myriapods (e.g. millipedes), neuroblasts are missing. In the latter taxa, groups of neural precursors segregate from the neuroectoderm and directly differentiate into neurons and glial cells. In all euarthropod groups, achaete-scute homologues are required for neuroblast/neural precursor group formation. In the insects Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum achaete-scute homologues are initially expressed in clusters of cells (proneural clusters) in the neuroepithelium but expression becomes restricted to the future neuroblast. Subsequently genes such as snail and prospero are expressed in the neuroblasts which are required for asymmetric division and differentiation. In contrast to insects, malacostracan neuroblasts do not segregate into the embryo but remain in the outer neuroepithelium, similar to vertebrate neural stem cells. It has been suggested that neuroblasts are present in another crustacean group, the branchiopods, and that they also remain in the neuroepithelium. This raises the questions how the molecular mechanisms of neuroblast selection have been modified during crustacean and insect evolution and if the segregation or the maintenance of neuroblasts in the neuroepithelium represents the ancestral state. Here we take advantage of the recently published Daphnia pulex (branchiopod) genome and identify genes in Daphnia magna that are known to be required for the selection and asymmetric division of neuroblasts in the fruit fly D. melanogaster. We unambiguously identify neuroblasts in D. magna by molecular marker gene expression and division pattern. We show for the first time that branchiopod neuroblasts divide in the same pattern as insect and malacostracan neuroblasts. Furthermore, in contrast to D. melanogaster, neuroblasts are not selected from proneural clusters in the branchiopod. Snail rather than ASH is the first gene to be expressed in the nascent neuroblasts suggesting that ASH is not required for the selection of neuroblasts as in D. melanogaster. The prolonged expression of ASH in D. magna furthermore suggests that it is involved in the maintenance of the neuroblasts in the neuroepithelium. Based on these and additional data from various representatives of arthropods we conclude that the selection of neural precursors from proneural clusters as well as the segregation of neural precursors represents the ancestral state of neurogenesis in arthropods. We discuss that the derived characters of malacostracans and branchiopods - the absence of neuroblast segregation and proneural clusters - might be used to support or reject the possible groupings of paraphyletic crustaceans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of dispersant on early life stages of the water flea Daphnia magna and the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Maryam; Rodriguez, Rachel; Boettcher, Anne; Powers, Sean; Geitner, Nick; Ladner, David A; Rikard, Scott; Whelton, Andrew J

    2017-06-27

    In response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, over 1 million gallons of dispersant were applied in Gulf of Mexico offshore waters; Corexit 9500 was the most applied dispersant. The impact on organisms in nearshore and freshwaters has received little scrutiny. Acute 48 h toxicity of Corexit 9500 and a new hyperbranched polyethylenimine (HPEI) dispersant-like compound were evaluated for the freshwater indicator organism, Daphnia magna and for larval and early spat stages of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. For D. magna, Corexit 9500 demonstrated toxicity (EC50 of 0.14 [0.13, 0.15] ppm) similar to the 10-kDa HPEI (EC50 of 0.16 [0.12, 0.19] ppm). HPEI toxicity increased as a function of molecular weight (1.2 to 750 kDa). The 10 kDa size HPEI was further investigated because it dispersed crude oil with equal effectiveness as Corexit. For Corexit, 100% oyster mortality was detected for the ≤0.2-mm size classes and mortality >50% for the 0.3- and 0.7-mm size classes at the two greatest concentrations (25 and 50 ppm). HPEI (10 kDa) exhibited low mortality rates (<30%) for all concentrations for all oyster size classes except the 0.1-mm class. Although mortality rates for this size class were up to 60%, mortality was still less than the mortality caused by Corexit 9500. The low toxicity of HPEI polymers for C. virginica in comparison with Corexit 9500 suggests that HPEI polymers warrant further study. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Characterization of genome-wide SNPs for the water flea Daphnia pulicaria generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Joaquín; Chaturvedi, Anurag; De Meester, Luc;

    2016-01-01

    populations. We report a unique resource of novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP) markers for Daphnia pulicaria using the reduction in genomic complexity with the restriction enzymes approach, genotyping-by-sequencing. Using the genome of D. pulex as a reference, SNPs were scored for 53 clones from five...

  6. Characterization of genome-wide SNPs for the water flea Daphnia pulicaria generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Joaquín; Chaturvedi, Anurag; De Meester, Luc; Weider, Lawrence J

    2016-06-27

    The keystone aquatic herbivore Daphnia has been studied for more than 150 years in the context of evolution, ecology and ecotoxicology. Although it is rapidly becoming an emergent model for environmental and population genomics, there have been limited genome-wide level studies in natural populations. We report a unique resource of novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP) markers for Daphnia pulicaria using the reduction in genomic complexity with the restriction enzymes approach, genotyping-by-sequencing. Using the genome of D. pulex as a reference, SNPs were scored for 53 clones from five natural populations that varied in lake trophic status. Our analyses resulted in 32,313 highly confident and bi-allelic SNP markers. 1,364 outlier SNPs were mapped on the annotated D. pulex genome, which identified 2,335 genes, including 565 within functional genes. Out of 885 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups that we found from outlier SNPs, 294 were involved in three metabolic and four regulatory pathways. Bayesian-clustering analyses showed two distinct population clusters representing the possible combined effects of geography and lake trophic status. Our results provide an invaluable tool for future population genomics surveys in Daphnia targeting informative regions related to physiological processes that can be linked to the ecology of this emerging eco-responsive taxon.

  7. Safety of a topically applied metaflumizone spot-on formulation for flea control in cats and kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, K; Lindahl, R G

    2007-12-15

    Four laboratory studies were conducted in cats of various ages to evaluate the safety of a novel low-volume topical spot-on containing 20% metaflumizone (ProMeris for Cats, Fort Dodge Animal Health, Overland Park, KS) when used in cats according to the recommended minimum dosage of 40mg metaflumizonekg(-1) delivered via fixed volume doses of 0.8ml for cats 4.0kg. Study parameters included body weight, food consumption, clinical, physical and neurological examinations, and clinical pathology including complete hematology, coagulation, clinical chemistry and urinalysis. Exaggerated and repeated topical applications of metaflumizone at 1x, 3x and 5x the proposed recommended dose in adult cats and kittens 8 weeks of age had no effect on mortality, body weight, food consumption, clinical, physical or neurological examinations, or clinical pathology parameters. Transient salivation was sporadically noted following some, but not all treatment applications. It occurred and resolved within minutes of treatment application in all groups, including cats treated with placebo. Consequently, it was not considered a direct result of treatment with the active ingredient, metaflumizone. Cats orally administered 10% of the recommended topical dose exhibited considerable avoidance behaviors including spitting, head shaking, and salivation. Therefore, voluntary oral exposure is unlikely. No other adverse signs were observed. Repeated use of metaflumizone caused no adverse health effects when administered at 5x the recommended dose and is safe when used as directed, even on kittens as young as 8 weeks of age.

  8. Identification of putative peptide paracrines/hormones in the water flea Daphnia pulex (Crustacea; Branchiopoda; Cladocera) using transcriptomics and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Ashley L; Lenz, Petra H; Shaw, Joseph R; Christie, Andrew E

    2009-02-01

    The cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex has emerged as a model species for many biological fields, in particular environmental toxicology and toxicogenomics. Recently, this species has been the subject of an extensive transcriptome project, resulting in the generation and public deposition of over 150,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). This resource makes D. pulex an excellent model for protein discovery using bioinformatics. Here, in silico searches of the D. pulex EST database were conducted to identify transcripts encoding putative peptide precursors. Moreover, the mature peptides contained within the deduced prepro-hormones were predicted using online peptide processing programs and homology to known arthropod isoforms. In total, 63 putative peptide-encoding ESTs were identified encompassing 14 distinct peptide families/subfamilies: A-type allatostatin, B-type allatostatin, C-type allatostatin, bursicon (both alpha and beta subunit peptides), crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH)/ion transport peptide (both CHH- and moult-inhibiting hormone-like subfamilies), diuretic hormone (calcitonin-like), ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH), FMRFamide (both neuropeptide F and short neuropeptide F subfamilies), orcokinin and pigment dispersing hormone. From these transcripts, the structures of 76 full-length/partial peptides were predicted, which included the first C-type allatostatin-like peptide identified from a crustacean, the first crustacean calcitonin-like diuretic hormone, an undescribed CCAP isoform, two hitherto unknown ETH variants, and two new orcokinins. Neuronal localization of several of the identified peptide families was confirmed using immunohistochemitry (i.e. A-type allatostatin, CCAP, FMRFamide and PDH). In addition, immunohistochemical analyses identified other putative neuropeptides for which no ESTs had been found (i.e. corazonin, insect kinin, proctolin, red pigment concentrating hormone, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide). Collectively, the data presented here not only catalog an extensive array of putative D. pulex peptide paracrines/hormones, but also provide a strong foundation for future investigations of the effects of environmental/anthropogenic stressors on peptidergic control in this model organism.

  9. Characterization of genome-wide SNPs for the water flea Daphnia pulicaria generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Joaquín; Chaturvedi, Anurag; De Meester, Luc; Weider, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    The keystone aquatic herbivore Daphnia has been studied for more than 150 years in the context of evolution, ecology and ecotoxicology. Although it is rapidly becoming an emergent model for environmental and population genomics, there have been limited genome-wide level studies in natural populations. We report a unique resource of novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP) markers for Daphnia pulicaria using the reduction in genomic complexity with the restriction enzymes approach, genotyping-by-sequencing. Using the genome of D. pulex as a reference, SNPs were scored for 53 clones from five natural populations that varied in lake trophic status. Our analyses resulted in 32,313 highly confident and bi-allelic SNP markers. 1,364 outlier SNPs were mapped on the annotated D. pulex genome, which identified 2,335 genes, including 565 within functional genes. Out of 885 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups that we found from outlier SNPs, 294 were involved in three metabolic and four regulatory pathways. Bayesian-clustering analyses showed two distinct population clusters representing the possible combined effects of geography and lake trophic status. Our results provide an invaluable tool for future population genomics surveys in Daphnia targeting informative regions related to physiological processes that can be linked to the ecology of this emerging eco-responsive taxon. PMID:27346179

  10. Release of Potentially Cold Tolerant Alligatorweed Flea Beetles (Agasicles hygrophila Selman and Vogt) into the United States from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Entomology & Research Program Nematology , Gainesville, Fla. 32611 I. REPORT DATE 1t. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS April 1982 ,3. NUMBER oF PAGES...Control Research Unit, USDA Science and Education Administration), Drion Boucias (Department of Entomology and Nematology , University of Florida

  11. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, Heather A.; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North

  12. Ctenophthalmus (Ethioctenophthalmus kemmelberg n. sp. (Insecta : Siphonaptera : Ctenophthalmidae, Puce nouvelle de Tanzanie et description de structures internes non signalées chez les Mécoptèroïdes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laudisoit A.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nous avons récemment décrit deux taxa nouveaux de Siphonaptères (Ctenophthalmus (Ethioctenophthalmus teucqae teucqae et C. (E. teucqae shumeensis Laudisoit & Beaucournu, 2007 du foyer pesteux de Lushoto (Monts Usambara occidentaux, Tanzanie. Nous étudierons ici un taxon nouveau, Ctenophthalmus kemmelberg, puce originale, non seulement par ses segments génitaux, mais aussi par des structures jusqu’à maintenant décrites, à notre connaissance, chez aucun Mécoptèroïde. Elles sont observables chez les femelles uniquement. Nous proposons d’attribuer à ces structures remarquables le nom d’“organes de Teucq”.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF A FOCUS OF Tunga penetrans INFESTATION IN OUTDOOR PIG PRODUCTION ASPECTOS EPIDEMIOLÓGICOS DE UM FOCO DE TUNGÍASE (Tunga penetrans, SIPHONAPTERA EM UM SISTEMA INTENSIVO DE SUÍNOS CRIADOS AO AR LIVRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doralice Pedroso de Paiva

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The outdoors intensive-type pig production is characterized by maintaining swine during reproductive, pregnancy and nursing periods on pasture limited by wiring and/or electric fences. The aim of the present report was to describe the epidemiological aspects of an outbreak of Tunga penetrans in an outdoor pig production system. A total of six mature boars, 9 lactating sows, 13 pregnant sows, 9 mating sows, 20 suckling pigs and 34 weaned pigs were clinically examined. None of the boars were infested, while 50% of all sows examined had the parasite lesions, most frequently observed in the breast area, thus resulting in agalactia in lactating sows due to obstruction of the galactophorus channel, with subsequent involution of the mammary gland. In 90% of suckling piglets walking difficulty was observed, caused by the presence of the parasite in the hoofs, with 25% of these animals also showing hock lesions (farm number 1, n = 48. Similar lesions were observed in 100% of 40-47 days old weaned pigs (farm number 2, n = 24 and in 80% of 70 days old weaned pigs (farm number 3, n = 10, all of which had been transferred to finishing units in a confinement system. Therefore we conclude that Tunga penetrans can infest pigs reared or kept outdoors, causing agalactia in lactating sows, and walking disorders in suckling and weaned pigs.

    KEY-WORDS: Chiggers, agalactia in sows; outdoors pig production.

    O sistema intensivo de produção de suínos criados ao ar livre (SISCAL é caracterizado por manter os suínos em piquetes com cobertura vegetal, nas fases de reprodução, maternidade e creche, cercados com tela e/ou fios de arame eletrificado. Este trabalho teve por objetivo relatar aspectos epidemiológicos de um foco de tungíase ocorrido em um SISCAL. Foram examinados clinicamente 72 animais, sendo 6 cachaços, 9 fêmeas lactantes, 13 em gestação e 6 em cobrição, 20 leitões lactantes e 34 leitões desmamados e transferidos para unidades de terminação. Verificou-se que nenhum dos cachaços estava infestado (granja 1= 48 e que em 50% do total de fêmeas examinadas ocorreram lesões com maior freqüência nos tetos, o que nas porcas lactantes deu origem à agalaxia por obstrução do canal galactóforo ocasionando involução da glândula mamária. Em 90% dos leitões lactantes constatou-se dificuldade de locomoção causada pela presença do parasito na região plantar do casco e 25% apresentavam, além disto, lesões no jarrete. Dos leitões desmamados transferidos para unidades de terminação em confinamento, com 40-47 dias (granja 2, n=24 e com 70 dias (granja 3, n= 10 de idade 100% e 80%, respectivamente. ainda apresentavam lesões semelhantes às observadas em leitões lactantes. Conclui-se que a tungíase pode afetar suínos criados ao ar livre podendo causar agalaxia em porcas lactantes e dificuldade de locomoção em leitões lactantes e desmamados.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Tunga penetrans; bicho-de-pé; tungíase; sistema intensivo de suínos criados ao ar livre; agalaxia.

  14. How High Can You Jump?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕山鱼

    2005-01-01

    Flea trainers have observed a strange habit of fleas while training them. Fleas are trained by putting them in a cardboard box with a top on it. The fleas will jump up and hit the top of the cardboard box over and over and over again. As you watch them jump and hitthe lid, something very interesting becomes obvious.The fleas continue to jump, but they are no longer jumping high enough to hit the top.

  15. Molecular Evidence of Bartonella Species From Fleas in Yunnan%用PCR方法检出蚤类携带巴尔通体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗冬梅; 刘起勇; 俞东征; 董兴齐

    2005-01-01

    目的调查我国巴尔通体宿主动物体表寄生蚤类是否携带巴尔通体.方法2003年6~7月在云南省大理州云龙县居民区采集家猫、狗、鼠类等体表寄生蚤,用3对巴尔通体属特异性引物BhCS.781p-BhCS.1137n、Bh 311pBh.452n和TIle.455p-TAla.885n进行聚合酶链反应(PCR),扩增巴尔通体gltA和16S~23S rRNA ITS中部分核酸片段,检测采集的蚤类是否感染巴尔通体.结果共采集251只寄生蚤,包括猫栉首蚤、人蚤、缓慢细蚤等7个常见蚤种,从1组猫栉首蚤和1组缓慢细蚤中扩增出目标带,证实有巴尔通体感染.结论猫栉首蚤和缓慢细蚤能够感染巴尔通体,是该种病原体的潜在传播媒介,间接表明当地家猫和鼠类动物存在巴尔通体感染.

  16. Sublethal and Reproductive Effects of Acute and Chronic Exposure to Flowback and Produced Water from Hydraulic Fracturing on the Water Flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Delompré, Perrine L M; He, Yuhe; Folkerts, Erik J; Flynn, Shannon L; Alessi, Daniel S; Goss, Greg G

    2017-02-13

    Hydraulic fracturing is an industrial process allowing for the extraction of gas or oil. To fracture the rocks, a proprietary mix of chemicals is injected under high pressure, which later returns to the surface as flowback and produced water (FPW). FPW is a complex chemical mixture consisting of trace metals, organic compounds, and often, high levels of salts. FPW toxicity to the model freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna was characterized utilizing acute (48 h median lethal concentrations; LC50) and chronic (21 day) exposures. A decrease in reproduction was observed, with a mean value of 18.5 neonates produced per replicate over a 21 day chronic exposure to 0.04% FPW, which was a significant decrease from the average of 64 neonates produced in the controls. The time to first brood was delayed in the highest FPW (0.04%) treatment. Neonates exhibited an LC50 of 0.19% of full-strength FPW, making them more sensitive than adults, which displayed an LC50 value of 0.75%. Quantitative PCR highlighted significant changes in expression of genes encoding xenobiotic metabolism (cyp4) and moulting (cut). This study is the first to characterize chronic FPW toxicity and will help with the development of environmental monitoring and risk assessment of FPW spills.

  17. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's "Historia Insectorum Generalis" and the Case of the Water Flea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Hasok Chang ("Sci Educ" 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science…

  18. TRANSFERABLE RESIDUES FROM DOG FUR AND PLASMA CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN DOGS TREATED WITH A FLEA CONTROL DIP CONTAINING CHLORPYRIFOS. (R825170)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Yield reduction in Brassica napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and Sinapis alba caused by flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)) infestation in northern Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack; McCaffrey, Joseph P; Brown, Donna A; Harmon, Bradley L; Davis, James B

    2004-10-01

    Phyllotreta cruciferae is an important insect pest of spring-planted Brassica crops, especially during the seedling stage. To determine the effect of early season P. cruciferae infestation on seed yield, 10 genotypes from each of two canola species (Brassica napus L. and Brassica rapa L.) and two mustard species (Brassica juncea L. and Sinapis alba L.) were grown in 2 yr under three different P. cruciferae treatments: (1) no insecticide control; (2) foliar applications of endosulfan; and (3) carbofuran with seed at planting plus foliar application of carbaryl. Averaged over 10 genotypes, B. rapa showed most visible P. cruciferae injury and showed greatest yield reduction without insecticide application. Mustard species (S. alba and B. juncea) showed least visible injury and higher yield without insecticide compared with canola species (B. napus and B. rapa). Indeed, average seed yield of S. alba without insecticide was higher than either B. napus or B. rapa with most effective P. cruciferae control. Significant variation occurred within each species. A number of lines from B. napus, B. juncea, anid S. alba showed less feeding injury and yield reduction as a result of P. cruciferae infestation compared with other lines from the same species examined, thus having potential genetic background for developing resistant cultivars.

  20. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's "Historia Insectorum Generalis" and the Case of the Water Flea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Hasok Chang ("Sci Educ" 20:317-341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science…

  1. NMDA receptor activation upstream of methyl farnesoate signaling for short day-induced male offspring production in the water flea, Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ogino, Yukiko; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-03-14

    The cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex produces female offspring by parthenogenesis under favorable conditions, but in response to various unfavorable external stimuli, it produces male offspring (environmental sex determination: ESD). We recently established an innovative system for ESD studies using D. pulex WTN6 strain, in which the sex of the offspring can be controlled simply by changes in the photoperiod: the long-day and short-day conditions can induce female and male offspring, respectively. Taking advantage of this system, we demonstrated that de novo methyl farnesoate (MF) synthesis is necessary for male offspring production. These results indicate the key role of innate MF signaling as a conductor between external environmental stimuli and the endogenous male developmental pathway. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms underlying up- and downstream signaling of MF have not yet been well elucidated in D. pulex. To elucidate up- and downstream events of MF signaling during sex determination processes, we compared the transcriptomes of daphnids reared under the long-day (female) condition with short-day (male) and MF-treated (male) conditions. We found that genes involved in ionotropic glutamate receptors, known to mediate the vast majority of excitatory neurotransmitting processes in various organisms, were significantly activated in daphnids by the short-day condition but not by MF treatment. Administration of specific agonists and antagonists, especially for the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor, strongly increased or decreased, respectively, the proportion of male-producing mothers. Moreover, we also identified genes responsible for male production (e.g., protein kinase C pathway-related genes). Such genes were generally shared between the short-day reared and MF-treated daphnids. We identified several candidate genes regulating ESD which strongly suggests that these genes may be essential factors for male offspring production as an upstream regulator of MF signaling in D. pulex. This study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying how living organisms alter their phenotypes in response to various external environments.

  2. Prediction of acute toxicity of emerging contaminants on the water flea Daphnia magna by Ant Colony Optimization-Support Vector Machine QSTR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalizadeh, Reza; von der Ohe, Peter C; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2017-03-22

    According to the European REACH Directive, the acute toxicity towards Daphnia magna should be assessed for any industrial chemical with a market volume of more than 1 t/a. Therefore, it is highly recommended to determine the toxicity at a certain confidence level, either experimentally or by applying reliable prediction models. To this end, a large dataset was compiled, with the experimental acute toxicity values (pLC50) of 1353 compounds in Daphnia magna after 48 h of exposure. A novel quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) model was developed, using Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) to select the most relevant set of molecular descriptors, and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to correlate the selected descriptors with the toxicity data. The proposed model showed high performance (QLOO(2) = 0.695, Rfitting(2) = 0.920 and Rtest(2) = 0.831) with low root mean square errors of 0.498 and 0.707 for the training and test set, respectively. It was found that, in addition to hydrophobicity, polarizability and summation of solute-hydrogen bond basicity affected toxicity positively, while minimum atom-type E-state of -OH influenced toxicity values in Daphnia magna inversely. The applicability domain of the proposed model was carefully studied, considering the effect of chemical structure and prediction error in terms of leverage values and standardized residuals. In addition, a new method was proposed to define the chemical space failure for a compound with unknown toxicity to avoid using these prediction results. The resulting ACO-SVM model was successfully applied on an additional evaluation set and the prediction results were found to be very accurate for those compounds that fall inside the defined applicability domain. In fact, compounds commonly found to be difficult to predict, such as quaternary ammonium compounds or organotin compounds were outside the applicability domain, while five representative homologues of LAS (non-ionic surfactants) were, on average, well predicted within one order of magnitude.

  3. Genome-wide profiling of 24 hr diel rhythmicity in the water flea, Daphnia pulex: network analysis reveals rhythmic gene expression and enhances functional gene annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rund, Samuel S C; Yoo, Boyoung; Alam, Camille; Green, Taryn; Stephens, Melissa T; Zeng, Erliang; George, Gary F; Sheppard, Aaron D; Duffield, Giles E; Milenković, Tijana; Pfrender, Michael E

    2016-08-18

    Marine and freshwater zooplankton exhibit daily rhythmic patterns of behavior and physiology which may be regulated directly by the light:dark (LD) cycle and/or a molecular circadian clock. One of the best-studied zooplankton taxa, the freshwater crustacean Daphnia, has a 24 h diel vertical migration (DVM) behavior whereby the organism travels up and down through the water column daily. DVM plays a critical role in resource tracking and the behavioral avoidance of predators and damaging ultraviolet radiation. However, there is little information at the transcriptional level linking the expression patterns of genes to the rhythmic physiology/behavior of Daphnia. Here we analyzed genome-wide temporal transcriptional patterns from Daphnia pulex collected over a 44 h time period under a 12:12 LD cycle (diel) conditions using a cosine-fitting algorithm. We used a comprehensive network modeling and analysis approach to identify novel co-regulated rhythmic genes that have similar network topological properties and functional annotations as rhythmic genes identified by the cosine-fitting analyses. Furthermore, we used the network approach to predict with high accuracy novel gene-function associations, thus enhancing current functional annotations available for genes in this ecologically relevant model species. Our results reveal that genes in many functional groupings exhibit 24 h rhythms in their expression patterns under diel conditions. We highlight the rhythmic expression of immunity, oxidative detoxification, and sensory process genes. We discuss differences in the chronobiology of D. pulex from other well-characterized terrestrial arthropods. This research adds to a growing body of literature suggesting the genetic mechanisms governing rhythmicity in crustaceans may be divergent from other arthropod lineages including insects. Lastly, these results highlight the power of using a network analysis approach to identify differential gene expression and provide novel functional annotation.

  4. Protein kinase C is involved with upstream signaling of methyl farnesoate for photoperiod-dependent sex determination in the water flea Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Toyota

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination of Daphnia pulex is decided by environmental conditions. We established a suitable experimental system for this study using D. pulex WTN6 strain, in which the sex of the offspring can be controlled by photoperiod. Long-day conditions induced females and short-day conditions induced males. Using this system, we previously found that methy farnesoate (MF, which is a putative innate juvenile hormone molecule in daphnids, is necessary for male sex determination and that protein kinase C (PKC is a candidate factor of male sex determiner. In this study, we demonstrated that a PKC inhibitor [bisindolylmaleimide IV (BIM] application strongly suppressed male offspring induction in the short-day condition. Moreover, co-treatment of BIM with MF revealed that PKC signaling acts upstream of MF signaling for male sex determination. This is the first experimental evidence that PKC is involved in the male sex determination process associated with methyl farnesoate signaling in daphnid species.

  5. Effect of Na, Ca and pH on simultaneous uptake of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the water flea Daphnia magna measured using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komjarova, I; Blust, R

    2009-08-31

    The present study investigates the effects of Na(+), Ca(2+) and pH on the kinetics of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn uptake in Daphnia magna at low exposure concentrations measured using a stable isotope technique. Using experimental data the uptake rate constants were calculated for each metal individually on the basis of total metal concentrations. The copper uptake was not significantly affected by variations in chemical composition of the test medium. Calcium had a suppressing effect on the uptake of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn. Specifically, Cd and Ni uptake rate constants decreased with increases in calcium concentrations from 0.1 to 2.5mM. The uptake of Zn and Pb was significantly suppressed only at 2.5mM Ca. The effect of sodium was less clear. There was no effect of varying sodium concentrations on the Ni uptake rate constants. Cd and Pb showed an increase in uptake rate constants at elevated sodium concentrations (2-8mM Na(+) for Cd and 8mM Na(+) for Pb). A bell-shaped response on increasing Na(+) concentrations was observed for Zn with a maximum value of uptake rate constant at the middle value (2mM Na(+)). Variation in pH of the medium affected Cd, Ni and Zn uptake processes. When Daphnia were exposed to acidic conditions (pH 6), the Cd and Ni uptake rate constants were the highest, while similarly low values were observed at neutral and basic conditions. In contrast, the uptake rates of Zn were linearly increasing with increasing pH of the medium.

  6. Resurrecting complexity: the interplay of plasticity and rapid evolution in the multiple trait response to strong changes in predation pressure in the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoks, Robby; Govaert, Lynn; Pauwels, Kevin; Jansen, Bastiaan; De Meester, Luc

    2015-12-09

    A resurrection ecology reconstruction of 14 morphological, life history and behavioural traits revealed that a natural Daphnia magna population rapidly tracked changes in fish predation by integrating phenotypic plasticity and widespread evolutionary changes both in mean trait values and in trait plasticity. Increased fish predation mainly generated rapid adaptive evolution of plasticity (especially in the presence of maladaptive ancestral plasticity) resulting in an important change in the magnitude and direction of the multivariate reaction norm. Subsequent relaxation of the fish predation pressure resulted in reversed phenotypic plasticity and mainly caused evolution of the trait means towards the ancestral pre-fish means. Relaxation from fish predation did, however, not result in a complete reversal to the ancestral fishless multivariate phenotype. Our study emphasises that the study population rapidly tracked environmental changes through a mosaic of plasticity, evolution of trait means and evolution of plasticity to generate integrated phenotypic changes in multiple traits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  7. The uptake of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles in the water-flea Daphnia magna under acute exposure scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nathalie; Leroux, Frédéric; Knapen, Dries; Bals, Sara; Blust, Ronny

    2014-11-01

    In this study the uptake of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles by Daphnia magna was tested. Daphnids were exposed during 48 h to acute concentrations of the nanoparticles and corresponding metal salts. The Daphnia zinc and copper concentration was measured and the nanoparticles were localized using electron microscopy. The aggregation and dissolution in the medium was characterized. A fast dissolution of ZnO in the medium was observed, while most CuO formed large aggregates and only a small fraction dissolved. The Daphnia zinc concentration was comparable for the nanoparticles and salts. Contrarily, a much higher Daphnia copper concentration was observed in the CuO exposure, compared to the copper salt. CuO nanoparticles adsorbed onto the carapace and occurred in the gut but did not internalize in the tissues. The combined dissolution and uptake results indicate that the toxicity of both nanoparticle types was caused by metal ions dissolved from the particles in the medium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neverland regulates embryonic moltings through the regulation of ecdysteroid synthesis in the water flea Daphnia magna, and may thus act as a target for chemical disruption of molting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Eri; Ogino, Yukiko; Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-11-01

    Embryo development in arthropods is accompanied by a series of moltings. A cladoceran crustacean Daphnia magna molts three times before reaching first instar neonate during embryogenesis. Previous studies argued ecdysteroids might regulate D. magna embryogenesis. However, no direct evidence between innate ecdysteroids fluctuation and functions has been forthcoming. Recently, we identified genes involved in ecdysteroid synthesis called, neverland (neverland1 and neverland 2) and shade and in the ecdysteroid degradation (Cyp18a1). To understand the physiological roles of ecdysteroids in D. magna embryos, we performed expression and functional analyzes of those genes. Examining innate ecdysteroids titer during embryogenesis showed two surges of ecdysteroids titer at 41 and 61 h after oviposition. The first and second embryonic moltings occurred at each ecdysteroid surge. Expression of neverland1 and shade began to increase before the first peak in ecdysteroid. Knockdown of neverland1 or shade by RNAi technique caused defects in embryonic moltings and subsequent development. The ecdysteroids titer seemingly decreased in nvd1-knowckdown embryos. Knockdown of Cyp18a1 resulted in early embryonic lethality before the first molting. Our in situ hybridization analysis revealed that nvd1 was prominently expressed in embryonic gut epithelium suggesting the site for an initial step of ecdysteroidgenesis, a conversion of cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol and possibly for ecdysone production. Taken together, de novo ecdysteroid synthesis by nvd1 in the gut epithelial cells stimulates molting, which is indispensable for D. magna embryo development. These findings identify neverland as a possible target for chemicals, including various pesticides that are known to disrupt molting, development and reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pesticide exposure impacts not only hatching of dormant eggs, but also hatchling survival and performance in the water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navis, Sabine; Waterkeyn, Aline; Voet, Tom; De Meester, Luc; Brendonck, Luc

    2013-07-01

    Laboratory ecotoxicity tests and biomonitoring in aquatic systems are currently based on the active component of invertebrate communities. Even though dormant egg banks are crucial for the long term survival and community dynamics of many aquatic organisms, the effects of anthropogenic activities on dormant egg bank dynamics have rarely been studied. In this study we investigated the effects of two pesticides with a different mode of action (carbaryl and fenoxycarb) on hatching of Daphnia magna dormant eggs (ephippia) as well as on survival, growth and reproduction of the hatched neonates. Dormant eggs were exposed to the pesticides simultaneously to incubation under conditions that induce hatching (long daylight and 20 °C). Carbaryl had no negative effects on embryonic development or hatching rate up to concentrations almost 1,000 times the median effect concentration (EC50) of neonate survival in acute tests. Fenoxycarb, however, had a significant dose-related effect by delaying or completely stopping the hatching process and caused severe abnormalities in developing individuals. Both pesticides had significant negative effects on survival and reproduction of the hatchlings. These results indicate that, in addition to inducing mortality of active individuals, pesticides can affect zooplankton communities by altering hatching dynamics and life history traits of hatched individuals. We briefly discuss how such pollution induced changes in the benthic-pelagic coupling could translate into trans-generational effects impacting ecological and evolutionary dynamics.

  10. Metabolomics reveals an involvement of pantothenate for male production responding to the short-day stimulus in the water flea, Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Gavin, Alex; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Viant, Mark R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-04-26

    Under favorable conditions, the micro-crustacean Daphnia pulex produces female offspring by parthenogenesis, whereas under unfavorable conditions, they produce male offspring to induce sexual reproduction (environmental sex determination: ESD). We recently established a suitable system for ESD studies using D. pulex WTN6 strain, in which the sex of the offspring can be regulated by alterations in day-length; long-day and short-day conditions can induce female and male offspring, respectively. Taking advantage of this system, we have already demonstrated that methyl farnesoate (MF) synthesis is necessary for male offspring production, and identified ionotropic glutamate receptors as an upstream regulator of MF signaling. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms associated with MF signaling have not yet been well elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the whole metabolic profiles of mother daphnids reared under long-day (female-producing) and short-day (male-producing) conditions, and discovered that pantothenate (vitamin B5), a known precursor to coenzyme A, was significantly accumulated in response to the short-day condition. To confirm the innate role of pantothenate in D. pulex, this metabolite was administered to mother daphnids resulting in a significantly increased proportion of male offspring producing mothers. This study provides novel insights of the metabolic mechanisms of the ESD system in D. pulex.

  11. Offspring Provisioning Explains Clone-Specific Maternal Age Effects on Life History and Life Span in the Water Flea, Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaistow, Stewart J; Shirley, Christopher; Collin, Helene; Cornell, Stephen J; Harney, Ewan D

    2015-09-01

    Genetic inheritance underpins evolutionary theories of aging, but the role that nongenetic inheritance plays is unclear. Parental age reduces the life span of offspring in a diverse array of taxa but has not been explained from an evolutionary perspective. We quantified the effect that maternal age had on the growth and maturation decisions, life history, rates of senescence, and life span of offspring from three Daphnia pulex clones collected from different populations. We then used those data to test general hypotheses proposed to explain maternal age effects on offspring life span. Three generations of breeding from young or old mothers produced dramatic differences in the life histories of fourth-generation offspring, including significant reductions in life span. The magnitude of the effect differed between clones, which suggests that genetic and nongenetic factors ultimately underpin trait inheritance and shape patterns of aging. Older parents did not transmit a senescent state to their offspring. Instead, offspring from older ancestors had increased early-life reproductive effort, which resulted in an earlier onset of reproductive senescence, and an increased rate of actuarial senescence, which shortened their life span. Our results provide a clear example of the need to consider multiple inheritance mechanisms when studying trait evolution.

  12. Protein kinase C is involved with upstream signaling of methyl farnesoate for photoperiod-dependent sex determination in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2017-02-15

    Sex determination of Daphnia pulex is decided by environmental conditions. We established a suitable experimental system for this study using D. pulex WTN6 strain, in which the sex of the offspring can be controlled by photoperiod. Long-day conditions induced females and short-day conditions induced males. Using this system, we previously found that methy farnesoate (MF), which is a putative innate juvenile hormone molecule in daphnids, is necessary for male sex determination and that protein kinase C (PKC) is a candidate factor of male sex determiner. In this study, we demonstrated that a PKC inhibitor [bisindolylmaleimide IV (BIM)] application strongly suppressed male offspring induction in the short-day condition. Moreover, co-treatment of BIM with MF revealed that PKC signaling acts upstream of MF signaling for male sex determination. This is the first experimental evidence that PKC is involved in the male sex determination process associated with methyl farnesoate signaling in daphnid species. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Key to Holarctic species of Epitrix flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) with review of their distribution, host plants and history of invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieńkowski, Andrzej O; Orlova-Bienkowskaja, Marina J

    2016-10-17

    The genus Epitrix Foudras, 1860a has a worldwide distribution. Some species of Epitrix are major pests of potato, tomato, eggplant, tobacco and other plants in North America and Europe. Some pest species have been inadvertently introduced from North America to Europe, from Europe to North America and from both continents to some islands in Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Therefore, a key for the identification of all Holarctic species is necessary for plant quarantine and protection services. We have compiled the key for distinguishing Epitrix from genera that could be confused with it and a key for all Holarctic species of Epitrix with the figures of spermathecae and aedeagi and the checklist with a review of the geographical distribution, host plants and history of invasions. The following species are included: E. abeillei (Bauduer), E. allardii (Wollaston), E. atropae Foudras, E. brevis Schwarz, E. caucasica (Heikertinger), E. cucumeris (Harris), E. dieckmanni (Mohr), E. ermischi (Mohr), E. fasciata Blatchley, E. flavotestacea Horn, E. fuscula Crotch, E. hirtipennis (Melsheimer), E. humeralis Dury, E. intermedia Foudras, E. krali Döberl, E. lobata Crotch, E. muehlei Döberl, E. priesneri (Heikertinger), E. pubescens (Koch), E. ogloblini (Iablokov-Khnzorian), E. robusta Jacoby, E. setosella (Fairmaire), E. similaris Gentner, E. solani (Blatchley), E. subcrinita (LeConte), E. tuberis Gentner, E. warchalowskii (Mohr) and E. papa Orlova-Bienkowskaja.

  14. Tick and flea infestation in a captive Margay Leopardus wiedii (Schinz, 1821) (Carnivora: Felidae: Felinae) in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Quevedo, M; Gomez, L; J. Lescano

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between wild and domestic animals can increase the risk for transmission of parasites in both directions, and thus, affects the ecology of diseases. Wild felids have been proven to be sensitive to infectious agents commonly found in domestic animals, and those agents have had detrimental effects on wildlife conservation. A margay Leopardus wiedii which had been kept captive as a pet for about fifteen days, was found moderately infested with the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguin...

  15. 灭蚤项圈对犬、猫蚤的临床试验%Efficacy of pet cervical collar against fleas on naturally infested dogs and cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明寿; 许金俊; 彭金彪; 彭昊; 陶建平

    2007-01-01

    采用自身对照试验,以自然感染栉首蚤(Ctenocephalides sp.)的犬与猫为试验动物,验证常熟市金牧药业有限公司生产的灭蚤项圈(犬用、猫用)对蚤的杀灭与防治效果.结果表明:在整个试验期间,所有参与试验的犬、猫均未出现任何不良反应,犬、猫在挂项圈(即用药)后第14~60天,杀虫率分别在97.3%~98.4%与96.6%~98.0%之间,杀虫效果极显著(P<0.01).证明灭蚤项圈(犬用、猫用)对犬、猫安全可靠,能长期杀灭犬、猫蚤类.

  16. Bubonic plague fungus after flea spreading process in related gene%鼠疫菌经蚤传播过程中的相关基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘耀光; 王身荣

    2008-01-01

    美国落基山实验室的Hinnebusch和Perry等研究人员在上述实验研究领域不间断探索,有大量的研究论文问世,他们的研究成果比较令人信服地证明,表达耶尔森鼠毒素的基因ymt对于侵入蚤类中肠的鼠疫菌的生存和繁殖至关重要,而鼠疫菌染色体pgm位点内的氯化高铁血红素储存系统基因hms的正常表达,是鼠疫菌在蚤类前胃形成菌栓所必需的.

  17. On the Confession of a Canary Bird, Children on a Holiday Camp, and the Apology for Fleas Planned by Janusz Korczak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zgrzywa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The point of departure for this article is the memory of moving fragments of Janusz Korczak’s journal from Warsaw ghetto. The author confronts the fragments with Korczak’s earlier texts, such as the short storied about holiday camps for Polish and Jewish children, and the novel Król Maciuś na bezludnej wyspie [King Maciuś on a Desert Island]. The image of a canary bird, used in the novel, is confronted with other symbolic stories about this bird, such as the story in Wiesław Myśliwski’s Pałac [Palace]. With reference to the image, the article invokes Korczak’s meditations on identity and tolerance, and human ethical and aesthetic choices. The audacity of Korczak’s thoughts and conclusions goes far beyond his time, and seems perfectly fit for ours.

  18. Report on activities conducted at Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the work done at Arapaho NWR to collect prairie dogs and prairie dog fleas, in order to conduct a laboratory study of flea control methods....

  19. Vom work Book Journal, 2011 1st Edition PDF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    animals, including humans (Lyon, 1997; Kramer and. Mencke, 2001). ... Rust, 1994) and transmission of the tape worm Dipylidium caninum (Pugh, 1987). This flea can ... eggs and other developmental stages of the flea which are not normally ...

  20. Notes on some ectoparasites received by the Medical Entomology Unit, Institute for Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H L; Krishnasamy, M; Jeffery, J; Paramasvaran, S

    2006-06-01

    There were a spate of recent complaints of insect bites and the entomological specimens received from various sources were identified to be those of cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) and rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis), the tropical bed-bug (Cimex hemipterus) and the dog louse (Heterodoxus spiniger). Only the fleas and the bed-bug are known to attack humans.

  1. COⅠ and COⅡ sequences analysis for an imported Siphonaptera sample of Ctenocephalides felis felis at Alataw Pass,China-Kazakhstan%中哈边境阿拉山口口岸输入性猫栉首蚤指名亚种线粒体COⅠ和COⅡ基因序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗丹; 王安东; 尹小平; 田延河; 梁臻; 巴特; 张江国

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析阿拉山口口岸地区输入性猫栉首蚤指名亚种细胞色素C氧化酶Ⅰ(COⅠ)和Ⅱ(COⅡ)基因特征和系统进化关系.方法 从2014年1月入境集装箱死猫体表采集蚤类样本,形态学鉴定完毕后提取DNA,PCR扩增COⅠ和COⅡ基因并测定序列,使用Mega 6.0通过ML法构建系统发育树.结果 猫栉首蚤指名亚种COⅠ和COⅡ基因富含A+T,碱基突变多为置换突变,无移码,缺失和插入突变;Blast显示与澳大利亚猫栉首蚤指名亚种同源性较高(99%).结论 COⅠ基因序列存在足够的变异能够区分亲缘关系很近的种类,为外来或新发现的蚤种的鉴别提供了分子水平的技术依据.

  2. Curative and preventive efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against Ctenocephalides canis infestation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Pascal; Gale, Boyd; Chester, Theodore S; Larsen, Diane L

    2014-04-02

    The efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against adult dog fleas, Ctenocephalides canis, was evaluated in a controlled, blinded study. A total of 32 dogs were infested with 100 adult unfed fleas approximately 24h prior to treatment and then at weekly intervals for 5 weeks after treatment. Live fleas were counted upon removal at 12h (for 16 dogs) and 24h (for the remaining 16 dogs) after treatment (for counts performed the first week) or after infestation (for counts performed on subsequent weeks). In addition, flea eggs were collected from each pen and counted for the dogs with flea removal at 24h. Dosing of individual dogs was achieved using a combination of the chewable tablets to be as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of 2.5mg/kg. The percent efficacy of the afoxolaner treatment was ≥ 99.0% for all 24-h flea counts. For flea counts performed 12h after treatment or infestations, the percent efficacy was ≥ 94.1% up to Day 21. After Day 1, no flea eggs were recovered from the afoxolaner treated group, providing 100% reduction in numbers of flea eggs recovered versus untreated control group. This study confirmed that a single oral treatment with afoxolaner provided excellent efficacy against infestations by C. canis within 12-24h after treatment, prevented re-infestations, and completely prevented egg production from new flea infestations for up to 5 weeks.

  3. Burrowing Owls, Pulex irritans, and Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belthoff, James R; Bernhardt, Scott A; Ball, Christopher L; Gregg, Michael; Johnson, David H; Ketterling, Rachel; Price, Emily; Tinker, Juliette K

    2015-09-01

    Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) are small, ground-dwelling owls of western North America that frequent prairie dog (Cynomys spp.) towns and other grasslands. Because they rely on rodent prey and occupy burrows once or concurrently inhabited by fossorial mammals, the owls often harbor fleas. We examined the potential role of fleas found on burrowing owls in plague dynamics by evaluating prevalence of Yersinia pestis in fleas collected from burrowing owls and in owl blood. During 2012-2013, fleas and blood were collected from burrowing owls in portions of five states with endemic plague-Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, and South Dakota. Fleas were enumerated, taxonomically identified, pooled by nest, and assayed for Y. pestis using culturing and molecular (PCR) approaches. Owl blood underwent serological analysis for plague antibodies and nested PCR for detection of Y. pestis. Of more than 4750 fleas collected from owls, Pulex irritans, a known plague vector in portions of its range, comprised more than 99.4%. However, diagnostic tests for Y. pestis of flea pools (culturing and PCR) and owl blood (PCR and serology) were negative. Thus, even though fleas were prevalent on burrowing owls and the potential for a relationship with burrowing owls as a phoretic host of infected fleas exists, we found no evidence of Y. pestis in sampled fleas or in owls that harbored them. We suggest that studies similar to those reported here during plague epizootics will be especially useful for confirming these results.

  4. [An experimental study of the possibility for the preservation of the causative agent of plague in the nest substrate of the long-tailed suslik].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazanova, L P; Maevskiĭ, M P; Khabarov, A V

    1997-01-01

    How long Yersinia pestis can preserve in the nest substrate of Spermophililus undulatus and whether it can infect the animals contacting with the substrate infected with flea feces and carcasses were studied in a Tuva natural focus. The infected material was kept in special niches of a bunkering laboratory, which imitated a souslik nest. Biological, serological, and bacteriological studies were conducted after different storage periods. The experiment used 25 sousliks, 56 albino mice, and 3256 fleas. Two hundred and ninety flea carcasses were individually explored. Y.pestis was ascertained to survive in the nest substrate infected with flea feces and carcasses. The pathogen may be preserved as a mutant in the flea carcasses, as evidenced by the isolation of 6 Y. pestis cultures from flea carcasses as a L-form. There is evidence for the fact that healthy animals may be infected on their contact with the contaminated substrate.

  5. No evidence of deer mouse involvement in plague (Yersinia pestis) epizootics in prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Stapp, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, can have devastating impacts on black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies. One suggested mechanism behind sporadic prairie dog die-offs involves an alternative mammal host, such as the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), which often inhabits prairie dog colonies. We examined the flea populations of deer mice to investigate the potential of flea-borne transmission of plague between deer mice and prairie dogs in northern Colorado, where plague is active in prairie dog colonies. Deer mice were predominantly infested with the flea Aetheca wagneri, and were rarely infested with prairie dog fleas, Oropsylla hirsuta. Likelihood of flea infestation increased with average monthly temperature, and flea loads were higher in reproductive animals. These results suggest that the deer mouse is an unlikely maintenance host of plague in this region.

  6. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) and afoxolaner (NexGard®) against induced infestations of Ctenocephalides felis on dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Six, Robert H.; Liebenberg, Julian; Honsberger, Nicole A.; Mahabir, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fleas are the most common ectoparasite infesting dogs globally. The many possible sequellae of infestation include: direct discomfort; allergic reactions; and the transmission of pathogens. Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle. In this study, the speed of kill of a novel orally administered isoxazoline parasiti...

  7. Plague cycles in two rodent species from China: Dry years might provide context for epizootics in wet years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David; Biggins, Dean E.; Xu, Lei; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Plague, a rodent-associated, flea-borne zoonosis, is one of the most notorious diseases in history. Rates of plague transmission can increase when fleas are abundant. Fleas commonly desiccate and die when reared under dry conditions in laboratories, suggesting fleas will be suppressed during droughts in the wild, thus reducing the rate at which plague spreads among hosts. In contrast, fleas might increase in abundance when precipitation is plentiful, producing epizootic outbreaks during wet years. We tested these hypotheses using a 27-yr data set from two rodents in Inner Mongolia, China: Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus). For both species of rodents, fleas were most abundant during years preceded by dry growing seasons. For gerbils, the prevalence of plague increased during wet years preceded by dry growing seasons. If precipitation is scarce during the primary growing season, succulent plants decline in abundance and, consequently, herbivorous rodents can suffer declines in body condition. Fleas produce more offspring and better survive when parasitizing food-limited hosts, because starving animals tend to exhibit inefficient behavioral and immunological defenses against fleas. Further, rodent burrows might buffer fleas from xeric conditions aboveground during dry years. After a dry year, fleas might be abundant due to the preceding drought, and if precipitation and succulent plants become more plentiful, rodents could increase in density, thereby creating connectivity that facilitates the spread of plague. Moreover, in wet years, mild temperatures might increase the efficiency at which fleas transmit the plague bacterium, while also helping fleas to survive as they quest among hosts. In this way, dry years could provide context for epizootics of plague in wet years.

  8. Yersinia pestis infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Egberink, Herman; Hartmann, Katrin; Lloret, Albert; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hosie, Margaret J; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Möstl, Karin; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C

    2013-07-01

    Plague, the medieval 'Black Death', is caused by a Gram-negative coccobacillus, Yersinia pestis, which also infects cats. As in people, it is transmitted from rodents through flea bites; it occurs in Asia, Africa and the Americas in flea-infested regions, all year round, and where rodent reservoirs are abundant. A poor prognosis is associated with high fever, and the pulmonary and septicaemic forms. Antibiotic therapy, flea control and avoidance of rodent contacts have made this infection manageable.

  9. Untersuchungen zur Populationsdynamik von Flöhen auf Hunden und Katzen im Großraum Regensburg

    OpenAIRE

    Biebel, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Investigations on the Population Dynamics of Fleas in Dogs and Cats in the Region of Regensburg, Germany The objective of this study was to compile epidemiological data about the occurrence and distribution of flea infestation by parasitological screening of dogs and cats in the area of Regensburg. Simultaneously, pet owners have been interviewed by use of a questionnaire regarding their experience with flea infestation of their animals and in the environment. The mean infestation rate...

  10. 植物提取物对黄曲条跳甲成虫的忌避作用%Deterrent effects of extracts from non-preferable plants on the adult of striped flea beetle (SFB), Phyllotreta striolata (F.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖荣泉; 魏辉; 侯有明; 刘长明; 尤民生

    2004-01-01

    研究23种植物乙醇提取物,植物保护剂保卫德、15%烟碱在室内对黄曲条跳甲成虫的忌避活性.结果表明:处理后72 h,烟草Nicotiana tabacum、烟碱nicotinamide、艾蒿Artemisia argyi 、繁缕Stellaria media、羊蹄甲Bauhinia variegata乙醇提取物对黄曲条跳甲成虫的忌避效果最好,忌避率为84.45%-98.79%;花椒Zanthoxylum bungeanum、苦瓜Momordica charantia、构树Broussonetia papyrifera、莴苣Lactuca sativa乙醇提取物忌避效果最差,忌避率为41.89%-59.13%;其余提取物忌避效果居中,忌避率为40.35%-97.07%.

  11. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Spiny/fishhook water flea, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.<