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Sample records for flavin-containing monooxygenase activity

  1. Joint Functions of Protein Residues and NADP(H) in Oxygen Activation by Flavin-containing Monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orru, Roberto; Torres Pazmino, Daniel; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The reactivity of flavoenzymes with dioxygen is at the heart of a number of biochemical reactions with far reaching implications for cell physiology and pathology. Flavin-containing monooxygenases are an attractive model system to study flavin-mediated oxygenation. In these enzymes, the NADP(H)

  2. Bacterial flavin-containing monooxygenase is trimethylamine monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Patel, Nisha A; Crombie, Andrew; Scrivens, James H; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-10-25

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are one of the most important monooxygenase systems in Eukaryotes and have many important physiological functions. FMOs have also been found in bacteria; however, their physiological function is not known. Here, we report the identification and characterization of trimethylamine (TMA) monooxygenase, termed Tmm, from Methylocella silvestris, using a combination of proteomic, biochemical, and genetic approaches. This bacterial FMO contains the FMO sequence motif (FXGXXXHXXXF/Y) and typical flavin adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-binding domains. The enzyme was highly expressed in TMA-grown M. silvestris and absent during growth on methanol. The gene, tmm, was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein had high Tmm activity. Mutagenesis of this gene abolished the ability of M. silvestris to grow on TMA as a sole carbon and energy source. Close homologs of tmm occur in many Alphaproteobacteria, in particular Rhodobacteraceae (marine Roseobacter clade, MRC) and the marine SAR11 clade (Pelagibacter ubique). We show that the ability of MRC to use TMA as a sole carbon and/or nitrogen source is directly linked to the presence of tmm in the genomes, and purified Tmm of MRC and SAR11 from recombinant E. coli showed Tmm activities. The tmm gene is highly abundant in the metagenomes of the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, and we estimate that 20% of the bacteria in the surface ocean contain tmm. Taken together, our results suggest that Tmm, a bacterial FMO, plays an important yet overlooked role in the global carbon and nitrogen cycles.

  3. Flavin-containing monooxygenases in plants: looking beyond detox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaich, Nikolaus L

    2007-09-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are known in bacteria, yeast and mammals where they catalyze the transfer of one atom of molecular O(2) to low molecular weight substrates. The predominant physiological function of animal FMOs appears to be detoxification of a vast spectrum of xenobiotics but until recently very little was known about the function of FMOs in plants. In the last two to three years, genetic and biochemical characterization has shown that plant FMOs can catalyze specific steps in the biosynthesis of auxin or in the metabolism of glucosinolates, and, furthermore, have a role in pathogen defence. Thus, plant FMOs hint that further FMO functions might be identified also in non-plant organisms and could stimulate novel research in this area.

  4. Microbial flavoprotein monooxygenases as mimics of mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases for the enantioselective preparation of drug metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, Turan; Krzek, Marzena; Permentier, Hjalmar; Fraaije, Marco; Bischoff, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases are difficult to obtain and study while they play a major role in detoxifying various xenobiotics. In order to provide alternative biocatalytic tools to generate FMO-derived drug metabolites, a collection of microbial flavoprotein monooxygenases,

  5. Exploring the biocatalytic scope of a bacterial flavin-containing monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rioz-Martinez, Ana; Kopacz, Malgorzata; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Pazmino, Daniel E. Torres; Gotor, Vicente; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2011-01-01

    A bacterial flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO), fused to phosphite dehydrogenase, has been used to explore its biocatalytic potential. The bifunctional biocatalyst could be expressed in high amounts in Escherichia coli and was able to oxidize indole and indole derivatives into a variety of indigo

  6. EXPRESSION OF BRANCHIAL FLAVIN-CONTAINING MONOOXYGENASE IS DIRECTLY CORRELATED WITH SALINITY-INDUCED ALDICARB TOXICITY IN THE EURYHALINE FISH (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R826109)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractEarlier studies in our laboratory have demonstrated a reduction of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) activity when salt-water adapted euryhaline fish were transferred to water of less salinity. Since FMOs have been shown to be responsible for the bioact...

  7. Hepatic Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Enzyme Suppressed by Type 1 Allergy-Produced Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Tadatoshi; Bando, Toru; Komada, Akira; Nojiri, Yukie; Okada, Yuna; Ueda, Yukari; Sakurai, Eiichi

    2017-11-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are major mammalian non-cytochrome P450 oxidative enzymes. T helper 2 cell-activated allergic diseases produce excess levels of nitric oxide (NO) that modify the functions of proteins. However, it remains unclear whether allergy-induced NO affects the pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized by FMOs. This study investigated alterations of hepatic microsomal FMO1 and FMO3 activities in type 1 allergic mice and further examined the interaction of FMO1 and FMO3 with allergy-induced NO. Imipramine (IMP; FMO1 substrate) N- oxidation activity was not altered in allergic mice with high serum NO and immunoglobulin E levels. At 7 days after primary sensitization (PS7) or secondary sensitization (SS7), benzydamine (BDZ; FMO1 and FMO3 substrate) N- oxygenation was significantly decreased to 70% of individual controls. The expression levels of FMO1 and FMO3 proteins were not significantly changed in the sensitized mice. Hepatic inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA level increased 5-fold and 15-fold in PS7 and SS7 mice, respectively, and hepatic tumor necrosis factor- α levels were greatly enhanced. When a selective iNOS inhibitor was injected into allergic mice, serum NO levels and BDZ N- oxygenation activity returned to control levels. NO directly suppressed BDZ N- oxygenation, which was probably related to FMO3-dependent metabolism in comparison with IMP N- oxidation. In hepatic microsomes from PS7 and SS7 mice, the suppression of BDZ N- oxygenation was restored by ascorbate. Therefore, type 1 allergic mice had differentially suppressed FMO3-dependent BDZ N- oxygenation. The suppression of FMO3 metabolism related to reversible S- nitrosyl modifications of iNOS-derived NO. NO is expected to alter FMO3-metabolic capacity-limited drug pharmacokinetics in humans. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K m s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min −1 . The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1

  9. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); Krueger, Sharon K. [The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); Stevens, J. Fred [The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); Kedzie, Karen [Department of Biological Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA 92623-9534 (United States); Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael [Department of Chemical Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA 92623-9534 (United States); Gil, Daniel [Department of Biological Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA 92623-9534 (United States); Williams, David E., E-mail: david.williams@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); The Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States); Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7301 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  10. Potential for drug interactions mediated by polymorphic flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 in human livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makiko; Shiraishi, Arisa; Sato, Ayumi; Nagashima, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Human flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) in the liver catalyzes a variety of oxygenations of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing medicines and xenobiotic substances. Because of growing interest in drug interactions mediated by polymorphic FMO3, benzydamine N-oxygenation by human FMO3 was investigated as a model reaction. Among the 41 compounds tested, trimethylamine, methimazole, itopride, and tozasertib (50 μM) suppressed benzydamine N-oxygenation at a substrate concentration of 50 μM by approximately 50% after co-incubation. Suppression of N-oxygenation of benzydamine, trimethylamine, itopride, and tozasertib and S-oxygenation of methimazole and sulindac sulfide after co-incubation with the other five of these six substrates was compared using FMO3 proteins recombinantly expressed in bacterial membranes. Apparent competitive inhibition by methimazole (0-50 μM) of sulindac sulfide S-oxygenation was observed with FMO3 proteins. Sulindac sulfide S-oxygenation activity of Arg205Cys variant FMO3 protein was likely to be suppressed more by methimazole than wild-type or Val257Met variant FMO3 protein was. These results suggest that genetic polymorphism in the human FMO3 gene may lead to changes of drug interactions for N- or S-oxygenations of xenobiotics and endogenous substances and that a probe battery system of benzydamine N-oxygenation and sulindac sulfide S-oxygenation activities is recommended to clarify the drug interactions mediated by FMO3. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Hirani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation.

  13. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and die...

  14. Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) role in busulphan metabolic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terelius, Ylva; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Naughton, Seán; Saghafian, Maryam; Moshfegh, Ali; Mattsson, Jonas; Potácová, Zuzana; Hassan, Moustapha

    2017-01-01

    Busulphan (Bu) is an alkylating agent used in the conditioning regimen prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Bu is extensively metabolized in the liver via conjugations with glutathione to form the intermediate metabolite (sulfonium ion) which subsequently is degraded to tetrahydrothiophene (THT). THT was reported to be oxidized forming THT-1-oxide that is further oxidized to sulfolane and finally 3-hydroxysulfolane. However, the underlying mechanisms for the formation of these metabolites remain poorly understood. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to elucidate the involvement of flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) and cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) in Bu metabolic pathway. Rapid clearance of THT was observed when incubated with human liver microsomes. Furthermore, among different recombinant microsomal enzymes, the highest intrinsic clearance for THT was obtained via FMO3 followed by several CYPs including 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2E1 and 3A4. In Bu- or THT-treated mice, inhibition of FMO3 by phenylthiourea significantly suppressed the clearance of both Bu and THT. Moreover, the simultaneous administration of a high dose of THT (200μmol/kg) to Bu-treated mice reduced the clearance of Bu. Consistently, in patients undergoing HSCT, repeated administration of Bu resulted in a significant up-regulation of FMO3 and glutathione-S-transfrase -1 (GSTA1) genes. Finally, in a Bu-treated patient, additional treatment with voriconazole (an antimycotic drug known as an FMO3-substrate) significantly altered the Bu clearance. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that FMO3 along with CYPs contribute a major part in busulphan metabolic pathway and certainly can affect its kinetics. The present results have high clinical impact. Furthermore, these findings might be important for reducing the treatment-related toxicity of Bu, through avoiding interaction with other concomitant used drugs during conditioning and

  15. The TMAO-Producing Enzyme Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Regulates Obesity and the Beiging of White Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Schugar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that microbes resident in the human intestine represent a key environmental factor contributing to obesity-associated disorders. Here, we demonstrate that the gut microbiota-initiated trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO-generating pathway is linked to obesity and energy metabolism. In multiple clinical cohorts, systemic levels of TMAO were observed to strongly associate with type 2 diabetes. In addition, circulating TMAO levels were associated with obesity traits in the different inbred strains represented in the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. Further, antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown or genetic deletion of the TMAO-producing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3 conferred protection against obesity in mice. Complimentary mouse and human studies indicate a negative regulatory role for FMO3 in the beiging of white adipose tissue. Collectively, our studies reveal a link between the TMAO-producing enzyme FMO3 and obesity and the beiging of white adipose tissue.

  16. An Investigation into the Prediction of in Vivo Clearance for a Range of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barry C; Srivastava, Abhishek; Colclough, Nicola; Wilson, Joanne; Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Amberntsson, Sara; Li, Danxi

    2017-10-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO) are metabolic enzymes mediating the oxygenation of nucleophilic atoms such as nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and selenium. These enzymes share similar properties to the cytochrome P450 system but can be differentiated through heat inactivation and selective substrate inhibition by methimazole. This study investigated 10 compounds with varying degrees of FMO involvement to determine the nature of the correlation between human in vitro and in vivo unbound intrinsic clearance. To confirm and quantify the extent of FMO involvement six of the compounds were investigated in human liver microsomal (HLM) in vitro assays using heat inactivation and methimazole substrate inhibition. Under these conditions FMO contribution varied from 21% (imipramine) to 96% (itopride). Human hepatocyte and HLM intrinsic clearance (CL int ) data were scaled using standard methods to determine the predicted unbound intrinsic clearance (predicted CL int u ) for each compound. This was compared with observed unbound intrinsic clearance (observed CL int u ) values back calculated from human pharmacokinetic studies. A good correlation was observed between the predicted and observed CL int u using hepatocytes ( R 2 = 0.69), with 8 of the 10 compounds investigated within or close to a factor of 2. For HLM the in vitro-in vivo correlation was maintained ( R 2 = 0.84) but the accuracy was reduced with only 3 out of 10 compounds falling within, or close to, twofold. This study demonstrates that human hepatocytes and HLM can be used with standard scaling approaches to predict the human in vivo clearance for FMO substrates. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  18. The participation of human hepatic P450 isoforms, flavin-containing monooxygenases and aldehyde oxidase in the biotransformation of the insecticide fenthion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leoni, Claudia; Buratti, Franca M.; Testai, Emanuela

    2008-01-01

    Although fenthion (FEN) is widely used as a broad spectrum insecticide on various crops in many countries, very scant data are available on its biotransformation in humans. In this study the in vitro human hepatic FEN biotransformation was characterized, identifying the relative contributions of cytochrome P450 (CYPs) and/or flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOs) by using single c-DNA expressed human enzymes, human liver microsomes and cytosol and CYP/FMO-specific inhibitors. Two major metabolites, FEN-sulfoxide and FEN-oxon (FOX), are formed by some CYPs although at very different levels, depending on the relative CYP hepatic content. Formation of further oxidation products and the reduction of FEN-sulfoxide back to FEN by the cytosolic aldehyde oxidase enzyme were ruled out. Comparing intrinsic clearance values, FOX formation seemed to be favored and at low FEN concentrations CYP2B6 and 1A2 are mainly involved in its formation. At higher levels, a more widespread CYP involvement was evident, as in the case of FEN-sulfoxide, although a higher efficiency of CYP2C family was suggested. Hepatic FMOs were able to catalyze only sulfoxide formation, but at low FEN concentrations hepatic FEN sulfoxidation is predominantly P450-driven. Indeed, the contribution of the hepatic isoforms FMO 3 and FMO 5 was generally negligible, although at high FEN concentrations FMO's showed activities comparable to the active CYPs, accounting for up to 30% of total sulfoxidation. Recombinant FMO 1 showed the highest efficiency with respect to CYPs and the other FMOs, but it is not expressed in the adult human liver. This suggests that FMO 1 -catalysed sulfoxidation may represent the major extra-hepatic pathway of FEN biotransformation

  19. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)–flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) signaling acts in silver nanoparticles and silver ion toxicity in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Ahn, Jeong-Min; Kim, Younghun; Choi, Jinhee

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, nanotoxicity mechanism associated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exposure was investigated on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans focusing on the hypoxia response pathway. In order to test whether AgNPs-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation was due to hypoxia or to oxidative stress, depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the test media and a rescue effect using an antioxidant were investigated, respectively. The results suggested that oxidative stress was involved in activation of the HIF-1 pathway. We then investigated the toxicological implications of HIF-1 activation by examining the HIF-1 mediated transcriptional response. Of the genes tested, increased expression of the flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) gene was found to be the most significant as induced by AgNPs exposure. We found that AgNPs exposure induced FMO-2 activation in a HIF-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-1 dependent manner, and oxidative stress was involved in it. We conducted all experiments to include comparison of AgNPs and AgNO 3 in order to evaluate whether any observed toxicity was due to dissolution or particle specific. The AgNPs and AgNO 3 did not produce any qualitative differences in terms of exerting toxicity in the pathways observed in this study, however, considering equal amount of silver mass, in every endpoint tested the AgNPs were found to be more toxic than AgNO 3 . These results suggest that Ag nanotoxicity is dependent not only on dissolution of Ag ion but also on particle specific effects and HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway seems to be involved in it. - Highlights: • HIF-1 signaling was investigated in C. elegans exposed to AgNPs and AgNO 3 . • HIF-1 and PMK-1 were needed for AgNPs- and AgNO 3 -induced fmo-2 gene expression. • PMK-1–HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway was dependent on oxidative stress. • AgNPs and AgNO 3 did not produce any qualitative differences in HIF-1 signaling. • AgNPs were more toxic than an equal amount of silver mass contained

  20. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)–flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) signaling acts in silver nanoparticles and silver ion toxicity in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Ahn, Jeong-Min [School of Environmental Engineering and Graduate School of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Jeonnong-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Younghun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwangwoon University, 447-1, Wolgye-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinhee, E-mail: jinhchoi@uos.ac.kr [School of Environmental Engineering and Graduate School of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Jeonnong-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, nanotoxicity mechanism associated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exposure was investigated on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans focusing on the hypoxia response pathway. In order to test whether AgNPs-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation was due to hypoxia or to oxidative stress, depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the test media and a rescue effect using an antioxidant were investigated, respectively. The results suggested that oxidative stress was involved in activation of the HIF-1 pathway. We then investigated the toxicological implications of HIF-1 activation by examining the HIF-1 mediated transcriptional response. Of the genes tested, increased expression of the flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) gene was found to be the most significant as induced by AgNPs exposure. We found that AgNPs exposure induced FMO-2 activation in a HIF-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-1 dependent manner, and oxidative stress was involved in it. We conducted all experiments to include comparison of AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} in order to evaluate whether any observed toxicity was due to dissolution or particle specific. The AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in terms of exerting toxicity in the pathways observed in this study, however, considering equal amount of silver mass, in every endpoint tested the AgNPs were found to be more toxic than AgNO{sub 3}. These results suggest that Ag nanotoxicity is dependent not only on dissolution of Ag ion but also on particle specific effects and HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway seems to be involved in it. - Highlights: • HIF-1 signaling was investigated in C. elegans exposed to AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3}. • HIF-1 and PMK-1 were needed for AgNPs- and AgNO{sub 3}-induced fmo-2 gene expression. • PMK-1–HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway was dependent on oxidative stress. • AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in HIF-1 signaling. • AgNPs were more toxic than an equal

  1. Cytochrome P450 2C8 and flavin-containing monooxygenases are involved in the metabolism of tazarotenic acid in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Mayssa; Dong, Dahai; Ling, Kah-Hiing John; Tang-Liu, Diane D-S

    2003-04-01

    Upon oral administration, tazarotene is rapidly converted to tazarotenic acid by esterases. The main circulating agent, tazarotenic acid is subsequently oxidized to the inactive sulfoxide metabolite. Therefore, alterations in the metabolic clearance of tazarotenic acid may have significant effects on its systemic exposure. The objective of this study was to identify the human liver microsomal enzymes responsible for the in vitro metabolism of tazarotenic acid. Tazarotenic acid was incubated with 1 mg/ml pooled human liver microsomes, in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), at 37 degrees C, over a period of 30 min. The microsomal enzymes that may be involved in tazarotenic acid metabolism were identified through incubation with microsomes containing cDNA-expressed human microsomal isozymes. Chemical inhibition studies were then conducted to confirm the identity of the enzymes potentially involved in tazarotenic acid metabolism. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to quantify the sulfoxide metabolite, the major metabolite of tazarotenic acid. Upon incubation of tazarotenic acid with microsomes expressing CYP2C8, flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 (FMO1), or FMO3, marked formation of the sulfoxide metabolite was observed. The involvement of these isozymes in tazarotenic acid metabolism was further confirmed by inhibition of metabolite formation in pooled human liver microsomes by specific inhibitors of CYP2C8 or FMO. In conclusion, the in vitro metabolism of tazarotenic acid to its sulfoxide metabolite in human liver microsomes is mediated by CYP2C8 and FMO.

  2. The involvement of flavin-containing monooxygenase but not CYP3A4 in metabolism of itopride hydrochloride, a gastroprokinetic agent: comparison with cisapride and mosapride citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushiroda, T; Douya, R; Takahara, E; Nagata, O

    2000-10-01

    The goals of the present study were to identify the enzyme responsible for metabolism of itopride hydrochloride (itopride) and to evaluate the likelihood of drug interaction involving itopride. In human liver microsomes, the involvement of flavin-containing monooxygenase in N-oxygenation, the major metabolic pathway of itopride, was indicated by the following results: inhibition by methimazole and thiourea, heat inactivation, and protection against heat inactivation by NADPH. When the effects of ketoconazole on the metabolism of itopride, cisapride, and mosapride citrate (mosapride) were examined using human liver microsomes, ketoconazole strongly inhibited the formation of the primary metabolites of cisapride and mosapride, but not itopride. Other cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitors, cimetidine, erythromycin, and clarithromycin, also inhibited the metabolism of cisapride and mosapride. In an in vivo study, itopride (30 mg/kg), cisapride (1.5 mg/kg), or mosapride (3 mg/kg) was orally administered to male rats with or without oral pretreatment with ketoconazole (120 mg/kg) twice daily for 2 days. The ketoconazole pretreatment significantly increased the area under the serum concentration curve and the maximum serum concentration of cisapride and mosapride but had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of itopride. In addition, itopride did not inhibit five specific CYP-mediated reactions of human liver microsomes. These results suggest that itopride is unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of other concomitantly administered drugs.

  3. Predicting the Metabolic Sites by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase on Drug Molecules Using SVM Classification on Computed Quantum Mechanics and Circular Fingerprints Molecular Descriptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Wei Fu

    Full Text Available As an important enzyme in Phase I drug metabolism, the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO also metabolizes some xenobiotics with soft nucleophiles. The site of metabolism (SOM on a molecule is the site where the metabolic reaction is exerted by an enzyme. Accurate prediction of SOMs on drug molecules will assist the search for drug leads during the optimization process. Here, some quantum mechanics features such as the condensed Fukui function and attributes from circular fingerprints (called Molprint2D are computed and classified using the support vector machine (SVM for predicting some potential SOMs on a series of drugs that can be metabolized by FMO enzymes. The condensed Fukui function fA- representing the nucleophilicity of central atom A and the attributes from circular fingerprints accounting the influence of neighbors on the central atom. The total number of FMO substrates and non-substrates collected in the study is 85 and they are equally divided into the training and test sets with each carrying roughly the same number of potential SOMs. However, only N-oxidation and S-oxidation features were considered in the prediction since the available C-oxidation data was scarce. In the training process, the LibSVM package of WEKA package and the option of 10-fold cross validation are employed. The prediction performance on the test set evaluated by accuracy, Matthews correlation coefficient and area under ROC curve computed are 0.829, 0.659, and 0.877 respectively. This work reveals that the SVM model built can accurately predict the potential SOMs for drug molecules that are metabolizable by the FMO enzymes.

  4. Human plasma metabolic profiles of benzydamine, a flavin-containing monooxygenase probe substrate, simulated with pharmacokinetic data from control and humanized-liver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki-Nishioka, Miho; Shimizu, Makiko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Megumi; Mitsui, Marina; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    1. Benzydamine is used clinically as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in oral rinses and is employed in preclinical research as a flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) probe substrate. In this study, plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its primary N-oxide and N-demethylated metabolites were investigated in control TK-NOG mice, in humanized-liver mice, and in mice whose liver cells had been ablated with ganciclovir. 2. Following oral administration of benzydamine (10 mg/kg) in humanized-liver TK-NOG mice, plasma concentrations of benzydamine N-oxide were slightly higher than those of demethyl benzydamine. In contrast, in control and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice, concentrations of demethyl benzydamine were slightly higher than those of benzydamine N-oxide. 3. Simulations of human plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its N-oxide were achieved using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic models based on data from control TK-NOG mice and from reported benzydamine concentrations after low-dose administration in humans. Estimated clearance rates based on data from humanized-liver and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice were two orders magnitude high. 4. The pharmacokinetic profiles of benzydamine were different for control and humanized-liver TK-NOG mice. Humanized-liver mice are generally accepted human models; however, drug oxidation in mouse kidney might need to be considered when probe substrates undergo FMO-dependent drug oxidation in mouse liver and kidney.

  5. Facile N-oxygenation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine by the flavin-containing monooxygenase. A convenient synthesis of tritiated [methyl-3H]-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashman, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid, efficient procedure useful for the radiosynthesis of [Me- 3 H]-MPDP+ ([methyl- 3 H]-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium species) is described. Hog liver microsomes or the highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase from hog liver quantitatively biotransforms [Me- 3 H]-MPTP to its corresponding radiolabeled N-oxide. For the small-scale synthesis required for radiolabeling procedures, this enzymatic process is superior to H 2 O 2 -mediated N-oxygenation of MPTP. In the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH, 4.5 mM n-octylamine, and 2 microCi [Me- 3 H]-MPTP, the only product detected in extracts from incubations performed with hog liver microsomes or purified hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase is [Me- 3 H]-MPTP N-oxide. [Me- 3 H]-MPTP N-oxide is almost completely converted to [Me- 3 H]-MPDP+ by the action of trifluoroacetic anhydride. This procedure has the advantage of using a commercially available tritiated starting material, efficient transformations, and easily accomplished purification to afford a rapid synthesis of [Me- 3 H]-MPDP+

  6. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the effects of flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) polymorphisms on itopride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wangda; Humphries, Helen; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Gardner, Iain; Masson, Eric; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Zhou, Diansong

    2017-09-01

    Itopride, a substrate of FMO3, has been used for the symptomatic treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to evaluate the impact of FMO3 polymorphism on itopride pharmacokinetics (PK). The Asian populations within the Simcyp simulator were updated to incorporate information on the frequency, activity and abundance of FMO3 enzyme with different phenotypes. A meta-analysis of relative enzyme activities suggested that FMO3 activity in subjects with homozygous Glu158Lys and Glu308Gly mutations (Lys158 and Gly308) in both alleles is ~47% lower than those carrying two wild-type FMO3 alleles. Individuals with homozygous Lys158 and Gly308 mutations account for about 5% of the total population in Asian populations. A CL int of 9 μl/min/pmol was optimised for itopride via a retrograde approach as human liver microsomal results would under-predict its clearance by ~7.9-fold. The developed itopride PBPK model was first verified with three additional clinical studies in Korean and Japanese subjects resulting in a predicted clearance of 52 to 69 l/h, which was comparable to those observed (55 to 88 l/h). The model was then applied to predict plasma concentration-time profiles of itopride in Chinese subjects with wild type or homozygous Lys158 and Gly308 FMO3 genotypes. The ratios of predicted to observed AUC of itopride in subjects with each genotype were 1.23 and 0.94, respectively. In addition, the results also suggested that for FMO3 metabolised drugs with a safety margin of 2 or more, proactive genotyping FMO3 to exclude subjects with homozygous Lys158/Gly308 alleles may not be necessary. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. CORRELATION OF FLAVIN-CONTAINING MONOOXYGENASE ACTIVITY, ALDICARB TOXICITY AND SALINITY IN THE EURYHALINE FISH, JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R826109)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Genotyping of flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 3 (FMO3) gene by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    63.40%) of the 306 samples were genotyped using MAMA-PCR and 42 (13.72%) of the 306 samples were genotyped by both of PCR-RFLP and MAMA-PCR and genotyping data were validated by DNA sequencing. The results show that the ...

  9. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: Solubility, activity, purification☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K.; Mole, D.J.; Binnie, M.; Homer, N.Z.M.; Zheng, X.; Yard, B.A.; Iredale, J.P.; Auer, M.; Webster, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington’s disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  11. Polycyclic Ketone Monooxygenase from the Thermophilic Fungus Thermothelomyces thermophila : A Structurally Distinct Biocatalyst for Bulky Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fürst, Maximilian J L J; Savino, Simone; Dudek, Hanna M; Gómez Castellanos, J Rúben; Gutiérrez de Souza, Cora; Rovida, Stefano; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Regio- and stereoselective Baeyer-Villiger oxidations are difficult to achieve by classical chemical means, particularly when large, functionalized molecules are to be converted. Biocatalysis using flavin-containing Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) is a well-established tool to address these

  12. Reconstitution of active mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase complex in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hayashi, Mika; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial binuclear iron monooxygenases play numerous physiological roles in oxidative metabolism. Monooxygenases of this type found in actinomycetes also catalyze various useful reactions and have attracted much attention as oxidation biocatalysts. However, difficulties in expressing these multicomponent monooxygenases in heterologous hosts, particularly in Escherichia coli, have hampered the development of engineered oxidation biocatalysts. Here, we describe a strategy to functionally express the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase MimABCD in Escherichia coli. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of the mimABCD gene expression in E. coli revealed that the oxygenase components MimA and MimC were insoluble. Furthermore, although the reductase MimB was expressed at a low level in the soluble fraction of E. coli cells, a band corresponding to the coupling protein MimD was not evident. This situation rendered the transformed E. coli cells inactive. We found that the following factors are important for functional expression of MimABCD in E. coli: coexpression of the specific chaperonin MimG, which caused MimA and MimC to be soluble in E. coli cells, and the optimization of the mimD nucleotide sequence, which led to efficient expression of this gene product. These two remedies enabled this multicomponent monooxygenase to be actively expressed in E. coli. The strategy described here should be generally applicable to the E. coli expression of other actinomycetous binuclear iron monooxygenases and related enzymes and will accelerate the development of engineered oxidation biocatalysts for industrial processes.

  13. A putative flavin-containing mono-oxygenase as a marker for certain defense and cell death pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Brian; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Brodersen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    to a virulent strain. In addition, a close barley homolog was identified by differential display and shown also be induced by pathogen infection. AtFMO::GUS was induced by the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and by superoxide generation, but not by treatments with hydrogen peroxide, ozone or nitric oxide. During...

  14. Analyzing Activities of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases by Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjørge; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases perform oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds in various polysaccharides. The majority of LMPOs studied so far possess activity on either cellulose or chitin and analysis of these activities is therefore the main focus of this review. Notably, however, the num...

  15. A copper-methionine interaction controls the pH-dependent activation of peptidylglycine monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Andrew T; Broers, Brenda A; Kline, Chelsey D; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2011-12-20

    The pH dependence of native peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM) and its M314H variant has been studied in detail. For wild-type (WT) PHM, the intensity of the Cu-S interaction visible in the Cu(I) extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data is inversely proportional to catalytic activity over the pH range of 3-8. A previous model based on more limited data was interpreted in terms of two protein conformations involving an inactive Met-on form and an active flexible Met-off form [Bauman, A. T., et al. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 11140-11150] that derived its catalytic activity from the ability to couple into vibrational modes critical for proton tunneling. The new studies comparing the WT and M314H variant have led to the evolution of this model, in which the Met-on form has been found to be derived from coordination of an additional Met residue, rather than a more rigid conformer of M314 as previously proposed. The catalytic activity of the mutant decreased by 96% because of effects on both k(cat) and K(M), but it displayed the same activity-pH profile with a maximum around pH 6. At pH 8, the reduced Cu(I) form gave spectra that could be simulated by replacement of the Cu(M) Cu-S(Met) interaction with a Cu-N/O interaction, but the data did not unambiguously assign the ligand to the imidazole side chain of H314. At pH 3.5, the EXAFS still showed the presence of a strong Cu-S interaction, establishing that the Met-on form observed at low pH in WT cannot be due to a strengthening of the Cu(M)-methionine interaction but must arise from a different Cu-S interaction. Therefore, lowering the pH causes a conformational change at one of the Cu centers that brings a new S donor residue into a favorable orientation for coordination to copper and generates an inactive form. Cys coordination is unlikely because all Cys residues in PHM are engaged in disulfide cross-links. Sequence comparison with the PHM homologues tyramine β-monooxygenase and dopamine β-monooxygenase

  16. Reconstitution of β-carotene hydroxylase activity of thermostable CYP175A1 monooxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momoi, Kyoko; Hofmann, Ute; Schmid, Rolf D.; Urlacher, Vlada B.

    2006-01-01

    CYP175A1 is a thermostable P450 Monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27, demonstrating in vivo activity towards β-carotene. Activity of CYP175A1 was reconstituted in vitro using artificial electron transport proteins. First results were obtained in the mixture with a crude Escherichia coli cell extract at 37 o C. In this system, β-carotene was hydroxylated to β-cryptoxanthin. The result indicated the presence of electron transport enzymes among the E. coli proteins, which are suitable for CYP175A1. However, upon in vitro reconstitution of CYP175A1 activity with purified recombinant flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase from E. coli, only very low β-cryptoxanthin production was observed. Remarkably, with another artificial electron transport system, putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida, purified CYP175A1 enzyme hydroxylated β-carotene at 3- and also 3'-positions, resulting in β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the turnover rate of the enzyme reached 0.23 nmol β-cryptoxanthin produced per nmol P450 per min

  17. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Zhang, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty......-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used...... as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes...

  18. Differential Transcriptional Activation of Genes Encoding Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in a Facultative Versus an Obligate Methanotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Angela V; Dunfield, Peter F

    2018-03-06

    Methanotrophs are a specialized group of bacteria that can utilize methane (CH₄) as a sole energy source. A key enzyme responsible for methane oxidation is methane monooxygenase (MMO), of either a soluble, cytoplasmic type (sMMO), or a particulate, membrane-bound type (pMMO). Methylocella silvestris BL2 and Methyloferula stellata AR4 are closely related methanotroph species that oxidize methane via sMMO only. However, Methyloferula stellata is an obligate methanotroph, while Methylocella silvestris is a facultative methanotroph able to grow on several multicarbon substrates in addition to methane. We constructed transcriptional fusions of the mmo promoters of Methyloferula stellata and Methylocella silvestris to a promoterless gfp in order to compare their transcriptional regulation in response to different growth substrates, in the genetic background of both organisms. The following patterns were observed: (1) The mmo promoter of the facultative methanotroph Methylocella silvestris was either transcriptionally downregulated or repressed by any growth substrate other than methane in the genetic background of Methylocella silvetris ; (2) Growth on methane alone upregulated the mmo promoter of Methylocella silvetris in its native background but not in the obligate methanotroph Methyloferula stellata ; (3) The mmo promoter of Methyloferula stellata was constitutive in both organisms regardless of the growth substrate, but with much lower promoter activity than the mmo promoter of Methylocella silvetris . These results support a conclusion that a different mode of transcriptional regulation of sMMO contributes to the facultative lifestyle of Methylocella silvetris compared to the obligate methanotroph Methyloferula stellata .

  19. Differential Transcriptional Activation of Genes Encoding Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in a Facultative Versus an Obligate Methanotroph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela V. Smirnova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Methanotrophs are a specialized group of bacteria that can utilize methane (CH4 as a sole energy source. A key enzyme responsible for methane oxidation is methane monooxygenase (MMO, of either a soluble, cytoplasmic type (sMMO, or a particulate, membrane-bound type (pMMO. Methylocella silvestris BL2 and Methyloferula stellata AR4 are closely related methanotroph species that oxidize methane via sMMO only. However, Methyloferula stellata is an obligate methanotroph, while Methylocella silvestris is a facultative methanotroph able to grow on several multicarbon substrates in addition to methane. We constructed transcriptional fusions of the mmo promoters of Methyloferula stellata and Methylocella silvestris to a promoterless gfp in order to compare their transcriptional regulation in response to different growth substrates, in the genetic background of both organisms. The following patterns were observed: (1 The mmo promoter of the facultative methanotroph Methylocella silvestris was either transcriptionally downregulated or repressed by any growth substrate other than methane in the genetic background of Methylocella silvetris; (2 Growth on methane alone upregulated the mmo promoter of Methylocella silvetris in its native background but not in the obligate methanotroph Methyloferula stellata; (3 The mmo promoter of Methyloferula stellata was constitutive in both organisms regardless of the growth substrate, but with much lower promoter activity than the mmo promoter of Methylocella silvetris. These results support a conclusion that a different mode of transcriptional regulation of sMMO contributes to the facultative lifestyle of Methylocella silvetris compared to the obligate methanotroph Methyloferula stellata.

  20. Kynurenine pathway metabolic balance influences microglia activity: Targeting kynurenine monooxygenase to dampen neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Allison M; Parrott, Jennifer M; Tuñon, Arnulfo; Delgado, Jennifer; Redus, Laney; O'Connor, Jason C

    2018-08-01

    Chronic stress or inflammation increases tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway (KP), and the generation of neuroactive kynurenine metabolites contributes to subsequent depressive-like behaviors. Microglia regulate KP balance by preferentially producing oxidative metabolites, including quinolinic acid. Research has focused on the interplay between cytokines and HPA axis-derived corticosteroids in regulating microglial activity and effects of KP metabolites directly on neurons; however, the potential role that KP metabolites have directly on microglial activity is unknown. Here, murine microglia were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide(LPS). After 6 h, mRNA expression of interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS) was dose-dependently increased along with the rate-limiting enzymes for oxidative KP metabolism, indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase(IDO)-1 and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase(KMO). By 24 h post-LPS, kynurenine and quinolinic acid in the media was elevated. Inhibiting KMO with Ro 61-8048 during LPS challenge attenuated extracellular nitrite accumulation and expression of KMO and TNF-α in response to LPS. Similarly, primary microglia isolated from KMO -/- mice exhibited a significantly reduced pro-inflammatory response to LPS compared to WT controls. To determine whether the substrate (kynurenine) or end product (quinolinic acid) of KMO-dependent metabolism modulates the LPS response, microglia were treated with increasing concentrations of L-kynurenine or quinolinic acid in combination with LPS or saline. Interestingly, quinolinic acid did not impact the microglial LPS response. However, L-kynurenine had dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the LPS response. These data are the first to show an anti-inflammatory effect of KMO inhibition on microglia during immune challenge and suggest that KP metabolic balance may play a direct role in regulating microglia activity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. N-terminus determines activity and specificity of styrene monooxygenase reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Thomas; Scholtissek, Anika; Westphal, Adrie H; van Berkel, Willem J H; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) are two-enzyme systems that catalyze the enantioselective epoxidation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide. The FADH 2 co-substrate of the epoxidase component (StyA) is supplied by an NADH-dependent flavin reductase (StyB). The genome of Rhodococcus opacus 1CP encodes two SMO systems. One system, which we define as E1-type, displays homology to the SMO from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120. The other system, originally reported as a fused system (RoStyA2B), is defined as E2-type. Here we found that E1-type RoStyB is inhibited by FMN, while RoStyA2B is known to be active with FMN. To rationalize the observed specificity of RoStyB for FAD, we generated an artificial reductase, designated as RoStyBart, in which the first 22 amino acid residues of RoStyB were joined to the reductase part of RoStyA2B, while the oxygenase part (A2) was removed. RoStyBart mainly purified as apo-protein and mimicked RoStyB in being inhibited by FMN. Pre-incubation with FAD yielded a turnover number at 30°C of 133.9±3.5s -1 , one of the highest rates observed for StyB reductases. RoStyBart holo-enzyme switches to a ping-pong mechanism and fluorescence analysis indicated for unproductive binding of FMN to the second (co-substrate) binding site. In summary, it is shown for the first time that optimization of the N-termini of StyB reductases allows the evolution of their activity and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R.; Löffler, F. E.

    2016-01-29

    Nitrosomonas europaeais an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2uptake byN. europaeaby 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and

  3. Differential Transcriptional Activation of Genes Encoding Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in a Facultative Versus an Obligate Methanotroph

    OpenAIRE

    Angela V. Smirnova; Peter F. Dunfield

    2018-01-01

    Methanotrophs are a specialized group of bacteria that can utilize methane (CH4) as a sole energy source. A key enzyme responsible for methane oxidation is methane monooxygenase (MMO), of either a soluble, cytoplasmic type (sMMO), or a particulate, membrane-bound type (pMMO). Methylocella silvestris BL2 and Methyloferula stellata AR4 are closely related methanotroph species that oxidize methane via sMMO only. However, Methyloferula stellata is an obligate methanotroph, while Methylocella silv...

  4. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and ChiB) and a ......Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and Chi...... but different product profiles depending on the substrate. In LPMO-chitinase synergy experiments, CBP21 is able to boost the activity of both ChiA and ChiB more than LmLPMO10. Product analysis of the synergy assays revealed that the chitinases were unable to efficiently hydrolyse the LPMO products...... (chitooligosaccharide aldonic acids) with a degree of polymerization below four (ChiA and SmChiC) or three (ChiB). Gene transcription and protein expression analysis showed that LmLPMO10 is neither highly transcribed, nor abundantly secreted during the growth of L. monocytogenes in a chitin-containing medium...

  5. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Zhang, Zhenghong; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-09-08

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes was evaluated in combination with endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase. Two enzymes (TrCel61A and Aspte6) showed the ability to release more than 36% of the pretreated soy spent flake glucose - a greater than 75% increase over the same treatment without LPMO addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of р-450-depended monooxygenases changing immunotoxicity of phosphoroorganic compounds due to their metabolism character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.F. Zabrodsky

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It was established that the application of the monooxygenase system inductors (MSI of phenobarbital and benzonal up to acute poisoning of animals by trichlorfom in a dose of 1,0 LD50, metabolized in the organism till production of compounds with higher toxicity caused its immunotoxic properties increase. The experiment was carried out on outbred white rats. the acute dimethyldichlorvinylphosphate (1,0 LD50 poisoning, biotransformation of which proceeded with formation of less-toxic and non-toxic compounds after MSI introduction, caused its decrease of suppression influence on immunity system indices

  7. Daily fluctuation of hepatic P450 monooxygenase activities in male rats is controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus but remains unaffected by adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, T; Manabe, S; Watanabe, T; Sehata, S; Sharyo, S; Okada, T; Mori, Y

    1999-09-01

    Hepatic P450 monooxygenase activities, which strongly influence the efficacy and/or toxicity of drugs, are known to fluctuate daily. We also know that the P450 activities assessed by measurement of 7-alkoxycoumarin O-dealkylase (ACD) activities fluctuate daily, with apparently high values during the dark period in male rats. However, there is little knowledge about the factors that regulate daily fluctuation of P450 monooxygenase activities. In the present study using rats, we induced lesions in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain, the known site of the body's internal clock, and examined the effects on the daily fluctuation of the ACD activities to clarify the relationship between the SCN and the daily fluctuation of P450 monooxygenase activities. In addition, adrenalectomy was performed to re-evaluate the influence of adrenal hormones on the P450 activities. Our results indicated that daily fluctuations of the hepatic ACD activities were completely eliminated in the SCN-lesioned rats. However, the ACD activities in the adrenalectomized rats showed apparent daily fluctuations with high values during the dark period and low values during the light period. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the daily fluctuation of the hepatic P450 monooxygenase activities in male rats is controlled by the SCN but remains unaffected by the adrenal hormones.

  8. Methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 affects gene expression and methane monooxygenase activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Vorobev, Alexey; Baral, Bipin S; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2015-04-01

    Methanotrophs can express a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase (sMMO) or membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Expression of these MMOs is strongly regulated by the availability of copper. Many methanotrophs have been found to synthesize a novel compound, methanobactin (Mb), that is responsible for the uptake of copper, and methanobactin produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b plays a key role in controlling expression of MMO genes in this strain. As all known forms of methanobactin are structurally similar, it was hypothesized that methanobactin from one methanotroph may alter gene expression in another. When Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was grown in the presence of 1 μM CuCl2, expression of mmoX, encoding a subunit of the hydroxylase component of sMMO, was very low. mmoX expression increased, however, when methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 (SB2-Mb) was added, as did whole-cell sMMO activity, but there was no significant change in the amount of copper associated with M. trichosporium OB3b. If M. trichosporium OB3b was grown in the absence of CuCl2, the mmoX expression level was high but decreased by several orders of magnitude if copper prebound to SB2-Mb (Cu-SB2-Mb) was added, and biomass-associated copper was increased. Exposure of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b to SB2-Mb had no effect on expression of mbnA, encoding the polypeptide precursor of methanobactin in either the presence or absence of CuCl2. mbnA expression, however, was reduced when Cu-SB2-Mb was added in both the absence and presence of CuCl2. These data suggest that methanobactin acts as a general signaling molecule in methanotrophs and that methanobactin "piracy" may be commonplace. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The kynurenine pathway is activated in human obesity and shifted toward kynurenine monooxygenase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favennec, Marie; Hennart, Benjamin; Caiazzo, Robert; Leloire, Audrey; Yengo, Loïc; Verbanck, Marie; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Marre, Michel; Pigeyre, Marie; Bessede, Alban; Guillemin, Gilles J; Chinetti, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Pattou, François; Balkau, Beverley; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile

    2015-10-01

    This study characterized the kynurenine pathway (KP) in human obesity by evaluating circulating levels of kynurenines and the expression of KP enzymes in adipose tissue. Tryptophan and KP metabolite levels were measured in serum of individuals from the D.E.S.I.R. cohort (case-cohort study: 212 diabetic, 836 randomly sampled) and in women with obesity, diabetic or normoglycemic, from the ABOS cohort (n = 100). KP enzyme gene expressions were analyzed in omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue of women from the ABOS cohort, in human primary adipocytes and in monocyte-derived macrophages. In the D.E.S.I.R. cohort, kynurenine levels were positively associated with body mass index (BMI) (P = 4.68 × 10(-19) ) and with a higher HOMA2-IR insulin resistance index (P = 6.23 × 10(-4) ). The levels of kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and quinolinic acid were associated with higher BMI (P KMO], and kynurenine aminotransferase III [CCBL2]) was increased in the omental adipose tissue of women with obesity compared to lean (P KMO that is not expressed in these cells. The expressions of IDO1, KYNU, KMO, and CCBL2 were higher in proinflammatory than in anti-inflammatory macrophages (P KMO activation. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  10. The Flavin-Containing Reductase Domain of Cytochrome P450 BM3 Acts as a Surrogate for Mammalian NADPH-P450 Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Ha; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ahn, Taeho; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 BM3 (CYP102A1) from Bacillus megaterium is a self-sufficient monooxygenase that consists of a heme domain and FAD/FMN-containing reductase domain (BMR). In this report, the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) by BMR was evaluated as a method for monitoring BMR activity. The electron transfer proceeds from NADPH to BMR and then to BMR substrates, MTT and CTC. MTT and CTC are monotetrazolium salts that form formazans upon reduction. The reduction of MTT and CTC followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics (kcat =4120 min(-1), Km =77 μM for MTT and kcat =6580 min(-1), Km =51 μM for CTC). Our continuous assay using MTT and CTC allows the simple, rapid measurement of BMR activity. The BMR was able to metabolize mitomycin C and doxorubicin, which are anticancer drug substrates for CPR, producing the same metabolites as those produced by CPR. Moreover, the BMR was able to interact with CYP1A2 and transfer electrons to promote the oxidation reactions of substrates by CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 in humans. The results of this study suggest the possibility of the utilization of BMR as a surrogate for mammalian CPR.

  11. Downregulated kynurenine 3-monooxygenase gene expression and enzyme activity in schizophrenia and genetic association with schizophrenia endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; Stine, O Colin; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Mitchell, Braxton D; Hong, L Elliot; Kajii, Yasushi; Thaker, Gunvant K; Schwarcz, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Kynurenic acid, a metabolite of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, is an antagonist at N-methyl-d-aspartate and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and modulates glutamate, dopamine, and acetylcholine signaling. Cortical kynurenic acid concentrations are elevated in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of schizophrenia patients. The proximal cause may be an impairment of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a rate-limiting enzyme at the branching point of the kynurenine pathway. To examine KMO messenger RNA expression and KMO enzyme activity in postmortem tissue from the frontal eye field (FEF; Brodmann area 6) obtained from schizophrenia individuals compared with healthy control individuals and to explore the relationship between KMO single-nucleotide polymorphisms and schizophrenia oculomotor endophenotypes. Case-control postmortem and clinical study. Maryland Brain Collection, outpatient clinics. Postmortem specimens from schizophrenia patients (n = 32) and control donors (n = 32) and a clinical sample of schizophrenia patients (n = 248) and healthy controls (n = 228). Comparison of quantitative KMO messenger RNA expression and KMO enzyme activity in postmortem FEF tissue between schizophrenia patients and controls and association of KMO single-nucleotide polymorphisms with messenger RNA expression in postmortem FEF and schizophrenia and oculomotor endophenotypes (ie, smooth pursuit eye movements and oculomotor delayed response). In postmortem tissue, we found a significant and correlated reduction in KMO gene expression and KMO enzyme activity in the FEF in schizophrenia patients. In the clinical sample, KMO rs2275163 was not associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia but showed modest effects on predictive pursuit and visuospatial working memory endophenotypes. Our results provide converging lines of evidence implicating reduced KMO activity in the etiopathophysiology of schizophrenia and related neurocognitive deficits.

  12. CD and MCD studies of the effects of component B variant binding on the biferrous active site of methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, Natasa; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2008-08-12

    The multicomponent soluble form of methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane through the activation of O 2 at a nonheme biferrous center in the hydroxylase component, MMOH. Reactivity is limited without binding of the sMMO effector protein, MMOB. Past studies show that mutations of specific MMOB surface residues cause large changes in the rates of individual steps in the MMOH reaction cycle. To define the structural and mechanistic bases for these observations, CD, MCD, and VTVH MCD spectroscopies coupled with ligand-field (LF) calculations are used to elucidate changes occurring near and at the MMOH biferrous cluster upon binding of MMOB and the MMOB variants. Perturbations to both the CD and MCD are observed upon binding wild-type MMOB and the MMOB variant that similarly increases O 2 reactivity. MMOB variants that do not greatly increase O 2 reactivity fail to cause one or both of these changes. LF calculations indicate that reorientation of the terminal glutamate on Fe2 reproduces the spectral perturbations in MCD. Although this structural change allows O 2 to bridge the diiron site and shifts the redox active orbitals for good overlap, it is not sufficient for enhanced O 2 reactivity of the enzyme. Binding of the T111Y-MMOB variant to MMOH induces the MCD, but not CD changes, and causes only a small increase in reactivity. Thus, both the geometric rearrangement at Fe2 (observed in MCD) coupled with a more global conformational change that may control O 2 access (probed by CD), induced by MMOB binding, are critical factors in the reactivity of sMMO.

  13. A rapid quantitative activity assay shows that the Vibrio cholerae colonization factor GbpA is an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Forsberg, Zarah; Fraaije, Marco W.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) has revealed new territory for chemical and biochemical analysis. These unique mononuclear copper enzymes are abundant, suggesting functional diversity beyond their established roles in the depolymerization of biomass

  14. Dual role of the carboxyl-terminal region of pig liver L-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: mitochondrial-targeting signal and enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kumiko; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hirabayashi-Takahashi, Kanako; Saito, Kuniaki; Haga, Seiich; Uemura, Tomihiko; Izumi, Susumu

    2010-12-01

    l-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin monooxygenase that catalyses the hydroxylation of l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and is localized as an oligomer in the mitochondrial outer membrane. In the human brain, KMO may play an important role in the formation of two neurotoxins, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, both of which provoke severe neurodegenerative diseases. In mosquitos, it plays a role in the formation both of eye pigment and of an exflagellation-inducing factor (xanthurenic acid). Here, we present evidence that the C-terminal region of pig liver KMO plays a dual role. First, it is required for the enzymatic activity. Second, it functions as a mitochondrial targeting signal as seen in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) or outer membrane cytochrome b(5). The first role was shown by the comparison of the enzymatic activity of two mutants (C-terminally FLAG-tagged KMO and carboxyl-terminal truncation form, KMOΔC50) with that of the wild-type enzyme expressed in COS-7 cells. The second role was demonstrated with fluorescence microscopy by the comparison of the intracellular localization of the wild-type, three carboxyl-terminal truncated forms (ΔC20, ΔC30 and ΔC50), C-terminally FLAG-tagged wild-type and a mutant KMO, where two arginine residues, Arg461-Arg462, were replaced with Ser residues.

  15. Biocatalytic Conversion of Avermectin to 4"-Oxo-Avermectin: Characterization of Biocatalytically Active Bacterial Strains and of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Enzymes and Their Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Volker; Molnár, István; Hammer, Philip E.; Hill, D. Steven; Zirkle, Ross; Buckel, Thomas G.; Buckel, Dagmar; Ligon, James M.; Pachlatko, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    4"-Oxo-avermectin is a key intermediate in the manufacture of the agriculturally important insecticide emamectin benzoate from the natural product avermectin. Seventeen biocatalytically active Streptomyces strains with the ability to oxidize avermectin to 4"-oxo-avermectin in a regioselective manner have been discovered in a screen of 3,334 microorganisms. The enzymes responsible for this oxidation reaction in these biocatalytically active strains were found to be cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) and were termed Ema1 to Ema17. The genes for Ema1 to Ema17 have been cloned, sequenced, and compared to reveal a new subfamily of CYPs. Ema1 to Ema16 have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified as His-tagged recombinant proteins, and their basic enzyme kinetic parameters have been determined. PMID:16269732

  16. Effects of Quinizarin and Five Synthesized Derivatives on Fifth Larval Instar Midgut Ecdysone 20-Monooxygenase Activity of the Tobacco Hornworm Manduca sexta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant allelochemical, quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone, and five anthraquinones that were synthesized from quinizarin, namely, 1,4-anthraquinone; 2-hydroxy-1,4-anthraquinone; 2-methoxy-1,4-anthraquinone; 9-hydroxy-1,4-anthraquinone; and 9-methoxy-1,4-anthraquinone, were assessed as to their effects on the essential, P450-dependent ecdysone 20-monooxygenase system of the insect model Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm. This steroid hydroxylase converts the arthropod molting hormone, ecdysone, to the physiologically required 20-hydroxyecdysone form. M. sexta fifth larval instar midgut homogenates were incubated with increasing concentrations (10−8 to 10−3 M of each of the six anthraquinones followed by ecdysone 20-monooxygenase assessments using a radioenzymological assay. Four of the five anthraquinones exhibited I50’s of about 4×10-6 to 6×10-2 M. The most effective inhibitors were 2-methoxy-1,4-anthraquinone and 1,4-anthraquinone followed by 9-hydroxy-1,4 anthraquinone and 9-methoxy-1,4-anthraquinone. At lower concentrations the latter anthraquinone stimulated E20M activity. Quinizarin was less inhibitory and 2-hydroxy-1,4-anthraquinone was essentially without effect. Significantly, these studies make evident for the first time that anthraquinones can affect insect E20M activity, and thus insect endocrine regulation and development, and that a relationship between anthraquinone structure and effectiveness is apparent. These studies represent the first demonstrations of anthraquinones affecting any steroid hydroxylase system.

  17. Unliganded and substrate bound structures of the cellooligosaccharide active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase LsAA9A at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Tandrup, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been found to be key components in microbial (bacterial and fungal) degradation of biomass. They are copper metalloenzymes that degrade polysaccharides oxidatively and act in synergy with glycoside hydrolases. Recently crystallographic studies...

  18. Expression levels of chaperones influence biotransformation activity of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Micrococcus luteus alcohol dehydrogenase and Pseudomonas putida Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, A-Hyong; Jeon, Eun-Yeong; Lee, Sun-Mee; Park, Jin-Byung

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated for the first time that the archaeal chaperones (i.e., γ-prefoldin and thermosome) can stabilize enzyme activity in vivo. Ricinoleic acid biotransformation activity of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Micrococcus luteus alcohol dehydrogenase and the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase improved significantly with co-expression of γ-prefoldin or recombinant themosome originating from the deep-sea hyperthermophile archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Furthermore, the degree of enhanced activity was dependent on the expression levels of the chaperones. For example, whole-cell biotransformation activity was highest at 12 µmol/g dry cells/min when γ-prefoldin expression level was approximately 46% of the theoretical maximum. This value was approximately two-fold greater than that in E. coli, where the γ-prefoldin expression level was zero or set to the theoretical maximum. Therefore, it was assumed that the expression levels of chaperones must be optimized to achieve maximum biotransformation activity in whole-cell biocatalysts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and insecticide resistance in insects.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergé, J B; Feyereisen, R; Amichot, M

    1998-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in many cases of resistance of insects to insecticides. Resistance has long been associated with an increase in monooxygenase activities and with an increase in cytochrome P450 content. However, this increase does not always account for all of the resistance. In Drosophila melanogaster, we have shown that the overproduction of cytochrome P450 can be lost by the fly without a corresponding complete loss of resistance. These results prompted the seque...

  20. Structures of the Apo and FAD-bound forms of 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) locate activity hotspots identified by using directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-04-13

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Role of active oxygen species in the photodestruction of microsomal cytochrome P-450 and associated monooxygenases by hematoporphyrin derivative in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.; Dixit, R.; Mukhtar, H.; Bickers, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cytochrome P-450 in hepatic microsomes prepared from rats pretreated with hematoporphyrin derivative was shown to be rapidly destroyed in the presence of long-wave ultraviolet light. The photocatalytic destruction of the heme-protein was dependent on both the dose of ultraviolet light and of hematoporphyrin derivative administered to the animals. The destructive reaction was accompanied by increased formation of cytochrome P-420, loss of microsomal heme content, and diminished catalytic activity of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase. The specificity of the effect on cytochrome P-450 was confirmed by the observation that other heme-containing moieties such as myoglobin and cytochrome c were not susceptible to photocatalytic destruction. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 was a photodynamic process requiring oxygen since quenchers of singlet oxygen, including 2,5-dimethylfuran, histidine, and beta-carotene, each substantially diminished the reaction. Scavengers of superoxide anion such as superoxide dismutase and of H 2 O 2 such as catalase did not protect against photodestruction of cytochrome P-450, whereas inhibitors of the hydroxyl radical, including benzoate, mannitol, and ethyl alcohol, did afford protection. These results indicate that lipid-rich microsomal membranes and the heme-protein cytochrome P-450 embedded therein are potential targets of injury in cells exposed to hematoporphyrin derivative photosensitization

  2. Lyophilization conditions for the storage of monooxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Hugo L.; Beyer, Nina; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) was used as a model enzyme to find suitable freeze-drying conditions for long-term storage of an isolated monooxygenase. CHMO is a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) known for its ability to catalyze a large number of oxidation reactions. With a focus on

  3. Effect of strychnine hydrochloride on liver cytochrome P450 mRNA expression and monooxygenase activities in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Gao

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Strychnos nux-vomica L. has been frequently used in traditional Chinese medicine but has high acute toxicity. It is commonly taken with Glycyrrhizae radix to decrease its toxicity but the mechanism of this interaction is unknown. In this work, the mRNA expression and the activity of four cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes representative of four subfamilies (CYP1A, CYP3A, CYP2C and CYP2E were determined ex vivo in rat livers from groups of Wistar rats orally administered strychnine hydrochloride (SH at three doses (0.1, 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg/day alone and, at the highest dose, in combination with glycyrrhetinic acid (GA, 25 mg/kg/day or liquiritin (LQ, 20 mg/kg/day once a day for 7 consecutive days. Compared to control, the mRNA expressions of CYP3A1, 1A2 and 2E1 were higher in rats receiving the highest dose of SH but lower for CYP3A1 and CYP2E1 in rats receiving the SH+GA and SH+LQ combinations. CYP2E1 activity was higher and CYP2C, CYP3A and CYP1A2 activities were lower in rats receiving the highest dose of SH. In contrast CYP1A2 and CYP2C activities were higher and CYP2E1 and CYP3A activities lower in rats receiving the SH+GA combination. CYP2E1 and CYP3A activities were also lower in rats receiving the SH+LQ combination. The results show that treatment with SH for 7 days affects the expression and the activity of CYP enzymes and that coadministration of GA and LQ modulates these effects. This modulation may explain the role of Glycyrrhizae radix in reducing the acute toxicity of Strychnos nux-vomica L.CYPs enzymes.

  4. Detection of toxic effects of Cd{sup 2+} on different fish species via liver cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase activities and FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henczova, Maria; Deer, Aranka Kiss [University of Szeged, Department of Biochemistry, P.O. Box 533, Szeged (Hungary); Komlosi, Viktoria [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Molecular Spectroscopy, P.O. Box 17, Budapest (Hungary); Mink, Janos [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Molecular Spectroscopy, P.O. Box 17, Budapest (Hungary); University of Veszprem, Faculty of Information Technology, Research Institute of Chemistry and Process Engineering; Analytical Chemistry Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 158, Veszprem (Hungary)

    2006-06-15

    The in vivo and in vitro effects of Cd{sup 2+} and the CYP1A inductor {beta}-naphthoflavone({beta}-NF) on the hepatic cytochrome P450 (Cyt 450) monooxygenases were studied in silver carp (Hypophthalmichtys molitrix V.), wels (Silurus glanis L.), and carp (Cyprinus carpio). In vivo treatment of carp with a high dose of Cd{sup 2+} (10 mg kg{sup -1}, for 3 days) caused a strong inhibition of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and a lower inhibition of 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD) activity. The low-dose cadmium treatment (2 mg kg{sup -1} Cd{sup 2+}, for 6+3 days) resulted in 4-fold increase in EROD and a 3-fold increase in ECOD activity. The combined treatment with Cd{sup 2+} and {beta}-NF in both cases led to a loss of EROD inducibility. The silver carp and wels were treated with 10 mg L{sup -1} Cd{sup 2+} for 72 h in water. The Cyt P450 content in the wels liver microsomes was increased significantly after treatment for 48 h, whereas there was only a slight, not significant increase in Cyt P450 content in the silver carp microsomes. While the Cd{sup 2+} treatment resulted in inhibition of the CYP1A isoenzymes (EROD and ECOD), the APND (aminopyrene-N-demethylase, CYP2B or CYP3A isoenzyme) activity was increased 3- to 4-fold in both fish species. In vitro experiments of the effect of Cd{sup 2+} led to a concentration-dependent inhibition in all three investigated fish species. The ECOD isoenzyme of silver carp was the most sensitive to Cd{sup 2+}. The lowest concentration of Cd{sup 2+} resulted in 50% inhibition. The APND isoenzyme was similarly sensitive to Cd{sup 2+} in all three investigated fish species. The most sensitive species was the wels, and the least sensitive were the carp isoenzyme. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that cadmium caused damage to the protein structure. These results support the enzyme activity measurements measured in vivo and in vitro. (orig.)

  5. Role of brain cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases in bilirubin oxidation-specific induction and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaro, Sabrina E; Robert, Maria C; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    In the Crigler-Najjar type I syndrome, the genetic absence of efficient hepatic glucuronidation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) by the uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) enzyme produces the rise of UCB level in blood. Its entry to central nervous system could generate toxicity and neurological damage, and even death. In the past years, a compensatory mechanism to liver glucuronidation has been indicated in the hepatic cytochromes P450 enzymes (Cyps) which are able to oxidize bilirubin. Cyps are expressed also in the central nervous system, the target of bilirubin toxicity, thus making them theoretically important to confer a protective activity toward bilirubin accumulation and neurotoxicity. We therefore investigated the functional induction (mRNA, EROD/MROD) and the ability to oxidize bilirubin of Cyp1A1, 1A2, and 2A3 in primary astrocytes cultures obtained from two rat brain region (cortex: Cx and cerebellum: Cll). We observed that Cyp1A1 was the Cyp isoform more easily induced by beta-naphtoflavone (βNF) in both Cx and Cll astrocytes, but oxidized bilirubin only after uncoupling by 3, 4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB). On the contrary, Cyp1A2 was the most active Cyp in bilirubin clearance without uncoupling, but its induction was confined only in Cx cells. Brain Cyp2A3 was not inducible. In conclusion, the exposure of astrocytes to βNF plus TCB significantly enhanced Cyp1A1 mediating bilirubin clearance, improving cell viability in both regions. These results may be a relevant groundwork for the manipulation of brain Cyps as a therapeutic approach in reducing bilirubin-induced neurological damage.

  6. Structural basis of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marta; Levy, Colin; Heyes, Derren J; Lafite, Pierre; Outeiro, Tiago F; Giorgini, Flaviano; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-04-18

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), an enzyme in the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway (that is, kynurenine pathway), leads to amelioration of Huntington's-disease-relevant phenotypes in yeast, fruitfly and mouse models, as well as in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. KMO is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase and is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it converts l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Perturbations in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites have been linked to the pathogenesis of a spectrum of brain disorders, as well as cancer and several peripheral inflammatory conditions. Despite the importance of KMO as a target for neurodegenerative disease, the molecular basis of KMO inhibition by available lead compounds has remained unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KMO, in the free form and in complex with the tight-binding inhibitor UPF 648. UPF 648 binds close to the FAD cofactor and perturbs the local active-site structure, preventing productive binding of the substrate l-kynurenine. Functional assays and targeted mutagenesis reveal that the active-site architecture and UPF 648 binding are essentially identical in human KMO, validating the yeast KMO-UPF 648 structure as a template for structure-based drug design. This will inform the search for new KMO inhibitors that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in targeted therapies against neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  7. Exploring flavin-containing carbohydrate oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, Alessandro Renato

    2017-01-01

    Oxidases are enzymes capable of removing one or more electrons from their substrate and transfer them to molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide. Due to their high regio- and enantioselectivity, their use is preferred over traditional organic chemistry methods. Among the oxidases, flavoprotein

  8. Regulation of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the compound 1,4-bis[2-(3,4-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) has been identified as a highly potent phenobabital-like agonist in mice. This finding has led to the suggestion that a receptor-mediated process may govern the induction of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases by phenobarbital and phenobarbital-like agonists. This dissertation examines: (1) the effects of structural alterations of the TCPOBOP molecule on enzyme induction activity, (2) the induction response to phenobarbital and TCPOBOP among inbred mouse strains, (3) the spectrum of monooxygenase activities induced by phenobarbital and TCPOBOP compared to 3-methylcholanthrene, isosafrole and pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) and (4) the binding of [ 3 H] TCPOBOP in hepatic cytosol. Changes in the structure of the pyridyloxy or benzene rings markedly affect enzyme induction activity and provide additional indirect evidence for a receptor-mediated response. An evaluation of monooxygenase induction by TCPOBOP for 27 inbred mouse strains and by phenobarbital for 15 inbred mouse strains failed to identify a strain which was completely nonresponsive to these compounds, although several strains exhibited decreased responsiveness for select monooxygenase reactions. TCPOBOP, PCN and phenobarbital were all found to significantly increase the rate of hydroxylation of testosterone at the 2α-, 6β- and 15β- positions but only TCPOBOP and phenobarbital dramatically increased the rate of pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation. The results demonstrates that TCPOBOP most closely resembles phenobarbital in its mode of monooxygenase induction in mice. Sucrose density gradient analysis of [ 3 H] TCPOBOP-hepatic cytosol incubations failed to identify specific, saturable binding of [ 3 H] TCPOBOP to cytosolic marcomolecular elements

  9. How pH Modulates the Reactivity and Selectivity of a Siderophore-Associated Flavin Monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze the oxygenation of diverse organic molecules using O2, NADPH, and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. The fungal FMO SidA initiates peptidic siderophore biosynthesis via the highly selective hydroxylation of l-ornithine, while the related amino acid l-lysine is a potent effector of reaction uncoupling to generate H2O2. We hypothesized that protonation states could critically influence both substrate-selective hydroxylation and H2O2 release, and therefore undertook a study of SidA’s pH-dependent reaction kinetics. Consistent with other FMOs that stabilize a C4a-OO(H) intermediate, SidA’s reductive half reaction is pH independent. The rate constant for the formation of the reactive C4a-OO(H) intermediate from reduced SidA and O2 is likewise independent of pH. However, the rate constants for C4a-OO(H) reactions, either to eliminate H2O2 or to hydroxylate l-Orn, were strongly pH-dependent and influenced by the nature of the bound amino acid. Solvent kinetic isotope effects of 6.6 ± 0.3 and 1.9 ± 0.2 were measured for the C4a-OOH/H2O2 conversion in the presence and absence of l-Lys, respectively. A model is proposed in which l-Lys accelerates H2O2 release via an acid–base mechanism and where side-chain position determines whether H2O2 or the hydroxylation product is observed. PMID:24490904

  10. Effect of PCB 126 on aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) and AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) mRNA expression and CYP1 monooxygenase activity in chicken (Gallus domesticus) ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Dagmara; Antos, Piotr A; Katarzyńska, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-12-03

    The aim of the experiment was to study the in vitro effect of 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126; a coplanar PCB congener) on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR1) and AHR1 nuclear translocator (ARNT1) mRNA expression and the activity of CYP1 family monooxygenases in chicken ovarian follicles. White (1-4 mm) and yellowish (4-8 mm) prehierarchical follicles as well as fragments of the theca and granulosa layers of the 3 largest preovulatory follicles (F3-F1) were incubated in a medium supplemented with 0 (control group), 1, 10 or 100 nM PCB 126. The incubation was carried out for 6 h or 24 h for determination of mRNA expression of AHR1 and ARNT1 genes (real-time qPCR) and CYP1 monooxygenase activity (EROD and MROD fluorometric assays), respectively. It was found that chicken ovarian follicles express mRNA of AHR1 and ARNT1 genes. A modulatory effect of PCB 126 on AHR1 and ARNT1 expression depended not only on the biphenyl concentration but also on the follicular layer and the maturational state of the follicle. EROD and MROD activities appeared predominantly in the granulosa layer of the yellow preovulatory follicles. PCB 126 induced these activities in a dose-dependent manner in all ovarian follicles. The obtained results suggest that ovarian follicles, especially the granulosa layer, are involved in the detoxification process of PCBs in the laying hen. Taking this finding into consideration it can be suggested that the granulosa layer of the yellow hierarchical follicles plays a key role in the protective mechanism which reduces the amount of transferred dioxin-like compounds into the yolk of the oocyte. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Desaturation reactions catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-09-01

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) is shown to be capable of catalyzing desaturation reactions in addition to the usual hydroxylation and epoxidation reactions. Dehydrogenated products are generated from MMO-catalyzed oxidation of certain substrates including ethylbenzene and cyclohexadienes. In the reaction of ethylbenzene, desaturation of ethyl C-H occurred along with the conventional hydroxvlations of ethyl and phenyl C-Hs. As a result, styrene is formed together with ethylphenols and phenylethanols. Similarly, when 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadienes were used as substrates, benzene was detected as a product in addition to the corresponding alcohols and epoxides. In all cases, reaction conditions were found to significantly affect the distribution among the different products. This new activity of MMO is postulated to be associated with the chemical properties of the substrates rather than fundamental changes in the nature of the oxygen and C-H activation chemistries. The formation of the desaturated products is rationalized by formation of a substrate cationic intermediate, possibly via a radical precursor. The cationic species is then proposed to partition between recombination (alcohol formation) and elimination (alkene production) pathways. This novel function of MMO indicates close mechanistic kinship between the hydroxylation and desaturation reactions catalyzed by the nonheme diiron clusters.

  12. Monooxygenase activitity in Aedes aegypti population in Tembalang subdistrict, Semarang city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Widiastuti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF is a major health problem in Tembalang sub district, Semarang City. Fogging with insecticide applications was done frequently as an effort to control Dengue vectors. The use of insecticides from the same class in a long time can lead to resistance in mosquitos’ population. The research aimed to observe the activity of monooxygenases in Aedes aegypti populations in Tembalang Subdistrict, Semarang. The study was conducted during February-November 2014 with a cross-sectional design in 10 villages in Tembalang Subdistirict, Semarang City. Field strains of Ae. aegypti eggs were collected using ovitraps. The collected eggs were grown under standard condition to adult mosquitoes. Mosquitos’ homogenate were stored at -85C and used for biochemical assays. The results showed there was increased monooxygenases activity in Ae. aegypti populations. Resistance to synthetic pyrethroid insecticide in Ae. aegypti mosquitoes population in Tembalang Subdistrict might be caused by the mechanism of detoxification enzymes in particular monooxygenases

  13. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs: An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Mascotti

    Full Text Available The Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs are enzymes belonging to the "Class B" of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other "Class B" monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases--FMOs--and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases--NMOs was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all "Class B" monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes.

  14. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  15. Consecutive emamectin benzoate and deltamethrin treatments affect the expressions and activities of detoxification enzymes in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Juan Guillermo; Aguilar, Marcelo N; Carreño, Constanza F; Vera, Tamara; Arias-Darraz, Luis; Figueroa, Jaime E; Romero, Alex P; Alvarez, Marco; Yañez, Alejandro J

    2017-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) subjected to three consecutive, alternating treatments with emamectin benzoate (EMB) and deltamethrin (DM) during outbreaks of Caligus rogercresseyi in a farm located in southern Chile (Hornopiren, Chiloé), were studied to determine the effects of these treatments on the protein and enzymatic activity levels of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in different tissues. Consecutive and alternating EMB/DM treatments resulted in a 10-fold increase and 3-fold decrease of CYP1A protein levels in the intestine and gills, respectively. Notably, CYP1A activity levels decreased in most of the analyzed tissues. FMO protein and activity levels markedly increased in the kidney and the intestine. GST was up-regulated in all tissues, either as protein or enzyme activity. When comparing consecutive EMB/DM treatments against previous studies of EMB treatment alone, CYP1A activity levels were similarly diminished, except in muscle. Likewise, FMO activity levels were increased in most of the analyzed tissues, particularly in the muscle, kidney, and intestine. The increases observed for GST were essentially unchanged between consecutive EMB/DM and EMB only treatments. These results indicate that consecutive EMB/DM treatments in rainbow trout induce the expression and activity of FMO and GST enzymes and decrease CYP1A activity. These altered activities of detoxification enzymes could generate imbalances in metabolic processes, synthesis, degradation of hormones and complications associated with drug interactions. It is especially important when analyzing possible effects of consecutive antiparasitic treatments on withholding periods and salmon farming yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Copper Enhanced Monooxygenase Activity and FT-IR Spectroscopic Characterisation of Biotransformation Products in Trichloroethylene Degrading Bacterium: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali Mukherjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102 (NCBI GenBank Acc. no. JQ797560 is capable of growth on trichloroethylene as the sole carbon source. In this paper, we report the purification and characterisation of oxygenase present in the PM102 isolate. Enzyme activity was found to be induced 10.3-fold in presence of 0.7 mM copper with a further increment to 14.96-fold in presence of 0.05 mM NADH. Optimum temperature for oxygenase activity was recorded at 36∘C. The reported enzyme was found to have enhanced activity at pH 5 and pH 8, indicating presence of two isoforms. Maximum activity was seen on incubation with benzene compared to other substrates like TCE, chloroform, toluene, hexane, and petroleum benzene. Km and Vmax for benzene were 3.8 mM and 340 U/mg/min and those for TCE were 2.1 mM and 170 U/mg/min. The crude enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by dialysis. Zymogram analysis revealed two isoforms in the 70% purified enzyme fraction. The activity stain was more prominent when the native gel was incubated in benzene as substrate in comparison to TCE. Crude enzyme and purified enzyme fractions were assayed for TCE degradation by the Fujiwara test. TCE biotransformation products were analysed by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  17. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, D A; Bertolani, S J; Siegel, J B

    2015-02-11

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  18. The role of active-site Phe87 in modulating the organic co-solvent tolerance of cytochrome P450 BM3 monooxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuper, Jochen; Tee, Kang Lan; Wilmanns, Matthias; Roccatano, Danilo; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Wong, Tuck Seng

    2012-01-01

    Active-site Phe87 of cytochrome P450 BM3 protects the haem from DMSO molecule, thereby conferring higher organic co-solvent tolerance. Understanding the effects of organic co-solvents on protein structure and function is pivotal to engineering enzymes for biotransformation in non-aqueous solvents. The effects of DMSO on the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 BM3 have previously been investigated and the importance of Phe87 in its organic co-solvent tolerance was identified. To probe the DMSO inactivation mechanism and the functional role of Phe87 in modulating the organic co-solvent tolerance of P450 BM3, the haem domain (Thr1–Leu455) of the F87A variant was cocrystallized in the presence of 14%(v/v) and 28%(v/v) DMSO. At both DMSO concentrations the protein retained the canonical structure of the P450 haem domain without any sign of partial or global unfolding. Interestingly, a DMSO molecule was found in the active site of both structures, with its O atom pointing towards the haem iron. The orientation of the DMSO molecule indicated a dynamic coordination process that was in competition with the active-site water molecule. The ability of the DMSO molecule to coordinate the haem iron is plausibly the main reason why P450 BM3 is inactivated at elevated DMSO concentrations. The data allowed an interesting comparison with the wild-type structures reported previously. A DMSO molecule was found when the wild-type protein was placed in 28%(v/v) DMSO, in which the DMSO molecule coordinated the haem iron directly via its S atom. Intriguingly, no DMSO molecule was observed at 14%(v/v) DMSO for the wild-type structure. These results suggested that the bulky phenyl side chain of Phe87 protects the haem from being accessed by the DMSO molecule and explains the higher tolerance of the wild-type enzyme towards organic co-solvents compared with its F87A variant

  19. Oxidative cyclization of prodigiosin by an alkylglycerol monooxygenase-like enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Rond, Tristan; Stow, Parker; Eigl, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Prodiginines, which are tripyrrole alkaloids displaying a wide array of bioactivities, occur as linear and cyclic congeners. Identification of an unclustered biosynthetic gene led to the discovery of the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the regiospecific C–H activation and cyclization of prodigi...... of prodigiosin to cycloprodigiosin in Pseudoalteromonas rubra. This enzyme is related to alkylglycerol monooxygenase and unrelated to RedG, the Rieske oxygenase that produces cyclized prodiginines in Streptomyces, implying convergent evolution....

  20. [The effect of berberine administration of evaluation of the functional state of rat liver after ligation of common bile duct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverinskiĭ, I V; Mel'nichenko, N G; Poplavskiĭ, V A; Sut'ko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shliakhtun, A G

    2013-01-01

    On the eighth day after ligation of the common bile duct in rats a significant increase in the serum content of total lipids, cholesterol bilirubin and ALT, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase was observed. In the microsomal fraction there was a marked decrease in the content and activity of microsomal monooxygenases. Introperitoneal injection of berberine (10 mg/kg) for 6 days caused a partial normalization of permeability of hepatocytes plasma membranes and activity microsomal flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that berberine is a substrate and inducer of flavin-containing monooxygenases. Membrane-stabilizing effect of berberine is probably realized at the level of inhibition of prooxidant status of liver cells.

  1. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase: An Influential Mediator of Neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Jennifer M; O'Connor, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function, and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  2. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: an influential mediator of neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Parrott

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO, is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are up-regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  3. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; van Houwelingen, A.; Bosch, H.J.; Sonke, T.; Bouwmeester, H.; Beekwilder, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene

  4. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Wichmann, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of ...

  5. Status of Resistance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to Neonicotinoids in Iran and Detoxification by Cytochrome P450-Dependent Monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basij, M; Talebi, K; Ghadamyari, M; Hosseininaveh, V; Salami, S A

    2017-02-01

    Nine Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations were collected from different regions of Iran. In all nine populations, only one biotype (B biotype) was detected. Susceptibilities of these populations to imidacloprid and acetamiprid were assayed. The lethal concentration 50 values (LC 50 ) for different populations showed a significant discrepancy in the susceptibility of B. tabaci to imidacloprid (3.76 to 772.06 mg l -1 ) and acetamiprid (4.96 to 865 mg l -1 ). The resistance ratio of the populations ranged from 9.72 to 205.20 for imidacloprid and 6.38 to 174.57 for acetamiprid. The synergistic effects of piperonylbutoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were evaluated for the susceptible (RF) and resistant (JR) populations for the determination of the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase and carboxylesterase, respectively, in their resistance mechanisms. The results showed that PBO overcame the resistance of the JR population to both imidacloprid and acetamiprid, with synergistic ratios of 72.7 and 106.9, respectively. Carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase were studied biochemically, for the purpose of measuring the activity of the metabolizing enzymes in order to determine which enzymes are directly involved in neonicotinoid resistance. There was an increase in the activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase up to 17-fold in the resistant JR population (RR = 205.20). The most plausible activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase correlated with the resistances of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and this suggests that cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase is the only enzyme system responsible for neonicotinoid resistance in the nine populations of B. tabaci.

  6. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition in blood ameliorates neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwilling, Daniel; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Lee, Jason; Truong, Jennifer; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Hsieh, Eric W.; Louie, Jamie Y.; Wu, Tiffany; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Giorgini, Flaviano; Moussaoui, Saliha; Laue, Grit; Rassoulpour, Arash; Flik, Gunnar; Huang, Yadong; Muchowski, Joseph M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolites in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation are thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Metabolites that cause glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and free radical formation are elevated in the blood and vulnerable brain regions in these diseases, while levels of the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid are often decreased. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of JM6, a novel small-molecule pro-drug inhibitor of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). JM6 raises kynurenic acid and reduces extracellular glutamate in the brain after chronic oral administration by inhibiting KMO in blood. In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, JM6 prevented spatial memory deficits, anxiety-related behavior, and synaptic loss. JM6 also extended life span, prevented synaptic loss, and decreased microglial activation in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. These findings support a critical link between blood cells and neurodegeneration that is mediated by KMO and the kynurenine pathway. PMID:21640374

  7. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F. [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom); Lau, Peter C. [National Research Council Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, QC H4P 2R2 (Canada); Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki [Kansai University (Japan); Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T. [Greifswald University, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 4, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Bourenkov, Gleb [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Littlechild, Jennifer A., E-mail: j.a.littlechild@exeter.ac.uk [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  8. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily

  9. Targeted Deletion of Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Flaviano; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Thomas, Marian A. R.; Tararina, Margarita; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation, has been suggested to play a major role in physiological and pathological events involving bioactive KP metabolites. To explore this role in greater detail, we generated mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Kmo and present here the first biochemical and neurochemical characterization of these mutant animals. Kmo−/− mice lacked KMO activity but showed no obvious abnormalities in the activity of four additional KP enzymes tested. As expected, Kmo−/− mice showed substantial reductions in the levels of its enzymatic product, 3-hydroxykynurenine, in liver, brain, and plasma. Compared with wild-type animals, the levels of the downstream metabolite quinolinic acid were also greatly decreased in liver and plasma of the mutant mice but surprisingly were only slightly reduced (by ∼20%) in the brain. The levels of three other KP metabolites: kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid, were substantially, but differentially, elevated in the liver, brain, and plasma of Kmo−/− mice, whereas the liver and brain content of the major end product of the enzymatic cascade, NAD+, did not differ between Kmo−/− and wild-type animals. When assessed by in vivo microdialysis, extracellular kynurenic acid levels were found to be significantly elevated in the brains of Kmo−/− mice. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that KMO plays a key regulatory role in the KP and indicate that Kmo−/− mice will be useful for studying tissue-specific functions of individual KP metabolites in health and disease. PMID:24189070

  10. Identification of a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase sequence motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, MW; Kamerbeek, NM; van Berkel, WJH; Janssen, DB; Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    2002-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) form a distinct class of flavoproteins that catalyze the insertion of an oxygen atom in a C-C bond using dioxygen and NAD(P)H. Using newly characterized BVMO sequences, we have uncovered a BVMO-identifying sequence motif: FXGXXXRXXXW(P/D). Studies with

  11. Discovery of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases from photosynthetic eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneventi, Elisa; Niero, Mattia; Motterle, Riccardo; Fraaije, Marco; Bergantino, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases are attractive "green" catalysts able to produce chiral esters or lactones starting from ketones. They can act as natural equivalents of peroxyacids that are the catalysts classically used in the organic synthesis reactions, consisting in the cleavage of C-C bonds with

  12. Synthesis of methyl propanoate by Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Hugo L.; Winter, Remko T.; Eastham, Graham R.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl propanoate is an important precursor for polymethyl methacrylates. The use of a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) to produce this compound was investigated. Several BVMOs were identified that produce the chemically non-preferred product methyl propanoate in addition to the normal product

  13. Studies on whole cell fluorescence-based screening for epoxide hydrolases and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicalho, Beatriz; Chen, Lu S.; Marsaioli, Anita J.; Grognux, Johann; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    Biocatalysis reactions were performed on microtiter plates (200 μL) aiming at the utilization of fluorogenic substrates (100 μmol L -1 ) for rapid whole cell screening for epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs). A final protocol was achieved for EHs, with 3 new enzymatic sources being detected (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pichia stipitis, Trichosporom cutaneum). The fluorogenic assay for BVMO did not work as expected. However, an approach to possible variables involved (aeration; pH) provided the first detection of a BVMO activity in T. cutaneum. (author)

  14. Vanillin production using Escherichia coli cells over-expressing isoeugenol monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mamoru; Okada, Yukiyoshi; Yoshida, Toyokazu; Nagasawa, Toru

    2008-04-01

    The isoeugenol monooxygenase gene of Pseudomonas putida IE27 was inserted into an expression vector, pET21a, under the control of the T7 promoter. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells, containing no vanillin-degrading activity. The transformed E. coli BL21(DE3) cells produced 28.3 g vanillin/l from 230 mM isoeugenol, with a molar conversion yield of 81% at 20 degrees C after 6 h. In the reaction system, no accumulation of undesired by-products, such as vanillic acid or acetaldehyde, was observed.

  15. Adaptive and Behavioral Changes in Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Knockout Mice: Relevance to Psychotic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sophie; Pocivavsek, Ana; Repici, Mariaelena; Liu, Xi-Cong; Imbeault, Sophie; Maddison, Daniel C; Thomas, Marian A R; Smalley, Joshua L; Larsson, Markus K; Muchowski, Paul J; Giorgini, Flaviano; Schwarcz, Robert

    2017-11-15

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase converts kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and its inhibition shunts the kynurenine pathway-which is implicated as dysfunctional in various psychiatric disorders-toward enhanced synthesis of kynurenic acid, an antagonist of both α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Possibly as a result of reduced kynurenine 3-monooxygenase activity, elevated central nervous system levels of kynurenic acid have been found in patients with psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. In the present study, we investigated adaptive-and possibly regulatory-changes in mice with a targeted deletion of Kmo (Kmo -/- ) and characterized the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase-deficient mice using six behavioral assays relevant for the study of schizophrenia. Genome-wide differential gene expression analyses in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of these mice identified a network of schizophrenia- and psychosis-related genes, with more pronounced alterations in cerebellar tissue. Kynurenic acid levels were also increased in these brain regions in Kmo -/- mice, with significantly higher levels in the cerebellum than in the cerebrum. Kmo -/- mice exhibited impairments in contextual memory and spent less time than did controls interacting with an unfamiliar mouse in a social interaction paradigm. The mutant animals displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and in a light/dark box. After a D-amphetamine challenge (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), Kmo -/- mice showed potentiated horizontal activity in the open field paradigm. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the elimination of Kmo in mice is associated with multiple gene and functional alterations that appear to duplicate aspects of the psychopathology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. Integrating cell-free biosyntheses of heme prosthetic group and apoenzyme for the synthesis of functional P450 monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Oh, In-Seok; Lee, Nahum; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Lee, Eun Yeol; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2013-04-01

    Harnessing the isolated protein synthesis machinery, cell-free protein synthesis reproduces the cellular process of decoding genetic information in artificially controlled environments. More often than not, however, generation of functional proteins requires more than simple translation of genetic sequences. For instance, many of the industrially important enzymes require non-protein prosthetic groups for biological activity. Herein, we report the complete cell-free biogenesis of a heme prosthetic group and its integration with concurrent apoenzyme synthesis for the production of functional P450 monooxygenase. Step reactions required for the syntheses of apoenzyme and the prosthetic group have been designed so that these two separate pathways take place in the same reaction mixture, being insulated from each other. Combined pathways for the synthesis of functional P450 monooxygenase were then further integrated with in situ assay reactions to enable real-time measurement of enzymatic activity during its synthesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Inactivation of Toluene 2-Monooxygenase in Burkholderia cepacia G4 by Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Chris M.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.; Hyman, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of acetylene (10 to 50% [vol/vol] gas phase) were required to inhibit the growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4 on toluene, while 1% (vol/vol) (gas phase) propyne or 1-butyne completely inhibited growth. Low concentrations of longer-chain alkynes (C5 to C10) were also effective inhibitors of toluene-dependent growth, and 2- and 3-alkynes were more potent inhibitors than their 1-alkyne counterparts. Exposure of toluene-grown B. cepacia G4 to alkynes resulted in the irreversible loss of toluene- and o-cresol-dependent O2 uptake activities, while acetate- and 3-methylcatechol-dependent O2 uptake activities were unaffected. Toluene-dependent O2 uptake decreased upon the addition of 1-butyne in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The loss of activity followed first-order kinetics, with apparent rate constants ranging from 0.25 min−1 to 2.45 min−1. Increasing concentrations of toluene afforded protection from the inhibitory effects of 1-butyne. Furthermore, oxygen, supplied as H2O2, was required for inhibition by 1-butyne. These results suggest that alkynes are specific, mechanism-based inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase in B. cepacia G4, although the simplest alkyne, acetylene, was relatively ineffective compared to longer alkynes. Alkene analogs of acetylene and propyne—ethylene and propylene—were not inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity in B. cepacia G4 but were oxidized to their respective epoxides, with apparent Ks and Vmax values of 39.7 μM and 112.3 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for ethylene and 32.3 μM and 89.2 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for propylene. PMID:9925593

  19. Expression, purification and characterization of human Dopamine ß-monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Trine Vammen

    catalytic domains called ascorbate dependent type IImonooxygenase domains and a C-terminal dimerization domain. DBM is related to peptidylglycine a-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM). They are 28 % identical over approximately 300 amino scids (AA) which corresponds to the catalytic domains. This is, among...... residue 47-596 in each chain, was hereafter manually built. The structure reveals the first structural insights into the DOMON domain and the C-terminal dimerization domain and it shows two different conformations of the catalytic domains. An open conformation, that resembles the structures known from PHM...

  20. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) and CYP1 family monooxygenase mRNAs and their activity in chicken ovarian follicles following in vitro exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antos, Piotr A; Błachuta, Małgorzata; Hrabia, Anna; Grzegorzewska, Agnieszka K; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-09-02

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of TCDD and luteinizing hormone (LH) on mRNA expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1), AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1), and the CYP1 family monooxygenases (CYP1A4, CYP1A5, CYP1B1), and to assess the basal and TCDD-induced activity of these enzymes in chicken ovarian follicles. White (WF) and yellowish (YF) prehierarchical follicles and fragments of the theca (TL) and granulosa (GL) layers of the 3 largest preovulatory follicles (F3-F1) were exposed to TCDD (10nM), ovine LH (oLH; 10ng/mL) or a combination of TCDD (10nM) and oLH (10ng/mL), and increasing doses of TCDD (0.01-100nM). AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA transcripts were found in all examined follicles. The effect of TCDD and oLH on AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression depended on the maturational state of the follicle. CYP1A4 was predominantly expressed in the GL of the F3-F1 follicles; in comparison with the WF, a higher level of CYP1A5 mRNA was found both in the GL and TL of F3-F1 follicles. Alternatively, the highest level of CYP1B1 mRNA was noticed in the WF follicles. In different developmental stages of the follicle TCDD and oLH induced a different CYP1 isoform. TCDD increased EROD and MROD activities in all the investigated ovarian follicles. In conclusion, AHR1 and ARNT1 mRNA expression indicate that the chicken ovary is a target tissue for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds. The expression of CYP1-family genes and TCDD-inducible EROD and MROD activities in ovarian follicles suggest the possibility of xenobiotic detoxification in the chicken ovary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ligand complex structures of l-amino acid oxidase/monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 813 and its conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Dohyun; Matsui, Daisuke; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Isobe, Kimiyasu; Asano, Yasuhisa; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2018-03-01

    l-Amino acid oxidase/monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. AIU 813 (l-AAO/MOG) catalyzes both the oxidative deamination and oxidative decarboxylation of the α-group of l-Lys to produce a keto acid and amide, respectively. l-AAO/MOG exhibits limited specificity for l-amino acid substrates with a basic side chain. We previously determined its ligand-free crystal structure and identified a key residue for maintaining the dual activities. Here, we determined the structures of l-AAO/MOG complexed with l-Lys, l-ornithine, and l-Arg and revealed its substrate recognition. Asp238 is located at the ceiling of a long hydrophobic pocket and forms a strong interaction with the terminal, positively charged group of the substrates. A mutational analysis on the D238A mutant indicated that the interaction is critical for substrate binding but not for catalytic control between the oxidase/monooxygenase activities. The catalytic activities of the D238E mutant unexpectedly increased, while the D238F mutant exhibited altered substrate specificity to long hydrophobic substrates. In the ligand-free structure, there are two channels connecting the active site and solvent, and a short region located at the dimer interface is disordered. In the l-Lys complex structure, a loop region is displaced to plug the channels. Moreover, the disordered region in the ligand-free structure forms a short helix in the substrate complex structures and creates the second binding site for the substrate. It is assumed that the amino acid substrate enters the active site of l-AAO/MOG through this route. The atomic coordinates and structure factors (codes 5YB6, 5YB7, and 5YB8) have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (http://wwpdb.org/). 1.4.3.2 (l-amino acid oxidase), 1.13.12.2 (lysine 2-monooxygenase).

  2. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase polymorphisms: relevance for kynurenic acid synthesis in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtze, Maria; Saetre, Peter; Engberg, Göran

    2012-01-01

    on the activity of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the enzyme converting kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Methods: We analyzed the association between KMO gene polymorphisms and CSF concentrations of KYNA in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were...... selected covering KMO and were analyzed in UNPHASED. Results: We included 17 patients with schizophrenia and 33 controls in our study. We found an association between a KMO SNP (rs1053230), encoding an amino acid change of potential importance for substrate interaction, and CSF concentrations of KYNA....... Limitations: Given the limited sample size, the results are tentative until replication. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the nonsynonymous KMO SNP rs1053230 influences CSF concentrations of KYNA....

  3. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase polymorphisms: relevance for kynurenic acid synthesis in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtze, Maria; Saetre, Peter; Engberg, Göran; Schwieler, Lilly; Werge, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A; Hall, Håkan; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G; Schalling, Martin; Erhardt, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show increased brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA). This compound is an end-metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, and its formation indirectly depends on the activity of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the enzyme converting kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. We analyzed the association between KMO gene polymorphisms and CSF concentrations of KYNA in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected covering KMO and were analyzed in UNPHASED. We included 17 patients with schizophrenia and 33 controls in our study. We found an association between a KMO SNP (rs1053230), encoding an amino acid change of potential importance for substrate interaction, and CSF concentrations of KYNA. Given the limited sample size, the results are tentative until replication. Our results suggest that the nonsynonymous KMO SNP rs1053230 influences CSF concentrations of KYNA.

  4. FAD C(4a)-hydroxide stabilized in a naturally fused styrene monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlömann, Michael; van Berkel, Willem J.H.; Gassner, George T.

    2013-01-01

    StyA2B represents a new class of styrene monooxygenases that integrates flavin-reductase and styrene-epoxidase activities into a single polypeptide. This naturally-occurring fusion protein offers new avenues for studying and engineering biotechnologically relevant enantioselective biochemical epoxidation reactions. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of StyA2B reported here identify reaction intermediates similar to those reported for the separate reductase and epoxidase components of related two-component systems. Our studies identify substrate epoxidation and elimination of water from the FAD C(4a)-hydroxide as rate-limiting steps in the styrene epoxidation reaction. Efforts directed at accelerating these reaction steps are expected to greatly increase catalytic efficiency and the value of StyA2B as biocatalyst. PMID:24157359

  5. Terbinafine Resistance Mediated by Salicylate 1-Monooxygenase in Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graminha, Marcia A. S.; Rocha, Eleusa M. F.; Prade, Rolf A.; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance to antifungal agents is a recurring and growing problem among patients with systemic fungal infections. UV-induced Aspergillus nidulans mutants resistant to terbinafine have been identified, and we report here the characterization of one such gene. A sib-selected, 6.6-kb genomic DNA fragment encodes a salicylate 1-monooxygenase (salA), and a fatty acid synthase subunit (fasC) confers terbinafine resistance upon transformation of a sensitive strain. Subfragments carrying salA but not fasC confer terbinafine resistance. salA is present as a single-copy gene on chromosome VI and encodes a protein of 473 amino acids that is homologous to salicylate 1-monooxygenase, a well-characterized naphthalene-degrading enzyme in bacteria. salA transcript accumulation analysis showed terbinafine-dependent induction in the wild type and the UV-induced mutant Terb7, as well as overexpression in a strain containing the salA subgenomic DNA fragment, probably due to the multicopy effect caused by the transformation event. Additional naphthalene degradation enzyme-coding genes are present in fungal genomes, suggesting that resistance could follow degradation of the naphthalene ring contained in terbinafine. PMID:15328121

  6. Monooxygenase, a novel beta-cypermethrin degrading enzyme from Streptomyces sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Chen

    Full Text Available The widely used insecticide beta-cypermethrin has become a public concern because of its environmental contamination and toxic effects on mammals. In this study, a novel beta-cypermethrin degrading enzyme designated as CMO was purified to apparent homogeneity from a Streptomyces sp. isolate capable of utilizing beta-cypermethrin as a growth substrate. The native enzyme showed a monomeric structure with a molecular mass of 41 kDa and pI of 5.4. The enzyme exhibited the maximal activity at pH 7.5 and 30°C. It was fairly stable in the pH range from 6.5-8.5 and at temperatures below 10°C. The enzyme activity was significantly stimulated by Fe(2+, but strongly inhibited by Ag(+, Al(3+, and Cu(2+. The enzyme catalyzed the degradation of beta-cypermethrin to form five products via hydroxylation and diaryl cleavage. A novel beta-cypermethrin detoxification pathway was proposed based on analysis of these products. The purified enzyme was identified as a monooxygenase by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF-MS and N-terminal protein sequencing. Given that all the characterized pyrethroid-degrading enzymes are the members of hydrolase family, CMO represents the first pyrethroid-degrading monooxygenase identified from environmental microorganisms. Taken together, our findings depict a novel pyrethroid degradation mechanism and indicate that the purified enzyme may be a promising candidate for detoxification of beta-cypermethrin and environmental protection.

  7. VpStyA1/VpStyA2B of Variovorax paradoxus EPS: An Aryl Alkyl Sulfoxidase Rather than a Styrene Epoxidizing Monooxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Tischler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein we describe the first representative of an E2-type two-component styrene monooxygenase of proteobacteria. It comprises a single epoxidase protein (VpStyA1 and a two domain protein (VpStyA2B harboring an epoxidase (A2 and a FAD-reductase (B domain. It was annotated as VpStyA1/VpStyA2B of Variovorax paradoxus EPS. VpStyA2B serves mainly as NADH:FAD-oxidoreductase. A Km of 33.6 ± 4.0 µM for FAD and a kcat of 22.3 ± 1.1 s−1 were determined and resulted in a catalytic efficiency (kcat Km−1 of 0.64 s−1 μM−1. To investigate its NADH:FAD-oxidoreductase function the linker between A2- and B-domain (AREAV was mutated. One mutant (AAAAA showed 18.7-fold higher affinity for FAD (kcat Km−1 of 5.21 s−1 μM−1 while keeping wildtype NADH-affinity and -oxidation activity. Both components, VpStyA2B and VpStyA1, showed monooxygenase activity on styrene of 0.14 U mg−1 and 0.46 U mg−1, as well as on benzyl methyl sulfide of 1.62 U mg−1 and 3.11 U mg−1, respectively. The high sulfoxidase activity was the reason to test several thioanisole-like substrates in biotransformations. VpStyA1 showed high substrate conversions (up to 95% in 2 h and produced dominantly (S-enantiomeric sulfoxides of all tested substrates. The AAAAA-mutant showed a 1.6-fold increased monooxygenase activity. In comparison, the GQWCSQY-mutant did neither show monooxygenase nor efficient FAD-reductase activity. Hence, the linker between the two domains of VpStyA2B has effects on the reductase as well as on the monooxygenase performance. Overall, this monooxygenase represents a promising candidate for biocatalyst development and studying natural fusion proteins.

  8. Biochemistry and structural studies of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reveal allosteric inhibition by Ro 61-8048.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingjing; Yao, Licheng; Xia, Tingting; Liao, Xuebin; Zhu, Deyu; Xiang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (hKMO) is a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative and neurologic disorders. Inhibition of KMO by Ro 61-8048, a potent, selective, and the most widely used inhibitor of KMO, was shown effective in various models of neurodegenerative or neurologic disorders. However, the molecular basis of hKMO inhibition by Ro 61-8048 is not clearly understood. Here, we report biochemistry studies on hKMO and crystal structures of an hKMO homolog, pfKMO from Pseudomonas fluorescens, in complex with the substrate l-kynurenine and Ro 61-8048. We found that the C-terminal ∼110 aa are essential for the enzymatic activity of hKMO and the homologous C-terminal region of pfKMO folds into a distinct, all-α-helical domain, which associates with the N-terminal catalytic domain to form a unique tunnel in proximity to the substrate-binding pocket. The tunnel binds the Ro 61-8048 molecule, which fills most of the tunnel, and Ro 61-8048 is hydrogen bonded with several completely conserved residues, including an essential catalytic residue. Modification of Ro 61-8048 and biochemical studies of the modified Ro 61-8048 derivatives suggested that Ro 61-8048 inhibits the enzyme in an allosteric manner by affecting the conformation of the essential catalytic residue and by blocking entry of the substrate or product release. The unique binding sites distinguish Ro 61-8048 as a noncompetitive and highly selective inhibitor from other competitive inhibitors, which should facilitate further optimization of Ro 61-8048 and the development of new inhibitory drugs to hKMO.-Gao, J., Yao, L., Xia, T., Liao, X., Zhu, D., Xiang, Y. Biochemistry and structural studies of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reveal allosteric inhibition by Ro 61-8048.

  9. Development of a series of aryl pyrimidine kynurenine monooxygenase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Sherman, Leticia M; Prime, Michael E; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Beconi, Maria G; Beresford, Alan; Brookfield, Frederick A; Brown, Christopher J; Cardaun, Isabell; Courtney, Stephen M; Dijkman, Ulrike; Hamelin-Flegg, Estelle; Johnson, Peter D; Kempf, Valerie; Lyons, Kathy; Matthews, Kimberly; Mitchell, William L; O'Connell, Catherine; Pena, Paula; Powell, Kendall; Rassoulpour, Arash; Reed, Laura; Reindl, Wolfgang; Selvaratnam, Suganathan; Friley, Weslyn Ward; Weddell, Derek A; Went, Naomi E; Wheelan, Patricia; Winkler, Christin; Winkler, Dirk; Wityak, John; Yarnold, Christopher J; Yates, Dawn; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Dominguez, Celia

    2015-02-12

    We report on the development of a series of pyrimidine carboxylic acids that are potent and selective inhibitors of kynurenine monooxygenase and competitive for kynurenine. We describe the SAR for this novel series and report on their inhibition of KMO activity in biochemical and cellular assays and their selectivity against other kynurenine pathway enzymes. We describe the optimization process that led to the identification of a program lead compound with a suitable ADME/PK profile for therapeutic development. We demonstrate that systemic inhibition of KMO in vivo with this lead compound provides pharmacodynamic evidence for modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites both in the periphery and in the central nervous system.

  10. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene

    OpenAIRE

    Cankar, K.; Houwelingen, van, A.M.M.L.; Bosch, H.J.; Sonke, Th.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene synthase in yeast, led to formation of trans-nootkatol, cis-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. The novel enzyme was also found to catalyse a three step conversion of germacrene A to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-tr...

  11. LKM-1 autoantibodies recognize a short linear sequence in P450IID6, a cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Manns, M P; Griffin, K J; Sullivan, K F; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    LKM-1 autoantibodies, which are associated with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, recognize P450IID6, a cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase. The reactivities of 26 LKM-1 antisera were tested with a panel of deletion mutants of P450IID6 expressed in Escherichia coli. 22 sera recognize a 33-amino acid segment of P450IID6, and 11 of these recognize a shorter segment, DPAQPPRD. PAQPPR is also found in IE175 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Antibodies for HSV-1 proteins were detected by ELISA...

  12. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzhu Wang

    Full Text Available Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  13. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linzhu; Beuerle, Till; Timbilla, James; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  14. [Association of kynurenine-3-monooxygenase gene with schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimbet, V E; Lezheiko, T V; Alfimova, M V; Abramova, L I; Kondrat'ev, N V

    2014-06-01

    Neurotoxic products produced during tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway could be involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It has been shown that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is indirectly involved in these products' formation. KMO polymorphic loci rs2275163 (C/T) and rs1053230 (A/G) were examined in 187 schizophrenia patients and 229 healthy subjects. A genetic combination of allele T and genotype GG was observed more often in a patient group compared with healthy controls (p = 0.003, OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-2.9). In the latter group, this combination was associated with schizophrenia endophenotype (p = 0.04), which manifested in a higher expression of schizotypal personality traits assessed using the MMPI test.

  15. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase: a review of structure, mechanism, and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason R; Jamie, Joanne F; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-02-01

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme of the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway (KP), which is the major catabolic route of tryptophan. Kyn represents a branch point of the KP, being converted into the neurotoxin 3-hydroxykynurenine via KMO, neuroprotectant kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid. As a result of this branch point, KMO is an attractive drug target for several neurodegenerative and/or neuroinflammatory diseases, especially Huntington's (HD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Although a neurological target, administration of KMO inhibitors in the periphery has demonstrated promising pharmacological results. In light of a recent crystal structure release and reports of preclinical candidates, here we provide a concise yet comprehensive update on the current state of research into the enzymology of KMO and related drug discovery efforts, highlighting areas where further work is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss of Kynurenine 3-Mono-oxygenase Causes Proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, Ron; Deutsch, Konstantin; Bolanos-Palmieri, Patricia; Hanke, Nils; Schroder, Patricia; Staggs, Lynne; Bräsen, Jan H; Roberts, Ian S D; Sheehan, Susan; Savage, Holly; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Changes in metabolite levels of the kynurenine pathway have been observed in patients with CKD, suggesting involvement of this pathway in disease pathogenesis. Our recent genetic analysis in the mouse identified the kynurenine 3-mono-oxygenase (KMO) gene (Kmo) as a candidate gene associated with albuminuria. This study investigated this association in more detail. We compared KMO abundance in the glomeruli of mice and humans under normal and diabetic conditions, observing a decrease in glomerular KMO expression with diabetes. Knockdown of kmo expression in zebrafish and genetic deletion of Kmo in mice each led to a proteinuria phenotype. We observed pronounced podocyte foot process effacement on long stretches of the filtration barrier in the zebrafish knockdown model and mild podocyte foot process effacement in the mouse model, whereas all other structures within the kidney remained unremarkable. These data establish the candidacy of KMO as a causal factor for changes in the kidney leading to proteinuria and indicate a functional role for KMO and metabolites of the tryptophan pathway in podocytes. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Substrate and inhibitor specificity of kynurenine monooxygenase from Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert S; Anderson, Andrew D; Gentry, Harvey G; Güner, Osman F; Bowen, J Phillip

    2017-04-15

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) is a potential drug target for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. We have evaluated substituted kynurenines as substrates or inhibitors of KMO from Cytophaga hutchinsonii. Kynurenines substituted with a halogen at the 5-position are excellent substrates, with values of k cat and k cat /K m comparable to or higher than kynurenine. However, kynurenines substituted in the 3-position are competitive inhibitors, with K I values lower than the K m for kynurenine. Bromination also enhances inhibition, and 3,5-dibromokynurenine is a potent competitive inhibitor with a K I value of 1.5μM. A pharmacophore model of KMO was developed, and predicted that 3,4-dichlorohippuric acid would be an inhibitor. The K I for this compound was found to be 34μM, thus validating the pharmacophore model. We are using these results and our model to design more potent inhibitors of KMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of substrates, including both soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry, and soy spent flake pretreated with sodium hydroxide. Products from enzymatic treatments were analyzed using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. We demonstrate that TrCel61A is capable of oxidizing cellulose from both pretreated soy spent flake and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, oxidizing at both the C1 and C4 positions. In addition, we show that the oxidative activity of TrCel61A displays a synergistic effect capable of boosting endoglucanase activity, and thereby substrate depolymerization of soy cellulose, by 27%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalytic diversity and homotropic allostery of two Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase like proteins from Trichoderma brevicompactum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Razak; Kumari, Indu; Sharma, Shikha; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Khan, Tabreiz Ahmad; Akhter, Yusuf

    2017-12-01

    Trichothecenes are the secondary metabolites produced by Trichoderma spp. Some of these molecules have been reported for their ability to stimulate plant growth by suppressing plant diseases and hence enabling Trichoderma spp. to be efficiently used as biocontrol agents in modern agriculture. Many of the proteins involved in the trichothecenes biosynthetic pathway in Trichoderma spp. are encoded by the genes present in the tri cluster. Tri4 protein catalyzes three consecutive oxygenation reaction steps during biosynthesis of isotrichodiol in the trichothecenes biosynthetic pathway, while tri11 protein catalyzes the C4 hydroxylation of 12, 13-epoxytrichothec-9-ene to produce trichodermol. In the present study, we have homology modelled the three-dimensional structures of tri4 and tri11 proteins. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to elucidate the mechanism of their action. Both tri4 and tri11 encode for cytochrome P450 monooxygenase like proteins. These data also revealed effector-induced allosteric changes on substrate binding at an alternative binding site and showed potential homotropic negative cooperativity. These analyses also showed that their catalytic mechanism relies on protein-ligand and protein-heme interactions controlled by hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions which orient the complex in optimal conformation within the active sites.

  20. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  1. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie Z M; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew G F; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah E M; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20% (ref. 3), and the lifespans of those who survive the initial episode are typically shorter than those of the general population. There are no specific therapies available to protect individuals from AP-MODS. Here we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain that is deficient for Kmo (encoding KMO) and that has a robust biochemical phenotype that protects against extrapancreatic tissue injury to the lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of the oxazolidinone GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo, and it afforded therapeutic protection against MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS, and they open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness.

  2. Characterization of the peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) from the venom ducts of neogastropods, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul-Hasan, Sabah; Burgess, Daniel M; Gajewiak, Joanna; Li, Qing; Hu, Hao; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K

    2013-11-01

    Cone snails, genus Conus, are predatory marine snails that use venom to capture their prey. This venom contains a diverse array of peptide toxins, known as conotoxins, which undergo a diverse set of posttranslational modifications. Amidating enzymes modify peptides and proteins containing a C-terminal glycine residue, resulting in loss of the glycine residue and amidation of the preceding residue. A significant fraction of peptides present in the venom of cone snails contain C-terminal amidated residues, which are important for optimizing biological activity. This study describes the characterization of the amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), present in the venom duct of cone snails, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus. PAM is known to carry out two functions, peptidyl α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and peptidylamido-glycolate lyase (PAL). In some animals, such as Drosophila melanogaster, these two functions are present in separate polypeptides, working as individual enzymes. In other animals, such as mammals and in Aplysia californica, PAM activity resides in a single, bifunctional polypeptide. Using specific oligonucleotide primers and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction we have identified and cloned from the venom duct cDNA library, a cDNA with 49% homology to PAM from A. californica. We have determined that both the PHM and PAL activities are encoded in one mRNA polynucleotide in both C. bullatus and C. geographus. We have directly demonstrated enzymatic activity catalyzing the conversion of dansyl-YVG-COOH to dansyl-YV-NH2 in cloned cDNA expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP154H1 from the thermophilic soil bacterium Thermobifida fusca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schallmey, Anett; den Besten, Gijs; Teune, Ite G. P.; Kembaren, Roga F.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are valuable biocatalysts due to their ability to hydroxylate unactivated carbon atoms using molecular oxygen. We have cloned the gene for a new cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, named CYP154H1, from the moderately thermophilic soil bacterium Thermobifida fusca. The

  4. Mammalian peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) mRNA expression can be modulated by the La autoantigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenet, Fabienne; Dussault, Nadège; Borch, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates, yielding amidated products. We have previously reported a putative regulatory RNA binding protein (PAM mRNA-BP) that binds specifically to the 3' untranslated...... region (UTR) of PAM-mRNA. Here, the PAM mRNA-BP was isolated and revealed to be La protein using affinity purification onto a 3' UTR PAM RNA, followed by tandem mass spectrometry identification. We determined that the core binding sequence is approximately 15-nucleotides (nt) long and is located 471 nt...... downstream of the stop codon. Moreover, we identified the La autoantigen as a protein that specifically binds the 3' UTR of PAM mRNA in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, La protein overexpression caused a nuclear retention of PAM mRNAs and resulted in the down-regulation of endogenous PAM activity. Most...

  5. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-03

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene synthase in yeast, led to formation of trans-nootkatol, cis-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. The novel enzyme was also found to catalyse a three step conversion of germacrene A to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, indicating its involvement in chicory sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Likewise, amorpha-4,11-diene was converted to artemisinic acid. Surprisingly, the chicory P450 has a different regio-specificity on (+)-valencene compared to germacrene A and amorpha-4,11-diene. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flavins contained in yeast extract are exploited for anodic electron transfer by Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masaki; Freguia, Stefano; Wang, Yung-Fu; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Cyclic voltammograms of yeast extract-containing medium exhibit a clear redox peak around -0.4V vs. Ag|AgCl. Fermentative bacterium Lactococcus lactis was hereby shown to exploit this redox compound for extracellular electron transfer towards a graphite anode using glucose as an electron donor. High performance liquid chromatography revealed that this may be a flavin-type compound. The ability of L. lactis to exploit exogenous flavins for anodic glucose oxidation was confirmed by tests where flavin-type compounds were supplied to the bacterium in well defined media. Based on its mid-point potential, riboflavin can be regarded as a near-optimal mediator for microbially catalyzed anodic electron transfer. Riboflavin derivative flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was also exploited by L. lactis as a redox shuttle, unlike flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), possibly due to the absence of a specific transporter for the latter. The use of yeast extract in microbial fuel cell media is herein discouraged based on the related unwanted artificial addition of redox mediators which may distort experimental results. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of liver monooxygenases by annatto and bixin in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.A.X. De-Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Annatto or urucum is an orange-yellow dye obtained from Bixa orellana seeds. It has been used as a natural dye in a variety of food products, drugs and cosmetics, and also in Brazilian cuisine as a condiment ('colorau'. Bixin, a carotenoid devoid of provitamin A activity, is the main pigment found in annatto. Some carotenoids (canthaxanthin, astaxanthin and ß-Apo-8'-carotenal are known to be potent inducers of CYP1A1, a property not shared by others (ß-carotene, lycopene and lutein. Little is known, however, about the CYP1A1-inducing properties of bixin and annatto. The present study was performed to determine the effects of an annatto extract (28% bixin and bixin (95% pure on rat liver monooxygenases. Adult female Wistar rats were treated by gavage with daily doses of annatto (250 mg/kg body weight, which contains approximately 70 mg bixin/kg body weight, bixin (250 mg/kg body weight or the vehicle only (corn oil, 3.75 g/kg body weight for 5 consecutive days, or were not treated (untreated control. The activities of aniline-4-hydroxylase (A4H, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD, ethoxy- (EROD, methoxy- (MROD, pentoxy- (PROD and benzyloxy- (BROD resorufin-O-dealkylases were measured in liver microsomes. Annatto (250 mg/kg containing 70 mg bixin/kg induced EROD (3.8x, MROD (4.2x, BROD (3.3x and PROD (2.4x. Bixin (250 mg/kg was a weaker inducer of EROD (2.7x, MROD (2.3x and BROD (1.9x and did not alter PROD, A4H or ECOD activities. These results suggest that constituents of the extract other than bixin play an important role in the induction of CYP1A and CYP2B observed with annatto food colorings.

  8. Exploiting the enantioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases via boron oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brondani, Patricia B.; Dudek, Hanna; Reis, Joel S.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2012-01-01

    The enantioselective carbon-boron bond oxidation of several chiral boron-containing compounds by Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases was evaluated. PAMO and M446G PAMO conveniently oxidized 1-phenylethyl boronate into the corresponding 1-(phenyl)ethanol (ee = 82-91%). Cyclopropyl boronic esters were also

  9. A fluorescence polarization binding assay to identify inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jun; Kizjakina, Karina; Robinson, Reeder; Tolani, Karishma; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are essential for pathogenesis in fungi and bacteria. NMOs catalyze the hydroxylation of sine and ornithine in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Inhibition of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), which catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, alleviates neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases and brain infections caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. These enzymes are examples of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, which are validated drug targets. Here, we describe the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization assay to identify potential inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Fluorescently labeled ADP molecules were synthesized and tested. An ADP-TAMRA chromophore bound to KMO with a K(d) value of 0.60 ± 0.05 μM and to the NMOs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Mycobacterium smegmatis with K(d) values of 2.1 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. The assay was tested in competitive binding experiments with substrates and products of KMO and an NMO. Furthermore, we show that this assay can be used to identify inhibitors of NMOs. A Z' factor of 0.77 was calculated, and we show that the assay exhibits good tolerance to temperature, incubation time, and dimethyl sulfoxide concentration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Substrate Scope of Baeyer–Villiger Monooxygenases with Branched Lactones as Entry towards Polyesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgove, Marie; Fürst, Maximilian; Fraaije, Marco; Bernaerts, Katrien; de Wildeman, Stefaan

    2018-01-01

    Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that are able to convert cyclic ketones into lactones by the insertion of oxygen. The aim of this study was to explore the substrate scope of several BVMOs with (biobased) cyclic ketones as precursors for the synthesis of branched polyesters.

  11. Exploring the substrate scope of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases with branched lactones as entry towards polyesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgove, Marie; Fürst, Maximilian; Fraaije, Marco; Bernaerts, Katrien; De Wildeman, Stefaan M A

    2018-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts able to convert cyclic ketones to lactones by the insertion of oxygen. The aim of this study was to explore the substrate scope of several BVMOs with (biobased) cyclic ketones as precursors for the synthesis of branched polyesters.The product

  12. Coupled reactions by coupled enzymes : alcohol to lactone cascade with alcohol dehydrogenase-cyclohexanone monooxygenase fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, Friso S; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-01-01

    The combination of redox enzymes for redox-neutral cascade reactions has received increasing appreciation. An example is the combination of an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with a cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO). The ADH can use NADP(+) to oxidize cyclohexanol to form cyclohexanone and NADPH. Both

  13. Development of LC/MS/MS, high-throughput enzymatic and cellular assays for the characterization of compounds that inhibit kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Dirk; Beconi, Maria; Toledo-Sherman, Leticia M; Prime, Michael; Ebneth, Andreas; Dominguez, Celia; Muñoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Modulation of KMO activity has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington disease. Our goal is to develop potent and selective small-molecule KMO inhibitors with suitable pharmacokinetic characteristics for in vivo proof-of-concept studies and subsequent clinical development. We developed a comprehensive panel of biochemical and cell-based assays that use liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry to quantify unlabeled kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. We describe assays to measure KMO inhibition in cell and tissue extracts, as well as cellular assays including heterologous cell lines and primary rat microglia and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  14. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase is implicated in antidepressants-responsive depressive-like behaviors and monoaminergic dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Yuki; Mouri, Akihiro; Imamura, Yukio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Saito, Kuniaki

    2017-01-15

    l-Tryptophan (TRP) is metabolized via serotonin and kynurenine pathways (KP). Several studies have demonstrated that abnormality of both pathways is involved in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the KP, has been suggested to play major roles in physiological and pathological events mediated by bioactive kynurenine metabolites. In this study, we investigated the role of KMO in the emotional and cognitive functions by using KMO knockout (KO) mice. We measured contents of TRP and monoamines and their metabolites in the serum and hippocampus of KMO KO mice. Further, we investigated whether antidepressants improved the depressive-like behaviors in KMO KO mice. KMO KO mice showed depressive-like behaviors such as decreased sucrose preference and increased immobility in the forced swimming test and high anxiety by decreased time spent in the center area of open field. But, there was no difference in spontaneous alternation in Y-maze test, counts of rearing or locomotor activity. Higher contents of TRP metabolites such as kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid (KA), anthranilic acid (AA), and 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) in the serum and hippocampus and decreased serotonin turnover and higher content of normetanephrine (NM) in the hippocampus were observed in the KMO KO mice. Although both antidepressant attenuated increase of immobility, sertraline but not imipramine improved decrease of sucrose preference in the KMO KO mice. These findings suggested that KMO KO mice show antidepressants-responsive depressive-like behaviors and monoaminergic dysfunctions via abnormality of kynurenine metabolism with good validities as MDD model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cloning, characterization and expression of OsFMO(t) in rice encoding a flavin monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jicai; Liu, Lanna; Cao, Youpei; Li, Jiazuo; Mei, Mantong

    2013-12-01

    Flavin monooxygenases (FMO) play a key role in tryptophan (Trp)-dependent indole-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis in plants and regulate plant growth and development. In this study, the full-length genomic DNA and cDNA of OsFMO(t), a FMO gene that was originally identified from a rolled-leaf mutant in rice, was isolated and cloned from wild type of the rolled-leaf mutant. OsFMO(t) was found to have four exons and three introns, and encode a protein with 422 amino acid residues that contains two basic conserved motifs, with a 'GxGxxG' characteristic structure. OsFMO(t) showed high amino acid sequence identity with FMO proteins from other plants, in particular with YUCCA from Arabidopsis, FLOOZY from Petunia, and OsYUCCA1 from rice. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that OsFMO(t) and the homologous FMO proteins belong to the same clade in the evolutionary tree. Overexpression of OsFMO(t) in transformed rice calli produced IAA-excessive phenotypes that showed browning and lethal effects when exogenous auxins such as naphthylacetic acid (NAA) were added to the medium. These results suggested that the OsFMO(t) protein is involved in IAA biosynthesis in rice and its overexpression could lead to the malformation of calli. Spatio-temporal expression analysis using RT-PCR and histochemical analysis for GUS activity revealed that expression of OsFMO(t) was totally absent in the rolled-leaf mutant. However, in the wild type variety, this gene was expressed at different levels temporally and spatially, with the highest expression observed in tissues with fast growth and cell division such as shoot apexes, tender leaves and root tips. Our results demonstrated that IAA biosynthesis regulated by OsFMO(t) is likely localized and might play an essential role in shaping local IAA concentrations which, in turn, is critical for regulating normal growth and development in rice.

  16. Characterization of alternate reductant binding and electron transfer in the dopamine β-monooxygenase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state limiting kinetic parameters V/sub max/, V/K/sub DA/, and V/K/sub O 2 /, together with deuterium isotope effects on these parameters, have been determined for the dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM) reaction in the presence of structurally distinct reductants. The results show the one-electron reductant ferrocyanide to be nearly as kinetically competent as the presumed in vivo reductant ascrobate. Further, a reductant system of ferricyanide plus substrate dopamine yields steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects very similar to those measured solely in the presence of ferrocyanide, indicating a role for catecholamine in the rapid recycling of oxidized ferrocyanide. Use of substrate dopamine as the sole reductant is found to lead to a highly unusual kinetic independence of oxygen concentration, as well as significantly reduced values of V/sub max/ and V/K/sub DA/, and the authors conclude that dopamine reduces enzymic copper in a rate-limiting step that is 40-fold slower than with ascorbate. The near-identical kinetic parameters measured in the presence of either ascorbate or ferrocyanide, together with markedly reduced rates with dopamine, are interpreted in terms of a binding site for reductant that is physically distinct from the substrate binding site. This view is supported by molecular modeling, which reveals ascorbate and ferrocyanide to possess an unexpected similarity in potential sites for interaction with enzymic residues. With regard to electron flux, identical values of V/K/sub O 2 / have been measured with [2,2- 2 H 2 ]dopamine as substrate both in the presence and in the absence of added ascorbate. This key result unambiguously rules out an entry of electrons to enzyme forms leading from the enzyme-dopamine complex to enzyme-bound product and, hence, reaction mechanisms involving a reductive activation of the putative Cu(II)-OOH prior to substrate hydroxylation

  17. Catalytic mechanism of phenylacetone monooxygenases for non-native linear substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alexandra T P; Dourado, Daniel F A R; Skvortsov, Timofey; de Abreu, Miguel; Ferguson, Lyndsey J; Quinn, Derek J; Moody, Thomas S; Huang, Meilan

    2017-10-11

    Phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) is the most stable and thermo-tolerant member of the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase family, and therefore it is an ideal candidate for the synthesis of industrially relevant compounds. However, its limited substrate scope has largely limited its industrial applications. In the present work, we provide, for the first time, the catalytic mechanism of PAMO for the native substrate phenylacetone as well as for a linear non-native substrate 2-octanone, using molecular dynamics simulations, quantum mechanics and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. We provide a theoretical basis for the preference of the enzyme for the native aromatic substrate over non-native linear substrates. Our study provides fundamental atomic-level insights that can be employed in the rational engineering of PAMO for wide applications in industrial biocatalysis, in particular, in the biotransformation of long-chain aliphatic oils into potential biodiesels.

  18. Conversion of chlorinated propanes by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing soluble methane monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, T.; Janssen, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    Chlorinated propanes are important pollutants that may show persistent behaviour in the environment. The biotransformation of 1-chloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,3-dichloropropane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane was studied using resting cell suspensions of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing soluble methane monooxygenase. The transformation followed first-order kinetics. The rate constants were in the order 1-chloropropane > 1,3-dichloropropane > 1,2-dichloropropane > 1,2,3-trichloropr...

  19. Monooxygenase system in Guerin’s carcinoma of rats under conditions of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Marchenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the variations of function in components of monooxygenase system (MOS of rat Guerin’s carcinoma under ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs administration. The activity of Guerin’s carcinoma microsomal NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, the content and the rate of cytochrome b5 oxidation-reduction, the content and the rate of cytochrome Р450 oxidation-reduction have been investigated in rats with tumor under conditions of ω-3 PUFAs administration. ω-3 PUFAs supplementation before and after transplantation of Guerin’s carcinoma resulted in the increase of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity and decrease of cytochrome b5 level in the Guerin’s carcinoma microsomal fraction in the logarithmic phases of carcinogenesis as compared to the tumor-bearing rats. Increased activity of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase facilitates higher electron flow in redox-chain of MOS. Under decreased cytochrome b5 levels the electrons are transferred to oxygen, which leads to heightened generation of superoxide (O2•- in comparison to control. It was shown, that the decrease of cytochrome P450 level in the Guerin’s carcinoma microsomal fraction in the logarithmic phases of oncogenesis under ω-3 PUFAs administration may be associated with its transition into an inactive form – cytochrome P420. This decrease in cytochrome P450 coincides with increased generation of superoxide by MOS oxygenase chain.

  20. Importance of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase for spontaneous firing and pharmacological responses of midbrain dopamine neurons: Relevance for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufvesson-Alm, Maximilian; Schwieler, Lilly; Schwarcz, Robert; Goiny, Michel; Erhardt, Sophie; Engberg, Göran

    2018-06-05

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an essential enzyme of the kynurenine pathway, converting kynurenine into 3-hydroxykynurenine. Inhibition of KMO increases kynurenine, resulting in elevated levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous N-methyl-d-aspartate and α*7-nicotinic receptor antagonist. The concentration of KYNA is elevated in the brain of patients with schizophrenia, possibly as a result of a reduced KMO activity. In the present study, using in vivo single cell recording techniques, we investigated the electrophysiological characteristics of ventral tegmental area dopamine (VTA DA) neurons and their response to antipsychotic drugs in a KMO knock-out (K/O) mouse model. KMO K/O mice exhibited a marked increase in spontaneous VTA DA neuron activity as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, VTA DA neurons showed clear-cut, yet qualitatively opposite, responses to the antipsychotic drugs haloperidol and clozapine in the two genotypes. The anti-inflammatory drug parecoxib successfully lowered the firing activity of VTA DA neurons in KMO K/O, but not in WT mice. Minocycline, an antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, produced no effect in this regard. Taken together, the present data further support the usefulness of KMO K/O mice for studying distinct aspects of the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Differential Reactivity between Two Copper Sites in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Chufan; S Prigge; X Siebert; B Eipper; R Mains; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Peptidylglycine {alpha}-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of the C{alpha} of C-terminal glycine-extended peptides and proteins, the first step in the activation of many peptide hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters. The crystal structure of the enzyme revealed two nonequivalent Cu sites (Cu{sub M} and Cu{sub H}) separated by {approx}11 {angstrom}. In the resting state of the enzyme, Cu{sub M} is coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral geometry by one methionine, two histidines, and a water molecule. The coordination site of the water molecule is the position where external ligands bind. The Cu{sub H} has a planar T-shaped geometry with three histidines residues and a vacant position that could potentially be occupied by a fourth ligand. Although the catalytic mechanism of PHM and the role of the metals are still being debated, Cu{sub M} is identified as the metal involved in catalysis, while Cu{sub H} is associated with electron transfer. To further probe the role of the metals, we studied how small molecules such as nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}), azide (N{sub 3}{sup -}), and carbon monoxide (CO) interact with the PHM copper ions. The crystal structure of an oxidized nitrite-soaked PHMcc, obtained by soaking for 20 h in mother liquor supplemented with 300 mM NaNO{sub 2}, shows that nitrite anion coordinates Cu{sub M} in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. Surprisingly, nitrite does not bind Cu{sub H}, despite the high concentration used in the experiments (nitrite/protein > 1000). Similarly, azide and carbon monoxide coordinate Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the PHMcc crystal structures obtained by cocrystallization with 40 mM NaN{sub 3} and by soaking CO under 3 atm of pressure for 30 min. This lack of reactivity at the Cu{sub H} is also observed in the reduced form of the enzyme: CO binds Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the structure of PHMcc obtained by exposure of a crystal to 3 atm CO for 15 min in the presence of 5

  2. Sparteine monooxygenase in brain and liver: Identified by the dopamine uptake blocker [3H]GBR-12935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalow, W.; Tyndale, R.F.; Niznik, H.B.; Inaba, T.

    1990-01-01

    P450IID6 (human sparteine monooxygenase) metabolizes many drugs including neuroleptics, antidepressants, and beta-blockers. The P450IID6 exists in human, bovine, rat and canine brains, but in very low quantities causing methodological difficulties in its assessment. Work with [ 3 H]GBR-12935; 1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy) ethyl]-4-(3-phenyl propyl) piperazine has shown that it binds a neuronal/hepatic protein with high affinity (∼7nM) and a rank order of inhibitory potency suggesting that the binding protein is cytochrome P450IID6. The binding was used to predict that d-amphetamine and methamphetamine would interact with P450IID6. Inhibition studies indicated that these compounds were competitive inhibitors of P450IID6. Haloperidol (HAL) and it's metabolite hydroxy-haloperidol (RHAL) are both competitive inhibitors of P450IID6 activity and were found to inhibit [ 3 H]GBR-12935 binding. K i values of twelve compounds (known to interact with the DA transporter or P450IID6) for [ 3 H]GRB-12935 binding and P450IID6 activity. The techniques are now available for measurements of cytochrome P450IID6 in healthy and diseased brain/liver tissue using radio-receptor binding assay techniques with [ 3 H]GBR-12935

  3. Targeted deletion of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase in mice: a new tool for studying kynurenine pathway metabolism in periphery and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Flaviano; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Thomas, Marian A R; Tararina, Margarita; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J

    2013-12-20

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation, has been suggested to play a major role in physiological and pathological events involving bioactive KP metabolites. To explore this role in greater detail, we generated mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Kmo and present here the first biochemical and neurochemical characterization of these mutant animals. Kmo(-/-) mice lacked KMO activity but showed no obvious abnormalities in the activity of four additional KP enzymes tested. As expected, Kmo(-/-) mice showed substantial reductions in the levels of its enzymatic product, 3-hydroxykynurenine, in liver, brain, and plasma. Compared with wild-type animals, the levels of the downstream metabolite quinolinic acid were also greatly decreased in liver and plasma of the mutant mice but surprisingly were only slightly reduced (by ∼20%) in the brain. The levels of three other KP metabolites: kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid, were substantially, but differentially, elevated in the liver, brain, and plasma of Kmo(-/-) mice, whereas the liver and brain content of the major end product of the enzymatic cascade, NAD(+), did not differ between Kmo(-/-) and wild-type animals. When assessed by in vivo microdialysis, extracellular kynurenic acid levels were found to be significantly elevated in the brains of Kmo(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that KMO plays a key regulatory role in the KP and indicate that Kmo(-/-) mice will be useful for studying tissue-specific functions of individual KP metabolites in health and disease.

  4. Molecular dynamics analysis reveals structural insights into mechanism of nicotine N-demethylation catalyzed by tobacco cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    Full Text Available CYP82E4, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, has nicotine N-demethylase (NND activity, which mediates the bioconversion of nicotine into nornicotine in senescing tobacco leaves. Nornicotine is a precursor of the carcinogen, tobacco-specific nitrosamine. CYP82E3 is an ortholog of CYP82E4 with 95% sequence identity, but it lacks NND activity. A recent site-directed mutagenesis study revealed that a single amino acid substitution, i.e., cysteine to tryptophan at the 330 position in the middle of protein, restores the NND activity of CYP82E3 entirely. However, the same amino acid change caused the loss of the NND activity of CYP82E4. To determine the mechanism of the functional turnover of the two molecules, four 3D structures, i.e., the two molecules and their corresponding cys-trp mutants were modeled. The resulting structures exhibited that the mutation site is far from the active site, which suggests that no direct interaction occurs between the two sites. Simulation studies in different biological scenarios revealed that the mutation introduces a conformation drift with the largest change at the F-G loop. The dynamics trajectories analysis using principal component analysis and covariance analysis suggests that the single amino acid change causes the opening and closing of the transfer channels of the substrates, products, and water by altering the motion of the F-G and B-C loops. The motion of helix I is also correlated with the motion of both the F-G loop and the B-C loop and; the single amino acid mutation resulted in the curvature of helix I. These results suggest that the single amino acid mutation outside the active site region may have indirectly mediated the flexibility of the F-G and B-C loops through helix I, causing a functional turnover of the P450 monooxygenase.

  5. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    ) and AA13 active on starch (α-1,4 linked sugars).Here crystallographic studies of LPMOs from the filamentous fungi Lentinus similis (Ls),Chaetomium virescens (Cv), Aspergillus oryzae (Ao) and Thielavia terrestris (Tt) have been carried out.LPMOs belonging to family AA9 and AA13 (LsAA9A and AoAA13...

  6. Biocatalytic Conversion of Avermectin to 4"-Oxo-Avermectin: Heterologous Expression of the ema1 Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, István; Hill, D. Steven; Zirkle, Ross; Hammer, Philip E.; Gross, Frank; Buckel, Thomas G.; Jungmann, Volker; Pachlatko, Johannes Paul; Ligon, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Ema1 from Streptomyces tubercidicus R-922 and its homologs from closely related Streptomyces strains are able to catalyze the regioselective oxidation of avermectin into 4"-oxo-avermectin, a key intermediate in the manufacture of the agriculturally important insecticide emamectin benzoate (V. Jungmann, I. Molnár, P. E. Hammer, D. S. Hill, R. Zirkle, T. G. Buckel, D. Buckel, J. M. Ligon, and J. P. Pachlatko, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71:6968-6976, 2005). The gene for Ema1 has been expressed in Streptomyces lividans, Streptomyces avermitilis, and solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strains using different promoters and vectors to provide biocatalytically competent cells. Replacing the extremely rare TTA codon with the more frequent CTG codon to encode Leu4 in Ema1 increased the biocatalytic activities of S. lividans strains producing this enzyme. Ferredoxins and ferredoxin reductases were also cloned from Streptomyces coelicolor and biocatalytic Streptomyces strains and tested in ema1 coexpression systems to optimize the electron transport towards Ema1. PMID:16269733

  7. In planta functions of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes in the phytocassane biosynthetic gene cluster on rice chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhongfeng; Yamazaki, Kohei; Minoda, Hiromi; Miyamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Sho; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Yajima, Arata; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Okada, Kazunori

    2018-06-01

    In response to environmental stressors such as blast fungal infections, rice produces phytoalexins, an antimicrobial diterpenoid compound. Together with momilactones, phytocassanes are among the major diterpenoid phytoalexins. The biosynthetic genes of diterpenoid phytoalexin are organized on the chromosome in functional gene clusters, comprising diterpene cyclase, dehydrogenase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes. Their functions have been studied extensively using in vitro enzyme assay systems. Specifically, P450 genes (CYP71Z6, Z7; CYP76M5, M6, M7, M8) on rice chromosome 2 have multifunctional activities associated with ent-copalyl diphosphate-related diterpene hydrocarbons, but the in planta contribution of these genes to diterpenoid phytoalexin production remains unknown. Here, we characterized cyp71z7 T-DNA mutant and CYP76M7/M8 RNAi lines to find that potential phytoalexin intermediates accumulated in these P450-suppressed rice plants. The results suggested that in planta, CYP71Z7 is responsible for C2-hydroxylation of phytocassanes and that CYP76M7/M8 is involved in C11α-hydroxylation of 3-hydroxy-cassadiene. Based on these results, we proposed potential routes of phytocassane biosynthesis in planta.

  8. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase mediates inhibition of Th17 differentiation via catabolism of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Geoffrey L; Wang, Qun; Swerdlow, Bonnie; Bhat, Geetha; Kolbeck, Roland; Fung, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a key transcriptional regulator of Th17-cell differentiation. Although endogenous ligands have yet to be identified, evidence suggests that tryptophan metabolites can act as agonists for the AhR. Tryptophan metabolites are abundant in circulation, so we hypothesized that cell intrinsic factors might exist to regulate the exposure of Th17 cells to AhR-dependent activities. Here, we find that Th17 cells preferentially express kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), which is an enzyme involved in catabolism of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenine. KMO inhibition, either with a specific inhibitor or via siRNA-mediated silencing, markedly increased IL-17 production in vitro, whereas IFN-γ production by Th1 cells was unaffected. Inhibition of KMO significantly exacerbated disease in a Th17-driven model of autoimmune gastritis, suggesting that expression of KMO by Th17 cells serves to limit their continuous exposure to physiological levels of endogenous AhR ligands in vivo. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-04-14

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress.

  10. Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: Evidence for a Substrate Access Channel in the FAD-Dependent Monooxygenase Coq6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coq6 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q, a polyisoprenylated benzoquinone lipid essential to the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase is proposed to hydroxylate the benzene ring of coenzyme Q (ubiquinone precursor at position C5. We show here through biochemical studies that Coq6 is a flavoprotein using FAD as a cofactor. Homology models of the Coq6-FAD complex are constructed and studied through molecular dynamics and substrate docking calculations of 3-hexaprenyl-4-hydroxyphenol (4-HP6, a bulky hydrophobic model substrate. We identify a putative access channel for Coq6 in a wild type model and propose in silico mutations positioned at its entrance capable of partially (G248R and L382E single mutations or completely (a G248R-L382E double-mutation blocking access to the channel for the substrate. Further in vivo assays support the computational predictions, thus explaining the decreased activities or inactivation of the mutated enzymes. This work provides the first detailed structural information of an important and highly conserved enzyme of ubiquinone biosynthesis.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, Jane G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 Å. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 Å. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  13. The Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Encoding Gene, BcKMO, Is Involved in the Growth, Development, and Pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A pathogenic mutant, BCG183, was obtained by screening the T-DNA insertion library of Botrytis cinerea. A novel pathogenicity-related gene BcKMO, which encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO, was isolated and identified via thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, bioinformatics analyses, and KMO activity measurement. The mutant BCG183 grew slowly, did not produce conidia and sclerotia, had slender hyphae, and presented enhanced pathogenicity. The phenotype and pathogenicity of the BcKMO-complementing mutant (BCG183/BcKMO were similar to those of the wild-type (WT strain. The activities of polymethylgalacturonase, polygalacturonase, and toxins were significantly higher, whereas acid production was significantly decreased in the mutant BCG183, when compared with those in the WT and BCG183/BcKMO. Moreover, the sensitivity of mutant BCG183 to NaCl and KCl was remarkably increased, whereas that to fluconazole, Congo Red, menadione, H2O2, and SQ22536 and U0126 [cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways inhibitors, respectively] were significantly decreased compared with the other strains. Furthermore, the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways, Pka1, Pka2, PkaR, Bcg2, Bcg3, bmp1, and bmp3, were significantly upregulated or downregulated in the mutant BCG183. BcKMO expression levels were also upregulated or downregulated in the RNAi mutants of the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways. These findings indicated that BcKMO positively regulates growth and development, but negatively regulates pathogenicity of B. cinerea. Furthermore, BcKMO was found to be involved in controlling cell wall degrading enzymes activity, toxins activity, acid production, and cell wall integrity, and participate in cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways of B. cinerea.

  14. The Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Encoding Gene, BcKMO, Is Involved in the Growth, Development, and Pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Yuan, Xuemei; Zang, Jinping; Wang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Li, Peifen; Cao, Hongzhe; Han, Jianmin; Xing, Jihong; Dong, Jingao

    2018-01-01

    A pathogenic mutant, BCG183, was obtained by screening the T-DNA insertion library of Botrytis cinerea . A novel pathogenicity-related gene BcKMO , which encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), was isolated and identified via thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, bioinformatics analyses, and KMO activity measurement. The mutant BCG183 grew slowly, did not produce conidia and sclerotia, had slender hyphae, and presented enhanced pathogenicity. The phenotype and pathogenicity of the BcKMO -complementing mutant (BCG183/ BcKMO ) were similar to those of the wild-type (WT) strain. The activities of polymethylgalacturonase, polygalacturonase, and toxins were significantly higher, whereas acid production was significantly decreased in the mutant BCG183, when compared with those in the WT and BCG183/ BcKMO . Moreover, the sensitivity of mutant BCG183 to NaCl and KCl was remarkably increased, whereas that to fluconazole, Congo Red, menadione, H 2 O 2 , and SQ22536 and U0126 [cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways inhibitors, respectively] were significantly decreased compared with the other strains. Furthermore, the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways, Pka1 , Pka2 , PkaR , Bcg2 , Bcg3 , bmp1 , and bmp3, were significantly upregulated or downregulated in the mutant BCG183. BcKMO expression levels were also upregulated or downregulated in the RNAi mutants of the key genes involved in the cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways. These findings indicated that BcKMO positively regulates growth and development, but negatively regulates pathogenicity of B. cinerea . Furthermore, BcKMO was found to be involved in controlling cell wall degrading enzymes activity, toxins activity, acid production, and cell wall integrity, and participate in cAMP and MAPK signaling pathways of B. cinerea .

  15. Assessing and Modulating Kynurenine Pathway Dynamics in Huntington's Disease: Focus on Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Breda, Carlo; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2018-01-01

    The link between disturbances in kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolism and Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis has been explored for a number of years. Several novel genetic and pharmacological tools have recently been developed to modulate key regulatory steps in the KP such as the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). This insight has offered new options for exploring the mechanistic link between this metabolic pathway and HD, and provided novel opportunities for the development of candidate drug-like compounds. Here, we present an overview of the field, focusing on some novel approaches for interrogating the pathway experimentally.

  16. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  17. Flavin-Dependent Enzymes in Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Wojcieszyńska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Statistical studies have demonstrated that various agents may reduce the risk of cancer’s development. One of them is activity of flavin-dependent enzymes such as flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOGS-OX1, FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and flavin-dependent monoamine oxidase. In the last decade, many papers concerning their structure, reaction mechanism and role in the cancer prevention were published. In our work, we provide a more in-depth analysis of flavin-dependent enzymes and their contribution to the cancer prevention. We present the actual knowledge about the glucosinolate synthesized by flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOGS-OX1 and its role in cancer prevention, discuss the influence of mutations in FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase on the cancer risk, and describe FAD as an important cofactor for the demethylation of histons. We also present our views on the role of riboflavin supplements in the prevention against cancer.

  18. Induction of cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases in northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, by 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.-W.; Melancon, M.J.; Jung, R.E.; Karasov, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were injected intraperitoneally either with a solution of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 in corn oil at a concentration of 0.2, 0.7, 2.3 and 7.8 mg/kg body weight or with corn oil alone. Appropriate assay conditions with hepatic microsomes were determined for four cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases: ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD), methoxy-ROD (MROD), benzyloxy-ROD (BROD) and pentoxy-ROD (PROD). One week after PCB administration, the specific activities of EROD, MROD, BROD and PROD were not elevated at doses ? 0.7 mg/kg (p > 0.05), but were significantly increased at doses ? 2.3 mg/kg compared to the control groups (p leopard frogs.

  19. Transcriptional control of the isoeugenol monooxygenase of Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Young; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the most valuable compounds in the flavoring and fragrance industries, and many attempts to produce natural vanillin have been made in recent years. Isoeugenol monooxygenase (Iem) converts the phenylpropanoid compound isoeugenol to vanillin. In Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1, the positive regulatory protein IemR is divergently expressed from Iem, and the promoter region is located between the genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of iem in Escherichia coli. We focused on inducers and regulatory protein IemR. Transcription of iem was found to be dependent on the amounts of isoeugenol and IemR. Isoeugenol was found to be the best inducer of iem, followed by trans-anethole, which induced iem to 58% of the transcription level observed for isoeugenol. Overproduction of IemR in E. coli significantly increased the transcription of iem, up to 96-fold, even in the absence of isoeugenol, as compared to basally expressed IemR. Results of this study indicate that the transcription of iem iss dependent on the type of inducers and on IemR. They should contribute to the development of bioengineering strategies for increased production of vanillin through high-level expression of the isoeugenol monooxygenase gene in microorganisms.

  20. A novel methanotroph in the genus Methylomonas that contains a distinct clade of soluble methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Loi; Yu, Woon-Jong; Yang, Hye-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Jung, Man-Young; Park, Soo-Je; Roh, Seong-Woon; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2017-10-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation is a key process in the global carbon cycle that acts as a major sink of methane. In this study, we describe a novel methanotroph designated EMGL16-1 that was isolated from a freshwater lake using the floating filter culture technique. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolate was found to be closely related to the genus Methylomonas in the family Methylococcaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria with 94.2-97.4% 16S rRNA gene similarity to Methylomonas type strains. Comparison of chemotaxonomic and physiological properties further suggested that strain EMGL16-1 was taxonomically distinct from other species in the genus Methylomonas. The isolate was versatile in utilizing nitrogen sources such as molecular nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, urea, and ammonium. The genes coding for subunit of the particulate form methane monooxygenase (pmoA), soluble methane monooxygenase (mmoX), and methanol dehydrogenase (mxaF) were detected in strain EMGL16-1. Phylogenetic analysis of mmoX indicated that mmoX of strain EMGL16-1 is distinct from those of other strains in the genus Methylomonas. This isolate probably represents a novel species in the genus. Our study provides new insights into the diversity of species in the genus Methylomonas and their environmental adaptations.

  1. Pam (Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase) heterozygosity alters brain copper handling with region specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric D; Miller, Megan B; Ralle, Martina; Aryal, Dipendra; Wetsel, William C; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2013-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential trace element present throughout the mammalian nervous system, is crucial for normal synaptic function. Neuronal handling of Cu is poorly understood. We studied the localization and expression of Atp7a, the major intracellular Cu transporter in the brain, and its relation to peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential cuproenzyme and regulator of Cu homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells. Based on biochemical fractionation and immunostaining of dissociated neurons, Atp7a was enriched in postsynaptic vesicular fractions. Cu followed a similar pattern, with ~20% of total Cu in synaptosomes. A mouse model heterozygous for the Pam gene (PAM+/−) is selectively Cu deficient in the amygdala. As in cortex and hippocampus, Atp7a and PAM expression overlap in the amygdala, with highest expression in interneurons. Messenger RNA levels of Atox-1 and Atp7a, which deliver Cu to the secretory pathway, were reduced in the amygdala but not the hippocampus in PAM+/− mice, along with GABAB receptor mRNA levels. Consistent with Cu deficiency, dopamine β-monooxygenase function was impaired as evidenced by elevated dopamine metabolites in the amygdala, but not the hippocampus, of PAM+/− mice. These alterations in Cu delivery to the secretory pathway in the PAM+/− amygdala may contribute to the physiological and behavioral deficits observed. PMID:24032518

  2. Arg279 is the key regulator of coenzyme selectivity in the flavin-dependent ornithine monooxygenase SidA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Reeder; Franceschini, Stefano; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Ellerbrock, Jacob; Romero, Elvira; Echandi, Maria Paulina; Martin Del Campo, Julia S; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Siderophore A (SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the NAD(P)H- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine in the biosynthesis of siderophores in Aspergillus fumigatus and is essential for virulence. SidA can utilize both NADPH or NADH for activity; however, the enzyme is selective for NADPH. Structural analysis shows that R279 interacts with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. To probe the role of electrostatic interactions in coenzyme selectivity, R279 was mutated to both an alanine and a glutamate. The mutant proteins were active but highly uncoupled, oxidizing NADPH and producing hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated ornithine. For wtSidA, the catalytic efficiency was 6-fold higher with NADPH as compared to NADH. For the R279A mutant the catalytic efficiency was the same with both coenyzmes, while for the R279E mutant the catalytic efficiency was 5-fold higher with NADH. The effects are mainly due to an increase in the KD values, as no major changes on the kcat or flavin reduction values were observed. Thus, the absence of a positive charge leads to no coenzyme selectivity while introduction of a negative charge leads to preference for NADH. Flavin fluorescence studies suggest altered interaction between the flavin and NADP⁺ in the mutant enzymes. The effects are caused by different binding modes of the coenzyme upon removal of the positive charge at position 279, as no major conformational changes were observed in the structure for R279A. The results indicate that the positive charge at position 279 is critical for tight binding of NADPH and efficient hydroxylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic variants of the kynurenine-3-monooxygenase and postpartum depressive symptoms after cesarean section in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sai-Ying; Duan, Kai-Ming; Tan, Xiao-Fang; Yin, Ji-Ye; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Yang, Mi; Peng, Cheng; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2017-06-01

    New conceptualizations of depression have emphasized the role of the kynurenine pathway (KP) in the pathogenesis of postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS). Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a rate-limiting enzyme of the KP, where it catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine (KYN) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK). Previous work indicates that KMO is closely linked to the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether variations in the KMO gene affect PDS development after cesarean section. A total of 710 Chinese women receiving cesarean section were enrolled in this study. PDS was determined by an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score ≥13. Subsequently, 24 women with PDS and 48 matched women without PDS were randomly selected for investigation of perinatal serum concentrations of KYN, 3-HK and the 3-HK/KYN ratio. The 3-HK/KYN ratio indicates the activity of KMO. In addition, 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KMO gene were examined. Following this genotyping, 36 puerperant women carrying the KMO rs1053230 AG genotype and 72 matched puerperant women carrying the KMO rs1053230 GG genotype were selected for comparisons of KYN, 3-HK and 3-HK/KYN ratio levels. The results show the incidence of PDS in the Chinese population to be 7.3%, with PDS characterized by increased serum 3-HK concentration and 3-HK/KYN ratio, versus matched postpartum women without PDS (PKMO rs1053230 are significantly associated with the incidence of PDS (PKMO rs1053230 AG genotype are significantly higher than those in matched postpartum women carrying the KMO rs1053230 GG genotype. The presented data highlight the contribution of alterations in the KP to the pathogenesis of postpartum depression. Heightened KMO activity, including as arising from KMO rs1053230 G/A genetic variations, are indicated as one possible mechanism driving the biological underpinnings of PDS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Methyloferula stellata AR4, an Obligate Methanotroph Possessing Only a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedysh, Svetlana N; Naumoff, Daniil G; Vorobev, Alexey V; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Smirnova, Angela V; Dunfield, Peter F

    2015-03-05

    Methyloferula stellata AR4 is an aerobic acidophilic methanotroph, which, in contrast to most known methanotrophs but similar to Methylocella spp., possesses only a soluble methane monooxygenase. However, it differs from Methylocella spp. by its inability to grow on multicarbon substrates. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Dedysh et al.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Methyloferula stellata AR4, an Obligate Methanotroph Possessing Only a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Dedysh, Svetlana N.; Naumoff, Daniil G.; Vorobev, Alexey V.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Crombie, Andrew T.; Murrell, J. Colin; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Smirnova, Angela V.; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Methyloferula stellata AR4 is an aerobic acidophilic methanotroph, which, in contrast to most known methanotrophs but similar to Methylocella spp., possesses only a soluble methane monooxygenase. However, it differs from Methylocella spp. by its inability to grow on multicarbon substrates. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium.

  6. [Effects of berberine on the recovery of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes after partial hepatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverinsky, I V; Zverinskaya, H G; Sutsko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shlyahtun, A G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of berberine on the recovery processes of liver xenobiotic-metabolizing function during its compensatory growth after 70% partial hepatectomy. It was found the hepatic ability to metabolize foreign substances are not restored up to day 8. Administration of berberine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 6 days led to normalization of both cytochrome P450-dependent and flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that in the biotransformation of berberine involved not only cytochrome P450, but also flavin-containing monooxygenases.

  7. EUI1, encoding a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, regulates internode elongation by modulating gibberellin responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Anding; Qian, Qian; Yin, Hengfu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yin, Changxi; Lan, Ying; Tang, Jiuyou; Tang, Zuoshun; Cao, Shouyun; Wang, Xiujie; Xia, Kai; Fu, Xiangdong; Luo, Da; Chu, Chengcai

    2006-02-01

    Elongation of rice internodes is one of the most important agronomic traits, which determines the plant height and underlies the grain yield. It has been shown that the elongation of internodes is under genetic control, and various factors are implicated in the process. Here, we report a detailed characterization of an elongated uppermost internode1 (eui1) mutant, which has been used in hybrid rice breeding. In the eui1-2 mutant, the cell lengths in the uppermost internodes are significantly longer than that of wild type and thus give rise to the elongated uppermost internode. It was found that the level of active gibberellin was elevated in the mutant, whereas its growth in response to gibberellin is similar to that of the wild type, suggesting that the higher level accumulation of gibberellin in the eui1 mutant causes the abnormal elongation of the uppermost internode. Consistently, the expression levels of several genes which encode gibberellin biosynthesis enzymes were altered. We cloned the EUI1 gene, which encodes a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, by map-based cloning and found that EUI1 was weakly expressed in most tissues, but preferentially in young panicles. To confirm its function, transgenic experiments with different constructs of EUI1 were conducted. Overexpression of EUI1 gave rise to the gibberellin-deficient-like phenotypes, which could be partially reversed by supplementation with gibberellin. Furthermore, apart from the alteration of expression levels of the gibberellin biosynthesis genes, accumulation of SLR1 protein was found in the overexpressing transgenic plants, indicating that the expression level of EUI1 is implicated in both gibberellin-mediated SLR1 destruction and a feedback regulation in gibberellin biosynthesis. Therefore, we proposed that EUI1 plays a negative role in gibberellin-mediated regulation of cell elongation in the uppermost internode of rice.

  8. Possible Peroxo State of the Dicopper Site of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Combined Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoyama, Shuhei; Doitomi, Kazuki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-03-21

    Enzymatic methane hydroxylation is proposed to efficiently occur at the dinuclear copper site of particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), which is an integral membrane metalloenzyme in methanotrophic bacteria. The resting state and a possible peroxo state of the dicopper active site of pMMO are discussed by using combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations on the basis of reported X-ray crystal structures of the resting state of pMMO by Rosenzweig and co-workers. The dicopper site has a unique structure, in which one copper is coordinated by two histidine imidazoles and another is chelated by a histidine imidazole and primary amine of an N-terminal histidine. The resting state of the dicopper site is assignable to the mixed-valent Cu(I)Cu(II) state from a computed Cu-Cu distance of 2.62 Å from calculations at the B3LYP-D/TZVP level of theory. A μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 structure similar to those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase is reasonably obtained by using the resting state structure and dioxygen. Computed Cu-Cu and O-O distances are 3.63 and 1.46 Å, respectively, in the open-shell singlet state. Structural features of the dicopper peroxo species of pMMO are compared with those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase and synthetic dicopper model compounds. Optical features of the μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 state are calculated and analyzed with TD-DFT calculations.

  9. Structural and mechanistic basis of differentiated inhibitors of the acute pancreatitis target kynurenine-3-monooxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jonathan P.; Rowland, Paul; Taylor, Mark R. D.; Christodoulou, Erica M.; Haslam, Carl; Hobbs, Clare I.; Holmes, Duncan S.; Homes, Paul; Liddle, John; Mole, Damian J.; Uings, Iain; Walker, Ann L.; Webster, Scott P.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chung, Chun-Wa

    2017-06-01

    Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a key FAD-dependent enzyme of tryptophan metabolism. In animal models, KMO inhibition has shown benefit in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's. Most recently it has been identified as a target for acute pancreatitis multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (AP-MODS); a devastating inflammatory condition with a mortality rate in excess of 20%. Here we report and dissect the molecular mechanism of action of three classes of KMO inhibitors with differentiated binding modes and kinetics. Two novel inhibitor classes trap the catalytic flavin in a previously unobserved tilting conformation. This correlates with picomolar affinities, increased residence times and an absence of the peroxide production seen with previous substrate site inhibitors. These structural and mechanistic insights culminated in GSK065(C1) and GSK366(C2), molecules suitable for preclinical evaluation. Moreover, revising the repertoire of flavin dynamics in this enzyme class offers exciting new opportunities for inhibitor design.

  10. Sterol homeostasis requires regulated degradation of squalene monooxygenase by the ubiquitin ligase Doa10/Teb4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foresti, Ombretta; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K

    2013-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis is essential for the function of cellular membranes and requires feedback inhibition of HMGR, a rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. As HMGR acts at the beginning of the pathway, its regulation affects the synthesis of sterols and of other essential mevalonate......-derived metabolites, such as ubiquinone or dolichol. Here, we describe a novel, evolutionarily conserved feedback system operating at a sterol-specific step of the mevalonate pathway. This involves the sterol-dependent degradation of squalene monooxygenase mediated by the yeast Doa10 or mammalian Teb4, a ubiquitin...... ligase implicated in a branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. Since the other branch of ERAD is required for HMGR regulation, our results reveal a fundamental role for ERAD in sterol homeostasis, with the two branches of this pathway acting together...

  11. Structure, dynamics, and function of the monooxygenase P450 BM-3: insights from computer simulations studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccatano, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    The monooxygenase P450 BM-3 is a NADPH-dependent fatty acid hydroxylase enzyme isolated from soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium. As a pivotal member of cytochrome P450 superfamily, it has been intensely studied for the comprehension of structure–dynamics–function relationships in this class of enzymes. In addition, due to its peculiar properties, it is also a promising enzyme for biochemical and biomedical applications. However, despite the efforts, the full understanding of the enzyme structure and dynamics is not yet achieved. Computational studies, particularly molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have importantly contributed to this endeavor by providing new insights at an atomic level regarding the correlations between structure, dynamics, and function of the protein. This topical review summarizes computational studies based on MD simulations of the cytochrome P450 BM-3 and gives an outlook on future directions. (topical review)

  12. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Sadeghi, Sheila J

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia✰,✰✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P.; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L. Elliot; Gold, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. Methods We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Results Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. Conclusions These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. PMID:25464917

  14. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L Elliot; Gold, James M

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  16. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sehlmeyer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects

  17. HHM motif at the CuH-site of peptidylglycine monooxygenase is a pH-dependent conformational switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Chelsey D; Mayfield, Mary; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2013-04-16

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase is a copper-containing enzyme that catalyzes the amidation of neuropeptides hormones, the first step of which is the conversion of a glycine-extended pro-peptide to its α-hydroxyglcine intermediate. The enzyme contains two mononuclear Cu centers termed CuM (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H242, H244 and the thioether S of M314) and CuH (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H107, H108, and H172) with a Cu-Cu separation of 11 Å. During catalysis, the M site binds oxygen and substrate, and the H site donates the second electron required for hydroxylation. The WT enzyme shows maximum catalytic activity at pH 5.8 and undergoes loss of activity at lower pHs due to a protonation event with a pKA of 4.6. Low pH also causes a unique structural transition in which a new S ligand coordinates to copper with an identical pKA, manifest by a large increase in Cu-S intensity in the X- ray absorption spectroscopy. In previous work (Bauman, A. T., Broers, B. A., Kline, C. D., and Blackburn, N. J. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 10819-10828), we tentatively assigned the new Cu-S interaction to binding of M109 to the H-site (part of an HHM conserved motif common to all but one member of the family). Here we follow up on these findings via studies on the catalytic activity, pH-activity profiles, and spectroscopic (electron paramagnetic resonance, XAS, and Fourier transform infrared) properties of a number of H-site variants, including H107A, H108A, H172A, and M109I. Our results establish that M109 is indeed the coordinating ligand and confirm the prediction that the low pH structural transition with associated loss of activity is abrogated when the M109 thioether is absent. The histidine mutants show more complex behavior, but the almost complete lack of activity in all three variants coupled with only minor differences in their spectroscopic properties suggests that unique structural elements at H are critical for functionality. The data suggest a more general

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression

  19. The lumenal loop M672-P707 of the Menkes protein (ATP7A) transfers copper to peptidylglycine monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoikhian, Adenike [Oregon Health & Sciences University; Barry, Amanda N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayfield, Mary [Oregon Health & Science University; Nilges, Mark [Illinois EPR Center; Huang, Yiping [Johns Hopkins University; Lutsenko, Svetlana [Johns Hopkins University; Blackburn, Ninian [Oregon Health & Science University

    2012-05-14

    Copper transfer to cuproproteins located in vesicular compartments of the secretory pathway depends on activity of the copper translocating ATPase (ATP7A or ATP7B) but the mechanism of transfer is largely unexplored. Copper-ATPase ATP7A is unique in having a sequence rich in histidine and methionine residues located on the lumenal side of the membrane. The corresponding fragment binds Cu(I) when expressed as a chimera with a scaffold protein, and mutations or deletions of His and/or Met residues in its sequence inhibit dephosphorylation of the ATPase, a catalytic step associated with copper release. Here we present evidence for a potential role of this lumenal region of ATP7A in copper transfer to cuproenzymes. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) forms were investigated since the form in which copper is transferred to acceptor proteins is currently unknown. Analysis of Cu(II) using EPR demonstrated that at Cu:P ratios below 1:1, 15N-substituted protein had Cu(II) bound by 4 His residues, but this coordination changed as the Cu(II) to protein ratio increased towards 2:1. XAS confirmed this coordination via analysis of the intensity of outer-shell scattering from imidazole residues. The Cu(II) complexes could be reduced to their Cu(I) counterparts by ascorbate, but here again, as shown by EXAFS and XANES spectroscopy, the coordination was dependent on copper loading. At low copper Cu(I) was bound by a mixed ligand set of His + Met while at higher ratios His coordination predominated. The copper-loaded loop was able to transfer either Cu(II) or Cu(I) to peptidylglycine monooxygenase in the presence of chelating resin, generating catalytically active enzyme in a process that appeared to involve direct interaction between the two partners. The variation of coordination with copper loading suggests copper-dependent conformational change which in turn could act as a signal for regulating copper release by the ATPase pump.

  20. Co-immobilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase onto polyethylenimine-porous agarose polymeric composite using γ irradiation to use in biotechnological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atia, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    The co-immobilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) was optimized by completely coating, via covalent immobilization, the surface aldehyde groups of porous agarose (glyoxyl-agarose) with amine groups of polyethylenimine (PEI). The highest immobilization efficiency (∼87%) (activity of enzyme per amount of immobilized enzyme) was obtained with a CHMO/G6PDH ratio 2:1. The effects of different ratios of the support to the amount of enzymes (CHMO:G6PDH=2:1), the optimum incubation pH and the incubation time on the enzymatic activity of the enzymes were determined and found to be 5:1, 8.5 and 30 min, respectively. Subjecting the co-immobilized enzymes to doses of γ-radiation (5-100 kGy) resulted in complete loss in the activity of the free enzymes at a dose of 40 kGy, while the co-immobilized ones showed relatively high resistance to γ-radiation up to a dose of 50 kGy

  1. Structural Basis for Inhibitor-Induced Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Tae; Na, Byeong Kwan; Chung, Jiwoung; Kim, Sulhee; Kwon, Sool Ki; Cha, Hyunju; Son, Jonghyeon; Cho, Joong Myung; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2018-04-19

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanisms of flavin reduction and hydrogen peroxide production by KMO inhibitors are unknown. Herein, we report the structure of human KMO and crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sc) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (pf) KMO with Ro 61-8048. Proton transfer in the hydrogen bond network triggers flavin reduction in p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, but the mechanism triggering flavin reduction in KMO is different. Conformational changes via π-π interactions between the loop above the flavin and substrate or non-substrate effectors lead to disorder of the C-terminal α helix in scKMO and shifts of domain III in pfKMO, stimulating flavin reduction. Interestingly, Ro 61-8048 has two different binding modes. It acts as a competitive inhibitor in scKMO and as a non-substrate effector in pfKMO. These findings provide understanding of the catalytic cycle of KMO and insight for structure-based drug design of KMO inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  3. Absence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reduces mortality of acute viral myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hisako; Hoshi, Masato; Mouri, Akihiro; Tashita, Chieko; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Saito, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) in mice is an established model for viral myocarditis. Previously, we have demonstrated that indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an L-tryptophan - kynurenine pathway (KP) enzyme, affects acute viral myocarditis. However, the roles of KP metabolites in EMCV infection remain unclear. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is one of the key regulatory enzymes, which metabolizes kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine in the KP. Therefore, we examined the role of KMO in acute viral infection by comparing between KMO -/- mice and KMO +/+ mice. KMO deficiency resulted in suppressed mortality after EMCV infection. The number of infiltrating cells and F4/80 + cells in KMO -/- mice was suppressed compared with those in KMO +/+ mice. KMO -/- mice showed significantly increased levels of serum KP metabolites, and induction of KMO expression upon EMCV infection was involved in its effect on mortality through EMCV suppression. Furthermore, KMO -/- mice showed significantly suppression of CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 on day 2 and CXCL1 on day 4 after infection. These results suggest that increased KP metabolites reduced chemokine production, resulting in suppressed mortality upon KMO knockdown in EMCV infection. KP metabolites may thus provide an effective strategy for treating acute viral myocarditis. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO): implications for therapy in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevandavakkam, Mathuravani A; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2010-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an adult onset neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. Recent work has shown that perturbation of kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolism is a hallmark of HD pathology, and that changes in brain levels of KP metabolites may play a causative role in this disease. The KP contains three neuroactive metabolites, the neurotoxins 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and quinolinic acid (QUIN), and the neuroprotectant kynurenic acid (KYNA). In model systems in vitro and in vivo, 3-HK and QUIN have been shown to cause neurodegeneration via a combination of excitotoxic mechanisms and oxidative stress. Recent studies with HD patient samples and in HD model systems have supported the idea that a shift away from the synthesis of KYNA and towards the formation of 3-HK and QUIN may trigger the neuropathological features observed in HD. The enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is located at a critical branching point in the KP such that inhibition of this enzyme by either pharmacological or genetic means shifts the flux in the pathway towards the formation of KYNA. This intervention ameliorates disease-relevant phenotypes in HD models. Here we review the work implicating the KP in HD pathology and discuss the potential of KMO as a therapeutic target for this disorder. As several neurodegenerative diseases exhibit alterations in KP metabolism, this concept has broader implications for the treatment of brain diseases.

  5. Sterol homeostasis requires regulated degradation of squalene monooxygenase by the ubiquitin ligase Doa10/Teb4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresti, Ombretta; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Carvalho, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis is essential for the function of cellular membranes and requires feedback inhibition of HMGR, a rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. As HMGR acts at the beginning of the pathway, its regulation affects the synthesis of sterols and of other essential mevalonate-derived metabolites, such as ubiquinone or dolichol. Here, we describe a novel, evolutionarily conserved feedback system operating at a sterol-specific step of the mevalonate pathway. This involves the sterol-dependent degradation of squalene monooxygenase mediated by the yeast Doa10 or mammalian Teb4, a ubiquitin ligase implicated in a branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. Since the other branch of ERAD is required for HMGR regulation, our results reveal a fundamental role for ERAD in sterol homeostasis, with the two branches of this pathway acting together to control sterol biosynthesis at different levels and thereby allowing independent regulation of multiple products of the mevalonate pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00953.001 PMID:23898401

  6. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evolutionary recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for stabilization of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in arctiids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Dorothee; Ober, Dietrich

    2011-09-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are secondary metabolites that are produced by certain plants as a chemical defense against herbivores. They represent a promising system to study the evolution of pathways in plant secondary metabolism. Recently, a specific gene of this pathway has been shown to have originated by duplication of a gene involved in primary metabolism followed by diversification and optimization for its specific function in the defense machinery of these plants. Furthermore, pyrrolizidine alkaloids are one of the best-studied examples of a plant defense system that has been recruited by several insect lineages for their own chemical defense. In each case, this recruitment requires sophisticated mechanisms of adaptations, e.g., efficient excretion, transport, suppression of toxification, or detoxification. In this review, we briefly summarize detoxification mechanism known for pyrrolizidine alkaloids and focus on pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxidation as one of the mechanisms allowing insects to accumulate the sequestered toxins in an inactivated protoxic form. Recent research into the evolution of pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenases of adapted arctiid moths (Lepidoptera) has shown that this enzyme originated by the duplication of a gene encoding a flavin-dependent monooxygenase of unknown function early in the arctiid lineage. The available data suggest several similarities in the molecular evolution of this adaptation strategy of insects to the mechanisms described previously for the evolution of the respective pathway in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Methyloferula stellata gen. nov., sp. nov., an acidophilic, obligately methanotrophic bacterium that possesses only a soluble methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobev, Alexey V; Baani, Mohamed; Doronina, Nina V; Brady, Allyson L; Liesack, Werner; Dunfield, Peter F; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2011-10-01

    Two strains of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, AR4(T) and SOP9, were isolated from acidic (pH 3.8-4.0) Sphagnum peat bogs in Russia. Another phenotypically similar isolate, strain LAY, was obtained from an acidic (pH 4.0) forest soil in Germany. Cells of these strains were Gram-negative, non-pigmented, non-motile, thin rods that multiplied by irregular cell division and formed rosettes or amorphous cell conglomerates. Similar to Methylocella species, strains AR4(T), SOP9 and LAY possessed only a soluble form of methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and lacked intracytoplasmic membranes. Growth occurred only on methane and methanol; the latter was the preferred growth substrate. mRNA transcripts of sMMO were detectable in cells when either methane or both methane and methanol were available. Carbon was assimilated via the serine and ribulose-bisphosphate (RuBP) pathways; nitrogen was fixed via an oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase. Strains AR4(T), SOP9 and LAY were moderately acidophilic, mesophilic organisms capable of growth between pH 3.5 and 7.2 (optimum pH 4.8-5.2) and at 4-33 °C (optimum 20-23 °C). The major cellular fatty acid was 18 : 1ω7c and the quinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 55.6-57.5 mol%. The isolates belonged to the family Beijerinckiaceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria and were most closely related to the sMMO-possessing methanotrophs of the genus Methylocella (96.4-97.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), particulate MMO (pMMO)-possessing methanotrophs of the genus Methylocapsa (96.1-97.0 %), facultative methylotrophs of the genus Methylovirgula (96.1-96.3 %) and non-methanotrophic organotrophs of the genus Beijerinckia (96.5-97.0 %). Phenotypically, strains AR4(T), SOP9 and LAY were most similar to Methylocella species, but differed from members of this genus by cell morphology, greater tolerance of low pH, detectable activities of RuBP pathway enzymes and inability to grow on multicarbon compounds. Therefore, we propose a novel

  9. [Altered expressions of alkane monooxygenase and hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression in lung tissue of rat hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua-jun; Yuan, Ya-dong

    2013-10-29

    To explore the altered expressions of alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Twenty Wistar rats were divided randomly into normal control and hypoxia groups after 1-week adaptive feeding. Hypoxia group was raised in a homemade organic glass tank with a 24-h continuous supply of air and nitrogen atmospheric mixed gas. And the oxygen concentration of (10.0 ± 0.5)% was controlled by oxygen monitoring control system. The control group was maintained in room air. Both groups stayed in the same room with the same diet. After 8 weeks, the level of mean pulmonary pressure (mPAP) was measured by right-heart catheterization, right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) calculated by the ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum and hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling (HPSR) observed under microscope. And the levels of AlkB and HIF-1α mRNA and protein in lungs were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. At 8 weeks post-hypoxia, compared with the control group [11.0 ± 0.7 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa), 0.210 ± 0.035], the levels of mPAP and RVHI in hypoxia group (33.3 ± 1.3 mm Hg, 0.448 ± 0.013) increased significantly (both P < 0.05), the expressions of AlkB mRNA and protein in pulmonary tissue decreased significantly (0.338 ± 0.085 vs 0.688 ± 0.020, P < 0.01) (0.483 ± 0.052 vs 0.204 ± 0.010, P < 0.01), and the expressions of HIF-1α mRNA and protein increased significantly (0.790 ± 0.161 vs 0.422 ± 0.096, P < 0.01) (0.893 ± 0.080 vs 0.346 ± 0.008, P < 0.01). The down-regulation of AlkB in lung tissue may increase the activity of HIF-1 to participate in the occurrence and development of pulmonary hypertension.

  10. ELONGATED UPPERMOST INTERNODE Encodes a Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase That Epoxidizes Gibberellins in a Novel Deactivation Reaction in RiceW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongyou; Nomura, Takahito; Xu, Yonghan; Zhang, Yingying; Peng, Yu; Mao, Bizeng; Hanada, Atsushi; Zhou, Haicheng; Wang, Renxiao; Li, Peijin; Zhu, Xudong; Mander, Lewis N.; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; He, Zuhua

    2006-01-01

    The recessive tall rice (Oryza sativa) mutant elongated uppermost internode (eui) is morphologically normal until its final internode elongates drastically at the heading stage. The stage-specific developmental effect of the eui mutation has been used in the breeding of hybrid rice to improve the performance of heading in male sterile cultivars. We found that the eui mutant accumulated exceptionally large amounts of biologically active gibberellins (GAs) in the uppermost internode. Map-based cloning revealed that the Eui gene encodes a previously uncharacterized cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP714D1. Using heterologous expression in yeast, we found that EUI catalyzed 16α,17-epoxidation of non-13-hydroxylated GAs. Consistent with the tall and dwarfed phenotypes of the eui mutant and Eui-overexpressing transgenic plants, respectively, 16α,17-epoxidation reduced the biological activity of GA4 in rice, demonstrating that EUI functions as a GA-deactivating enzyme. Expression of Eui appeared tightly regulated during plant development, in agreement with the stage-specific eui phenotypes. These results indicate the existence of an unrecognized pathway for GA deactivation by EUI during the growth of wild-type internodes. The identification of Eui as a GA catabolism gene provides additional evidence that the GA metabolism pathway is a useful target for increasing the agronomic value of crops. PMID:16399803

  11. A collection of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes involved in modification and detoxification of herbicide atrazine in rice (Oryza sativa) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong Tan, Li; Chen Lu, Yi; Jing Zhang, Jing; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases constitute one of the largest families of protein genes involved in plant growth, development and acclimation to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, whether these genes respond to organic toxic compounds and their biological functions for detoxifying toxic compounds such as herbicides in rice are poorly understood. The present study identified 201 genes encoding cytochrome P450s from an atrazine-exposed rice transcriptome through high-throughput sequencing. Of these, 69 cytochrome P450 genes were validated by microarray and some of them were confirmed by real time PCR. Activities of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and p-nitroanisole O-demethylase (PNOD) related to toxicity were determined and significantly induced by atrazine exposure. To dissect the mechanism underlying atrazine modification and detoxification by P450, metabolites (or derivatives) of atrazine in plants were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). Major metabolites comprised desmethylatrazine (DMA), desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA), hydroxyatrazine (HA), hydroxyethylatrazine (HEA) and hydroxyisopropylatrazine (HIA). All of them were chemically modified by P450s. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and malathion (MAL) were used to assess the correlation between the P450s activity and rice responses including accumulation of atrazine in tissues, shoot and root growth and detoxification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coupled effects of methane monooxygenase and nitrogen source on growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    The coupled effects of nitrogen source and methane monooxygenase (MMO) on the growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation capacity of methanotrophs were explored. The ammonia-supplied methanotrophs expressing soluble MMO (sMMO) grew at the highest rate, while N 2 -fixing bacteria expressing particulate MMO (pMMO) grew at the lowest rate. Further study showed that more hydroxylamine and nitrite was formed by ammonia-supplied bacteria containing pMMO, which might cause their slightly lower growth rate. The highest PHB content (51.0%) was obtained under nitrogen-limiting conditions with the inoculation of nitrate-supplied bacteria containing pMMO. Ammonia-supplied bacteria also accumulated a higher content of PHB (45.2%) with the expression of pMMO, while N 2 -fixing bacteria containing pMMO only showed low PHB production capacity (32.1%). The maximal PHB contents of bacteria expressing sMMO were low, with no significant change under different nitrogen source conditions. The low MMO activity, low cell growth rate and low PHB production capacity of methanotrophs continuously cultivated with N 2 with the expression of pMMO were greatly improved in the cyclic NO 3 - N 2 cultivation regime, indicating that long-term deficiency of nitrogen sources was detrimental to the activity of methanotrophs expressing pMMO. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Overexpression of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP6ER1, is associated with resistance to imidacloprid in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, C; Carvalho, R A; Oliphant, L; Puinean, A M; Field, L M; Nauen, R; Williamson, M S; Moores, G; Gorman, K

    2011-12-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, is an economically significant pest of rice throughout Asia and has evolved resistance to many insecticides including the neonicotinoid imidacloprid. The resistance of field populations of N. lugens to imidacloprid has been attributed to enhanced detoxification by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), although, to date, the causative P450(s) has (have) not been identified. In the present study, biochemical assays using the model substrate 7-ethoxycoumarin showed enhanced P450 activity in several resistant N. lugens field strains when compared with a susceptible reference strain. Thirty three cDNA sequences encoding tentative unique P450s were identified from two recent sequencing projects and by degenerate PCR. The mRNA expression level of 32 of these was examined in susceptible, moderately resistant and highly resistant N. lugens strains using quantitative real-time PCR. A single P450 gene (CYP6ER1) was highly overexpressed in all resistant strains (up to 40-fold) and the level of expression observed in the different N. lugens strains was significantly correlated with the resistance phenotype. These results provide strong evidence for a role of CYP6ER1 in the resistance of N. lugens to imidacloprid. © 2011 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2011 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral kynurenine-3-monooxygenase deficiency as a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; van der Hart, Marieke; Roeser, Julien; Summergrad, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Increased predisposition of schizophrenia patients (SP) to development of obesity and insulin resistance suggested common signaling pathway between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and schizophrenia. Deficiency of kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), enzyme catalyzing formation of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) from kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan (Trp) metabolite, might contribute to development of MetS as suggested by non-expression of KMO genes in human fat tissue and elevated serum concentrations of Kyn and its metabolites, kynurenic (KYNA) and anthranilic (ANA) acids, in diabetic patients and Zucker fatty rats (ZFR). Markers of KMO deficiency: decreased 3-HK and elevated Kyn, KYNA and ANA, were observed in brains and spinal fluids of SP, and in brains and serum of experimental animals with genetically- or pharmacologically-induced KMO deficiency. However, elevated concentrations of ANA and decreased 3-HK were reported in serum of SP without concurrent increase of Kyn and KYNA. Present study aimed to re-assess serum Kyn metabolites (HPLC-MS) in a sub-group of SP with elevated KYNA. We found increased Kyn concentrations (by 30%) and Kyn:Trp ratio (by 20%) in serum of SP with elevated KYNA concentrations (by 40%). Obtained results and our previous data suggest that peripheral KMO deficiency might be manifested by, at least, two different patterns: elevated ANA with decreased 3-HK; and elevated KYNA and KYN. The latter pattern was previously described in type 2 diabetes patients and might underline increased predisposition of SP to development of MetS. Assessment of peripheral KMO deficiency might identify SP predisposed to MetS. Attenuation of the consequences of peripheral KMO deficiency might be a new target for prevention/treatment of obesity and diabetes in SP.

  16. Identification of the intermediates of in vivo oxidation of 1 ,4-dioxane by monooxygenase-containing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Shaily; Petzold, Christopher J; Baidoo, Edward E; Keasling, Jay D; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2007-11-01

    1,4-dioxane is a probable human carcinogen and an emerging water contaminant. Monooxygenase-expressing bacteria have been shown to degrade dioxane via growth-supporting as well as cometabolic mechanisms. In this study, the intermediates of dioxane degradation by monooxygenase-expressing bacteria were determined by triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The major intermediates were identified as 2-hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), ethylene glycol, glycolate, and oxalate. Studies with uniformly labeled 14C dioxane showed that over 50% of the dioxane was mineralized to CO2 by CB1190, while 5% became biomass-associated after 48 h. Volatile organic acids and non-volatiles, respectively, accounted for 20 and 11% of the radiolabeled carbon. Although strains cometabolizing dioxane exhibited limited transformation capacities, nearly half of the initial dioxane was recovered as CO2. On the basis of these analytical results, we propose a pathway for dioxane oxidation by monooxygenase-expressing cells in which dioxane is first converted to 2-hydroxy-1,4-dioxane, which is spontaneously oxidized to HEAA. During a second monooxygenation step, HEAA is further hydroxylated, resulting in a mixture of dihydroxyethoxyacetic acids with a hydroxyl group at the ortho or para position. After cleavage of the second ether bond, small organic molecules such as ethylene glycol, glycolate, glyoxalate, and oxalate are progressively formed, which are then mineralized to CO2 via common cellular metabolic pathways. Bioremediation of dioxane via this pathway is not expected to cause an accumulation of toxic compounds in the environment.

  17. Development of a Series of Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Inhibitors Leading to a Clinical Candidate for the Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ann L; Ancellin, Nicolas; Beaufils, Benjamin; Bergeal, Marylise; Binnie, Margaret; Bouillot, Anne; Clapham, David; Denis, Alexis; Haslam, Carl P; Holmes, Duncan S; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Liddle, John; McBride, Andrew; Mirguet, Olivier; Mowat, Christopher G; Rowland, Paul; Tiberghien, Nathalie; Trottet, Lionel; Uings, Iain; Webster, Scott P; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Mole, Damian J

    2017-04-27

    Recently, we reported a novel role for KMO in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). A number of inhibitors of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) have previously been described as potential treatments for neurodegenerative conditions and particularly for Huntington's disease. However, the inhibitors reported to date have insufficient aqueous solubility relative to their cellular potency to be compatible with the intravenous (iv) dosing route required in AP. We have identified and optimized a novel series of high affinity KMO inhibitors with favorable physicochemical properties. The leading example is exquisitely selective, has low clearance in two species, prevents lung and kidney damage in a rat model of acute pancreatitis, and is progressing into preclinical development.

  18. Effects of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Oxidation on Cellulose Structure and Binding of Oxidized Cellulose Oligomers to Cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Payne, Christina M.

    2015-05-21

    In nature, polysaccharide glycosidic bonds are cleaved by hydrolytic enzymes for a vast array of biological functions. Recently, a new class of enzymes that utilize an oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic linkages was discovered; these enzymes are called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO). These oxidative enzymes are synergistic with cocktails of hydrolytic enzymes and are thought to act primarily on crystalline regions, in turn providing new sites of productive attachment and detachment for processive hydrolytic enzymes. In the case of cellulose, the homopolymer of ..beta..-1,4-d-glucose, enzymatic oxidation occurs at either the reducing end or the nonreducing end of glucose, depending on enzymatic specificity, and results in the generation of oxidized chemical substituents at polymer chain ends. LPMO oxidation of cellulose is thought to produce either a lactone at the reducing end of glucose that can spontaneously or enzymatically convert to aldonic acid or 4-keto-aldose at the nonreducing end that may further oxidize to a geminal diol. Here, we use molecular simulation to examine the effect of oxidation on the structure of crystalline cellulose. The simulations highlight variations in behaviors depending on the chemical identity of the oxidized species and its location within the cellulose fibril, as different oxidized species introduce steric effects that disrupt local crystallinity and in some cases reduce the work needed for polymer decrystallization. Reducing-end oxidations are easiest to decrystallize when located at the end of the fibril, whereas nonreducing end oxidations readily decrystallize from internal cleavage sites despite their lower solvent accessibility. The differential in decrystallization free energy suggests a molecular mechanism consistent with experimentally observed LPMO/cellobiohydrolase synergy. Additionally, the soluble oxidized cellobiose products released by hydrolytic cellulases may bind to the active sites of cellulases

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase Reductase: New Insight into the FAD–Transfer Reaction†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    The two–component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH– and FAD–dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH→FADox charge–transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride–transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s−1, in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD+. Electrochemical and equilibrium–binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ~13–times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)–hydroperoxide intermediate. The half–life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD–transfer reaction is increased ~21–fold, supporting the model of a protein–protein interaction between apoSMOB and NSMOA with the peroxide intermediate. The mechanisms of FAD–dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. Based on these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S–state) and more reactive, transfer state (T–state). Dissociation of NAD+ after the hydride transfer–reaction transiently populates the T–state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB–FADhq shifts the FADhq–binding equilibrium from the T–state to the S–state. Additionally, the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB–FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide–gated flavin–transfer and electron

  20. Isoeugenol monooxygenase and its putative regulatory gene are located in the eugenol metabolic gene cluster in Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Young; Seo, Jiyoung; Unno, Tatsuya; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Yan, Tao; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2010-03-01

    The plant-derived phenylpropanoids eugenol and isoeugenol have been proposed as useful precursors for the production of natural vanillin. Genes involved in the metabolism of eugenol and isoeugenol were clustered in region of about a 30 kb of Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1. Two of the 23 ORFs in this region, ORFs 26 (iemR) and 27 (iem), were predicted to be involved in the conversion of isoeugenol to vanillin. The deduced amino acid sequence of isoeugenol monooxygenase (Iem) of strain Jin1 had 81.4% identity to isoeugenol monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida IE27, which also transforms isoeugenol to vanillin. Iem was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) and was found to lead to isoeugenol to vanillin transformation. Deletion and cloning analyses indicated that the gene iemR, located upstream of iem, is required for expression of iem in the presence of isoeugenol, suggesting it to be the iem regulatory gene. Reverse transcription, real-time PCR analyses indicated that the genes involved in the metabolism of eugenol and isoeugenol were differently induced by isoeugenol, eugenol, and vanillin.

  1. Identification of the Regulator Gene Responsible for the Acetone-Responsive Expression of the Binuclear Iron Monooxygenase Gene Cluster in Mycobacteria ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hirose, Satomi; Semba, Hisashi; Kino, Kuniki

    2011-01-01

    The mimABCD gene cluster encodes the binuclear iron monooxygenase that oxidizes propane and phenol in Mycobacterium smegmatis strain MC2 155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523. Interestingly, expression of the mimABCD gene cluster is induced by acetone. In this study, we investigated the regulator gene responsible for this acetone-responsive expression. In the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155, the mimABCD gene cluster is preceded by a gene designated mimR, which is divergently transcribed. Sequence analysis revealed that MimR exhibits amino acid similarity with the NtrC family of transcriptional activators, including AcxR and AcoR, which are involved in acetone and acetoin metabolism, respectively. Unexpectedly, many homologs of the mimR gene were also found in the sequenced genomes of actinomycetes. A plasmid carrying a transcriptional fusion of the intergenic region between the mimR and mimA genes with a promoterless green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was constructed and introduced into M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Using a GFP reporter system, we confirmed by deletion and complementation analyses that the mimR gene product is the positive regulator of the mimABCD gene cluster expression that is responsive to acetone. M. goodii strain 12523 also utilized the same regulatory system as M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Although transcriptional activators of the NtrC family generally control transcription using the σ54 factor, a gene encoding the σ54 factor was absent from the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. These results suggest the presence of a novel regulatory system in actinomycetes, including mycobacteria. PMID:21856847

  2. Structural and molecular dynamics studies of a C1-oxidizing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase from Heterobasidion irregulare reveal amino acids important for substrate recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Kognole, Abhishek A. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY USA; Wu, Miao [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Westereng, Bjørge [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås Norway; Crowley, Michael F. [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Kim, Seonah [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Dimarogona, Maria [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Greece; Payne, Christina M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY USA; Directorate of Engineering, Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems, National Science Foundation, Alexandria VA USA; Sandgren, Mats [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden

    2018-04-24

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a group of recently discovered enzymes that play important roles in the decomposition of recalcitrant polysaccharides. Here, we report the biochemical, structural, and computational characterization of an LPMO from the white-rot fungus Heterobasidion irregulare (HiLPMO9B). This enzyme oxidizes cellulose at the C1 carbon of glycosidic linkages. The crystal structure of HiLPMO9B was determined at 2.1 A resolution using X-ray crystallography. Unlike the majority of the currently available C1-specific LPMO structures, the HiLPMO9B structure contains an extended L2 loop, connecting ..beta..-strands ..beta..2 and ..beta..3 of the ..beta..-sandwich structure. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest roles for both aromatic and acidic residues in the substrate binding of HiLPMO9B, with the main contribution from the residues located on the extended region of the L2 loop (Tyr20) and the LC loop (Asp205, Tyr207, and Glu210). Asp205 and Glu210 were found to be involved in the hydrogen bonding with the hydroxyl group of the C6 carbon of glucose moieties directly or via a water molecule. Two different binding orientations were observed over the course of the MD simulations. In each orientation, the active-site copper of this LPMO preferentially skewed toward the pyranose C1 of the glycosidic linkage over the targeted glycosidic bond. This study provides additional insight into cellulose binding by C1-specific LPMOs, giving a molecular-level picture of active site substrate interactions.

  3. Two Arabidopsis cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, CYP714A1 and CYP714A2, function redundantly in plant development through gibberellin deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Baichen; Yan, Dawei; Dong, Weixin; Yang, Weibing; Li, Qun; Zeng, Longjun; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Linyou; Hicks, Leslie M; He, Zuhua

    2011-07-01

    The rice gene ELONGATED UPPERMOST INTERNODE1 (EUI1) encodes a P450 monooxygenase that epoxidizes gibberellins (GAs) in a deactivation reaction. The Arabidopsis genome contains a tandemly duplicated gene pair ELA1 (CYP714A1) and ELA2 (CYP714A2) that encode EUI homologs. In this work, we dissected the functions of the two proteins. ELA1 and ELA2 exhibited overlapping yet distinct gene expression patterns. We showed that while single mutants of ELA1 or ELA2 exhibited no obvious morphological phenotype, simultaneous elimination of ELA1 and ELA2 expression in ELA1-RNAi/ela2 resulted in increased biomass and enlarged organs. By contrast, transgenic plants constitutively expressing either ELA1 or ELA2 were dwarfed, similar to those overexpressing the rice EUI gene. We also discovered that overexpression of ELA1 resulted in a severe dwarf phenotype, while overexpression of ELA2 gave rise to a breeding-favored semi-dwarf phenotype in rice. Consistent with the phenotypes, we found that the ELA1-RNAi/ela2 plants increased amounts of biologically active GAs that were decreased in the internodes of transgenic rice with ELA1 and ELA2 overexpression. In contrast, the precursor GA(12) slightly accumulated in the transgenic rice, and GA(19) highly accumulated in the ELA2 overexpression rice. Taken together, our study strongly suggests that the two Arabidopsis EUI homologs subtly regulate plant growth most likely through catalyzing deactivation of bioactive GAs similar to rice EUI. The two P450s may also function in early stages of the GA biosynthetic pathway. Our results also suggest that ELA2 could be an excellent tool for molecular breeding for high yield potential in cereal crops. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. A histidine-rich linker region in peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase has the properties of a pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanatha, Kurutihalli; Bäck, Nils; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2014-05-02

    Decreasing luminal pH is thought to play a role in the entry of newly synthesized and endocytosed membrane proteins into secretory granules. The two catalytic domains of peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a type I integral membrane protein, catalyze the sequential reactions that convert peptidyl-Gly substrates into amidated products. We explored the hypothesis that a conserved His-rich cluster (His-Gly-His-His) in the linker region connecting its two catalytic domains senses pH and affects PAM trafficking by mutating these His residues to Ala (Ala-Gly-Ala-Ala; H3A). Purified recombinant wild-type and H3A linker peptides were examined using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence; mutation of the His cluster largely eliminated its pH sensitivity. An enzymatically active PAM protein with the same mutations (PAM-1/H3A) was expressed in HEK293 cells and AtT-20 corticotrope tumor cells. Metabolic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation revealed more rapid loss of newly synthesized PAM-1/H3A than PAM-1; although release of newly synthesized monofunctional PHM/H3A was increased, release of soluble bifunctional PAM/H3A, a product of the endocytic pathway, was decreased. Surface biotinylation revealed rapid loss of PAM-1/H3A, with no detectable return of the mutant protein to secretory granules. Consistent with its altered endocytic trafficking, little PAM-1/H3A was subjected to regulated intramembrane proteolysis followed by release of a small nuclear-targeted cytosolic fragment. AtT-20 cells expressing PAM-1/H3A adopted the morphology of wild-type AtT-20 cells; secretory products no longer accumulated in the trans-Golgi network and secretory granule exocytosis was more responsive to secretagogue.

  5. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  6. The oxidation of alkylaryl sulfides and benzo[b]thiophenes by Escherichia coli cells expressing wild-type and engineered styrene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Coulombel, Lydie; Francuski, Djordje; Sharma, Narain D; Boyd, Derek R; Ferrall, Rory Moore O; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2013-06-01

    Nine different sulfur-containing compounds were biotransformed to the corresponding sulfoxides by Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3) cells expressing styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Thioanisole was consumed at 83.3 μmoles min(-1) g cell dry weight(-1) resulting mainly in the formation of R-thioanisole sulfoxide with an enantiomeric excess (ee) value of 45 %. The rate of 2-methyl-, 2-chloro- and 2-bromo-thioanisole consumption was 2-fold lower than that of thioanisole. Surprisingly, the 2-methylthioanisole sulfoxide product had the opposite (S) configuration to that of the other 2-substituted thioanisole derivatives and had a higher ee value (84 %). The rate of oxidation of 4-substituted thioanisoles was higher than the corresponding 2-substituted substrates but the ee values of the products were consistently lower (10-23 %). The rate of benzo[b]thiophene and 2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene sulfoxidation was approximately 10-fold lower than that of thioanisole. The ee value of the benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide could not be determined as the product racemized rapidly. E. coli cells expressing an engineered SMO (SMOeng R3-11) oxidised 2-substituted thioanisoles between 1.8- and 2.8-fold faster compared to cells expressing the wild-type enzyme. SMOeng R3-11 oxidised benzo[b]thiophene and 2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene 10.1 and 5.6 times faster that the wild-type enzyme. The stereospecificity of the reaction catalysed by SMOeng was unchanged from that of the wild type. Using the X-ray crystal structure of the P. putida S12 SMO, it was evident that the entrance of substrates into the SMO active site is limited by the binding pocket bottleneck formed by the side chains of Val-211 and Asn-46 carboxyamide group.

  7. Development of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Novel Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Inhibitor Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K R; Guillemin, G J; Lovejoy, D B

    2018-02-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a well-validated therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Huntington's disease (HD). This work reports a facile fluorescence-based KMO assay optimized for high-throughput screening (HTS) that achieves a throughput approximately 20-fold higher than the fastest KMO assay currently reported. The screen was run with excellent performance (average Z' value of 0.80) from 110,000 compounds across 341 plates and exceeded all statistical parameters used to describe a robust HTS assay. A subset of molecules was selected for validation by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography, resulting in the confirmation of a novel hit with an IC 50 comparable to that of the well-described KMO inhibitor Ro-61-8048. A medicinal chemistry program is currently underway to further develop our novel KMO inhibitor scaffolds.

  8. Inhibition of the Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Siderophore A (SidA) Blocks Siderophore Biosynthesis and Aspergillus fumigatus Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Del Campo, Julia S; Vogelaar, Nancy; Tolani, Karishma; Kizjakina, Karina; Harich, Kim; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-11-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the most common causative agent of fatal invasive mycoses. The flavin-dependent monooxygenase siderophore A (SidA) catalyzes the oxygen and NADPH dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine (l-Orn) to N 5 -l-hydroxyornithine in the biosynthetic pathway of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Deletion of the gene that codes for SidA has shown that it is essential in establishing infection in mice models. Here, a fluorescence polarization high-throughput assay was used to screen a 2320 compound library for inhibitors of SidA. Celastrol, a natural quinone methide, was identified as a noncompetitive inhibitor of SidA with a MIC value of 2 μM. Docking experiments suggest that celastrol binds across the NADPH and l-Orn pocket. Celastrol prevents A. fumigatus growth in blood agar. The addition of purified ferric-siderophore abolished the inhibitory effect of celastrol. Thus, celastrol inhibits A. fumigatus growth by blocking siderophore biosynthesis through SidA inhibiton.

  9. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  10. Genomic and transcriptomic insights into the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene repertoire in the rice pest brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Shu-Hua; Huang, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Hai-Jian; Liu, Cheng-Wen; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Bao, Yan-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) gene family is one of the most abundant eukaryotic gene families that encode detoxification enzymes. In this study, we identified an abundance of P450 gene repertoire through genome- and transcriptome-wide analysis in the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens), the most destructive rice pest in Asia. Detailed gene information including the exon-intron organization, size, transcription orientation and distribution in the genome revealed that many P450 loci were closely situated on the same scaffold, indicating frequent occurrence of gene duplications. Insecticide-response expression profiling revealed that imidacloprid significantly increased NlCYP6CS1v2, NLCYP4CE1v2, NlCYP4DE1, NlCYP417A1v2 and NlCYP439A1 expression; while triazophos and deltamethrin notably enhanced NlCYP303A1 expression. Expression analysis at the developmental stage showed the egg-, nymph-, male- and female-specific expression patterns of N. lugens P450 genes. These novel findings will be helpful for clarifying the P450 functions in physiological processes including development, reproduction and insecticide resistance in this insect species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognostic significance of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haojie; Zhang, Yurong; You, Haiyan; Tao, Xuemei; Wang, Cun; Jin, Guangzhi; Wang, Ning; Ruan, Haoyu; Gu, Dishui; Huo, Xisong; Cong, Wenming; Qin, Wenxin

    2015-06-23

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation and plays a critical role in Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. This study aimed to examine the expression of KMO in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigate the relationship between its expression and prognosis of HCC patients. We first analyzed KMO expression in 120 paired HCC samples (HCC tissues vs matched adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues), and 205 clinical HCC specimens using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses were executed to evaluate the prognosis of HCC. The results of IHC analysis showed that KMO expression was significantly higher in HCC tissues than that in normal liver tissues (all p KMO was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) and time to recurrence (TTR) (both pKMO positively regulated proliferation, migration, and invasion of HCC cells. These results suggest that KMO exhibits tumor-promoting effects towards HCC and it may serve as a novel prognostic marker in HCC.

  12. Mutation of the glucosinolate biosynthesis enzyme cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase increases camalexin accumulation and powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simu eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1, which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  13. Fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases bind starch and β-cyclodextrin similarly to amylolytic hydrolases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Isaksen, Trine; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    , the clustering of CBM20s from starch-targeting LPMOs and hydrolases was in accord with taxonomy and did not correlate to appended catalytic activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the CBM20-binding scaffold is retained in the evolution of hydrolytic and oxidative starch-degrading activities....

  14. Role of Ser-257 in the sliding mechanism of NADP(H) in the reaction catalyzed by the Aspergillus fumigatus flavin-dependent ornithine N5-monooxygenase SidA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Carolyn; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Sobrado, Pablo

    2013-11-08

    SidA (siderophore A) is a flavin-dependent N-hydroxylating monooxygenase that is essential for virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus. SidA catalyzes the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent formation of N(5)-hydroxyornithine. In this reaction, NADPH reduces the flavin, and the resulting NADP(+) is the last product to be released. The presence of NADP(+) is essential for activity, as it is required for stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin, which is the hydroxylating species. As part of our efforts to determine the molecular details of the role of NADP(H) in catalysis, we targeted Ser-257 for site-directed mutagenesis and performed extensive characterization of the S257A enzyme. Using a combination of steady-state and stopped-flow kinetic experiments, substrate analogs, and primary kinetic isotope effects, we show that the interaction between Ser-257 and NADP(H) is essential for stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. Molecular dynamics simulation results suggest that Ser-257 functions as a pivot point, allowing the nicotinamide of NADP(+) to slide into position for stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin.

  15. Report on a survey in fiscal 1999. Direct oxidation of hydrocarbons by manifestation of functions of methane mono-oxygenase (MMO); 1999 nendo metamonookishinaze (MMO) no kino hatsugen ni yoru tanka suiso no chokusetsu sanka seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The metallic enzyme, methane mono-oxygenase (MMO) collected from methanotrophic bacteria, may perform a reaction that has a possibility to proceed direct conversion from methane to methanol under normal temperatures and pressures. However, its utilization of biological bacteria makes massive cultivation and handling difficult, not having realized its practical use. Therefore, research and development has been carried out on a process that can convert directly and selectively hydrocarbons including methane under normal temperatures and pressures, mimicking the excellent functions of MMO. To achieve the development, surveys and discussions were given on the following elementary researches: elucidation of the reaction mechanism in the activation point in microorganism enzymes; analysis of structures in microorganism MMO; creation of a technology to develop a bio-mimetic catalyst; improvement in selectivity of the bio-mimetic catalyst; and international joint research (basic analysis of the catalyst mechanism). As a result, technological problems in developing the mimetic catalyst were put into order, and guidelines and measures for specific catalyst designing are being proposed. Furthermore, a way was opened for international joint research with the complex synthesis research group in CNRS in France, and progress into the step of demonstrating and discussing the feasibility thereof is now ready. (NEDO)

  16. The detection and phylogenetic analysis of the alkane 1-monooxygenase gene of members of the genus Rhodococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táncsics, András; Benedek, Tibor; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Veres, Péter G; Farkas, Milán; Máthé, István; Márialigeti, Károly; Kukolya, József; Lányi, Szabolcs; Kriszt, Balázs

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring and anthropogenic petroleum hydrocarbons are potential carbon sources for many bacteria. The AlkB-related alkane hydroxylases, which are integral membrane non-heme iron enzymes, play a key role in the microbial degradation of many of these hydrocarbons. Several members of the genus Rhodococcus are well-known alkane degraders and are known to harbor multiple alkB genes encoding for different alkane 1-monooxygenases. In the present study, 48 Rhodococcus strains, representing 35 species of the genus, were investigated to find out whether there was a dominant type of alkB gene widespread among species of the genus that could be used as a phylogenetic marker. Phylogenetic analysis of rhodococcal alkB gene sequences indicated that a certain type of alkB gene was present in almost every member of the genus Rhodococcus. These alkB genes were common in a unique nucleotide sequence stretch absent from other types of rhodococcal alkB genes that encoded a conserved amino acid motif: WLG(I/V/L)D(G/D)GL. The sequence identity of the targeted alkB gene in Rhodococcus ranged from 78.5 to 99.2% and showed higher nucleotide sequence variation at the inter-species level compared to the 16S rRNA gene (93.9-99.8%). The results indicated that the alkB gene type investigated might be applicable for: (i) differentiating closely related Rhodococcus species, (ii) properly assigning environmental isolates to existing Rhodococcus species, and finally (iii) assessing whether a new Rhodococcus isolate represents a novel species of the genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Methylocapsa aurea sp. nov., a facultative methanotroph possessing a particulate methane monooxygenase, and emended description of the genus Methylocapsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunfield, Peter F; Belova, Svetlana E; Vorob'ev, Alexey V; Cornish, Sabrina L; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2010-11-01

    An aerobic, methanotrophic bacterium, designated KYG(T), was isolated from a forest soil in Germany. Cells of strain KYG(T) were Gram-negative, non-motile, slightly curved rods that multiplied by binary fission and produced yellow colonies. The cells contained intracellular granules of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate at each cell pole, a particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and stacks of intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs) packed in parallel along one side of the cell envelope. Strain KYG(T) grew at pH 5.2-7.2 and 2-33 °C and could fix atmospheric nitrogen under reduced oxygen tension. The major cellular fatty acid was C(18 : 1)ω7c (81.5 %) and the DNA G+C content was 61.4 mol%. Strain KYG(T) belonged to the family Beijerinckiaceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria and was most closely related to the obligate methanotroph Methylocapsa acidiphila B2(T) (98.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 84.7 % pmoA sequence similarity). Unlike Methylocapsa acidiphila B2(T), which grows only on methane and methanol, strain KYG(T) was able to grow facultatively on acetate. Facultative acetate utilization is a characteristic of the methanotrophs of the genus Methylocella, but the genus Methylocella does not produce pMMO or ICMs. Strain KYG(T) differed from Methylocapsa acidiphila B2(T) on the basis of substrate utilization pattern, pigmentation, pH range, cell ultrastructure and efficiency of dinitrogen fixation. Therefore, we propose a novel species, Methylocapsa aurea sp. nov., to accommodate this bacterium. The type strain is KYG(T) (=DSM 22158(T) =VKM B-2544(T)).

  18. A cytochrome P450 monooxygenase commonly used for negative selection in transgenic plants causes growth anomalies by disrupting brassinosteroid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivasagam Sindhu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases form a large superfamily of enzymes that catalyze diverse reactions. The P450SU1 gene from the soil bacteria Streptomyces griseolus encodes CYP105A1 which acts on various substrates including sulfonylurea herbicides, vitamin D, coumarins, and based on the work presented here, brassinosteroids. P450SU1 is used as a negative-selection marker in plants because CYP105A1 converts the relatively benign sulfonyl urea pro-herbicide R7402 into a highly phytotoxic product. Consistent with its use for negative selection, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated with P450SU1 situated between recognition sequences for FLP recombinase from yeast to select for recombinase-mediated excision. However, unexpected and prominent developmental aberrations resembling those described for mutants defective in brassinosteroid signaling were observed in many of the lines. Results The phenotypes of the most affected lines included severe stunting, leaf curling, darkened leaves characteristic of anthocyanin accumulation, delayed transition to flowering, low pollen and seed yields, and delayed senescence. Phenotype severity correlated with P450SU1 transcript abundance, but not with transcript abundance of other experimental genes, strongly implicating CYP105A1 as responsible for the defects. Germination and seedling growth of transgenic and control lines in the presence and absence of 24-epibrassinolide indicated that CYP105A1 disrupts brassinosteroid signaling, most likely by inactivating brassinosteroids. Conclusions Despite prior use of this gene as a genetic tool, deleterious growth in the absence of R7402 has not been elaborated. We show that this gene can cause aberrant growth by disrupting brassinosteroid signaling and affecting homeostasis.

  19. A STRUCTURAL OVERVIEW OF GH61 PROTEINS – FUNGAL CELLULOSE DEGRADING POLYSACCHARIDE MONOOXYGENASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Lo Leggio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a spurt of activities in the elucidation of the molecular function of a class of proteins with great potential in biomass degradation. GH61 proteins are of fungal origin and were originally classified in family 61 of the glycoside hydrolases. From the beginning they were strongly suspected to be involved in cellulose degradation because of their expression profiles, despite very low detectable endoglucanase activities. A major breakthrough came from structure determination of the first members, establishing the presence of a divalent metal binding site and a similarity to bacterial proteins involved in chitin degradation. A second breakthrough came from the identification of cellulase boosting activity dependent on the integrity of the metal binding site. Finally very recently GH61 proteins were demonstrated to oxidatively cleave crystalline cellulose in a Cu and reductant dependant manner. This mini-review in particular focuses on the contribution that structure elucidation has made in the understanding of GH61 molecular function and reviews the currently known structures and the challenges remaining ahead for exploiting this new class of enzymes to the full.

  20. A structural overview of GH61 proteins – fungal cellulose degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Lo Leggio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a spurt of activities in the elucidation of the molecular function of a class of proteins with great potential in biomass degradation. GH61 proteins are of fungal origin and were originally classified in family 61 of the glycoside hydrolases. From the beginning they were strongly suspected to be involved in cellulose degradation because of their expression profiles, despite very low detectable endoglucanase activities. A major breakthrough came from structure determination of the first members, establishing the presence of a divalent metal binding site and a similarity to bacterial proteins involved in chitin degradation. A second breakthrough came from the identification of cellulase boosting activity dependent on the integrity of the metal binding site. Finally very recently GH61 proteins were demonstrated to oxidatively cleave crystalline cellulose in a Cu and reductant dependant manner. This mini-review in particular focuses on the contribution that structure elucidation has made in the understanding of GH61 molecular function and reviews the currently known structures and the challenges remaining ahead for exploiting this new class of enzymes to the full.

  1. First molecular modeling report on novel arylpyrimidine kynurenine monooxygenase inhibitors through multi-QSAR analysis against Huntington's disease: A proposal to chemists!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Jha, Tarun; Gayen, Shovanlal

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutation of huntingtin protein (mHtt) leading to neuronal cell death. The mHtt induced toxicity can be rescued by inhibiting the kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) enzyme. Therefore, KMO is a promising drug target to address the neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's diseases. Fiftysix arylpyrimidine KMO inhibitors are structurally explored through regression and classification based multi-QSAR modeling, pharmacophore mapping and molecular docking approaches. Moreover, ten new compounds are proposed and validated through the modeling that may be effective in accelerating Huntington's disease drug discovery efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Induction of monooxygenases and incorporation of radioactivity from 2-14C-lysine into hepatic microsomes of phenobarbital-treated rats fed a diet deficient in lysine, methionine, threonine and vitamine A, C and E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmagambetov, T.Zh.; Amirov, B.B.; Kuanysheva, T.K.; Sharmanov, T.Sh.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of diet on induction of monooxygenases and distribution of label from 2- 14 C-lysine in fractions of liver homogenate, muscle homogenate and blood of male rats treated with phenobarbital (80 mg/rg, three days) was studied. 2- 14 C-lysine was injected intraperitoneally 24 h before the first injection of phenobarbital. It was demonstrated that monooxygenase induction, increase of relative liver weight and incorporation of label from 2- 14 C-lysine into fractions of liver homogenate in phenobarbital-treated rats were more pronounced as compared with the similarly trated rats that were fed a balanced diet. The possibility of mobilization of deficient essential components to liver from other organs and tissues for maintenance of monooxygenase induction is discussed

  3. Induction of monooxygenases and incorporation of radioactivity from 2-14C-lysine into hepatic microsomes of phenobarbital-treated rats fed a diet deficient in lysine, methionine, threonine and vitamines A, C, E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmagambetov, T.Zh.; Amirov, B.B.; Kuanysheva, T.G.; Sharmanov, T.Sh.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of diet on induction of monooxygenases and distribution of radioactivity from 2- 14 C-lysine in fractions of liver homogenate, muscle homogenate and blood of male rats treated with phenobarbital was studied. 2- 14 C-lysin was injected intraperitoneally 24 h before the first injection of phenobarbital. It was demonstrated that monooxygenase induction, increase of relative liver weight and incorporation of radioactivity from 2- 14 C-lysine into fractions of liver homogenate in phenobarbital-treated rats fed diet deficient in lysine, methionine, threonine and vitamins A, C, E were more pronounced as compared with the similarly treated rats which were fed a balanced diet. The possibility of mobilization of deficient essencial components to liver from other organs and tissues for maintenance of monooxygenase induction iis discussed

  4. Molecular cloning of a peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, F; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    conserved regions of PHM, we have now cloned a PHM from the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica showing 42% amino acid sequence identity with rat PHM. Among the conserved (identical) amino acid residues are five histidine and one methionine residue, which bind two Cu2+ atoms that are essential for PHM...... activity. No cDNA coding for PAL could be identified, suggesting that sea anemone PAL is coded for by a gene that is different from the sea anemone PHM gene, a situation similar to the one found in insects. This is the first report on the molecular cloning of a cnidarian PHM. Udgivelsesdato: 1997-Dec-18...

  5. Elucidation of cladofulvin biosynthesis reveals a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase required for anthraquinone dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Scott; Mesarich, Carl H; Saccomanno, Benedetta; Vaisberg, Abraham; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Cox, Russell; Collemare, Jérôme

    2016-06-21

    Anthraquinones are a large family of secondary metabolites (SMs) that are extensively studied for their diverse biological activities. These activities are determined by functional group decorations and the formation of dimers from anthraquinone monomers. Despite their numerous medicinal qualities, very few anthraquinone biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated so far, including the enzymatic dimerization steps. In this study, we report the elucidation of the biosynthesis of cladofulvin, an asymmetrical homodimer of nataloe-emodin produced by the fungus Cladosporium fulvum A gene cluster of 10 genes controls cladofulvin biosynthesis, which begins with the production of atrochrysone carboxylic acid by the polyketide synthase ClaG and the β-lactamase ClaF. This compound is decarboxylated by ClaH to yield emodin, which is then converted to chrysophanol hydroquinone by the reductase ClaC and the dehydratase ClaB. We show that the predicted cytochrome P450 ClaM catalyzes the dimerization of nataloe-emodin to cladofulvin. Remarkably, such dimerization dramatically increases nataloe-emodin cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines. These findings shed light on the enzymatic mechanisms involved in anthraquinone dimerization. Future characterization of the ClaM enzyme should facilitate engineering the biosynthesis of novel, potent, dimeric anthraquinones and structurally related compound families.

  6. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence....... In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important...

  7. Magnetic resonance studies on the copper site of dopamine β-monooxygenase in the presence of cyanide and azide anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, A.; Tanaka, H.; Kawazura, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to elucidate the coordination state of water molecules in the Cu(II) site of dopamine [(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine] β-monooxygenase, measurements of the paramagnetic 1 H nuclear magnetic relaxation rate of solvent water in the enzyme solution containing cyanide or azide as an exogenous ligand were carried out to obtain the values of intrinsic paramagnetic relaxation rate decrements R/sub p/ 1 and R/sub p/ 2 for the ligand-enzyme 1:1 and 2:1 complexes, respectively. R/sub p/ 1 (percent) values were 53 (pH 5.5) and 52 (pH 7.0) for cyanide and 38 (pH 5.5) and 32 (pH 7.0) for azide, while R/sub p/ 2 (percent) values were 98 (pH 5.5) and 96 (pH 7.0) for azide. Although no R/sub p/ 2 values for cyanide were obtained because of its reducing power at the Cu(II) site, the R/sub p/ 1 and R/sub p/ 2 values obtained above prove that the Cu(II) center has two coordinated water molecules that are exchangeable for exogenous ligands at either pH. Supporting evidence was provided by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) titration, in which the enzyme solution containing cyanide-enzyme (1:1) complex in an equal proportion to uncomplexed enzyme gave an observed paramagnetic relaxation rate decrement, R/sub p/, of 23%. Another characteristic of the R/sub p/ 1 and R/sub p/ 2 values was their invariability with respect to pH, indicating that the three-dimensional structure of the Cu(II) site is pH-invariant within the range examined. Binding constants of ligand to enzyme K/sub b/ 1 and K/sub b/ 2 for 1:1 and 2:1 complex formation, respectively, were also determined through an analysis of the R/sub p/ values; it was found that K/sub b/ 1 was larger than K/sub b/ 2 irrespective of pH. On the basis of these results, together with the axial-symmetric EPR parameters of the 1:1 complexes, a possible coordination geometry of the two water molecules in the Cu(II) site of the enzyme is suggested

  8. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehlohonolo Benedict Qhanya

    Full Text Available Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s, heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence. Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea, Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala, revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea to 14 (M. osmundae. Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  9. Sequencing and characterization of mixed function monooxygenase genes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 of Mink (Mustela vison) to facilitate study of dioxin-like compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaowei; Moore, Jeremy N.; Newsted, John L.; Hecker, Markus; Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Jones, Paul D.; Bursian, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity in mink, cDNAs encoding for CYP1A1 and the CYP1A2 mixed function monooxygenases were cloned and characterized. In addition, the effects of selected dibenzofurans on the expression of these genes and the presence of their respective proteins (P4501A) were investigated, and then correlated with the catalytic activities of these proteins as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) activities. The predicted protein sequences for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 comprise 517 and 512 amino acid residues, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis of the mink CYP1As with protein sequences of other mammals revealed high sequence homology with sea otter, seals and the dog, with amino acid identities ranging from 89 to 95% for CYP1A1 and 81 to 93% for CYP1A2. Since exposure to both 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) and 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) resulted in dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 mRNA, CYP1A2 mRNA and CYP1A protein levels an underlying AhR-mediated mechanism is suggested. The up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA in liver was more consistent to the sum adipose TEQ concentration than to the liver TEQ concentration in minks treated with TCDF or PeCDF. The result suggested that the hepatic-sequestered fraction of PeCDF was biologically inactive to the induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2

  10. Development and Application of a New Microarray- Based Method for High-Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia

    single defined polysaccharides, mixtures of defined polysaccharides and complex biomass extracts. Furthermore, the capacity of the technique to analyse endo- and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases has been confirmed...... will contribute to both the discovery of CAZymes and the empirical characterisation of their activities, thus aiding their industrial utilisation and biological understanding...

  11. Nitrogen transformations as inferred from the activities of key enzymes in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; Narvekar, P.V.; Alagarsamy, R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    within the sigma theta range 26.6-26.8, which corresponds to the Persian Gulf Watermass (PGW). Depth profiles of nitrate reductase (NaR), nitrite reductase (NiR) and ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) activities were compared with those of O2, NO3(super...

  12. Optimized formation of detergent micelles of beta-carotene and retinal production using recombinant human beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2008-01-01

    The formation of beta-carotene detergent micelles and their conversion into retinal by recombinant human beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase was optimized under aqueous conditions. Toluene was the most hydrophobic among the organic solvents tested; thus, it was used to dissolve beta-carotene, which is a hydrophobic compound. Tween 80 was selected as the detergent because it supported the highest level of retinal production among all of the detergents tested. The maximum production of retinal was achieved in detergent micelles containing 200 mg/L of beta-carotene and 2.4% (w/v) Tween 80. Under these conditions, the recombinant enzyme produced 97 mg/L of retinal after 16 h with a conversion yield of 48.5% (w/w). The amount of retinal produced, which is the highest ever reported, is a result of the ability of our system to dissolve large amounts of beta-carotene.

  13. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430 2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene expression

  14. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Meeghan A., E-mail: meeghan.oconnor@boehringer-ingelheim.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States); Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877-0368 (United States); Koza-Taylor, Petra, E-mail: petra.h.koza-taylor@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Campion, Sarah N., E-mail: sarah.campion@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleksunes, Lauren M., E-mail: aleksunes@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gu, Xinsheng, E-mail: xinsheng.gu@uconn.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States); Enayetallah, Ahmed E., E-mail: ahmed.enayetallah@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Lawton, Michael P., E-mail: michael.lawton@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Manautou, José E., E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  15. Cytochrome P450 genes from the aquatic midge Chironomus tentans: Atrazine-induced up-regulation of CtCYP6EX3 contributing to oxidative activation of chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    The open reading frames of 19 cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) genes were sequenced from Chironomus tentans, a commonly used freshwater invertebrate model. Functional analysis of CtCYP6EX3 confirmed its atrazine-induced oxidative activation for chlorpyrifos by using a nanoparticle-based RNA inter...

  16. Determination of the human cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzing the enantioselective oxidation of 2,2',3,5',6-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95) and 2,2',3,4,4',5',6-heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB 183).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Haruna; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kajimura, Keiji; Nakano, Takeshi

    2017-10-17

    2,2',3,5',6-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 95) and 2,2',3,4,4',5',6-heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB 183) possess axial chirality and form the aS and aR enantiomers. The enantiomers of these congeners have been reported to accumulate in the human body enantioselectively via unknown mechanisms. In this study, we determined the cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase responsible for the enantioselective oxidization of PCB 95 and PCB 183, using a recombinant human CYP monooxygenase. We evaluated 13 CYP monooxygenases, namely CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, CYP2J2, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F2, and aromatase (CYP19), and revealed that CYP2A6 preferably oxidizes aS-PCB 95 enantioselectively; however, it did not oxidize PCB 183. The enantiomer composition was elevated from 0.5 (racemate) to 0.54. In addition, following incubation with CYP2A6, the enantiomer fraction (EF) of PCB 95 demonstrated a time-dependent increase.

  17. Physical map location of the multicopy genes coding for ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, R; Yamagata, A; Kato, J; Kuroda, A; Ikeda, T; Takiguchi, N; Ohtake, H

    2000-02-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of PmeI digests of the Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 chromosome produced four bands ranging from 1,200 to 480 kb in size. Southern hybridizations suggested that a 487-kb PmeI fragment contained two copies of the amoCAB genes, coding for ammonia monooxygenase (designated amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2)), and three copies of the hao gene, coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3)). In this DNA fragment, amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2) were about 390 kb apart, while hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3) were separated by at least about 100 kb from each other. Interestingly, hao(1) and hao(2) were located relatively close to amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2), respectively. DNA sequence analysis revealed that hao(1) and hao(2) shared 160 identical nucleotides immediately upstream of each translation initiation codon. However, hao(3) showed only 30% nucleotide identity in the 160-bp corresponding region.

  18. Crystallization of a fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase expressed from glycoengineered Pichia pastoris for X-ray and neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O; Dell, William B.; Swartz, Paul D.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Meilleur, Flora (ORNL); (NCSU)

    2017-01-19

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are carbohydrate-disrupting enzymes secreted by bacteria and fungi that break glycosidic bondsviaan oxidative mechanism. Fungal LPMOs typically act on cellulose and can enhance the efficiency of cellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes that release soluble sugars for bioethanol production or other industrial uses. The enzyme PMO-2 fromNeurospora crassa(NcPMO-2) was heterologously expressed inPichia pastoristo facilitate crystallographic studies of the fungal LPMO mechanism. Diffraction resolution and crystal morphology were improved by expressingNcPMO-2 from a glycoengineered strain ofP. pastorisand by the use of crystal seeding methods, respectively. These improvements resulted in high-resolution (1.20 Å) X-ray diffraction data collection at 100 K and the production of a largeNcPMO-2 crystal suitable for room-temperature neutron diffraction data collection to 2.12 Å resolution.

  19. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  20. MPN- and Real-Time-Based PCR Methods for the Quantification of Alkane Monooxygenase Homologous Genes (alkB) in Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Schulz, Stephan; Schloter, Michael

    Hydrocarbons are major contaminants of soil ecosystems as a result of uncontrolled oil spills and wastes disposal into the environment. Ecological risk assessment and remediation of affected sites is often constrained due to lack of suitable prognostic and diagnostic tools that provide information of abiotic-biotic interactions occurring between contaminants and biological targets. Therefore, the identification and quantification of genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons may play a crucial role for evaluating the natural attenuation potential of contaminated sites and the development of successful bioremediation strategies. Besides other gene clusters, the alk operon has been identified as a major player for alkane degradation in different soils. An oxygenase gene (alkB) codes for the initial step of the degradation of aliphatic alkanes under aerobic conditions. In this work, we present an MPN- and a real-time PCR method for the quantification of the bacterial gene alkB (coding for rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase) in environmental samples. Both approaches enable a rapid culture-independent screening of the alkB gene in the environment, which can be used to assess the intrinsic natural attenuation potential of a site or to follow up the on-going progress of bioremediation assays.

  1. Metabolism of methoxychlor by the P450-monooxygenase CYP6G1 involved in insecticide resistance of Drosophila melanogaster after expression in cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussen, Nicole; Schuphan, Ingolf; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2010-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP6G1 of Drosophila melanogaster was heterologously expressed in a cell suspension culture of Nicotiana tabacum. This in vitro system was used to study the capability of CYP6G1 to metabolize the insecticide methoxychlor (=1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane, 1) against the background of endogenous enzymes of the corresponding non-transgenic culture. The Cyp6g1-transgenic cell culture metabolized 96% of applied methoxychlor (45.8 microg per assay) within 24 h by demethylation and hydroxylation mainly to trishydroxy and catechol methoxychlor (16 and 17%, resp.). About 34% of the metabolism and the distinct formation of trishydroxy and catechol methoxychlor were due to foreign enzyme CYP6G1. Furthermore, methoxychlor metabolism was inhibited by 43% after simultaneous addition of piperonyl butoxide (458 microg), whereas inhibition in the non-transgenic culture amounted to 92%. Additionally, the rate of glycosylation was reduced in both cultures. These results were supported by the inhibition of the metabolism of the insecticide imidacloprid (6; 20 microg, 24 h) in the Cyp6g1-transgenic culture by 82% in the presence of piperonyl butoxide (200 microg). Due to CYP6G1 being responsible for imidacloprid resistance of Drosophila or being involved in DDT resistance, it is likely that CYP6G1 conveys resistance to methoxychlor (1). Furthermore, treating Drosophila with piperonyl butoxide could weaken the observed resistance phenomena.

  2. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulates GTP-cyclohydrolase I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin levels in primary dopaminergic neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, M; Suppmann, S; Meyer, M

    2002-01-01

    in tetrahydrobiopterin levels whereas tyrosine 3-monooxygenase activity was not altered. Actinomycin D, asan inhibitor of de novo biosynthesis, abolished any GDNF-mediated up-regulation of GTPCH I activity. However, GTPCH I mRNA levels in primary dopaminergic neurones were not altered by GDNF treatment, suggesting...... by triggering activation of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), a key enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. GDNF stimulation of primary dopaminergic neurones expressing both tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and GTPCH I resulted in a dose-dependent doubling of GTPCH I activity, and a concomitant increase...... that the mode of action for that up-regulation is not directly connected to the regulation of GTPCH I transcription. We conclude that GDNF, in addition to its action in structural differentiation, also promotes differentiation regarding expression and enzymatic activity of a crucial component...

  3. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eCappelletti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD – coding for soluble di-iron monooxgenases (SDIMOs involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation – were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria Bertani broth. The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane and/or liquid (n-hexane short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step.

  4. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J.; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD—coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation—were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria–Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  5. A conserved degron containing an amphipathic helix regulates the cholesterol-mediated turnover of human squalene monooxygenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Ngee Kiat; Howe, Vicky; Jatana, Nidhi; Thukral, Lipi; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-12-08

    Cholesterol biosynthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is tightly controlled by multiple mechanisms to regulate cellular cholesterol levels. Squalene monooxygenase (SM) is the second rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and is regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally. SM undergoes cholesterol-dependent proteasomal degradation when cholesterol is in excess. The first 100 amino acids of SM (designated SM N100) are necessary for this degradative process and represent the shortest cholesterol-regulated degron identified to date. However, the fundamental intrinsic characteristics of this degron remain unknown. In this study, we performed a series of deletions, point mutations, and domain swaps to identify a 12-residue region (residues Gln-62-Leu-73), required for SM cholesterol-mediated turnover. Molecular dynamics and circular dichroism revealed an amphipathic helix within this 12-residue region. Moreover, 70% of the variation in cholesterol regulation was dependent on the hydrophobicity of this region. Of note, the earliest known Doa10 yeast degron, Deg1, also contains an amphipathic helix and exhibits 42% amino acid similarity with SM N100. Mutating SM residues Phe-35/Ser-37/Leu-65/Ile-69 into alanine, based on the key residues in Deg1, blunted SM cholesterol-mediated turnover. Taken together, our results support a model whereby the amphipathic helix in SM N100 attaches reversibly to the ER membrane depending on cholesterol levels; with excess, the helix is ejected and unravels, exposing a hydrophobic patch, which then serves as a degradation signal. Our findings shed new light on the regulation of a key cholesterol synthesis enzyme, highlighting the conservation of critical degron features from yeast to humans. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Induction of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase in rat brain following a systemic inflammatory challenge: a role for IFN-gamma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Thomas J; Starr, Neasa; O'Sullivan, Joan B; Harkin, Andrew

    2008-08-15

    Inflammation-mediated dysregulation of the kynurenine pathway has been implicated as a contributor to a number of major brain disorders. Consequently, we examined the impact of a systemic inflammatory challenge on kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in rat brain. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression was induced in cortex and hippocampus following systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Whilst IDO expression was paralleled by increased circulating interferon (IFN)-gamma concentrations, IFN-gamma expression in the brain was only modestly altered following LPS administration. In contrast, induction of IDO was associated with increased central tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 expression. Similarly, in cultured glial cells LPS-induced IDO expression was accompanied by increased TNF-alpha and IL-6 expression, whereas IFN-gamma was not detectable. These findings indicate that IFN-gamma is not required for LPS-induced IDO expression in brain. A robust increase in kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) expression was observed in rat brain 24h post LPS, without any change in kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II) expression. In addition, we report that constitutive expression of KAT II is approximately 8-fold higher than KMO in cortex and 20-fold higher in hippocampus. Similarly, in glial cells constitutive expression of KAT II was approximately 16-fold higher than KMO, and expression of KMO but not KAT II was induced by LPS. These data are the first to demonstrate that a systemic inflammatory challenge stimulates KMO expression in brain; a situation that is likely to favour kynurenine metabolism in a neurotoxic direction. However, our observation that expression of KAT II is much higher than KMO in rat brain is likely to counteract potential neurotoxicity that could arise from KMO induction following an acute inflammation.

  7. Use of isotope effects to characterize intermediates in mechanism-based inactivation of dopamine beta-monooxygenase by beta-chlorophenethylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossard, M.J.; Klinman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A mechanism for beta-chlorophenethylamine inhibition of dopamine beta-monooxygenase has been postulated in which bound alpha-aminoacetophenone is generated followed by an intramolecular redox reaction to yield a ketone-derived radical cation as the inhibitory species. Based on the assumption that the ketone radical is the inhibitory intermediate, an analogous system was predicted and verified. In the present study, the role of alpha-aminoacetophenone as the proposed intermediate in the inactivation by beta-chlorophenethylamine was examined in greater detail. From the interdependence of tyramine and alpha-aminoacetophenone concentrations, ketone inactivation is concluded to occur at the substrate site as opposed to potential binding at the reductant-binding site. Using beta-[2-1H]- and beta-[2-2H]chlorophenethylamine, the magnitude of the deuterium isotope effect on inactivation under second-order conditions has been found to be identical to that observed under catalytic turnover, D(kappa inact/Ki) = D(kappa cat/Km) = 6-7. By contrast, the isotope effect on inactivation under conditions of substrate and oxygen saturation, D kappa inact = 2, is 3-fold smaller than that seen on catalytic turnover, D kappa cat = 6. This reduced isotope effect for inactivation is attributed to a normal isotope effect on substrate hydroxylation followed by an inverse isotope effect on the partitioning of the enol of alpha-aminoacetophenone between oxidation to a radical cation versus protonation to regenerate ketone. These findings are unusual in that two isotopically sensitive steps are present in the inactivation pathway whereas only one is observable in turnover

  8. CYP79 P450 monooxygenases in gymnosperms: CYP79A118 is associated with the formation of taxiphyllin in Taxus baccata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Katrin; Jia, Qidong; Huber, Meret; Handrick, Vinzenz; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Nelson, David R; Chen, Feng; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Köllner, Tobias G

    2017-09-01

    Conifers contain P450 enzymes from the CYP79 family that are involved in cyanogenic glycoside biosynthesis. Cyanogenic glycosides are secondary plant compounds that are widespread in the plant kingdom. Their biosynthesis starts with the conversion of aromatic or aliphatic amino acids into their respective aldoximes, catalysed by N-hydroxylating cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) of the CYP79 family. While CYP79s are well known in angiosperms, their occurrence in gymnosperms and other plant divisions containing cyanogenic glycoside-producing plants has not been reported so far. We screened the transcriptomes of 72 conifer species to identify putative CYP79 genes in this plant division. From the seven resulting full-length genes, CYP79A118 from European yew (Taxus baccata) was chosen for further characterization. Recombinant CYP79A118 produced in yeast was able to convert L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, and L-phenylalanine into p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime, indole-3-acetaldoxime, and phenylacetaldoxime, respectively. However, the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and transient expression of CYP79A118 in Nicotiana benthamiana indicate that L-tyrosine is the preferred substrate in vivo. Consistent with these findings, taxiphyllin, which is derived from L-tyrosine, was the only cyanogenic glycoside found in the different organs of T. baccata. Taxiphyllin showed highest accumulation in leaves and twigs, moderate accumulation in roots, and only trace accumulation in seeds and the aril. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CYP79A118 was expressed in plant organs rich in taxiphyllin. Our data show that CYP79s represent an ancient family of plant P450s that evolved prior to the separation of gymnosperms and angiosperms. CYP79A118 from T. baccata has typical CYP79 properties and its substrate specificity and spatial gene expression pattern suggest that the enzyme contributes to the formation of taxiphyllin in this plant species.

  9. The peptidylglycine-α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) gene rs13175330 A>G polymorphism is associated with hypertension in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Chae, Jey Sook; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2017-11-21

    Peptidylglycine-α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) may play a role in the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), which is a hormone involved in the maintenance of blood pressure (BP). The objective of the present study was to determine whether PAM is a novel candidate gene for hypertension (HTN). A total of 2153 Korean participants with normotension and HTN were included. Genotype data were obtained using the Korean Chip. The rs13175330 polymorphism of the PAM gene was selected from the ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most strongly associated with BP. The presence of the G allele of the PAM rs13175330 A>G SNP was associated with a higher risk of HTN after adjustments for age, sex, BMI, smoking, and drinking [OR 1.607 (95% CI 1.220-2.116), p = 0.001]. The rs13175330 G allele carriers in the HTN group treated without antihypertensive therapy (HTN w/o therapy) had significantly higher systolic and diastolic BP than the AA carriers, whereas the G allele carriers in the HTN group treated with antihypertensive therapy (HTN w/ therapy) showed significantly higher diastolic BP. Furthermore, rs13175330 G allele carriers in the HTN w/o therapy group had significantly increased levels of insulin, insulin resistance, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and significantly decreased LDL-cholesterol levels and LDL particle sizes compared to the AA carriers. These results suggest that the PAM rs13175330 A>G SNP is a novel candidate gene for HTN in the Korean population. Additionally, the PAM rs13175330 G allele might be associated with insulin resistance and LDL atherogenicity in patients with HTN.

  10. Transaldolase inhibition impairs mitochondrial respiration and induces a starvation-like longevity response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bennett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction can increase oxidative stress and extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homeostatic mechanisms exist to cope with disruptions to mitochondrial function that promote cellular health and organismal longevity. Previously, we determined that decreased expression of the cytosolic pentose phosphate pathway (PPP enzyme transaldolase activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt and extends lifespan. Here we report that transaldolase (tald-1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in vivo, as evidenced by altered mitochondrial morphology, decreased respiration, and increased cellular H2O2 levels. Lifespan extension from knockdown of tald-1 is associated with an oxidative stress response involving p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK MAPKs and a starvation-like response regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB homolog HLH-30. The latter response promotes autophagy and increases expression of the flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (fmo-2. We conclude that cytosolic redox established through the PPP is a key regulator of mitochondrial function and defines a new mechanism for mitochondrial regulation of longevity.

  11. Transient trimethylaminuria related to menstruation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makiko; Cashman, John R; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Background Trimethylaminuria, or fish odor syndrome, includes a transient or mild malodor caused by an excessive amount of malodorous trimethylamine as a result of body secretions. Herein, we describe data to support the proposal that menses can be an additional factor causing transient trimethylaminuria in self-reported subjects suffering from malodor and even in healthy women harboring functionally active flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). Methods FMO3 metabolic capacity (conversion of trimethylamine to trimethylamine N-oxide) was defined as the urinary ratio of trimethylamine N-oxide to total trimethylamine. Results Self-reported Case (A) that was homozygous for inactive Arg500stop FMO3, showed decreased metabolic capacity of FMO3 (i.e., ~10% the unaffected metabolic capacity) during 120 days of observation. For Case (B) that was homozygous for common [Glu158Lys; Glu308Gly] FMO3 polymorphisms, metabolic capacity of FMO3 was almost ~90%, except for a few days surrounding menstruation showing 90%) metabolic capacity, however, on days around menstruation the FMO3 metabolic capacity was decreased to ~60–70%. Conclusion Together, these results indicate that abnormal FMO3 capacity is caused by menstruation particularly in the presence, in homozygous form, of mild genetic variants such as [Glu158Lys; Glu308Gly] that cause a reduced FMO3 function. PMID:17257434

  12. Metagenomic identification of a novel salt tolerance gene from the human gut microbiome which encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn P Culligan

    Full Text Available The human gut microbiome consists of at least 3 million non-redundant genes, 150 times that of the core human genome. Herein, we report the identification and characterisation of a novel stress tolerance gene from the human gut metagenome. The locus, assigned brpA, encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene monooxygenase. Cloning and heterologous expression of brpA in Escherichia coli confers a significant salt tolerance phenotype. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of exogenous β-carotene, cell pellets adopt a red/orange pigmentation indicating the incorporation of carotenoids in the cell membrane.

  13. Upregulation of neuronal kynurenine 3-monooxygenase mediates depression-like behavior in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumet, Geoffroy; Zhou, Wenjun; Dantzer, Robert; Edralin, Jules D; Huo, XiaoJiao; Budac, David P; O'Connor, Jason C; Lee, Anna W; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2017-11-01

    Pain and depression often co-occur, but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we used the spared nerve injury (SNI) model in mice to induce both neuropathic pain and depression-like behavior. We investigated whether brain interleukin (IL)-1 signaling and activity of kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme for metabolism of kynurenine into the neurotoxic NMDA receptor agonist quinolinic acid, are necessary for comorbid neuropathic pain and depression-like behavior. SNI mice showed increased expression levels of Il1b and Kmo mRNA in the contralateral side of the brain. The SNI-induced increase of Kmo mRNA was associated with increased KMO protein and elevated quinolinic acid and reduced kynurenic acid in the contralateral hippocampus. The increase in KMO-protein in response to SNI mostly took place in hippocampal NeuN-positive neurons rather than microglia. Inhibition of brain IL-1 signaling by intracerebroventricular administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist after SNI prevented the increase in Kmo mRNA and depression-like behavior measured by forced swim test. However, inhibition of brain IL-1 signaling has no effect on mechanical allodynia. In addition, intracerebroventricular administration of the KMO inhibitor Ro 61-8048 abrogated depression-like behavior without affecting mechanical allodynia after SNI. We show for the first time that the development of depression-like behavior in the SNI model requires brain IL-1 signaling and activation of neuronal KMO, while pain is independent of this pathway. Inhibition of KMO may represent a promising target for treating depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A new versatile microarray-based method for high-throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Schückel, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatic tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate degrading and modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases...... that the technique can be used to analyse both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified un-characterised enzymes...

  15. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase Gene Associated With Nicotine Initiation and Addiction: Analysis of Novel Regulatory Features at 5′ and 3′-Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. Aziz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is widespread behavior in Qatar and worldwide and is considered one of the major preventable causes of ill health and death. Nicotine is part of tobacco smoke that causes numerous health risks and is incredibly addictive; it binds to the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR in the brain. Recent studies showed α7nAChR involvement in the initiation and addiction of smoking. Kynurenic acid (KA, a significant tryptophan metabolite, is an antagonist of α7nAChR. Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme encoded by KMO enhances the KA levels. Modulating KMO gene expression could be a useful tactic for the treatment of tobacco initiation and dependence. Since KMO regulation is still poorly understood, we aimed to investigate the 5′ and 3′-regulatory factors of KMO gene to advance our knowledge to modulate KMO gene expression. In this study, bioinformatics methods were used to identify the regulatory sequences associated with expression of KMO. The displayed differential expression of KMO mRNA in the same tissue and different tissues suggested the specific usage of the KMO multiple alternative promoters. Eleven KMO alternative promoters identified at 5′-regulatory region contain TATA-Box, lack CpG Island (CGI and showed dinucleotide base-stacking energy values specific to transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. The structural features of regulatory sequences can influence the transcription process and cell type-specific expression. The uncharacterized LOC105373233 locus coding for non-coding RNA (ncRNA located on the reverse strand in a convergent manner at the 3′-side of KMO locus. The two genes likely expressed by a promoter that lacks TATA-Box harbor CGI and two TFBSs linked to the bidirectional transcription, the NRF1, and ZNF14 motifs. We identified two types of microRNA (miR in the uncharacterized LOC105373233 ncRNA, which are like hsa-miR-5096 and hsa-miR-1285-3p and can target the miR recognition

  16. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  17. Biosynthetic machinery of ionophore polyether lasalocid: enzymatic construction of polyether skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Atsushi; Oguri, Hiroki; Watanabe, Kenji; Oikawa, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    Diversity of natural polycyclic polyethers originated from very simple yet versatile strategy consisting of epoxidation of linear polyene followed by epoxide opening cascade. To understand two-step enzymatic transformations at molecular basis, a flavin containing monooxygenase (EPX) Lsd18 and an epoxide hydrolase (EH) Lsd19 were selected as model enzymes for extensive investigation on substrate specificity, catalytic mechanism, cofactor requirement and crystal structure. This pioneering study on prototypical lasalocid EPX and EH provides insight into detailed mechanism of ionophore polyether assembly machinery and clarified remaining issues for polyether biosynthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequential enzymatic epoxidation involved in polyether lasalocid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Atsushi; Shimaya, Mayu; Suzuki, Gaku; Migita, Akira; Shinde, Sandip S; Sato, Kyohei; Watanabe, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohiro; Oguri, Hiroki; Oikawa, Hideaki

    2012-05-02

    Enantioselective epoxidation followed by regioselective epoxide opening reaction are the key processes in construction of the polyether skeleton. Recent genetic analysis of ionophore polyether biosynthetic gene clusters suggested that flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) could be involved in the oxidation steps. In vivo and in vitro analyses of Lsd18, an FMO involved in the biosynthesis of polyether lasalocid, using simple olefin or truncated diene of a putative substrate as substrate mimics demonstrated that enantioselective epoxidation affords natural type mono- or bis-epoxide in a stepwise manner. These findings allow us to figure out enzymatic polyether construction in lasalocid biosynthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Kelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  20. Diversity of the active methanotrophic community in acidic peatlands as assessed by mRNA and SIP-PLFA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; McNamara, Niall P; Chamberlain, Paul M; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-02-01

    The active methanotroph community was investigated for the first time in heather (Calluna)-covered moorlands and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered UK peatlands. Direct extraction of mRNA from these soils facilitated detection of expression of methane monooxygenase genes, which revealed that particulate methane monooxygenase and not soluble methane monooxygenase was probably responsible for CH(4) oxidation in situ, because only pmoA transcripts (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase) were readily detectable. Differences in methanotroph community structures were observed between the Calluna-covered moorland and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gully habitats. As with many other Sphagnum-covered peatlands, the Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gullies were dominated by Methylocystis. Methylocella and Methylocapsa-related species were also present. Methylobacter-related species were found as demonstrated by the use of a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. In Calluna-covered moorlands, in addition to Methylocella and Methylocystis, a unique group of peat-associated type I methanotrophs (Gammaproteobacteria) and a group of uncultivated type II methanotrophs (Alphaproteobacteria) were also found. The pmoA sequences of the latter were only distantly related to Methylocapsa and also to the RA-14 group of methanotrophs, which are believed to be involved in oxidation of atmospheric concentrations of CH(4). Soil samples were also labelled with (13)CH(4), and subsequent analysis of the (13)C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that 16:1 omega 7, 18:1 omega 7 and 18:1 omega 9 were the major labelled PLFAs. The presence of (13)C-labelled 18:1 omega 9, which was not a major PLFA of any extant methanotrophs, indicated the presence of novel methanotrophs in this peatland.

  1. Identification of active methanotrophs in a landfill cover soil through detection of expression of 16S rRNA and functional genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; Cébron, Aurélie; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-11-01

    Active methanotrophs in a landfill soil were revealed by detecting the 16S rRNA of methanotrophs and the mRNA transcripts of key genes involved in methane oxidation. New 16S rRNA primers targeting type I and type II methanotrophs were designed and optimized for analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Direct extraction of RNA from soil enabled the analysis of the expression of the functional genes: mmoX, pmoA and mxaF, which encode subunits of soluble methane monooxygenase, particulate methane monooxygenase and methanol dehydrogenase respectively. The 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for type I methanotrophs detected Methylomonas, Methylosarcina and Methylobacter sequences from both soil DNA and cDNA which was generated from RNA extracted directly from the landfill cover soil. The 16S rRNA primers for type II methanotrophs detected primarily Methylocella and some Methylocystis 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of mRNA recovered from the soil indicated that Methylobacter, Methylosarcina, Methylomonas, Methylocystis and Methylocella were actively expressing genes involved in methane and methanol oxidation. Transcripts of pmoA but not mmoX were readily detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), indicating that particulate methane monooxygenase may be largely responsible for methane oxidation in situ.

  2. Cloning of genes related to aliphatic glucosinolate metabolism and the mechanism of sulforaphane accumulation in broccoli sprouts under jasmonic acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liping; Yang, Runqiang; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 79F1 (CYP79F1), cytochrome P450 83A1 (CYP83A1), UDP-glucosyltransferase 74B1 (UGT74B1), sulfotransferase 18 (ST5b) and flavin-containing monooxygenase GS-OX1 (FMOGS - OX1 ) are important enzymes in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In this study, their full-length cDNA in broccoli was firstly cloned, then the mechanism of sulforaphane accumulation under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment was investigated. The full-length cDNA of CYP79F1, CYP83A1, UGT74B1, ST5b and FMOGS - OX1 comprised 1980, 1652, 1592, 1378 and 1623 bp respectively. The increase in aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation in broccoli sprouts treated with JA was associated with elevated expression of genes in the aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. Application of 100 µmol L(-1) JA increased myrosinase (MYR) activity but did not affect epithiospecifier protein (ESP) activity in broccoli sprouts, which was supported by the expression of MYR and ESP. Sulforaphane formation in 7-day-old sprouts treated with 100 µmol L(-1) JA was 3.36 and 1.30 times that in the control and 300 µmol L(-1) JA treatment respectively. JA enhanced the accumulation of aliphatic glucosinolates in broccoli sprouts via up-regulation of related gene expression. Broccoli sprouts treated with 100 µmol L(-1) JA showed higher sulforphane formation than those treated with 300 µmol L(-1) JA owing to the higher glucoraphanin content and myrosinase activity under 100 µmol L(-1) JA treatment. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes by plant-associated bacteria in the rhizosphere and endosphere of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) grown in diesel contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andria, Verania; Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Sessitsch, Angela

    2009-01-01

    For phytoremediation of organic contaminants, plants have to host an efficiently degrading microflora. To assess the role of endophytes in alkane degradation, Italian ryegrass was grown in sterile soil with 0, 1 or 2% diesel and inoculated either with an alkane degrading bacterial strain originally derived from the rhizosphere of Italian ryegrass or with an endophyte. We studied plant colonization of these strains as well as the abundance and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes in the rhizosphere, shoot and root interior. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior. - Bacterial alkane degradation genes are expressed in the rhizosphere and in the plant interior.

  4. Expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes by plant-associated bacteria in the rhizosphere and endosphere of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) grown in diesel contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andria, Verania [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Unit of Environmental Resources and Technologies, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.a [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2009-12-15

    For phytoremediation of organic contaminants, plants have to host an efficiently degrading microflora. To assess the role of endophytes in alkane degradation, Italian ryegrass was grown in sterile soil with 0, 1 or 2% diesel and inoculated either with an alkane degrading bacterial strain originally derived from the rhizosphere of Italian ryegrass or with an endophyte. We studied plant colonization of these strains as well as the abundance and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes in the rhizosphere, shoot and root interior. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior. - Bacterial alkane degradation genes are expressed in the rhizosphere and in the plant interior.

  5. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and other oxidative enzymes are abundantly secreted by Aspergillus nidulans grown on different starches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    of Aspergillus nidulans grown on cereal starches from wheat and high-amylose (HA) maize, as well as legume starch from pea for 5 days. Aspergillus nidulans grew efficiently on cereal starches, whereas growth on pea starch was poor. The secretomes at days 3-5 were starch-type dependent as also reflected...... by amylolytic activity measurements. Nearly half of the 312 proteins in the secretomes were carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), mostly glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and oxidative auxiliary activities (AAs). The abundance of the GH13 α-amylase (AmyB) decreased with time, as opposed to other starch...

  6. The Role of Biotransformation and Oxidative Stress in 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) Induced Nephrotoxicity in Isolated Renal Cortical Cells from Male Fischer 344 Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Christopher R.; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Debbie; Ward, Dakota; Ball, John; Anestis, Dianne; Valentovic, Monica; Rankin, Gary O.

    2016-01-01

    Among the mono- and dichloroanilines, 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of renal biotransformation in 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity is unknown. The current study was designed to determine the in vitro nephrotoxic potential of 3,5-DCA in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) obtained from male Fischer 344 rats, and the role of renal bioactivation and oxidative stress in 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity. IRCC (~4 million cells/ml) from male rats were exposed to 3,5-DCA (0-1.0 mM) for up to 120 min. In IRCC, 3,5-DCA was cytotoxic at 1.0 mM by 60 min as evidenced by the increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but 120 min was required for 3,5-DCA 0.5 mM to increase LDH release. In subsequent studies, IRCC were exposed to a pretreatment (antioxidant or enzyme inhibitor) prior to exposure to 3,5-DCA (1.0 mM) for 90 min. Cytotoxicity induced by 3,5-DCA was attenuated by pretreatment with inhibitors of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; methimazole, N-octylamine), cytochrome P450 (CYP; piperonyl butoxide, metyrapone), or peroxidase (indomethacin, mercaptosuccinate) enzymes. Use of more selective CYP inhibitors suggested that the CYP 2C family contributed to 3,5-DCA bioactivation. Antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, pyruvate) also attenuated 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity, but oxidized glutathione levels and the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratios were not increased. These results indicate that 3,5-DCA may be activated via several renal enzyme systems to toxic metabolites, and that free radicals, but not oxidative stress, contribute to 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26808022

  7. What is the contribution of human FMO3 in the N-oxygenation of selected therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagmann, Lea; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-09-06

    Little is known about the role of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) in the metabolism of xenobiotics. FMO3 is the isoform in adult human liver with the highest impact on drug metabolism. The aim of the presented study was to elucidate the contribution of human FMO3 to the N-oxygenation of selected therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse (DOAs). Its contribution to the in vivo hepatic net clearance of the N-oxygenation products was calculated by application of an extended relative activity factor (RAF) approach to differentiate from contribution of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms. FMO3 and CYP substrates were identified using pooled human liver microsomes after heat inactivation and chemical inhibition, or single enzyme incubations. Kinetic parameters were subsequently determined using recombinant human enzymes and mass spectrometric analysis via authentic reference standards or simple peak areas of the products divided by those of the internal standard. FMO3 was identified as enzyme mainly responsible for the formation of N,N-diallyltryptamine N-oxide and methamphetamine hydroxylamine (>80% contribution for both). A contribution of 50 and 30% was calculated for the formation of N,N-dimethyltryptamine N-oxide and methoxypiperamide N-oxide, respectively. However, FMO3 contributed with less than 5% to the formation of 3-bromomethcathinone hydroxylamine, amitriptyline N-oxide, and clozapine N-oxide. There was no significant difference in the contributions when using calibrations with reference metabolite standards or peak area ratio calculations. The successful application of a modified RAF approach including FMO3 proved the importance of FMO3 in the N-oxygenation of DOAs in human metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. One-electron oxidation of diclofenac by human cytochrome P450s as a potential bioactivation mechanism for formation of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Jan Simon; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2014-01-25

    Reactive metabolites have been suggested to play a role in the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity observed with diclofenac (DF). By structural identification of the GSH conjugates formed after P450-catalyzed bioactivation of DF, it was shown that three types of reactive intermediates were formed: p-benzoquinone imines, o-imine methide and arene-oxide. Recently, detection of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac (DDF-SG), resulting from chlorine substitution, suggested the existence of a fourth type of P450-dependent reactive intermediate whose inactivation by GSH is completely dependent on presence of glutathione S-transferase. In this study, fourteen recombinant cytochrome P450s and three flavin-containing monooxygenases were tested for their ability to produce oxidative DF metabolites and their corresponding GSH conjugates. Concerning the hydroxymetabolites and their GSH conjugates, results were consistent with previous studies. Unexpectedly, all tested recombinant P450s were able to form DDF-SG to almost similar extent. DDF-SG formation was found to be partially independent of NADPH and even occurred by heat-inactivated P450. However, product formation was fully dependent on both GSH and glutathione-S-transferase P1-1. DDF-SG formation was also observed in reactions with horseradish peroxidase in absence of hydrogen peroxide. Because DDF-SG was not formed by free iron, it appears that DF can be bioactivated by iron in hemeproteins. This was confirmed by DDF-SG formation by other hemeproteins such as hemoglobin. As a mechanism, we propose that DF is subject to heme-dependent one-electron oxidation. The resulting nitrogen radical cation, which might activate the chlorines of DF, then undergoes a GST-catalyzed nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction in which the chlorine atom of the DF moiety is replaced by GSH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens: substrate-like inhibitors both stimulate flavin reduction and stabilize the flavin-peroxo intermediate yet result in the production of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier-Reabe, Karen R; Phillips, Robert S; Moran, Graham R

    2008-11-25

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a flavin-dependent hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of l-kynurenine (l-Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3OHKyn) in the pathway for tryptophan catabolism. KMO inhibition has been widely suggested as an early treatment for stroke and other neurological disorders that involve ischemia. We have investigated the reductive and the oxidative half-reactions of a stable form of KMO from Pseudomonas fluorescens (KMO). The binding of l-Kyn by the enzyme is relatively slow and involves at least two reversible steps. The rate constant for reduction of the flavin cofactor by NADPH increases by a factor of approximately 2.5 x 10(3) when l-Kyn is bound. The rate of reduction of the KMO.l-Kyn complex is 160 s(-1), and the K(d) for the NADPH complex is 200 microM with charge-transfer absorption bands for the KMO(RED).l-Kyn.NADP(+) complex accumulating after reduction. The reduction potential of KMO is -188 mV and is unresponsive to the addition of l-Kyn or other inhibitory ligands. KMO inhibitors whose structures are reminiscent of l-Kyn such as m-nitrobenzoylalanine and benzoylalanine also stimulate reduction of flavin by NADPH and, in the presence of dioxygen, result in the stoichiometric liberation of hydrogen peroxide, diminishing the perceived therapeutic potential of inhibitors of this type. In the presence of the native substrate, the oxidative half-reaction exhibits triphasic absorbance data. A spectrum consistent with that of a peroxyflavin species accumulates and then decays to yield the oxidized enzyme. This species then undergoes minor spectral changes that, based on flavin difference spectra defined in the presence of 3OHKyn, can be correlated with product release. The oxidative half-reaction observed in the presence of saturating benzoylalanine or m-nitrobenzoylalanine also shows the accumulation of a peroxyflavin species that then decays to yield hydrogen peroxide without hydroxylation.

  10. Engineered chloroplast dsRNA silences cytochrome p450 monooxygenase, V-ATPase and chitin synthase genes in the insect gut and disrupts Helicoverpa zea larval development and pupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Li, Lebin; Zhang, Xianlong; Daniell, Henry

    2015-04-01

    In the past two decades, chloroplast genetic engineering has been advanced to achieve high-level protein accumulation but not for down-regulation of targeted genes. Therefore, in this report, lepidopteran chitin synthase (Chi), cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) and V-ATPase dsRNAs were expressed via the chloroplast genome to study RNA interference (RNAi) of target genes in intended hosts. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy and site-specific integration of transgene cassettes into the chloroplast genomes. Northern blots and real-time qRT-PCR confirmed abundant processed and unprocessed dsRNA transcripts (up to 3.45 million copies of P450 dsRNAs/μg total RNA); the abundance of cleaved dsRNA was greater than the endogenous psbA transcript. Feeding of leaves expressing P450, Chi and V-ATPase dsRNA decreased transcription of the targeted gene to almost undetectable levels in the insect midgut, likely after further processing of dsRNA in their gut. Consequently, the net weight of larvae, growth and pupation rates were significantly reduced by chloroplast-derived dsRNAs. Taken together, successful expression of dsRNAs via the chloroplast genome for the first time opens the door to study RNA interference/processing within plastids. Most importantly, dsRNA expressed in chloroplasts can be utilized for gene inactivation to confer desired agronomic traits or for various biomedical applications, including down-regulation of dysfunctional genes in cancer or autoimmune disorders, after oral delivery of dsRNA bioencapsulated within plant cells. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification and optimization of tyrosine hydroxylase activity in Mucuna pruriens DC. var. utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Singh, Satendra

    2010-05-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase, an iron containing tetrahydrobiopterin dependent monooxygenase (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase; EC 1.14.16.2), catalyzes the rate-limiting step in which L: -dopa is formed from the substrate L-tyrosine. L-Dopa concentration and activity of L-tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme were measured in roots, stem, leaves, pods, and immature seeds of Mucuna pruriens. Immature seeds contained maximum L-dopa content and mature leaves possessed maximum catalytic activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Tyrosine hydroxylase from leaf homogenate was characterized as a 55 kDa protein by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot analysis with monoclonal mouse IgG2a tyrosine hydroxylase antibody. The conditions for maximum tyrosine hydroxylase activity from the leaf extract were optimized with respect to temperature, pH, cofactor 6-MPH(4), and divalent metal ions. The tyrosine hydroxylase from leaf extract possessed a K (m) value of 808.63 microM for L-tyrosine at 37 degrees C and pH 6.0. The activity of the enzyme was slightly inhibited at 2,000 microM L-tyrosine. Higher concentrations of the cofactor 6-MPH(4), however, completely inhibited the synthesis of L-dopa. Tyrosine hydroxylase converted specific monophenols such as L-tyrosine (808.63 microM) and tyramine (K (m) 1.1 mM) to diphenols L-dopa and dopamine, respectively. Fe(II) activated the enzyme while higher concentration of other divalent metals reduced its activity. For the first time, tyrosine hydroxylase from M. pruriens is being reported in this study.

  12. Multiple intracellular signaling pathways orchestrate adipocytic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh Hafez Ali, Dalia; Abuelreich, Sarah; Alkeraishan, Nora

    2018-01-01

    during adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) and identified 2,589 up-regulated and 2,583 down-regulated mRNA transcripts. Pathway analysis on the up-regulated gene list untraveled enrichment in multiple signaling pathways including insulin receptor......Bone marrow adipocyte formation plays a role in bone homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. However, the transcriptional landscape and signaling pathways associated with adipocyte lineage commitment and maturation are not fully delineated. Thus, we performed global gene expression profiling...... signaling, focal Adhesion, metapathway biotransformation, a number of metabolic pathways e.g. selenium metabolism, Benzo(a)pyrene metabolism, fatty acid, triacylglycerol, ketone body metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, and catalytic cycle of mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOs). On the other hand...

  13. Elaboration of Copper-Oxygen Mediated C–H Activation Chemistry in Consideration of Future Fuel and Feedstock Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    To contribute solutions for current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of C-H bond cleavage chemistry, e.g., selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  14. CYP2J2 and CYP2C19 are the major enzymes responsible for metabolism of albendazole and fenbendazole in human liver microsomes and recombinant P450 assay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhexue; Lee, Doohyun; Joo, Jeongmin; Shin, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Wonku; Oh, Sangtaek; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Su-Jun; Yea, Sung Su; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Taeho; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2013-11-01

    Albendazole and fenbendazole are broad-spectrum anthelmintics that undergo extensive metabolism to form hydroxyl and sulfoxide metabolites. Although CYP3A and flavin-containing monooxygenase have been implicated in sulfoxide metabolite formation, the enzymes responsible for hydroxyl metabolite formation have not been identified. In this study, we used human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450s (P450s) to characterize the enzymes involved in the formation of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole from albendazole and fenbendazole, respectively. Of the 10 recombinant P450s, CYP2J2 and/or CYP2C19 was the predominant enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of albendazole and fenbendazole. Albendazole hydroxylation to hydroxyalbendazole is primarily mediated by CYP2J2 (0.34 μl/min/pmol P450, which is a rate 3.9- and 8.1-fold higher than the rates for CYP2C19 and CYP2E1, respectively), whereas CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 contributed to the formation of hydroxyfenbendazole from fenbendazole (2.68 and 1.94 μl/min/pmol P450 for CYP2C19 and CYP2J2, respectively, which are rates 11.7- and 8.4-fold higher than the rate for CYP2D6). Correlation analysis between the known P450 enzyme activities and the rate of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole formation in samples from 14 human liver microsomes showed that albendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2J2 activity and fenbendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 activities. These findings were supported by a P450 isoform-selective inhibition study in human liver microsomes. In conclusion, our data for the first time suggest that albendazole hydroxylation is primarily catalyzed by CYP2J2, whereas fenbendazole hydroxylation is preferentially catalyzed by CYP2C19 and CYP2J2. The present data will be useful in understanding the pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of albendazole and fenbendazole in vivo.

  15. Oxidation of C18 Hydroxy-Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids to Epoxide or Ketone by Catalase-Related Hemoproteins Activated with Iodosylbenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teder, Tarvi; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2017-07-01

    Small catalase-related hemoproteins with a facility to react with fatty acid hydroperoxides were examined for their potential mono-oxygenase activity when activated using iodosylbenzene. The proteins tested were a Fusarium graminearum 41 kD catalase hemoprotein (Fg-cat, gene FGSG_02217), a Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfl01 catalase (37.5 kD, accession number WP_011333788.1), and a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis 33 kD catalase (gene MAP-2744c). 13-Hydroxy-octadecenoic acids (which are normally unreactive) were selected as substrates because these enzymes react specifically with the corresponding 13S-hydroperoxides (Pakhomova et al. 18:2559-2568, 5; Teder et al. 1862:706-715, 14). In the presence of iodosylbenzene Fg-cat converted 13S-hydroxy-fatty acids to two products: the 15,16-double bond of 13S-hydroxy α-linolenic acid was oxidized stereospecifically to the 15S,16R-cis-epoxide or the 13-hydroxyl was oxidized to the 13-ketone. Products were identified by UV, HPLC, LC-MS, NMR and by comparison with authentic standards prepared for this study. The Pfl01-cat displayed similar activity. MAP-2744c oxidized 13S-hydroxy-linoleic acid to the 13-ketone, and epoxidized the double bonds to form the 9,10-epoxy-13-hydroxy, 11,12-epoxy-13-hydroxy, and 9,10-epoxy-13-keto derivatives; equivalent transformations occurred with 9S-hydroxy-linoleic acid as substrate. In parallel incubations in the presence of iodosylbenzene, human catalase displayed no activity towards 13S-hydroxy-linoleic acid, as expected from the highly restricted access to its active site. The results indicated that with suitable transformation to Compound I, monooxygenase activity can be demonstrated by these catalase-related hemoproteins with tyrosine as the proximal heme ligand.

  16. Relation among cytochrome P450, AH-active PCB congeners and dioxin equivalents in pipping black-crowned night-heron embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Hatfield, J.S.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Tillitt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Pipping black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos were collected from a relatively uncontaminated site (next to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA) and three polluted sites (Cat Island, Green Bay, Lake Michigan, WI; Bair Island, San Francisco Bay, CA; West Marin Island, San Francisco Bay, CA). Hepatic cytochrome P-450-associated monooxygenases and cytochrome P-450 proteins, induced up to 85-fold relative to the reference site, were associated with concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 11 PCB congeners that are presumed to express toxicity through the arylhydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. Multiple regression revealed that up to 86% of the variation of cytochrome P450 measurements was accounted for by variation in the concentration of these PCB congeners. Toxic equivalents (TEQs) of sample extracts, predicted mathematically (summed product of PCB congener concentrations and toxic equivalency factors), and dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs), derived by bioassay (ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity of treated H4IIE rat hepatoma cells), were greatest in Cat Island samples. Cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases and cytochrome P450 proteins were related to TEQs and TCDD-EQs; adjusted r-2 often exceeded 0.5 for the relation among mathematically predicted TEQs and cytochrome P450 measurements. These data extend previous observations in heron embryos of an association between P450 and total PCB burdens to include Ah-active PCB congeners, and presumably other compounds, which interact similarly with the Ah receptor. Benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase, ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase, and cytochrome P450 1A appear to be the most reliable measures of exposure to Ah-active PCB congeners in black-crowned night-heron embryos. These findings provide further evidence that cytochrome P450-associated parameters have considerable value as a biomarker for assessing environmental contamination of wetlands.

  17. Hydroxylamine addition impact to Nitrosomonas europaea activity in the presence of monochloramine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In drinking water, monochloramine may promote ammonia–oxidizing bacteria (AOB) growth because of concurrent ammonia presence. AOB use (i) ammonia monooxygenase for biological ammonia oxidation to hydroxylamine and (ii) hydroxylamine oxidoreductase for hydroxylamine oxidation to ...

  18. Boosting LPMO-driven lignocellulose degradation by polyphenol oxidase-activated lignin building blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Mutte, Sumanth Kumar; Westphal, Adrie H.; Koetsier, Martijn J.; Hinz, Sandra W.A.; Visser, Jaap; Vincken, Jean Paul; Weijers, Dolf; Berkel, Van Willem J.H.; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many fungi boost the deconstruction of lignocellulosic plant biomass via oxidation using lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). The application of LPMOs is expected to contribute to ecologically friendly conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals. Moreover, applications of

  19. Identification of active methylotroph populations in an acidic forest soil by stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radajewski, Stefan; Webster, Gordon; Reay, David S; Morris, Samantha A; Ineson, Philip; Nedwell, David B; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2002-08-01

    Stable-isotope probing (SIP) is a culture-independent technique that enables the isolation of DNA from micro-organisms that are actively involved in a specific metabolic process. In this study, SIP was used to characterize the active methylotroph populations in forest soil (pH 3.5) microcosms that were exposed to (13)CH(3)OH or (13)CH(4). Distinct (13)C-labelled DNA ((13)C-DNA) fractions were resolved from total community DNA by CsCl density-gradient centrifugation. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from the (13)C-DNA revealed that bacteria related to the genera Methylocella, Methylocapsa, Methylocystis and Rhodoblastus had assimilated the (13)C-labelled substrates, which suggested that moderately acidophilic methylotroph populations were active in the microcosms. Enrichments targeted towards the active proteobacterial CH(3)OH utilizers were successful, although none of these bacteria were isolated into pure culture. A parallel analysis of genes encoding the key enzymes methanol dehydrogenase and particulate methane monooxygenase reflected the 16S rDNA analysis, but unexpectedly revealed sequences related to the ammonia monooxygenase of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) from the beta-subclass of the PROTEOBACTERIA: Analysis of AOB-selective 16S rDNA amplification products identified Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira sequences in the (13)C-DNA fractions, suggesting certain AOB assimilated a significant proportion of (13)CO(2), possibly through a close physical and/or nutritional association with the active methylotrophs. Other sequences retrieved from the (13)C-DNA were related to the 16S rDNA sequences of members of the Acidobacterium division, the beta-Proteobacteria and the order Cytophagales, which implicated these bacteria in the assimilation of reduced one-carbon compounds or in the assimilation of the by-products of methylotrophic carbon metabolism. Results from the (13)CH(3)OH and (13)CH(4) SIP experiments thus provide a rational basis for further

  20. Insecticidal effects of Moroccan plant extracts on development, energy reserves and enzymatic activities of Plodia interpunctella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouayard, N.; Rharrabe, K.; Ghailani, N. N.; Jbilou, R.; Castanera, P.; Ortego, F.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of methanol extracts of ten plant species used in traditional medicine in Morocco (Peganum harmala, Ajuga iva, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula stoechas, Lavandula dentata, Cistus ladanifer, Cistus salviaefolius, Cistus monspeliensis, Centaurium erythraea and Launaea arborescens) on Plodia interpunctella Hubner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae. Firstly, we studied the effects of the ingestion of these extracts at 500 ppm on post-embryonic development parameters. Most plant extracts provoked a notable decrease of larval weight 8 days after treatment (up to 33% weight loss with C. erythraea) and caused significant alterations on pupation (ranging from 5% to 85%) and adult emergence (below 2.5% with R. officinalis, C. erythraea and A. iva). The plant extracts that showed strongest effects on post-embryonic development were selected to test their effects on the following physiological parameters: larval reserve substances (at 500 ppm); and midgut activities of hydrolytic and detoxification enzymes (at 500, 750 and 1000 ppm). All treatments provoked a significant reduction of protein and carbon hydrate larval contents, the inhibition of proteases and {alpha}-amylase activities in a dose depended manner, and the induction of glutathione S-transferase and esterase (using MtB as substrate) activities, whereas the activity of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and esterases (using 1-NA as substrate) increase or decrease depending on the extract concentration and the plant analyzed. (Author) 65 refs.

  1. Insecticidal effects of Moroccan plant extracts on development, energy reserves and enzymatic activities of Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bouayad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effects of methanol extracts of ten plant species used in traditional medicine in Morocco (Peganum harmala, Ajuga iva, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula stoechas, Lavandula dentata, Cistus ladanifer, Cistus salviaefolius, Cistus monspeliensis, Centaurium erythraea and Launaea arborescens on Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae larvae. Firstly, we studied the effects of the ingestion of these extracts at 500 ppm on post-embryonic development parameters. Most plant extracts provoked a notable decrease of larval weight 8 days after treatment (up to 33% weight loss with C. erythraea and caused significant alterations on pupation (ranging from 5% to 85% and adult emergence (below 2.5% with R. officinalis, C. erythraea and A. iva. The plant extracts that showed strongest effects on post-embryonic development were selected to test their effects on the following physiological parameters: larval reserve substances (at 500 ppm; and midgut activities of hydrolytic and detoxification enzymes (at 500, 750 and 1000 ppm. All treatments provoked a significant reduction of protein and carbon hydrate larval contents, the inhibition of proteases and α-amylase activities in a dose depended manner, and the induction of glutathione S-transferase and esterase (using MtB as substrate activities, whereas the activity of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and esterases (using 1-NA as substrate increase or decrease depending on the extract concentration and the plant analyzed.

  2. Apparent expression of flower colours and internal variation of enzyme activities in some typical phenotypes of dyer's saffron cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Saito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical screening of four Carthamus pigments in phenotypically different cultivars of dyer's saffron was carried out by means of chromatographic techniques. The pigment composition in the floral part correlated well with the flower colour, supporting these components as idoneous chemotaxonomic markers. Among seven cultivars examined, three were orange-yellow and contained carthamin (red and precarthamin, safflor yellow A and safflor yellow B (orange-yellow (type 0. There were bright-yellow and also had the above four pigments (type Y. The seventh cultivar was ivory-white and produced no quinoidal chalcones in the florets (type W. Relative activities of three different enzymes were examined in soluble protein extracts from etiolated seedlings of the garden varieties. Monophenol monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1 and peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7. were distributed over all cultivars tested. The relative level of the enzyme activities could be ordered as follows: type 0, type W and type Y. The activity of a carthamin-synthesizing enzyme was found in the protein extracts from all garden forms examined. Its activity was most prominent in type O. The activity level in type W was inferior to that of type O. The catalytic intensity in type Y was found to even lower. The results were discussed as to the composition of the phenotypic markers and the distribution of the enzyme activities in three different garden forms of dyer's saffron cultivars.

  3. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo

    2015-07-21

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  4. Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in alkaline soil from a Chinese coal mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Chen, Yin; Abell, Guy; Jiang, Hao; Bodrossy, Levente; Zhao, Jiangang; Murrell, J Colin; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-11-01

    Culture-independent molecular biological techniques, including 16S rRNA gene and functional gene clone libraries and microarray analyses using pmoA (encoding a key subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase), were applied to investigate the methanotroph community structure in alkaline soil from a Chinese coal mine. This environment contained a high diversity of methanotrophs, including the type II methanotrophs Methylosinus/Methylocystis, type I methanotrophs related to Methylobacter/Methylosoma and Methylococcus, and a number of as yet uncultivated methanotrophs. In order to identify the metabolically active methane-oxidizing bacteria from this alkaline environment, DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) experiments using (13)CH(4) were carried out. This showed that both type I and type II methanotrophs were active, together with methanotrophs related to Methylocella, which had previously been found only in acidic environments. Methylotrophs, including Methylopila and Hyphomicrobium, were also detected in soil DNA and after DNA-SIP experiments. DNA sequence information on the most abundant, active methanotrophs in this alkaline soil will facilitate the design of oligonucleotide probes to monitor enrichment cultures when isolating key alkaliphilic methanotrophs from such environments.

  5. Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in alkaline soil from a Chinese coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bing; Chen, Yin; Abell, Guy; Jiang, Hao; Bodrossy, Levente; Zhao, Jiangang; Murrell, J. Colin; Xing, Xin-Hui [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-11-15

    Culture-independent molecular biological techniques, including 16S rRNA gene and functional gene clone libraries and microarray analyses using pmoA (encoding a key subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase), were applied to investigate the methanotroph community structure in alkaline soil from a Chinese coal mine. This environment contained a high diversity of methanotrophs, including the type II methanotrophs Methylosinus/Methylocystis, type I methanotrophs related to Methylobacter/Methylosoma and Methylococcus, and a number of as yet uncultivated methanotrophs. In order to identify the metabolically active methane-oxidizing bacteria from this alkaline environment, DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) experiments using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} were carried out. This showed that both type I and type II methanotrophs were active, together with methanotrophs related to Methylocella, which had previously been found only in acidic environments. Methylotrophs, including Methylopila and Hyphomicrobium, were also detected in soil DNA and after DNA-SIP experiments. DNA sequence information on the most abundant, active methanotrophs in this alkaline soil will facilitate the design of oligonucleotide probes to monitor enrichment cultures when isolating key alkaliphilic methanotrophs from such environments.

  6. Active methanotrophs in two contrasting North American peatland ecosystems revealed using DNA-SIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Smemo, Kurt A; Yavitt, Joseph B; Basiliko, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    The active methanotroph community was investigated in two contrasting North American peatlands, a nutrient-rich sedge fen and nutrient-poor Sphagnum bog using in vitro incubations and (13)C-DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP) to measure methane (CH(4)) oxidation rates and label active microbes followed by fingerprinting and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA and methane monooxygenase (pmoA and mmoX) genes. Rates of CH(4) oxidation were slightly, but significantly, faster in the bog and methanotrophs belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and were similar to other methanotrophs of the genera Methylocystis, Methylosinus, and Methylocapsa or Methylocella detected in, or isolated from, European bogs. The fen had a greater phylogenetic diversity of organisms that had assimilated (13)C, including methanotrophs from both the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria classes and other potentially non-methanotrophic organisms that were similar to bacteria detected in a UK and Finnish fen. Based on similarities between bacteria in our sites and those in Europe, including Russia, we conclude that site physicochemical characteristics rather than biogeography controlled the phylogenetic diversity of active methanotrophs and that differences in phylogenetic diversity between the bog and fen did not relate to measured CH(4) oxidation rates. A single crenarchaeon in the bog site appeared to be assimilating (13)C in 16S rDNA; however, its phylogenetic similarity to other CO(2)-utilizing archaea probably indicates that this organism is not directly involved in CH(4) oxidation in peat.

  7. Neuropeptide FF increases M2 activation and self-renewal of adipose tissue macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Syed F. Hassnain; Hoang, Anh Cuong; Ampem, Grace; Azegrouz, Hind; Balogh, Lajos; Thuróczy, Julianna; Gerling, Ivan C.; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Jong-Seok; Martinez-Ibañez, Juncal; Real, José T.; Paschke, Stephan; Quillet, Raphaëlle; Ayachi, Safia; Simonin, Frédéric; Schneider, E. Marion; Brinkman, Jacqueline A.; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2017-01-01

    The quantity and activation state of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) impact the development of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Appetite-controlling hormones play key roles in obesity; however, our understanding of their effects on ATMs is limited. Here, we have shown that human and mouse ATMs express NPFFR2, a receptor for the appetite-reducing neuropeptide FF (NPFF), and that NPFFR2 expression is upregulated by IL-4, an M2-polarizing cytokine. Plasma levels of NPFF decreased in obese patients and high-fat diet–fed mice and increased following caloric restriction. NPFF promoted M2 activation and increased the proliferation of murine and human ATMs. Both M2 activation and increased ATM proliferation were abolished in NPFFR2-deficient ATMs. Mechanistically, the effects of NPFF involved the suppression of E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF128 expression, resulting in enhanced stability of phosphorylated STAT6 and increased transcription of the M2 macrophage–associated genes IL-4 receptor α (Il4ra), arginase 1 (Arg1), IL-10 (Il10), and alkylglycerol monooxygenase (Agmo). NPFF induced ATM proliferation concomitantly with the increase in N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) expression and suppressed the transcription of Ifi200 cell-cycle inhibitor family members and MAF bZIP transcription factor B (Mafb), a negative regulator of macrophage proliferation. NPFF thus plays an important role in supporting healthy adipose tissue via the maintenance of metabolically beneficial ATMs. PMID:28581443

  8. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  9. Fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases: new players in the decomposition of cellulose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žifčáková, Lucia; Baldrian, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2012), s. 481-489 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0751; GA MŠk(CZ) OC10064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Decomposition * Glycosyl hydrolase family 61 * Cellulose Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.854, year: 2012

  10. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frommhagen, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Current developments aim at the effective enzymatic degradation of plant biomass polysaccharides into fermentable monosaccharides for biofuels and biochemicals. Recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially

  11. Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases - Studies of Fungal Secretomes and Enzyme Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura

    degradation, were also identified upstream the LPMO genes, providing evidence for a co-regulatory mechanism of LPMOs and amylolytic hydrolases. The second part of the PhD thesis is focused on understanding the binding properties of LPMOs to starch and starch mimic substrate. It was shown that LPMOs possessing...... to different substrates at the protein level. It could help to design better enzyme cocktails that increase efficiency of biomass degradation. The secretomes of A. nidulans revealed differences in growth and secretion of enzymes, depending on the type and properties of starches. A common characteristic...... conversion as they produce a wide diversity of degrading enzymes. In the first part of this PhD thesis, the secretomes of the well-known fungus Aspergillus nidulans grown on cereal and legume starches were analyzed. Secretomics is a powerful tool to unravel secretion patterns of fungi and their response...

  12. Recovery of microbial diversity and activity during bioremediation following chemical oxidation of diesel contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Nora B; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Lasso, Daniel Hidalgo; van der Zaan, Bas; van Gaans, Pauline; Maphosa, Farai; Smidt, Hauke; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-03-01

    To improve the coupling of in situ chemical oxidation and in situ bioremediation, a systematic analysis was performed of the effect of chemical oxidation with Fenton's reagent, modified Fenton's reagent, permanganate, or persulfate, on microbial diversity and activity during 8 weeks of incubation in two diesel-contaminated soils (peat and fill). Chemical oxidant and soil type affected the microbial community diversity and biodegradation activity; however, this was only observed following treatment with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent, and in the biotic control without oxidation. Differences in the highest overall removal efficiencies of 69 % for peat (biotic control) and 59 % for fill (Fenton's reagent) were partially explained by changes in contaminant soil properties upon oxidation. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene abundances indicated that oxidation with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent negatively affected microbial abundance. However, regeneration occurred, and final relative alkB abundances were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in chemically treated microcosms than in the biotic control. 16S rRNA gene fragment fingerprinting with DGGE and prominent band sequencing illuminated microbial community composition and diversity differences between treatments and identified a variety of phylotypes within Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. Understanding microbial community dynamics during coupled chemical oxidation and bioremediation is integral to improved biphasic field application.

  13. Advances in directed monooxygenase evolution : from diversity generation and flow cytometry screening to tailor-made monooxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Ruff, Anna Joëlle

    2012-01-01

    Directed Evolution became a powerful tool for proteins engineers to generate tailor-made biocatalyst. Directed protein evolution consist of the following three consecutive main steps, which are performed in iterative cycles; Step 1 the gene diversity generation, Step 2 the screening for improved variants and Step 3 the isolation of gene encoding for improved proteins. In this thesis, methodological advancements in the two key steps of the directed evolution, the diversity generation (SeSaM me...

  14. Effect of radio-detoxified endotoxin on the liver microsomal drug metabolizing enzyme system in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertok, L.; Szeberenyi, S.

    1983-01-01

    E. coli endotoxin (LPS) depresses the hepatic microsomal mono-oxygenase activity. Radio-detoxified LPS (TOLERIN: 60 Co irradiated endotoxin preparation) decreases this biotransforming activity to a smaller extent. Phenobarbital, an inducer of this mono-oxygenase system, failed to induce in LPS-treated animals. In radio-detoxified LPS-treated rats, phenobarbital induced the mono-oxygenase and almost fully restored the biotransformation

  15. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3 Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Min Woo

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3 and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3. Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3 expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1 into n-heptanoic acid (5 and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4. This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  16. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  17. HMGB1 mediates depressive behavior induced by chronic stress through activating the kynurenine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Lian, Yong-Jie; Su, Wen-Jun; Peng, Wei; Dong, Xin; Liu, Lin-Lin; Gong, Hong; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yun-Xia

    2017-11-28

    Our previous study has reported that the proactive secretion and role of central high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive behavior. Here, the potential mechanism of HMGB1 mediating chronic-stress-induced depression through the kynurenine pathway (KP) was further explored both in vivo and in vitro. Depression model was established with the 4-week chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Sucrose preference and Barnes maze test were performed to reflect depressive behaviors. The ratio of kynurenine (KYN)/tryptophan (Trp) represented the enzyme activity of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Gene transcription and protein expression were assayed by real-time RT-PCR and western-blot or ELISA kit respectively. Along with depressive behaviors, HMGB1 concentrations in the hippocampus and serum substantially increased post 4-week CUMS exposure. Concurrent with the upregulated HMGB1 protein, the regulator of translocation of HMGB1, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) concentration in the hippocampus remarkably increased. In addition to HMGB1 and SIRT1, IDO, the rate limiting enzyme of KP, was upregulated at the level of mRNA expression and enzyme activity in stressed hippocampi and LPS/HMGB1-treated hippocampal slices. The gene transcription of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) and kynureninase (KYNU) in the downstream of KP also increased both in vivo and in vitro. Mice treated with ethyl pyruvate (EP), the inhibitor of HMGB1 releasing, were observed with lower tendency of developing depressive behaviors and reduced activation of enzymes in KP. All of these experiments demonstrate that the role of HMGB1 on the induction of depressive behavior is mediated by KP activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of methane oxidation activity in waste biocover soil during landfill stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wang, Jing; Xia, Fang-Fang; Mao, Li-Juan; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Biocover soil has been demonstrated to have high CH(4) oxidation capacity and is considered as a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH(4) emission from landfills, yet the response of CH(4) oxidation activity of biocover soils to the variation of CH(4) loading during landfill stabilization is poorly understood. Compared with a landfill cover soil (LCS) collected from Hangzhou Tianziling landfill cell, the development of CH(4) oxidation activity of waste biocover soil (WBS) was investigated using simulated landfill systems in this study. Although a fluctuation of influent CH(4) flux occurred during landfill stabilization, the WBS covers showed a high CH(4) removal efficiency of 94-96% during the entire experiment. In the LCS covers, the CH(4) removal efficiencies varied with the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux, even negative ones occurred due to the storage of CH(4) in the soil porosities after the high CH(4) influent flux of ~137 gm(-2) d(-1). The lower concentrations of O(2) and CH(4) as well as the higher concentration of CO(2) were observed in the WBS covers than those in the LCS covers. The highest CH(4) oxidation rates of the two types of soil covers both occurred in the bottom layer (20-30 cm). Compared to the LCS, the WBS showed higher CH(4) oxidation activity and methane monooxygenase activity over the course of the experiment. Overall, this study indicated the WBS worked well for the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux during landfill stabilization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the cellulolytic secretome of Trichoderma harzianum during growth on sugarcane bagasse and analysis of the activity boosting effects of swollenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A L Rocha, Vanessa; N Maeda, Roberto; Pereira, Nei; F Kern, Marcelo; Elias, Luisa; Simister, Rachael; Steele-King, Clare; Gómez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J

    2016-03-01

    This study demonstrates the production of an active enzyme cocktail produced by growing Trichoderma harzianum on sugarcane bagasse. The component enzymes were identified by LCMS-MS. Glycosyl hydrolases were the most abundant class of proteins, representing 67% of total secreted protein. Other carbohydrate active enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction included lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (AA9), carbohydrate-binding modules, carbohydrate esterases and swollenin, all present at levels of 1%. In total, proteases and lipases represented 5 and 1% of the total secretome, respectively, with the rest of the secretome being made up of proteins of unknown or putative function. This enzyme cocktail was efficient in catalysing the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse cellulolignin to fermentable sugars for potential use in ethanol production. Apart from mapping the secretome of T. harzianum, which is a very important tool to understand the catalytic performance of enzyme cocktails, the gene coding for T. harzianum swollenin was expressed in Aspergillus niger. This novel aspect in this work, allowed increasing the swollenin concentration by 95 fold. This is the first report about the heterologous expression of swollenin from T. harzianum, and the findings are of interest in enriching enzyme cocktail with this important accessory protein which takes part in the cellulose amorphogenesis. Despite lacking detectable glycoside activity, the addition of swollenin of T. harzianum increased by two-fold the hydrolysis efficiency of a commercial cellulase cocktail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:327-336, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Biochemical interpretation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for biodegradation of N-heterocycles: a complementary approach to predict biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Bodo; Hoff, Malte; Germa, Florence; Schink, Bernhard; Beimborn, Dieter; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2007-02-15

    Prediction of the biodegradability of organic compounds is an ecologically desirable and economically feasible tool for estimating the environmental fate of chemicals. We combined quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) with the systematic collection of biochemical knowledge to establish rules for the prediction of aerobic biodegradation of N-heterocycles. Validated biodegradation data of 194 N-heterocyclic compounds were analyzed using the MULTICASE-method which delivered two QSAR models based on 17 activating (OSAR 1) and on 16 inactivating molecular fragments (GSAR 2), which were statistically significantly linked to efficient or poor biodegradability, respectively. The percentages of correct classifications were over 99% for both models, and cross-validation resulted in 67.9% (GSAR 1) and 70.4% (OSAR 2) correct predictions. Biochemical interpretation of the activating and inactivating characteristics of the molecular fragments delivered plausible mechanistic interpretations and enabled us to establish the following biodegradation rules: (1) Target sites for amidohydrolases and for cytochrome P450 monooxygenases enhance biodegradation of nonaromatic N-heterocycles. (2) Target sites for molybdenum hydroxylases enhance biodegradation of aromatic N-heterocycles. (3) Target sites for hydratation by an urocanase-like mechanism enhance biodegradation of imidazoles. Our complementary approach represents a feasible strategy for generating concrete rules for the prediction of biodegradability of organic compounds.

  1. Effect of two-linked mutations of the FMO3 gene on itopride metabolism in Chinese healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Ping; Tan, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Hao; Guo, Dong; Chen, Yao; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2014-11-01

    Itopride is an effective gastroprokinetic agent mainly used for the treatment of functional dyspepsia. Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) has been confirmed to be the key enzyme involved in the main itopride metabolic pathway. We investigated whether the FMO3 genotypes can affect itopride metabolism in Chinese healthy volunteers. Twelve healthy volunteers who had been genotyped for FMO3 gene were selected to participate in our study. Volunteers were given 50 mg itopride orally and then blood samples were collected from 0 to 24 h. The plasma concentrations of itopride and itopride N-oxide were determined by HPLC-MS/MS method. Itopride and itopride N-oxide both exhibit FMO3 genotype-dependent pharmacokinetic profiles. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of itopride increased by 127.82 ± 41.99 % (P itopride N-oxide decreased by 30.30 ± 25.70 % (P itopride and itopride N-oxide were observed between these two genotypes. The FMO3 allele can significantly affect the metabolism of itopride. The pharmacokinetic parameters of both itopride and itopride N-oxide were significantly different between these two genotypes.

  2. Studies of the contribution of respiratory tract metabolism to the toxicity of inhaled chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, A.R.; Petridou-Fischer, J.; Sabourin, P.J.; Whaley, S.; Bond, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Efforts to identify specific nasal enzymes are reported. The nasal enzymes identified and characterized within this project include the cytochromes P-450, primary xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes for PAH's, nitrosamines, some halogenated compounds, alkenes, alkanes, and a large variety of other organic compounds. In addition, flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO), has been identified in the nasal cavity and characterized. Carboxylesterases, and rhodanese have also been found in the nasal cavity. Other nasal enzymes identified include: catechol methyltransferases, phenol methyltransferases, epoxide hydrolase and glutathione and glucuronyl transferases. Each of these enzyme systems may have important toxicological effects on inhaled materials. The authors have tested the ability of nasal enzymes to metabolize substrates in vivo. In these experiments, radiolabeled substances were placed on the nasal mucosas of monkeys, dogs, or Syrian hamsters. Mucus was then collected and analyzed for metabolites. It was found that benzo(a)pyrene and dihydrosafrole are both metabolized on the nasal surface following instillation by this method. Currently, experiments are planned to test the role of nasal enzymes in the fate of inhaled materials

  3. Diversity of Metabolically Active Bacteria in Water-Flooded High-Temperature Heavy Oil Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara N. Nazina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the overall genomic diversity of microorganisms of the Dagang high-temperature oilfield (PRC and to characterize the metabolically active fraction of these populations. At this water-flooded oilfield, the microbial community of formation water from the near-bottom zone of an injection well where the most active microbial processes of oil degradation occur was investigated using molecular, cultural, radiotracer, and physicochemical techniques. The samples of microbial DNA and RNA from back-flushed water were used to obtain the clone libraries for the 16S rRNA gene and cDNA of 16S rRNA, respectively. The DNA-derived clone libraries were found to contain bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the alkB genes encoding alkane monooxygenases similar to those encoded by alkB-geo1 and alkB-geo6 of geobacilli. The 16S rRNA genes of methanogens (Methanomethylovorans, Methanoculleus, Methanolinea, Methanothrix, and Methanocalculus were predominant in the DNA-derived library of Archaea cloned sequences; among the bacterial sequences, the 16S rRNA genes of members of the genus Geobacillus were the most numerous. The RNA-derived library contained only bacterial cDNA of the 16S rRNA sequences belonging to metabolically active aerobic organotrophic bacteria (Tepidimonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, as well as of denitrifying (Azoarcus, Tepidiphilus, Calditerrivibrio, fermenting (Bellilinea, iron-reducing (Geobacter, and sulfate- and sulfur-reducing bacteria (Desulfomicrobium, Desulfuromonas. The presence of the microorganisms of the main functional groups revealed by molecular techniques was confirmed by the results of cultural, radioisotope, and geochemical research. Functioning of the mesophilic and thermophilic branches was shown for the microbial food chain of the near-bottom zone of the injection well, which included the microorganisms of the carbon, sulfur, iron, and nitrogen cycles.

  4. An ancestral human genetic variant linked to an ancient disease: A novel association of FMO2 polymorphisms with tuberculosis (TB in Ethiopian populations provides new insight into the differential ethno-geographic distribution of FMO2*1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephrem Mekonnen

    Full Text Available The human FMO2 (flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 gene has been shown to be involved in innate immunity against microbial infections, including tuberculosis (TB, via the modulation of oxidative stress levels. It has also been found to possess a curious loss-of-function mutation (FMO2*1/FMO2*2 that demonstrates a distinctive differentiation in expression, function and ethno-geographic distribution. However, despite evidences of ethnic-specific genetic associations in the inflammatory profile of TB, no studies were done to investigate whether these patterns of variations correlate with evidences for the involvement of FMO2 in antimicrobial immune responses and ethnic differences in the distribution of FMO2 polymorphisms except for some pharmacogenetic data that suggest a potentially deleterious role for the functional variant (FMO2*1. This genetic epidemiological study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between FMO2 polymorphisms and TB, an ancient malady that remains a modern global health concern, in a sub-Saharan Africa setting where there is not only a relatively high co-prevalence of the disease and the ancestral FMO2*1 variant but also where both Mycobcaterium and Homo sapiens are considered to have originated and co-evolved. Blood samples and TB related clinical data were collected from ascertained TB cases and unrelated household controls (n = 292 from 3 different ethnic groups in Ethiopia. Latent Mtb infection was determined using Quantiferon to develop reliable TB progression phenotypes. We sequenced exonic regions of FMO2.We identified for the first time an association between FMO2 and TB both at the SNP and haplotype level. Two novel SNPs achieved a study-wide significance [chr1:171181877(A, p = 3.15E-07, OR = 4.644 and chr1:171165749(T, p = 3.32E-06, OR = 6.825] while multiple SNPs (22 showed nominal signals. The pattern of association suggested a protective effect of FMO2 against both active and latent TB

  5. Active Teachers - Active Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    as an initiative from the Polytechnic in Nantes, France and the University the Los Andes in Bogota, Colombia. The objective was to start a world wide collaboration allowing teachers in engineering to learn from each other about their experiences with active learning. In this thirteenth edition, ALE joins forces...... with the International Research Symposium on Problem Based Learning (IRSPB) and the International Symposium on Project Approaches in Engineering Education (PAEE) to organise the first International Joint Conference on the Learner in Engineering Education (IJCLEE 2015) hosted by Mondragon University, in San Sebastian...

  6. High abundances of potentially active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in oligotrophic, high-altitude lakes of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis J Hayden

    Full Text Available Nitrification plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle by determining the oxidation state of nitrogen and its subsequent bioavailability and cycling. However, relatively little is known about the underlying ecology of the microbial communities that carry out nitrification in freshwater ecosystems--and particularly within high-altitude oligotrophic lakes, where nitrogen is frequently a limiting nutrient. We quantified ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB in 9 high-altitude lakes (2289-3160 m in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, in relation to spatial and biogeochemical data. Based on their ammonia monooxygenase (amoA genes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected. AOB were present in 88% of samples and were more abundant than AOA in all samples. Both groups showed >100 fold variation in abundance between different lakes, and were also variable through time within individual lakes. Nutrient concentrations (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate were generally low but also varied across and within lakes, suggestive of active internal nutrient cycling; AOB abundance was significantly correlated with phosphate (r(2 = 0.32, p<0.1, whereas AOA abundance was inversely correlated with lake elevation (r(2 = 0.43, p<0.05. We also measured low rates of ammonia oxidation--indicating that AOB, AOA, or both, may be biogeochemically active in these oligotrophic ecosystems. Our data indicate that dynamic populations of AOB and AOA are found in oligotrophic, high-altitude, freshwater lakes.

  7. Is activation analysis still active?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Zhifang

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects of neutron activation analysis (NAA), covering instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), k 0 method, prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) and molecular activation analysis (MAA). The comparison of neutron activation analysis with other analytical techniques are also made. (author)

  8. Exposure of northern leopard frogs in the Green Bay ecosystem to polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans is measured by direct chemistry but not hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.W.; Karasov, W.H.; Patnode, K.A.; Jefcoate, C.R.

    1999-10-01

    The authors measured concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in northern leopard frogs collected from the Green Bay ecosystem and explored the catalytic activity of hepatic cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase (P450 enzyme) as a biomarker for exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. The two hypotheses tested were PCH concentrations in northern leopard frogs would be positively correlated with sediment polychlorinated hydrocarbon (PCH) levels in wetland habitats along a contamination gradient and hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity of northern leopard frogs, which is presumably mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), would be positively correlated with PCH concentrations in frog carcasses from different collection sites. In 1994 and 1995, frogs from seven sites along the lower Fox River and Green Bay, USA, were assayed for hepatic EROD activities and whole carcass concentrations of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. Tissue total PCB concentrations ranging from 3 to 154 ng/g were significantly correlated with sediment PCB levels. Only one PCDD and two PCDFs at concentrations of 6 to 8 pg/g were found in the frogs collected with frog body weight and was similar among sites except for Peter's Marsh. No significant correlation was found between EROD activity and carcass PCB concentration. This result was consistent with the fact that the frogs collected from the Green Bay ecosystem had relatively low PCB concentrations compared with what was required for induction in the laboratory.

  9. The effect of NGATHA altered activity in auxin signaling pathways within the Arabidopsis gynoecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eMartinez-Fernandez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The four NGATHA genes (NGA form a small subfamily within the large family of B3-domain transcription factors of Arabidopsis thaliana. NGA genes act redundantly to direct the development of the apical tissues of the gynoecium, the style and the stigma. Previous studies indicate that NGA genes could exert this function at least partially by directing the synthesis of auxin at the distal end of the developing gynoecium through the upregulation of two different YUCCA genes, which encode flavin monooxygenases involved in auxin biosynthesis. We have compared three developing pistil transcriptome data sets from wildtype, nga quadruple mutants and a 35S::NGA3 line. The differentially expressed genes showed a significant enrichment for auxin-related genes, supporting the idea of NGA genes as major regulators of auxin accumulation and distribution within the developing gynoecium.We have introduced reporter lines for several of these differentially expressed genes involved in synthesis, transport and response to auxin in NGA gain- and loss-of-function backgrounds. We present here a detailed map of the response of these reporters to NGA misregulation that could help to clarify the role of NGA in auxin-mediated gynoecium morphogenesis. Our data point to a very reduced auxin synthesis in the developing apical gynoecium of nga mutants, likely responsible for the lack of DR5rev::GFP reporter activity observed in these mutants. In addition, NGA altered activity affects the expression of protein kinases that regulate the cellular localization of auxin efflux regulators, and thus likely impact auxin transport. Finally, protein accumulation in pistils of several ARFs was differentially affected by nga mutations or NGA overexpression, suggesting that these accumulation patterns depend not only on auxin distribution but could be also regulated by transcriptional networks involving NGA factors.

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK061794 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061794 001-039-F11 AF031161.1 Pseudomonas sp. VLB120 styrene degradation genes in...cluding histidine kinase (stdSc) gene, partial cds; and transcriptional activator (stdR), styrene monooxygen...ase large component (stdA), styrene monooxygenase small component (stdB), styrene oxide isomerase (stdC), an

  11. Effect of chlorinated ethene conversion on viability and activity of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Koning, Wim de; Janssen, Dick B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of transformation of chlorinated ethenes on the cell viability of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was investigated. A comparison of the loss of viability with the decrease in transformation rates shelved that for the monooxygenase-mediated transformation of all chlorinated ethenes except

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-05-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-05-0051 ref|YP_956349.1| Amine oxidase (flavin-containing) [Mycobacterium vanba...alenii PYR-1] gb|ABM16343.1| Amine oxidase (flavin-containing) [Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1] YP_956349.1 2e-46 36% ...

  13. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P-450 dependent benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase activity by acetylenic and olefinic polycyclic arylhydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene (EP), 3-ethynylperylene (EPL), cis- and trans-1-(2-bromo-vinyl)pyrene (c-BVP and t-BVP), and 1-allylpyrene (AP) serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) hydroxylase, while 1-vinyl-pyrene (VP) and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene (PPA) do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of the BP hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of BP hydroxylase activity caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes. In the presence of NADPH, 3 H-labeled EP covalently attached to P-450 isozymes with a measured stoichiometry of one mole of EP per mole of the P-450 heme. The results of the effects of these aryl derivatives in the mammalian cell-mediated mutagenesis assay and toxicity assay show that none of the compounds examined nor any of the their metabolites produced in the incubation system are cytotoxic to V79 cells

  14. The impact on the soil microbial community and enzyme activity of two earthworm species during the bioremediation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhong; Zhen, Zhen; Wu, Zhihao; Yang, Jiewen; Zhong, Laiyuan; Hu, Hanqiao; Luo, Chunling; Bai, Jing; Li, Yongtao; Zhang, Dayi

    2016-01-15

    The ecological effect of earthworms on the fate of soil pentachlorophenol (PCP) differs with species. This study addressed the roles and mechanisms by which two earthworm species (epigeic Eisenia fetida and endogeic Amynthas robustus E. Perrier) affect the soil microbial community and enzyme activity during the bioremediation of PCP-contaminated soils. A. robustus removed more soil PCP than did E. foetida. A. robustus improved nitrogen utilisation efficiency and soil oxidation more than did E. foetida, whereas the latter promoted the organic matter cycle in the soil. Both earthworm species significantly increased the amount of cultivable bacteria and actinomyces in soils, enhancing the utilisation rate of the carbon source (i.e. carbohydrates, carboxyl acids, and amino acids) and improving the richness and evenness of the soil microbial community. Additionally, earthworm treatment optimized the soil microbial community and increased the amount of the PCP-4-monooxygenase gene. Phylogenic classification revealed stimulation of indigenous PCP bacterial degraders, as assigned to the families Flavobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae and Sphingobacteriacea, by both earthworms. A. robustus and E. foetida specifically promoted Comamonadaceae and Moraxellaceae PCP degraders, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of copper mineralogy and methanobactin on cell growth and sMMO activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dennison

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Controls on in situ methanotroph activity are not well understood. One potentially important parameter is copper (Cu because it is the metal-centre of particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO, the most active enzyme for oxidizing methane to methanol. Further, Cu-to-cell ratios influence the relative expression of pMMO versus the alternate soluble MMO (sMMO in some species. However, most methanotroph studies only have assessed readily soluble forms of Cu (e.g. CuCl2 and there is a dearth of Cu-related activity data for Cu sources more common in the environment. Here we quantified sMMO activity (as a practical indicator of Cu availability and growth kinetics in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, an organism that expresses both pMMO and sMMO, when grown on Cu-minerals with differing dissolution equilibria to assess how mineral type and methanobactin (mb might influence in situ methanotroph activity. Mb is a molecule produced by M. trichosporium OB3b that has a high affinity for Cu, reduces Cu toxicity, and may influence Cu availability in terrestrial systems. CuCO3.Cu(OH2 and CuO were chosen for study based on modelling data, reflecting more and less soluble minerals, respectively, and were found to affect M. trichosporium OB3b activity differently. Cells grew without growth lag and with active pMMO on CuCO3.Cu(OH2, regardless of the amount of mineral supplied (−1. The organism also grew well on CuO; however, significant sMMO activity was retained up to 50 μmoles Cu-total l−1, although sMMO activity was suppressed by supplemental mb and-or direct cell-mineral contact. Mb addition increased growth rates (p < 0.05 with both minerals. Results show mb broadly stimulates growth, but Cu mineralogy and mb dictate whether sMMO or pMMO is active in the cells. This explains why sMMO activity has been seen in soils with high Cu and also has implications for predicting dominant MMO activity in terrestrial bioremediation applications.

  16. Activated Charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common charcoal is made from peat, coal, wood, coconut shell, or petroleum. “Activated charcoal” is similar to common charcoal, but is made especially for use as a medicine. To make activated charcoal, manufacturers heat common ...

  17. Community Composition and Transcriptional Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Prokaryotes of Seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in Coral Reef Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrasses in coral reef ecosystems play important ecological roles by enhancing coral reef resilience under ocean acidification. However, seagrass primary productivity is typically constrained by limited nitrogen availability. Ammonia oxidation is an important process conducted by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB, yet little information is available concerning the community structure and potential activity of seagrass AOA and AOB. Therefore, this study investigated the variations in the abundance, diversity and transcriptional activity of AOA and AOB at the DNA and transcript level from four sample types: the leaf, root, rhizosphere sediment and bulk sediment of seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in three coral reef ecosystems. DNA and complementary DNA (cDNA were used to prepare clone libraries and DNA and cDNA quantitative PCR (qPCR assays, targeting the ammonia monooxygenase-subunit (amoA genes as biomarkers. Our results indicated that the closest relatives of the obtained archaeal and bacterial amoA gene sequences recovered from DNA and cDNA libraries mainly originated from the marine environment. Moreover, all the obtained AOB sequences belong to the Nitrosomonadales cluster. Nearly all the AOA communities exhibited higher diversity than the AOB communities at the DNA level, but the qPCR data demonstrated that the abundances of AOB communities were higher than that of AOA communities based on both DNA and RNA transcripts. Collectively, most of the samples shared greater community composition similarity with samples from the same location rather than sample type. Furthermore, the abundance of archaeal amoA gene in rhizosphere sediments showed significant relationships with the ammonium concentration of sediments and the nitrogen content of plant tissue (leaf and root at the DNA level (P < 0.05. Conversely, no such relationships were found for the AOB communities. This work provides new insight into the nitrogen cycle

  18. Active ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frode F. Jacobsen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of active ageing has been gaining prominence in the Nordic countries and beyond. This has been reflected in policy papers in Norway and other Nordic nations. Aims: The aim of this article is to analyse the topic of active ageing in five Norwegian White Papers (2002 to 2015 and discuss those policy documents in context of relevant research literature. Methods: A qualitative document analyses is employed focusing on how active ageing, and ageing in general, is described and which concepts are employed. No ethical approval was needed. Findings: The general theme of ageing and the specific theme of active ageing are increasingly prominent in the Norwegian White Papers studied. In all documents, some assumptions regarding ageing and active ageing seem implicit, such as independence being more important than (interdependence. ‘Productive’ activities like participation in working life are stressed, while others, like reading, watching TV or watching children playing in the street, are ignored. Conclusions: The policy documents demonstrate that the topic of active ageing is growing in importance. The documents increasingly seem to stress ‘productive’ activities – those related to working life, voluntary work or sports and physical training. They exclude activities that are meaningful for many older people, like watching their grandchildren play or reading books. Implications for practice: Practitioners in older people’s care could consider reflecting on: Government documents dealing with their own practice The prevalent concept of active ageing The trend of active ageing as a facilitating or hindering factor for good care work How present discourse on active ageing may influence their attitude towards frail older persons How they wish to relate to active ageing in their own practice

  19. Physical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund Alfred; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers.......Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Wisløff U, Hellénius M-L, Fogelholm M, Ekelund U. (Expert Group) Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012. Integrating nutrition and physical activity. Chapter: Physical Activity p. 195-217.Nordic Counsil of Ministers....

  20. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: Reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Xiangchun, E-mail: xchquan@bnu.edu.cn; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-02-15

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning. - Highlights: • AGS demonstrated a good tolerance to the long-term presence of Ag NPs. • Ag NPs did not produce acute toxicity but cause chronic toxicity to AGS. • AGS maintained granular shape, granule size and good settling ability. • The microbial community of AGS slightly changed after long-term Ag NPs exposure.

  1. Response of aerobic granular sludge to the long-term presence to nanosilver in sequencing batch reactors: Reactor performance, sludge property, microbial activity and community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Xiangchun; Cen, Yan; Lu, Fang; Gu, Lingyun; Ma, Jingyun

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. Granular shape sludge is a special type of microbial aggregate. The response of aerobic granular sludge (AGS) to the long-term presence of Ag NPs has not been well studied. In this study, AGS was exposed to 5 and 50 mg/L Ag NPs in sequence batch reactors (SBRs) for 69 days, and its response was evaluated based on the sludge properties, microbial activity and community, and reactor performance. The results showed that Ag NPs caused inhibition to microbial activities of AGS from Day 35. At the end of 69 days of Ag NPs exposure, the microbial activity of AGS was significantly inhibited in terms of inhibitions of the ammonia oxidizing rate (33.0%), respiration rate (17.7% and 45.6%) and denitrification rate (6.8%), as well as decreases in the ammonia mono-oxygenase and nitrate reductase activities. During the long-term exposure, the AGS maintained its granular shape and large granule size (approximately 900 μm); the microbial community of AGS slightly changed, but the dominant microbial population remained. Overall, the AGS tolerated the toxicity of Ag NPs well, but a long-term exposure may produce chronic toxicity to the AGS, which is concerning. - Highlights: • AGS demonstrated a good tolerance to the long-term presence of Ag NPs. • Ag NPs did not produce acute toxicity but cause chronic toxicity to AGS. • AGS maintained granular shape, granule size and good settling ability. • The microbial community of AGS slightly changed after long-term Ag NPs exposure

  2. Activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    The Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Biology and Chemistry (IFM) presents every year a progress report containing a brief description of activities in research and education within the department. The report is intended as an information for colleagues and institutions. The present report contains activities for the academic year July 1989 to June 1990

  3. InterProScan Result: FS916621 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: FS792231 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -30 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FY033820 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS777678 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: BY928037 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -15 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: FS829494 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -58 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: DB669055 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS926084 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -34 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  11. InterProScan Result: FS765261 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FS739298 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ir...on ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FS764425 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: FS768188 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -24 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: FS873080 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -29 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS926084 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: BY943844 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -34 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: FS783911 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -66 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS777678 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -44 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FY023246 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS793798 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: DC556432 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -14 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS777434 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -60 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: FY761356 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS935108 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ir...on ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: DC530232 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ...ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: BP123442 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -43 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  8. InterProScan Result: BY931349 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  9. InterProScan Result: FY752086 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  10. InterProScan Result: FS728322 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  11. InterProScan Result: FS930315 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -09 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  12. InterProScan Result: FY016464 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -25 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  13. InterProScan Result: FY761356 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e-18 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function:... iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  14. InterProScan Result: CK534983 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  15. InterProScan Result: CN211485 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron... ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  16. InterProScan Result: FS797656 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -53 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS814325 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -21 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  18. InterProScan Result: BP117781 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iron ...ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  19. InterProScan Result: FS783911 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: iro...n ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  20. InterProScan Result: FS826604 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -73 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  1. InterProScan Result: FS739297 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -21 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  2. InterProScan Result: FS733119 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -54 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  3. InterProScan Result: FS793798 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ir...on ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  4. InterProScan Result: BP117781 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e-10 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function:... iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  5. InterProScan Result: FS770245 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -25 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: BP126135 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -16 T IPR001128 Cytochrome P450 Molecular Function: monooxygenase activity (GO:0004497)|Molecular Function: ...iron ion binding (GO:0005506)|Molecular Function: electron carrier activity (GO:0009055)|Molecular Function: heme binding (GO:0020037) ...

  7. Potent Nematicidal Activity and New Hybrid Metabolite Production by Disruption of a Cytochrome P450 Gene Involved in the Biosynthesis of Morphological Regulatory Arthrosporols in Nematode-Trapping Fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian-Yang; Xu, Zi-Fei; Chen, Yong-Hong; Ding, Qiu-Yan; Sun, Yu-Rong; Miao, Yang; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Niu, Xue-Mei

    2017-05-24

    Types of polyketide synthase-terpenoid synthase (PKS-TPS) hybrid metabolites, including arthrosporols with significant morphological regulatory activity, have been elucidated from nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. A previous study suggested that the gene cluster AOL_s00215 in A. oligospora was involved in the production of arthrosporols. Here, we report that disruption of one cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene AOL_s00215g280 in the cluster resulted in significant phenotypic difference and much aerial hyphae. A further bioassay indicated that the mutant showed a dramatic decrease in the conidial formation but developed numerous traps and killed 85% nematodes within 6 h in contact with prey, in sharp contrast to the wild-type strain with no obvious response. Chemical investigation revealed huge accumulation of three new PKS-TPS epoxycyclohexone derivatives with different oxygenated patterns around the epoxycyclohexone moiety and the absence of arthrosporols in the cultural broth of the mutant ΔAOL_s00215g280. These findings suggested that a study on the biosynthetic pathway for morphological regulatory metabolites in nematode-trapping fungus would provide an efficient way to develop new fungal biocontrol agents.

  8. [Active euthanasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folker, A P; Hvidt, N

    1995-02-20

    The growing interest in the subject of active euthanasia in connection with the debate regarding legalization of such practices in Denmark necessitates taking a definite standpoint. The difference in concept between active and passive euthanasia is stressed, and the Dutch guidelines are reviewed. The article discusses how far the patient's autonomy should go, as it regards the consideration of self-determination as being too narrow a criterion in itself. The discussion on the quality of life is included, and the consequences of the process of expulsion as a sociological concept are considered--the risk of a patient feeling guilty for being alive and therefore feeling compelled to request active euthanasia. The changed function of the physician is underlined, and it is discussed whether active euthansia will cause a breach of confidence between the physician and his patient. In connection with the debate the following tendencies in society are emphasized: lack of clarity, increasing medicalization and utilitarian priorities.

  9. Differentiation in the microbial ecology and activity of suspended and attached bacteria in a nitritation-anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hongkeun; Sundar, Suneethi; Ma, Yiwei; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-02-01

    A directed differentiation between the biofilm and suspension was observed in the molecular microbial ecology and gene expression of different bacteria in a biofilm nitritation-anammox process operated at varying hydraulic residence times (HRT) and nitrogen loading rates (NLR). The highest degree of enrichment observed in the biofilm was of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AMX) followed by that of Nitrospira spp. related nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). For AMX, a major shift from Candidatus "Brocadia fulgida" to Candidatus "Kuenenia stuttgartiensis" in both suspension and biofilm was observed with progressively shorter HRT, using discriminatory biomarkers targeting the hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene. In parallel, expression of the hydrazine oxidoreductase gene (hzo), a functional biomarker for AMX energy metabolism, became progressively prominent in the biofilm. A marginal but statistically significant enrichment in the biofilm was observed for Nitrosomonas europaea related ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In direct contrast to AMX, the gene expression of ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), a functional biomarker for AOB energy metabolism, progressively increased in suspension. Using gene expression and biomass concentration measures in conjunction, it was determined that signatures of AOB metabolism were primarily present in the biofilm throughout the study. On the other hand, AMX metabolism gradually shifted from being uniformly distributed in both the biofilm and suspension to primarily the biofilm at shorter HRTs and higher NLRs. These results therefore highlight the complexity and key differences in the microbial ecology, gene expression and activity between the biofilm and suspension of a nitritation-anammox process and the biokinetic and metabolic drivers for such niche segregation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Use of aliphatic n-alkynes to discriminate soil nitrification activities of ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne E; Vajrala, Neeraja; Giguere, Andrew T; Gitelman, Alix I; Arp, Daniel J; Myrold, David D; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Bottomley, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and thaumarchaea (AOA) co-occupy most soils, yet no short-term growth-independent method exists to determine their relative contributions to nitrification in situ. Microbial monooxygenases differ in their vulnerability to inactivation by aliphatic n-alkynes, and we found that NH3 oxidation by the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus was unaffected during a 24-h exposure to ≤ 20 μM concentrations of 1-alkynes C8 and C9. In contrast, NH3 oxidation by two AOB (Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis) was quickly and irreversibly inactivated by 1 μM C8 (octyne). Evidence that nitrification carried out by soilborne AOA was also insensitive to octyne was obtained. In incubations (21 or 28 days) of two different whole soils, both acetylene and octyne effectively prevented NH4(+)-stimulated increases in AOB population densities, but octyne did not prevent increases in AOA population densities that were prevented by acetylene. Furthermore, octyne-resistant, NH4(+)-stimulated net nitrification rates of 2 and 7 μg N/g soil/day persisted throughout the incubation of the two soils. Other evidence that octyne-resistant nitrification was due to AOA included (i) a positive correlation of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries of cropped and noncropped soils with allylthiourea-resistant activity (100 μM) and (ii) the finding that the fraction of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries correlated with the fraction of nitrification that recovered from irreversible acetylene inactivation in the presence of bacterial protein synthesis inhibitors and with the octyne-resistant fraction of NH4(+)-saturated net nitrification measured in whole soils. Octyne can be useful in short-term assays to discriminate AOA and AOB contributions to soil nitrification.

  11. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P. O. Box 80, M. G. Marg, Lucknow-226 001, U. P. (India); Parmar, Devendra [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P. O. Box 80, M. G. Marg, Lucknow-226 001, U. P. (India)

    2007-12-15

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD{sub 50}) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring.

  12. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2007-01-01

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD 50 ) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring

  13. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  14. Active colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior. (physics of our days)

  15. Biocatalytic production of adipic acid from glucose using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Raj

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Adipic acid is an important industrial chemical used in the synthesis of nylon-6,6. The commercial synthesis of adipic acid uses petroleum-derived benzene and releases significant quantities of greenhouse gases. Biocatalytic production of adipic acid from renewable feedstocks could potentially reduce the environmental damage and eliminate the need for fossil fuel precursors. Recently, we have demonstrated the first enzymatic hydrogenation of muconic acid to adipic acid using microbial enoate reductases (ERs - complex iron-sulfur and flavin containing enzymes. In this work, we successfully expressed the Bacillus coagulans ER in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain producing muconic acid and developed a three-stage fermentation process enabling the synthesis of adipic acid from glucose. The ability to express active ERs and significant acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae highlight the applicability of the developed yeast strain for the biocatalytic production of adipic acid from renewable feedstocks. Keywords: Biosynthesis, Renewable resources, Yeast, Adipic acid, Synthetic biology

  16. Physics activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    As we move into the 21st Century, nuclear technology is on the verge of rejuvenation in advanced Member States and of expansion in developing Member States. The principal responsibilities of the IAEA are transferring technologies, co-ordinating scientific research, managing specialized projects and maintaining analytical quality control. The IAEA physics activities provide assistance with nuclear instrumentation, promote more effective utilization of research reactors and accelerators, and facilitate global co-operation in nuclear fusion research. These activities will help Member States improve their standards of living through the benefits of nuclear technology. This booklet presents a brief profile on the physics activities and involvement in these fields of the Physics Section, IAEA

  17. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  18. Influenza virus-induced alterations of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activities following exposure of mice to coal and diesel particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabovsky, J.; Judy, D.J.; Rodak, D.J.; Petersen, M.

    1986-06-01

    We have investigated a relationship between two detoxication systems, metabolic detoxication through the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) pathway and resistance to infection through interferon (IFN), in mice infected with influenza virus following exposure to coal dust (CD) and diesel exhaust (DE) particulates. Mice were exposed by inhalation to filtered air (FA; control), CD, or DE for 1 month and then inoculated intranasally (IN) with influenza virus. During infection, 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylase (7ECdeEt'ase) and ethylmorphine demethylase (EMdeMe'ase) (monooxygenases), and NADPH cytochrome c reductase (NADPH c red'ase) were measured in liver microsomes. Temporal patterns of enzyme activities were observed with control animals. EMdeMe'ase and NADPH c red'ase exhibited peak values at Day 4 postinfection (27.6 and 482 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively), compared to initial activities (9.1 and 307 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively). 7ECdeEt'ase activity decreased between Days 1-3 postvirus infection and thereafter returned to the original value (1.7 nmole/min/mg protein). When the mice were first exposed to CD or DE particulates for 1 month prior to influenza infection, changes in enzyme temporal patterns were observed. The increased EMdeMe'ase activity at Day 4 was not observed in mice exposed to CD and was reduced in mice exposed to DE. Preexposure to either particulate resulted in the abolition of the increased Day 4 activity of NADPH c red'ase. The 7ECdeEt'ase postinfection temporal pattern was not affected by a preexposure to either particulate. Estimates of the enzyme activities after the 1-month exposure to FA, CD, or DE but before virus infection indicated no changes due to particulate exposure alone. Under conditions of particulate exposure and virus infection, serum IFN levels peaked at Days 4-5 and were unaffected by the 1-month preexposure to CD or DE.

  19. Influenza virus-induced alterations of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activities following exposure of mice to coal and diesel particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabovsky, J; Judy, D J; Rodak, D J; Petersen, M

    1986-06-01

    We have investigated a relationship between two detoxication systems, metabolic detoxication through the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) pathway and resistance to infection through interferon (IFN), in mice infected with influenza virus following exposure to coal dust (CD) and diesel exhaust (DE) particulates. Mice were exposed by inhalation to filtered air (FA; control), CD, or DE for 1 month and then inoculated intranasally (IN) with influenza virus. During infection, 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylase (7ECdeEt'ase) and ethylmorphine demethylase (EMdeMe'ase) (monooxygenases), and NADPH cytochrome c reductase (NADPH c red'ase) were measured in liver microsomes. Temporal patterns of enzyme activities were observed with control animals. EMdeMe'ase and NADPH c red'ase exhibited peak values at Day 4 postinfection (27.6 and 482 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively), compared to initial activities (9.1 and 307 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively). 7ECdeEt'ase activity decreased between Days 1-3 postvirus infection and thereafter returned to the original value (1.7 nmole/min/mg protein). When the mice were first exposed to CD or DE particulates for 1 month prior to influenza infection, changes in enzyme temporal patterns were observed. The increased EMdeMe'ase activity at Day 4 was not observed in mice exposed to CD and was reduced in mice exposed to DE. Preexposure to either particulate resulted in the abolition of the increased Day 4 activity of NADPH c red'ase. The 7ECdeEt'ase postinfection temporal pattern was not affected by a preexposure to either particulate. Estimates of the enzyme activities after the 1-month exposure to FA, CD, or DE but before virus infection indicated no changes due to particulate exposure alone. Under these conditions of particulate exposure and virus infection, serum IFN levels in the mice used in this study peaked at Days 4-5 and were unaffected by the 1-month preexposure to CD or DE (Hahon et al., (1985). The data suggest the relationship that exists

  20. Identity Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    in reaction to their environment. They reflect an individual’s internal or external, conscious or subconscious , overt or covert, voluntary or...identity activities under a range of legal authorities, policy constraints, transnational threats, regional concerns and biases , and most likely...Biography. A baseline and descriptive analytic product that supports the development of the behavioral influences analysis ( BIA ) individual behavioral

  1. Active instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Miguel Antonio; Ørberg, Jakob Williams

    2017-01-01

    themselves. We draw on two multi-year field studies of India and Denmark to investigate how national reforms and developments within the ranking industry interact in often surprising ways. Rankings do not always do what policy makers expect. We (1) highlight the activity of rankers in these two countries, (2...

  2. Active house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kurt Emil; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    Formålet med dette abstrakt er at illustrere, at huse kan være konstrueret til at basere sig udelukkende på vedvarende energikilder og samtidig være CO2-neutrale og producere mere energi end de forbruger. Active House Visionen undersøger disse muligheder i otte demonstration huse i fem forskellige...

  3. Activity of 3-Ketosteroid 9α-Hydroxylase (KshAB) Indicates Cholesterol Side Chain and Ring Degradation Occur Simultaneously in Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capyk, Jenna K.; Casabon, Israël; Gruninger, Robert; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a significant global pathogen, contains a cholesterol catabolic pathway. Although the precise role of cholesterol catabolism in Mtb remains unclear, the Rieske monooxygenase in this pathway, 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase (KshAB), has been identified as a virulence factor. To investigate the physiological substrate of KshAB, a rhodococcal acyl-CoA synthetase was used to produce the coenzyme A thioesters of two cholesterol derivatives: 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oic acid (forming 4-BNC-CoA) and 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-22-oic acid (forming 1,4-BNC-CoA). The apparent specificity constant (kcat/Km) of KshAB for the CoA thioester substrates was 20–30 times that for the corresponding 17-keto compounds previously proposed as physiological substrates. The apparent KmO2 was 90 ± 10 μm in the presence of 1,4-BNC-CoA, consistent with the value for two other cholesterol catabolic oxygenases. The Δ1 ketosteroid dehydrogenase KstD acted with KshAB to cleave steroid ring B with a specific activity eight times greater for a CoA thioester than the corresponding ketone. Finally, modeling 1,4-BNC-CoA into the KshA crystal structure suggested that the CoA moiety binds in a pocket at the mouth of the active site channel and could contribute to substrate specificity. These results indicate that the physiological substrates of KshAB are CoA thioester intermediates of cholesterol side chain degradation and that side chain and ring degradation occur concurrently in Mtb. This finding has implications for steroid metabolites potentially released by the pathogen during infection and for the design of inhibitors for cholesterol-degrading enzymes. The methodologies and rhodococcal enzymes used to generate thioesters will facilitate the further study of cholesterol catabolism. PMID:21987574

  4. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1: ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL ECOLOGY PARAMETERS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into aquifers for bioremediation purposes requires monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial populations for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1 constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase (tom) ...

  5. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  6. Active solar information dissemination activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The principal objective of the project has been the development of an information dissemination strategy for the UK active solar heating industry. The project has also aimed to prepare the industry for the implementation of such a strategy and to produce initial information materials to support the early stages of the implementation process. (author)

  7. Bioanalytical methods for determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunissen, S.F.; Rosing, H.; Schinkel, A.H.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Beijnen, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is used in the treatment of early and advanced breast cancer and in selected cases for breast cancer prevention in high-risk subjects. The cytochrome P450 enzyme system and flavin-containing monooxygenase are responsible for the extensive metabolism of tamoxifen into several phase I metabolites that vary in toxicity and potencies towards estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ER beta. An extensive overview of publications on the determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in biological samples is presented. In these publications techniques were used such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid, gas and thin layer chromatography coupled with various detection techniques (mass spectrometry, ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, liquid scintillation counting and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). A trend is seen towards the use of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). State-of-the-art LC-MS equipment allowed for identification of unknown metabolites and quantification of known metabolites reaching lower limit of quantification levels in the sub pg mL -1 range. Although tamoxifen is also metabolized into phase II metabolites, the number of publications reporting on phase II metabolism of tamoxifen is scarce. Therefore the focus of this review is on phase I metabolites of tamoxifen. We conclude that in the past decades tamoxifen metabolism has been studied extensively and numerous metabolites have been identified. Assays have been developed for both the identification and quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites in an array of biological samples. This review can be used as a resource for method transfer and development of analytical methods used to support pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites.

  8. Genome-wide association identifies genetic variants associated with lentiform nucleus volume in N = 1345 young and elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Ryles, April B; Kohannim, Omid; Jahanshad, Neda; Medland, Sarah E; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Saykin, Andrew J; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Deficits in lentiform nucleus volume and morphometry are implicated in a number of genetically influenced disorders, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and ADHD. Here we performed genome-wide searches to discover common genetic variants associated with differences in lentiform nucleus volume in human populations. We assessed structural MRI scans of the brain in two large genotyped samples: the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; N = 706) and the Queensland Twin Imaging Study (QTIM; N = 639). Statistics of association from each cohort were combined meta-analytically using a fixed-effects model to boost power and to reduce the prevalence of false positive findings. We identified a number of associations in and around the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene cluster. The most highly associated SNP, rs1795240, was located in the FMO3 gene; after meta-analysis, it showed genome-wide significant evidence of association with lentiform nucleus volume (P MA  = 4.79 × 10(-8)). This commonly-carried genetic variant accounted for 2.68 % and 0.84 % of the trait variability in the ADNI and QTIM samples, respectively, even though the QTIM sample was on average 50 years younger. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed significant contributions of this gene to the cytochrome P450 pathway, which is involved in metabolizing numerous therapeutic drugs for pain, seizures, mania, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. The genetic variants we identified provide replicated, genome-wide significant evidence for the FMO gene cluster's involvement in lentiform nucleus volume differences in human populations.

  9. Interspecies Variation of In Vitro Stability and Metabolic Diversity of YZG-331, a Promising Sedative-Hypnotic Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihao Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available YZG-331, a synthetic adenosine derivative, express the sedative and hypnotic effects via binding to the adenosine receptor. The current study was taken to investigate the metabolic pathway of YZG-331 as well as species-specific differences in vitro. YZG-331 was reduced by 14, 11, 6, 46, and 11% within 120 min incubation in human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse liver microsomes (LMs, respectively. However, YZG-331 was stable in human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse liver cytoplasm. In addition, YZG-331 was unstable in rat or mouse gut microbiota with more than 50% of prototype drug degraded within 120 min incubation. Interestingly, the systemic exposure of M2 and M3 in rats and mice treated with antibiotics were significantly decreased in the pseudo germ-free group. YZG-331 could be metabolized in rat and human liver under the catalysis of CYP enzymes, and the metabolism showed species variation. In addition, 3 phase I metabolites were identified via hydroxyl (M1, hydrolysis (M2, or hydrolysis/ hydroxyl (M3 pathway. Flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 (FMO1 and FMO3 participated in the conversion of YZG-331 in rat LMs. Nevertheless, YZG-331 expressed stability with recombinant human FMOs, which further confirmed the species variation in the metabolism. Overall, these studies suggested that YZG-331 is not stable in LMs and gut microbiota. CYP450 enzymes and FMOs mediated the metabolism of YZG-331, and the metabolic pathway showed species difference. Special attention must be paid when extrapolating data from other species to humans.

  10. Chocolate active

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    There is a table of current radioactivity values for various foods and mushrooms. A special accent is on milk and chocolate. Chocolate sorts with more powdered milk are more active. Finally there is a chapter on radionucleides contained in the Chernobyl fallout, other than cesium 137, cesium 134 and strontium 90. The amounts of ruthenium 106, antimony 125, cerium 144, silver 110 m, cesium 134, strontium 90 and plutonium 239 relative to cesium 137 in soil samples in autumn 1987 are given. Special emphasis is on ruthenium 'hot particles' and on plutonium. (qui)

  11. Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Home For Patients Search FAQs Staying ... Exercise FAQ045, November 2016 PDF Format Staying Active: Physical Activity and Exercise Women's Health What are the benefits ...

  12. Halal Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to further our understanding of contemporary Muslim consumer activism in Malaysia with a particular focus on halal (in Arabic, literally “permissible” or “lawful”) products and services. Muslim activists and organisations promote halal on a big scale in the interface...... zones between new forms of Islamic revivalism, the ethnicised state and Muslim consumer culture. Organisations such as the Muslim Consumers Association of Malaysia play an important role in pushing and protecting halal in Malaysia, that is, halal activists constantly call on the state to tighten halal...... in particular historical/national settings and that these issues should be explored in the interfaces between Islam, the state and market. More specifically, this article examines the above issues building on ethnography from fieldwork with three Muslim organisations in Malaysia....

  13. Active sharing

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The big news this week is, of course, the conclusions from the LHC performance workshop held in Chamonix from 6 to 10 February . The main recommendation, endorsed by CERN’s Machine Advisory Committee and adopted by the Management, is that the LHC will run at 4 TeV per beam this year. You can find all the details from Chamonix in the slides presented on Wednesday at the summary session, which leaves me free to talk about another important development coming up soon.   In ten days time, a new kind of gathering will be taking place in Geneva, bringing together two previously separate conferences, one driven by physics, the other by the medical community, but both looking to apply physics to the advancement of health. The merger of the International Conference for Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and CERN’s workshop on Physics for Health in Europe (ICTR-PHE) makes for a very eclectic mix. Presentations range from active shielding for interplanetary flight to the rather...

  14. Active Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary.We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach.

  15. Oxidoreductases on their way to industrial biotransformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Camarero, Susana; Serrano, Ana; Linde, Dolores; Lund, Henrik; Vind, Jesper; Tovborg, Morten; Herold-Majumdar, Owik M.; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane; Berkel, van Willem J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Fungi produce heme-containing peroxidases and peroxygenases, flavin-containing oxidases and dehydrogenases, and different copper-containing oxidoreductases involved in the biodegradation of lignin and other recalcitrant compounds. Heme peroxidases comprise the classical ligninolytic peroxidases and

  16. Oxidoreductases on their way to industrial biotransformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Camarero, Susana; Serrano, Ana; Linde, Dolores; Lund, Henrik; Vind, Jesper; Tovborg, Morten; Herold-Majumdar, Owik M.; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane; Ullrich, René; Scheibner, Katrin; Sannia, Giovanni; Piscitelli, Alessandra; Pezzella, Cinzia; Sener, Mehmet E.; Kılıç, Sibel; van Berkel, Willem J.H.; Guallar, Victor; Lucas, Maria Fátima; Zuhse, Ralf; Ludwig, Roland; Hollmann, F.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Record, Eric; Faulds, Craig B.; Tortajada, Marta; Winckelmann, Ib; Rasmussen, Jo Anne; Gelo-Pujic, Mirjana; Gutiérrez, Ana; del Río, José C.; Rencoret, Jorge; Alcalde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Fungi produce heme-containing peroxidases and peroxygenases, flavin-containing oxidases and dehydrogenases, and different copper-containing oxidoreductases involved in the biodegradation of lignin and other recalcitrant compounds. Heme peroxidases comprise the classical ligninolytic peroxidases

  17. Conversion of chlorinated propanes by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing soluble methane monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, T.; Janssen, D.B.

    Chlorinated propanes are important pollutants that may show persistent behaviour in the environment. The biotransformation of 1-chloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,3-dichloropropane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane was studied using resting cell suspensions of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing

  18. Degradation of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b Expressing Soluble Methane Monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, R.; Vink, Ruud L.J.M.; Janssen, D. B.; Witholt, B.

    1989-01-01

    Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by the methanotrophic bacterium Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was studied by using cells grown in continuous culture. TCE degradation was a strictly cometabolic process, requiring the presence of a cosubstrate, preferably formate, and oxygen. M. trichosporium

  19. Genomic organization and splicing variants of a peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase from sea anemones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, M; Hauser, F; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    Cnidarians are primitive animals that use neuropeptides as their transmitters. All the numerous cnidarian neuropeptides isolated, so far, have a carboxy-terminal amide group that is essential for their actions. This strongly suggests that alpha-amidating enzymes are essential for the functioning ...

  20. An immobilized and highly stabilized self-sufficient monooxygenase as biocatalyst for oxidative biotransformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valencia, Daniela; Guillén, Marina; Fürst, Maximilian; Josep, López-Santín; Álvaro, Gregorio

    BACKGROUND The requirement of expensive cofactors that must be efficiently recycled is one of the major factors hindering the wide implementation of industrial biocatalytic oxidation processes. In this research, a sustainable approach based on immobilized self-sufficient Baeyer-Villiger

  1. Oxidase uncoupling in heme monooxygenases: Human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 in Nanodiscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; McLean, Mark A. [Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Illinois, 505 South Goodwin Avenue (United States); Sligar, Stephen G., E-mail: s-sligar@illinois.edu [Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Illinois, 505 South Goodwin Avenue (United States)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Substantial reducing equivalents are lost in human P450 CYP3A4 via an oxidase channel. ► Substrate binding has a pronounced effect on uncoupling in cytochrome P450. ► Anionic phospholipids improve the overall coupling in CYP3A4 Nanodiscs. -- Abstract: The normal reaction mechanism of cytochrome P450 operates by utilizing two reducing equivalents to reduce atmospheric dioxygen, producing one molecule of water and an oxygenated product in an overall stoichiometry of 2 electrons:1 dioxygen:1 product. However, three alternate unproductive pathways exist where the intermediate iron–oxygen states in the catalytic cycle can yield reduced oxygen products without substrate metabolism. The first involves release of superoxide from the oxygenated intermediate while the second occurs after input of the second reducing equivalent. Superoxide rapidly dismutates and hence both processes produce hydrogen peroxide that can be cytotoxic to the organism. In both cases, the formation of hydrogen peroxide involves the same overall stoichiometry as oxygenases catalysis. The key step in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450 involves scission of the oxygen–oxygen bond of atmospheric dioxygen to produce a higher valent iron-oxo state termed “Compound I”. This intermediate initiates a radical reaction in the oxygenase pathway but also can uptake two additional reducing equivalents from reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADPH) and the flavoprotein reductase to produce a second molecule of water. This non-productive decay of Compound I thus yields an overall oxygen to NADPH ratio of 1:2 and does not produce hydrocarbon oxidation. This water uncoupling reaction provides one of a limited means to study the reactivity of the critical Compound I intermediate in P450 catalysis. We measured simultaneously the rates of NADPH and oxygen consumption as a function of substrate concentration during the steady-state hydroxylation of testosterone catalyzed by human P450 CYP3A4 reconstituted in Nanodiscs. We discovered that the “oxidase” uncoupling pathway is also operating in the substrate free form of the enzyme with rate of this pathway substantially increasing with the first substrate binding event. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the reducing equivalents used by the P450 system is wasted in this oxidase pathway. In addition, the overall coupling with testosterone and bromocryptine as substrates is significantly higher in the presence of anionic lipids, which is attributed to the changes in the redox potential of CYP3A4 and reductase.

  2. Cellular and subcellular localization of flavin-monooxygenases involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jing; Kristiansen, Kim A.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram

    2011-01-01

    the side chain modifications take place despite their importance. Hence, the spatial expression pattern of FMO(GS-OX1-5) genes in Arabidopsis was investigated by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion genes controlled by FMO(GS-OX1-5) promoters. The cellular...

  3. Expression and purification of the metal-containing monooxygenases tryptophan hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach

    -hyperactive disorder (ADHD) among others. Since all these diseases are the cause of huge economical and personal costs it is very important to gain more knowledge of TPH and DβH since these two enzymes could be possible targets for medicine against the diseases mentioned above. TPH a three-domain, iron......-containing enzyme which belongs to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylase (AAAH) family. It exist in two isoforms, TPH1 and TPH2, which are expressed in different tissues and have different properties. TPH is known as a very diffcult protein to work with especially due to instability and only truncated forms of TPH1...... have been purified and crystallized. This project concern the human neuronal TPH or TPH2. In an attempt to overcome the problems with recombinant TPH two stability and solubility optimized variants of TPH2 are designed. Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression strains for these variants and full length...

  4. IASS Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  5. Interplay of Electronic Cooperativity and Exchange Coupling in Regulating the Reactivity of Diiron(IV)-oxo Complexes towards C-H and O-H Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Azaj; Ansari, Mursaleem; Singha, Asmita; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2017-07-26

    Activation of inert C-H bonds such as those of methane are extremely challenging for chemists but in nature, the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme readily oxidizes methane to methanol by using a diiron(IV) species. This has prompted chemists to look for similar model systems. Recently, a (μ-oxo)bis(μ-carboxamido)diiron(IV) ([Fe IV 2 O(L) 2 ] 2+ L=N,N-bis-(3',5'-dimethyl-4'-methoxypyridyl-2'-methyl)-N'-acetyl-1,2-diaminoethane) complex has been generated by bulk electrolysis and this species activates inert C-H bonds almost 1000 times faster than mononuclear Fe IV =O species and at the same time selectively activates O-H bonds of alcohols. The very high reactivity and selectivity of this species is puzzling and herein we use extensive DFT calculations to shed light on this aspect. We have studied the electronic and spectral features of diiron {Fe III -μ(O)-Fe III } +2 (complex I), {Fe III -μ(O)-Fe IV } +3 (II), and {Fe IV -μ(O)-Fe IV } +4 (III) complexes. Strong antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe centers leads to spin-coupled S=0, S=3/2, and S=0 ground state for species I-III respectively. The mechanistic study of the C-H and O-H bond activation reveals a multistate reactivity scenario where C-H bond activation is found to occur through the S=4 spin-coupled state corresponding to the high-spin state of individual Fe IV centers. The O-H bond activation on the other hand, occurs through the S=2 spin-coupled state corresponding to an intermediate state of individual Fe IV centers. Molecular orbital analysis reveals σ-π/π-π channels for the reactivity. The nature of the magnetic exchange interaction is found to be switched during the course of the reaction and this offers lower energy pathways. Significant electronic cooperativity between two metal centers during the course of the reaction has been witnessed and this uncovers the reason behind the efficiency and selectivity observed. The catalyst is found to prudently choose the desired spin

  6. Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  7. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your ... Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations ...

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  11. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers ... required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their ...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend ...

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  14. BAM! Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Smarts Links Fuel Up for Fun Power Packing Physical Activity Activity Calendar Activity Information Sheets I Heard Hurdle ... Links Sleep Game Questions Answered Under the Microscope Physical Activity Game Questions Answered Under the Microscope Lurking in ...

  15. Facts about Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some Americans ... Activity Guideline for aerobic activity than older adults. Physical activity and socioeconomic status Adults with more education are ...

  16. Physical Activity Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use this site. health.gov Physical Activity Guidelines Physical Activity Physical activity is key to improving the health of the Nation. Based on the latest science, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is an essential resource for ...

  17. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Vestergaard, E

    1999-01-01

    was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly......The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension...... hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Apr...

  18. Activation analysis. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The principle, sample and calibration standard preparation, activation by neutrons, charged particles and gamma radiation, sample transport after activation, activity measurement, and chemical sample processing are described for activation analysis. Possible applications are shown of nondestructive activation analysis. (J.P.)

  19. Active transport and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Peter W

    2011-07-01

    Increasing heat may impede peoples' ability to be active outdoors thus limiting active transport options. Co-benefits from mitigation of and adaptation to global warming should not be assumed but need to be actively designed into strategies.

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your ... Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & ... Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting a DFCN Promotion ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  5. Physical Activity Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How much physical activity do you need? Regular physical activity helps improve ...

  6. Physical Activity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  7. Guide to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Guide to Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of your ... to injury. Examples of moderate-intensity amounts of physical activity Common Chores Washing and waxing a car for ...

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  9. Physical activity and obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bouchard, Claude; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2010-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 The Physical Activity and Exercise Continuum 7 Darren Warburton Definition of Health, Physical Activity, and Exercise . . . . . . . 7 The Continuum...

  10. Physical Activity and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Physical Activity and Cancer On This Page What is physical activity? What is known about the relationship between physical ...

  11. Growth-arresting Activity of Acmella Essential Oil and its Isolated Component D-Limonene (1, 8 P-Mentha Diene) against Trichophyton rubrum (Microbial Type Culture Collection 296).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhan, Diptikanta; Pattnaik, Smaranika; Behera, Ajaya Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Spilanthes acmella is used as a remedy in toothache complaints by the tribal people of Western part of Odisha, India. The objective of this study was to study the growth-arresting activity of an indigenous Acmella essential oil (EO) ( S. acmella Murr, Asteraceae ) and its isolated component, d-limonene against Trichophyton rubrum (microbial type culture collection 296). The EO was extracted from flowers of indigenous S. acmella using Clevenger's apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was carried out to isolate the major constituent. The isolated fraction was subjected to fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The antidermatophytic activity was screened for using "disc diffusion" and "slant dilution" method followed by optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. The molecular dockings were made between d-limonene with cell wall synthesis-related key enzymes (14 methyl deaminase and monooxygenase). The GC-MS analysis EO had inferred the presence of 7 number of major (≥2%) components. The component with highest peak area (%) was found to be 41.02. The HPLC-isolated fraction was identified as d-limonene (1,8 p-Mentha-diene) by FTIR and NMR. Qualitative and quantitative assays had suggested the growth inhibitory activity of Acmella EO and its component. Shrinkage, evacuation, cell wall puncture, and leakage of cellular constituents by the activity of Acmella oil and d-limonene were evidenced from optical, SEM, and TEM studies. The computer simulation had predicted the binding strengths of d-limonene and fluconazole with dermatophyte cell wall enzymes. There could have been synergistic action of all or some of compounds present in indigenous Acmella EO. There was presence of seven number of (d-limonene, ocimene, β-myrcene, cyclohexene, 3-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-6-methylene,

  12. Activity of 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase (KshAB) indicates cholesterol side chain and ring degradation occur simultaneously in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capyk, Jenna K; Casabon, Israël; Gruninger, Robert; Strynadka, Natalie C; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2011-11-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a significant global pathogen, contains a cholesterol catabolic pathway. Although the precise role of cholesterol catabolism in Mtb remains unclear, the Rieske monooxygenase in this pathway, 3-ketosteroid 9α-hydroxylase (KshAB), has been identified as a virulence factor. To investigate the physiological substrate of KshAB, a rhodococcal acyl-CoA synthetase was used to produce the coenzyme A thioesters of two cholesterol derivatives: 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oic acid (forming 4-BNC-CoA) and 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-22-oic acid (forming 1,4-BNC-CoA). The apparent specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) of KshAB for the CoA thioester substrates was 20-30 times that for the corresponding 17-keto compounds previously proposed as physiological substrates. The apparent K(m)(O(2)) was 90 ± 10 μM in the presence of 1,4-BNC-CoA, consistent with the value for two other cholesterol catabolic oxygenases. The Δ(1) ketosteroid dehydrogenase KstD acted with KshAB to cleave steroid ring B with a specific activity eight times greater for a CoA thioester than the corresponding ketone. Finally, modeling 1,4-BNC-CoA into the KshA crystal structure suggested that the CoA moiety binds in a pocket at the mouth of the active site channel and could contribute to substrate specificity. These results indicate that the physiological substrates of KshAB are CoA thioester intermediates of cholesterol side chain degradation and that side chain and ring degradation occur concurrently in Mtb. This finding has implications for steroid metabolites potentially released by the pathogen during infection and for the design of inhibitors for cholesterol-degrading enzymes. The methodologies and rhodococcal enzymes used to generate thioesters will facilitate the further study of cholesterol catabolism.

  13. Criminalisation of Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie

    Different forms of political participation involve different challenges. This paper focuses on challenges to radical activism and particularly the criminalisation of activism.......Different forms of political participation involve different challenges. This paper focuses on challenges to radical activism and particularly the criminalisation of activism....

  14. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  15. Roles of different forms of cytochrome P450 in the activation of the promutagen 6-aminochrysene to genotoxic metabolites in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, H; Mimura, M; Oda, Y; Inui, Y; Shiraga, T; Iwasaki, K; Guengerich, F P; Shimada, T

    1993-07-01

    We reported previously that the potent mutagen 6-aminochrysene is catalyzed principally by rat liver microsomal P4501A and P4502B enzymes to reactive metabolites that induce umu gene expression in O-acetyltransferase-over-expressing strain Salmonella typhimurium NM2009; the proposal was made that there are different mechanisms in the formation of reactive N-hydroxylated and diolepoxide metabolites by P450 enzymes (Yamazaki, H. and Shimada, T., Biochem. Pharmacol., 44, 913-920, 1992). Here we further examined the roles of human liver P450 enzymes and the mechanism of activation of 6-aminochrysene by rat and human P450 enzymes in the Salmonella tester strains. Liver microsomes from 18 different human samples catalyzed activation of 6-aminochrysene more efficiently in S. typhimurium NM2009 than in the original strain of S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. The rates of 6-aminochrysene activation in 18 human liver samples showed good correlation to the contents of P4502B6 as well as contents of P4503A4 and the respective mono-oxygenase activities catalyzed by P4503A4. Among purified P450 enzymes examined, P4501A2 as well as P4503A4 were highly active in transforming 6-amino-chrysene to reactive metabolites, suggesting the involvement of different human P450 enzymes in the reaction. Four human samples that contained relatively high levels of particular P450 enzymes in their microsomes were selected and used for further characterization. Liver microsomes from human samples HL-13 and HL-4 that contained the highest levels of P4502B6 and P4503A4 respectively, were sensitive to the respective antibodies raised against monkey P4502B and human P4503A4; the activity in sample HL-16 having the highest level of P4501A2 was inhibited by anti-P4501A2 IgG. alpha-Naphthoflavone enhanced the activation of 6-aminochrysene very significantly in human liver microsomes enriched in P4503A4 and P4502B6 enzymes. Pentachlorophenol, an inhibitor of acetyltransferase activity, suppressed the

  16. Active nematic gels as active relaxing solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turzi, Stefano S.

    2017-11-01

    I propose a continuum theory for active nematic gels, defined as fluids or suspensions of orientable rodlike objects endowed with active dynamics, that is based on symmetry arguments and compatibility with thermodynamics. The starting point is our recent theory that models (passive) nematic liquid crystals as relaxing nematic elastomers. The interplay between viscoelastic response and active dynamics of the microscopic constituents is naturally taken into account. By contrast with standard theories, activity is not introduced as an additional term of the stress tensor, but it is added as an external remodeling force that competes with the passive relaxation dynamics and drags the system out of equilibrium. In a simple one-dimensional channel geometry, we show that the interaction between nonuniform nematic order and activity results in either a spontaneous flow of particles or a self-organization into subchannels flowing in opposite directions.

  17. Physical Activity During School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino

    It is important, not only on health grounds, to exercise and to be physically active. In school, physical activities have shown to improve the students’ academic behaviour resulting in improved attention and information processing as well as enhanced coping. To stimulate and motivate students...... to be even more active during school hours further enhancing their academic behaviour, it is important to know when, why and how they are active, and their attitude towards different types of physical activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to categorize the physical activities attended by students...... during school hours and to elucidate their attitude towards the different types of activities. The data consisted of observations of lessons followed by group interviews. Analyses of the observations revealed six categories of physical activities, varying from mandatory physical activities, activities...

  18. Active regions, ch. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martres, M.J.; Bruzek, A.

    1977-01-01

    The solar Active Region is an extremely complex phenomenon comprising a large variety of features (active,region phenomena) in the photosphere, chromosphere and corona. The occurrence of the various active phenomena depends on the phase and state of evolution of the AR; their appearance depends on the radiation used for the observation. The various phenomena are described and illustrated with photographs. Several paragraphs are dedicated to magnetic classification of AR, Mt. Wilson Spot Classification, solar activity indices, and solar activity data publications

  19. Lectures Abandoned: Active Learning by Active Seminars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Corry, Aino Vonge

    2012-01-01

    Traditional lecture-based courses are widely criticised for be- ing less eective in teaching. The question is of course what should replace the lectures and various active learning tech- niques have been suggested and studied. In this paper, we report on our experiences of redesigning a software ......- tive seminars as a replacement of traditional lectures, an activity template for the contents of active seminars, an ac- count on how storytelling supported the seminars, as well as reports on our and the students' experiences....

  20. Antifeedant activity of quassinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, V; Polonsky, J; Bhatnagar, S

    1984-10-01

    The antifeedant activity of 13 quassinoids of different structural types has been studied against the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Mulsant) 4th instar larvae and the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Crawer) 5th instar larvae. All quassinoids tested displayed significant activity against the Mexican bean beetle and, thus, do not reveal a simple structure-activity relationship. Five quassinoids were active against the southern armyworm. Interestingly, four of these-bruceantin (I), glaucarubinone (VI), isobruceine A (VIII), and simalikalactone D (XI)-possess the required structural features for antineoplastic activity. The noncytotoxic quassin (X) is an exception; it is active against both pests.

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  2. Illicit Activities and Goondagardi

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The research analyzes the pathways through which exclusionary urban ... casual labour in construction or small-scale trade activities, etc) and ... PATHWAYS TO ILLICIT ACTIVITIES .... VGG Nagar had become a gambling den for some time.

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Strategies BE Active: Connecting Routes + Destinations Real-World Examples Implementation Resource Guide Visual Guide Worksite Physical Activity ... Implementation Maintaining Interest Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example ... Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other ...

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    Full Text Available ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ...

  7. Family Activities for Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ... Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local ...

  9. Major operations and activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

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  11. Active Marine Station Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, ... The table below lists examples of activities classified as moderate-intensity or vigorous-intensity based upon the ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

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    Full Text Available ... Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & ...

  15. Diabetes - keeping active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ways to add more activity to your day. Introduction There are many benefits to being active. Staying ... them emails. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Stand up and move around while making phone ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists ... upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. Top of Page Moderate ...

  17. Activities for Calculators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Arthur A.

    1987-01-01

    Ten activities that give learners in grades 5-8 a chance to explore mathematics with calculators are provided. The activity cards involve such topics as odd addends, magic squares, strange projects, and conjecturing rules. (MNS)

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a breath. Absolute Intensity The amount of energy used by the body per minute of activity. ... or vigorous-intensity based upon the amount of energy used by the body while doing the activity. ...

  19. Major operations and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs ...

  1. USAID Activity Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID Activities dataset is a snapshot of activities supported by USAID including their geographical locations within countries at the time of the snapshot. The...

  2. Interpretable Active Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Richard L.; Chang, Kyu Hyun; Friedler, Sorelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Active learning has long been a topic of study in machine learning. However, as increasingly complex and opaque models have become standard practice, the process of active learning, too, has become more opaque. There has been little investigation into interpreting what specific trends and patterns an active learning strategy may be exploring. This work expands on the Local Interpretable Model-agnostic Explanations framework (LIME) to provide explanations for active learning recommendations. W...

  3. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  4. Activity-based design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2006-01-01

      In many types of activities communicative and material activities are so intertwined that the one cannot be understood without taking the other into account. This is true of maritime and hospital work that are used as examples in the paper. The spatial context of the activity is also important:...... and automatic machinery can replace one another in an activity. It also gives an example of how to use the framework for design....

  5. Impaired systemic tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability and increased dihydrobiopterin in adult falciparum malaria: association with disease severity, impaired microvascular function and increased endothelial activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsin W Yeo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄ is a co-factor required for catalytic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS and amino acid-monooxygenases, including phenylalanine hydroxylase. BH4 is unstable: during oxidative stress it is non-enzymatically oxidized to dihydrobiopterin (BH₂, which inhibits NOS. Depending on BH₄ availability, NOS oscillates between NO synthase and NADPH oxidase: as the BH₄/BH₂ ratio decreases, NO production falls and is replaced by superoxide. In African children and Asian adults with severe malaria, NO bioavailability decreases and plasma phenylalanine increases, together suggesting possible BH₄ deficiency. The primary three biopterin metabolites (BH₄, BH₂ and B₀ [biopterin] and their association with disease severity have not been assessed in falciparum malaria. We measured pterin metabolites in urine of adults with severe falciparum malaria (SM; n=12, moderately-severe malaria (MSM, n=17, severe sepsis (SS; n=5 and healthy subjects (HC; n=20 as controls. In SM, urinary BH₄ was decreased (median 0.16 ¼mol/mmol creatinine compared to MSM (median 0.27, SS (median 0.54, and HC (median 0.34]; p<0.001. Conversely, BH₂ was increased in SM (median 0.91 ¼mol/mmol creatinine, compared to MSM (median 0.67, SS (median 0.39, and HC (median 0.52; p<0.001, suggesting increased oxidative stress and insufficient recycling of BH2 back to BH4 in severe malaria. Overall, the median BH₄/BH₂ ratio was lowest in SM [0.18 (IQR: 0.04-0.32] compared to MSM (0.45, IQR 0.27-61, SS (1.03; IQR 0.54-2.38 and controls (0.66; IQR 0.43-1.07; p<0.001. In malaria, a lower BH₄/BH₂ ratio correlated with decreased microvascular reactivity (r=0.41; p=0.03 and increased ICAM-1 (r=-0.52; p=0.005. Decreased BH4 and increased BH₂ in severe malaria (but not in severe sepsis uncouples NOS, leading to impaired NO bioavailability and potentially increased oxidative stress. Adjunctive therapy to regenerate BH4 may have a role in improving NO

  6. Ras activation by SOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual ...

  7. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  8. Modeling Patterns of Activities using Activity Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Pervasive computing offers an unprecedented opportunity to unobtrusively monitor behavior and use the large amount of collected data to perform analysis of activity-based behavioral patterns. In this paper, we introduce the notion of an activity curve , which represents an abstraction of an individual's normal daily routine based on automatically-recognized activities. We propose methods to detect changes in behavioral routines by comparing activity curves and use these changes to analyze the possibility of changes in cognitive or physical health. We demonstrate our model and evaluate our change detection approach using a longitudinal smart home sensor dataset collected from 18 smart homes with older adult residents. Finally, we demonstrate how big data-based pervasive analytics such as activity curve-based change detection can be used to perform functional health assessment. Our evaluation indicates that correlations do exist between behavior and health changes and that these changes can be automatically detected using smart homes, machine learning, and big data-based pervasive analytics.

  9. Heterogeneous Active Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Thomas; Klotsa, Daphne

    Active systems are composed of self-propelled (active) particles that locally convert energy into motion and exhibit emergent collective behaviors, such as fish schooling and bird flocking. Most works so far have focused on monodisperse, one-component active systems. However, real systems are heterogeneous, and consist of several active components. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of multi-component active matter systems and report on their emergent behavior. We discuss the phase diagram of dynamic states as well as parameters where we see mixing versus segregation.

  10. Active food packaging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Floros, John D

    2004-01-01

    Active packaging technologies offer new opportunities for the food industry, in the preservation of foods. Important active packaging systems currently known to date, including oxygen scavengers, carbon dioxide emitters/absorbers, moisture absorbers, ethylene absorbers, ethanol emitters, flavor releasing/absorbing systems, time-temperature indicators, and antimicrobial containing films, are reviewed. The principle of operation of each active system is briefly explained. Recent technological advances in active packaging are discussed, and food related applications are presented. The effects of active packaging systems on food quality and safety are cited.

  11. Characterization of active members in C and N cycles in the subsurface environment of the Witwatersrand Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, M. R.; Lau, C. M.; Tetteh, G.; Snyder, L.; Kieft, T. L.; Lollar, B. S.; Li, L.; Maphanga, S.; van Heerden, E.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Fracture fluid from various depths and locations in Beatrix gold mine (Gold Fields Ltd.), located in the Welkom region on the 2.9 Ga Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa has been previously studied. Research has shown differential geochemistry data and distinctive community structure which varies from the dominance of different Proteobacterial classes in waters with paleometeoric 18O and 2H signatures including methanotrophs to one dominated by Firmicutes including Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator-like taxa, which are associated with more saline waters with high concentrations of dissolved H2, hydrocarbons from water-rock reaction and 18O and 2H signatures above the Global Meteoric Water Line. Archaea seem to be a minority and all are euryarchaeota including methanogenic genera. The question is:Which of them are actively driving the subsurface C and N cycles? At shaft 3 on level 26, 1.3 kmbls, fracture water from 42 m behind the tunnel wall located in the Main quartzite formation was collected and analyzed. The temperature, pH, Eh, dissolved O2 and salinity of this hydrocarbon-containing fracture water ranged from 35 to 38°C, 8.2 to 8.8, -30 to -100 mV, 0.3 to 30 μM and 4.2 to 4.3 ppt, respectively. Gas comprised 60% CH4 and 20% N2. The same fracture formerly yielded Halicephalobus mephisto, the first reported subsurface nematode. Microorganisms were captured on filters in two field seasons. Defined by 16S rDNA, 2011 January sample contains β-Proteobacteria (50%), Firmicutes (39%) and α- and γ-Proteobacteria (7%). Of the Firmicutes, 90% were represented by Ca. D. audaxviator. All archaea detected are closestly related to sequences also reported from South African gold mines, with Crenarchaeota accounting for 77% of the clones. Prospective methane-oxidation and production were assessed by amplifying genes encoding for particulate methane monooxygenase alpha subunit (pmoA) and methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA). PmoA genes of Type II

  12. Accessibility, activity participation and location of activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter

    2006-01-01

    By investigating relationships between residential location and the availability of facilities, location of activities, trip distances, activity participation and trip frequencies, this paper seeks to contribute to a more detailed and nuanced understanding of the relationships between residential...... location and the amount of daily-life travel in an urban region. The empirical data are from a comprehensive study of residential location and travel in Copenhagen Metropolitan Area. Differences between inner- and outer-area residents in activity frequencies and trip frequencies are modest and partly...... outweigh each other. However, differences in trip distances due to the location of the dwelling relative to concentrations of facilities translate into substantially longer total travelling distances among suburbanites than among inner-city residents....

  13. Defense Human Resources Activity > PERSEREC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Defense Human Resources Activity Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Search Defense Human Resources Activity: Search Defense Human Resources Activity U.S. Department of Defense Defense Human Resources Activity Overview

  14. NEA activities in 1980. 9. Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1980 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, nuclear safety research and licensing, nuclear law, nuclear development and fuel cycle studies technical co-operation, nuclear science organisation and administration are reviewed

  15. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  16. Activated carbon from biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  17. Active ageing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    In the recent decade the concept of active aging has become important in the Western hemisphere. The World Health Organization and The European Union have staged active aging as a core policy area and initiated programs of physical activity, independence and prolonged working lives among...... the elderly. As part of this rearticulation of old age, many new technologies take form. This paper uses a wide concept of technologies (devices, regimes, strategies and ways of doing) and argues that technologies form active aging subjectivities, and on the other hand, that these subjectivities...... in their socio-material practices form active aging. Hence, active aging is a mutual entanglement (Callon and Rabeharisoa 2004) between technologies, practices and subjectivities. The paper is based on four months of participant observations and 17 in-depth interviews with elderly persons conducted at three...

  18. Mechanics of active surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-09-01

    We derive a fully covariant theory of the mechanics of active surfaces. This theory provides a framework for the study of active biological or chemical processes at surfaces, such as the cell cortex, the mechanics of epithelial tissues, or reconstituted active systems on surfaces. We introduce forces and torques acting on a surface, and derive the associated force balance conditions. We show that surfaces with in-plane rotational symmetry can have broken up-down, chiral, or planar-chiral symmetry. We discuss the rate of entropy production in the surface and write linear constitutive relations that satisfy the Onsager relations. We show that the bending modulus, the spontaneous curvature, and the surface tension of a passive surface are renormalized by active terms. Finally, we identify active terms which are not found in a passive theory and discuss examples of shape instabilities that are related to active processes in the surface.

  19. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  20. Optimizing Active Cyber Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wenlian; Xu, Shouhuai; Yi, Xinlei

    2016-01-01

    Active cyber defense is one important defensive method for combating cyber attacks. Unlike traditional defensive methods such as firewall-based filtering and anti-malware tools, active cyber defense is based on spreading "white" or "benign" worms to combat against the attackers' malwares (i.e., malicious worms) that also spread over the network. In this paper, we initiate the study of {\\em optimal} active cyber defense in the setting of strategic attackers and/or strategic defenders. Specific...

  1. Contemporary physical activities

    OpenAIRE

    Tainio, Matti

    2018-01-01

    The customary view of today’s recreational physical activities turns the human movement into a rational practice that is pursued for practical reasons only: for health, vitality, stamina and longevity. This prevalent point of view affects the understanding of the ends, content and quality of physical activities and it creates a bias where the biological, physiological and medical characteristics of physical activities are emphasized while the sensuous, experiential and creative aspects are su...

  2. Zinc triggers microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Tiina M; Higashi, Youichirou; Suh, Sang Won; Escartin, Carole; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Swanson, Raymond A

    2008-05-28

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS. When stimulated by infection, tissue injury, or other signals, microglia assume an activated, "ameboid" morphology and release matrix metalloproteinases, reactive oxygen species, and other proinflammatory factors. This innate immune response augments host defenses, but it can also contribute to neuronal death. Zinc is released by neurons under several conditions in which microglial activation occurs, and zinc chelators can reduce neuronal death in animal models of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we show that zinc directly triggers microglial activation. Microglia transfected with a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) reporter gene showed a severalfold increase in NF-kappaB activity in response to 30 microm zinc. Cultured mouse microglia exposed to 15-30 microm zinc increased nitric oxide production, increased F4/80 expression, altered cytokine expression, and assumed the activated morphology. Zinc-induced microglial activation was blocked by inhibiting NADPH oxidase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or NF-kappaB activation. Zinc injected directly into mouse brain induced microglial activation in wild-type mice, but not in mice genetically lacking PARP-1 or NADPH oxidase activity. Endogenous zinc release, induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, likewise induced a robust microglial reaction, and this reaction was suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. Together, these results suggest that extracellular zinc triggers microglial activation through the sequential activation of NADPH oxidase, PARP-1, and NF-kappaB. These findings identify a novel trigger for microglial activation and a previously unrecognized mechanism by which zinc may contribute to neurological disorders.

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what ...

  4. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  5. CDBG Economic Development Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to economic development, including commercial or industrial rehab, commercial or industrial land acquisition, commercial or industrial...

  6. Automatic NAA. Saturation activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, G.P.; Grass, F.; Kuhnert, M.

    2008-01-01

    A system for Automatic NAA is based on a list of specific saturation activities determined for one irradiation position at a given neutron flux and a single detector geometry. Originally compiled from measurements of standard reference materials, the list may be extended also by the calculation of saturation activities from k 0 and Q 0 factors, and f and α values of the irradiation position. A systematic improvement of the SRM approach is currently being performed by pseudo-cyclic activation analysis, to reduce counting errors. From these measurements, the list of saturation activities is recalculated in an automatic procedure. (author)

  7. Contact activation: a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  8. Activated carbons and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, G.J.; Hancock, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  9. CDBG Public Services Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public services, including senior services, legal services, youth services, employment training, health services, homebuyer counseling, food...

  10. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram ...

  11. CDBG Housing Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to housing, including multifamily rehab, housing services, code enforcement, operation and repair of foreclosed property and public housing...

  12. NEA activities in 1983. 12. Activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the main features of the Agency's work during 1983 and discusses the state and prospects of the nuclear industry in OECD countries. Trends in nuclear power, nuclear development and the fuel cycles nuclear safety technology and licensing, radiological and environmental impacts of nuclear fuel cycle activities, legal affairs, nuclear science, joint undertakings and other NEA joint projects, organisation and administration are reviewed

  13. Russian: An Active Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Nina

    The Active Introduction is one of the modules in an array of materials used in Russian training for beginners at the Foreign Service Institute. It is essentially a catalog of sentences relating to typical daily activities which can be combined to form different communication sequences in dialog form. Students learn to speak Russian through…

  14. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  15. Obesity and physical activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. k.westerterp@hb.unimaas.nl OBJECTIVES: Three aspects of obesity and physical activity are reviewed: whether the obese are inactive; how the activity level can be increased; and which are the effects of an increase in physical

  16. Rhythmic Activities for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Focusing on the development of fundamental rhythm skills involved in music and movement activities, this teaching guide emphasizes activities that will help children express their feelings and communicate with others, develop perceptual and motor skills, and enhance sensory awareness. Suggestions for involving handicapped children and examples of…

  17. Elementary Environmental Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert J.

    This guide presents suggestions for field trips, out-of-doors activities, material for centers, and individualized activities in the teaching of elementary school science and particularly environmental education at the elementary level. The guide includes a section on preparation and procedures for conducting field trips, including sample…

  18. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  19. RTE activity report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The RTE (electric power transport network) is the french manger of the electric power transport. This activity report provides information on the company results for the year 2005: panorama of the year, management and organization, the place of RTE in the european market, the customers, the industrial tool, the environment the human resources, the international activity and the management report. (A.L.B.)

  20. Active and Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…