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Sample records for flat oyster ostrea

  1. Epidemiology of Bonamia ostreae infecting European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) from Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Kerkhoff, S.; Roozenburg, I.; Haenen, O.L.M.; van Gool, A.; Sistermans, W.C.H.; Wijnhoven, S.; Hummel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Production of European flat oysters Ostrea edulis in the Netherlands has been hampered by the presence of the haplosporidian parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is now an enzootic species following its establishment after 1980. We analyzed histopathological data from annual shellfish disease monitoring

  2. Epidemiology of Bonamia ostrea infecting European flat oysters Ostrea edulis from Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Kerkhoff, S.; Roozenburg, I.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Gool, van A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Production of European flat oysters Ostrea edulis in the Netherlands has been hampered by the presence of the haplosporidian parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is now an enzootic species following its establishment after 1980. We analyzed histopathological data from annual shellfish disease monitoring

  3. Feeding traits of the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vismann, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Two oysters, the native flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the non-indigenous Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have partially overlapping distributions in European waters. Relatively little is known about particle selection by O. edulis, and the goal of the present study was to establish baselines...... °C and a salinity of 25. The CR of O. edulis was one to three times lower than that of C. gigas for the three smaller algal species (5−15 µm) but not different for the two larger algae. Algae in the size range 7−32 µm were retained with 100% RE by both oysters, but the smallest alga was retained...

  4. Bonamia exitiosa (Haplosporidia) observed infecting the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis cultured on the Spanish Mediterranean coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco, N.; Villalba, A.; Andree, K.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Lacuesta, B.; Ramilo, A.; Gairin, I.; Furones, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Bonamia exitiosa and Bonamia ostreae are parasites that reproduce within the haemocytes of several oyster species. In Europe, the host species is the flat oyster Ostrea edulis. The parasite B. ostreae has been responsible for mortalities since the late 1970s throughout the European Atlantic coast. B

  5. Consumer Preference and Sensory Properties of the Pacific Cupped Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the European Flat Oyster (Ostrea edulis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Stieger, Markus; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2016-01-01

    Experts in the oyster supply chain (farmers, retailers, and gourmet chefs) in The Netherlands have suggested that the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) has superior sensory qualities compared to the Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas). However, scientific evidence is lacking. The aim of

  6. Consumer Preference and Sensory Properties of the Pacific Cupped Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and the European Flat Oyster (Ostrea edulis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Stieger, Markus; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2015-01-01

    Experts in the oyster supply chain (farmers, retailers, and gourmet chefs) in The Netherlands have suggested that the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) has superior sensory qualities compared to the Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas). However, scientific evidence is lacking. The aim of

  7. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis confirms Ostreidae classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morga Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of its typical architecture, inheritance and small size, mitochondrial (mt DNA is widely used for phylogenetic studies. Gene order is generally conserved in most taxa although some groups show considerable variation. This is particularly true in the phylum Mollusca, especially in the Bivalvia. During the last few years, there have been significant increases in the number of complete mitochondrial sequences available. For bivalves, 35 complete mitochondrial genomes are now available in GenBank, a number that has more than doubled in the last three years, representing 6 families and 23 genera. In the current study, we determined the complete mtDNA sequence of O. edulis, the European flat oyster. We present an analysis of features of its gene content and genome organization in comparison with other Ostrea, Saccostrea and Crassostrea species. Results The Ostrea edulis mt genome is 16 320 bp in length and codes for 37 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 23 tRNAs on the same strand. As in other Ostreidae, O. edulis mt genome contains a split of the rrnL gene and a duplication of trnM. The tRNA gene set of O. edulis, Ostrea denselamellosa and Crassostrea virginica are identical in having 23 tRNA genes, in contrast to Asian oysters, which have 25 tRNA genes (except for C. ariakensis with 24. O. edulis and O. denselamellosa share the same gene order, but differ from other Ostreidae and are closer to Crassostrea than to Saccostrea. Phylogenetic analyses reinforce the taxonomic classification of the 3 families Ostreidae, Mytilidae and Pectinidae. Within the Ostreidae family the results also reveal a closer relationship between Ostrea and Saccostrea than between Ostrea and Crassostrea. Conclusions Ostrea edulis mitogenomic analyses show a high level of conservation within the genus Ostrea, whereas they show a high level of variation within the Ostreidae family. These features provide useful information for further

  8. Biochemical and volatile organic compound profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas) cultivated in the Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Medina, Isabel; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two important different geographical cultivation areas in the Netherlands (Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen) on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

  9. Effects of microplastics on European flat oysters, Ostrea edulis and their associated benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dannielle Senga

    2016-09-01

    Plastic pollution is recognised as an emerging threat to aquatic ecosystems, with microplastics now the most abundant type of marine debris. Health effects caused by microplastics have been demonstrated at the species level, but impacts on ecological communities remain unknown. In this study, impacts of microplastics on the health and biological functioning of European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and on the structure of associated macrofaunal assemblages were assessed in an outdoor mesocosm experiment using intact sediment cores. Biodegradable and conventional microplastics were added at low (0.8 μg L(-1)) and high (80 μg L(-1)) doses in the water column repeatedly for 60 days. Effects on the oysters were minimal, but benthic assemblage structures differed and species richness and the total number of organisms were ∼1.2 and 1.5 times greater in control mesocosms than in those exposed to high doses of microplastics. Notably, abundances of juvenile Littorina sp. (periwinkles) and Idotea balthica (an isopod) were ∼2 and 8 times greater in controls than in mesocosms with the high dose of either type of microplastic. In addition, the biomass of Scrobicularia plana (peppery furrow shell clam) was ∼1.5 times greater in controls than in mesocosms with the high dose of microplastics. This work indicates that repeated exposure to high concentrations of microplastics could alter assemblages in an important marine habitat by reducing the abundance of benthic fauna.

  10. Role of microRNAs in the immunity process of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis against bonamiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Laura; Villalba, Antonio; Kerkhoven, Ron H; Abollo, Elvira

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼22nt) non-coding regulatory single strand RNA molecules that reduce stability and/or translation of sequence-complementary target. miRNAs are a key component of gene regulatory networks and have been involved in a wide variety of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Many miRNAs are broadly conserved among the animal lineages and even between invertebrates and vertebrates. The European flat oyster Ostrea edulis is highly susceptible to infection with Bonamia ostreae, an intracellular parasite able to survive and proliferate within oyster haemocytes. Mollusc haemocytes play a key role in the immune response of molluscs as main cellular effectors. The roles of miRNAs in the immune response of O. edulis to bonamiosis were analysed using a commercial microarray platform (miRCURY LNA™ v2, Exiqon) for miRNAs. Expression of miRNAs in haemocytes from oysters with different bonamiosis intensity was compared. Differential expression was detected in 63 and 76 miRNAs when comparing heavily-affected with non-affected oysters and with lightly-affected ones, respectively. Among them, 19 miRNAs are known to be linked to immune response, being responsible of proliferation and activation of macrophages, inflammation, apoptosis and/or oxidative damage, which is consistent with the modulation of their expression in oyster haemocytes due to bonamiosis.

  11. Screening of repetitive motifs inside the genome of the flat oyster (Ostrea edulis): Transposable elements and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Manuel; Bello, Xabier; Álvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Pardo, Belen G; Sánchez, Laura; Carlsson, Jens; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Bartolomé, Carolina; Maside, Xulio; Martinez, Paulino

    2015-12-01

    The flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) is one of the most appreciated molluscs in Europe, but its production has been greatly reduced by the parasite Bonamia ostreae. Here, new generation genomic resources were used to analyse the repetitive fraction of the oyster genome, with the aim of developing molecular markers to face this main oyster production challenge. The resulting oyster database, consists of two sets of 10,318 and 7159 unique contigs (4.8 Mbp and 6.8 Mbp in total length) representing the oyster's genome (WG) and haemocyte transcriptome (HT), respectively. A total of 1083 sequences were identified as TE-derived, which corresponded to 4.0% of WG and 1.1% of HT. They were clustered into 142 homology groups, most of which were assigned to the Penelope order of retrotransposons, and to the Helitron and TIR DNA-transposons. Simple repeats and rRNA pseudogenes, also made a significant contribution to the oyster's genome (0.5% and 0.3% of WG and HT, respectively).The most frequent short tandem repeats identified in WG were tetranucleotide motifs while trinucleotide motifs were in HT. Forty identified microsatellite loci, 20 from each database, were selected for technical validation. Success was much lower among WG than HT microsatellites (15% vs 55%), which could reflect higher variation in anonymous regions interfering with primer annealing. All microsatellites developed adjusted to Hardy-Weinberg proportions and represent a useful tool to support future breeding programmes and to manage genetic resources of natural flat oyster beds.

  12. Feasibility of Flat Oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) restoration in the Dutch part of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaal, A.C.; Kamermans, P.; Have, van der T.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Sas, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the recovery of flat oyster beds, knowledge is required of the conditions under which the active restoration of this species in the North Sea can be successfully implemented. This is the subject of the current feasibility study. Living flat oysters have occasionally been found in wind farms. Fla

  13. Occurrence of the haemocyte parasite Bonamia sp. in flat oysters Ostrea puelchana farmed in San Antonio Bay (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeck, Marina A; Montes, Jaime

    2005-02-28

    Culture of native flat oysters Ostrea puelchana d'Orbigny in San Antonio Bay (San Matías Gulf, Argentina) began in 1995. After elevated mortality (33%) occurred in September 1996, 18 mo after immersion, histopathological analysis and evaluation of parasitic prevalence was carried out. In October 1997, after 31 mo of cultivation, cumulative mortality was 80%, and in December of the same year, when individuals reached marketable size, mortality was 95% and culture was discontinued. The present study describes the haemocytic parasitism that affected O. puelchana, and suggests that a Bonamia sp. was the etiological agent. This parasite should be considered as a different species from Bonamia sp. detected in Australia and New Zealand until more studies are made to determine the correct taxonomy. This work constitutes the first record of this haemocyte parasite in flat oysters from the Argentinean coast.

  14. Disseminated neoplasia in flat oysters Ostrea edulis from Galicia (NW Spain): occurrence, ultrastructural aspects and relationship with bonamiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Fuentes, José; Villalba, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN) was one of the most important pathological conditions found in cultured flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) from different geographical origins grow in Galicia (NW Spain), during a two years selective breeding programme to produce oysters less susceptible to bonamiosis. Histological characteristics observed in oysters affected by DN included intense infiltration of connective tissue of various organs (gills, stomach, digestive gland and gonad) by large undifferentiated cells, with a large nucleus and a high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio. The main ultrastructural features were predominance of euchromatin over heterochromatin that was arrayed in small clumps in the nucleus, prominent granular nucleolus, swollen mitochondria with few cristae and high number of free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. A seasonal pattern of DN prevalence was detected, with higher values in spring-summer, but there were no significant differences between geographic origins or families within these origins. However, the intensity of the disease was significantly different between origins; oysters originating outside of Galicia (particularly those originating from Ireland) were more susceptible to develop advanced DN. DN (8%) and bonamiosis (4.9%) were found concurrently in oysters. The nature and significance of this association warrants more investigation to determine its importance, if any.

  15. Comparison of haemocytic parameters among flat oyster Ostrea edulis stocks with different susceptibility to bonamiosis and the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comesaña, Pilar; Casas, Sandra M; Cao, Asunción; Abollo, Elvira; Arzul, Isabelle; Morga, Benjamin; Villalba, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Farming of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis in Europe is severely constrained by the protozoan Bonamia ostreae. The introduction of the resistant species Crassostrea gigas has been a relief for the farmers, while the pilot programmes to select O. edulis strains resistant to bonamiosis performed in various countries can be seen as a promising strategy to minimise the effects of bonamiosis. However, the physiological bases of this differential susceptibility remain unknown. A search for an explanation of the intra and interspecific differences in oyster susceptibility to bonamiosis was accomplished by comparing some immune parameters among various O. edulis stocks and C. gigas. On December 2003, naïve and Bonamia-relatively resistant flat oysters from Ireland, Galician flat oysters and Pacific oysters C. gigas were deployed in a Galician area affected by bonamiosis; haemolymph samples were taken in February and May 2004. A new oyster deployment at the same place was carried out on June 2004 and haemolymph sampling was performed on April 2005. On November 2004, new sets of Irish flat oysters and C. gigas were deployed in Ireland and haemolymph sampling was performed in June 2005. Various haemocytic parameters were measured: total and differential haemocyte count, phagocytic ability, respiratory burst (superoxide anion [O(2)(-)] and hydrogen peroxide [H(2)O(2)]) and nitric oxide [NO] production. The comparison of the parameters was carried out at 3 levels: (1) between O. edulis and C. gigas, (2) among O. edulis stocks with different susceptibility to bonamiosis, and (3) between Bonamia-infected and non infected O. edulis. In addition, haemocyte-B. ostreaein vitro encounters were performed to analyse interspecific differences in the haemocytic respiratory burst, using flow cytometry. Significant differences associated with total and differential haemocyte count, and respiratory burst between O. edulis and C. gigas were detected, which could be linked to differences in

  16. Growth and the energy budget of flat oyster (Ostrea edulis in early ontogenesis

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    N. A. Sitnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularities of growth and dynamics of balance constituents of the energy budget of the flat oyster larvae in development are investigated. It is shown, that the linear growth in early ontogenesis is described by the exponential equation with high accuracy. Parameters of the functions connecting length, height and weight of larvae are defined. The quantitative characteristic of the energy balance elements of oysters larvae is given. It is shown, that during development from a veliger stage to a pediveliger the energy expenditures for growth, metabolism and nutriment assimilation increase more than 10 times. Net efficiency of larvae growth (coefficient К2 varies within 61.6–62.8 % during development, and the magnitude of a specific daily ration of oyster larvae equals 32–35 % of the energy equivalent of body weight.

  17. Cadmium bioaccumulation in European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis from Middle Adriatic Sea (San Benedetto del Tronto district, Italy

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    Cesare Ciccarelli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs represent an important source of cadmium exposure in humans, in particular oysters, because of their high filter feeding capability and high concentration of metal-binding metallothionein in tissues. In this study the authors investigated the difference in cadmium bioaccumulation in European flat oysters harvested from production areas in the district of San Benedetto del Tronto (Ascoli Piceno province, Italy, as a function of their origin (farming or natural beds and the time of gathering. The beds lie 3 nm off-shore at a depth of 20-40 m and are collected by dredging. In the farms, baskets are suspended in the water column 2.5-3 nm offshore at a depth of 4 m. The authors analysed the results of cadmium monitoring plan carried out in oyster natural beds for a total of 15 samples collected from 2004 to 2012 and in two oyster farms for a total of 11 samples from 2009 to 2012. Although the few data did not allow to find a significant statistical association, they suggested two findings: i cadmium concentration in oysters from natural beds seemed to be lower than in farmed oysters; and ii in farmed oysters cadmium concentration even exceeded allowed maximum level for human consumption, in particular in autumn. The vertical stratification in the water column of phytoplankton and a cadmium dilution at oyster gonadal maturation might cause changes in oyster cadmium accumulation.

  18. Bonamia ostreae in the New Zealand oyster Ostrea chilensis: a new host and geographic record for this haplosporidian parasite.

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    Lane, Henry S; Webb, Stephen Charles; Duncan, John

    2016-02-11

    Previous reports of the haplosporidian parasite Bonamia ostreae have been restricted to the Northern Hemisphere, including Europe, and both eastern and western North America. This species is reported for the first time in New Zealand infecting the flat oyster Ostrea chilensis. Histological examination of 149 adult oysters identified 119 (79.9%) infected with Bonamia microcells. Bonamia generic PCR of several oysters followed by DNA sequencing of a 300 bp portion of the 18S rDNA gene produced a 100% match with that of B. ostreae. All DNA-sequenced products also produced a B. ostreae PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) profile. Bonamia species-specific PCRs further detected single infections of B. exitiosa (2.7%), B. ostreae (40.3%), and concurrent infections (53.7%) with these 2 Bonamia species identifying overall a Bonamia prevalence of 96.6%. Detailed histological inspection revealed 2 microcell types. An infection identified by PCR as B. ostreae histologically presented small microcells (mean ± SE diameter = 1.28 ± 0.16 µm, range = 0.9-2 µm, n = 60) commonly with eccentric nuclei. A B. exitiosa infection exhibited larger microcells (mean ± SE diameter = 2.12 ± 0.27 µm, range = 1.5-4 µm, n = 60) with more concentric nuclei. Concurrent infections of both Bonamia species, as identified by PCR, exhibited both types of microcells. DNA barcoding of the B. ostreae-infected oyster host confirmed the identification as O. chilensis. A suite of other parasites that accompany O. chilensis are reported here for the first time in mixed infection with B. ostreae including apicomplexan X (76.5%), Microsporidium rapuae (0.7%) and Bucephalus longicornutus (30.2%).

  19. Molecular characterisation of TNF, AIF, dermatopontin and VAMP genes of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and analysis of their modulation by diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Laura; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J; Abollo, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Bonamiosis and disseminated neoplasia (DN) are the most important diseases affecting cultured flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) in Galicia (NW Spain). Previous research of the response of O. edulis against bonamiosis by suppression subtractive hybridisation yielded a partial expressed sequence tag of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and allograft inflammatory factor (AIF), as well as the whole open reading frame for dermatopontin and vesicle-associated membrane (VAMP). Herein, the complete open reading frames of TNF and AIF genes were determined by the rapid amplification of cDNA, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the four genes were characterised. Phylogenetic relationships for each gene were studied using maximum likelihood parameters. Quantitative-PCR assays were also performed in order to analyse the modulation of the expression of these genes by bonamiosis and disseminated neoplasia. Gene expression profiles were studied in haemolymph cells and in various organs (gill, gonad, mantle and digestive gland) of oysters affected by bonamiosis, DN, and both diseases with regard to non-affected oysters (control). TNF expression in haemolymph cells was up-regulated at heavy stage of bonamiosis but its expression was not affected by DN. AIF expression was up-regulated at heavy stage of bonamiosis in haemolymph cells and mantle, which is associated with heavy inflammatory response, and in haemolymph cells of oysters affected by DN. AIF expression was, however, down-regulated in other organs as gills and gonads. Dermatopontin expression was down-regulated in haemolymph cells and digestive gland of oysters affected by bonamiosis, but DN had no significant effect on its expression. Gills and gonads showed up-regulation of dermatopontin expression associated with bonamiosis. There were significant differences in the expression of TNF and VAMP depending on the bonamiosis intensity stage whereas no significant differences were detected between light and heavy severity degrees of

  20. Influence of the sponge Cliothosa hancocki on the european flat oyster bed (Ostrea edulis) in the Mar Menor (Murcia, Se Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosique, M. J.; Rocamora, J. [Instituto Espanol de Oceanografia C.O., de Murcia- apdo, Murcia (Spain); Cano, J. [C.O. de La Coruna- apdo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    In the flat oyster bed in the coastal lagoon of the Mar Menor, (Murcia) the presence of the borer sponge Cliothosa hancocki has been detected. The reason why the flat oyster of this lagoon, and in particular its valves, are becoming the main host to this species could be due to the bottom is almost totally (85%) covered by silt, this borer species, which lives on substrates made up of calcium carbonate, has no choice but to settle on the valves of these molluscs.

  1. Oyster parasites Bonamia ostreae and B. exitiosa co-occur in Galicia (NW Spain): spatial distribution and infection dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramilo, Andrea; González, Mar; Carballal, María J; Darriba, Susana; Abollo, Elvira; Villalba, Antonio

    2014-07-24

    Bonamiosis constrains the flat oyster industry worldwide. The protistan species Bonamia ostreae had been considered solely responsible for this disease in Europe, but the report of B. exitiosa infecting Ostrea edulis 5 yr ago in Galicia (NW Spain), and subsequently in other European countries, raised the question of the relevance of each species in bonamiosis. The spatial distribution of B. exitiosa and B. ostreae in Galicia was addressed by sampling 7 natural O. edulis beds and 3 culture raft areas, up to 3 times in the period 2009 to 2010. B. ostreae infected flat oysters in every natural bed and every raft culture area. True B. exitiosa infections (histological diagnosis) were detected in every raft culture area but only in 2 natural beds, i.e. in 4 rías. PCR-positive results for B. exitiosa were recorded in 4 out of 5 beds where true infections were not found, thus the occurrence of B. exitiosa in those 4 beds cannot be ruled out. Additionally, 4 cohorts of hatchery-produced oyster spat were transferred to a raft to analyse Bonamia spp. infection dynamics through oyster on-growing. The highest percentages of oysters PCR-positive for both Bonamia spp. were recorded in the first months of on-growing; other peaks of PCR-positive diagnosis were successively lower. Differences in the percentage of PCR-positive cases and in the prevalence of true infection between B. exitiosa and B. ostreae through on-growing were not significant. Our results support that B. exitiosa is adapted to infect O. edulis in the Galician marine ecosystem.

  2. Seasonal variation in the condition index, meat yield and biochemical composition of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis (Linnaeus, 1758 from the Dardanelles, Turkey

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    Harun Yildiz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Dardanelles between October 2007 and August 2009 when condition index, meat yield, biochemical compositions and environmental parameters of seawater were investigated and the study area was found to have available conditions for cultivation. Investigation of the study area showed a positive correlation in particular among condition index, seasonal variation of temperature, protein, fat and chlorophyll-a; a negative correlation was seen between them and carbohydrate value. It was clear from the two years study that the most ideal period for oyster harvest is April and August especially when condition index was maximum followed by a winter with no oyster yield is available in terms of the related processes involving oyster cultivation.

  3. Seasonal variation in the condition index, meat yield and biochemical composition of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis (Linnaeus, 1758 from the Dardanelles, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Acarlı

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Dardanelles between October 2007 and August 2009 when condition index, meat yield, biochemical compositions and environmental parameters of seawater were investigated and the study area was found to have available conditions for cultivation. Investigation of the study area showed a positive correlation in particular among condition index, seasonal variation of temperature, protein, fat and chlorophyll-a; a negative correlation was seen between them and carbohydrate value. It was clear from the two years study that the most ideal period for oyster harvest is April and August especially when condition index was maximum followed by a winter with no oyster yield is available in terms of the related processes involving oyster cultivation.

  4. OYSTERECOVER: The Efficiency of Different Types of Oyster Spat Collectors for Ostrea edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this task is to potentially identify a way to develop more efficient spat collecting techniques that may compensate for the lower survival rate of the oysters caused by the Bonamia ostreae parasite. As part of the project a review of the efficiency of different spat collectors was conduct

  5. Heavy metal complexation in polluted molluscs. II. Oysters (Ostrea edulis and Crassostrea gigas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.G.; Nickless, G.

    1977-06-01

    Cadmium, zinc and copper, accumulated from polluted habitats by the oysters Ostrea edulis and Crassostrea gigas, were studued. Three distinct low molecular weight (less than 3000 daltons) zinc complexes were separated from highly contaminated C. gigas, one of which may be a complex with the amino acid taurine. Only one of these zinc complexes was present in less contaminatd specimens of O. edulis. On gel permeation chromatography of oyster extracts, copper was eluted together with amino acids (principally taurine) and the betaine homarine. No evidence of metallothionein type proteins was found.

  6. Etude des intéractions entre le parasite Bonamia ostreae et son hôte, huître plate Ostrea edulis in vitro (Diaporama)

    OpenAIRE

    Morga, Benjamin; Arzul, Isabelle; Chollet, Bruno; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Renault, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Bonamiosis is a disease affecting the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and caused by the protozoa parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is affiliated to the haplosporidia order and the cercozoa phylum. This parasite is mainly intracellular, infecting haemocytes, circulating cells playing an important role in the oyster's defence mechanisms. Even though the parasite's cycle has not been completely understood yet, direct infection from infected oysters to healthy oysters is possible. This leads us to think ...

  7. Etude des intéractions entre le parasite Bonamia ostreae et son hôte, huître plate Ostrea edulis in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Morga, Benjamin; Arzul, Isabelle; Chollet, Bruno; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Renault, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Bonamiosis is a disease affecting the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and caused by the protozoa parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is affiliated to the haplosporidia order and the cercozoa phylum. This parasite is mainly intracellular, infecting haemocytes, circulating cells playing an important role in the oyster's defence mechanisms. Even though the parasite's cycle has not been completely understood yet, direct infection from infected oysters to healthy oysters is possible. This leads us to think ...

  8. Uptake and accumulation of naphthalene by the Oyster ostrea edulis, in a flow-through system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.T.; Mix, M.C.; Schaffer, R.L.; Bunting, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A flow-through system was used to follow naphthalene and naphthalene metabolite accumulation in the seawater and in the tissue of the oyster Ostrea edulis. After 72 h, 82.5% of the naphthalene carbon was recovered from the system. Glucose was added to seawater to stimulate the pathways of glucose metabolism in the oysters Streptomycin (100 ppm) reduced microbial oxidation of naphthalene and glucose, and reduced bacterial growth. However, even in the presence of streptomycin, microbial oxidation of naphthalene was considerable. The main oxidation product recovered from seawater was /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Radioactivity was also associated with compounds which separated by TLC with 2- and 1- naphthol. The pattern of naphthalene uptake and accumulation in oyster tissues was relatively constant after only a few hours of exposure to naphthalene. The potential of tissues to accumulate naphthalene was shown to be a function of multiple variables such as nutritional state, lipid concentration, length of exposure to naphthalene, and the external naphthalene concentration. Carbon-14-labeled metabolites derived from /sup 14/C-naphthalene were consistently recovered from digests of the oyster tissues. Non-CO/sub 2/ alkaline-soluble substances were the primary metabolites. Hexane-extractable substances, which separated by TLC with known standards of 2- and 1- naphthol, were consistently recovered from seawater and tissue digests. It was not possible to conclude that these metabolites were a result of naphthalene metabolism by oyster enzyme systems.

  9. Biochemical correlates of dissolved mercury uptake by the oyster Ostrea edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrench, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    From previous work, the equilibrium concentration factor for dissolved mercury in the digestive gland of Ostrea edulis Linnaeus was found to be three to four times higher than that in the gills. In the present study, an analysis of soluble protein revealed values of 49.3 +- 14.2 mg g wet tissue/sup -1/ for the digestive gland and 0.7 +- 0.1 mg g wet tissue/sup -1/ for the gills. Starvation significantly reduces the soluble protein level of the digestive gland to 31.1 +- 6.4 mg g/sup -1/ and that of the gills to below the limit of detection. These results suggest that the difference in concentration factors between the gills and digestive gland may be based on a quantitative difference in macromolecular binding sites. However, the uptake of dissolved mercury over a period of 48 h was considerably greater in the gills, so that although the soluble protein content of the tissue may influence the final concentration factor, it does not appear to affect the rate at which this equilibrium is achieved. A more detailed investigation of the mechanism of dissolved mercury uptake by oyster gills has been carried out using isolated tissues. The process is inhibited by 5mM 2-4 dinitrophenol, by the absence of a readily metabolizable substrate (dextrose) in the uptake medium, and by 30mM K/sup +/. The effect of K/sup +/ necessitated further investigation with a specific inhibitor of K/sup +/ transport. Strophanthin G (ouabain), at a concentration of 0.01 mM, caused a significant increase in mercury uptake.

  10. On influence of some ecological factors on intensity of the oyster filtration (Ostrea edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sitnik

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative regularities of the filtration feeding of the Black Sea oyster depending on some ecological factors were studied. Influence of food concentration on filtration activity of shellfish is described. Dependences of filtration speed are certain on the body mass of oysters under different temperature conditions were found. The seasonal changes of its intensity in the Kerch Strait and the Donuzlav Estuary are illustrated. Influence of water salinity on filtration activity of the oyster is established.

  11. Construction of an Ostrea edulis database from genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained from Bonamia ostreae infected haemocytes: Development of an immune-enriched oligo-microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Belén G; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cao, Asunción; Ramilo, Andrea; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Planas, Josep V; Villalba, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-12-01

    The flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, is one of the main farmed oysters, not only in Europe but also in the United States and Canada. Bonamiosis due to the parasite Bonamia ostreae has been associated with high mortality episodes in this species. This parasite is an intracellular protozoan that infects haemocytes, the main cells involved in oyster defence. Due to the economical and ecological importance of flat oyster, genomic data are badly needed for genetic improvement of the species, but they are still very scarce. The objective of this study is to develop a sequence database, OedulisDB, with new genomic and transcriptomic resources, providing new data and convenient tools to improve our knowledge of the oyster's immune mechanisms. Transcriptomic and genomic sequences were obtained using 454 pyrosequencing and compiled into an O. edulis database, OedulisDB, consisting of two sets of 10,318 and 7159 unique sequences that represent the oyster's genome (WG) and de novo haemocyte transcriptome (HT), respectively. The flat oyster transcriptome was obtained from two strains (naïve and tolerant) challenged with B. ostreae, and from their corresponding non-challenged controls. Approximately 78.5% of 5619 HT unique sequences were successfully annotated by Blast search using public databases. A total of 984 sequences were identified as being related to immune response and several key immune genes were identified for the first time in flat oyster. Additionally, transcriptome information was used to design and validate the first oligo-microarray in flat oyster enriched with immune sequences from haemocytes. Our transcriptomic and genomic sequencing and subsequent annotation have largely increased the scarce resources available for this economically important species and have enabled us to develop an OedulisDB database and accompanying tools for gene expression analysis. This study represents the first attempt to characterize in depth the O. edulis haemocyte transcriptome in

  12. Using particle dispersal models to assist in the conservation and recovery of the overexploited native oyster (Ostrea edulis) in an enclosed sea lough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, David; Kregting, Louise; Elsäßer, Björn; Kennedy, Richard; Roberts, Dai

    2016-02-01

    Oyster populations around the world have seen catastrophic decline which has been largely attributed to overexploitation, disease and pollution. While considerable effort and resources have been implemented into restoring these important environmental engineers, the success of oyster populations is often limited by poor understanding of site-specific dispersal patterns of propagules. Water-borne transport is a key factor controlling or regulating the dispersal of the larval stage of benthic marine invertebrates which have limited mobility. The distribution of the native oyster Ostrea edulis in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, together with their densities and population structure at subtidal and intertidal sites has been documented at irregular intervals between 1997 and 2013. This paper revisits this historical data and considers whether different prevailing environmental conditions can be used to explain the distribution, densities and population structure of O. edulis in Strangford Lough. The approach adopted involved comparing predictive 2D hydrodynamic models coupled with particle tracking to simulate the dispersal of oyster larvae with historical and recent field records of the distribution of both subtidal and intertidal, populations since 1995. Results from the models support the hypothesis that commercial stocks of O. edulis introduced into Strangford Lough in the 1990s resulted in the re-establishment of wild populations of oysters in the Northern Basin which in turn provided a potential source of propagules for subtidal populations. These results highlight that strategic site selection (while inadvertent in the case of the introduced population in 1995) for the re-introduction of important shellfish species can significantly accelerate their recovery and restoration.

  13. Detoxication of metals by marine bivalves: an ultrastructural study of the compartmentation of copper and zinc in the oyster ostrea edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, S.G.; Pirie, B.J.S.; Cheyne, A.R.; Coombs, T.L.; Grant, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation of the mechanisms of detoxication of copper and zinc by the oyster Ostrea edulis (L) has been carried out using naturally occurring ''green-sick'' (contamination by copper) and unpolluted oysters. Electron microprobe X-ray analysis of tissues in the electron microscope gives direct evidence for the structural compartmentation of copper and zinc in separate, specific, granular amoebocytes. The metals are immobilized in membrane-limited vesicles as different chemical compounds, copper being associated with sulphur and zinc with phosphorus. Chemical analyses of serum and tissues of normal and ''green-sick'' oysters indicate that (a) Cu and Zn are accumulated independently, (b) the Cu and Zn in the serum, while higher than in the surrounding sea water, are maintained at a 10-fold smaller level than the tissues, (c) toxicity is reduced by active uptake from the serum into granular amoebocytes, where it is further reduced by compartmentation in membrane-limited vesicles. It is calculated that the individual cell types may contain as much as 13,000 ppm Cu and 25,000 ppm Zn.

  14. In vitro Culture of Bonamia ostreae and Its Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Chunyan; Wang; Fei; Yang; Lianru; Wu; Shaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years,bonamiosis has frequently occurred in European areas,which has caused the death of oyster in a wide range and brought enormous economic losses to the breeding industry of oyster. Nowadays,the study on Bonamia sp. is still in the elementary phase. The technology of pathogen’s culture in vitro is the basis for further study on the pathogenesis of Bonamia sp.,its interaction with hosts and the prevention and control of the related disease. In this study,total tissues of oyster identified by PCR were used as culture media to in vitro culture. After one month,they were identified by the method of in situ hybridization. It was found that the results of in situ hybridization were accordant with PCR results. And Bonamia ostreae were detected by in situ hybridization after B. ostreae were cultured for one month. We successfully established a simple and feasible method for in vitro culturing B. ostreae.

  15. Evolution de la situation épizootiologique en Bretagne en 1983 suite au développement de Bonamia ostreae

    OpenAIRE

    Tige, Gilbert; Grizel, Henri; Cochennec, Nathalie; Rabouin, Marie-agnès

    1984-01-01

    Bonamia ostreae diseease is always present in Brittany in the different farming areaa except few free natural oysters beds. Yet Bonamiose disease have not increased in the Bay of Cancale on oysters initialy very few parasited. The technical modifications of rearing and the eradication on sick oysters could explain this situation.

  16. Concomitant herpes-like virus infections in hatchery-reared larvae and nursery-cultured spat Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, T; Le Deuff, R M; Chollet, B; Cochennec, N; Gérard, A

    2000-09-28

    Concomitant sporadic high mortalities were reported in France in May 1994 among batches of hatchery-reared larval Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas and European flat oysters Ostrea edulis in 2 hatcheries, and in June and July 1994 among batches of cultured spat of both species in a shellfish nursery. Histological observation showed the presence of cellular abnormalities in moribund animals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of herpes-like virus particles in infected larvae and spat of both oyster species. This is the first description of a herpes-like virus infection in larval O. edulis. Viruses observed in diseased larvae and spat of both species are similar with respect to ultrastructure and morphogenesis. They were detected simultaneously in C. gigas and O. edulis larvae and spat, indicating possible interspecific transmission. Moreover, these viruses are associated with high mortality rates in both oyster species. An electron microscopic examination revealed hemocytes with condensed chromatin and extensive perinuclear fragmentation of chromatin. These data suggest that herpes-like viruses infecting oysters may induce apoptosis in oyster hemocytes.

  17. Phylogeny and Species Diversity of Gulf of California Oysters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial loci (COI and 16S) used to infer the phylogeny of oysters in the genus Ostrea along the Pacific coast of North...

  18. Phaeobacter inhibens as biocontrol agent against Vibrio vulnificus in oyster models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Gram, Lone

    2016-08-01

    Molluscan shellfish can cause food borne diseases and here we investigated if addition of Vibrio-antagonising bacteria could reduce Vibrio vulnificus in model oyster systems and prevent its establishment in live animals. Phaeobacter inhibens, which produces an antibacterial compound, tropodithietic acid (TDA), inhibited V. vulnificus as did pure TDA (MIC of 1-3.9 μM). P. inhibens DSM 17395 (at 10(6) cfu/ml) eradicated 10(5) cfu/ml V. vulnificus CMCP6 (a rifampicin resistant variant) from a co-culture oyster model system (oyster juice) whereas the pathogen grew to 10(7) cfu/ml when co-cultured with a TDA negative Phaeobacter mutant. P. inhibens grew well in oyster juice to 10(8) CFU/ml and sterile filtered samples from these cultures were inhibitory to Vibrio spp. P. inhibens established itself in live European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and remained at 10(5) cfu/g for five days. However, the presence of P. inhibens could not prevent subsequently added V. vulnificus from entering the live animals, likely because of too low levels of the biocontrol strain. Whilst the oyster model studies provided indication that P. inhibens DSM 17395 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus further optimization is need in the actual animal rearing situation.

  19. Ostrea puelchana (D'Orbigny 1842: a new host of Tumidotheres maculatus (Say, 1818 in northern Patagonia, Argentina Ostrea puelchana D’Orbigny 1842 nuevo hospedador de Tumidotheres maculatus (Say, 1818 en el norte de Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Socorro Doldan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumidotheres maculatus has been reported as a commensal of Mytilus platensis and Atrina seminuda and suggested as a parasite of Aequipecten tehuelchus in San Matías Gulf (SMG. The native flat oyster, Ostrea puelchana, has been studied in SMG for decades, and no crab-oyster association has been reported. In autumn-spring 2009 and 2010, oysters were collected from four banks in SMG, and the occurrence of T. maculatus inside the pallial cavity of O. puelchana was recorded. The prevalence varied between sites, with 0-12.5% at El Sótano, 0-16.7% at Caleta de los Loros, and no crabs found in the samples from Las Grutas and Puerto Lobos. Infected oysters hosted a single crab. Oysters were infested by either one male (47.7% or one female (15.1%. A positive but low correlation was found for male crab size and oyster size. The presence of these crabs inside the oysters could be due to the overlap of the distribution areas of O. puelchana and other bivalve hosts. Our findings may also be a consequence of local fishing. Commercial extraction of traditional hosts may have caused crabs to look for new hosts.En el Golfo San Matías (GSM, Tumidotheres maculatus ha sido registrado como comensal de Mytilus platensis y Atrina seminuda, y se lo ha indicado como parásito de Aequipecten tehuelchus. La ostra plana nativa Ostrea puelchana ha sido objeto de estudio por décadas en el GSM y no existen precedentes sobre una asociación entre las ostras y el cangrejo pinotérido. Durante otoño-primavera de 2009 y de 2010 se recolectaron ostras de cuatro bancos del GSM, registrándose la ocurrencia de T. maculatus en la cavidad paleal de O. puelchana. La prevalencia varió entre los sitios: 0-12,5% en El Sótano, 0-16,7% en Caleta de los Loros; no se encontraron cangrejos en los muestreos en Las Grutas y en Puerto Lobos. Se encontró un único cangrejo por hospedador; las ostras estuvieron infestadas por cangrejos macho (47,7%, o hembras (15,1%. Se encontró una

  20. Larvae of commercial  and other oyster species in Thailand (Andaman Sea and Gulf of Thailand)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussarawit, Somchai; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    reference to changes in shell morphology. Planktonic oyster larvae were collected in the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand. Different species of oyster larvae were found in the genera Crassostrea, Saccostrea, Ostrea, Dendrostrea, Nanostrea, Planostrea, Lopha, and Hyotissa. Detailed morphological...

  1. Molecular characterization and evolution of an interspersed repetitive DNA family of oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Flores, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Rejón, Carmelo; Cross, Ismael; Rebordinos, Laureana; Robles, Francisca; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; de la Herrán, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    When genomic DNA from the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis L. was digested by BclI enzyme, a band of about 150 bp was observed in agarose gel. After cloning and sequencing this band and analysing their molecular characteristics and genomic organization by means of Southern blot, in situ hybridisation, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols, we concluded that this band is an interspersed highly repeated DNA element, which is related in sequence to the flanking regions of (CT)-microsatellite loci of the species O. edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Furthermore, we determined that this element forms part of a longer repetitive unit of 268 bp in length that, at least in some loci, is present in more than one copy. By Southern blot hybridisation and PCR amplifications-using primers designed for conserved regions of the 150-bp BclI clones of O. edulis-we determined that this repetitive DNA family is conserved in five other oyster species (O. stentina, C. angulata, C. gigas, C. ariakensis, and C. sikamea) while it is apparently absent in C. gasar. Finally, based on the analysis of the repetitive units in these oyster species, we discuss the slow degree of concerted evolution in this interspersed repetitive DNA family and its use for phylogenetic analysis.

  2. Identification of different oyster species using RAPD-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Özcan Gökçek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid determination of the genetic differences between some oyster samples observed in the Aegean Sea that were assumed as an invasive species and domestic oyster (Ostrea edulis, Linnaeus 1758 using RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA- PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction markers was aimed in this study. In this regard, domestic species samples and the other samples collected from Altınoluk coasts which were morphologically different than Ostrea species and were showing similarities to Crassostrea genus were genetically indetified by using 8 RAPD profiles. Total 343 bands were observed in the study. Polymorphism rate was found higher in the samples that might belong to Crassostrea genus. 6 of all loci considered in this study were found highly identical for these species. Total of 16 species-spesific diagnostic bands: 11 bands for the invasive species and 5 bands for the domestic species, were determined.

  3. Inducible defenses in Olympia oysters in response to an invasive predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jillian M; Griffith, Kaylee R; Sanford, Eric

    2017-01-13

    The prey naiveté hypothesis suggests that native prey may be vulnerable to introduced predators because they have not evolved appropriate defenses. However, recent evidence suggests that native prey sometimes exhibit induced defenses to introduced predators, as a result of rapid evolution or other processes. We examined whether Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) display inducible defenses in the presence of an invasive predator, the Atlantic oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea), and whether these responses vary among oyster populations from estuaries with and without this predator. We spawned oysters from six populations distributed among three estuaries in northern California, USA, and raised their offspring through two generations under common conditions to minimize effects of environmental history. We exposed second-generation oysters to cue treatments: drills eating oysters, drills eating barnacles, or control seawater. Oysters from all populations grew smaller shells when exposed to drill cues, and grew thicker and harder shells when those drills were eating oysters. Oysters exposed to drills eating other oysters were subsequently preyed upon at a slower rate. Although all oyster populations exhibited inducible defenses, oysters from the estuary with the greatest exposure to drills grew the smallest shells suggesting that oyster populations have evolved adaptive differences in the strength of their responses to predators. Our findings add to a growing body of literature that suggests that marine prey may be less likely to exhibit naiveté in the face of invasive predators than prey in communities that are more isolated from native predators, such as many freshwater and terrestrial island ecosystems.

  4. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  5. Hyperspectral remote sensing of wild oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Anthony; Rosa, Philippe; Lerouxel, Astrid; Cognie, Bruno; Gernez, Pierre; Launeau, Patrick; Robin, Marc; Barillé, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The invasion of the wild oyster Crassostrea gigas along the western European Atlantic coast has generated changes in the structure and functioning of intertidal ecosystems. Considered as an invasive species and a trophic competitor of the cultivated conspecific oyster, it is now seen as a resource by oyster farmers following recurrent mass summer mortalities of oyster spat since 2008. Spatial distribution maps of wild oyster reefs are required by local authorities to help define management strategies. In this work, visible-near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing was investigated to map two contrasted intertidal reef structures: clusters of vertical oysters building three-dimensional dense reefs in muddy areas and oysters growing horizontally creating large flat reefs in rocky areas. A spectral library, collected in situ for various conditions with an ASD spectroradiometer, was used to run Spectral Angle Mapper classifications on airborne data obtained with an HySpex sensor (160 spectral bands) and SPOT satellite HRG multispectral data (3 spectral bands). With HySpex spectral/spatial resolution, horizontal oysters in the rocky area were correctly classified but the detection was less efficient for vertical oysters in muddy areas. Poor results were obtained with the multispectral image and from spatially or spectrally degraded HySpex data, it was clear that the spectral resolution was more important than the spatial resolution. In fact, there was a systematic mud deposition on shells of vertical oyster reefs explaining the misclassification of 30% of pixels recognized as mud or microphytobenthos. Spatial distribution maps of oyster reefs were coupled with in situ biomass measurements to illustrate the interest of a remote sensing product to provide stock estimations of wild oyster reefs to be exploited by oyster producers. This work highlights the interest of developing remote sensing techniques for aquaculture applications in coastal

  6. Lignolytic Enzymes of a Mushroom Stereum ostrea Isolated from Wood Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Praveen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of lignolytic enzymes by the mushroom fungus Stereum ostrea in liquid medium under conditions of vegetative growth was examined for 10 days in comparison to the reference culture Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Though growth and secretion of extracellular protein by S. ostrea were comparable to those of P. chrysosporium, yields of laccase enzyme by S. ostrea were higher than laccase titres of P. chrysosporium by more than 2 folds on the peak production time interval (IVth day of incubation. S. ostrea yielded titres of 25 units of laccase/ml as against 8.9 units of laccase/ml on the IVth day of incubation. Stereum ostrea also exhibited activities of other lignolytic enzymes, lignin peroxidase (LiP and manganese peroxidase (MnP, higher than the reference culture. Growth of S. ostrea on the medium in the presence of Remazol orange 16 resulted in the decolourisation of dye, confirming the presence of lignolytic enzymes. S. ostrea appears to be a promising culture with complete lignolytic system.

  7. Loss of an ecological baseline through the eradication of oyster reefs from coastal ecosystems and human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleway, Heidi K; Connell, Sean D

    2015-06-01

    Oyster reefs form over extensive areas and the diversity and productivity of sheltered coasts depend on them. Due to the relatively recent population growth of coastal settlements in Australia, we were able to evaluate the collapse and extirpation of native oyster reefs (Ostrea angasi) over the course of a commercial fishery. We used historical records to quantify commercial catch of O. angasi in southern Australia from early colonization, around 1836, to some of the last recorded catches in 1944 and used our estimates of catch and effort to map their past distribution and assess oyster abundance over 180 years. Significant declines in catch and effort occurred from 1886 to 1946 and no native oyster reefs occur today, but historically oyster reefs extended across more than 1,500 km of coastline. That oyster reefs were characteristic of much of the coastline of South Australia from 1836 to 1910 appears not to be known because there is no contemporary consideration of their ecological and economic value. Based on the concept of a shifted baseline, we consider this contemporary state to reflect a collective, intergenerational amnesia. Our model of generational amnesia accounts for differences in intergenerational expectations of food, economic value, and ecosystem services of nearshore areas. An ecological system that once surrounded much of the coast and possibly the past presence of oyster reefs altogether may be forgotten and could not only undermine progress towards their recovery, but also reduce our expectations of these coastal ecosystems. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Enhanced Production of Ligninolytic Enzymes by a Mushroom Stereum ostrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Y. Usha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The white rot fungi Stereum ostrea displayed a wide diversity in their response to supplemented inducers, surfactants, and copper sulphate in solid state fermentation. Among the inducers tested, 0.02% veratryl alcohol increased the ligninolytic enzyme production to a significant extent. The addition of copper sulphate at 300 μM concentration has a positive effect on laccase production increasing its activity by 2 times compared to control. Among the surfactants, Tween 20, Tween 80, and Triton X 100, tested in the studies, Tween 80 stimulated the production of ligninolytic enzymes. Biosorption of dyes was carried out by using two lignocellulosic wastes, rice bran and wheat bran, in 50 ppm of remazol brilliant blue and remazol brilliant violet 5R dyes. These dye adsorbed lignocelluloses were then utilized for the production of ligninolytic enzymes in solid state mode. The two dye adsorbed lignocelluloses enhanced the production of laccase and manganese peroxidase but not lignin peroxidase.

  9. Levels of PCBs in Oysters Coming from Galicia Coast: Comparison to Mussels from the Same Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, N; García, I; Ignacio, M; Mouteira, A

    2016-05-01

    PCBs were analyzed in two species of oyster (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis) cultured in intertidal beds and rafts coming from the Galician Rías during the period 2011-2014. PCBs were also analyzed in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected in the same Rías during 2011. The main objective of this work is to investigate the distribution of PCBs in Galician oysters and to study their suitability as bioindicator in comparison to mussels. The levels of ΣPCBs (ten congeners) ranged from 5.58 to 179.49 ng g(-1) d.w. The effect of biological parameters (shell length, lipid content and condition index) on bioaccumulation of PCBs was also evaluated. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between species for higher chlorinated biphenyls (CBs 153 and 138). The spatial patterns were investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed differences between geographical areas (Rías Altas, Centrales and Baixas) in the distribution of PCBs.

  10. Food competition between Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus edulis in the Oosterschelde estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stehouwer, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an invasive species in the Oosterschelde estuary. It was originally brought there to replace the native flat oyster Ostrea edulis which had been greatly reduced in numbers due to diseases and parasites. Because of some hot summers the pacific oyster could sp

  11. [Study on medication regularity of grand master of traditional Chinese medicine YAN Zheng-hua's Ostreae Concha-containing prescriptions based on data mining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Rui; Guo, Wei-Xian; Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    In this study, prescriptions were collected to establish a database based on the traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system (TCMISS). Such data-mining methods as software's statistical statement module, data analysis module and apriori algorithm were used to analyze the frequency of single drug, the frequency of drug combination, the association rules and the core drug combinations of ostreae concha-containing prescriptions. The results showed that Ostreae Concha-containing prescriptions were frequently used to treat insomnia, vertigo, stomach-ache and other syndromes. The frequently used drugs included Ossis Mastodi Fossilia, Parched Ziziphi Spinosae Semen, Polygoni Multiflori Caulis, Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix and Paeoniae Rubra Radix. The frequently used drug combinations included "Ostreae Concha and Ossis Mastodi Fossilia", "Ostreae Concha and Parched Ziziphi Spinosae Semen", and "Ostreae Concha and Polygoni Multiflori Caulis". The drug association rules with the confidence coefficient of more than 0. 95 included "Ossis Mastodi Fossilia-->Ostreae Concha", "Cocos Poria-Ossis Mastodi Fossilia-Ostreae Concha", "Ossis Mastodi Fossilia-Parched Ziziphi Spinosae Semen-->Ostreae Concha", and "Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix-Ossis Mastodi Fossilia--Ostreae Concha".

  12. Histone H3 gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793: molecular and cytogenetic characterisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bouilly

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 (2n = 20 is an economically important mollusc species cultured throughout the world. The most frequently used technique for molecular cytogenetic studies is fluorescence in situ hybridisation which offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. In oysters, it has been used to locate telomeric sequences, satellite DNA, simple sequence repeats, ribosomal RNA genes, and bacteriophage P1 clones. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been done with histone H3 gene. Histone H3 is among the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. Most histone H3 genes are repeatedly organised into clusters, which make them an ideal chromosomal marker. In bivalves, some data exist concerning sequence information but little knowledge is available concerning the physical mapping of histone genes. The histone H3 gene was sequenced in C. gigas and phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. gigas was more closely related to Ostrea edulis Linnaeus, 1758 and species of the genus Mytilus Linnaeus, 1758. In C. gigas, the histone H3 gene was mapped on two different pairs of chromosomes, one at an interstitial site on the long arm of chromosome pair 4, and the other on the telomeres of the smaller chromosome pair (pair 10. Polymorphism was detected on the telomeres of pair 10, once it was possible to observe single or double signals. Comparative chromosomal mapping should improve our understanding of bivalve genome organisation.

  13. Molecular phylogenetics of cupped oysters based on partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, D T

    1994-09-01

    Partial sequences of 28S-like rDNA were amplified using PCR and sequenced for eight species of oyster and one species of mussel. Phylogenetic relationships among seven species of Crassostreinid oyster were inferred from aligned sequences by parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods. Of the 315 sites that varied, 90 were phylogenetically informative in parsimony analysis. Inference by maximum parsimony (MP) is consistent with maximum-likelihood (ML) analysis for the major lineages, yielding a tree with the topology (Mytilus edulis (Ostrea edulis ((Crassostrea rivularis (C. belcheri, C. gigas))(C. virginica, C. rhizophorae, Saccostrea cuccullata, S. commercialis)))). MP and ML analyses resolved the systematic relationships of the Saccostrea and Atlantic Crassostrea differently such that a polytomy linking these four taxa is preferred with the data available. Molecular data support a later divergence of the tropical Pacific Saccostrea from a common ancestor of the Atlantic Crassostrea species. Molecular data from domains D1, D2, and partial D3 of the 28S rDNA supply sufficient phylogenetic information to determine systematic relationships among the extant oyster taxa, from the major species groups to the family level, thus providing valuable characters that are able to supplement the paucity of morphological characters so far recognized.

  14. Adjustment of the components of energy balance in response to temperature change in Ostrea edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, R.C.; Johson, L.G.; Kofoed, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Routine oxygen consumption (V/sub 02/ ..mu..l 285 mg/sup -1/ h/sup -1/) by specimens of Ostrea acclimated to temperatures between 5/sup 0/ and 25/sup 0/C increases with exposure temperature throughout much of the range 5 to 30/sup 0/C. There is little evidence of a relative suppression of the acutely-measured rate: temperature curves for routine oxygen consumption following warm acclimation. Energetic costs in Ostrea thus rise sharply with increase of environmental temperature. The clearance rate (V/sub w/, ml 285 mg/sup -1/ h/sup -1/) of Phaeodactylum measured synchronously shows a marked thermal optimum within the range 15 to 28/sup 0/C, followed by a decline towards high exposure temperatures. Maximal clearance rates of 600 to 750 ml water h/sup -1/ occur approximately 5/sup 0/C above the temperature to which the animals have been acclimated and are adjusted according to environmental temperature. The changes in filtration efficiency)V/sub w//V/sub 02/, ml/..mu..l) in Ostrea following thermal acclimation are controlled by compensatory responses of the irrigation rate rather than by a relative reduction of energy losses from metabolism. Because the clearance rate declines in animals acclimated to 25/sup 0/C, whereas the metabolic losses increase throughout the temperature range 5 to 30/sup 0/C, maximum filtration efficiency is achieved at 20/sup 0/C. Calculation of the energetic cost of filtration suggests that the improvement of filtration following warm acclimation offsets metabolic energy losses even at low food concentrations in Ostrea. Even if energy losses not accounted for in the study were substantial, a positive index of energy balance could be maintained during the summer months at ration levels which commonly occur in inshore waters.

  15. 78 FR 62293 - Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Oyster Bay near Oyster Bay, NY for the...

  16. Oyster Fisheries App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Guerrero, Geraldo A.; Armstrong, Duane; Underwood, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This project is creating a cloud-enabled, HTML 5 web application to help oyster fishermen and state agencies apply Earth science to improve the management of this important natural and economic resource. The Oyster Fisheries app gathers and analyzes environmental and water quality information, and alerts fishermen and resources managers about problems in oyster fishing waters. An intuitive interface based on Google Maps displays the geospatial information and provides familiar interactive controls to the users. Alerts can be tailored to notify users when conditions in specific leases or public fishing areas require attention. The app is hosted on the Amazon Web Services cloud. It is being developed and tested using some of the latest web development tools such as web components and Polymer.

  17. Detection of domoic acid in Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ostrea edulis linked to the presence of Nitzschia bizertensis in Bizerte Lagoon (SW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchouicha-Smida, Donia; Lundholm, Nina; Sahraoui, Inès; Lambert, Christophe; Mabrouk, Hassine Hadj; Hlaili, Asma Sakka

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal variation of DA in bivalves was monitored from August 2008 to March 2009 at a shellfish station in Bizerte Lagoon, one of the most important shellfish areas in Tunisia. At the same time, dynamics of potentially toxic diatoms was studied at six stations in the lagoon. Several diatom strains were isolated, maintained in culture and their identification as well as the toxicity was examined. During the study period, domoic acid (DA) was detected in Tunisia, in both mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis: 0.13-0.86 μg DA g-1 tissue) and oysters (Ostrea edulis: 0.42-1.04 μg DA g-1 tissue). The amount of DA in the two species was below the EU guideline limits for shellfish (20 μg DA g-1). Within the phytoplankton community, potentially toxic diatoms were observed in high densities (104-106 cells l-1). Among the 9 established cultured strains, seven were identified as the recently described species Nitzschia bizertensis sp. nov, which is apparently a commonly occurring species in the Bizerte Lagoon. Among tested five strains of N. bizertensis, four were confirmed to be toxin producers, containing 2-7 × 10-3 pg DA cell-1 during stationary growth phase. Our results indicate for the first time a Nitzschia species, here Nitzschia bizertensis, could be in relation to accumulation of DA in shellfish. Monitoring of DA in phytoplankton and shellfish should be considered for Bizerte Lagoon in order to gain knowledge about the ecology and toxin-production of N. bizertensis and to explore the risk of DA accumulation in the local shellfish industry caused by this species.

  18. Dangerous Raw Oysters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-05

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch at the California Department of Public Health, discusses the dangers of eating raw oysters.  Created: 8/5/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/7/2013.

  19. The American Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E.

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on the American oyster. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  20. 牡蛎炮制前后砷含量的变化研究%The Changes of Arsenic Contents in Oyster before and after the Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王行美

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To detect arsenic (As) contents contained in oysters (ostrea gigas thunberg) which were prepared in different processing times, before and after the preparation. Methods:The contents of As contained in raw oysters and the calcined ones were determined by silver diethyldithiocarb nate (DDC-Ag) method. Results:The contents of As in calcined oysters were lower than those in raw ones, and the duration of preparation time could af-fect the contents of As. Conclusion:Oyster after calcined could decrease the contents of As, which could ensure the safety of clinical application.%目的:探讨牡蛎炮制前后和不同炮制时间对牡蛎中砷含量的变化。方法:采用二乙基二硫代氨基甲酸银(DDC-Ag)法测定生牡蛎和煅牡蛎中砷的含量。结果:牡蛎经煅制后有害元素砷的含量比生品大大降低,并且煅制时间的长短对砷含量也有影响。结论:牡蛎经煅制后可以降低砷的含量,保证临床用药安全。

  1. The influence of food supply on the response of Olympia oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hettinger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide drive accompanying changes in the marine carbonate system as carbon dioxide (CO2 enters seawater and alters ocean pH (termed "ocean acidification". However, such changes do not occur in isolation, and other environmental factors have the potential to modulate the consequences of altered ocean chemistry. Given that physiological mechanisms used by organisms to confront acidification can be energetically costly, we explored the potential for food supply to influence the response of Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida larvae to ocean acidification. In laboratory experiments, we reared oyster larvae under a factorial combination of pCO2 and food level. Elevated pCO2 had negative effects on larval growth, total dry weight, and metamorphic success, but high food availability partially offset these influences. The combination of elevated pCO2 and low food availability led to the greatest reduction in larval performance. However, the effects of food and pCO2 interacted additively rather than synergistically, indicating that they operated independently. Despite the potential for abundant resources to counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, impacts were never completely negated, suggesting that even under conditions of enhanced primary production and elevated food availability, impacts of ocean acidification may still accrue in some consumers.

  2. The influence of food supply on the response of Olympia oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hettinger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide drive accompanying changes in the marine carbonate system as carbon dioxide (CO2 enters seawater and alters its pH (termed "ocean acidification". However, such changes do not occur in isolation, and other environmental factors have the potential to modulate the consequences of altered ocean chemistry. Given that physiological mechanisms used by organisms to confront acidification can be energetically costly, we explored the potential for food supply to influence the response of Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida larvae to ocean acidification. In laboratory experiments, we reared oyster larvae under a factorial combination of pCO2 and food level. High food availability offset the negative consequences of elevated pCO2 on larval shell growth and total dry weight. Low food availability, in contrast, exacerbated these impacts. In both cases, effects of food and pCO2 interacted additively rather than synergistically, indicating that they operated independently. Despite the potential for abundant resources to counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, impacts were never completely negated, suggesting that even under conditions of enhanced primary production and elevated food availability, impacts of ocean acidification may still accrue in some consumers.

  3. Coast-wide recruitment dynamics of Olympia oysters reveal limited synchrony and multiple predictors of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Kerstin; Hughes, Brent B; Berriman, John S; Chang, Andrew L; Deck, Anna K; Dinnel, Paul A; Endris, Charlie; Espinoza, Michael; Dudas, Sarah; Ferner, Matthew C; Grosholz, Edwin D; Kimbro, David; Ruesink, Jennifer L; Trimble, Alan C; Vander Schaaf, Dick; Zabin, Chela J; Zacherl, Danielle C

    2016-12-01

    Recruitment of new propagules into a population can be a critical determinant of adult density. We examined recruitment dynamics in the Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida), a species occurring almost entirely in estuaries. We investigated spatial scales of interannual synchrony across 37 sites in eight estuaries along 2,500 km of Pacific North American coastline, predicting that high vs. low recruitment years would coincide among neighboring estuaries due to shared exposure to regional oceanographic factors. Such synchrony in recruitment has been found for many marine species and some migratory estuarine species, but has never been examined across estuaries in a species that can complete its entire life cycle within the same estuary. To inform ongoing restoration efforts for Olympia oysters, which have declined in abundance in many estuaries, we also investigated predictors of recruitment failure. We found striking contrasts in absolute recruitment rate and frequency of recruitment failure among sites, estuaries, and years. Although we found a positive relationship between upwelling and recruitment, there was little evidence of synchrony in recruitment among estuaries along the coast, and only limited synchrony of sites within estuaries, suggesting recruitment rates are affected more strongly by local dynamics within estuaries than by regional oceanographic factors operating at scales encompassing multiple estuaries. This highlights the importance of local wetland and watershed management for the demography of oysters, and perhaps other species that can complete their entire life cycle within estuaries. Estuaries with more homogeneous environmental conditions had greater synchrony among sites, and this led to the potential for estuary-wide failure when all sites had no recruitment in the same year. Environmental heterogeneity within estuaries may thus buffer against estuary-wide recruitment failure, analogous to the portfolio effect for diversity. Recruitment failure

  4. Detection of Sapovirus in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, You; Shoji, Mika; Okimura, Yoko; Miyota, Yasuko; Masago, Yoshifumi; Oka, Tomoichiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Noda, Mamoru; Miura, Takayuki; Sano, Daisuke; Omura, Tatsuo

    2010-08-01

    SaV sequences which are either genetically identical or similar were detected from oysters, feces from gastroenteritis patients, and domestic wastewater samples in geographically close areas. This is the first report of the detection of SaV in oysters which meet the legal requirements for raw consumption in Japan.

  5. Flat semimodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mohammed J. Al-Thani

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and investigate flat semimodules and k-flat semimodules .We hope these concepts will have the same importance in semimodule theory as in the theory of rings and modules.

  6. Distribution of Georgia Oyster Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The feature class in this ESRI Geodatabase contains polygons representing oyster reefs along the Georgia coastal waterways from Chatham County south to Glynn County....

  7. History of Oystering in the United States and Canada, Featuring the Eight Greatest Oyster Estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    MacKenzie, Jr., Clyde L.

    1996-01-01

    Oyster landings in the United States and Canada have been based mainly on three species, the native eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, native Olympia oyster, Ostreola conchaphila, and introduced Pacific oyster, C. gigas. Landings reached their peak of around 27 million bushels/year in the late 1800's and early 1900's when eastern oysters were a common food throughout the east coast and Midwest. Thousands of people were involved in harvesting them with tongs and dredges and in shucking, ca...

  8. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.145 Canned oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all of... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food...

  9. 7 CFR 701.54 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM AND CERTAIN RELATED PROGRAMS PREVIOUSLY... be made available under this section for the eligible cost of refurbishing public or private oyster... mud from public and private oyster beds, staking out the leased areas, reestablishing the oyster...

  10. Purification, preliminary characterization and bioactivities of polysaccharides from Ostrea rivularis Gould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijie; Zhang, Danyan; Wu, Jun; Li, Xia; Zhang, Jingnian; Wan, Mianjie; Lai, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    In this study, purification, preliminary characterization and biological activities of water-soluble polysaccharides from Ostrea rivularis Gould (ORP) were investigated. Firstly, crude ORP was extracted by enzyme-assisted extraction and then sequentially purified by chromatography of DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-100, producing one main purified fractions of ORPp. Furthermore, the preliminary characterization of ORPp was studied, and its antioxidant and spermatogenesis activities were evaluated. Experimental results showed that ORPp was mainly composed of glucose (76.3%) and galactose (23.7%). The average molecular weight of ORPp was 118 kDa. Besides, ORPp showed strong antioxidant activities in vitro. For the experiments of antioxidant activities in vivo, ORPp can significantly inhibited the formation of MDA in rats' serums, and raised the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the level of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC). Furthermore, ORPp could significantly increase the weights of male rats' sexual organs, promote sperm motility and raise epididymal sperm counts. These results suggest that ORPp could be a new source of natural antioxidants and spermatogenic agent with its potential usage in developing novel supplements and medicines.

  11. Líneas germinales, ciclo reproductivo y sucesión de sexos en Ostrea edus (Linnaeus, 1758)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Salvado, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Esta tesis estudia la estrategia reproductiva de Ostrea edulis cultivada en suspensión en Santa Pola, Alicante, describiendo sus ciclos gametogénicos, reproductores y energéticos. Describe las series macho y hembra correspondientes a las respectivas líneas germinales. En estas series se identifican histológicamente, a nivel de microscopía óptica, sus componentes celulares y sus transformaciones, definiendo los procesos de foliculogénesis, espermatogénesis y ovogénesis; y estableciéndose ta...

  12. Noroviruses in oysters from local markets and oyster farms in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittigul, Leera; Pombubpa, Kannika; Sukonthalux, Suntharee; Rattanatham, Tippawan; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and eighteen oyster samples collected from local markets and oyster farms in southern Thailand were examined for noroviruses (NoVs) and bacterial indicators of fecal contamination (fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli). Using a virus concentration procedure followed by RT-nested PCR, NoVs were detected in 38% of the samples. Oysters collected from oyster farms were found with NoVs at a higher detection rate (25/53 samples) than oysters from local markets (20/65 samples). Of the 45 NoV-positive oyster samples, 67% belonged to NoV genogroup I (GI), 15% to GII, and 18% to both GI and GII. DNA sequencing showed that 2 NoVs belonged to NoV GI-2 genotype. Fecal coliforms in NoV-positive oyster samples were in the range of oyster samples contained fecal coliforms within the standard acceptable level of raw shellfish (oyster samples were within acceptable levels of E. coli contamination (oysters obtained from both markets and oyster farms might pose a potential risk of acute gastroenteritis associated with raw oyster consumption. Examination for both fecal bacterial indicators and enteric viruses should be conducted for microbiological food safety of shellfish.

  13. Composted oyster shell as lime fertilizer is more effective than fresh oyster shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han; Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Hong, Sun Joo; Cho, Kye Man; Math, Renukaradhya K; Heo, Jae Young; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Han Dae

    2010-01-01

    Physio-chemical changes in oyster shell were examined, and fresh and composted oyster shell meals were compared as lime fertilizers in soybean cultivation. Structural changes in oyster shell were observed by AFM and FE-SEM. We found that grains of the oyster shell surface became smoother and smaller over time. FT-IR analysis indicated the degradation of a chitin-like compound of oyster shell. In chemical analysis, pH (12.3+/-0.24), electrical conductivity (4.1+/-0.24 dS m(-1)), and alkaline powder (53.3+/-1.12%) were highest in commercial lime. Besides, pH was higher in composted oyster shell meal (9.9+/-0.53) than in fresh oyster shell meal (8.4+/-0.32). The highest organic matter (1.1+/-0.08%), NaCl (0.54+/-0.03%), and moisture (15.1+/-1.95%) contents were found in fresh oyster shell meal. A significant higher yield of soybean (1.33 t ha(-1)) was obtained by applying composted oyster shell meal (a 21% higher yield than with fresh oyster shell meal). Thus composting of oyster shell increases the utility of oyster shell as a liming material for crop cultivation.

  14. SETTLEMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CREATED OYSTER REEF HABITATS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to restore the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reef habitats in Chesapeake Bay typically begin with the placement of hard substrata to form three-dimensional mounds on the seabed to serve as a base for oyster recruitment and growth. A shortage of oyster shell for ...

  15. Flat pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Kevin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    'Flat pyramid' is a multi-channel video installation. The project employs appropriated promotional and instructional video from a defunct pyramid scheme as the source material for fictionalized reenactment. The footage primarily consists of presentation documentation, testimonial interviews, and product photography—throughout all of which cutting rarely occurs between takes. Perpetrators and victims are seen moving in and out of their promotional personas, inadvertently making their disquieti...

  16. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable

  17. Sensitivity of oysters (Crassostrea Brasiliana) to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiolo Marchese, S.R. [Brazilian Navy Technology Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mastro, N.L. del [Inst. of Nuclear and Energy Researches IPEN-CNEN/SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    Various foods including oysters, crabs and shrimps have been shown to be possible transmitters of Vibrio ssp. Irradiation of sea-foods is being considered an alternative to intervention measures in Public Health against food borne diseases. The aim of this work was to establish, the radiation resistance of the oysters Crassostrea brasiliana. The oysters were irradiated with Co-60 radiation with doses of 0, 1.5, 3 and 6 kGy. Survival curves as a function of time showed that 100% of the oysters irradiated with doses of 3 kGy survived at least 6 days. 100% those irradiated with 6 kGy survived 3 days. The obtained results are auspicious considering that a dose of 2 kGy is already effective in the diminishing of the microbial load on oysters. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab.

  18. Uptake and metabolism of selenium by oysters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrench, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Observation of the equilibration of /sup 75/Se with the tissues of Ostrea edulis suggested that the highest concentration factor occurred in the digestive gland. A study of the form of selenium in this tissue after assimilation of /sup 75/Se from water or labelled phytoplankton showed that the majority of selenium, in both cases, was strongly associated with protein. Enzymic hydrolysis of protein and subsequent chromatography of hydrolytic products revealed the presence of breakdown products of selenium analogues of the common sulphur amino acids.

  19. Antiangiogenic Effect of Oyster Polypeptide (OPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua WANG

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Drugs which block tumor angiogenesis will be likely effective towards inhibiting tumor growth for angiogenesis being a prerequisite for tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, antiangiogenesis has become a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Investigation on both antiangiogenic effect and mechanism(s of oyster polypeptide (OPP were performed via experiments of chicken embryos model in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs in vitro. Methods The methods employed in experiment were chorioallantoic membrane (CAM angiogenesis in chicken embryos in vivo, MTT cell survival assay, flat plate scarification, transwell plates assay, matrigel-induced tube formation assay and transmission electron microscope et al. and the OPP’s effects on angiogenesis was observed. Results Study showed that treatment with OPP resulted in significant inhibition of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM angiogenesis in chicken embryos. MTT cell survival assay showed that treatment with OPP resulted in strong inhibition of HUVECs growth, with an IC50 of 400 μg/mL. Flat plate scarification suggested that OPP (200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL distinctly inhibited HUVECs’ migration (18.75%, 37.93%, 74.07% respectively, treatment for 12 h. Treatment with OPP of different concentrations (200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL significantly reduced the density of the migration cells by 15.5%, 37.2% and 67.24% (P<0.05 respectively. Matrigel-induced tube formation assay showed that OPP resulted in striking inhibition of tube formation of 52.43%, 84.47% and 96.12% (P<0.01 at 200 μg/mL, 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL (treatment for 10 h respectively. In addition, the apoptotic analysis by transmission electron microscope showed that OPP (400 μg/mL, treatment for 48 h distinctly induced HUVECs’ apoptosis. Conclusion This study strikingly showed that OPP could inhibit angiogenesis through its effects on vascular endothelial cells

  20. Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay: A Brief Primer. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experience supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  1. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  2. Ultrastructural comparison of Bonamia spp (Haplosporidia) infecting ostreid oysters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hine, P.M.; Carnegie, R.B.; Kroeck, M.A.; Villalba, A.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Burreson, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructure of Bonamia from Ostrea angasi from Australia, Crassostrea ariakensis from the USA, O. puelchana from Argentina and O. edulis from Spain was compared with described Bonamia spp. All appear conspecific with B. exitiosa. The Bonamia sp. from Chile had similarities to the type B. exit

  3. Directly measured denitrification reveals oyster aquaculture and restored oyster reefs remove nitrogen at comparable high rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for ecosystem functioning. Oyster restoration and aquaculture are both hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via benthic denitrification (DNF). However, this has...

  4. Oyster leases in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1997) [oyster_leases_USACE_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set indicates the locations of oyster leases in Louisiana. The lease areas should be polygons, however, the source data has very poor topology including...

  5. Flat for Free Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Manman

    2010-01-01

    @@ Just as Thomas Fried man's famous book,The World Is Flat,if not completely flat,it is anyway tending to be shaped flat.January 1,2010 saw the formation of the China-ASEAN Free Trade Agreement(CAFTA),which was another historical event flattening majority of Asia continent for international trade.

  6. Inactivation of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus during oyster fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Jina; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2014-12-01

    Fermented seafood is popular in Asian countries. This study examined the survival of feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) during oyster fermentation. Oysters spiked with FCV and MNV were fermented with 5% or 10% salt at 18 °C for 15 days, and MNV and FCV titers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations, pH, and enzymatic activity were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 days post-fermentation (DPF). Reductions in MNV and FCV were greater in 5% NaCl-supplemented oysters than in 10% NaCl-supplemented oysters. In 5% NaCl oysters, MNV and FCV titers significantly decreased by 1.60 log and 3.01 log, respectively, at 15 DPF. Populations of LAB increased from 3.62 log10 colony-forming units/g at 0 DPF to 8.77 log10 colony-forming units/g at 15 DPF during oyster fermentation supplemented with 5% NaCl supplementation, and the pH decreased gradually from 5.38 at 0 DPF to 4.17 at 15 DPF. During oyster fermentation, α-amylase, proteinase, and lipase were produced at higher levels in 5% salted oysters than in 10% salted oysters (P oysters could contribute to a reduction in foodborne viruses.

  7. Oyster mycelium on the liquid medium

    OpenAIRE

    Mariusz Gapiński; Wanda Woźniak; Mirosława Ziombra; Joanna Murawska

    2013-01-01

    The research presents the results of oyster mycelium growth on the liquid medium. The growth of 4-mycelium genius: Pleurotus citrinopileatus Singer, Pleurotus djamor Fries, Boedjin, Pleurotus erynii Fr. Kumm. and Pleurotus precoce Fr. Quel was tested. The quality and quantity of mycelium was assumed.

  8. Oyster shell calcium induced parotid swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthiah Palaniappan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59 year old female consumer was started on therapy with oyster shell calcium in combination with vitamin D3 and she presented with swelling below the ear, after two doses. She stopped the drug by herself and the swelling disappeared in one day. She started the drug one day after recovery and again she developed the swelling. She was advised to stop the drug with a suggestion to take lemon to enhance parotid secretion and the swelling subsided. Calcium plays major role in salivary secretion and studies have shown reduced parotid secretion in rats, deficient of vitamin D. But in humans involvement of calcium and vitamin D3 in parotid secretion is unknown. However, the patient had no history of reaction though she had previously taken vitamin D3 with calcium carbonate which was not from oyster shell. Hence, we ruled out vitamin D3 in this reaction and suspecting oyster shell calcium as a culprit. This adverse drug reaction (ADR was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO causality assessment, Naranjo′s and Hartwig severity scales. As per WHO causality assessment scale, the ADR was classified as "certain". This reaction was analyzed as per Naranjo′s algorithm and was classified as probable. According to Hartwig′s severity scale the reaction was rated as mild. Our case is an example of a mild but rare adverse effect of oyster shell calcium carbonate which is widely used.

  9. 长牡蛎肉小肽营养液的研制%The Preparation of Small Peptides Nutrient Solution by Enzymatic Method from Ostrea Gigas Thunberg Meat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方富永; 芦志刚; 苗艳丽; 胡世伟; 黄勇; 宋文东

    2012-01-01

    To study the technological conditions of small peptides nutrient solution preparation from Ostrea gigas Thunberg meat, first .Taking the hydrolyzing degree as the target to determine the optimum conditions of Ostrea gigas Thunberg meat hydrolyzed respectively by neutral protease, papain and bromelain. Based on orthogonal test, the best technological conditions hydrolyzed respectively by single protease were confirmed; and then three enzymes composite enzyme hydrolysis tests were proceeded.on the basis of hydrolyzing degree,the perfect match and the best technological conditions of enzyme hydrolysis were confirmed. On these grounds, the enzyme hydrolysate of Ostrea gigas Thunberg meat was prepared. Finally, small peptides nutrient solution was made from the enzyme hydrolysate under the condition of optimum formula confirmed by the orthogonal test.the composite hydrolyzing degree of Ostrea gigas Thunberg meat hydrolyzed by three protease can reach 52.97% under the optimum technological conditions, The peak value of relative molecular mass of these small peptide varied from 300 to 1 000 determined by polyacrylamide gradient gel vertical flatbed electrophoresis. The content of 17 free amino acids was 500.16 mg/100 mL. The optimum formula of small peptides nutrient solution.: hydrolysate (mL) : sucrose (g) :citric acid (g):sodium chloride (g)in proper sequence were as follow 100∶10∶ 0.2∶0.2. The total amount of free amino acids ≥5 000 mg/L. The nutritious liquid with eutrophy and simple preparation technology can be be applied to the high-priced exploitation of Ostrea gigas Thunberg meat.%研究长牡蛎肉小肽营养液制备的工艺条件.先以水解度为指标,确定长牡蛎肉中性蛋白酶、木瓜蛋白酶、菠萝蛋白酶单酶的最适水解条件,通过正交试验确定各单酶水解的最佳工艺条件;然后以此为基础进行三酶复合试验,根据水解度确定最佳工艺条件,制备长牡蛎肉水解液;最后以该水解液

  10. Structure and Property Characterization of Oyster Shell Cementing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟彬杨; 周强; 单昌锋; 于岩

    2012-01-01

    Oyster shell powder was used as the admixture of ordinary portland cement.The effects of different addition amounts and grinding ways on the strength and stability of cement mortar were discussed and proper addition amount of oyster shell powder was determined.The structure and property changes of cementing samples with different oyster shell powder contents were tested by XRD and SEM means.The results revealed that compressive and rupture strengths of the sample with 10% oyster shell powder was close to those of the original one without addition.Stability experiment showed that the sample prepared by pat method had smooth surface without crack and significant expansion or shrinkage after pre-curing and boiling,which indicated that cementing material dosed with oyster shell powder had fine stability.XRD and SEM observation showed that oyster shell independently exists in the cementing material.

  11. OYSTER POPULATUION ESTIMATION IN SUPPORT OF THE TEN-YEAR GOAL FOR OYSTER RESOTRATION IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY: DEVELOPING STRATEGIES FOR RESTORING AND MANAGING THE EASTERN OYSTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Roger, Steve Jordan, Gary Smith, Kennedy Paynter, James Wesson, Mary Christman, Jessica Vanisko, Juliana Harding, Kelly Greenhawk and Melissa Southworth. 2003. Oyster Population Estimation in Support of the Ten-Year Goal for Oyster Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay: Develop...

  12. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health

    OpenAIRE

    Froelich, Brett A.; Noble, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest pol...

  13. From artificial structures to self-sustaining oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walles, Brenda; Troost, Karin; van den Ende, Douwe; Nieuwhof, Sil; Smaal, Aad C.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly recognized as essential elements within coastal defence schemes and coastal adaptation. The capacity of coastal ecosystems, like marshes and oyster reefs, to maintain their own habitat and grow with sea-level rise via biophysical feedbacks is seen as an important advantage of such systems compared to man-made hard engineering structures. Providing a suitable substrate for oysters to settle on offers a kick-start for establishment at places where they were lost or are desirable for coastal protection. Accumulation of shell material, through recruitment and growth, is essential to the maintenance of oyster reefs as it provides substrate for new generations (positive feedback loop), forming a self-sustainable structure. Insight in establishment, survival and growth thresholds and knowledge about the population dynamics are necessary to successfully implement oyster reefs in coastal defence schemes. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether artificial Pacific oyster reefs develop into self-sustaining oyster reefs that contribute to coastal protection. Reef development was investigated by studying recruitment, survival and growth rates of oysters on artificial oyster reefs in comparison with nearby natural Pacific oyster reefs. The artificial reef structure successfully offered substrate for settlement of oysters and therefore stimulated reef formation. Reef development, however, was hampered by local sedimentation and increasing tidal emersion. Tidal emersion is an important factor that can be used to predict where artificial oyster reefs have the potential to develop into self-sustaining reefs that could contribute to coastal protection, but it is also a limiting factor in using oyster reefs for coastal protection.

  14. Relatively Flat Envelopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁南庆

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate relatively flat envelopes. A necessary and sufficient condition is given for a relatively-finitely presented module to have a (mono-morphic or epic) relatively flat envelope. Then those rings are characterized whose every relatively-finitely presented module has a relatively flat envelope which coincides with its in-jective envelope. Some known results are obtained as corollaries.

  15. Creating flat design websites

    CERN Document Server

    Pratas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book contains practical, step-by-step tutorials along with plenty of explanation about designing your flat website. Each section is introduced sequentially, building up your web design skills and completing your website.Creating Flat Design Websites is ideal for you if you are starting on your web development journey, but this book will also benefit seasoned developers wanting to start developing in flat.

  16. Strongly Gorenstein Flat Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Xia ZHANG; Li Min WANG

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of modules and rings.We show this dimension has nice properties when the ring is coherent,and extend the well-known Hilbert's syzygy theorem to the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of rings.Also,we investigate the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of direct products of rings and (almost)excellent extensions of rings.

  17. The potential of aerial photography for estimating surface areas of intertidal Pacific oyster beds (Crassostrea gigas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, B.J.; Baars, J.M.D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Pacific oysters were introduced into the Eastern Scheldt in 1964 for breeding purposes. The first spatfall of wild Pacific oysters was recorded in 1976, and a second larval outburst in 1982 definitely settled wild Pacific oysters in the Eastern Scheldt waters. Oyster beds on intertidal and subtidal

  18. 76 FR 79227 - Exemption Request Submitted by Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Exelon Generation Company...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Exemption Request Submitted by Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Exelon Generation Company... Generation Company, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (Oyster... for Oyster Creek and NUREG-1437, Vol. 1, Supplement 28, ``Generic Environmental Impact Statement...

  19. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rossana Sussarellu; Marc Suquet; Yoann Thomas; Christophe Lambert; Caroline Fabioux; Marie Eve Julie Pernet; Nelly Le Goïc; Virgile Quillien; Christian Mingant; Yanouk Epelboin; Charlotte Corporeau; Julien Guyomarch; Johan Robbens; Ika Paul-Pont; Philippe Soudant; Arnaud Huvet

    2016-01-01

    .... To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L(-1...

  20. Commercialization of raft oyster culture in Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watters, K.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Oyster Culture Project of the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center has been investigating the feasibility of raft-culturing the local mangrove oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) for the past two years. Attempts to start culture efforts on a commercial scale are described. (CH)

  1. Shell Games. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experiences supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  2. Seasonal dynamics and diversity of bacteria in retail oyster tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Yan; Shi, Xianming

    2014-03-03

    Oysters are one of the important vehicles for the transfer of foodborne pathogens. It was reported that bacteria could be bio-accumulated mainly in the gills and digestive glands. In artificially treated oysters, bacterial communities have been investigated by culture-independent methods after harvest. However, little information is available on the seasonal dynamics of bacterial accumulation in retail oyster tissues. In this study, retail oysters were collected from local market in different seasons. The seasonal dynamics and diversity of bacteria in oyster tissues, including the gills, digestive glands and residual tissues, were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). It was interesting that the highest bacterial diversity appeared in the Fall season, not in summer. Our results indicated that Proteobacteria was the predominant member (23/46) in oyster tissues. Our results also suggested that bacterial diversity in gills was higher than that in digestive glands and other tissues. In addition, not all the bacteria collected from surrounding water by gills were transferred to digestive glands. On the other hand, few bacteria were found in oyster tissues except in the gills. Therefore, the gills could be the best candidate target tissue for monitoring of pathogenic bacteria either to human or to oyster.

  3. Resource potential and status of pearl oyster fishery in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Many cultivable species of pearl oysters are known to occur in the Indo-Australian Archipelago which is an important region in the world distribution of pearl oysters. An account of the development of Indian pearl fisheries that took place over...

  4. Microbiological analysis and microbiota in oyster: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Oyster, is a popular shellfish consumed globally. As a bivalve filter-feeding invertebrate mollusk, oyster harbors many microorganisms, which could eventually cause potential health risks of human. Microorganisms were correlated to oyster mortality, shelf life, spoilage, and foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Meanwhile, they could be adjusted by the preservative technologies in order to prolong the shelf life. With the development of molecular biological techniques, such as 16S Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, Real-time PCR, Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP, Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH, etc., microbiological diversity and spoilage mechanism of oyster can be further investigated. The spoilage microbiota belongs to Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB, and Micrococcus, etc., and the main pathogens are Vibrio, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Photobacterium, and Shewanella according to current studies. However, little information is available for the spoilage mechanism of entire oyster and different tissues under different preservation conditions. This article reviews the oyster microbiota analysis methods, the impacts of aquaculture and pathogenic bacteria on oyster mortality and food safety, as well as initial and spoilage microbiotas in whole oyster and separated tissues during preservation.

  5. Adult Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas May Have Light Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wu

    Full Text Available Light-sensitivity is an important aspect of mollusk survival as it plays a vital role in reproduction and predator avoidance. In the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas light sensitivity has been demonstrated in the larval stage but has not yet been conclusively demonstrated in adult oysters. In this paper we describe an experiment which was undertaken to determine if adult Pacific oysters were sensitive to light. One LED flashlight was used to shine light onto adult oysters while they were filtering seawater through their shell openings. We found that the degree of opening increased gradually during the light period but rapidly decreased when the flashlight was turned off in the treated group but not in the control group. These results suggest that adult Pacific oyster may be sensitive to light.

  6. Water quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and vibrionaceae loads in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster gardening sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae conc...

  7. Effect of Calcinated Oyster Shell Powder on Growth, Yield, Spawn Run, and Primordial Formation of King Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus Eryngii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the calcium (Ca absorption efficacy of king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii grown on sawdust medium supplemented with Ca-sources, including oyster shell powder, and to determine the efficacy of oyster shell powder as a calcium supplement on growth, yield, spawn run and primordial formation of P. eryngii. Optimum calcination of oyster shell powder was achieved at the temperature of 620.56 °C. A 1% supplementation of oyster shell powder in sawdust medium did not suppress the mycelial growth of P. eryngii. Also the supplementation of 2% calcinated oyster shell powder to sawdust medium potentially increased the calcium content up to a level of 315.7 ± 15.7 mg/100 g in the fruiting body of P. eryngii, without extension of duration of spawn run and the retardation of the days to primordial formation. These results suggest that the shellfish by-products, including oyster shell powder, can be utilized to develop calcium enriched king oyster mushrooms.

  8. Effect of calcinated oyster shell powder on growth, yield, spawn run, and primordial formation of king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ung-Kyu; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Kim, Young-Chan

    2011-03-10

    This study was conducted to evaluate the calcium (Ca) absorption efficacy of king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii) grown on sawdust medium supplemented with Ca-sources, including oyster shell powder, and to determine the efficacy of oyster shell powder as a calcium supplement on growth, yield, spawn run and primordial formation of P. eryngii. Optimum calcination of oyster shell powder was achieved at the temperature of 620.56 °C. A 1% supplementation of oyster shell powder in sawdust medium did not suppress the mycelial growth of P. eryngii. Also the supplementation of 2% calcinated oyster shell powder to sawdust medium potentially increased the calcium content up to a level of 315.7 ± 15.7 mg/100 g in the fruiting body of P. eryngii, without extension of duration of spawn run and the retardation of the days to primordial formation. These results suggest that the shellfish by-products, including oyster shell powder, can be utilized to develop calcium enriched king oyster mushrooms.

  9. Interactions between the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the indigenous blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Local-scale food competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, I.W.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if food competition between mussels and oysters occurs, and how mussel and oyster growth is affected by this interaction. This was done by relating mussel growth to oyster density relating oyster growth to oyster biomass and perform a field control, by inventor

  10. Flat-port connectors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrashed, Mohammed

    2017-05-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for connectors used with electronic devices, such as input and/or output ports to connect peripheral equipment or accessories. More specifically, various flat-port are provided that can be used in place of standard connectors including, but not limited to, audio jacks and Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. The flat-port connectors are an alternate connection design to replace the traditional receptacle port (female-port), making the device more sealed creation more dust and water resistant. It is unique in the way of using the outer surfaces of the device for the electrical connection between the ports. Flat-port design can allow the manufacture of extremely thin devices by eliminating the side ports slots that take a lot of space and contribute to the increase thickness of the device. The flat-port receptacle improves the overall appearance of the device and makes it more resistant to dust and water.

  11. Perkinsus beihaiensis (Perkinsozoa) in oysters of Bahia State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, M S A; Carvalho, F S; Oliveira, H C; Boehs, G

    2017-08-17

    This study reports the pathogen Perkinsus beihaiensis in oysters of the genus Crassostrea on the coast of the State of Bahia (Brazil), its prevalence, infection intensity and correlation with salinity. Oysters (n = 240) were collected between October and December 2014 at eight sampling stations between latitudes 13°55'S and 15°42'S. The laboratory procedures included macroscopic analysis, histology, culture in Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM), Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. PCR and sequencing have been used for the genetic identification of oysters as well. Two species of oysters have been identified: Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. brasiliana. In both oyster species P. beihaiensis was the only Perkinsus species detected. In C. rhizophorae, the average prevalence was 82.8% by histology and 65.2% by RFTM. In C. brasiliana, the prevalences were 70.5% and 35.7%, respectively. The higher prevalence of P. beihaiensis in C. rhizophorae was probably influenced by salinity, with which was positively correlated (r> 0.8). In both oysters, P. beihaiensis was located mainly in the gastric epithelium. The infection was generally mild or moderate, without apparent harm to the hosts, but in cases of severe infection, there was hemocytical reaction and tissue disorganization. The generally high prevalence in the region suggests that oysters should be monitored with respect to this pathogen, especially in growing areas.

  12. Quantitative validation of a habitat suitability index for oyster restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eTheuerkauf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Habitat suitability index (HSI models provide spatially explicit information on the capacity of a given habitat to support a species of interest, and their prevalence has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite caution that the reliability of HSIs must be validated using independent, quantitative data, most HSIs intended to inform terrestrial and marine species management remain unvalidated. Furthermore, of the eight HSI models developed for eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica restoration and fishery production, none has been validated. Consequently, we developed, calibrated, and validated an HSI for the eastern oyster to identify optimal habitat for restoration in a tributary of Chesapeake Bay, the Great Wicomico River (GWR. The GWR harbors a high density, restored oyster population, and therefore serves as an excellent model system for assessing the validity of the HSI. The HSI was derived from GIS layers of bottom type, salinity, and water depth (surrogate for dissolved oxygen, and was tested using live adult oyster density data from a survey of high vertical relief reefs (HRR and low vertical relief reefs (LRR in the sanctuary network. Live adult oyster density was a statistically-significant sigmoid function of the HSI, which validates the HSI as a robust predictor of suitable oyster reef habitat for rehabilitation or restoration. In addition, HRR had on average 103-116 more adults m^−2 than LRR at a given level of the HSI. For HRR, HSI values ≥0.3 exceeded the accepted restoration target of 50 live adult oysters m^−2. For LRR, the HSI was generally able to predict live adult oyster densities that meet or exceed the target at HSI values ≥0.3. The HSI indicated that there remain large areas of suitable habitat for restoration in the GWR. This study provides a robust framework for HSI model development and validation, which can be refined and applied to other systems and previously developed HSIs to improve the efficacy of

  13. Drought Increases Consumer Pressure on Oyster Reefs in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Hanna G; Kimbro, David L

    2015-01-01

    Coastal economies and ecosystems have historically depended on oyster reefs, but this habitat has declined globally by 85% because of anthropogenic activities. In a Florida estuary, we investigated the cause of newly reported losses of oysters. We found that the oyster reefs have deteriorated from north to south and that this deterioration was positively correlated with the abundance of carnivorous conchs and water salinity. In experiments across these gradients, oysters survived regardless of salinity if conchs were excluded. After determining that conchs were the proximal cause of oyster loss, we tested whether elevated water salinity was linked to conch abundance either by increasing conch growth and survivorship or by decreasing the abundance of a predator of conchs. In field experiments across a salinity gradient, we failed to detect spatial variation in predation on conchs or in conch growth and survivorship. A laboratory experiment, however, demonstrated the role of salinity by showing that conch larvae failed to survive at low salinities. Because this estuary's salinity increased in 2006 in response to reduced inputs of freshwater, we concluded that the ultimate cause of oyster decline was an increase in salinity. According to records from 2002 to 2012, oyster harvests have remained steady in the northernmost estuaries of this ecoregion (characterized by high reef biomass, low salinity, and low conch abundance) but have declined in the southernmost estuaries (characterized by lower reef biomass, increases in salinity, and increases in conch abundance). Oyster conservation in this ecoregion, which is probably one of the few that still support viable oyster populations, may be undermined by drought-induced increases in salinity causing an increased abundance of carnivorous conchs.

  14. Effects of Intertidal Harvest Practices on Levels of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus Bacteria in Oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, T. P.; Johnson, L. W.; Porso, R.; Friedman, B.; Curtis, M.; Wesighan, P.; Schuster, R.; Bowers, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus can grow rapidly in shellfish subjected to ambient air conditions, such as during intertidal exposure. In this study, levels of total and pathogenic (tdh+ and/or trh+) V. parahaemolyticus and total V. vulnificus were determined in oysters collected from two study locations where intertidal harvest practices are common. Samples were collected directly off intertidal flats, after exposure (ambient air [Washington State] or refrigerated [New Jersey]), and after reimmersion by natural tidal cycles. Samples were processed using a most-probable-number (MPN) real-time PCR method for total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus or V. vulnificus. In Washington State, the mean levels of V. parahaemolyticus increased 1.38 log MPN/g following intertidal exposure and dropped 1.41 log MPN/g after reimmersion for 1 day, but the levels were dependent upon the container type utilized. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels followed a similar trend. However, V. vulnificus levels increased 0.10 log MPN/g during intertidal exposure in Washington but decreased by >1 log MPN/g after reimmersion. In New Jersey, initial levels of all vibrios studied were not significantly altered during the refrigerated sorting and containerizing process. However, there was an increase in levels after the first day of reimmersion by 0.79, 0.72, 0.92, and 0.71 log MPN/g for total, tdh+ and trh+ V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus, respectively. The levels of all targets decreased to those similar to background after a second day of reimmersion. These data indicate that the intertidal harvest and handling practices for oysters that were studied in Washington and New Jersey do not increase the risk of illness from V. parahaemolyticus or V. vulnificus. IMPORTANCE Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus are the leading causes of seafood-associated infectious morbidity and mortality in the United States. Vibrio spp. can grow rapidly in shellfish

  15. Development of Genetic Markers for Triploid Verification of the Pacific Oyster,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ha Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The triploid Pacific oyster, which is produced by mating tetraploid and diploid oysters, is favored by the aquaculture industry because of its better flavor and firmer texture, particularly during the summer. However, tetraploid oyster production is not feasible in all oysters; the development of tetraploid oysters is ongoing in some oyster species. Thus, a method for ploidy verification is necessary for this endeavor, in addition to ploidy verification in aquaculture farms and in the natural environment. In this study, a method for ploidy verification of triploid and diploid oysters was developed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR panels containing primers for molecular microsatellite markers. Two microsatellite multiplex PCR panels consisting of three markers each were developed using previously developed microsatellite markers that were optimized for performance. Both panels were able to verify the ploidy levels of 30 triploid oysters with 100% accuracy, illustrating the utility of microsatellite markers as a tool for verifying the ploidy of individual oysters.

  16. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. La Peyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  17. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T. Andrew; Humphries, Austin T.

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  18. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, Megan K; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T Andrew; Humphries, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y(-1). Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of contaminants within estuarine sediments and native Olympia oysters: A contrast between a developed and an undeveloped estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Elise F.; Conn, Kathleen E.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Pillsbury, Lori; Strecker, Angela; Rumrill, Steve; Fish, William

    2016-01-01

    Chemical contaminants can be introduced into estuarine and marine ecosystems from a variety of sources including wastewater, agriculture and forestry practices, point and non-point discharges, runoff from industrial, municipal, and urban lands, accidental spills, and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of potential sources contributes to the likelihood of contaminated marine waters and sediments and increases the probability of uptake by marine organisms. Despite widespread recognition of direct and indirect pathways for contaminant deposition and organismal exposure in coastal systems, spatial and temporal variability in contaminant composition, deposition, and uptake patterns are still poorly known. We investigated these patterns for a suite of persistent legacy contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and chemicals of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals within two Oregon coastal estuaries (Coos and Netarts Bays). In the more urbanized Coos Bay, native Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida) tissue had approximately twice the number of PCB congeners at over seven times the total concentration, yet fewer PBDEs at one-tenth the concentration as compared to the more rural Netarts Bay. Different pharmaceutical suites were detected during each sampling season. Variability in contaminant types and concentrations across seasons and between species and media (organisms versus sediment) indicates the limitation of using indicator species and/or sampling annually to determine contaminant loads at a site or for specific species. The results indicate the prevalence of legacy contaminants and CECs in relatively undeveloped coastal environments highlighting the need to improve policy and management actions to reduce contaminant releases into estuarine and marine waters and to deal with legacy compounds that remain long after prohibition of use. Our results point to the need for better understanding of the ecological and

  20. Evaluation of Norfolk Harbor Deepening Project (A Study on Its Possible Impact on Oysters, Hard Clams and Oyster Drills).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-20

    Virginia 23062 DTIC 20 June 1984 ELECTE ~L&JMAR 12 i9BB IA B! ,", Contract No. DACW65-84-M-0056 -Ap’oved to: publicO t01b0 I D)WtbuZidon Unlimited .~Norfolk...impact on the transport of the larval oysters and hard clams during their planktonic stage. Oysters and hard clams are widely tolerant to high salinity...planktonic for about 2 weeks and during this period are transported by currents. This latter aspect will be covered later in our discussion on oysters. ~i

  1. Oyster radiation sensitivity; Sensibilidade de ostras a radiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, Sandra R.M. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil); Mastro, Nelida L. del [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-07-01

    Various food products like oysters, crabs and shrimps have been described as possible Vibrio spp. transmitting agents. Seafood irradiation is been presented as an alternative among the different public health intervention measures to control food borne diseases. The objective of this work was to establish, firstly, the radioresistance of Crassostrea brasiliana oysters. The oysters were irradiated with Co-60 radiation with doses of 0, 1.5,3 and 6 kGy. Survival curves a function of time showed that 100% of samples irradiated with 3 kGy survived at least 6 days; among those irradiated with 6 kGy, 100% survived 3 days. These results are encouraging since a dose of 2 kGy is already effective in diminishing oyster bioburden. (author)

  2. Effect of Depuration on Microbial Content of Mangrove Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Mangrove oysters and water samples collected from Benya lagoon, located at Elmina in the Central Region of. Ghana were ... wastewater and combined sewer overflows discharges ... laboratory for microbiological examinations. Depuration of ...

  3. Aquatic invasive species: oyster thief in Newfoundland and Labrador waters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2013-01-01

    Oyster thief was first reported washed up on shore near Arnold's Cove, Woody Island, and Spanish Room, Newfoundland, in July and August 2012, during Fisheries and Oceans Canada's aquatic invasive species surveys...

  4. The biogeography of trophic cascades on US oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbro, David L; Byers, James E; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Hughes, A Randall; Piehler, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Predators can indirectly benefit prey populations by suppressing mid-trophic level consumers, but often the strength and outcome of trophic cascades are uncertain. We manipulated oyster reef communities to test the generality of potential causal factors across a 1000-km region. Densities of oyster consumers were weakly influenced by predators at all sites. In contrast, consumer foraging behaviour in the presence of predators varied considerably, and these behavioural effects altered the trophic cascade across space. Variability in the behavioural cascade was linked to regional gradients in oyster recruitment to and sediment accumulation on reefs. Specifically, asynchronous gradients in these factors influenced whether the benefits of suppressed consumer foraging on oyster recruits exceeded costs of sediment accumulation resulting from decreased consumer activity. Thus, although predation on consumers remains consistent, predator influences on behaviour do not; rather, they interact with environmental gradients to cause biogeographic variability in the net strength of trophic cascades.

  5. Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  6. Narrative report Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge: January - December, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Narrative report Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge: January - December, 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Evaluation of Tea Wastes as an Alternative Substrate for Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    seed hull, rice bran, wheat bran, sugarcane bagasse, sawdust, cotton wastes, banana leaves, corn cob and ... Protein rich materials are generally used ... In Mauritius, oyster mushroom is still being cultivated on the bagasse based substrate.

  9. Length-weight relationship of Giant Oyster, Crassostrea gyphoides (Schlotheim)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Relationship between shell length and total weight, shell weight and meat weight of giant oyster, Crassostrea gryphoides revealed that the growth of these parameters is very fast and significant. It indicates the suitability of the species concerned...

  10. Annual Narrative Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Individual energy savings for individual flats in blocks of flats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Rose, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that similar flats in a block do not have the same energy demand. Part of the explanation for this is the location of the flat in the building, e.g. on the top floor, at the house end or in the middle of the building. It is possible to take this into account when the heating bill...... is distributed on the individual flats. Today, most blocks of flats have individual heat meters to save energy and to ensure a fair distribution of the cost. If all flats have the same indoor temperature, the distribution is correct. In practice, the inhabitants of the different flats maintain different indoor...

  12. The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Strand, Åsa;

    A massive invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas , has occurred in Scandinavia during the last decade. The introduction and dispersal was described through collaboration between scientists from Sweden, Denmark and Norway. This work has been followed up by national activities that clearly...... presented in this report is based on available scientific literature, expert judgments and data collected during a Nordic collaboration project on Pacific oysters in 2011 – 2013....

  13. Genotoxicity of diuron and glyphosate in oyster spermatozoa and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcha, F; Spagnol, C; Rouxel, J

    2012-01-15

    We investigated the effects of genotoxicant exposure in gametes and embryos to find a possible link between genotoxicity and reproduction/developmental impairment, and explore the impact of chemical genotoxicity on population dynamics. Our study focused on the genotoxic effects of two herbicides on oyster gametes and embryos: glyphosate (both as an active substance and in the Roundup formulation) and diuron. France is Europe's leading consumer of agrochemical substances and as such, contamination of France's coastal waters by pesticides is a major concern. Glyphosate and diuron are among the most frequently detected herbicides in oyster production areas; as oyster is a specie with external reproduction, its gametes and embryos are in direct contact with the surrounding waters and are hence particularly exposed to these potentially dangerous substances. In the course of this study, differences in genotoxic and embryotoxic responses were observed in the various experiments, possibly due to differences in pollutant sensitivity between the tested genitor lots. Glyphosate and Roundup had no effect on oyster development at the concentrations tested, whereas diuron significantly affected embryo-larval development from the lowest tested concentration of 0.05 μg L⁻¹, i.e. an environmentally realistic concentration. Diuron may therefore have a significant impact on oyster recruitment rates in the natural environment. Our spermiotoxicity study revealed none of the tested herbicides to be cytotoxic for oyster spermatozoa. However, the alkaline comet assay showed diuron to have a significant genotoxic effect on oyster spermatozoa at concentrations of 0.05 μg L⁻¹ upwards. Conversely, no effects due to diuron exposure were observed on sperm mitochondrial function or acrosomal membrane integrity. Although our initial results showed no negative effect on sperm function, the possible impact on fertilization rate and the consequences of the transmission of damaged DNA for

  14. Amylase polymorphism affects growth in the cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas

    OpenAIRE

    Huvet, Arnaud; Samain, Jean-francois; Boudry, Pierre; Bedier, Edouard; Ropert, Michel; Van Wormhoudt, A

    2005-01-01

    The better understanding of physiological and environmental factors that determine optimal food conversion efficiencies is of major interest for the cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas for which the strong increase of aquaculture has been correlated in France with a decrease in productivity due to competition between aquatic species for limited food supplies at grow-out sites. To investigate the non-neutrality of the polymorphism of amylase, a key enzyme for carbohydrate assimilation, in oyster p...

  15. Oyster shell as substitute for aggregate in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyunsuk; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kiho; Park, Junboum

    2004-06-01

    Enormous amounts of oyster shell waste have been illegally disposed of at oyster farm sites along the southern coast of Korea. In this study to evaluate the possibility of recycling this waste for use as a construction material, the mechanical characteristics of pulverized oyster shell were investigated in terms of its potential utilization as a substitute for the aggregates used in mortar. The unconfined compressive strengths of various soil mortar specimens, with varying blending ratios of cement, water and oyster shell, were evaluated by performing unconfined compression tests, and the results were compared with the strengths of normal cement mortar made with sand. In addition, the effect of organic chemicals on the hardening of concrete was evaluated by preparing ethyl-benzene-mixed mortar specimens. The long-term strength improvement resulting from the addition of fly ash was also examined by performing unconfined compression tests on specimens with fly-ash content. There was no significant reduction in the compressive strength of the mortars containing small oyster shell particles instead of sand. From these test data, the possible application of oyster shells in construction materials could be verified, and the change in the strength parameters according to the presence of organic compounds was also evaluated.

  16. Raw oysters can be a risk for infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes Vieira

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to count and identify sucrose positive and negative vibrios isolated from cultivated Crassostrea rhizophorae oysters during their growing cycle. Every month for 12 months, 10 to 18 oysters were collected for study. Collections occurred at the Center for Studies of Coastal Aquaculture (CSCA, which is associated with the Institute of Marine Science, Labomar, located in Euzebio, Ceará, Brazil. Approximately 150 oysters and their intervalvular liquor were studied. Vibrio Standard Plates Counts (SPC from oyster meat and their intervalvular liquor varied from 25 to 59,000,000 CFU/g. For most of the 12 months of the oysters' life, it was possible to identify Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Vibrio carchariae was identified in four collections. Among other isolated species, the most important, considering public health risks, was V. vulnificus, although only one strain was confirmed. We concluded that retail purchased oysters should never be eaten raw or undercooked because many species of the genus Vibrio are known to be pathogenic to humans and live naturally on and in shellfish throughout their life cycle.

  17. Raw oysters can be a risk for infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; Costa, Renata Albuquerque; Theophilo, Grace Nazareth Diogo; Macrae, Andrew; Fonteles Filho, Antonio Adauto; Rodrigues, Dália dos Prazeres

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to count and identify sucrose positive and negative vibrios isolated from cultivated Crassostrea rhizophorae oysters during their growing cycle. Every month for 12 months, 10 to 18 oysters were collected for study. Collections occurred at the Center for Studies of Coastal Aquaculture (CSCA), which is associated with the Institute of Marine Science, Labomar, located in Euzebio, Ceará, Brazil. Approximately 150 oysters and their intervalvular liquor were studied. Vibrio Standard Plates Counts (SPC) from oyster meat and their intervalvular liquor varied from 25 to 59,000,000 CFU/g. For most of the 12 months of the oysters' life, it was possible to identify Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Vibrio carchariae was identified in four collections. Among other isolated species, the most important, considering public health risks, was V. vulnificus, although only one strain was confirmed. We concluded that retail purchased oysters should never be eaten raw or undercooked because many species of the genus Vibrio are known to be pathogenic to humans and live naturally on and in shellfish throughout their life cycle.

  18. Total and methyl-mercury content in bivalves, Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck and Ostrea edulis Linnaeus: relationship of biochemical composition and body size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najdek, M.; Sapunar, J.

    1987-07-01

    Mussels and oysters are of interest to pollution ecologists because they are widely distributed, suspension feeding invertebrates and are likely to accumulate pollutants from their environment (Goldberg 1975). Many authors have estimated the relation between the concentration of metals in the flesh and various biotic and abiotic parameters. Body mass (estimated in dry weight) is evidently an important factor governing the uptake of metals by these organisms. The highest concentrations of certain metals were often found in the smallest individuals. The relation between metal content and body size can best be described using Boyden's model which is useful for quantifying any physiological activities in relation to the dry weight of the specimens. In the present paper the authors describe the investigation into the relationship between total and methyl-mercury content and body mass in mussels and oysters.

  19. Chemical Profiles and Identification of Key Compound Caffeine in Marine-Derived Traditional Chinese Medicine Ostreae concha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bing Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To compare the chemical differences between the medicinal and cultured oyster shells, their chemical profiles were investigated. Using the ultra performance liquid chromatography-electron spraying ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS, combined with principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA, the discrimination of the chemical characteristics among the medicinal and cultured oyster shells was established. Moreover, the chemometric analysis revealed some potential key compounds. After a large-scale extraction and isolation, one target key compound was unambiguously identified as caffeine (1 based on extensive spectroscopic data analysis (1D and 2D NMR, MS, and UV and comparison with literature data.

  20. 77 FR 135 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Exemption 1.0 Background...-16, which authorizes operation of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (OCNGS). The...

  1. Predicting the effects of proposed Mississippi River diversions on oyster habitat quality; application of an oyster habitat suitability index model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Thomas M.; Conzelmann, Craig P.; Byrd, Jason D.; Roszell, Dustin P.; Bridevaux, Joshua L.; Suir, Kevin J.; Colley, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decelerate the rate of coastal erosion and wetland loss, and protect human communities, the state of Louisiana developed its Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast. The master plan proposes a combination of restoration efforts including shoreline protection, marsh creation, sediment diversions, and ridge, barrier island, and hydrological restoration. Coastal restoration projects, particularly the large-scale diversions of fresh water from the Mississippi River, needed to supply sediment to an eroding coast potentially impact oyster populations and oyster habitat. An oyster habitat suitability index model is presented that evaluates the effects of a proposed sediment and freshwater diversion into Lower Breton Sound. Voluminous freshwater, needed to suspend and broadly distribute river sediment, will push optimal salinities for oysters seaward and beyond many of the existing reefs. Implementation and operation of the Lower Breton Sound diversion structure as proposed would render about 6,173 ha of hard bottom immediately east of the Mississippi River unsuitable for the sustained cultivation of oysters. If historical harvests are to be maintained in this region, a massive and unprecedented effort to relocate private leases and restore oyster bottoms would be required. Habitat suitability index model results indicate that the appropriate location for such efforts are to the east and north of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet.

  2. Flat covers of modules

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinzhong

    1996-01-01

    Since the injective envelope and projective cover were defined by Eckmann and Bas in the 1960s, they have had great influence on the development of homological algebra, ring theory and module theory. In the 1980s, Enochs introduced the flat cover and conjectured that every module has such a cover over any ring. This book provides the uniform methods and systematic treatment to study general envelopes and covers with the emphasis on the existence of flat cover. It shows that Enochs' conjecture is true for a large variety of interesting rings, and then presents the applications of the results. Readers with reasonable knowledge in rings and modules will not have difficulty in reading this book. It is suitable as a reference book and textbook for researchers and graduate students who have an interest in this field.

  3. Flat Earth图片

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    欢迎来到这期的光盘介绍。本月的附刊光盘中,除了每月的精彩教程外,您可在光盘中找到15张由Flat Earth友情提供的库存图片。当然还有Twixtor和最新的Acrobat Reader 7。

  4. 40 CFR 408.270 - Applicability; description of the steamed and canned oyster processing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... steamed and canned oyster processing subcategory. 408.270 Section 408.270 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steamed and Canned Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.270 Applicability; description of the steamed and canned oyster processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  5. 75 FR 33656 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station Environmental Assessment....2, as requested by Exelon Generation Company, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (Oyster Creek), located in Ocean County, New Jersey. Therefore, as required...

  6. Mortalities of eastern and pacific oyster larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio cora...

  7. 75 FR 33366 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Notice of Withdrawal of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station; Notice of Withdrawal of..., application for amendment to Facility Operating License No. DPR-16 for the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (Oyster Creek), located in Ocean County, New Jersey. The proposed amendment would have revised...

  8. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L(-1)) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (-38%), diameter (-5%), and sperm velocity (-23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring.

  9. History of the Virginia Oyster Fishery, Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Schulte

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oyster populations in Virginia's waters of Chesapeake Bay were lightly exploited until the early 1800s, when industrial fishery vessels first arrived, driven south from New England due to the collapse of northeastern oyster fisheries. Early signs of overexploitation and habitat degradation were evident by the 1850s. The public fishery, where oyster fishers harvest on state-owned bottom, rapidly developed after the Civil War and peaked in the early 1880s. Declines were noted by the late 1880s and eventually prompted the creation of Virginia's shell-planting and oyster-seed (young-of-the-year, YOY moving repletion program in the 1920s. Despite management and increasing repletion efforts, the public fishery collapsed (annual landings <10% of peak historical landings by the early 1960s. The private leasehold fishery, in which individuals rent areas outside the public grounds to plant shells and oysters for their own private use, surpassed the public fishery by the late 1920s, which partly masked this decline due to overfishing, habitat degradation, and diseases until both public and private fisheries completely collapsed in the mid-1980s after a third disease outbreak. This disease outbreak was likely related to warming waters. Overfishing and concomitant habitat loss followed a pattern of sequential population collapses observed in wild oyster fisheries along the Coastlines of the United States and worldwide. In recent years, expanding hatchery-produced seed oysters and aquaculture significantly increased leasehold landings. The wild fishery has also increased as disease resistance is developing naturally in the wild stocks, but remains ~5% of peak landings. Improved management has assisted in this recent limited recovery, improving these efforts further by enhancing stock recovery via large no-take sanctuaries, among other actions, could assist in stock recovery.

  10. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L−1) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (−38%), diameter (−5%), and sperm velocity (−23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring. PMID:26831072

  11. Molecular and histological identification of Marteilioides infection in Suminoe Oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the south coast of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpanont, Yanin; Yanin, Limpanont; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jeung, Hee-Do; Kim, Bong-Kyu; Le, Thanh Cuong; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    The oyster ovarian parasite Marteilioides chungmuensis has been reported from Korea and Japan, damaging the oyster industries. Recently, Marteilioides-like organisms have been identified in other commercially important marine bivalves. In this study, we surveyed Marteilioides infection in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, Suminoe oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, using histology and Marteilioides-specific small subunit (SSU) rDNA PCR. The SSU rDNA sequence of M. chungmuensis (1716 bp) isolated from C. gigas in Tongyoung bay was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis reported in Japan. Inclusions of multi-nucleated bodies in the oocytes, typical of Marteilioides infection, were identified for the first time in Suminoe oysters. The SSU rDNA sequence of a Marteilioides-like organism isolated from Suminoe oysters was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis. Marteilioides sp. was also observed from 7 Manila clams of 1840 individuals examined, and the DNA sequences of which were 98.2% similar to the known sequence of M. chungmuensis. Unlike Marteilioides infection of Pacific oysters, no remarkable pathological symptoms, such as large multiple lumps on the mantle, were observed in infected Suminoe oysters or Manila clams. Distribution of the infected Manila clams, Suminoe oysters and Pacific oysters was limited to small bays on the south coast, suggesting that the southern coast is the enzootic area of Marteilioides infection.

  12. Flat conductor cable commercialization project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, P.; Wadsworth, E.

    1977-01-01

    An undercarpet flat conductor cable and a baseboard flat conductor cable system were studied for commercialization. The undercarpet system is designed for use in office and commercial buildings. It employs a flat power cable, protected by a grounded metal shield, that terminates in receptacles mounted on the floor. It is designed to interface with a flat conductor cable telephone system. The baseboard system consists of a flat power cable mounted in a plastic raceway; both the raceway and the receptacles are mounted on the surface of the baseboard. It is designed primarily for use in residential buildings, particularly for renovation and concrete and masonry construction.

  13. An Efficient Method of Noroviruses Recovery from Oysters and Clams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Deqing; MA Liping; ZHAO Feng; YAO Lin; SU Laijin; LI Xinguang

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are widespread causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis.Outbreaks of NoVs caused diseases are commonly ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish.The concentration and RNA extraction of NoVs are crucial steps of detecting NoVs in shellfish.This study aimed to select a simple,rapid and highly efficient recovery method of NoVs detection with real-time RT-PCR.Four methods of recovering GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs from spiked digestive tissues of oysters and clams,respectively,were compared,of them,the method involving proteinase K and PEG 8000 was found the most efficient.With this method,9.3% and 13.1% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from oysters and 9.6% and 12.3% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from clams,respectively.This method was further used to detect NoVs in 84 oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and 86 clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 10 coastal cities in China from Jan.2011 to Feb.2012.The NoVs isolation rates were 10.47% of clams (9/86) and 7.14% of oysters (6/84).All the detected NoVs belonged to genotype GII.The NoVs recovery method selected is efficient for NoVs detection in oysters and clams.

  14. An efficient method of noroviruses recovery from oysters and clams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deqing; Ma, Liping; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Lin; Su, Laijin; Li, Xinguang

    2013-03-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are widespread causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Outbreaks of NoVs caused diseases are commonly ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. The concentration and RNA extraction of NoVs are crucial steps of detecting NoVs in shellfish. This study aimed to select a simple, rapid and highly efficient recovery method of NoVs detection with real-time RT-PCR. Four methods of recovering GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs from spiked digestive tissues of oysters and clams, respectively, were compared, of them, the method involving proteinase K and PEG 8000 was found the most efficient. With this method, 9.3% and 13.1% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from oysters and 9.6% and 12.3% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from clams, respectively. This method was further used to detect NoVs in 84 oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) and 86 clams ( Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 10 coastal cities in China from Jan. 2011 to Feb. 2012. The NoVs isolation rates were 10.47% of clams (9/86) and 7.14% of oysters (6/84). All the detected NoVs belonged to genotype GII. The NoVs recovery method selected is efficient for NoVs detection in oysters and clams.

  15. Piecewise flat gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Meent, Maarten, E-mail: M.vandeMeent@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-04-07

    We examine the continuum limit of the piecewise flat locally finite gravity model introduced by 't Hooft. In the linear weak field limit, we find the energy-momentum tensor and metric perturbation of an arbitrary configuration of defects. The energy-momentum turns out to be restricted to satisfy certain conditions. The metric perturbation is mostly fixed by the energy-momentum except for its lightlike modes which reproduce linear gravitational waves, despite no such waves being present at the microscopic level.

  16. Flat feet in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe flatfoot, as one of very frequent deformities in everyday medical practice. A special condition of the deformity associated with a calcaneal valgus position and complicated by a knee valgus position (as a consequence of non-treatment is described. Also, the precise anatomy of the longitudinal foot arches (medial and lateral, definition and classification of the deformity, clinical findings and therapeutic protocols are proposed. The authors especially emphasise that the need for having extensive knowledge on the differences between a flexible and rigid flatfoot, having in mind that the treatment of flexible flat foot is usually not necessary, while the treatment of rigid flatfoot is usually unavoidable.

  17. Guidelines for evaluating performance of oyster habitat restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Lesley P.; Powers, Sean P.; Brumbaugh, Robert D.; Coen, Loren D.; DeAngelis, Bryan M.; Greene, Jennifer K.; Hancock, Boze T.; Morlock, Summer M.; Allen, Brian L.; Breitburg, Denise L.; Bushek, David; Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Grizzle, Raymond E.; Grosholz, Edwin D.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Luckenbach, Mark W.; McGraw, Kay A.; Piehler, Michael F.; Westby, Stephanie R.; zu Ermgassen, Philine S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of degraded ecosystems is an important societal goal, yet inadequate monitoring and the absence of clear performance metrics are common criticisms of many habitat restoration projects. Funding limitations can prevent adequate monitoring, but we suggest that the lack of accepted metrics to address the diversity of restoration objectives also presents a serious challenge to the monitoring of restoration projects. A working group with experience in designing and monitoring oyster reef projects was used to develop standardized monitoring metrics, units, and performance criteria that would allow for comparison among restoration sites and projects of various construction types. A set of four universal metrics (reef areal dimensions, reef height, oyster density, and oyster size–frequency distribution) and a set of three universal environmental variables (water temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen) are recommended to be monitored for all oyster habitat restoration projects regardless of their goal(s). In addition, restoration goal-based metrics specific to four commonly cited ecosystem service-based restoration goals are recommended, along with an optional set of seven supplemental ancillary metrics that could provide information useful to the interpretation of prerestoration and postrestoration monitoring data. Widespread adoption of a common set of metrics with standardized techniques and units to assess well-defined goals not only allows practitioners to gauge the performance of their own projects but also allows for comparison among projects, which is both essential to the advancement of the field of oyster restoration and can provide new knowledge about the structure and ecological function of oyster reef ecosystems.

  18. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Oyster Leases, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_oyster_lease_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) oyster leases data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  19. Defining optimal freshwater flow for oyster production: effects of freshet rate and magnitude of change and duration on eastern oysters and Perkinsus marinus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Gossman, B.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2009-01-01

    In coastal Louisiana, the development of large-scale freshwater diversion projects has led to controversy over their effects on oyster resources. Using controlled laboratory experiments in combination with a field study, we examined the effects of pulsed freshwater events (freshet) of different magnitude, duration, and rate of change on oyster resources. Laboratory and field evidence indicate that low salinity events (oyster growth was positively correlated with salinity. To maximize oyster production, data indicate that both low and high salinity events will be necessary.

  20. Oilseed rape straw for cultivation of oyster mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Peyvast

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Oyster mushroom [Pleurotus ostreatus var. sajor caju (Fr. Singer] was grown on five substrates: rice straw, rice straw + oilseed rape straw (75:25, 50:50, and 25:75 dw/dw, and oilseed rape straw alone. Rice straw + oilseed rape straw (25:75 and oilseed rape straw were best for fruit body production of P. ostreatus. The time to fruiting for P. ostreatus was also shorter on oilseed rape straw. Protein content of the fruit bodies obtained with oilseed rape straw was highest among all substrates. Oilseed rape straw thus appears to be a suitable substrate for oyster mushroom production.

  1. IS THE WORLD FLAT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Încalţărău

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization became more and more prominent during the last decades. There is no way to argue that globalization led to more interconnected economies, facilitating the communication and the collaboration around the world. But where is this going? Doesglobalization mean uniformity or diversity? As the world begins to resemble more, the people are trying to distinguish between them more, which can exacerbate nationalistic feeling. Friedman argues that globalization made the world smaller and flatter, allowing all countries to take chance of the available opportunities equally. But is this really true? Although politic and cultural factors can stand in front of a really flat world, what is the key for Chinese and Indian success and which are theirs perspectives?

  2. Flat Helical Nanosieves

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Shengtao; Hussain, Sajid; Huang, Kun; Ling, Xiaohui; Siew, Shawn Yohanes; Liu, Hong; Teng, Jinghua; Danner, Aaron; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Compact and miniaturized devices with flexible functionalities are always highly demanded in optical integrated systems. Plasmonic nanosieve has been successfully harnessed as an ultrathin flat platform for complex manipulation of light, including holography, vortex generation and non-linear processes. Compared with most of reported single-functional devices, multi-functional nanosieves might find more complex and novel applications across nano-photonics, optics and nanotechnology. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a promising roadmap for nanosieve-based helical devices, which achieves full manipulations of optical vortices, including its generation, hybridization, spatial multiplexing, focusing and non-diffraction propagation etc., by controlling the geometric phase of spin light via over 121 thousands of spatially-rotated nano-sieves. Thanks to such spin-conversion nanosieve helical elements, it is no longer necessary to employ the conventional two-beam interferometric measurement to characterize optical ...

  3. More Ricci-flat branes

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, J M

    1999-01-01

    Certain supergravity solutions (including domain walls and the magnetic fivebrane) have recently been generalised by Brecher and Perry by relaxing the condition that the brane worldvolume be flat. In this way they obtain examples in which the brane worldvolume is a static spacetime admitting parallel spinors. In this note we simply point out that the restriction to static spacetimes is unnecessary, and in this way exhibit solutions where the brane worldvolume is an indecomposable Ricci-flat lorentzian manifold admitting parallel spinors. We discuss more Ricci-flat fivebranes and domain walls, as well as new Ricci-flat D3-branes.

  4. Millennial-scale sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay Native American oyster fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Torben C; Reeder-Myers, Leslie A; Hofman, Courtney A; Breitburg, Denise; Lockwood, Rowan; Henkes, Gregory; Kellogg, Lisa; Lowery, Darrin; Luckenbach, Mark W; Mann, Roger; Ogburn, Matthew B; Southworth, Melissa; Wah, John; Wesson, James; Hines, Anson H

    2016-06-07

    Estuaries around the world are in a state of decline following decades or more of overfishing, pollution, and climate change. Oysters (Ostreidae), ecosystem engineers in many estuaries, influence water quality, construct habitat, and provide food for humans and wildlife. In North America's Chesapeake Bay, once-thriving eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations have declined dramatically, making their restoration and conservation extremely challenging. Here we present data on oyster size and human harvest from Chesapeake Bay archaeological sites spanning ∼3,500 y of Native American, colonial, and historical occupation. We compare oysters from archaeological sites with Pleistocene oyster reefs that existed before human harvest, modern oyster reefs, and other records of human oyster harvest from around the world. Native American fisheries were focused on nearshore oysters and were likely harvested at a rate that was sustainable over centuries to millennia, despite changing Holocene climatic conditions and sea-level rise. These data document resilience in oyster populations under long-term Native American harvest, sea-level rise, and climate change; provide context for managing modern oyster fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere around the world; and demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be applied broadly to other fisheries.

  5. Role of dissolved and particulate cadmium in the accumulation of cadmium in cultured oysters (Crassostrea gigas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekhi, Priyanka [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)], E-mail: anka.lekhi@ubc.ca; Cassis, D. [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Pearce, C.M. [Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7 (Canada); Ebell, N. [Odyssey Shellfish Ltd., Nanoose Bay, BC V0R 9G0 (Canada); Maldonado, M.T. [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Orians, K.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected on the coast of British Columbia, Canada have occasionally shown cadmium (Cd) concentrations at or above 2 {mu}g g{sup -1} (wet weight), which has resulted in the loss of some international markets. This study investigated the source and transfer of Cd to oysters by focusing on the role of dissolved and particulate Cd in seawater. Parameters monitored for 1 year at two oyster farm sites on Vancouver Island included: oyster tissue mass and shell length, Cd in oysters, dissolved Cd, particulate Cd, temperature and salinity. Results show that dissolved Cd was the main source of Cd to the oysters and that Cd was mainly concentrated in the gut tissues. A seasonal trend was observed in Cd in oysters, in which levels were lowest during periods of higher temperatures. Results also indicate that the local oceanographic inputs and sediment diagenesis directly affect dissolved Cd and thereby influence the Cd levels in oysters. Particulate matter was not found to be a source of Cd in oysters, and was actually negatively correlated. This was likely due to the uptake of dissolved Cd by phytoplankton and the effect of phytoplankton on oyster tissue mass.

  6. Microbiological Quality and Prevalence of β-Lactam Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Oysters ( Crassostrea rhizophorae ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Maria Aparecida da RessurreiÇão; Lopes, Amanda Teixeira Sampaio; Neta, Maria Tereza da Silva; de Oliveira, Rhyan Barros Farias; Rezende, Rachel Passos; Albuquerque, George Rêgo; Gonçalves, Verônica Dias; Rodrigues, Dália Dos Prazeres; Boehs, Guisla; Maciel, Bianca Mendes

    2017-03-01

    The microbiological quality of oysters reflects the microbiological quality of their habitats because they are filter feeders. The objective of this study was to assess the bacterial composition of the edible oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in urban and preserved estuaries. Particularly, we assessed the presence of pathogenic bacteria, investigated antibiotic susceptibility in bacterial isolates, and quantified β-lactam antibiotic resistance genes (blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaKPC) via quantitative PCR of oyster DNA. Our results detected total coliforms, Escherichia coli , and enterobacteria in the oysters from urban estuaries, which is indicative of poor water quality. In addition, our detection of the eaeA and stxA2 virulence genes in 16.7% of E. coli isolates from oysters from this region suggests the presence of multiantibiotic-resistant enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains. During periods of low precipitation, increased contamination by E. coli (in winter) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (in autumn) was observed. In contrast, cultivated oysters inhabiting monitored farms in preserved areas had low levels of bacterial contamination, emphasizing that oyster culture monitoring enhances food quality and makes oysters fit for human consumption. Distinct antibiotic resistance profiles were observed in bacteria isolated from oysters collected from different areas, including resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. The presence of the blaTEM gene in 91.3% of oyster samples indicated that microorganisms in estuarine water conferred the capability to produce β-lactamase. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly quantify and detect β-lactam antibiotic resistance genes in oysters. We believe our study provides baseline data for bacterial dynamics in estuarine oysters; such knowledge contributes to developing risk assessments to determine the associated hazards and consequences of consuming oysters from aquatic environments containing pathogenic bacteria

  7. Culture and Sustainability: Lessons from the Oyster and Other Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Consider the oyster. Like all good metaphors, it has done some morphing since the days of Shakespeare's "Merry Wives of Windsor." Newer bands of shell material have repainted the mollusk metaphor, transforming it from ostracism, opportunism, and exploitation to openness, opportunity and exploration, and thus an apt symbol for the…

  8. Genotyping and evaluation of Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Hendrickx, P.M.; Sumiati, E.

    2005-01-01

    Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus) represent one of the most popular mushroom species grown in Indonesia. There is a need for strains that are better adapted to the climate conditions at Java, where most mushrooms in Indonesia are produced. Strains that can produce mushrooms at 22 to 28 oC and h

  9. Macrofauna Settlement on Pearl Oyster Collectors in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Collection of pearl oyster seed using artificial collectors is a critical step in the production of cultured ... settled on spat collectors set to collect Pinctada margaritifera and Pteria penguin seed in shallow ... experiments conducted in Kenya between 2002 and. 2005. ..... the macrofauna and the bivalves follow a similar.

  10. From artificial structures to self-sustaining oyster reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, B.; Troost, K.; Van den Ende, D.; Nieuwhof, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Ysebaert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly recognized as essential elements within coastal defence schemes and coastal adaptation. The capacity of coastal ecosystems, like marshes and oyster reefs, to maintain their own habitat and grow with sea-level rise via biophysical feedbacks is seen as an important

  11. Growth and reproductive investment of introduced Pacific oysters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; Peralta, N.R.E.; Machado, J.P.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Growth and reproductive investment of cultured Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas were studied in two south-western European estuaries: the Ria de Ribadeo in Spain and the Ria Formosa in Portugal. Developing gonads were found in individuals >23.5 mm shell length in the Ria Formosa and >27.5 mm shell

  12. From artificial structures to self-sustaining oyster reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, B.; Troost, K.; Ende, van den D.; Nieuwhof, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Ysebaert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly recognized as essential elements within coastal defence schemes and coastal adaptation. The capacity of coastal ecosystems, like marshes and oyster reefs, to maintain their own habitat and grow with sea-level rise via biophysical feedbacks is seen as an importa

  13. Performance of selected eastern oyster lines across northeastern US estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern oyster production derived from aquaculture has expanded, but growth potential is constrained by losses to disease. Breeding programs supporting industry in the Northeast have targeted resistance to three diseases: MSX, Dermo, and ROD. Selected lines should possess some level of resistance a...

  14. Active downward propulsion by oyster larvae in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Hunter, Elias J; Schmitt, Erika L; Guazzo, Regina A

    2013-04-15

    Oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) could enhance their settlement success by moving toward the seafloor in the strong turbulence associated with coastal habitats. We characterized the behavior of individual oyster larvae in grid-generated turbulence by measuring larval velocities and flow velocities simultaneously using infrared particle image velocimetry. We estimated larval behavioral velocities and propulsive forces as functions of the kinetic energy dissipation rate ε, strain rate γ, vorticity ξ and acceleration α. In calm water most larvae had near-zero vertical velocities despite propelling themselves upward (swimming). In stronger turbulence all larvae used more propulsive force, but relative to the larval axis, larvae propelled themselves downward (diving) instead of upward more frequently and more forcefully. Vertical velocity magnitudes of both swimmers and divers increased with turbulence, but the swimming velocity leveled off as larvae were rotated away from their stable, velum-up orientation in strong turbulence. Diving speeds rose steadily with turbulence intensity to several times the terminal fall velocity in still water. Rapid dives may require a switch from ciliary swimming to another propulsive mode such as flapping the velum, which would become energetically efficient at the intermediate Reynolds numbers attained by larvae in strong turbulence. We expected larvae to respond to spatial or temporal velocity gradients, but although the diving frequency changed abruptly at a threshold acceleration, the variation in propulsive force and behavioral velocity was best explained by the dissipation rate. Downward propulsion could enhance oyster larval settlement by raising the probability of larval contact with oyster reef patches.

  15. Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus) are useful for utilizing lignocellulosic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. ADEBAYO

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... industrial lignocellulosic wastes due to their production of ligninolytic and ... technologies developed between oyster mushrooms and. Adebayo ..... The cost of mushroom is directly dependent on the substrate ... Coconut leaves. 31. 585 ..... poultry and as additives to wheat flour for improving the quality of ...

  16. Genotyping and evaluation of Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Hendrickx, P.M.; Sumiati, E.

    2005-01-01

    Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus) represent one of the most popular mushroom species grown in Indonesia. There is a need for strains that are better adapted to the climate conditions at Java, where most mushrooms in Indonesia are produced. Strains that can produce mushrooms at 22 to 28 oC and

  17. Spatial synchronies in the seasonal occurrence of larvae of oysters (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippart, C.J.M.; Amaral, A.; Asmus, R.; van Bleijswijk, J.; Bremner, J.; Buchholz, F.; Cabanellas-Reboredo, M.; Catarino, D.; Cattrijsse, A.; Charles, F.; Comtet, T.; Cunha, A.; Deudero, S.; Duchêne, J.-C.; Fraschetti, S.; Gentil, F.; Gittenberger, A.; Guizien, K.; Gonçalves, J.M.; Guarnieri, G.; Hendriks, I.; Hussel, B.; Pinheiro Vieira, R.; Reijnen, B.T.; Sampaio, I.; Serrão, E.; Sousa Pinto, I.; Thiebaut, E.; Viard, F.; Zuur, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive cycles of marine invertebrates with complex life histories are considered to be synchronized by water temperature and feeding conditions, which vary with season and latitude. This study analyses seasonal variation in the occurrence of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and mussel (Mytilus eduli

  18. Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation technique using re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-08-31

    Aug 31, 2014 ... The mineral content of oyster mushroom grown on rice straws, ... environment from disposed plastic bags which are non-biodegradable and if burned may cause ill-health effect to ... straw bales and plastic bags and bottles for.

  19. Removal of Arsenic with Oyster Shell: Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Atiqur Rahman, , and

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oyster shell has tremendous potential as a remediation material for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. A single arsenic removal system was developed with oyster shell for tube well water containing arsenic. The system removes arsenic from water by adsorption through fine oyster shell. Various conditions that affect the adsorption/desorption of arsenic were investigated. Adsorption column methods showed the removal of As(III under the following conditions: initial As concentration, 100 µg /L; oyster shell amount, 6 g; particle size, <355µm ; treatment flow rate, 1.7 mL/min; and pH 6.5. Arsenic concentration of the treated water were below the Bangladesh drinking water standard of 50 µg/L for As. The desorption efficiencies with 2M of KOH after the treatment of groundwater were in the range of 80-83%. A combination of techniques was used to measure the pH, conductivity, cations and anions. The average concentrations of other inorganic constituents of health concern (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe in treated water were below their respective WHO guideline for drinking. The present study might provide new avenues to achieve the arsenic concentrations required for drinking water recommended by Bangladesh and the World Health Organization (WHO.

  20. Parameter Estimation of Fossil Oysters from High Resolution 3D Point Cloud and Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    A unique fossil oyster reef was excavated at Stetten in Lower Austria, which is also the highlight of the geo-edutainment park 'Fossilienwelt Weinviertel'. It provides the rare opportunity to study the Early Miocene flora and fauna of the Central Paratethys Sea. The site presents the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome formed about 16.5 million years ago in a tropical estuary of the Korneuburg Basin. About 15,000 up to 80-cm-long shells of Crassostrea gryphoides cover a 400 m2 large area. Our project 'Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef' combines methods of photogrammetry, geology and paleontology to document, evaluate and quantify the shell bed. This interdisciplinary approach will be applied to test hypotheses on the genesis of the taphocenosis (e.g.: tsunami versus major storm) and to reconstruct pre- and post-event processes. Hence, we are focusing on using visualization technologies from photogrammetry in geology and paleontology in order to develop new methods for automatic and objective evaluation of 3D point clouds. These will be studied on the basis of a very dense surface reconstruction of the oyster reef. 'Smart Geology', as extension of the classic discipline, exploits massive data, automatic interpretation, and visualization. Photogrammetry provides the tools for surface acquisition and objective, automated interpretation. We also want to stress the economic aspect of using automatic shape detection in paleontology, which saves manpower and increases efficiency during the monitoring and evaluation process. Currently, there are many well known algorithms for 3D shape detection of certain objects. We are using dense 3D laser scanning data from an instrument utilizing the phase shift measuring principle, which provides accurate geometrical basis < 3 mm. However, the situation is difficult in this multiple object scenario where more than 15,000 complete or fragmentary parts of an object with random orientation are found. The goal

  1. Latitudinal gradients in ecosystem engineering by oysters vary across habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Dominic; Cole, Victoria J; Bishop, Melanie J

    2016-04-01

    Ecological theory predicts that positive interactions among organisms will increase across gradients of increasing abiotic stress or consumer pressure. This theory has been supported by empirical studies examining the magnitude of ecosystem engineering across environmental gradients and between habitat settings at local scale. Predictions that habitat setting, by modifying both biotic and abiotic factors, will determine large-scale gradients in ecosystem engineering have not been tested, however. A combination of manipulative experiments and field surveys assessed whether along the east Australian coastline: (1) facilitation of invertebrates by the oyster Saccostrea glomerata increased across a latitudinal gradient in temperature; and (2) the magnitude of this effect varied between intertidal rocky shores and mangrove forests. It was expected that on rocky shores, where oysters are the primary ecosystem engineer, they would play a greater role in ameliorating latitudinal gradients in temperature than in mangroves, where they are a secondary ecosystem engineer living under the mangrove canopy. On rocky shores, the enhancement of invertebrate abundance in oysters as compared to bare microhabitat decreased with latitude, as the maximum temperatures experienced by intertidal organisms diminished. By contrast, in mangrove forests, where the mangrove canopy resulted in maximum temperatures that were cooler and of greater humidity than on rocky shores, we found no evidence of latitudinal gradients of oyster effects on invertebrate abundance. Contrary to predictions, the magnitude by which oysters enhanced biodiversity was in many instances similar between mangroves and rocky shores. Whether habitat-context modifies patterns of spatial variation in the effects of ecosystem engineers on community structure will depend, in part, on the extent to which the environmental amelioration provided by an ecosystem engineer replicates that of other co-occurring ecosystem engineers.

  2. Biochemical profile of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis and its nutritional attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Asha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oysters are highly esteemed sea food and considered a delicacy throughout the world. Yet this resource is not optimally utilised in several parts of the world. The aim of this study is to highlight its nutritional importance. Biochemical composition and nutritional attributes of oyster meat are discussed. Proximate composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles and mineral content were determined in oysters (Crassostrea madrasensis. Moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash contents in the oyster were 82.64%, 9.41%, 3.25% 3.2% and 1.01%, respectively and it was rich in macro-minerals and trace elements especially selenium. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA were highest of the total lipids among which eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and linoleic acid were the prominent fatty acids. The n-3/n-6 index was high indicating a predominance of n-3 fatty acids in the species. Total amino acid content was 99.33 g/100 g crude protein, of which, essential amino acid lysine was the most abundant. Valine had the lowest essential amino acid score (EAAS (0.17 while threonine had the highest EAAS of 3.62. Chemical score was 17% and the lowest limiting amino acid was valine. Protein efficiency ratio, essential amino acid index and biological value of oyster were 3.92, 120.2 and 174.0, respectively which indicates that the protein is of superior quality. Data on biochemical composition, nutritional attributes and quality indices of C. madrasensis protein may prove important for future policies regarding exploitation of this species and for inducing favourable changes in consumer preferences.

  3. The recovery of oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) populations in Sydney estuary (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, G F; Scammell, M S; Besley, C H

    2014-01-01

    The current work documented a significant and widespread increase in the abundance of the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata, in Sydney estuary (Australia) by undertaking surveys of oyster density in the estuary in 1989 and annually from 1994 to 2006. Oyster density at six control sites located in nearby National Parks unaffected by boating and stormwater discharges were compared to 17 study sites widely distributed within Sydney estuary. No oyster populations were evident in Sydney estuary in 1989; however, by 1994 oysters had colonised areas of the lower and central estuary and by 2002 densities were statistically similar to control sites. The timing of estuary-wide increases in oyster abundance suggests that the partial banning of tributyltin in 1989 for vessels under 25 m long may have played a major role in the increase of S. glomerata in this estuary.

  4. Irritated Method for Flat warts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiBingxu

    2004-01-01

    Summary Background The relation between spontaneous regression of Flat warts and T cells depended immunity was confirmed. Cells immunity against HPV was induced by presenting of HPV related antigens, and thrived by cytokine and some chemistry agent. So how to make HPV which incubated in keratinocyte to present PHV antigens and keratinocyte to secret cytokine or chemistry agents should be a pursuance for dermatologist who are looking for a efficient method to deal with flat warts. Present research had exhibited inflammable agents can induce dermatitis when apply to the skin surface, so it might bring flat warts to spontaneous regression. Objective To observe the effectiveness of irritant drugs on flat warts, and at same time to understand more on the mechanism of the regression. Methods Compared with Control we treat 88 case of flat warts with retinoid gel or 3% hydrogen peroxide solution plus 5 % salicylic acid cream (HPSC). Results Both retinoid gel and HPSC reveal significant effect on flat warts. Conclusion Retinoid gel or SPHC was effective on the treatment of flat warts. The possible explanation for this is the drugs when put on the skin will induce dermatitis and dissolve or denude keratin.

  5. Detection of multiple sapovirus genotypes and genogroups in oyster-associated outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa-Okamoto, Reiko; Arita-Nishida, Tomoko; Toda, Shoichi; Kato, Hirotomo; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Miho; Nishio, Osamu; Kimura, Hirokazu; Noda, Mamoru; Takeda, Naokazu; Oka, Tomoichiro

    2009-01-01

    This report describes multiple viruses in stool specimens from oyster-associated gastroenteritis. Eleven outbreaks of oyster-associated gastroenteritis were examined for enteric viruses between January 2002 and March 2006 in Japan. Multiple norovirus genotypes were detected in all outbreaks; moreover, kobuvirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were also detected in 6, 3, and 1 of the 11 outbreaks, respectively. Notably, multiple sapovirus genogroups were detected in the stool specimens from subjects in two oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  6. Metals in crab, oyster and sediment in two South Carolina estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus and the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica have the ability to concentrate metals from the marine environment. From August 1979 to May 1981, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc concentrations were determined quarterly for crab, oyster, and bottom sediment from two estuarine areas in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina. The results of the analyses indicate that crab muscle and oyster meats obtained from locations nearest domestic and industrial activities have the highest Cu and Zn concentrations.

  7. The curious case of eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica stock status in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pine III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Apalachicola Bay, Florida, eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica industry has annually produced about 10% of the U.S. oyster harvest. Today's simple individual-operator, hand-tonging, small-vessel fishery is remarkably similar to the one that began in the 1800s. Unprecedented attention is currently being given to the status of oyster resources in Apalachicola Bay because this fishery has become central to the decision making related to multistate water disputes in the southeastern United States, as well as millions of dollars in funding for restoration programs related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The oyster fishery collapsed in 2012, leading to large economic losses and community concerns over the current and future status of oyster resources, ecosystem health, and local economic opportunities. We used best available data to assess what mechanism(s may have led to the collapse of the Apalachicola Bay oyster fishery. We then assessed the efficacy of alternative management strategies (e.g., restoration, fishery closure to accelerate oyster population recovery. Our results suggest that the Apalachicola Bay oyster population is not overfished in the sense that recruitment has been limited by harvest, but that the 2012 collapse was driven by lower-than-average numbers and/or poor survival of juvenile oysters in the years preceding the collapse. This reduction in recruitment not only reduced the biomass of oysters available to harvest, but from a population resilience perspective, likely reduced the amount of dead shell material available as larval settlement area. Although the Apalachicola Bay oyster fishery has proven resilient over its >150-year history to periods of instability, this fishery now seems to be at a crossroads in terms of continued existence and possibly risks an irreversible collapse. How to use the restoration funds available, and which restoration and management practices to follow, are choices that will determine the

  8. Polarimetric Features of Oyster Farm Observed by AIRSAR and JERS-1

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, S.-K.; Hong, S.-H.; Kim, S.-W.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Won, J. -S.; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; 山口, 芳雄

    2006-01-01

    The polarimetric features of an oyster farm in a coastal area are analyzed to verify the applicability of radar polarimetry and interferometry. L-band Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data and Japan Earth Resources Satellite (JERS-1) data are used to examine the unique structure of an oyster farm located in South Korea. A specific feature of the oyster farm is the presence of numerous arrays of structures of various orientations that consist of exercise-bar-shaped poles protruding a...

  9. Flats: Preliminary WFC Data and Plans for Flight Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Hartig, G.; Tsvetanov, Z.

    2000-10-01

    The ACS WFC pixel-to-pixel P-flats with the build-3 detector repeat over a three month time span to a precision of better than 0.1% rms. The shape of the low frequency Lflat field varies with wavelength, where the ratio of the F435W/F814W L-flats differs from unity by - 10% in two patches near opposite corners of the field of view. At ~0.5%, the high frequency pixel-to-pixel structure in the WFC P-flats is about half that of the HRC build-2 and does not increase as much toward shorter wavelengths as the HRC build-2 with the Lesser coating. The amplitude of the fringes for continuum illumination is less than 1%, even in the narrow band ramp filters, while the fringing in monochromatic light is - 10% at 9300 Å. The goals of the laboratory WFC and HRC flat field program are to obtain the set of external flats that fully populates the pipeline database and to archive a baseline of high S/N internal flats for tracking post-launch changes.

  10. Is classical flat Kasner spacetime flat in quantum gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Parampreet

    2016-01-01

    Quantum nature of classical flat Kasner spacetime is studied using effective spacetime description in loop quantum cosmology. We find that even though the spacetime curvature vanishes at the classical level, non-trivial quantum gravitational effects can arise. For the standard loop quantization of Bianchi-I spacetime, which uniquely yields universal bounds on expansion and shear scalars and results in a generic resolution of strong singularities, we find that a flat Kasner metric is not a physical solution of the effective spacetime description, except in a limit. The lack of a flat Kasner metric at the quantum level results from a novel feature of the loop quantum Bianchi-I spacetime: quantum geometry induces non-vanishing spacetime curvature components, making it not Ricci flat even when no matter is present. The non-curvature singularity of the classical flat Kasner spacetime is avoided, and the effective spacetime transits from a flat Kasner spacetime in asymptotic future, to a Minkowski spacetime in asym...

  11. Detection, quantification and genotyping of noroviruses in oysters implicated in disease outbreaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefeli, Deborah; Gantenbein-Demarchi, Corinne; Böttiger, Blenda

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a major cause of foodborne outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Transmission of NoV is commonly linked to the consumption of oysters as they accumulate viruses through filter feeding in faecal-contaminated water. The NoV genogroups (G)I, GII and GIV infect humans....... While GI and GII have often been verified as causative agents of oyster-transmitted illness, GIV is rarely detected and has so far not been confirmed in outbreaks related to oysters. The aim of this study was to determine whether NoVs from oysters implicated in a disease outbreak were linked to the GI...

  12. Massive settlements of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia : Original paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Valero, Johanna; Harkestad, Lisbeth S.;

    2010-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important aquaculture species world-wide. Due to its wide environmental tolerance and high growth rate, it has also become a successful invader in many areas, leading to major ecosystem changes. Low water temperatures were previously believed to restrict...... the establishment of Pacific oysters in Scandinavia. However, recent surveys reveal that the Pacific oyster is now established in many areas in Scandinavia. The biomass of oysters in the Danish Wadden Sea has increased dramatically between 2005 and 2007, large numbers were observed along the Swedish west coast from...

  13. Massive settlements of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia : Invasion note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Valero, Johanna; Harkestad, Lisbeth S.;

    2010-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important aquaculture species world-wide. Due to its wide environmental tolerance and high growth rate, it has also become a successful invader in many areas, leading to major ecosystem changes. Low water temperatures were previously believed to restrict...... the establishment of Pacific oysters in Scandinavia. However, recent surveys reveal that the Pacific oyster is now established in many areas in Scandinavia. The biomass of oysters in the Danish Wadden Sea has increased dramatically between 2005 and 2007, large numbers were observed along the Swedish west coast from...

  14. Inhibition of 4NQO-Induced Oral Carcinogenesis by Dietary Oyster Shell Calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Jiang, Yi; Liao, Liyan; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Tang, Shengan; Yang, Qing; Sun, Lihua; Li, Yujie; Gao, Shuangrong; Xie, Zhongjian

    2016-03-01

    Oyster has gained much attention recently for its anticancer activity but it is unclear whether calcium, the major antitumor ingredient in oyster shell, is responsible for the anticarcinogenic role of the oyster. To address this issue, C57BL/6 mice were fed with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 50 µg/mL) and normal diet or a diet containing oyster powder, oyster calcium, or calcium depleted oyster powder. The tongue tissue specimens isolated from these mice were histologically evaluated for hyperplasia, dysplasia, and papillary lesions, and then analyzed for proliferation and differentiation markers by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that mice on the diet containing oyster calcium significantly reduced rates of tumors in the tongue and proliferation and enhanced differentiation in the oral epithelium compared with the diet containing calcium depleted oyster powder. These results suggest that calcium in oyster plays a critical role in suppressing formation of oral squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation and promoting differentiation of the oral epithelium.

  15. Ronchi test for flat mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Engelfried, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: jurgen@ifisica.uaslp.mx; Morelos, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2005-11-11

    One of the RICHes in the velocity spectrometers of the proposed CKM experiment requires a flat mirror, situated in the high intensity kaon beam. To reduce the interaction background for the experiment, this mirror has to be as thin as possible. First glass prototypes were produced in Mexico. To test the surface quality of these prototypes, we extended the Ronchi method so flat mirrors can also be tested. We present the methods and report on results of our measurements.

  16. Rapid detection of toxic metals in non-crushed oyster shells by portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou Ju, E-mail: Ju.Chou@selu.ed [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 (United States); Clement, Garret; Bursavich, Bradley; Elbers, Don [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 (United States); Cao Baobao; Zhou Weilie [Advanced Material Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this study was the multi-elemental detection of toxic metals such as lead (Pb) in non-crushed oyster shells by using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. A rapid, simultaneous multi-element analytical methodology for non-crushed oyster shells has been developed using a portable XRF which provides a quick, quantitative, non-destructive, and cost-effective mean for assessment of oyster shell contamination from Pb. Pb contamination in oyster shells was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The results indicated that Pb is distributed in-homogeneously in contaminated shells. Oyster shells have a lamellar structure that could contribute to the high accumulation of Pb on oyster shells. - A rapid, simultaneous multi-element analytical methodology for non-crushed oyster shells has been developed using XRF and contamination of lead on oyster shells was confirmed by XRF and SEM-EDS.

  17. AN OVACYSTIS-LIKE CONDITION IN THE AMERICAN OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA GMELIN FROM THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histological examination of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, from a study in Pensacola Bay, Florida, revealed two cases of abnormally large, basophilic ova that resemble ovacystis disease previously reported in oysters from Maine and Long Island. The hypertrophied gamet...

  18. Multibiomarker assessment of three Brazilian estuaries using oysters as bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez Domingos, F X; Azevedo, M; Silva, M D; Randi, M A F; Freire, C A; Silva de Assis, H C; Oliveira Ribeiro, C A

    2007-11-01

    Oysters have been largely employed as bioindicators of environmental quality in biomonitoring studies. Crassostrea rhizophorae was selected to evaluate the health status of three estuarine areas impacted by anthropogenic activities along the Brazilian coast, in three estuarine complexes, ranging in latitude from 7 to 25 degrees S. In each estuary three sites were sampled in Winter and in Summer: a site considered as reference, and two sites next to contamination sources. Condition index was similar at all sites and estuaries, with the highest values found for Itamaracá oysters in Summer. Necrosis, hyperplasia, mucocyte hypertrophy and fusion of ordinary filaments were the main histopathological lesions observed. Muscle cholinesterase activity was overall similar, but with a strong seasonal effect. Inhibition or activation of branchial total ATPase and Na,K-ATPase activities at the contaminated sites was observed. The health status of these estuarine areas is quite similar, and the combined use of biomarkers is recommended.

  19. Multiple enzymatic profiles of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Albuquerque Costa

    Full Text Available The enzymatic characterization of vibrios has been used as a virulence indicator of sanitary interest. The objective of this study was to determine the enzymatic profile of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains (n = 70 isolated from Crassostrea rhizophorae oysters. The strains were examined for the presence of gelatinase (GEL, caseinase (CAS, elastase (ELAS, phospholipase (PHOS, lipase (LIP, amilase (AML and DNase. All enzymes, except elastase, were detected in more than 60% of the strains. The most recurrent enzymatic profiles were AML + DNase + PHOS + GEL + LIP (n = 16; 22.9% and AML + CAS + DNase + PHOS + GEL + LIP (n = 21; 30%. Considering the fact that exoenzyme production by vibrios is closely related to virulence, one must be aware of the bacteriological risk posed to human health by the consumption of raw or undercooked oysters.

  20. Multiple enzymatic profiles of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Renata Albuquerque; Conde Amorim, Ludimila M M; Araújo, Rayza Lima; dos Fernandes Vieira, Regine H Silva

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic characterization of vibrios has been used as a virulence indicator of sanitary interest. The objective of this study was to determine the enzymatic profile of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains (n=70) isolated from Crassostrea rhizophorae oysters. The strains were examined for the presence of gelatinase (GEL), caseinase (CAS), elastase (ELAS), phospholipase (PHOS), lipase (LIP), amilase (AML) and DNase. All enzymes, except elastase, were detected in more than 60% of the strains. The most recurrent enzymatic profiles were AML + DNase + PHOS + GEL + LIP (n=16; 22.9%) and AML + CAS + DNase + PHOS + GEL + LIP (n=21; 30%). Considering the fact that exoenzyme production by vibrios is closely related to virulence, one must be aware of the bacteriological risk posed to human health by the consumption of raw or undercooked oysters. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Taste Components between Triploid and Diploid Oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hong; WANG Xiaoxue; ZHANG Bin; TANG Haiqing; XUE Changhu; XU Jiachao

    2002-01-01

    The main taste components of triploid and diploid oyster (Crassostrea gigas) were compared. Free amino acids,inosine monophosphate, succinate, trimethylamine oxide and betaine in fresh and boiled extractives were analyzed. The protein, lipids, glycogen, moisture and ash, which may affect the flavour, were evaluated. In boiled extractives, the amino acids were 394.1 mg(100 g)-1 in diploid and 183.5 mg(100 g)-1 in triploid. However, in fresh oyster extractives, they were 320.0 mg(100 g)-1 and 147.3 mg(100 g)-1 respectively. The inosine monophosphate in triploid was 44% more than that in diploid, and a little difference existed in the content of trimethylamine oxide between them. The contents of these taste components were the basis for taste flavour pattern determination.

  2. An outbreak of norovirus linked to oysters in Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodo, Kerryn L; Veitch, Mark G K; Green, Michelle L

    2014-03-31

    Norovirus is the most commonly reported virus in shellfish related gastroenteritis outbreaks. In March 2013 an investigation was conducted following the receipt of reports of gastroenteritis after the consumption of oysters at private functions in Tasmania. Cases were ascertained through general practitioners, emergency departments, media releases and self-reporting. Of the 306 cases identified in Tasmania, ten faecal specimens were collected for laboratory testing and eight were positive for norovirus (GII.g). The most common symptoms were vomiting (87%), diarrhoea (85%), myalgia (82%) and fever (56%). The implicated oysters were traced to a single lease from which they were harvested and distributed locally and interstate. Nationally 525 cases were identified from Tasmania (306), Victoria (209), New South Wales (8) and Queensland (2). This report highlights the consequences of norovirus outbreaks in shellfish, even with rapid identification, trace back and removal of the implicated product from the market.

  3. 40 CFR 408.250 - Applicability; description of the Pacific Coast hand-shucked oyster processing subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pacific Coast hand-shucked oyster processing subcategory. 408.250 Section 408.250 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Pacific Coast Hand-Shucked Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.250 Applicability; description of the Pacific Coast hand-shucked oyster processing subcategory....

  4. 76 FR 59423 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement... statement to consider the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-use permit in Drakes Estero, Point Reyes... National Seashore Web site, at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/pore (click on the Drakes Bay Oyster...

  5. 40 CFR 408.260 - Applicability; description of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast hand-shucked oyster processing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Atlantic and Gulf Coast hand-shucked oyster processing subcategory. 408.260 Section 408.260 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Atlantic and Gulf Coast Hand-Shucked Oyster Processing Subcategory § 408.260 Applicability; description of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast hand-shucked oyster...

  6. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  7. Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science Educational Series. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This CD-ROM, Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay, describes oyster reefs, reef communities, and their roles in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Detailed descriptions of scientific research methods and techniques used to monitor and describe oyster reef communities as well as applications of the resulting data are provided. The CD-ROM was…

  8. 75 FR 65373 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit... Statement (EIS) for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit, Point Reyes National...

  9. The reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHAM Gomes

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the reproductive cycle of the oyster Crassostrea gasar (= C. brasiliana in the field and the laboratory. The reproductive cycle of the animals was evaluated in the field at Sambaqui Beach, Florianópolis, SC (27° 29′18″ S and 48° 32′12″ W from May 2008 through November 2009. In July, the animals were in the resting stage. The early growth stage began in August and was followed by the late growth stage in October. In November and December, the oysters began to enter the mature stage. Females in spawning condition were predominant during these months. The stages of the reproductive cycle were positively associated with temperature (r=0.77, P<0.01 and negatively associated with salinity (r=−0.56, P=0.042. These findings demonstrated that increased temperature and reduced salinity influence the reproductive development of Crassostrea gasar. The condition index (CI of the animals was also associated with the seawater temperature. The highest values of the condition index were observed during the months when the temperature of the seawater was gradually increasing. A laboratory experiment was performed to test the effect of salinity on the reproductive cycle of the oysters. The experiment was conducted in standardized tanks. The animals were conditioned using two salinities (24‰ and 34‰. The salinity regime influenced the development of the gonadal tissue of the oysters. A salinity of 24‰ produced greater reproductive development.

  10. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in Brazilian oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L A; Santos, L K N S S; Brito, P A; Maciel, B M; Da Silva, A V; Albuquerque, G R

    2015-05-04

    The aim of this study was to detect evidence of Toxoplasma gondii using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) obtained from the southern coastal region of Bahia, Brazil. A total of 624 oysters were collected, and the gills and digestive glands were dissected. Each tissue sample was separated into pools containing tissues (of the same type) from three animals, leading to a total of 416 experimental samples for analysis (208 samples each from the gills and digestive glands). Molecular analysis using PCR-based detection of the T. gondii AF 146527 repetitive fragment yielded negative results for all samples. However, when nested-PCR was used for detection of the T. gondii SAG-1 gene, 17 samples were positive, with the gills being the tissue with maximal detection of the parasite. These positive results were confirmed by sample sequencing. It is therefore suggested that C. rhizophorae oysters are capable of filtering and retaining T. gondii oocysts in their tissue. This represents a risk to public health because they are traditionally ingested in natura.

  11. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Gulf of Mexico American Oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cake, Edwin W.

    1983-01-01

    The American or eastern oyster (Crassostrea virrinica [Gmelin]), a bivalve in the family Ostreidae, is an important commercia and recreational species along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of North America and other areas (U.S. Pacific coast and Hawaii) where it has been introduced (Galtsoff 1964). It evolved over the last 25 million years (Miocene and Pliocene epochs) from an ancestral, Atlantic-Pacific species that also gave rise to the Central American oyster of the Pacific coast, Crassostrea corteziensis (Hertlein) (Stenzel 1971). It evolved to fill a eurytopic niche in coastal estuaries where it forms massive reefs in nearshore bays, sounds, lagoons, and river mouths. Its existence depends on suitable substratum (cultch and firm bottom sediments) and acceptable sal-inity conditions. The location and distribution of oyster reefs in a salt marsh-estuari ne ecosystem are not acci denta 1; rather, they result from the interacti on of many bi 01 ogi ca 1, chemica1, geo1ogi ca1, and phys i ca 1 processes (Butler 1954a; Marshall 1954; Bahr and Lanier 1981).

  12. Identification of the Molecular Clockwork of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrigault, Mickael; Tran, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Molecular clock system constitutes the origin of biological rhythms that allow organisms to anticipate cyclic environmental changes and adapt their behavior and physiology. Components of the molecular clock are largely conserved across a broad range of species but appreciable diversity in clock structure and function is also present especially in invertebrates. The present work aimed at identify and characterize molecular clockwork components in relationship with the monitoring of valve activity behavior in the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Results provided the characterization of most of canonical clock gene including clock, bmal/cycle, period, timeless, vertebrate-type cry, rev-erb, ror as well as other members of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (plant-like cry, 6–4 photolyase). Analyses of transcriptional variations of clock candidates in oysters exposed to light / dark regime and to constant darkness led to the generation of a putative and original clockwork model in C. gigas, intermediate of described systems in vertebrates and insects. This study is the first characterization of a mollusk clockwork. It constitutes essential bases to understand interactions of the different components of the molecular clock in C. gigas as well as the global mechanisms associated to the generation and the synchronization of biological rhythms in oysters. PMID:28072861

  13. SAR Indicators for Morphological Changes and Bivalve Beds on Intertidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Kemme, Linnea

    2016-08-01

    We analysed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual- polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  14. Impact of an icy winter on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793) populations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Åsa; Blanda, Elisa; Bodvin, Torjan;

    2012-01-01

    at the sampling sites of oyster populations. Despite the severe winter conditions of 2009/2010 causing high mortality, the Pacific oyster still exists in large numbers in Scandinavia. The present investigation indicates that extreme winter conditions may result in a temporary reduction of the density...

  15. Growth, morphometrics and nutrient content of farmed eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), in New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    When harvested, oysters represent a removal from the ecosystem of nutrients such as nitrogen (N)and carbon (C). A number of factors potentially affect nutrient content, but a quantitative understanding across the geographical range of the eastern oysters is lacking. This study wa...

  16. On the Half Shell: An Introduction to Oysters and Their Unique Structures and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. Adam; Haines, Sarah; Romano, Christina; Takacs, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    The eastern oyster, "Crassostrea virginica," is an ecologically and economically important species in Chesapeake Bay. Oysters are ecologically unique in the Chesapeake Bay because they build a structure known as a bar or reef by attaching to one another over a 45 long period of time. They have been coined the "Ecological Engineers…

  17. 21 CFR 161.30 - Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... canned oysters. 161.30 Section 161.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions § 161.30 Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters. (a) For many years packers...

  18. A habitat suitability model for Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in the Oosterschelde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, T.; Wijsman, J.W.M.; Brink, van den A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The modelled habitat suitability maps show a reasonable estimation of the suitability for oysters throughout the Delta and can be used to broadly indicate the consequences of the effect of climate change and infrastructural changes on the habitat suitability for oysters. The largest effect on the su

  19. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES, POTENTIAL VIRULENT FACTORS, IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, is one of the two important parasites causing severe mortality in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on the US east coast. Our recent study suggests that P. marinus cells and its extracellular products (ECP) could scaveng...

  20. Thermal inactivation of enteric viruses and bioaccumulation of enteric foodborne viruses in live oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses are one of the main causative agents of shellfish associated outbreaks. In this study, the kinetics of viral bioaccumulation in live oysters and the heat stability of the most predominant enteric viruses were determined in both tissue culture and in oyster tissues. A human nor...

  1. Comparison of different methods for isolation of bacterial DNA from retail oyster tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oysters are filter-feeders that bio-accumulate bacteria in water while feeding. To evaluate the bacterial genomic DNA extracted from retail oyster tissues, including the gills and digestive glands, four isolation methods were used. Genomic DNA extraction was performed using the Allmag™ Blood Genomic...

  2. Kl-impregnated Oyster Shells as a Solid Catalyst for Soybean Oil Transesterificaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on inexpensive and green catalysts is needed for economical production of biodiesel. The goal of the research was to test KI-impregnated oyster shell as a solid catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil. Specific objectives were to characterize KI-impregnated oyster shell, determine t...

  3. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196). The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  4. Growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. Fr.) Kumm (oyster mushroom) on different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmay, Zenebe; Gorems, Weldesemayat; Birhanu, Getachew; Zewdie, Solomon

    2016-12-01

    Mushroom cultivation is reported as an economically viable bio-technology process for conversion of various lignocellulosic wastes. Given the lack of technology know-how on the cultivation of mushroom, this study was conducted in Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resource, with the aim to assess the suitability of selected substrates (agricultural and/or forest wastes) for oyster mushroom cultivation. Accordingly, four substrates (cotton seed, paper waste, wheat straw, and sawdust) were tested for their efficacy in oyster mushroom production. Pure culture of oyster mushroom was obtained from Mycology laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University. The pure culture was inoculated on potato dextrose agar for spawn preparation. Then, the spawn containing sorghum was inoculated with the fungal culture for the formation of fruiting bodies on the agricultural wastes. The oyster mushroom cultivation was undertaken under aseptic conditions, and the growth and development of mushroom were monitored daily. Results of the study revealed that oyster mushroom can grow on cotton seed, paper waste, sawdust and wheat straw, with varying growth performances. The highest biological and economic yield, as well as the highest percentage of biological efficiency of oyster mushroom was obtained from cotton seed, while the least was from sawdust. The study recommends cotton seed, followed by paper waste as suitable substrates for the cultivation of oyster mushroom. It also suggests that there is a need for further investigation on various aspects of oyster mushroom cultivation in Ethiopia to promote the industry.

  5. The Potential Use of Electricity to Control Burrowing Shrimp in Oyster Aquaculture Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalassinid shrimp cause significant problems for oyster aquaculture in the Pacific Northwest (USA) where oysters succumb to the physical disruption of the sediment by the burrowing activity of these animals. While electrofishing is a commonly used technique to capture fish and some invertebrates i...

  6. FACTORS INFLUENCING IN VITRO KILLING OF BACTERIA BY HEMOCYTES OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A tetrazolium dye reduction assay was used to study factors governing killing of bacteria by oyster hemocytes. In vitro tests were performed on bacterial strains by using hemocytes from oysters collected from the same location in winter and summer. Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains...

  7. Acanthoparyphium sp. and other metazoan symbionts of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, from South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredensborg, B L; Ramirez, J J; Partida, L

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated oysters, Crassostrea virginica , from Laguna Madre in South Texas, where a 45-yr old study recorded metacercarial infections of the echinostomatid trematode, Acanthoparyphium spinulosum , an Asian relative of which, Acanthoparyphium tyosenense, has been associated with human infections via the ingestion of raw mollusks. In an effort to examine the base-line infection parameters of Acanthoparyphium sp. in oysters, we examined the effect of distance from the shoreline, which is the habitat of the first intermediate host snail, Cerithidea pliculosa, as well as temporal changes in oyster infection levels, by conducting quarterly collections of oysters during a year. We found that almost all oysters (prevalence = 97.8-100%) were infected regardless of distance to the shoreline and season. However, the abundance of metacercariae was significantly higher close to the shoreline, while no significant temporal changes could be detected. In addition to the echinostomatid, we found a high abundance of the metacestode Tylocephalum sp. and the presence of 4 other metazoan parasites. None of the infections seemed to incur significant tissue damage to the oysters. Our study shows that at least locally, recreational harvesters of oysters may be exposed to Acanthoparyphium sp. Future studies should examine oysters from snail host habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, and the potential zoonotic risk of Acanthoparyphium sp. should be evaluated using experimental infections of animal models.

  8. On the Half Shell: An Introduction to Oysters and Their Unique Structures and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. Adam; Haines, Sarah; Romano, Christina; Takacs, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    The eastern oyster, "Crassostrea virginica," is an ecologically and economically important species in Chesapeake Bay. Oysters are ecologically unique in the Chesapeake Bay because they build a structure known as a bar or reef by attaching to one another over a 45 long period of time. They have been coined the "Ecological Engineers…

  9. Impact of an icy winter on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793) populations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Åsa; Blanda, Elisa; Bodvin, Torjan;

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an invasive species that has dispersed into Scandinavia during the last few decades. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of extreme winter conditions on the mortality of the Pacific oyster in Scandinavia. The study was done by compilin...

  10. Seasonal variation in the proximate composition of rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata from Bombay coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Nair, V.R.

    .73 and 53.68 + or - 3.59% were recorded respectively for oysters from stns. M and B and the difference was significant (P less than 0.01). Mean carbohydrate content in oysters from stn. M amounted to 14.69 + or - 3.22 whereas at stn. B it was 8.79 + or - 1...

  11. A bacteriological survey of an oyster-growing area: The Oualidia Lagoon, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchriti, N; El Marrakchi, A; Fahim, A; Goyal, S M

    1992-09-01

    A 3-year bacteriological survey of an oyster-growing area in Morocco, where the Japanese oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is grown, showed that the contamination of this lagunar ecosystem was not continuous but intermittent and that animal manure and human recreational activities were important sources of pollution. The major source of contamination was of animal origin, except during the summer, when human contamination prevailed.

  12. Are pesticide residues associated to rice production affecting oyster production in Delta del Ebro, NE Spain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Victoria; Riva, Carmen; Faria, Melissa; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià; Fernandez Tejedor, Margarita; Roque, Ana; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barata, Carlos

    2012-10-15

    Pesticide usage in Delta del Ebro (NE Spain) during the rice growing season has been associated with oyster episodes of mortality that occur early in summer. However, there are no studies that have directly evaluated pesticide levels and effects in oysters (Crassotrea gigas) cultured in Ebro's Bays. In this study pesticide levels in water, metal body burdens and up to 12 different biochemical markers were monitored in gills and digestive glands of oysters transplanted from May to June in 2008 and 2009. Biochemical responses evidenced clear differences in oysters from 2008 and 2009. Oysters transplanted in 2009 showed their antioxidant defenses unaffected from May to June and consequently increased levels of tissue damage measured as lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks and of mortality rates. Conversely oysters transplanted in 2008 increase their antioxidant defenses from May to June, had low levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA damage and low mortality rates. Some pesticides in water such as bentazone and propanil together with high temperatures and salinity levels were related with tissue damage in oyster transplanted in 2008 but the observed large differences between years indicate that abiotic factors alone could not explain the high mortalities observed in 2009. An analysis of recent reported studies pointed out in the direction that in addition to abiotic factors the use of oysters sensitive to diseases may explain the observed responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guofan; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Ximing

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress re...

  14. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  15. Study on Elemental Fingerprint of Traditional Marine Chinese Medicine Oysters from Jiaozhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yongjun; ZHENG Kang; LI Yantuan

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between the trace elements and the characteristics of the oysters,we analyzed the trace elements present in the germplasm of oysters from different producing areas in the Jiaozhou Bay.The element fingerprints were established to reflect the elemental characteristics of the oysters.Concentration patterns of the elements were deciphered by principle component analysis(PCA)and hierarchical cluster analysis(HCA).The six regions were discriminated with accuracy using HCA and PCA based on the concentration of 16 trace elements.The elements were viewed as characteristic elements of the oysters and the fingerprints of these elements could be used to distinguish the quality of the oysters.

  16. Impact of an icy winter on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793) populations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Åsa; Blanda, Elisa; Bodvin, Torjan;

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an invasive species that has dispersed into Scandinavia during the last few decades. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of extreme winter conditions on the mortality of the Pacific oyster in Scandinavia. The study was done by compiling...... mortality data from independent surveys in Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Winter mortality of the oysters increased with latitude, which can be explained by the colder climate experienced at higher latitudes. Mortality was also found to be affected by site specific conditions such as water depth...... at the sampling sites of oyster populations. Despite the severe winter conditions of 2009/2010 causing high mortality, the Pacific oyster still exists in large numbers in Scandinavia. The present investigation indicates that extreme winter conditions may result in a temporary reduction of the density...

  17. Oysters produce an organic-inorganic adhesive for intertidal reef construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Jeremy R; Hight, Lauren M; Kenny, Paul; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2010-09-15

    Coastal ecosystems rely upon oyster reefs to filter water, provide protection from storms, and build habitat for other species. From a chemistry perspective, few details are available to illustrate how these shellfish construct such extensive reef systems. Experiments presented here show that oysters generate a biomineralized adhesive material for aggregating into large communities. This cement is an organic-inorganic hybrid and differs from the surrounding shells by displaying an alternate CaCO(3) crystal form, a cross-linked organic matrix, and an elevated protein content. Emerging themes and unique aspects are both revealed when comparing oyster cement to the adhesives of other marine organisms. The presence of cross-linked proteins provides an analogy to mussel and barnacle adhesives whereas the high inorganic content is exclusive to oysters. With a description of oyster cement in hand we gain strategies for developing synthetic composite materials as well as a better understanding of the components needed for healthy coastal environments.

  18. The Fallacies of Flatness: Thomas Friedman's "The World Is Flat"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight; Roberts, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Friedman's best-selling "The World is Flat" has exerted much influence in the west by providing both an accessible analysis of globalization and its economic and social effects, and a powerful cultural metaphor for globalization. In this review, we more closely examine Friedman's notion of the social contract, the moral center of his…

  19. Nonlocal gravity: Conformally flat spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato

    2016-01-01

    The field equations of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation are presented in a form that is reminiscent of general relativity. The implications of the nonlocal field equations are studied in the case of conformally flat spacetimes. Even in this simple case, the field equations are intractable. Therefore, to gain insight into the nature of these equations, we investigate the structure of nonlocal gravity in two-dimensional spacetimes. While any smooth 2D spacetime is conformally flat and satisfies Einstein's field equations, only a subset containing either a Killing vector or a homothetic Killing vector can satisfy the field equations of nonlocal gravity.

  20. Survey for protozoan parasites in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from the Gulf of Maine using PCR-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Nicholas D; Record, Nicholas R; Robledo, José A Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Protozoan pathogens represent a serious threat to oyster aquaculture, since they can lead to significant production loses. Moreover, oysters can concentrate human pathogens through filter feeding, thus putting at risk raw oyster consumers' health. Using PCR-based assays in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Maine, we expand the Northeast range in the USA for the protozoans Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus chesapeaki, and Haplosporidium nelsoni, and report for the first time the detection of the human pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Oysters hosting both P. marinus and P. chesapeaki were more than three times as likely to be infected by a non-Perkinsus than those free of Perkinsus infections.

  1. [Reproductive cycle of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae (Bivalvia: Ostreidae) in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brasil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tiago; Boehs, Guisla

    2011-03-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is important fishery resource along the entire Brasilian coast with excellent potential for marine culture. The purpose of this paper was to examine the reproductive characteristics of the oyster of the Maraú river estuary in Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brasil. The samples were collected monthly, from September 2006 to August 2007, at two points (I and II) in Camamu Bay. At each site 20 oysters were collected for histological analysis, fixed in Davidson's solution, embedded in paraffin, dehydrated in an ethanol series, sectioned (7 microm thick) and stained with Harris hematoxylin and Eosin (HE). Additionally, 30 oysters were sampled, at each point, for a condition index analysis. The water temperature ranged from 23.5 degrees C to 30 degrees C and the salinity from 15 to 25 ups at Point I (Maraú) and from 25 to 35 at Point II (Tanque Island). The oyster's height ranged from 30 to 92 mm at Point I and from 27 to 102 mm at Point II, with an average of 49.0 mm +/- 9.1 (n = 230) and 49.9 mm +/- 9.9 (n = 237), respectively. Among the sampled oysters at Point I, 59.1% were females, 31.3% males, 1.3% hermaphrodites and 8.2% of the oysters of undetermined sex. At Point II, 66.2% were females, 30.4% males, 0.8% hermaphrodites and 2.5% (n = 237) of undetermined sex. The gonadic stage analysis indicated that the reproduction period of the C. rhizophorae in the Maraú Peninsula was continuous all year, without any regressive phase. The condition index (R) ranged from 8.0% to 17.7%. The peak periods of R coincided with the expressive oyster's percentage in the maturation and liberation gametic stages. The results of these findings will contribute information for the oyster spat collection and to the process installation of the oyster culture in Camamu Bay.

  2. Effects of sea depths and sizes of winged pearl oysters (Pteria penguin on pearl culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inthonjaroen, N.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental aspects and biology of pearl oysters are the important conditions affecting pearl production. In order to obtain commercially valuable pearl from winged pearl oysters, Pteria penguin, three sizes (shell-length of the oysters: small (130-135 mm, medium (160-165 mm and large (185-200 mm were suspended at 2 m (surface, 5 m (mid-depth and 8 m (bottom below the sea surface from February to November, 2001. Using a factorial design, the data were randomly recorded by month. All sizes of the pearl oysters at the surface produced pearl of significantly greater thickness than those at the greater depths. The small-sized pearl oysters at the surface depth produced the thickest pearl (0.612 mm. which took only 7 months for harvesting, and the pearl thickness was correlated with growth response in shell length. In contrast to the growth rate in tissue weight and mortality rates which were 36.00, 26.00, 24.00% at the surface depth; 30.60, 24.60, 16.00% at mid-depth and 25.30, 19.30, 12.00% at the bottom for the small, medium and large-sized oysters, respectively. The results depended on infestation of fouling organisms on oyster shells which were much more intense at the surface than at a greater depths and slowed the growth rate in tissue weight, especially in the small-sized oysters. However, there was a greater amount of many kinds of plankton, the food resource of marine animals, at surface than at greater depths, so it retained shell-length growth and pearl production of the small-sized oysters: The other environmental factors, such as salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH and sea water temperature, at all depths did not have an impact on the pearl oyster rearing.

  3. Biotransformation and detoxification of inorganic arsenic in Bombay oyster Saccostrea cucullata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Yanyan; Liu, Huaxue; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) exists as the toxic inorganic forms in marine water and sediment, while marine oysters usually accumulate high As contents mostly as the less toxic organic forms. It has not yet been clear that how As is biotransformed in marine oysters. This study therefore investigated the biotransformation and detoxification of two inorganic As forms (As(III) and As(V)) in Bombay oyster Saccostrea cucullata after waterborne exposures for 30 days. Seven treatments of dissolved As exposure (clean seawater, 1, 5, 20 mg/L As(III), and 1, 5, 20 mg/L As(V)) were performed. Body As concentration increased significantly after all As exposure treatments except 1mg/L As(V). Total As, As(III), and As(V) concentration were positive correlated with glutathione-S-transferases (GST) activities, suggesting GST might play an important role in the As biotransformation and detoxification process. Organic As species were predominant in control and the low As exposed oysters, whereas a large fraction of As was remained as the inorganic forms in the high As exposed oysters, suggesting As could be biotransformed efficiently in the oysters in clean or light contaminated environment. The results of As speciation demonstrated the As biotransformation in the oysters included As(V) reduction, methylation to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and subsequent conversion to arsenobetaine (AsB). More As was distributed in the subcellular metallothionein-like proteins fraction (MTLP) functioning sequestration and detoxification in the inorganic As exposed oysters, suggesting it was also a strategy for oysters against As stress. In summary, this study elucidated that marine oysters had high ability to accumulate, biotransform, and detoxify inorganic As.

  4. The Effect of Oyster Reef Morphology on Particulate Transfer in a North Carolina Tidal Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, M. G.; Posey, M.; Mallin, M.; Alphin, T.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a vital ecosystem engineer species, providing a number of ecosystem services that structure and maintain estuarine environments through the construction of large, hard-bottom reef complexes. Through suspension feeding, oysters clear the water column of particulates, leading to decreased suspended material and enhanced benthic pelagic coupling. Past field studies have indicated the potential importance of the physical reef structure in regulating the transfer of particulate material in the seston. In order to directly assess the existence of the physical reef effect, multiple field experiments were performed in a small tidal creek estuary along the south eastern coast of North Carolina. Comparison of clearance rates derived from two different in situ methods, one accounting for the physical structure of the oyster reef in addition to oyster filtration and one looking at oyster filtration alone, indicate that the reef structure may increase the amount of particulate removal performed by the reef by more than 4 times the removal performed by oyster filtration alone. A defaunation experiment was performed by eliminating the live component of the oyster reef and comparing particulate transfer of this defaunated transect to that of an adjacent faunated transect. The defaunated transect had reduced but not significantly lower material removal when compared to the faunated transect prior to defaunation. Results from short and long term sediment collection and flow velocity measurements indicate that the physical effect of oyster reefs is strong over short temporal scales (days) but is much smaller when evaluated over longer time periods (months). Generally, large silt and small sand sized material is permanently removed from the seston due to the interaction of oyster reef structure and tidal flows, however the transfer of small and medium sized silt grains is only slowed down by the presence of large reef complexes. This

  5. Intertidal oysters reach their physiological limit in a future high-CO2 world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Stapp, Laura S; Ross, Pauline M

    2017-03-01

    Sessile marine molluscs living in the intertidal zone experience periods of internal acidosis when exposed to air (emersion) during low tide. Relative to other marine organisms, molluscs have been identified as vulnerable to future ocean acidification; however, paradoxically it has also been shown that molluscs exposed to high CO2 environments are more resilient compared with those molluscs naive to CO2 exposure. Two competing hypotheses were tested using a novel experimental design incorporating tidal simulations to predict the future intertidal limit of oysters in a high-CO2 world; either high-shore oysters will be more tolerant of elevated PCO2 because of their regular acidosis, or elevated PCO2  will cause high-shore oysters to reach their limit. Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata, were collected from the high-intertidal and subtidal areas of the shore and exposed in an orthogonal design to either an intertidal or a subtidal treatment at ambient or elevated PCO2 , and physiological variables were measured. The combined treatment of tidal emersion and elevated PCO2  interacted synergistically to reduce the haemolymph pH (pHe) of oysters, and increase the PCO2  in the haemolymph (Pe,CO2 ) and standard metabolic rate. Oysters in the intertidal treatment also had lower condition and growth. Oysters showed a high degree of plasticity, and little evidence was found that intertidal oysters were more resilient than subtidal oysters. It is concluded that in a high-CO2 world the upper vertical limit of oyster distribution on the shore may be reduced. These results suggest that previous studies on intertidal organisms that lacked tidal simulations may have underestimated the effects of elevated PCO2.

  6. Influence of water allocation and freshwater inflow on oyster production: a hydrodynamic-oyster population model for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N; Klinck, John M; Hofmann, Eileen E; McManus, Margaret A

    2003-01-01

    A hydrodynamic-oyster population model was developed to assess the effect of changes in freshwater inflow on oyster populations in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The population model includes the effects of environmental conditions, predators, and the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus, on oyster populations. The hydrodynamic model includes the effects of wind stress, river runoff, tides, and oceanic exchange on the circulation of the bay. Simulations were run for low, mean, and high freshwater inflow conditions under the present (1993) hydrology and predicted hydrologies for 2024 and 2049 that include both changes in total freshwater inflow and diversions of freshwater from one primary drainage basin to another. Freshwater diversion to supply the Houston metropolitan area is predicted to negatively impact oyster production in Galveston Bay. Fecundity and larval survivorship both decline. Mortality from Perkinsus marinus increases, but to a lesser extent. A larger negative impact in 2049 relative to 2024 originates from the larger drop in fecundity under that hydrology. Changes in recruitment and mortality, resulting in lowered oyster abundance, occur because the bay volume available for mixing freshwater input from the San Jacinto and Buffalo Bayou drainage basins that drain metropolitan Houston is small in comparison to the volume of Trinity Bay that presently receives the bulk of the bay's freshwater inflow. A smaller volume for mixing results in salinities that decline more rapidly and to a greater extent under conditions of high freshwater discharge.Thus, the decline in oyster abundance results from a disequilibrium between geography and salinity brought about by freshwater diversion. Although the bay hydrology shifts, available hard substrate does not. The simulations stress the fact that it is not just the well-appreciated reduction in freshwater inflow that can result in decreased oyster production. Changing the location of freshwater inflow can also

  7. Flat space physics from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, R

    2004-01-01

    We point out that aspects of quantum mechanics can be derived from the holographic principle, using only a perturbative limit of classical general relativity. In flat space, the covariant entropy bound reduces to the Bekenstein bound. The latter does not contain Newton's constant and cannot operate via gravitational backreaction. Instead, it is protected by - and in this sense, predicts - the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  8. The complexity of flat origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, M. [Xerox, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hayes, B. [ParcPlace-Digitalk, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We study a basic problem in mathematical origami: determine if a given crease pattern can be folded to a flat origami. We show that assigning mountain and valley folds is NP-hard. We also show that determining a suitable overlap order for flaps is NP-hard, even assuming a valid mountain and valley assignment.

  9. Line bundles and flat connections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INDRANIL BISWAS; GEORG SCHUMACHER

    2017-06-01

    We prove that there are cocompact lattices $\\Gamma$ in $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)$ with the property that there are holomorphic line bundles $L$ on $\\rm SL(2,\\mathbb C)/ \\Gamma$ with $c_{1}(L) = 0$ such that $L$ does not admit any unitary flat connection.

  10. Automatic Flatness Control of Cold Rolling Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbe, Yoshiharu; Sekiguchi, Kunio

    One of the subjects of cold rolling is a flatness of the rolled strip. Conventionally, measured strip flatness was approximated by polynomial (2th, 4th, 6th) equation across the entire strip width. This made it difficult to deal with desired loose edge or any desired flatness across the entire strip width. Also conventional flatness control was done for the entire strip width, so if there is a different flatness error among drive side and work side, conventional flatness control can not control properly. We propose independent strip flatness control among drive side and work side, and also automatic flatness control (AFC) system with arbitrary desired strip flatness. Also some applied results to cold mill are shown.

  11. 3D CENTRAL LINE EXTRACTION OF FOSSIL OYSTER SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Djuricic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetry provides a powerful tool to digitally document protected, inaccessible, and rare fossils. This saves manpower in relation to current documentation practice and makes the fragile specimens more available for paleontological analysis and public education. In this study, high resolution orthophoto (0.5 mm and digital surface models (1 mm are used to define fossil boundaries that are then used as an input to automatically extract fossil length information via central lines. In general, central lines are widely used in geosciences as they ease observation, monitoring and evaluation of object dimensions. Here, the 3D central lines are used in a novel paleontological context to study fossilized oyster shells with photogrammetric and LiDAR-obtained 3D point cloud data. 3D central lines of 1121 Crassostrea gryphoides oysters of various shapes and sizes were computed in the study. Central line calculation included: i Delaunay triangulation between the fossil shell boundary points and formation of the Voronoi diagram; ii extraction of Voronoi vertices and construction of a connected graph tree from them; iii reduction of the graph to the longest possible central line via Dijkstra’s algorithm; iv extension of longest central line to the shell boundary and smoothing by an adjustment of cubic spline curve; and v integration of the central line into the corresponding 3D point cloud. The resulting longest path estimate for the 3D central line is a size parameter that can be applied in oyster shell age determination both in paleontological and biological applications. Our investigation evaluates ability and performance of the central line method to measure shell sizes accurately by comparing automatically extracted central lines with manually collected reference data used in paleontological analysis. Our results show that the automatically obtained central line length overestimated the manually collected reference by 1.5% in the test set, which

  12. D Central Line Extraction of Fossil Oyster Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, A.; Puttonen, E.; Harzhauser, M.; Mandic, O.; Székely, B.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry provides a powerful tool to digitally document protected, inaccessible, and rare fossils. This saves manpower in relation to current documentation practice and makes the fragile specimens more available for paleontological analysis and public education. In this study, high resolution orthophoto (0.5 mm) and digital surface models (1 mm) are used to define fossil boundaries that are then used as an input to automatically extract fossil length information via central lines. In general, central lines are widely used in geosciences as they ease observation, monitoring and evaluation of object dimensions. Here, the 3D central lines are used in a novel paleontological context to study fossilized oyster shells with photogrammetric and LiDAR-obtained 3D point cloud data. 3D central lines of 1121 Crassostrea gryphoides oysters of various shapes and sizes were computed in the study. Central line calculation included: i) Delaunay triangulation between the fossil shell boundary points and formation of the Voronoi diagram; ii) extraction of Voronoi vertices and construction of a connected graph tree from them; iii) reduction of the graph to the longest possible central line via Dijkstra's algorithm; iv) extension of longest central line to the shell boundary and smoothing by an adjustment of cubic spline curve; and v) integration of the central line into the corresponding 3D point cloud. The resulting longest path estimate for the 3D central line is a size parameter that can be applied in oyster shell age determination both in paleontological and biological applications. Our investigation evaluates ability and performance of the central line method to measure shell sizes accurately by comparing automatically extracted central lines with manually collected reference data used in paleontological analysis. Our results show that the automatically obtained central line length overestimated the manually collected reference by 1.5% in the test set, which is deemed

  13. Improving early detection of exotic or emergent oyster diseases in France: identifying factors associated with shellfish farmer reporting behaviour of oyster mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, C; Osta Amigo, A; Mandard, Y V; Peroz, C; Renault, T

    2014-09-01

    Farmers' vigilance is essential for the detection of epidemics, including potential emerging diseases, in marine shellfish. A field study was conducted to investigate oyster farmers' reporting practices and behaviour, and to identify factors influencing the reporting process of oyster mortality, with the ultimate aim of improving early detection of unexplained oyster mortality outbreaks. A retrospective case-control study of oyster farmers from Charente-Maritime (France) was designed, based on interviews with 27 non-reporting and 89 reporting farmers, further split into 40 formerly-reporting and 49 currently-reporting farmers. Information about farmer and farm characteristics, farming practices, farm health history and related financial compensation on the farm, knowledge of the mortality reporting system and reporting behaviour was collected. Sampling design was considered in the calculations and farmers' reporting behaviour was modelled using an ordinal logistic regression (continuation-ratio model). Notification procedures were fairly well known among farmers and the reporting system was well accepted overall. Nevertheless, a lack of awareness of the aims of the reporting system was revealed, which contributed to late reporting. Factors identified as driving a farmer's decision to report oyster mortality concerned their lack of awareness of mortality reporting (production type, farm size, location of the production cycle, accessibility of the leasing grounds) and willingness to report (possibility and extent of financial compensation, a feeling of not being involved, whether it was first year of reporting). Overall classification performance of the model built in this study was 64%. In particular, financial compensation for oyster production losses appeared to be a clear incentive for reporting, but was countered by a habituation effect combined with a lack of awareness of the aims of the reporting system: oyster farmers looking for benefits for themselves in

  14. Epizootiology of Perkinsus sp. inCrassostrea gasar oysters in polyculture with shrimps in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Costa, Carolina Pereira; de Araújo, Jaíse Paiva Bragante; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Wainberg, Alexandre Alter

    2016-01-01

    Bivalve culture is of considerable economic and social interest in northeastern (NE) Brazil. The polyculture is an alternative approach to traditional monoculture for reducing the environmental impact of shrimp farming and improving oyster culture. Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus olseni were found infecting oysters in NE Brazil and can threaten oyster production. This study evaluated Perkinsus spp. occurrence in Crassostrea gasar during all production stages. Oyster spats were produced in a hatchery and grown in shrimp ponds in Rio Grande do Norte state. Perkinsus spp. were surveyed by Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence and intensity of infection were determined in oysters until they reached 7 cm. Results showed that the broodstock was already infected by Perkinsus (60%), but the derived spats were Perkinsus-free. Oyster spats acquired Perkinsus infection when transferred to ponds. The prevalence gradually increased in the seven months following placement in ponds (73%), and then decreased to 17% by the tenth month. The infections were initially mild, but intensity increased at the final growth stage. In conclusion, it is possible to produce Perkinsus-free C. gasar oyster spats from infected broodstock, and their culture in shrimp ponds is feasible.

  15. Epizootiology of Perkinsus sp. inCrassostrea gasar oysters in polyculture with shrimps in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Mirella da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bivalve culture is of considerable economic and social interest in northeastern (NE Brazil. The polyculture is an alternative approach to traditional monoculture for reducing the environmental impact of shrimp farming and improving oyster culture. Perkinsus marinus andPerkinsus olseni were found infecting oysters in NE Brazil and can threaten oyster production. This study evaluatedPerkinsus spp. occurrence in Crassostrea gasar during all production stages. Oyster spats were produced in a hatchery and grown in shrimp ponds in Rio Grande do Norte state.Perkinsus spp. were surveyed by Ray’s fluid thioglycollate medium and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence and intensity of infection were determined in oysters until they reached 7 cm. Results showed that the broodstock was already infected by Perkinsus (60%, but the derived spats were Perkinsus-free. Oyster spats acquired Perkinsus infection when transferred to ponds. The prevalence gradually increased in the seven months following placement in ponds (73%, and then decreased to 17% by the tenth month. The infections were initially mild, but intensity increased at the final growth stage. In conclusion, it is possible to produce Perkinsus-free C. gasar oyster spats from infected broodstock, and their culture in shrimp ponds is feasible.

  16. Biofiltration, growth and body composition of oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in effluents from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use oyster as biofilter to improve the quality of effluent from shrimp farming and to assess its growth performance and body composition. It was distributed 1,080 oysters into lanterns in fiberglass tanks (170 L in a completely randomized design with three treatments (0, 60 and 120 oysters and six replicates. It was used the effluent from the sedimentation tank. It was measured weekly: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, and it was analyzed ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N, orthophosphate-P, suspended solids and chlorophyll-α of the input effluent. The control tanks (without oysters were more efficient at removing ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N and orthophosphate-P. The tanks containing oysters were more efficient at removing suspended solids and chlorophyll-α. Stocking density influenced the height growth of oysters, but not width. Wet and daily weight, condition and yield index were not affected by stocking density, and a significant increase in comparison to the initials values was observed. Body composition was not affected by stocking density, and a significant difference (p0.05. Under the conditions evaluated, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae improves water quality and presents growth rates and body composition similar to those obtained in traditional crops.

  17. Parasites infecting the cultured oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) in Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Farias, Natanael Dantas; Da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2015-05-01

    The oyster Crassostrea gasar is a species widely used as food and a source of income for the local population of the estuaries of Northeast Brazil. Perkinsus marinus and Perkinsus olseni are deleterious parasites for oyster farming and were recently detected in Brazil. In this study, a histopathologic survey of the oyster C. gasar cultured in the estuary of the River Mamanguape (Paraíba State) was performed. Adult oysters were collected in December 2011 and March, May, August and October 2012 and processed for histology and Perkinsus sp. identification by molecular analyses. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of parasitic organisms including viral gametocytic hypertrophy, prokaryote-like colonies, protozoans (Perkinsus sp. and Nematopsis sp.) and metazoans (Tylocephalum sp. and cestodes). Other commensal organisms were also detected (the protozoan Ancistrocoma sp. and the turbellarian Urastoma sp.). The protozoan parasite Perkinsus sp. had the highest overall prevalence among the symbiotic organisms studied (48.9%), followed by Nematopsis sp. (36.3%). The other organisms were only sporadically observed. Only the protozoan Perkinsus sp. caused alterations in the oysters' infected organs. Molecular analyses confirmed the presence of P. marinus, P. olseni and Perkinsus beihaiensis infecting the oyster C. gasar. This is the first report of P. beihaiensis in this oyster species.

  18. The role of tissue-specific microbiota in initial establishment success of Pacific oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokmer, Ana; Kuenzel, Sven; Baines, John F; Wegner, Karl Mathias

    2016-03-01

    Microbiota can have positive and negative effects on hosts depending on the environmental conditions. Therefore, it is important to decipher host-microbiota-environment interactions, especially under natural conditions exerting (a)biotic stress. Here, we assess the relative importance of microbiota in different tissues of Pacific oyster for its successful establishment in a new environment. We transplanted oysters from the Southern to the Northern Wadden Sea and controlled for the effects of resident microbiota by administering antibiotics to half of the oysters. We then followed survival and composition of haemolymph, mantle, gill and gut microbiota in local and translocated oysters over 5 days. High mortality was recorded only in non-antibiotic-treated translocated oysters, where high titres of active Vibrio sp. in solid tissues indicated systemic infections. Network analyses revealed the highest connectivity and a link to seawater communities in the haemolymph microbiota. Since antibiotics decreased modularity and increased connectivity of the haemolymph-based networks, we propose that community destabilization in non-treated translocated oysters could be attributed to interactions between resident and external microbiota, which in turn facilitated passage of vibrios into solid tissues and invoked disease. These interactions of haemolymph microbiota with the external and internal environment may thus represent an important component of oyster fitness.

  19. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor derived from cross-linked oyster protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cheng-Liang; Kim, Jin-Soo; Ha, Jong-Myung; Choung, Se-Young; Choi, Yeung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension.

  20. Effects of oyster harvest activities on Louisiana reef habitat and resident nekton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Steve; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Oysters are often cited as “ecosystem engineers” because they modify their environment. Coastal Louisiana contains extensive oyster reef areas that have been harvested for decades, and whether differences in habitat functions exist between those areas and nonharvested reefs is unclear. We compared reef physical structure and resident community metrics between these 2 subtidal reef types. Harvested reefs were more fragmented and had lower densities of live eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hooked mussels (Ischadium recurvum) than the nonharvested reefs. Stable isotope values (13C and 15N) of dominant nekton species and basal food sources were used to compare food web characteristics. Nonpelagic source contributions and trophic positions of dominant species were slightly elevated at harvested sites. Oyster harvesting appeared to have decreased the number of large oysters and to have increased the percentage of reefs that were nonliving by decreasing water column filtration and benthopelagic coupling. The differences in reef matrix composition, however, had little effect on resident nekton communities. Understanding the thresholds of reef habitat areas, the oyster density or oyster size distribution below which ecosystem services may be compromised, remains key to sustainable management.

  1. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-01-01

    We used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. A comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish. PMID:23251548

  2. Persistence, Seasonal Dynamics and Pathogenic Potential of Vibrio Communities from Pacific Oyster Hemolymph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C.; Batista, Frederico M.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

  3. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Derived from Cross-Linked Oyster Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Liang Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension.

  4. Refrigerated seawater depuration for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination in pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Qianru; Häse, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    The efficacy of refrigerated-seawater depuration for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus levels in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was investigated. Raw Pacific oysters were inoculated with a mixed culture of five clinical strains of V. parahaemolyticus (10(5) to 10(6) most probable number [MPN] per g) and depurated with refrigerated seawater (5 degrees C) in a laboratory-scale recirculation system equipped with a 15-W gamma UV sterilizer. Depuration with refrigerated seawater for 96 h reduced V. parahaemolyticus populations by >3.0 log MPN/g in oysters harvested in the winter. However, 144 h of depuration at 5 degrees C was required to achieve a 3-log reduction in oysters harvested in the summer. Depuration with refrigerated seawater at 5 degrees C for up to 144 h caused no significant fatality in the Pacific oyster and could be applied as a postharvest treatment to reduce V. parahaemolyticus contamination in Pacific oysters. Further studies are needed to validate the efficacy of the depuration process for reducing naturally accumulated V. parahaemolyticus in oysters.

  5. Pleurostrin, an antifungal peptide from the oyster mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, K T; Xia, Lixin; Ng, T B

    2005-11-01

    A 7kDa peptide, with inhibitory activity on mycelial growth in the fungi Fusaerium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola and Physalospora piricola, was isolated from fresh fruiting bodies of the oyster mushroom. The isolation procedure entailed extraction with an aqueous buffer, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The protein was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. It demonstrated an N-terminal sequence different from known antifungal proteins and peptides.

  6. Oilseed rape straw for cultivation of oyster mushroom

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamali Peyvast

    2008-01-01

    Oyster mushroom [Pleurotus ostreatus var. sajor caju (Fr.) Singer] was grown on five substrates: rice straw, rice straw + oilseed rape straw (75:25, 50:50, and 25:75 dw/dw), and oilseed rape straw alone. Rice straw + oilseed rape straw (25:75) and oilseed rape straw were best for fruit body production of P. ostreatus. The time to fruiting for P. ostreatus was also shorter on oilseed rape straw. Protein content of the fruit bodies obtained with oilseed rape straw was highest among all substrat...

  7. Mortalities of Eastern and Pacific oyster Larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S; Church, Karlee M; Häse, Claudia C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a well-known coral pathogen, has recently been shown to elicit mortality in fish and shellfish. Several strains of V. coralliilyticus, such as ATCC 19105 and Pacific isolates RE22 and RE98, were misidentified as V. tubiashii until recently. We compared the mortalities caused by two V. tubiashii and four V. coralliilyticus strains in Eastern and Pacific oyster larvae. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of V. coralliilyticus in Eastern oysters (defined here as the dose required to kill 50% of the population in 6 days) ranged from 1.1 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml seawater; strains RE98 and RE22 were the most virulent. This study shows that V. coralliilyticus causes mortality in Eastern oyster larvae. Results for Pacific oysters were similar, with LD50s between 1.2 × 10(4) and 4.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml. Vibrio tubiashii ATCC 19106 and ATCC 19109 were highly infectious toward Eastern oyster larvae but were essentially nonpathogenic toward healthy Pacific oyster larvae at dosages of ≥1.1 × 10(4) CFU/ml. These data, coupled with the fact that several isolates originally thought to be V. tubiashii are actually V. coralliilyticus, suggest that V. coralliilyticus has been a more significant pathogen for larval bivalve shellfish than V. tubiashii, particularly on the U.S. West Coast, contributing to substantial hatchery-associated morbidity and mortality in recent years.

  8. Biochemical biomarkers in gills of mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae from three Brazilian estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Juliano; Monserrat, José Maria; Bianchini, Adalto

    2006-06-01

    Responses of biochemical biomarkers were evaluated in gills of immature adult mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected in three estuarine regions along the Brazilian coast. In each region, ten oysters were collected in one reference site (R) located far from pollution sources, and in two polluted sites (P-I and P-II sites) located in another water body with similar characteristics. P-I site is located close to recognized pollution sources while P-II site is in the same water body, but far from pollution sources. At the Paranaguá Bay (Southern Brazil), polluted sites receive domestic, harbor and phosphate fertilizer plant discharges. High lipid peroxides (LPO) content was observed in winter oysters from the P-I site. In summer, higher catalase activity was observed in these oysters. In the Piraquê region (Southeastern Brazil), polluted sites receive domestic and agricultural effluents. Lower total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC) towards peroxyradicals was observed in summer oysters from both P-I and P-II sites. In the Itamaracá region (Northeastern Brazil), polluted sites receive paper mill and caustic soda and chlorine factories effluents. Increased glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was observed in oysters from the P-I site in both summer and winter. At Paranaguá Bay (higher latitude), no seasonal differences were observed in oysters from the R site, suggesting that temperature was not an important factor influencing biomarkers levels. Lower GST activity was observed in oysters from the R site of the Itamaracá Bay (lower latitude) in winter and summer. Taken together, data obtained point to responses of biomarkers in oysters from polluted sites of the three estuarine regions analyzed, indicating the need for future monitoring of the biological effects of contaminants in these environments. They also point to the relevance to consider both season and latitude as factors influencing biomarker responses in environmental contamination

  9. Contrasting impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the molecular responses of CO2-resilient oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Thompson, Emma L; Raftos, David A

    2017-06-02

    This study characterises the molecular processes altered by both elevated CO2 and increasing temperature in oysters. Differences in resilience of marine organisms against the environmental stressors associated with climate change will have significant implications for the sustainability of coastal ecosystems worldwide. Some evidence suggests that climate change resilience can differ between populations within a species. B2 oysters represent a unique genetic resource because of their capacity to better withstand the impacts of elevated CO2 at the physiological level, compared to non-selected oysters from the same species (Saccostrea glomerata). Here, we used proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of gill tissue to evaluate whether the differential response of B2 oysters to elevated CO2 also extends to increased temperature. Substantial and distinctive effects on protein concentrations and gene expression were evident among B2 oysters responding to elevated CO2 or elevated temperature. The combination of both stressors also altered oyster gill proteomes and gene expression. However, the impacts of elevated CO2 and temperature were not additive or synergistic, and may be antagonistic. The data suggest that the simultaneous exposure of CO2-resilient oysters to near-future projected ocean pH and temperature results in complex changes in molecular processes in order to prevent stress-induced cellular damage. The differential response of B2 oysters to the combined stressors also indicates that the addition of thermal stress may impair the resilience of these oysters to decreased pH. Overall, this study reveals the intracellular mechanisms that might enable marine calcifiers to endure the emergent, adverse seawater conditions resulting from climate change.

  10. Flat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    菲亚特选在柏林举行的“面包与黄油(Bread&Butter)”青年时尚秀中发布了500柴油版车型。这款车型首先推出的是黑色和绿色车身颜色,共限量1万辆,目前已有6000辆被售出。现在,它又追加了1款车身颜色“午夜蓝”,菲亚特选择这款颜色,是因为它很接近牛仔裤的颜色,更容易吸引年轻的消费者。

  11. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  12. Parallel spinors on flat manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michał

    2006-05-01

    Let p(M) be the dimension of the vector space of parallel spinors on a closed spin manifold M. We prove that every finite group G is the holonomy group of a closed flat spin manifold M(G) such that p(M(G))>0. If the holonomy group Hol(M) of M is cyclic, then we give an explicit formula for p(M) another than that given in [R.J. Miatello, R.A. Podesta, The spectrum of twisted Dirac operators on compact flat manifolds, Trans. Am. Math. Soc., in press]. We answer the question when p(M)>0 if Hol(M) is a cyclic group of prime order or dim⁡M≤4.

  13. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  14. Flat heat pipe design, construction, and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegler, G.; Boughey, B.; Cerza, M.; Lindler, K.W.

    1999-08-02

    This paper details the design, construction and partial analysis of a low temperature flat heat pipe in order to determine the feasibility of implementing flat heat pipes into thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems.

  15. Perkinsus sp. infecting oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828) on the coast of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Rosana Pinho; Boehs, Guisla; Sabry, Rachel Costa; Ceuta, Liliane Oliveira; Luz, Mariane Dos Santos Aguiar; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; da Silva, Patrícia Mirella

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of the protozoan Perkinsus in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the coast of Bahia State, Brazil. The oysters (n = 900) were collected in February-March and July-August 2010. The Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) analysis of gills and rectum revealed hypnospores of Perkinsus sp. with a high mean prevalence (63%). The infection intensity varied from very light to advanced. The polymerase chain reaction confirmed Perkinsus in 87.2% of the RFTM-positive oysters. Histological analysis showed trophozoites and schizonts phagocytized by hemocytes, mainly in the intestine and the stomach epithelium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Deregulation of the humoral immune response of the oyster (Crassostrea corteziensis exposed to naphthalene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KJG Díaz-Resendiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Naphthalene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in aquatic ecosystems, and it can cause alterations in the immune system of organisms that live there. The oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is a species native to the Eastern Tropical Pacific, with economic and ecological importance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of subacute exposure to sublethal concentrations of naphthalene on the parameters of the humoral immune response (lysozyme and phenoloxidase activity, and nitric oxide production on the oyster C. corteziensis. The results indicated that naphthalene, under the conditions tested, significantly deregulated the parameters evaluated. This could increase susceptibility to infections and therefore affect oyster production.

  17. Application of Alternative Technologies to Eliminate Vibrios spp. in Raw Oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaopei

    2004-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) and gamma irradiation were applied to inactivate Vibrio vulnificus (MO624) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (O3:K6 TX2103) in pure culture and in inoculated live oysters. Vibrio pure culture and inoculated oysters were exposed to pressures of 207 MPa (30 kpsi) to 552 MPa (80 kpsi) for 0 min to maximum of 20 min. More than 5.4 log reductions of V. vulnificus occurred at 345 MPa for 0 min in oysters; 345 MPa for 2 min can achieve 4 log reductions on V. parahaemolyticus...

  18. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Half-flat Quantum Hair

    CERN Document Server

    García-Compeán, Hugo; Martínez-Merino, Aldo; Santos-Silva, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    By wrapping D3-branes over 3-cycles on a Half-flat manifold we construct an effective supersymmetric Black Hole in the N=2 low-energy theory in four-dimensions. Specifically we find that the torsion cycles present in a half-flat compactification, corresponding to the mirror symmetric image of electric NS flux on a Calabi-Yau manifold, manifest in the black hole physics as quantum hair. We compute the electric and magnetic charges related to the quantum hair, and also the mass contribution to the effective black hole. We find that by wrapping a number of D3-branes equal to the order of the discrete group associated to the torsional part of the half-flat homology, the effective charge and mass terms vanishes. We compute the variation of entropy and the corresponding temperature associated with the lost of the quantum hair. We also comment on the equivalence between canceling Freed-Witten anomalies and the assumption of self-duality for the five-form field strength. Finally from a K-theoretical perspective, we c...

  20. Flat colon polyps: what should radiologists know?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignjatovic, A. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Burling, D., E-mail: burlingdavid@yahoo.co.u [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Ilangovan, R.; Clark, S.K.; Taylor, S.A.; East, J.E.; Saunders, B.P. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St Mark' s Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    With the recent publication of international computed tomography (CT) colonography standards, which aim to improve quality of examinations, this review informs radiologists about the significance of flat polyps (adenomas and hyperplastic polyps) in colorectal cancer pathways. We describe flat polyp classification systems and propose how flat polyps should be reported to ensure patient management strategies are based on polyp morphology as well as size. Indeed, consistency when describing flat polyps is of increasing importance given the strengthening links between CT colonography and endoscopy.

  1. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  2. Characteristic crystal orientation of folia in oyster shell, Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Woo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyeung Ho [Nano-Materials Reserch Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheong Song [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cschoi@sogang.ac.kr

    2008-03-10

    The thin sheets of calcite, termed folia, that make up much of the shell of an oyster are composed of foliated lath. Folia of the giant Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) were examined using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and tested using microindentation and nanoindentation techniques. Analysis of the Kikuchi patterns obtained from the folia showed that there are two types (type I and type II) of preferred orientation, with an angle of around 70{sup o} between them. Nanoindentation tests showed that the folia exhibit a hardness of about 3 GPa and elastic modulus of about 73 GPa. Microcracks were generated using a microindenter in order to study the fracture mechanisms of the folia. Following on from these investigations, fracture mechanisms are discussed in conjunction with the correlation between preferred orientation and structural characteristics during cracking of the folia. Comparing the morphology and the polymorphism with nacre (also known as mother of pearl), the advantages of the relatively fast crystal growth and less amount of organic matrix in folia may have interesting implications for the development of sophisticated synthetic materials.

  3. Feasibility of Pulverized Oyster Shell as a Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Fu Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research intends to study the cementing potential of pulverized oyster shell, rich in calcium, when mixed with fly ash and soil. Cylindrical compacted soil and cubic lime specimens with different proportions of the shells and fly ash are made to study the strength variance. Soil, which is classified as CL in the USCS system, commercialized pulverized oyster shell, F-type fly ash, and lime are mixed in different weight percentages. Five sample groups are made to study the compressive strength of soil and lime specimens, respectively. The lime cubes are made with 0.45 W/B ratio and the cylindrical soils are compacted under the standard Procter compaction process with 20% moisture content. The results show that increment of shell quantity result to lower strength on both the soil and lime specimens. In a 56-day curing, the compressive strength of the lime cubes containing fly ash increases evidently while those carrying the shell get little progress in strength. The soil specimens containing fly ash gradually gain strength as curing proceeds. It suggests that mixtures of the shell and fly ash do not process any Pozzolanic reaction nor help to raise the unconfined strength of the compacted soil through the curing.

  4. Richness and distribution of tropical oyster parasites in two oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Hill-Spanik, Kristina M; Torchin, Mark E; Aguirre-Macedo, Leopoldina; Fleischer, Robert C; Ruiz, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Parasites can exert strong effects on population to ecosystem level processes, but data on parasites are limited for many global regions, especially tropical marine systems. Characterizing parasite diversity and distributions are the first steps towards understanding the potential impacts of parasites. The Panama Canal serves as an interesting location to examine tropical parasite diversity and distribution, as it is a conduit between two oceans and a hub for international trade. We examined metazoan and protistan parasites associated with ten oyster species collected from both Panamanian coasts, including the Panama Canal and Bocas del Toro. We found multiple metazoan taxa (pea crabs, Stylochus spp., Urastoma cyrinae). Our molecular screening for protistan parasites detected four species of Perkinsus (Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus chesapeaki, Perkinsus olseni, Perkinsus beihaiensis) and several haplosporidians, including two genera (Minchinia, Haplosporidium). Species richness was higher for the protistan parasites than for the metazoans, with haplosporidian richness being higher than Perkinsus richness. Perkinsus species were the most frequently detected and most geographically widespread among parasite groups. Parasite richness and overlap differed between regions, locations and oyster hosts. These results have important implications for tropical parasite richness and the dispersal of parasites due to shipping associated with the Panama Canal.

  5. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  6. An extension to flat band ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacsi, M.; Kovacs, G.; Gulacsi, Z.

    2014-11-01

    From flat band ferromagnetism, we learned that the lowest energy half-filled flat band gives always ferromagnetism if the localized Wannier states on the flat band satisfy the connectivity condition. If the connectivity conditions are not satisfied, ferromagnetism does not appear. We show that this is not always the case namely, we show that ferromagnetism due to flat bands can appear even if the connectivity condition does not hold due to a peculiar behavior of the band situated just above the flat band.

  7. Length spectra and degeneration of flat metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Duchin, Moon; Rafi, Kasra

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider flat metrics (semi-translation structures) on surfaces of finite type. There are two main results. The first is a complete description of when a set of simple closed curves is spectrally rigid, that is, when the length vector determines a metric among the class of flat metrics. Secondly, we give an embedding into the space of geodesic currents and use this to get a boundary for the space of flat metrics. The geometric interpretation is that flat metrics degenerate to "mixed structures" on the surface: part flat metric and part measured foliation.

  8. First report of Perkinsus sp. infecting mangrove oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae from the Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Rachel Costa; Rosa, Rafael Diego; Magalhães, Aimê Rachel Magenta; Barracco, Margherita Anna; Gesteira, Tereza Cristina Vasconcelos; da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2009-12-22

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Perkinsus are considered important pathogens responsible for mass mortalities in several mollusk species worldwide. In the present study we describe for the first time a parasite of the genus Perkinsus infecting the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae from the Brazilian coast. Prevalence of this parasite was low in the Pacoti River estuary (Ceará, northeast Brazil) and absent in oysters from southern Brazil. Oyster gill and rectum tissues incubated in Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) revealed the presence of spherical hypnospores (5 to 55 microm diam.). Histological analysis showed the occurrence of typical signet-ring trophozoites and schizonts (3 to 6 microm diam.) infecting connective tissues of several organs and digestive epithelia. PCR assays specific to the genus Perkinsus, followed by cloning and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene complex, confirmed a close phylogenetic relationship between Brazilian Perkinsus sp. and P. beihaiensis infecting Chinese oysters.

  9. Butyltin compounds in the oyster, Saccostrea cucculata, from the West Coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Garg, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    and reduced reproduction in oysters (Alzieu 1991, 2000), imposex in dogwhelk populations (Law et al. 1998; Evans et al. 2000), growth retardation in mussels (Salazar and Salazar 1991) and microalgae (Beaumont and Newman 1986). Because of these environmental...

  10. Oyster reef restoration in controlling coastal pollution around India: A viewpoint

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.

    metals fluxes and marine coastal pollution around India. Oyster reefs restoration may decrease nutrient and heavy metals fluxes in coastal waters and reduce the intensity of oxygen depletion in the coastal Arabian Sea (seasonal) and Bay of Bengal. However...

  11. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  12. Year-round screening of noncommercial and commercial oysters for the presence of human pathogenic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder-Verschoor, F.; Husman, A.M.R.; Berg, van den H.H.J.L.; Stein, A.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of virus-contaminated shellfish has caused numerous outbreaks of gastroenteritis and hepatitis worldwide. In The Netherlands, oysters are cultured and imported both for consumption and export; therefore, the presence of noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, and ent

  13. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nutrient cycling within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for other organisms. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via benthic denitrification. However, this has not been exam...

  14. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nitrogen removal within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for ecosystem functioning. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via assimilation, burial, or benthic denitrification. Stu...

  15. Use of extracts from oyster shell and soil for cultivation of Spirulina maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Sunmin; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Kyochan; Kim, Woong; Park, Min S; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2014-12-01

    Calcium ion and trace metals play important roles in various metabolisms of photosynthetic organisms. In this study, simple methods were developed to extract calcium ion and micronutrients from oyster shell and common soil, and the prepared extracts were tested as a replacement of the corresponding chemicals that are essential for growth of microalgae. The oyster shell and soil were treated with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide or with 10 % hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The potential application of these natural sources to cultivation was investigated with Spirulina maxima. When compared to standard Zarrouk medium, the Spirulina maxima cultivated in a modified Zarrouk media with elements from oyster shell and soil extract exhibited increases in biomass, chlorophyll, and phycocyanin by 17, 16, and 64 %, respectively. These results indicate that the extracts of oyster shell and soil provide sufficient amounts of calcium and trace metals for successful cultivation of Spirulina maxima.

  16. Fresh Water Inflow and Oyster Productivity in Apalachicola Bay, FL (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apalachicola Bay lies at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, where seasonally variable freshwater inflows and shifting winds support an unusually productive and commercially important oyster fishery. While there is concern that upstream water withdrawals may impact the fishery,...

  17. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  18. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  19. IN VITRO KILLING OF PERKINSUS MARINUS BY HEMOCYTES OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A colorimetric microbicidal assay was adapted, optimized and applied in experiments to characterize the in vitro capacity of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes to kill cultured isolates of Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite causing a highly destructive disease...

  20. INFLUENCE OF SEASONAL FACTORS ON OYSTER HEMOCYTE KILLING OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seasonal variation of cellular defenses of oyster Crassostrea virginica against Vibrio parahaemolyticus were examined from June 1997 to December 1998 using a recently developed bactericidal assay that utilizes a tetrazolium dye. Mean hemocyte numbers, plasma lysozyme, and P. mari...

  1. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  2. Evaluation of Water hyacinth and Paddy Straw Waste for Culture of Oyster Mushrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Nageswaran, M.; Gopalakrishnan, A.; M. Ganesan; Vedhamurthy, A.

    2003-01-01

    Waterhyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms.) was evaluated at ratios of 25, 50 and 75% with paddy straw ( Oryza sativa L.) for oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus sajor-caju) cultivation. There was an increase in yield with decreasing ratio waterhyacinth.

  3. Evaluation of Waterhyacinth and Paddy Straw Waste for Culture of Oyster Mushrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Nageswaran, M.; Gopalakrishnan, A.; M. Ganesan; Vedhamurthy, A.

    2003-01-01

    Waterhyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms.) was evaluated at ratios of 25, 50 and 75% with paddy straw ( Oryza sativa L.) for oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus sajor-caju) cultivation. There was an increase in yield with decreasing ratio waterhyacinth.

  4. Concentrations of heavy metals in commercially important Oysters from Goa, Central-West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, P.S.; Gauns, M.; Ansari, Z.A.

    . The high concentrations of Cd and Cu in tissues of edible oyster pose a threat to human health. Therefore, continuous monitoring, people awareness and a stringent government policy should be implemented to mitigate the metal pollution along the studied...

  5. Differential Response of Oyster Shell Powder on Enzyme Profile and Nutritional Value of Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus florida PF05

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Naraian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida was cultivated on different combinations of wheat straw (WS as basal substrate and oyster shell powder (OSP supplement. The OSP supplementation considerably responded to different cultivation phases. The mycelium grew fast and showed rapid growth rate (8.91 mmd−1 in WS + OSP (97 + 3 combination while WS + OSP (92 + 8 showed maximum laccase (3.133 U/g and Mn peroxidase (MnP activities (0.091 U/g. The climax level of laccase (5.433 U/g and MnP (0.097 U/g was recorded during fruit body initiation in WS + OSP (97 + 3 and WS + OSP (98 + 2 combinations, respectively. The WS + OSP (97 + 3 combination represented the best condition for mushroom cultivation and produced the highest biological efficiency (147%. In addition, protein and lipid contents in fruit bodies were slightly improved in response to OSP. The carbohydrate was significantly increased by raising concentration of OSP. The highest values of protein, carbohydrate, and lipid noted were 31.3 μg/g, 0.0639 (g/g, and 0.373 (g/g correspondingly. Conclusively it was evident that lower concentrations of OSP acted positively and relatively to higher concentrations and improved nutritional content which may suitably be used to enhance both yield and nutritional values of mushroom.

  6. Application of ICP-AES with Microwave Digestion to Detect Trace Elements in Oysters from Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Kang; YAN Cuiwei

    2011-01-01

    A Using ICP-AES with microwave digestion,we determined the concentrations of 16 trace elements in oysters from six sampling points in Jiaozhou Bay.The distributions of the wholesome elements Zn,Fe and Mn,and heavy metals such as As,Cd,Hg and Pb were studied.The oysters collected are all rich in the wholesome trace elements,and the oysters from Licun River have the highest concentrations of the three wholesome trace elements.The concentrations of heavy metals in oysters from Licun River are the highest and those from Hongdao are the lowest.Compared with the domestic and foreign sea-areas,the heavy metal contents in the oysters from Jiaozhou Bay are less in amount than those from some developed countries,and more than those in Southeast China.This implies that the Jiaozhou Bay's oysters have been polluted by the environment to some extent.

  7. Rapid detection of toxic metals in non-crushed oyster shells by portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ju; Clement, Garret; Bursavich, Bradley; Elbers, Don; Cao, Baobao; Zhou, Weilie

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was the multi-elemental detection of toxic metals such as lead (Pb) in non-crushed oyster shells by using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. A rapid, simultaneous multi-element analytical methodology for non-crushed oyster shells has been developed using a portable XRF which provides a quick, quantitative, non-destructive, and cost-effective mean for assessment of oyster shell contamination from Pb. Pb contamination in oyster shells was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The results indicated that Pb is distributed in-homogeneously in contaminated shells. Oyster shells have a lamellar structure that could contribute to the high accumulation of Pb on oyster shells.

  8. Non-Perturbative Flat Direction Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Basboll, A; Riva, F; West, S M; Basboll, Anders; Maybury, David; Riva, Francesco; West, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    We argue that supersymmetric flat direction vevs can decay non-perturbatively via preheating. Considering the case of a single flat direction, we explicitly calculate the scalar potential in the unitary gauge for a U(1) theory and show that the mass matrix for excitations around the flat direction has non-diagonal entries which vary with the phase of the flat direction vev. Furthermore, this mass matrix has 2 zero eigenvalues (associated with the excitations along the flat direction) whose eigenstates change with time. We show that these 2 light degrees of freedom are produced copiously in the non-perturbative decay of the flat direction vev. We also comment on the application of these results to the MSSM flat direction H_uL.

  9. Development and application of a real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticuss in oyster%牡蛎中副溶血弧菌荧光定量PCR检测方法的建立及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林强; 李宁求; 付小哲; 刘礼辉; 石存斌; 吴淑勤

    2011-01-01

    以副溶血弧菌毒素调控基因(toxin regulations,toxR)作为靶标基因,设计特异性引物及TaqMan探针,以含toxR基因的质粒为模板,建立质粒拷贝数与CT值的标准曲线,分别采用含toxR基因质粒、纯培养的副溶血弧菌和添加副溶血弧菌的牡蛎(Ostrea)模拟样品进行灵敏度试验,结果表明,其灵敏度分别为15拷贝、18 CFU/mL和180CFU/mL.同一个样品的30次重复性试验表明,试验内及试验间的变异系数分别为0.95%和1.5%.结果显示,本研究建立的副溶血弧菌荧光定量PcR检测方法特异性强、灵敏度高、重复性好,可用于牡蛎等水产品中副溶血弧菌的定量检测.%Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) is a pathogen that is the leading cause of shellfish-associated cases of bacterial food poisoning.To establish a real-time PCR for quantitative analysis of toxR gene, a pair of specific primers and TaqMan fluorescent probe of toxR gene of VP were designed.The positive recombinant plasmids of toxR gene served as templates to establish standard curve, which showed corresponding relationship between the copies of plasmids and threshold cycle (CT)values.The lowest limit detection was 15 copies of toxR gene for plasmid, and the sensitivity of pure cultures and simulated oyster sample was 18 CFU/mL and 180 CFU/g, respectively.The coefficient of variation was 0.95% for intra-assay test and 1.5% for inter-assay test.One hundred and sixty eight positively established samples were detected from 178 oysters collected from a farm in Guangdong Province.The result showed that the real-time PCR assay for VP had high specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and it was time saving, so it can be used for detecting and monitoring VP in aquatic products.

  10. Using oysters as anthropogenic indicators to evaluate the occurrence of the wastewater contamination of the estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2015-04-01

    The oyster (Crossostrea gigas) is an important aquacultural species in Taiwan. With an area of over 85% of the total inshore aquacultural field, its production, measured by quantity or economic value, ranks above all other aquacultural products in Taiwan. Since oyster's habitat is on shelves near the coast, the samples from a particular "oyster cultural site" can be applied to evaluate the pollution of a segment of the coastal water. Deficient wastewater treatment has caused untreated wastewaters to have flown in rivers into oyster cultural areas in estuaries as well as shallow coastal water. Therefore, the concentration of pollutants in the oysters can be used as anthropogenic indicators to evaluate the occurrence of the for wastewater contamination of the coastal water. In this study, two groups of anthropogenic organic compounds, chlorinated flame retardant (i.e., Dechlorane Plus) and benzophenone-type UV absorbing substances (i.e., 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone), were determined in oyster samples as wastewater contamination pollutants. The method involves the use of matrix solid-phase dispersion prior to their determination by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The results show that these two groups of compounds are ubiquitous in oysters with the concentrations of chlorinated flame retardant and benzophenone-type UV absorbing substances ranging from 0.3 to 3.6 ng/g and from 120 to 910 ng/g (lipid weight), respectively. Oysters are useful anthropogenic indicators of organic pollutants in Taiwan's marine environment. The ubiquity of these pollutants in Taiwan's coastal environment supports the need for greater awareness of bioaccumulation processes.

  11. Health assessment of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the southern coast of Bahia, northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Brandão,Rosana Pinho; Boehs,Guisla; Silva,Patrícia Mirella da

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the health of natural stocks of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the southern coast of Bahia in northeastern Brazil, during summer and winter 2010, at three localities (sampling points) in the estuaries of the Maraú (Camamu Bay) and Graciosa rivers. A total of 180 oysters (30/sampling point/season) were examined macroscopically for the presence of pathogens and anatomical changes. The specimens were subsequently fixed in Davidson solution, processed for paraf...

  12. A hemocyte gene expression signature correlated with predictive capacity of oysters to survive Vibrio infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rafael

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex balance between environmental and host factors is an important determinant of susceptibility to infection. Disturbances of this equilibrium may result in multifactorial diseases as illustrated by the summer mortality syndrome, a worldwide and complex phenomenon that affects the oysters, Crassostrea gigas. The summer mortality syndrome reveals a physiological intolerance making this oyster species susceptible to diseases. Exploration of genetic basis governing the oyster resistance or susceptibility to infections is thus a major goal for understanding field mortality events. In this context, we used high-throughput genomic approaches to identify genetic traits that may characterize inherent survival capacities in C. gigas. Results Using digital gene expression (DGE, we analyzed the transcriptomes of hemocytes (immunocompetent cells of oysters able or not able to survive infections by Vibrio species shown to be involved in summer mortalities. Hemocytes were nonlethally collected from oysters before Vibrio experimental infection, and two DGE libraries were generated from individuals that survived or did not survive. Exploration of DGE data and microfluidic qPCR analyses at individual level showed an extraordinary polymorphism in gene expressions, but also a set of hemocyte-expressed genes whose basal mRNA levels discriminate oyster capacity to survive infections by the pathogenic V. splendidus LGP32. Finally, we identified a signature of 14 genes that predicted oyster survival capacity. Their expressions are likely driven by distinct transcriptional regulation processes associated or not associated to gene copy number variation (CNV. Conclusions We provide here for the first time in oyster a gene expression survival signature that represents a useful tool for understanding mortality events and for assessing genetic traits of interest for disease resistance selection programs.

  13. Optimal Site Characterization and Selection Criteria for Oyster Restoration using Multicolinear Factorial Water Quality Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of nutrient loadings have enriched the Chesapeake Bay estuaries and coastal waters via point and nonpoint sources and the atmosphere. Restoring oyster beds is considered a Best Management Practice (BMP) to improve the water quality as well as provide physical aquatic habitat and a healthier estuarine system. Efforts include declaring sanctuaries for brood-stocks, supplementing hard substrate on the bottom and aiding natural populations with the addition of hatchery-reared and disease-resistant stocks. An economic assessment suggests that restoring the ecological functions will improve water quality, stabilize shorelines, and establish a habitat for breeding grounds that outweighs the value of harvestable oyster production. Parametric factorial models were developed to investigate multicolinearities among in situ water quality and oyster restoration activities to evaluate posterior success rates upon multiple substrates, and physical, chemical, hydrological and biological site characteristics to systematically identify significant factors. Findings were then further utilized to identify the optimal sites for successful oyster restoration augmentable with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and BMPs. Factorial models evaluate the relationship among the dependent variable, oyster biomass, and treatments of temperature, salinity, total suspended solids, E. coli/Enterococci counts, depth, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, nitrogen and phosphorus, and blocks consist of alternative substrates (oyster shells versus riprap, granite, cement, cinder blocks, limestone marl or combinations). Factorial model results were then compared to identify which combination of variables produces the highest posterior biomass of oysters. Developed Factorial model can facilitate maximizing the likelihood of successful oyster reef restoration in an effort to establish a healthier ecosystem and to improve overall estuarine water quality in the Chesapeake Bay estuaries.

  14. Temporal variation in development of ecosystem services from oyster reef restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Humphries, Austin T.; Casas, Sandra M.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration ecology relies heavily on ecosystem development theories that generally assume development of fully functioning natural systems over time, but often fail to identify the time-frame required for provision of desired functions, or acknowledge different pathways of functional development. In estuaries, a decline of overall habitat quality and functioning has led to significant efforts to restore critical ecosystem services, recently through the creation and restoration of oyster reefs. Oyster reef restoration generally occurs with goals of (1) increasing water quality via filtration through sustainable oyster recruitment, (2) stabilizing shorelines, and (3) creating and enhancing critical estuarine habitat for fish and invertebrates. We restored over 260 m2 of oyster reef habitat in coastal Louisiana and followed the development and provision of these ecosystem services from 2009 through 2012. Oysters recruited to reefs immediately, with densities of oysters greater than 75 mm exceeding 80 ind m−2 after 3 years, and provision of filtration rates of 1002 ± 187 L h−1 m−2; shoreline stabilization effects of the created reefs were minimal over the three years of monitoring, with some evidence of positive shoreline stabilization during higher wind/energy events only; increased nekton abundance of resident, but not larger transient fish was immediately measurable at the reefs, however, this failed to increase through time. Our results provide critical insights into the development trajectories of ecosystem services provided by restored oyster reefs, as well as the mechanisms mediating these changes. This is critical both ecologically to understand how and where a reef thrives, and for policy and management to guide decision-making related to oyster reef restoration and the crediting and accounting of ecosystem services.

  15. Modeling and Mapping Oyster Norovirus Outbreak Risks in Gulf of Mexico Using NASA MODIS Aqua Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Norovirus is a highly infectious virus and the leading cause of foodborne disease outbreaks such as oyster norovirus outbreaks. Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent norovirus infection and no drug to treat it. This paper presents an integrated modeling and mapping framework for predicting the risk of norovirus outbreaks in oyster harvesting waters in the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. The framework involves (1) the construction of three novel remote sensing algorithms for the retrieval of sea surface salinity, sea surface temperature, and gage height (tide level) using NASA MODIS Aqua data; (2) the development of probability-based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the prediction of oyster norovirus outbreak risk, and (3) the application of the Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) for mapping norovirus outbreak risks in oyster harvesting areas in the Northern Gulf of Mexico using the remotely sensed NASA data, retrieved data from the three remote sensing algorithms, and the ANN model predictions. The three remote sensing algorithms are able to correctly retrieve 94.1% of sea surface salinity, 94.0% of sea surface temperature, and 77.8% of gage height observed along the US coast, including the Pacific coast, the Gulf of Mexico coast, and the Atlantic coast. The gage height, temperature, and salinity are the three most important explanatory variables of the ANN model in terms of spatially distributed input variables. The ANN model is capable of hindcasting/predicting all oyster norovirus outbreaks occurred in oyster growing areas along the Gulf of Mexico coast where environmental data are available. The integrated modeling and mapping framework makes it possible to map daily risks of norovirus outbreaks in all oyster harvesting waters and particularly the oyster growing areas where no in-situ environmental data are available, greatly improving the safety of seafood and reducing outbreaks of foodborne disease.

  16. Flat lens for seismic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brule, Stephane; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    A prerequisite for achieving seismic invisibility is to demonstrate the ability of civil engineers to control seismic waves with artificially structured soils. We carry out large-scale field tests with a structured soil made of a grid consisting of cylindrical and vertical holes in the ground and a low frequency artificial source (< 10 Hz). This allows the identification of a distribution of energy inside the grid, which can be interpreted as the consequence of an effective negative refraction index. Such a flat lens reminiscent of what Veselago and Pendry envisioned for light opens avenues in seismic metamaterials to counteract the most devastating components of seismic signals.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and micronucleus frequency in oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis exposed to chlorpyrifos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AB Benitez-Trinidad1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpyrifos (CPF is an Organophosphorous pesticide (OP that has been widely used for both agricultural and domestic pest control. To date, there is little information regarding the effects of this pesticide on aquatic organisms, particularly oysters. The aim of this study was to evaluate Acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and Micronucleus (MN frequency in the oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in laboratory exposure with CPF (20, 40, 60, 80, and 160 μg/L and in a field study. The results showed that AChE was reduced 60 - 82 % in oysters exposed to CPF, relative to the negative control. Similar AChE results were observed in oysters collected from the Boca de Camichín Estuary in Nayarit, Mexico; with respect to genetic damage, evaluated through MN, treatment with CPF did not induce the MN frequency, nor did the oyster from the field study exhibit an increase in this biomarker. These results suggest that C. corteziensis is a sensitive model for evaluating the acute toxicity of OP in laboratory studies as well in the field. In addition, it generates prospects on studying mechanisms through which the oyster could possess resistance to genotoxic agents, as well as its being a reliable model for evaluating the genotoxic effects of xenobiotics through the MN technique.

  18. Geohistorical records indicate no impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on oyster body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Gregory P; Durham, Stephen R

    2016-11-01

    Documentation of the near- and long-term effects of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, one of the largest environmental disasters in US history, is still ongoing. We used a novel before-after-control-impact analysis to test the hypothesis that average body size of intertidal populations of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) inhabiting impacted areas in Louisiana decreased due to increased stress/mortality related to the oil spill. Time-averaged death assemblages of oysters were used to establish a pre-spill baseline of body-size structure for four impacted and four control locations along a 350 km stretch of Louisiana's coastline. Post-spill body sizes were then measured from live oysters at each site in order to evaluate the differences in body size between oiled (i.e. impact) and unoiled (i.e. control) locations before and after the spill. Our results indicate that average body size of oysters remained relatively unchanged after the oil spill. There were also no temporal patterns in temperature, salinity or disease prevalence that could have explained our results. Together, these findings suggest that oysters either recovered rapidly following the immediate impact of the DWH oil spill, or that its impact was not severe enough to influence short-term population dynamics of the oyster beds.

  19. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery E. Scherer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging.

  20. The depuration dynamics of oysters (Crassostrea gigas artificially contaminated with hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Abreu Corrêa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the country of Brazil, Santa Catarina is a major shellfish producer. Detection of viral contamination is an important step to ensure production quality and consumer safety during this process. In this study, we used a depuration system and ultraviolet (UV disinfection to eliminate viral pathogens from artificially infected oysters and analysed the results. Specifically, the oysters were contaminated with hepatitis A virus (HAV or human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5. After viral infection, the oysters were placed into a depuration tank and harvested after 48, 72 and 96 h. After sampling, various oyster tissues were dissected and homogenised and the viruses were eluted with alkaline conditions and precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The oyster samples were evaluated by cell culture methods, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative-PCR. Moreover, at the end of the depuration period, the disinfected seawater was collected and analysed by PCR. The molecular assays showed that the HAdV5 genome was present in all of the depuration time samples, while the HAV genome was undetectable after 72 h of depuration. However, viral viability tests (integrated cell culture-PCR and immunofluorescence assay indicated that both viruses were inactivated with 96 h of seawater recirculation. In conclusion, after 96 h of UV treatment, the depuration system studied in this work purified oysters that were artificially contaminated with HAdV5 and HAV.

  1. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  2. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host.

  3. Rice straw addition as sawdust substitution in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) planted media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Christine Pamardining; Susilawati, Puspita Ratna

    2017-08-01

    Oyster mushroom is favorite by the people because of the high nutrients. The oyster mushroom cultivation usually using sawdust. The availability of sawdust become difficult to find. It makes difficulties of mushroom cultivation. Rice straw as an agricultural waste can be used as planted media of oyster mushroom because they contain much nutrition needed to the mushroom growth. The aims of this research were to analysis the influence of rice straw addition in a baglog as planted media and to analysis the concentration of rice straw addition which can substitute sawdust in planted media of oyster mushroom. This research used 4 treatment of sawdust and rice straw ratio K = 75 % : 0 %, P1 = 60 % : 15 %, P2 = 40 % : 35 %, P3 = 15 % : 60 %. The same material composition of all baglog was bran 20%, chalk 5%, and water 70%. The parameters used in this research were wet weight, dry weight, moisture content and number of the mushroom fruit body. Data analysis was used ANOVA test with 1 factorial. The results of this research based on statistical analysis showed that there was no influence of rice straw addition in a planted media on the oyster mushroomgrowth. 15% : 60% was the concentrationof rice straw additionwhich can substitute the sawdust in planted media of oyster mushroom.

  4. Oyster-based national mapping of trace metals pollution in the Chinese coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Yuan; Ke, Cai-Huan; Zhu, Aijia; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-03-02

    To investigate the distribution and variability of trace metal pollution in the Chinese coastal waters, over 1000 adult oyster individuals were collected from 31 sites along the entire coastline, spanning from temperate to tropical regions (Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea), between August and September 2015. Concentrations of macroelements [sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P)] and trace elements [cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), silver (Ag), and titanium (Ti)] in these oysters were concurrently measured and analyzed. The results showed high Ti, Zn and Cu bioaccumulation in oysters from Guangdong (South China Sea) and Zhejiang (East China Sea). Oysters at Nanji Island (Wenzhou) and Daya Bay (Huizhou) accumulated significantly high concentrations of Ni and Cr. The elements in these oysters were several times higher than the national food safety limits of China. On the other hand, the present study found that normalization of metals by salinity (Na) and nutrient (P) could reflect more details of metal pollution in the oysters. Biomonitoring of metal pollution could benefit from incorporating the macroelement calibration instead of focusing only on the total metal concentrations. Overall, simultaneous measurement of macroelements and trace metals coupled with non-linear analysis provide a new perspective for revealing the underlying mechanism of trace metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation in marine organisms.

  5. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.

    2015-10-28

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world\\'s edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  6. Adsorption of copper to different biogenic oyster shell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China); Clark, Malcolm [Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, P.O. Box 157, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan_1972@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, New Campus, Minhou, Fujian Province 350108 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of copper to waste oyster shell occurs rapidly at pH 5.5. • Copper adsorbs to the different structures of oyster shell at different rates. • The prismatic layer dominates copper sorption rather than the nacreous layer. • SEM analysis shows a porous open network structure to the prismatic layer. • Surface ζ-potentials establish electrostatic attraction to drive copper sorption. - Abstract: The removal of copper from solution by oyster shell powder was investigated for potential wastewater treatment uses. In particular, adsorption behavior differences between the prismatic (PP) and nacreous (NP) shell layers, and how this affects copper removal, were investigated. Experimental results indicated that copper adsorption was highly pH-dependent with optimal copper removal at pH 5.5, where the powdered whole raw shell (RP) removed up to 99.9% of the copper within 24 h at a 10 mg/L initial copper concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to analyze the isotherm PP, NP and RP data. These results showed a strong homogeneous Langmuir model for low initial copper concentrations (5–30 mg/L) to both RP and PP layer, while strong agreement with a heterogeneous Freundlich model for high initial copper concentrations (30–200 mg/L); nevertheless, a homogeneous Langmuir model provided the best fit for the more dense NP layer across the initial concentration range (5–200 mg/L). The distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) value of PP layer for each initial concentration investigated was substantially higher than the NP layer and it was also found that the PP layer dominated the adsorption process with an adsorption capacity of 8.9 mg/g, while the adsorption capacity of the NP layer was 2.6 mg/g. These differences are believed to be because of the more porous structure of the PP layer, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and

  7. Fluxomics of the Eastern Oyster for Environmental Stress Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey P. Tikunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of 2-13C/15N-glycine and U-13C-glucose was determined in four tissue blocks (adductor muscle, stomach and digestive gland, mantle, and gills of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica using proton (1H and carbon-13 (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The oysters were treated in aerated seawater with three treatments (5.5 mM U-13C-glucose, 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine, and 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine and the relative mass balance and 13C fractional enrichments were determined in the four tissue blocks. In all tissues, glycine was metabolized by the glycine cycle forming serine exclusively in the mitochondria by the glycine cleavage system forming 2,3-13C-serine. In muscle, a minor amount of serine-derived pyruvate entered the Krebs cycle as substantiated by detection of a trace of 2,3-13C-aspartate. In all tissues, U-13C-glucose formed glycogen by glycogen synthesis, alanine by glycolysis, and glutamate and aspartate through the Krebs cycle. Alanine was formed exclusively from glucose via alanine transaminase and not glycine via alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. Based on isotopomer analysis, pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase appeared to be equal points for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle. In the 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine emergence treatment used to simulate 12 h of “low tide”, oysters accumulated more 13C-labeled metabolites, including both anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic Krebs cycle intermediates. The aerobic metabolites could be the biochemical result of the gaping behavior of mollusks during emergence. The change in tissue distribution and mass balance of 13C-labeled nutrients (U-13C-glucose and 2-13C/15N-glycine provides the basis for a new quantitative fluxomic method for elucidating sub-lethal environmental effects in marine organisms called whole body mass balance phenotyping (WoMBaP.

  8. Flat coalgebraic fixed point logics

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Fixed point logics have a wide range of applications in computer science, in particular in artificial intelligence and concurrency. The most expressive logics of this type are the mu-calculus and its relatives. However, popular fixed point logics tend to trade expressivity for simplicity and readability, and in fact often live within the single variable fragment of the mu-calculus. The family of such flat fixed point logics includes, e.g., CTL, the *-nesting-free fragment of PDL, and the logic of common knowledge. Here, we extend this notion to the generic semantic framework of coalgebraic logic, thus covering a wide range of logics beyond the standard mu-calculus including, e.g., flat fragments of the graded mu-calculus and the alternating-time mu-calculus (such as ATL), as well as probabilistic and monotone fixed point logics. Our main results are completeness of the Kozen-Park axiomatization and a timed-out tableaux method that matches EXPTIME upper bounds inherited from the coalgebraic mu-calculus but avo...

  9. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  10. Microbiological quality and bacterial diversity of the tropical oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in a monitored farming system and from natural stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neta, M T; Maciel, B M; Lopes, A T S; Marques, E L S; Rezende, R P; Boehs, G

    2015-12-02

    Microbiological evaluation is one of the most important parameters for analyzing the viability of an oyster farming system, which addresses public health and ecological concerns. Here, the microbiological quality of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivated in a monitored environment and from natural beds in Bahia, northeastern Brazil, was determined. Bacterial diversity in oysters was measured by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Sequence analysis revealed that most bacterial species showed similarity with uncultured or unidentified bacteria from environmental samples, and were clustered into the phylum Proteobacteria. Diverse bacteria from cultivated (monitored) oyster samples were grouped in the same cluster with a high similarity index (above 79%). Microbiological analyses revealed that these oysters did not contain pathogens. These results reflect the natural balance of the microbial communities essential to the maintenance of health and in inhibiting pathogen colonization in the oyster. On the other hand, bacterial diversity of samples from native stocks in extractive areas displayed a similarity index varying between 55 and 77%, and all samples were clustered separately from each other and from the cluster of samples derived from the cultivation area. Microbiological analyses showed that oysters from the extractive area were not fit for human consumption. This reflected a different composition of the microbial community in this area, probably resulting from anthropic impact. Our study also demonstrated that low temperatures and high rainfall limits the bacterial concentration in tropical oysters. This is the first study analyzing the total bacterial community profiles of the oyster C. rhizophorae.

  11. Bacterial microbiota profile in gills of modified atmosphere-packaged oysters stored at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huibin; Wang, Meiying; Lin, Xiangzhi; Shi, Caihua; Liu, Zhiyu

    2017-02-01

    As filter-feeding bivalves, oysters can accumulate microorganisms into their gills, causing spoilage and potential safety issues. This study aims to investigate the changes in the gill microbiota of oysters packed under air and modified atmospheres (MAs, 50% CO2: 50% N2, 70% CO2: 30% O2, and 50% CO2: 50% O2) during storage at 4 °C. The diversity of bacterial microbiota in oyster gills was profiled through polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis on the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to describe the variation during the entire storage period. The DGGE profile revealed high bacterial diversity in the air- and MA-packaged oyster gills, and the spoilage bacterial microbiota varied in the MA-packaged oyster gills. Results indicated that CO2:O2 (70%:30%) was suitable for oyster MA packaging and that high bacterial loads in oyster gills need to be considered during storage. In addition, Lactobacillus and Lactococcus species were found to grow dominantly in fresh oyster gills under MA packaging, which supports the potential application of MA packaging for oyster storage.

  12. Role and value of nitrogen regulation provided by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beseres Pollack, Jennifer; Yoskowitz, David; Kim, Hae-Cheol; Montagna, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Suspension-feeding activities of oysters impart a potentially significant benefit to estuarine ecosystems via reduction of water column nutrients, plankton and seston biomass, and primary productivity...

  13. Bonamia parasites: a rapidly changing perspective on a genus of important mollusc pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Culloty, S.C.; Lynch, S.A.; Arzul, I.; Carnegie, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms of the genus Bonamia are intracellular protistan parasites of oysters. To date, 4 species have been described (B. ostreae, B. exitiosa, B. perspora and B. roughleyi), although the status of B. roughleyi is controversial. Introduction especially of B. ostreae and B. exitiosa to naïve host p

  14. The discrepancy in concentration of metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) in oyster tissue (Saccostrea glomerata) and ambient bottom sediment (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, G F; Melwani, A; Lee, J-H; Apostolatos, C

    2014-03-15

    The current study aimed to examine the relationship between metals in sediments and metal bioaccumulation in oyster tissue in a highly-modified estuary (Sydney estuary, Australia). While extensive metal contamination was observed in surficial sediments, suspended particulate matter and oyster tissue, a significant relationship between these media could not be established. No relationship was determined between sediment quality guidelines and oyster size or weight, nor with human consumption levels for metals in oyster tissue. Moreover, oyster tissue metal concentrations varied greatly at a single locality over temporal scales of years. Oyster tissue at all 19 study sites exceeded consumptions levels for Cu. Bioaccumulation of metals in oyster tissue is a useful dynamic indicator of anthropogenic influence within estuaries, however oysters cannot be used in Sydney estuary as a valid biomonitor due to overriding internal regulation (homoestasis) by the animal, or by external natural (sediment resuspension) and anthropogenic (sewer/stormwater discharges) pressures, or both.

  15. Infectious diseases in oyster aquaculture require a new integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Coralie; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging diseases pose a recurrent threat to bivalve aquaculture. Recently, massive mortality events in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas associated with the detection of a microvariant of the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1µVar) have been reported in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Although the spread of disease is often viewed as a governance failure, we suggest that the development of protective measures for bivalve farming is presently held back by the lack of key scientific knowledge. In this paper, we explore the case for an integrated approach to study the management of bivalve disease, using OsHV-1 as a case study. Reconsidering the key issues by incorporating multidisciplinary science could provide a holistic understanding of OsHV-1 and increase the benefit of research to policymakers. PMID:26880845

  16. Adult somatic progenitor cells and hematopoiesis in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Morin, Nathalie; Cavelier, Patricia; Cau, Julien; Strub, Jean Marc; Delsert, Claude

    2014-09-01

    Long-lived animals show a non-observable age-related decline in immune defense, which is provided by blood cells that derive from self-renewing stem cells. The oldest living animals are bivalves. Yet, the origin of hemocytes, the cells involved in innate immunity, is unknown in bivalves and current knowledge about mollusk adult somatic stem cells is scarce. Here we identify a population of adult somatic precursor cells and show their differentiation into hemocytes. Oyster gill contains an as yet unreported irregularly folded structure (IFS) with stem-like cells bathing into the hemolymph. BrdU labeling revealed that the stem-like cells in the gill epithelium and in the nearby hemolymph replicate DNA. Proliferation of this cell population was further evidenced by phosphorylated-histone H3 mitotic staining. Finally, these small cells, most abundant in the IFS epithelium, were found to be positive for the stemness marker Sox2. We provide evidence for hematopoiesis by showing that co-expression of Sox2 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, a hemocyte-specific enzyme, does not occur in the gill epithelial cells but rather in the underlying tissues and vessels. We further confirm the hematopoietic features of these cells by the detection of Filamin, a protein specific for a sub-population of hemocytes, in large BrdU-labeled cells bathing into gill vessels. Altogether, our data show that progenitor cells differentiate into hemocytes in the gill, which suggests that hematopoiesis occurs in oyster gills. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Enhanced Detection of Vibrio Cholerae in Oyster Homogenate Based on Centrifugal Removal of Inhibitory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Donita; DePaola, Angelo; Young, Ronald B.

    1998-01-01

    The disease cholera, caused by Vibrio cholerae, has been associated with consumption of contaminated seafood, including raw oysters. Detection of V. cholerae in foods typically involves blending the oysters, diluting the homogenate in alkaline peptone water (APW), overnight enrichment, and isolation on selective agar. Unfortunately, the oyster homogenate must be diluted to large volumes because lower dilutions inhibit the growth of V. cholerae. The goals of this study were to develop an alternative to large dilutions and to evaluate the basis for the inhibition observed in lower dilutions of oyster homogenates. Centrifugation of oyster homogenates at 10,000 x g for 15 min, followed by enrichment of the resulting pellet in APW, was found to eliminate the inhibition of V. cholerae growth. Inhibition appears not to be due to competing microflora but to a component(s) released when V. cholerae grows in the presence of oyster homogenate. The inhibitory component(s) kills the V. cholerae after the cell concentration reaches > 10(exp 8) cells/mL, rather than initially preventing their growth. The pH also declines from 8.0 to 5.5 during this period; however, the pH decline by itself appears not to cause V. cholerae death. Seven strains of V. cholerae (01 and non-01) and two strains of V. vulnificus were susceptible to the inhibitory agent(s). However, other Vibrio and non-Vibrio species tested were not inhibited by the oyster homogenates. Based on digestion of oyster homogenates with pronase, trypsin and lipase, the inhibitory reaction involves a protein(s). In a preliminary trial with oyster homogenate seeded with 1 cfu/g of V. cholerae, the modified centrifugation technique detected a slightly higher percentage of samples at a 1:10 dilution than the standard FDA Bacteriological Analytical Method (BAM) detected in uncentrifuged oyster homogenate at a 1:100 dilution. V. cholerae in seeded samples could also be detected more frequently by the modified centrifugation method

  18. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  19. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  20. Representability of Hom Implies Flatness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitin Nitsure

    2004-02-01

    Let be a projective scheme over a noetherian base scheme , and let $\\mathcal{F}$ be a coherent sheaf on . For any coherent sheaf $\\mathcal{E}$ on , consider the set-valued contravariant functor $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}$ on -schemes, defined by $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}(T)=\\mathrm{Hom}(\\mathcal{E}_T,\\mathcal{F}_T)$ where $\\mathcal{E}_T$ and $\\mathcal{F}_T$ are the pull-backs of $\\mathcal{E}$ and $\\mathcal{F}$ to $X_T=X×_s T$. A basic result of Grothendieck ([EGA], III 7.7.9) says that if $\\mathcal{F}$ is flat over then $\\hom_{(\\mathcal{E},\\mathcal{F})}$ is representable for all $\\mathcal{E}$. We prove the converse of the above, in fact, we show that if is a relatively ample line bundle on over such that the functor $\\hom_{(L^{-n},\\mathcal{F})}$ is representable for infinitely many positive integers , then $\\mathcal{F}$ is flat over . As a corollary, taking $X=S$, it follows that if $\\mathcal{F}$ is a coherent sheaf on then the functor $T\\mapsto H^0(T,\\mathcal{F}_T)$ on the category of -schemes is representable if and only if $\\mathcal{F}$ is locally free on . This answers a question posed by Angelo Vistoli. The techniques we use involve the proof of flattening stratification, together with the methods used in proving the author's earlier result (see [N1]) that the automorphism group functor of a coherent sheaf on is representable if and only if the sheaf is locally free.

  1. Rapid transcriptional acclimation following transgenerational exposure of oysters to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Anderson, Kelli; Thompson, Emma L; Melwani, Aroon; Parker, Laura M; Ross, Pauline M; Raftos, David A

    2016-10-01

    Marine organisms need to adapt in order to cope with the adverse effects of ocean acidification and warming. Transgenerational exposure to CO2 stress has been shown to enhance resilience to ocean acidification in offspring from a number of species. However, the molecular basis underlying such adaptive responses is currently unknown. Here, we compared the transcriptional profiles of two genetically distinct oyster breeding lines following transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 in order to explore the molecular basis of acclimation or adaptation to ocean acidification in these organisms. The expression of key target genes associated with antioxidant defence, metabolism and the cytoskeleton was assessed in oysters exposed to elevated CO2 over three consecutive generations. This set of target genes was chosen specifically to test whether altered responsiveness of intracellular stress mechanisms contributes to the differential acclimation of oyster populations to climate stressors. Transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 resulted in changes to both basal and inducible expression of those key target genes (e.g. ecSOD, catalase and peroxiredoxin 6), particularly in oysters derived from the disease-resistant, fast-growing B2 line. Exposure to CO2 stress over consecutive generations produced opposite and less evident effects on transcription in a second population that was derived from wild-type (nonselected) oysters. The analysis of key target genes revealed that the acute responses of oysters to CO2 stress appear to be affected by population-specific genetic and/or phenotypic traits and by the CO2 conditions to which their parents had been exposed. This supports the contention that the capacity for heritable change in response to ocean acidification varies between oyster breeding lines and is mediated by parental conditioning. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development and characterization of EST-SSR markers in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongping; Guo, Ximing

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). ESTs of the eastern oyster were downloaded from GenBank and screened for SSRs with at least eight units of dinucleotide or five units of tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide repeats. The screening of 9101 ESTs identified 127 (1.4%) SSR-containing sequences. Primers were designed for 88 SSR-containing ESTs with good and sufficient flanking sequences. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was successful for 71 primer pairs, including 19 (27%) pairs that amplified fragments longer than expected sizes, probably due to introns. Sixty-six pairs that produced fragments shorter than 800 bp were screened for polymorphism in five oysters from three populations via polyacrylamide gels, and 53 of them (80%) were polymorphic. Fifty-three polymorphic SSRs were labeled and genotyped in 30 oysters from three populations via an automated sequencer. Five of the SSRs amplified more than two fragments per oyster, suggesting locus duplication. The remaining 48 SSRs had 2 alleles per individual, including 11 with null alleles. In the 30 oysters analyzed, the SSRs had an average of 9.3 alleles per locus, ranging from 2 to 24. Forty-three loci segregated in a family with 100 progeny, with nine showing significant deviation from Mendelian ratios (three after Bonferroni correction). Seventy percent of the loci were successfully amplified in C. rhizophorae and 34% in C. gigas. This study demonstrates that ESTs are valuable resources for the development of SSR markers in the eastern oyster, and EST-derived SSRs are more transferable across species than genomic SSRs.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of the Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata: Insights into Molluscan Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole G Ertl

    Full Text Available Oysters have important ecological functions in their natural environment, acting as global carbon sinks and improving water quality by removing excess nutrients from the water column. During their life-time oysters are exposed to a variety of pathogens that can cause severe mortality in a range of oyster species. Environmental stressors encountered in their habitat can increase the susceptibility of oysters to these pathogens and in general have been shown to impact on oyster immunity, making immune parameters expressed in these marine animals an important research topic.Paired-end Illumina high throughput sequencing of six S. glomerata tissues exposed to different environmental stressors resulted in a total of 484,121,702 paired-end reads. When reads and assembled transcripts were compared to the C. gigas genome, an overall low level of similarity at the nucleotide level, but a relatively high similarity at the protein level was observed. Examination of the tissue expression pattern showed that some transcripts coding for cathepsins, heat shock proteins and antioxidant proteins were exclusively expressed in the haemolymph of S. glomerata, suggesting a role in innate immunity. Furthermore, analysis of the S. glomerata ORFs showed a wide range of genes potentially involved in innate immunity, from pattern recognition receptors, components of the Toll-like signalling and apoptosis pathways to a complex antioxidant defence mechanism.This is the first large scale RNA-Seq study carried out in S. glomerata, showing the complex network of innate immune components that exist in this species. The results confirmed that many of the innate immune system components observed in mammals are also conserved in oysters; however, some, such as the TLR adaptors MAL, TRIF and TRAM are either missing or have been modified significantly. The components identified in this study could help explain the oysters' natural resilience against pathogenic microorganisms

  4. Kinds of nucleus for effective pearl cultivation of the pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjanachatree, K.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Seeding is the most important aspect of pearl cultivation, and appropriate nucleus can determine the quality of a pearl : nacre secretion and accumulation around the nucleus. This affects harvest time, nucleus extrusion, survival rate of the pearl oysters and the production cost. In order to provide nuclei to substitute for those imported from China which are made from freshwater pearl oyster-shells, 3 kinds of the local shells of Pinctada fucata, Pteria penguin and Pinctada maxima were selected for seed production. The obtained nuclei have various diameters depend on the shell width at the hinge region. The average diameters are 5.44, 6.78, 7.54 and 6.10 mm, while their production costs are 5, 7.7, 18.5 and 7.5 baht per 1 nucleus, respectively, for Pinctada fucata, Pteria penguin, Pinctada maxima and freshwater pearl oysters (control group. After nucleus implantation into the gonad of culture pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata, and rearing in the sea, the obtained pearls using nuclei made from the shells of Pinctada fucata and Pinctada maxima (both belong to the same genus as the implanted culture pearl oysters have as good nacre formation as that from freshwater pearl oysters. In contrast, the pearl production using nuclei made from Pteria penguin-shells have significantly worse nacre formation. Survival rate of the culture oysters seeded with nuclei made from Pinctada fucata-shells is highest at 47%, nucleus extrusion 8% only, and harvest rate 31%; while with Pinctada maxima-shells, these values are 38%, 17.5% and 14%, respectively. So the nuclei made from local Pinctada fucata-shells are appropriate for pearl cultivation and are comparable to imported nuclei. Although the obtained pearls are small, the nuclei made from Pinctada fucata-shells have low cost, low nucleus extrusion and high productivity.

  5. Detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus is a highly infectious pathogen that is commonly found in oysters growing in fecally contaminated waters. Norovirus outbreaks can cause the closure of oyster harvesting waters and acute gastroenteritis in humans associated with consumption of contaminated raw oysters. Extensive efforts and progresses have been made in detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks over the past decades. The main objective of this paper is to provide a literature review of methods and techniques for detecting and forecasting oyster norovirus outbreaks and thereby to identify the future directions for improving the detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks. It is found that (1) norovirus outbreaks display strong seasonality with the outbreak peak occurring commonly in December-March in the U.S. and April-May in the Europe; (2) norovirus outbreaks are affected by multiple environmental factors, including but not limited to precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, wind, and salinity; (3) various modeling approaches may be employed to forecast norovirus outbreaks, including Bayesian models, regression models, Artificial Neural Networks, and process-based models; and (4) diverse techniques are available for near real-time detection of norovirus outbreaks, including multiplex PCR, seminested PCR, real-time PCR, quantitative PCR, and satellite remote sensing. The findings are important to the management of oyster growing waters and to future investigations into norovirus outbreaks. It is recommended that a combined approach of sensor-assisted real time monitoring and modeling-based forecasting should be utilized for an efficient and effective detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks caused by consumption of contaminated oysters.

  6. The effects of storage temperature on the growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and organoleptic properties in oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshack eMudoh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During harvesting and storage, microbial pathogens and natural spoilage flora may grow, negatively affecting the composition and texture of oysters and posing a potential health threat to susceptible consumers. A solution to these problems would mitigate associated damaging effects on the seafood industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of storage temperature on growth of Vibrios as well as other microbial, sensory and textural characteristics of post-harvest shellstock Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica. Oysters harvested from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, during summer months (June, July, and August, 2010 were subjected to three storage temperatures (5, 10, and 20ºC over a 10 day period. At selected time intervals (0, 1, 3, 7, 10 days two separate samples of 6 oysters each were homogenated and analyzed for pH, halophilic plate counts (HPC, total Vibrios, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp. Oyster meats shucked after storage were also organoleptically evaluated (acceptability, appearance, and odor. Texture analysis was performed using a texture analyzer on meats shucked from oysters held under the same conditions. The pH of the oyster homogenates showed no consistent pattern with storage time and temperature. The HPC (4.5 to 9.4log CFU/g were highest on day 7 at 20C while olfactory acceptance reduced with time and increasing storage temperatures. The Vp counts increased over time from 3.5 to7.5 log MPN/g by day10. Loss of freshness as judged by appearance and odor was significant over time (p

  7. Perkinsus marinus in pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis from Nayarit, Pacific coast of México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, J; Vásquez-Yeomans, R; Padilla-Lardizábal, G; del Río Portilla, M A

    2008-09-01

    Culture of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is emerging as an alternative to the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) for oyster producers, who face severe mortalities since 1997 in Northwest México. For determining the health status of this species, we conducted a histopathological analysis of cultured populations from two estuaries in the Pacific coast of México. Macroscopical analysis revealed animals with transparent and retracted mantle. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasitic forms consistent with Perkinsus sp. infection. Stages of the parasite identified included tomont and trophozoites with an eccentric vacuole characteristic of Perkinsus spp. Pieces of tissues of infected oysters were incubated in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (FTM) resulting in blue-black hypnospores after incubation. The identity of the parasite was confirmed by species specific PCR-based assay in DNA samples from oysters, tissue fractions from FTM cultures, and deparaffined samples with Perkinsus-like parasite detected by histology. Sequencing of positive amplified fragments (307bp) showed a sequence similar to Perkinsus marinus strain TXsc NTS ribosomal RNA gene (100% coverage and 98% identity, GenBank Accession No. AF497479.1) and to P. marinus, Genomic DNA, (100% coverage and 97% identity, GenBank Accession No. S78416.1). The prevalence of P. marinus varied from 1 to 5% in Boca del Camichín and from 1 to 6% in Pozo Chino. In general, the intensity of infection was moderate. The infection was observed in oysters from 31 to 110mm of shell length. This is the first record of P. marinus in oysters from the North America Pacific coast and the first record in C. corteziensis. The origin of this parasite in the area is unknown, but it may be associated to introductions of Crassostrea virginica from the East coast of United States of America or Gulf of México.

  8. Nutritional and Antioxidant Values of Oyster Mushroom (P. sajor-caju Cultivated on Rubber Sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arini Nuran Mohd Rashidi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— Grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju is one of the edible mushrooms from Pleurotus family, which is cultivated commercially in Malaysia. The global mushroom market has shown remarkable growth in recent years and has attractive market potential for the future. This study aimed to determine nutritional value and antioxidant properties of fresh grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju with the intention to give better information on nutritional composition of fresh oyster mushroom cultivated on rubber sawdust. Grey oyster mushrooms were freshly harvested from Teloi Agro Farm, Kedah, Malaysia. The proximate analysis was used to determine nutrient composition of grey oyster mushroom. Highest nutritional value of grey oyster mushroom is the moisture content (90.10±0.09%, followed by crude fibre content (17.27±1.08%, protein content (4.00±0.31%, carbohydrates content (3.54±0.09%, while the lowest nutritional value was possessed by fat content (1.18±0.33% and ash content (1.16±0.02%. The antioxidant activities of the mushroom were measure using total phenolic content (TPC by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent method and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH assay. The hot water extract showed mushroom powder possessed 2.21±0.03 mg GAE/g of dried mushroom powder for total phenolic content and at concentration of 0.1g/ml it can inhibit 89.29% of DPPH radicals. By virtue of having high fibre with low fat and high antioxidant activity, grey oyster mushroom can be considered as a functional food, which can provide health benefits.

  9. Effects of heavy metals on the oyster (Crassostrea virginica) at Mandinga Lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-García, X; Botello, A V; Martinez-Tabche, L; González-Márquez, H

    2009-12-01

    The Mandinga Lagoon in the Mexican State of Veracruz is an important ecological zone that produces 32% of the oyster output in the state of Veracruz, the main oyster producer in Mexico. Samples of water, sediment, and oysters were collected in 2003 and 2004 to study heavy metal pollution. Metal concentrations were determined in water, soil, and oyster tissues from fresh and detoxified Crassostrea virginica, and histology samples were analyzed. Metal (Cr, Cd, and Pb) concentrations in water were within the Mexican legal limits. The recorded values in sediments corresponded to those not producing biological effects (ERL). In the tissues, the highest concentrations corresponded to Pb, above 5.84 microgg(-1) dry weight (d.w.); Cd was of 2.23 microgg(-1) d.w., and Cr above 6 microgg(-1) d.w. The metal levels detected in oysters exceeded the maximum permissible limits (MPL) for Cd and Pb, and oysters were unable to eliminate the concentrations of the bioaccumulated metals during the detoxification stage. The histopathological analysis revealed lesions in the digestive gland, edema, atrophy of epithelia in the digestive tubules, the presence of brown vesicles, hemocytic reaction, and necrosis. During detoxification, a higher number of epithelia were observed in the tubules, as well as an increase in brown vesicles and hemocytic reaction. Forty seven percent of oysters presented histopathological lesions related to metal concentrations. It is important to monitor metal concentrations, to detect the source of pollution, andto evaluate the effects on organisms to establish culture areas and adequate criteria for the exploitation of such an important fishery resource.

  10. Sensitivity of hepatitis A and murine norovirus to electron beam irradiation in oyster homogenates and whole oysters - quantifying the reduction in potential infection risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite worldwide regulations and advisories restricting shellfish harvest to approved locations, consumption of raw oysters continues to be an exposure route for human norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Therefore, a technology that can reduce the public health risks is needed. The focus...

  11. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI, IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994-Dec. 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, that set on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia, in Augus...

  12. The Effects of Temperature and Nutritional Conditions on Mycelium Growth of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Ha Thi; Wang, Chun-Li

    2015-03-01

    The influences of temperature and nutritional conditions on the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC) were investigated in laboratory experiment during the summer season of 2014. The results of the experiment indicated that potato dextrose agar (PDA) and yam dextrose agar (YDA) were the most suitable media for the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO while four media (PDA, YDA, sweet potato dextrose agar, and malt extract agar medium) were not significantly different in supporting mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC. The optimal temperature for mycelium growth of both oyster mushroom species was obtained at 28℃. Mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO was improved by carbon sources such as glucose, molasses, and at 1~5% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO was achieved the highest value. Whereas glucose, dextrose, and sucrose as carbon sources gave the good mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC, and at 1~3% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of PC was achieved the maximum value. Ammonium chloride concentrations at 0.03~0.09% and 0.03~0.05% also gave the greatest values in mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO and PC. Brown rice was found to be the most favourable for mycelium growth of two oyster mushroom species. In addition, sugarcane residue, acasia sawdust and corn cob were selected as favourable lignocellulosic substrate sources for mycelium growth of both oyster mushrooms.

  13. Oyster (Crassostrea gigas Hydrolysates Produced on a Plant Scale Have Antitumor Activity and Immunostimulating Effects in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhong Zhang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Oyster extracts have been reported to have many bioactive peptides. But the function of oyster peptides produced by proteolysis is still unknown. In this study, the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysates from oyster (Crassostrea gigas were produced using the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 at laboratory level, and scaled up to pilot (100 L and plant (1,000 L levels with the same conditions. And the antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects of the oyster hydrolysates in BALB/c mice were investigated. The growth of transplantable sarcoma-S180 was obviously inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in BALB/c mice given the oyster hydrolysates. Mice receiving 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/g of body weight by oral gavage had 6.8%, 30.6% and 48% less tumor growth, respectively. Concurrently, the weight coefficients of the thymus and the spleen, the activity of natural killer (NK cells, the spleen proliferation of lymphocytes and the phagocytic rate of macrophages in S180-bearing mice significantly increased after administration of the oyster hydrolysates. These results demonstrated that oyster hydrolysates produced strong immunostimulating effects in mice, which might result in its antitumor activity. The antitumor and immunostimulating effects of oyster hydrolysates prepared in this study reveal its potential for tumor therapy and as a dietary supplement with immunostimulatory activity.

  14. Radiation resistances and decontamination of common pathogenic bacteria contaminated in white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thupila, Nunticha; Ratana-arporn, Pattama; Wilaipun, Pongtep

    2011-07-01

    In Thailand, white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) was ranked for premium quality, being most expensive and of high demand. This oyster is often eaten raw, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. As limited alternative methods are available to sterilize the oyster while preserving the raw characteristic, irradiation may be considered as an effective method for decontamination. In this study, the radiation resistance of pathogenic bacteria commonly contaminating the oyster and the optimum irradiation doses for sterilization of the most radiation resistant bacteria were investigated. The radiation decimal reduction doses ( D10) of Salmonella Weltevreden DMST 33380, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 and Vibrio vulnificus DMST 5852 were determined in broth culture and inoculated oyster homogenate. The D10 values of S. Weltevreden, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth culture were 0.154, 0.132 and 0.059 kGy, while those of inoculated oyster homogenate were 0.330, 0.159 and 0.140 kGy, respectively. It was found that among the pathogens tested, S. Weltevreden was proved to be the most resistant species. An irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy reduced the counts of 10 5 CFU/g S. Weltevreden inoculated in oyster meat to an undetectable level. The present study indicated that a low-dose irradiation can improve the microbial quality of oyster and further reduce the risks from the food-borne pathogens without adversely affecting the sensory attributes.

  15. Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) hydrolysates produced on a plant scale have antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Kai; He, Hai-Lun; Wang, Guo-Fan; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2010-02-02

    Oyster extracts have been reported to have many bioactive peptides. But the function of oyster peptides produced by proteolysis is still unknown. In this study, the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysates from oyster (Crassostrea gigas) were produced using the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 at laboratory level, and scaled up to pilot (100 L) and plant (1,000 L) levels with the same conditions. And the antitumor activity and immunostimulating effects of the oyster hydrolysates in BALB/c mice were investigated. The growth of transplantable sarcoma-S180 was obviously inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in BALB/c mice given the oyster hydrolysates. Mice receiving 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/g of body weight by oral gavage had 6.8%, 30.6% and 48% less tumor growth, respectively. Concurrently, the weight coefficients of the thymus and the spleen, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells, the spleen proliferation of lymphocytes and the phagocytic rate of macrophages in S180-bearing mice significantly increased after administration of the oyster hydrolysates. These results demonstrated that oyster hydrolysates produced strong immunostimulating effects in mice, which might result in its antitumor activity. The antitumor and immunostimulating effects of oyster hydrolysates prepared in this study reveal its potential for tumor therapy and as a dietary supplement with immunostimulatory activity.

  16. Perception of oyster-based products by French consumers. The effect of processing and role of social representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debucquet, Gervaise; Cornet, Josiane; Adam, Isabelle; Cardinal, Mireille

    2012-12-01

    The search for new markets in the seafood sector, associated with the question of the continuity of raw oyster consumption over generations can be an opportunity for processors to extend their ranges with oyster-based products. The twofold aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of processing and social representation on perception of oyster-based products by French consumers and to identify the best means of development in order to avoid possible failure in the market. Five products with different degrees of processing (cooked oysters in a half-shell, hot preparation for toast, potted oyster, oyster butter and oyster-based soup) were presented within focus groups and consumer tests, at home and in canteens with the staff of several companies in order to reach consumers with different ages and professional activities. The results showed that social representation had a strong impact and that behaviours were contrasted according to the initial profile of the consumer (traditional raw oyster consumers or non-consumers) and their age distribution (younger and older people). The degree of processing has to be adapted to each segment. It is suggested to develop early exposure to influence the food choices and preferences of the youngest consumers on a long-term basis.

  17. Condition and Extent of the Natural Oyster Beds and Barren Bottoms in the Vicinity of Apalachicola, Fla.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of oyster beds in the vicinity of Apalachicola, FL was conducted in 1915. The area of the oyster beds is 7,135 acres, or 11.1 square miles, of which...

  18. The performance of oyster families exposed to Dermo disease is contingent on the source of pathogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report preliminary results from a course of research integrating pathology, feeding ecology, genetics and genomics to address resistance to Dermo disease in eastern oysters. We challenged six oyster families with Perkinsus marinus, the etiological agent of Dermo disease, through either direc...

  19. Assessing the extent of phenotypic variation for dermo resistance among selectively-bred families of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermo disease impacts nearly every region where oysters are cultured in the Eastern U.S. and is a significant concern to industry stakeholders. Efforts to breed for Dermo resistance in the Eastern Oyster have had modest success, yet the range of existing phenotypic variation with respect to Dermo ...

  20. Characterization of phenotypic variation for dermo resistance among selectively-bred families of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermo disease impacts nearly every region where oysters are cultured in the Eastern U.S. and is a significant concern to industry stakeholders. Efforts to breed for Dermo resistance in the Eastern Oyster have had modest success, yet the range of existing phenotypic variation with respect to Dermo r...

  1. 46 CFR 2.01-50 - Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels. 2.01-50 Section 2.01-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES... than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels. (a) A steam vessel engaged in towing,...

  2. Ecological studies on the seasonal production of the edible oyster, Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) in Cochin Backwater, Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Purushan, K.S.; Gopalan, U.K.; Rao, T.S.S.

    the intertidal ones, but as regards percentage meat weight the latter out-weighed the former. Among environmental variables, salinity seemed to be the foremost factor in influencing the production of oysters. A large majority (90-98%) of the intertidal oysters...

  3. The Effects of Temperature and Nutritional Conditions on Mycelium Growth of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Ha Thi

    2015-01-01

    The influences of temperature and nutritional conditions on the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC) were investigated in laboratory experiment during the summer season of 2014. The results of the experiment indicated that potato dextrose agar (PDA) and yam dextrose agar (YDA) were the most suitable media for the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO while four media (PDA, YDA, sweet potato dextrose agar, and malt extract agar medium) were not significantly different in supporting mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC. The optimal temperature for mycelium growth of both oyster mushroom species was obtained at 28℃. Mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO was improved by carbon sources such as glucose, molasses, and at 1~5% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO was achieved the highest value. Whereas glucose, dextrose, and sucrose as carbon sources gave the good mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC, and at 1~3% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of PC was achieved the maximum value. Ammonium chloride concentrations at 0.03~0.09% and 0.03~0.05% also gave the greatest values in mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO and PC. Brown rice was found to be the most favourable for mycelium growth of two oyster mushroom species. In addition, sugarcane residue, acasia sawdust and corn cob were selected as favourable lignocellulosic substrate sources for mycelium growth of both oyster mushrooms. PMID:25892910

  4. The Kumamoto oyster Crassostrea sikamea is neither rare nor threatened by hybridization in the northern Ariake Sea, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The status of the Kumamoto oyster Crassostrea sikamea in its native Japan is uncertain because of a lack of information about its abundance and distribution and a suggestion that C. sikamea and the Pacific oyster C. gigas hybridize in the northern Ariake Sea. Furthermore, broodstock populations on ...

  5. Focal rigidity of flat tori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Kwakkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Given a closed Riemannian manifold (M, g, i.e. compact and boundaryless, there is a partition of its tangent bundle TM = ∪iΣi called the focal decomposition of TM. The sets Σi are closely associated to focusing of geodesics of (M, g, i.e. to the situation where there are exactly i geodesic arcs of the same length joining points p and q in M. In this note, we study the topological structure of the focal decomposition of a closed Riemannian manifold and its relation with the metric structure of the manifold. Our main result is that flat n-tori, n > 2, are focally rigid in the sense that if two flat tori are focally equivalent then the tori are isometric up to rescaling. The case n = 2 was considered before by F. Kwakkel.Dada uma variedade Riemanniana (M, g fechada, isto é, compacta e sem bordo, existe uma partição de seu fibrado tangente TM = ∪iΣi chamada decomposição focal de TM. Os conjuntos Σi estão intimamente associados ao modo como focalizam as geodésicas de (M,g, isto é, à situação em que existem exatamente i arcos de geodésica de mesmo comprimento unindo pontos p e q em M. Nesta nota, estudamos a estrutura topológica da decomposição focal de uma variedade Riemanniana fechada e sua relação com a estrutura métrica de M. Nosso principal resultado é que n-toros planos, n > 2, são focalmente rigidos, isto é, se dois toros planos são focalmente equivalentes, então os dois toros são isométricos módulo mudança de escala. O caso n = 2 foi considerado anteriormente por F. Kwakkel.

  6. Annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po from sea food origin (Oysters and Mussels) in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bo Eum; Hong, Gi Hoon; Kim, Suk Hyun; Lee, Hyun Mi [Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ingestion of {sup 210}Po laden seafood accounts for a substantial amount of the effective dose of {sup 210}Po. Among seafood items, mollusks, especially domestically produced oysters and mussels, are highly enriched in {sup 210}Po and are consumed in large quantities in Korea. Oysters and mussels around the Korean coasts were collected from major farm areas in November 2013. Samples were spiked with an aliquot of {sup 210}Po as a yield tracer, and they were digested with 6 mol·L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The {sup 210}Po and {sup 209}Po were spontaneously deposited onto a silver disc in an acidic solution of 0.5 mol·L{sup -1} HCl and measured using an alpha spectrometer. The activity concentrations of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were decay corrected to the sampling date, accounting for the possible in-growth and decay of {sup 210}Po. {sup 210}Po activity concentrations in oysters were in a range from 41.3 to 206 Bq·(kg-ww{sup -1} and mussels in a range from 42.9 to 46.7 Bq·(kg-ww){sup -1}. The {sup 210}Po activity concentration of oysters in the turbid Western coast was higher than the Southern coast. The {sup 210}Po activity concentration of the oysters was positively correlated (R2=0.89) with those of the suspended particulate matter in the surface water. The calculated annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po from oysters and mussels consumed by the Korean population was 21-104 and 5.01-5.46 μSv·y{sup -1}. The combined effective dose due to the consumption of oysters and mussels appears to account for about 35±19% of that arising from seafood consumption in the Korean population. The annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po for oysters in the Korean population was found to be higher than other countries. The total annual effective dose of 210Po{sup 210}Po due to consumption of oysters and mussels consumed in Korea was found to be 76±42 μSv·y{sup -1}, accounting for 28±16% of the total effective dose of {sup 210}Po from food in Korea.

  7. Electrochemical characterization of a bioceramic material: The shell of the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yuhchae; Mount, Andrew S; Hansen, Karolyn M; Hansen, Douglas C

    2011-06-01

    The shell of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is composed of multiple incongruent mineralized layers. This bioceramic composite material was investigated to determine the effects of shell thickness, orientation and layer composition on its electrochemical behavior using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy. SEM-EDS analysis of the oyster shell revealed that the multilayered biocomposite material is composed of calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)). EIS measurements in 3.5wt.% NaCl indicated that the impedance of the whole oyster shell in the low frequency region exhibited high impedance values which exhibited a decreasing trend with increasing immersion time. In terms of overall shell thickness, limiting currents measured by potentiodynamic techniques through the shell were observed to increase when the outer layers of the shell were sequentially removed by grinding, thus decreasing the shell thickness. These limiting current values remained relatively constant when the inner layers of the shell were removed. The impedance values of the oyster shell material as measured by EIS were shown to decrease with decreasing shell thickness. These findings suggest that the prismatic (outermost) shell layer in combination with the soluble organic matrix between all shell layers may influence the ionic conductivity through the oyster shell. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Occurrence of Proteus mirabilis associated with two species of venezuelan oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Gueneau, Pulchérie; Suárez, Paula

    2007-01-01

    The fecal contamination of raw seafood by indicators and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms represents a public health concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of enteric bacteria colonizing oysters collected from a Venezuelan touristic area. Oyster samples were collected at the northwestern coast of Venezuela and local salinity, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen of seawater were recorded. Total and fecal coliforms were measured for the assessment of the microbiological quality of water and oysters, using the Multiple Tube Fermentation technique. Analyses were made using cultures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Diverse enrichment and selective culture methods were used to isolate enteric bacteria. We obtained pure cultures of Gram-negative straight rods with fimbriae from Isognomon alatus and Crassostrea rhizophorae. Our results show that P. mirabilis was predominant under our culture conditions. We confirmed the identity of the cultures by biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and data analysis. Other enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli, Morganella morganii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also isolated from seawater and oysters. The presence of pathogenic bacteria in oysters could have serious epidemiological implications and a potential human health risk associated with consumption of raw seafood.

  9. Oral bioaccessibility of toxic metals in contaminated oysters and relationships with metal internal sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2014-12-01

    The Hong Kong oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis are widely farmed in the estuarine waters of Southern China, but they accumulate Cu and Zn to alarmingly high concentrations in the soft tissues. Health risks of seafood consumption are related to contaminants such as toxic metals which are bioaccessible to humans. In the present study, we investigated the oral bioaccessibility of five toxic metals (Ag, Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn) in contaminated oysters collected from different locations of a large estuary in southern China. In all oysters, total Zn concentration was the highest whereas total Pb concentration was the lowest. Among the five metals, Ag had the lowest oral bioaccessibility (38.9-60.8%), whereas Cu and Zn had the highest bioaccessibility (72.3-93.1%). Significant negative correlation was observed between metal bioaccessibility and metal concentration in the oysters for Ag, Cd, and Cu. We found that the oral bioaccessibility of the five metals was positively correlated with their trophically available metal fraction (TAM) in the oyster tissues, and negatively correlated with metal distribution in the cellular debris. Thus, metal partitioning in the TAM and cellular debris controlled the oral bioaccessibility to humans. Given the dependence of oral bioaccessibility on tissue metal contamination, bioaccessibility needs to be incorporated in the risk assessments of contaminated shellfish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sequence analysis and quantitative detection of Norwalk-like viruses in cultured oysters of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Qingjuan; Yue, Zhiqin; Li, Zhaojie; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Changhu

    2008-05-01

    We isolated 4 Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) contaminated oysters from 33 Chinese oysters collected from local commercial sources of Shandong Province. After amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region of NLVs genomes with RT-PCR, the open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the RdRp was sequenced and subjected to multiple-sequence alignment. The results showed that NLVs in the four isolates belong to genogroup II. The sequence comparison showed that the similarity between four Chinese oyster isolates were higher than 99.0%, which indicated that NLVs prevalent in close areas have high homogeneity in genome sequences. In addition, the most conserved sequences between diverse NLVs were used to design primers and TaqMan probes, then the real-time quantitative PCR assay was performed. According to the standard curve of GII NLVs, the original amounts (copies) of NLVs in positive patient’s fecal isolate, positive Japanese oyster isolate, and the Chinese oyster isolate were 8.9×108, 1.25×108 and 4.7×101 respectively. The detecting limit of NLVs was 1×101 copies. This study will be helpful for routine diagnosis of NLVs pathogens in foods and thus for avoiding food poisoning in the future.

  11. Monthly Changes of Glycogen, Lipid and Free Amino Acid of Oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhicui; XUE Changhu; GAO Xin; LI Zhaojie; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    Monthly difference of the chemical composition of oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was analyzed.The components analyzed included glycogen, fatty acid and free amino acid (FAA).The content of glycogen was high in January and March (2.89 and 2.82 g(100 g)- 1 on average, respectively) and low in October (2.07 g(100 g)- 1 on average).The low content of neutral lipids in October reflected a relatively poor nutritional value of oyster (1.42 g(100 g) -1 on average).The main fatty acids of oyster were palmitic acid(16:0),oleic acid(18:1),eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA,20:5w-3) and docosahexaenoic acid(DHA,22:6w-3).The major FAAs of oyster were Taurine,Glutamicacid,Glycin,Alanine, Arginine and Proline.Taurine was the most abundant FAA with its content ranging from 603 mg(100 g)- 1 to 1139 mg(100 g) -1.The high contents of glycogen, polyunsaturated fatty acid and FAA showed that oyster cultured along the eastern coast of Shandong Province was nutritionally good in January and March.

  12. Sequence Analysis and Quantitative Detection of Norwalk-like Viruses in Cultured Oysters of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; TANG Qingjuan; YUE Zhiqin; LI Zhaojie; ZHANG Jin; XUE Changhu

    2008-01-01

    We isolated 4 Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) contaminated oysters from 33 Chinese oysters collected from local commer-cial sources of Shandong Province. After amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region of NLVs genomes with RT-PCR, the open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the RdRp was sequenced and subjected to multiple-sequence alignment. The re-suits showed that NLVs in the four isolates belong to genogroup Ⅱ. The sequence comparison showed that the similarity between four Chinese oyster isolates were higher than 99.0%, which indicated that NLVs prevalent in close areas have high homogeneity in genome sequences. In addition, the most conserved sequences between diverse NLVs were used to design primers and TaqMan probes, then the real-time quantitative PCR assay was performed. According to the standard curve of GII NLVs, the original amounts (copies) of NLVs in positive patient's fecal isolate, positive Japanese oyster isolate, and the Chinese oyster isolate were 8.9×108, 1.25×108 and 4.7×101 respectively. The detecting limit of NLVs was 1×101 copies. This study will be helpful for routine diagnosis of NLVs pathogens in foods and thus for avoiding food poisoning in the future.

  13. Norovirus genotypes implicated in two oyster-related illness outbreaks in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajko-Nenow, P; Keaveney, S; Flannery, J; McINTYRE, A; Doré, W

    2014-10-01

    We investigated norovirus (NoV) concentrations and genotypes in oyster and faecal samples associated with two separate oyster-related outbreaks of gastroenteritis in Ireland. Quantitative analysis was performed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis was conducted to establish the NoV genotypes present. For both outbreaks, the NoV concentration in oysters was >1000 genome copies/g digestive tissue and multiple genotypes were identified. In faecal samples, GII.13 was the only genotype detected for outbreak 1, whereas multiple genotypes were detected in outbreak 2 following the application of cloning procedures. While various genotypes were identified in oyster samples, not all were successful in causing infection in consumers. In outbreak 2 NoV GII.1 was identified in all four faecal samples analysed and NoV GII concentrations in faecal samples were >108 copies/g. This study demonstrates that a range of NoV genotypes can be present in highly contaminated oysters responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  14. A cytokine-like factor astakine accelerates the hemocyte production in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiqun; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Meijia; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-02-01

    Astakine has been reported to be a hematopoietic growth factor of prokineticin homolog firstly found in arthropods freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In the present study, an astakine homologous gene was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgAstakine). The full length cDNA of CgAstakine encoded a polypeptide of 103 amino acids containing a prokineticin (PK) domain homologous to that in astakine from freshwater crayfish P. leniusculus. The deduced amino acid sequence of CgAstakine shared higher similarity with those of other invertebrate astakines than prokineticins from vertebrates. The mRNA of CgAstakine was highly expressed in hepatopancreas and adductor muscle of oyster, while the CgAstakine protein was mainly distributed in hepatopancreas, gill and hemocytes. The mRNA expression of CgAstakine in hemocytes was significantly increased (p oyster hemocytes were incubated with 5 μg/mL recombinant CgAstakine protein (rCgAstakine) for 24 h in vitro, the proliferation of hemocytes was significantly increased to 1.89 fold of that in control group (p oyster hemocytes was significantly upregulated (2.45 fold of that in control group, p oysters were received an injection of rCgAstakine (0.5 μg/g). These results collectively indicated that CgAstakine could modulate the hemocytes proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, and probably involved in the hematopoietic process fighting against the invasion of foreign pathogens.

  15. Testing the effect of habitat structure and complexity on nekton assemblages using experimental oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Austin T.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Kimball, Matthew E.; Rozas, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    Structurally complex habitats are often associated with more diverse and abundant species assemblages in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Biogenic reefs formed by the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) are complex in nature and are recognized for their potential habitat value in estuarine systems along the US Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Few studies, however, have examined the response of nekton to structural complexity within oyster reefs. We used a quantitative sampling technique to examine how the presence and complexity of experimental oyster reefs influence the abundance, biomass, and distribution of nekton by sampling reefs 4 months and 16 months post-construction. Experimental oyster reefs were colonized immediately by resident fishes and decapod crustaceans, and reefs supported a distinct nekton assemblage compared to mud-bottom habitat. Neither increased reef complexity, nor age of the experimental reef resulted in further changes in nekton assemblages or increases in nekton abundance or diversity. The presence of oyster reefs per se was the most important factor determining nekton usage.

  16. Dose- and time-dependent hypocholesterolemic effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, P; Ozdín, L; Galbavý, S

    1998-03-01

    The effect of the dose of oyster mushroom in the diet (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0%) and of the period of application (8, 16, 28, and 52 wk) on cholesterol accumulation in blood and body organs was studied in weanling male Wistar rats fed a diet containing 0.3% cholesterol. Reduction of cholesterol in serum and body organs was found to be dependent on the amount of dietary oyster mushroom administered. A negative correlation between the mushroom dose and cholesterol level was found after 8 and 28 wk of feeding (r=-0.9821 and -0.9803, respectively; P < 0.02 for both cases). The dose of 1% oyster mushroom did not affect cholesterol levels in serum or body organs. A significant reduction of cholesterol levels was observed in serum (31-46%) and liver (25-30%) at a dose of 5% of oyster mushroom for all periods. Reduced cholesterol content in very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) was also observed at this level. The highest dose of oyster mushroom induced a decrease in conjugated diene levels in erythrocytes and an increase in the levels of reduced glutathione in the liver and stimulated the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in the liver in the final period of the experiment.

  17. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  18. Measuring Macrobenthos Biodiversity at Oyster Aquaculture Sites in the Delaware Inland Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, M. J.; Ozbay, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Delaware Inland Bays consists of three shallow coastal bays located in the southern portion of Delaware. Anthropogenic activities have led to the degradation of water quality, because the bays are surrounded by highly developed areas and have low flushing rates. This results in loss of biodiversity and abundance of organisms. Ongoing degradation of the bays has led to a dramatic decline in local oyster populations since the late 1800s. Oysters are keystone species, which provide habitats for organisms and help to improve water quality. This study aims to find if the introduction of oyster aquaculture improves local biodiversity and abundance of macrobenthos. The study was conducted in Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay and Little Assawoman Bay. Aquaculture gear was placed at one location in each of the bays and 24 sediment core samples were taken once a month. From these core samples all worms were fixed and stained in a 10% Formalin Rose Bengal solution and preserved in 70% Ethanol for later identification. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of oyster tissue will also be performed to assess the health of the bay. The goals of this research are to better understand the role of oyster aquaculture in restoring the viability and health of the Delaware Inland Bays.

  19. Characterization of Dredged Oyster Shell Deposits at Mobile Bay, Alabama Using Geophysical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C. Nwokebuihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for disposing materials dredged from ship channels is a common problem in bays and lagoons. This study is aimed at investigating the suitability of scour features produced by dredging oyster shell deposits in Mobile Bay, Alabama, to dispose excavated channel material. A study area approximately 740 by 280 m lying about 5 km east of Gaillard Island was surveyed using underwater electrical resistivity tomography (UWERT and continuous electrical resistivity profiling (CERP tools. The geophysical survey was conducted with the intent to map scour features created by oyster shell dredging activities in the bay between 1947 and 1982. The geoelectrical surveys show that oyster beds are characterized by high resistivity values greater than 1.1 ohm.m while infilled dredge cuts show lower resistivity, generally from 0.6 to 1.1 ohm.m. The difference in resistivity mainly reflects the lithology and the consolidation of the shallow sediments: consolidated silty clay and sandy sediments rich in oyster shell deposits (with less clay content overlying unconsolidated clayey materials infilling the scours. Results show that most of the infilled dredge cuts are mostly distributed in the north-south direction. Considering that the scours are generally up to 6 m deep across the survey location, it is estimated that about 0.8 million cubic meters of oyster shells and overlying strata were dredged from the survey location.

  20. Flat hat glass diffractive optical beam shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Steffen; Petzold, Uwe; Biertuempfel, Ralf; Vogt, Helge

    2009-02-01

    Many laser applications need a homogeneous - so called flat hat - light distribution in the application area. However, many laser emit Gaussian shaped light. The technology of diffractive optical elements (DOE) can be used to shape the Gaussian beam into a flat hat beam at a compact length. SCHOTT presents a DOE design of a flat hat DOE beam shaper made out of optical glass. Here the material glass has the significant advantage of high laser durability, low scattering losses, high resistance to temperature, moisture, and chemicals compared to polymer DOEs. Simulations and measurements on different DOEs for different wavelength, laser beam width, and laser divergence are presented. Surprisingly the flat hat DOE beam shaper depends only weakly on wavelength and beam width but strongly on laser divergence. Based on the good agreement between simulation and measurement an improved flat hat DOE beam shaper is also presented.

  1. Biomonitoring of trace metal contamination in the Potengi estuary, Natal (Brazil), using the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, a local food source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C A; Rainbow, P S; Smith, B D; Santos, Z L

    2001-12-01

    The oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae was collected in September 1997 from 10 stations along the Potengi estuary, Natal, Brazil, a mangrove-lined estuary receiving anthropogenic inputs of trace metals. C. rhizophorae is a net accumulator of trace metals and can be used as a biomonitor, the accumulated soft tissue concentrations representing integrated records of bioavailable metal fractions over the life of the oyster. Significant differences in oyster accumulated concentrations (and hence bioavailabilities) of Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni and Ag (but not Mn) were found between stations, and attributed to anthropogenic inputs including discharges of sewage and industrial effluent. The oysters are also a local food source, and concentrations of zinc, copper and lead in some of the oysters are above typical public health recommended limits.

  2. Cloning and Characterization of a Homologous Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase PSKH1 from Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yiping; XIE Liping; XIONG Xunhao; CHEN Lei; FAN Weimin; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    Many of the effects of Ca2+ signaling are mediated through the Ca2+/calmodulin complex and its acceptors, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including PSKH1. Studies of the proteins involved in the calcium metabolism in oysters will help elucidate the pearl formation mechanism. This paper describes a full-length PSKH1 cDNA isolated from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Oyster PSKH1 shares 65% homology with human PSKH1 and 48% similarity with rat CaM kinase I in the amino acid sequence, and contains a calmodulin-binding domain. The results of semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization revealed that oyster PSKH1 mRNA is highly expressed in the outer epithelial cells of the mantle pallial and in the gill epithelial cells. These studies provide important information describing the complex Ca2+ signaling mechanism in oyster calcium metabolism.

  3. The specifically enhanced cellular immune responses in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) against secondary challenge with Vibrio splendidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Qiu, Limei; Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Yue, Feng; Sun, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-07-01

    The increasing experimental evidences suggest that there are some forms of specific acquired immunity in invertebrates, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) stimulated primarily by heat-killed Vibrio splendidus displayed stronger immune responses at cellular and molecular levels when they encountered the secondary challenge of live V. splendidus. The total hemocyte counts (THC) increased significantly after the primary stimulation of heat-killed V. splendidus, and it increased even higher (p oysters received the secondary stimulation with live V. splendidus, and the phagocytic rate was also enhanced significantly (p oysters after the secondary stimulation of V. splendidus were higher (p oyster with specifically enhanced phagocytosis and rapidly promoted regeneration of circulating hemocytes when the primed oysters encountered the secondary challenge with V. splendidus.

  4. Cosmology in Conformally Flat Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endean, Geoffrey

    1997-04-01

    A possible solution to cosmological age and redshift-distance difficulties has recently been proposed by applying the appropriate conformally flat spacetime (CFS) coordinates to the standard solution of the field equations in a standard dust model closed universe. Here it is shown that CFS time correctly measures the true age of the universe, thus answering a major theoretical objection to the proposal. It is also shown that the CFS interpretation leads to a strong Copernican principle and is in all other respects wholly self-consistent. The deceleration parameter q0 is related to t0, the present age of the universe divided by L, the scale length of its curvature (an absolute constant). The values of q0 and L are approximately 5/6 and 9.2 × 109 yr, respectively. It is shown that the universe started everywhere simultaneously, with no recession velocity until the effects of its closed topology became significant. Conclusions to the contrary in standard theory (the big bang) stem from a different definition of recession velocity. The theoretical present cosmological mass density is quantified as 4.4 × 10-27 kg m-3 approximately, thus greatly reducing, in a closed universe, the observational requirement to find hidden mass. It is also shown that the prediction of standard theory, for a closed universe, of collapse toward a big crunch termination, will not in fact take place.

  5. Cellular and biochemical responses of the oyster Crassostrea gigas to controlled exposures to metals and Alexandrium minutum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, Hansy; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Quéré, Claudie [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Laboratoire de Physiologie des Invertébrés, Unité Physiologie Fonctionnelle des Organismes Marins, BP 70, 29280 Plouzané (France); Bruneau, Audrey; Riso, Ricardo; Auffret, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Soudant, Philippe, E-mail: Philippe.Soudant@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •Oysters, C. gigas, were exposed to both metals and PST-producer A. minutum. •Oysters exposed to metals accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs. •Exposure to both metals and A. minutum induced antagonistic or synergetic effects. -- Abstract: Effects of simultaneous exposure of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to both a harmful dinoflagellate that produces Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST), Alexandrium minutum, and cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu), were assessed. Oysters were exposed to a mix of Cd–Cu with two different diets (i.e. A. minutum or Tisochrysis lutea) and compared to control oysters fed A. minutum or T. lutea, respectively, without metal addition. Metals and PST accumulations, digestive gland lipid composition, and cellular and biochemical hemolymph variables were measured after 4 days of exposure. Oysters exposed to Cd–Cu accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs than oysters exposed to A. minutum alone. Exposure to Cd–Cu induced significant changes in neutral lipids (increase in diacylglycerol – DAG – and decrease in sterols) and phospholipids (decreases in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and ceramide aminoethylphosphonate) of digestive gland suggesting that lipid metabolism disruptions and/or lipid peroxidation have occurred. Simultaneously, concentrations, percentages of dead cells and phenoloxidase activity of hemocytes increased in oysters exposed to metals while reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes decreased. Feeding on the harmful dinoflagellate A. minutum resulted in significant decreases in monoacylglycerol (MAG) and DAG and ether glycerides (EG), as well as significant increases in hemocyte concentration and phagocytic activity as compared to oysters fed T. lutea. Finally, the present study revealed that short-term, simultaneous exposure to Cd–Cu and A. minutum may induce antagonistic (i.e. hemocyte concentration and phagocytosis) or synergic (i.e. DAG content in

  6. A restoration suitability index model for the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, TX, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Beseres Pollack

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs are one of the most threatened marine habitats on earth, with habitat loss resulting from water quality degradation, coastal development, destructive fishing practices, overfishing, and storm impacts. For successful and sustainable oyster reef restoration efforts, it is necessary to choose sites that support long-term growth and survival of oysters. Selection of suitable sites is critically important as it can greatly influence mortality factors and may largely determine the ultimate success of the restoration project. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS provides an effective methodology for identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration and removes much of the uncertainty involved in the sometimes trial and error selection process. This approach also provides an objective and quantitative tool for planning future oyster reef restoration efforts. The aim of this study was to develop a restoration suitability index model and reef quality index model to characterize locations based on their potential for successful reef restoration within the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA. The restoration suitability index model focuses on salinity, temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and depth, while the reef quality index model focuses on abundance of live oysters, dead shell, and spat. Size-specific Perkinsus marinus infection levels were mapped to illustrate general disease trends. This application was effective in identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration, is flexible in its use, and provides a mechanism for considering alternative approaches. The end product is a practical decision-support tool that can be used by coastal resource managers to improve oyster restoration efforts. As oyster reef restoration activities continue at small and large-scales, site selection criteria are critical for assisting stakeholders and managers and for maximizing long-term sustainability of oyster resources.

  7. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  8. Dried shiitake (Lentinulla edodes and oyster (Pleurotus ostreatus mushrooms as a good source of nutrient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julita Reguła

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to presented in literature potential health benefits of shiitake Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegl. and oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr. Kumm., chemical composition as well as Fe, Cu and Zn ions sorption (in conditions related to human digestive tract by dried shiitake and oyster were investigated. Both dried mushrooms had the high content of dietary fiber, Fe, Cu, Mg, K but low of fat, Na and Ca. Relatively low sorption of micronutrients was found in pH = 1.8, while the high sorption of Cu and Fe was observed in pH = 8.7. Dried mushrooms satisfied the maximum permissible level standards concerning toxic metals. The results of the research suggest that dried shiitake and oyster mushrooms can be used as additives in food products.

  9. Influence of seasonality on the chemical composition of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Giselda M; Pascoal, Jadna C M; Torres, Elizabeth A F S; Soares, Rosana A M; Mendonça, Simone; Sampaio, Geni R; Correia, Meiryellen S; Cabral, Caterine C V Q; Cabral Júnior, Cyro R; López, Ana M Q

    2013-06-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the influence of seasonality on the chemical composition of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae). Samples were collected during summer and winter from the estuary and lagoon complex of the municipality of Barra de São Miguel, Alagoas, Brazil. Statistical differences (p<0.05) between summer and winter were observed in relation to chemical composition. The oysters cultivated in the winter presented some nutritional advantages because of the higher levels of proteins and functional nutrients, such as the eicosapentaenoic-docosahexaenoic acid combination and percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 and n-6), and the lower levels of saturated fatty acids. Therefore, the animals in winter presented a higher content of cholesterol oxides. The levels of cholesterol oxides found in these products during winter may encourage researchers to investigate the composition of oysters cultivated in different climates all over the world. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Preparation and characterization of coacervate microcapsules for the delivery of antimicrobial oyster peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Yezhou; Wu, Zhongchen; Chen, Haixu

    2009-03-01

    Oyster peptides-loaded alginate/chitosan/starch microcapsules were prepared using external gelation method and internal emulsion gelation method. The solution of oyster peptides complexes was encapsulated into the microcapsules, which endowed the microcapsules with intestine passive targeting properties. The swelling behavior, encapsulation efficiency, and release behavior of oyster peptides from the microcapsules at different pH values were investigated. The microcapsules exhibited sustained release of the peptides in intestinal medium, and the release rate could be regulated by the pH value: in simulated gastric fluid, the release rate was greatly decreased, and in simulated body fluid and intestinal fluid, the microcapsules exhibited a sustained release in 24 h with different release rates. The microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared. The results suggested that the alginate/chitosan/starch microcapsules could be a suitable copolymeric carrier system for intestinal protein or peptides delivery in the intestine.

  11. Relationship between the lability of sediment-bound Cd and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Chennuri, Kartheek; Bardhan, Pratirupa

    2015-11-15

    A linkage between Cd speciation in sediments and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster (Crassostrea sp.) from a tropical estuarine system was established. Bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oyster increased with the increasing lability and dissociation rate constants of Cd-sediment complexes in the bottom sediments. Total Cd concentration in sediment was not a good indicator of Cd-bioavailability. Increasing trace metal competition in sediments increased lability and bioavailability of Cd in the tropical estuarine sediment. Low thermodynamic stability and high bioavailability of Cd in the estuarine sediment were responsible for high bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oysters (3.2-12.2mgkg(-1)) even though the total concentration of Cd in the bottom sediment was low (0.17-0.49mgkg(-1)).

  12. Biochemical, serological, and virulence characterization of clinical and oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; Garrett, Nancy; Fischer, Markus; Parsons, Michele B; Bopp, Cheryl A; DePaola, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    In this study, 77 clinical and 67 oyster Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from North America were examined for biochemical profiles, serotype, and the presence of potential virulence factors (tdh, trh, and type III secretion system [T3SS] genes). All isolates were positive for oxidase, indole, and glucose fermentation, consistent with previous reports. The isolates represented 35 different serotypes, 9 of which were shared by clinical and oyster isolates. Serotypes associated with pandemic strains (O1:KUT, O1:K25, O3:K6, and O4:K68) were observed for clinical isolates, and 7 (9%) oyster isolates belonged to serotype O1:KUT. Of the clinical isolates, 27% were negative for tdh and trh, while 45% contained both genes. Oyster isolates were preferentially selected for the presence of tdh and/or trh; 34% contained both genes, 42% had trh but not tdh, and 3% had tdh but not trh. All but 1 isolate (143/144) had at least three of the four T3SS1 genes examined. The isolates lacking both tdh and trh contained no T3SS2α or T3SS2β genes. All clinical isolates positive for tdh and negative for trh possessed all T3SS2α genes, and all isolates negative for tdh and positive for trh possessed all T3SS2β genes. The two oyster isolates containing tdh but not trh possessed all but the vopB2 gene of T3SS2α, as reported previously. In contrast to the findings of previous studies, all strains examined that were positive for both tdh and trh also carried T3SS2β genes. This report identifies the serotype as the most distinguishing feature between clinical and oyster isolates. Our findings raise concerns about the reliability of the tdh, trh, and T3SS genes as virulence markers and highlight the need for more-detailed pathogenicity investigations of V. parahaemolyticus.

  13. The recycling of oyster shells: an environmental analysis using Life Cycle Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alvarenga, Rodrigo Augusto Freitas; Galindro, Bruno Menezes; Helpa, Camile de Fátima; Soares, Sebastião Roberto

    2012-09-15

    Oysters represent a substantial fraction of the world's overall intensive aquaculture production. In Brazil, oyster aquaculture is still in the deployment phase but has the potential for growth and, likewise other aquaculture products, generate environmental impacts over their life cycle. Special attention should be devoted to the disposal or processing of the oyster shells, whose high calcium carbonate content (80-95%) gives them the potential for use as raw material for several other products. The objective of this study was to conduct a cradle-to-grave Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of 1 kg of oysters produced in southern Brazil, incorporating the recycling of the oyster shells on the LCA. Two scenarios were considered. The first scenario (termed scenario A) assumed that the oyster shells were deposited in a landfill, whereas the second scenario (scenario B) assumed that the shells were processed to make them available as raw material as a source of CaCO(3). We used Eco-indicator 99 H/A to perform the impact assessment. Scenario A had an overall impact of 93.71 mPt, whereas scenario B had an overall impact of 58.97 mPt. The latter scenario had lower environmental impacts, however they were depended strongly on the distance between the source of the shells (restaurant) and the shell-processing facility. This distance must not be greater than 323 km to yield overall environmental benefits. Moreover, it is hypothesized that the environmental benefits would be even higher than predicted because there is no evidence that all post-consumer shell residues would receive proper waste management, as assumed for scenario A (landfill).

  14. Inter-site differences of zinc susceptibility of the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengjie [Division of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Marine Pollution, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Rainbow, Philip S. [Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Rd., London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Wang, Wen-Xiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, State Key Laboratory of Marine Pollution, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Zn sensitivity and detoxification in oysters are related to the history of metal exposure. ► The lethal threshold concentration of total body Zn varied significantly among oyster populations. ► Total body Zn concentration could not serve as a suitable toxicity indicator in oysters. ► Zn toxicity is related to a threshold concentration of metabolically available metal. -- Abstract: Understanding the underlying mechanisms governing metal toxicity is crucial for predicting the risks and effects of metal pollutants. We hypothesized that metal toxicity is related to a threshold concentration of metabolically available metal but not to the total body metal concentration. Following a two-month laboratory Zn exposure, we characterized mortality and Zn bioaccumulation and subcellular partitioning in the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis sampled from three sites with contrasting histories of Zn exposure and one multiple-metal contaminated site. Large differences in Zn sensitivity, lethal body concentration, and detoxification capability between sites were observed. Specifically, the oysters from the highly Zn-contaminated site were more tolerant to Zn exposure than those from the relatively clean ones, and the former accumulated and detoxified more Zn and had a significantly higher lethal body Zn concentration. The accumulation of Zn in the metabolically available pool (operationally defined as the metal-sensitive fraction) in the oysters from the multiple-metal contaminated site was relatively fast, and correspondingly they were highly sensitive to Zn exposure. The lethal threshold concentration of total body Zn varied significantly within the four sites, and thus total body Zn concentration could not serve as a suitable toxicity indicator. Importantly, Zn accumulation within the operationally defined metabolically available pool better explained variances in mortality than Zn accumulation in the whole body. Our results suggested that Zn toxicity is

  15. Effects of intraspecific diversity on survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the eastern oyster across sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Torrance C; Hughes, A Randall; Williams, Bethany; Garland, Hanna; Kimbro, David L

    2016-06-01

    Intraspecific diversity, particularly of foundation species, can significantly affect population, community, and ecosystem processes. Examining how genetic diversity relates to demographic traits provides a key mechanistic link from genotypic and phenotypic variation of taxa with complex life histories to their population dynamics. We conducted a field experiment to assess how two metrics of intraspecific diversity (cohort diversity, the number of independent juvenile cohorts created from different adult source populations, and genetic relatedness, genetic similarity among individuals within and across cohorts) affect the survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the foundation species Crassostrea virginica. To assess the effects of both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness on oyster demographic traits under different environmental conditions, we manipulated juvenile oyster diversity and predator exposure (presence/absence of a cage) at two sites differing in resource availability and predation intensity. Differences in predation pressure between sites overwhelmingly determined post-settlement survivorship of oysters. However, in the absence of predation (i.e., cage treatment), one or both metrics of intraspecific diversity, in addition to site, influenced long-term survivorship, growth, and recruitment. While both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness were negatively associated with long-term survivorship, genetic relatedness alone showed a positive association with growth and cohort diversity alone showed a positive association with recruitment. Thus, our results demonstrate that in the absence of predation, intraspecific diversity can affect multiple demographic traits of a foundation species, but the relative importance of these effects depends on the environmental context. Moreover, the magnitude and direction of these effects vary depending on the diversity metric, cohort diversity or genetic relatedness, suggesting that although they are inversely

  16. Oyster reefs as natural breakwaters mitigate shoreline loss and facilitate fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Scyphers

    Full Text Available Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards "living shoreline" approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m(-2 at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus were the most clearly enhanced (+297% by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus (+108%, spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus (+88% and flounder (Paralichthys sp. (+79% also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study

  17. Oyster reefs as natural breakwaters mitigate shoreline loss and facilitate fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scyphers, Steven B; Powers, Sean P; Heck, Kenneth L; Byron, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards "living shoreline" approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m(-2) at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were the most clearly enhanced (+297%) by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) (+108%), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) (+88%) and flounder (Paralichthys sp.) (+79%) also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study and this

  18. IMPORTANCE OF SUBSTRAT DIZINFECTION ON OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS SP. CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana FICIOR

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest for oyster mushrooms is increasing very much in the last years due to their special taste and nutritional value. One of the most important aspects on mushroom culture is represented by substrate disinfection. The yield can be compromised if the competitive microorganisms are not removed from the cellulosic materials. The aim of these researches was to determine the most efficient method of disinfection. We have chosen five different methods of disinfection: material boiled for one hour, material boiled for 10 minutes, material scalded with boiled water (100 degree, material disinfected with a fungicide (Derosal 0.01% and material soaked in water for 24 hours with no disinfection. It has been noticed that method of disinfection affects the mycelium development, date of fructification and yield. The best yields have been obtained for variants with material scalded with boiled water (100 degree, material disinfected with a fungicide (Derosal 0.01% and material boiled for one hour. Mushrooms grown on material without disinfection have recorded very low yields.

  19. Faunal community use of enhanced and natural oyster reefs in Delaware Bay: A field study and classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Jenny L.

    In addition to its value as a fisheries resource, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, is a reef building, cornerstone species that provides ecosystem services to the environment. Oysters provide habitat for associated resident and transient species. With widespread declines in oyster populations, restoration efforts have focused on improving oyster stocks and enhancing the ecosystem services they provide. Community-based oyster restoration programs engage the public and local community in planning, construction and/or monitoring of restoration projects. Since 2007, a K-12 student centered community-based restoration venture, Project PORTS, Promoting Oyster Restoration Through Schools, has been working to educate students, promote stewardship values, and enhance oyster habitat in the Delaware Bay. The overarching goals of the present study were to (1) assess fish and macroinvertebrate utilization on the Project PORTS community-created, subtidal, low-relief oyster restoration area in the Delaware Bay, and (2) convert the data collected into a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) activity that can be implemented in the classroom. I examined six subtidal natural oyster reefs of varying oyster densities and one community-based restoration reef as habitat for fishes and invertebrates. Sampling methods on these low-relief reefs consisted of otter trawl tows and benthic habitat tray collections. Results revealed that the enhancement area supported a diverse faunal community consistent with nearby, natural oyster habitats. Data collected during the field study were then transformed into an educational lesson plan, "One Fish, Two Fish-Assessing Habitat Value of Restored Oyster Reefs", that fulfilled national and state (NJ) curriculum standards. The lesson was piloted in a middle school classroom and student learning was evaluated through summative assessments pre and post-participation in the activity. Results of the assessments indicated that

  20. SBC Internal Lamp P-flat Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, R. J.; Chiaberge, M.; Bohlin, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a Cycle 23 calibration program to monitor the status of the SBC P-flat. We find random pixel to pixel changes to be small, with only 2% of pixels having changed by more than 3. There are coherent changes that we measure to be above the poisson errors, in some regions as high as 4% peak to peak. We recommend that the ACS team obtain new observations in order to create a new P-flat. We also measured the degradation of the deuterium lamp used to create internal flats. The brightness of the lamp is currently 65% of its initial level, the degradation being dependent on lifetime usage.

  1. Shell growth of unfed oysters in the laboratory: a sublethal bioassay system for pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, K.A.; Swift, M.L.; Reeves, J.B. III; Lakshmanan, S.

    1978-01-16

    Unfed oysters, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin, in 12 g/l commercial grade artificial sea-water supplemented with calcium bicarbonate (approximately 7 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and HCO/sub 3//sup -/) deposit shell for four to six weeks. A no-growth critical calcium ion concentration of 1.5 mM was determined in this study. A simple sublethal bioassay system can be developed utilizing the observed shell growth. Significant (p < 0.001) inhibition of shell deposition in oysters subjected to an initial concentration of 0.25 mg Cd/sup 2 +//l demonstrates the efficacy of the proposed method.

  2. Oyster mushroom waste as manure in fish culture: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, K; Dwivedi, A

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to recycle the waste substrates of the oyster-mushroom crop, tanks were stocked with seed of Indian major carp Cirrhinus mrigala at the rate of 600,000/ha and waste substrate was applied at weekly interval at 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 g/tank. Oyster mushroom waste not only provided highly nutritive colonised detritus to the fish as direct feed, but also produced rich plankton in the tank. In waste treated tanks, production was better than in the control in 150, 200 and 250 g/...

  3. Flatness Control Using Roll Coolant Based on Predicted Flatness Variation in Cold Rolling Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmae, Yukihiro; Okamura, Yoshihide

    Flatness control for cold rolling mills is one of the important technologies for improving of product quality and productivity. In particular, poor flatness leads to strip tearing in the extreme case and, moreover, it significantly reduces productivity. Therefore, various flatness control system has been developed. The main actuators for flatness control are classified into two types; one is mechanical equipment such as roll bender, the other is roll coolant, which controls thermal expansion of roll. Flatness variation such as center buckle or edge wave is mainly controlled by mechanical actuator which has high response characteristics. On another front, flatness variation of local zone can be controlled by roll coolant although one's response is lower than the response of mechanical actuator. For accomplishing good flatness accuracy in cold rolling mills, it is important to improve the performance of coolant control moreover. In this paper, a new coolant control method based on flatness variation model is described. In proposed method, the state of coolant spray on or off is selected to minimize the flatness deviation by using predicted flatness variation. The effectiveness of developed system has been demonstrated by application in actual plant.

  4. B^F Theory and Flat Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Waelbroeck, Henri

    2009-01-01

    We propose a reduced constrained Hamiltonian formalism for the exactly soluble $B \\wedge F$ theory of flat connections and closed two-forms over manifolds with topology $\\Sigma^3 \\times (0,1)$. The reduced phase space variables are the holonomies of a flat connection for loops which form a basis of the first homotopy group $\\pi_1(\\Sigma^3)$, and elements of the second cohomology group of $\\Sigma^3$ with value in the Lie algebra $L(G)$. When $G=SO(3,1)$, and if the two-form can be expressed as $B= e\\wedge e$, for some vierbein field $e$, then the variables represent a flat spacetime. This is not always possible: We show that the solutions of the theory generally represent spacetimes with ``global torsion''. We describe the dynamical evolution of spacetimes with and without global torsion, and classify the flat spacetimes which admit a locally homogeneous foliation, following Thurston's classification of geometric structures.

  5. On certain geodesic conjugacies of flat cylinders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S ARAVINDA; H A GURURAJA

    2017-06-01

    We prove $C^0$-conjugacy rigidity of any flat cylinder among two different classes of metrics on the cylinder, namely among the class of rotationally symmetric metrics and among the class of metrics without conjugate points.

  6. Fuzzy Neural Model for Flatness Pattern Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chun-yu; SHAN Xiu-ying; LIU Hong-min; NIU Zhao-ping

    2008-01-01

    For the problems occurring in a least square method model,a fuzzy model,and a neural network model for flatness pattern recognition,a fuzzy neural network model for flatness pattern recognition with only three-input and three-output signals was proposed with Legendre orthodoxy polynomial as basic pattern,based on fuzzy logic expert experiential knowledge and genetic-BP hybrid optimization algorithm.The model not only had definite physical meanings in its inner nodes,but also had strong self-adaptability,anti-interference ability,high recognition precision,and high velocity,thereby meeting the demand of high-precision flatness control for cold strip mill and providing a convenient,practical,and novel method for flatness pattern recognition.

  7. Improved ferrous shielding for flat cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    To improve shielding of flat multicore cables, a thin, seamless ferrous shield around all cores optimizes low frequency magnetic shielding. Such shielding is covered with an ultrathin seamless coat of highly conductive nonferrous material.

  8. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Xia Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  9. Gauging state-level and user group views of oyster reef restoration activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Nix, Ashby; Laborde, Luke; Piazza, Bryan P.

    2012-01-01

    Successful oyster reef restoration, like many conservation challenges, requires not only biological understanding of the resource, but also stakeholder cooperation and political support. To measure perceptions of oyster reef restoration activities and priorities for future restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, a survey of 1500 individuals representing 4 user groups (oyster harvesters, shrimpers, environmental organization members, professionals), across 5 states (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) was conducted in 2011. All respondents highly supported reef restoration efforts, but there was a dichotomy in preferred restoration goals with commercial fishermen more likely to support oyster reef restoration for stock enhancement, while professionals and environmental organization members were more likely to support oyster reef restoration to enhance ecosystem services. All user groups identified enforcement, funding, and appropriate site selection as basic requirements for successful reef restoration. For management of restored oyster reefs, oyster harvesters and shrimpers were less likely to support options that restricted the use of reefs, including gear restrictions and permanent closures, but did support rotating annual reef closures, while other stakeholders were willing to consider all options, including annual reef closures and sanctuary reefs. Overall, there were clear differences in management and communication preferences across user groups, but few differences across states. Understanding these key differences in stakeholder support for, and willingness to accept specific management actions is critical in moving management and restoration forward while minimizing conflict.

  10. Insight into invertebrate defensin mechanism of action: oyster defensins inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis by binding to lipid II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Paulina; Wilmes, Miriam; Pugnière, Martine; Aumelas, André; Bachère, Evelyne; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2010-09-17

    Three oyster defensin variants (Cg-Defh1, Cg-Defh2, and Cg-Defm) were produced as recombinant peptides and characterized in terms of activities and mechanism of action. In agreement with their spectrum of activity almost specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, oyster defensins were shown here to be specific inhibitors of a bacterial biosynthesis pathway rather than mere membrane-active agents. Indeed, at lethal concentrations, the three defensins did not compromise Staphylococcus aureus membrane integrity but inhibited the cell wall biosynthesis as indicated by the accumulation of the UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide cell wall precursor. In addition, a combination of antagonization assays, thin layer chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that oyster defensins bind almost irreversibly to the lipid II peptidoglycan precursor, thereby inhibiting the cell wall biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of the mechanism of action of antibacterial defensins produced by invertebrates. Interestingly, the three defensins, which were chosen as representative of the oyster defensin molecular diversity, bound differentially to lipid II. This correlated with their differential antibacterial activities. From our experimental data and the analysis of oyster defensin sequence diversity, we propose that oyster defensin activity results from selective forces that have conserved residues involved in lipid II binding and diversified residues at the surface of oyster defensins that could improve electrostatic interactions with the bacterial membranes.

  11. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  12. High performance flat plate solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, F. L.; Reynolds, R.

    1976-01-01

    The potential use of porous construction is presented to achieve efficient heat removal from a power producing solid and is applied to solar air heaters. Analytical solutions are given for the temperature distribution within a gas-cooled porous flat plate having its surface exposed to the sun's energy. The extracted thermal energy is calculated for two different types of plate transparency. Results show the great improvement in performance obtained with porous flat plate collectors as compared with analogous nonporous types.

  13. Topological properties of flat electroencephalography's state space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken, Tan Lit; Ahmad, Tahir bin; Mohd, Mohd Sham bin; Ngien, Su Kong; Suwa, Tohru; Meng, Ong Sie

    2016-02-01

    Neuroinverse problem are often associated with complex neuronal activity. It involves locating problematic cell which is highly challenging. While epileptic foci localization is possible with the aid of EEG signals, it relies greatly on the ability to extract hidden information or pattern within EEG signals. Flat EEG being an enhancement of EEG is a way of viewing electroencephalograph on the real plane. In the perspective of dynamical systems, Flat EEG is equivalent to epileptic seizure hence, making it a great platform to study epileptic seizure. Throughout the years, various mathematical tools have been applied on Flat EEG to extract hidden information that is hardly noticeable by traditional visual inspection. While these tools have given worthy results, the journey towards understanding seizure process completely is yet to be succeeded. Since the underlying structure of Flat EEG is dynamic and is deemed to contain wealthy information regarding brainstorm, it would certainly be appealing to explore in depth its structures. To better understand the complex seizure process, this paper studies the event of epileptic seizure via Flat EEG in a more general framework by means of topology, particularly, on the state space where the event of Flat EEG lies.

  14. The impact of suspended oyster farming on nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide production in a sub-tropical Australian estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Dirk V.; Welsh, David T.; Bennet, William W.; Meziane, Tarik; Hubas, Cédric; Nizzoli, Daniele; Ferguson, Angus J. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this study we quantified nitrate (NO3-) reduction (denitrification, anammox and DNRA) and N2O production in sediments and epibiont communities associated with Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) farming. In sediments beneath an active suspended oyster farm, DNRA accounted for 98% of NO3- reduction with rates of up to 169 ± 45 μmol N m-2 h-1. Much of this DNRA was fuelled by NO3- derived from nitrification. Reference sediments had significantly lower DNRA rates of 83.8 ± 28.2 μmol N m-2 h-1, however this constituted 96% of the sites total NO3- reduction. Fatty acid analysis showed that sediment organic matter was more labile in the oyster impacted sediments, facilitating subtle shifts in sediment oxygen demand which increased the Fe2+ availability with respect to the reference sediments. The difference in DNRA rate between the sites was attributed to autotrophic oxidation of soluble Fe2+ in sediments underlying the oyster cultures. DNRA was absent in the oyster shell epibiont communities and rates of anammox and denitrification were lower than in the sediments. Production of NH4+ from the oysters and their associated epibionts was larger than DNRA and reached a rate of 206.2 μmol N m-2 h-1. Nitrous oxide production rates were generally low compared to other aquaculture systems and the net flux of N2O for the combined oyster cultivation system (i.e. sediments plus epibionts) was negative, i.e. there was N2O consumption in the sediments beneath the oysters. Overall, subtropical suspended oyster farming systems favour inorganic N retention over N loss.

  15. Flat H Frangible Joint Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelman, Thomas E.; Hinkel, Todd J.; Benjamin, Andrew; Rochon, Brian V.; Brown, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Space vehicle staging and separation events require pyrotechnic devices. They are single-use mechanisms that cannot be tested, nor can failure-tolerant performance be demonstrated in actual flight articles prior to flight use. This necessitates the implementation of a robust design and test approach coupled with a fully redundant, failure-tolerant explosive mechanism to ensure that the system functions even in the event of a single failure. Historically, NASA has followed the single failure-tolerant (SFT) design philosophy for all human-rated spacecraft, including the Space Shuttle Program. Following the end of this program, aerospace companies proposed building the next generation human-rated vehicles with off-the-shelf, non-redundant, zero-failure-tolerant (ZFT) separation systems. Currently, spacecraft and launch vehicle providers for both the Orion and Commercial Crew Programs (CCPs) plan to deviate from the heritage safety approach and NASA's SFT human rating requirements. Both programs' partners have base-lined ZFT frangible joints for vehicle staging and fairing separation. These joints are commercially available from pyrotechnic vendors. Non-human-rated missions have flown them numerous times. The joints are relatively easy to integrate structurally within the spacecraft. In addition, the separation event is debris free, and the resultant pyro shock is lower than that of other design solutions. It is, however, a serious deficiency to lack failure tolerance. When used for critical applications on human-rated vehicles, a single failure could potentially lead to loss of crew (LOC) or loss of mission (LOM)). The Engineering and Safety & Mission Assurance directorates within the NASA Johnson Space Center took action to address this safety issue by initiating a project to develop a fully redundant, SFT frangible joint design, known as the Flat H. Critical to the ability to retrofit on launch vehicles being developed, the SFT mechanisms must fit within the same

  16. Phaeobacter inhibens as biocontrol agent against Vibrio vulnificus in oyster models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    acid (TDA), inhibited V. vulnificus as did pure TDA (MIC of 1-3.9 μM). P. inhibens DSM 17395 (at 106 cfu/ml) eradicated 105 cfu/ml V. vulnificus CMCP6 (a rifampicin resistant variant) from a co-culture oyster model system (oyster juice) whereas the pathogen grew to 107 cfu/ml when co......, the presence of P. inhibens could not prevent subsequently added V. vulnificus from entering the live animals, likely because of too low levels of the biocontrol strain. Whilst the oyster model studies provided indication that P. inhibens DSM 17395 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V...

  17. [Pathogenic Vibrios in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) served at restaurants in Rio de Janeiro: a public health warning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Christiane Soares; Viana, Célio Mauro; Rodrigues, Dália dos Prazeres

    2007-01-01

    Forty oyster samples (Crassostrea rhizophorae) served raw in 15 restaurants in the city of Rio de Janeiro were evaluated in order to investigate the presence of Vibrio spp. The oyster samples were analyzed and subjected to enrichment in alkaline peptone water with the addition of 1 and 3% NaCl and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Following this, the cultures were seeded onto thiosulfate citrate bile sucrose agar (TCBS) and the suspected colonies were subjected to biochemical characterization. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio carchariae, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus were the main species (> 60%) isolated from raw oysters.

  18. Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Djuricic, Ana; Rasztovits, Sascha; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The geo-edutainment park "Fossilienwelt Weinviertel" at Stetten in Lower Austria exposes the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome. In the past decade, significant progress has been made in 3D digitizing sensor technology. To cope with the high amount of data, processing methods have been automated to a high degree. Consequently, we formulated the hypothesis that appropriate application of state-of-the-art 3D digitizing, data processing, and visualization technologies allows for a significant automation in paleontological prospection, making an evaluation of huge areas commercially feasible in both time and costs. We call the necessary processing steps "Smart Geology", being characterized by automation and large volumes of data. The Smart Geology project (FWF P 25883-N29) investigates three topics, 3D digitizing, automated geological and paleontological analysis and interpretation and finally investigating the applicability of smart devices for on-site accessibility of project data in order to support the two scientific hypotheses concerning the emerging process of the shell bed, i.e. was it formed by a tsunami or a major storm, and does it preserve pre- and post-event features. This contribution concentrates on the innovative and sophisticated 3D documentation and visualization processes being applied to virtualise approximately 15.000 fossil oysters at the approximately 25 by 17 m accessible shell bad. We decided to use a Terrestrial Laserscanner (TLS) for the determination of the geometrical 3D structures. The TLS achieves about 2 mm single point measurement accuracy. The scanning campaign provides a "raw" point cloud of approximately 1 bio. points at the respective area. Due to the scanning configuration used, the occurrence of occluded ares is minimized hence the full 3D structure of this unique site can be modelled. In addition, approximately 300 photos were taken with a nominal resolution of 0.6 mm per pixel. Sophisticated artificial lightning (close to

  19. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation.

  20. Pleurotus ostreatus: an oyster mushroom with nutritional and medicinal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Deepalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Mushrooms constitute an integral part of the normal human diet and in recent times, the amounts of consumption have been raised greatly, which includes variety of species. The genus Pleurotus comprise about 40 different species that are commonly referred to as “Oyster mushroom”. Among several species of this genus, Pleurotus ostreatus (P. ostreatus is popularly consumed by all over the world due to their taste, flavor, high nutritional values and medicinal properties. Because of the presence of numerous nutritional compositions and various active ingredients in P. ostreatus, have been reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anticholestrolic, antiarthritic, antioxidant, anticancer, eye health and antiviral activities. In this review, we particularly expose the high nutritional values of P. ostreatus, in relation to their potential medicinal usage which suggest that the P. ostreatus mushrooms are the most important nutraceutical functional foods. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  1. Spermatogenesis in the rock oyster, Saccostrea forskali (Gmelin, 1791).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuurai, Parinyaporn; Panasophonkul, Sasiporn; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Sobhon, Prasert; Wanichanon, Ratanasate

    2016-02-01

    Morphology of the differentiating spermatogenic cells of the rock oyster Saccostrea forskali (Bivalve: Ostreidae) was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. The testis is formed by several branching acini containing developing spermatogenic cells, classified into 7 stages based on nuclear characteristics, patterns of chromatin condensation and cytoplasmic contents. The spermatogonium is characterized by a euchromatic nucleus with a prominent nucleolus. The cytoplasm contains several round granulo-fibrillar dense bodies surrounded by numerous mitochondria. The round nucleus of the primary spermatocyte contains patches of electron-dense heterochromatin, numerous proacrosomal vesicles, ribosomes and mitochondria. The secondary spermatocytes contain a reticulated chromatin pattern and reduced number of proacrosomal vesicles. The early spermatids contain a small amount of euchromatin among dense patches of heterochromatin. A large single acrosomal vesicle is located in the posterior part of the cell. The middle spermatid is characterized by the migration of an acrosomal vesicle to the anterior part of the nucleus. The late spermatids contain highly condensed heterochromatin blocks and the acrosomal vesicle becomes cup-shaped and invaginated at the basal part. The spermatozoon contains a barrel-shaped head covered with the cup-like acrosome. At this stage, the subacrosomal space contains an axial rod in subacrosomal materials. Three to four transverse bands appear at the anterior region of the acrosome. The middle piece consists of spherical mitochondria surrounding the proximal and distal centrioles. The flagellum consists of 9+2 axonemal microtubule doublets surrounded by the plasma membrane. Our electron microscopic study of spermatogenesis in the S. forskali provides important new information on the mechanism of development of spermatogenesis of this species.

  2. DNA barcoding reveals that the common cupped oyster in Taiwan is the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata (Ostreoida; Ostreidae), not C. gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Tai; Chuang, Shin-Chang; Chen, Kao-Sung; Ho, Ping-Ho; Wu, Chi-Lun; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-09-01

    The Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is one of the major aquacultural shellfish species that has been introduced to Europe and America from its native source in the West Pacific. In Taiwan, the cultivated cupped oysters along the west coast have been identified as C. gigas for over centuries; however, several molecular phylogenetic studies have cast doubt upon the existence of this species in Taiwan and adjacent waters. Indeed, our analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from 313 Crassostrea collected from 12 locations along Taiwanese and southern Chinese coastlines confirm that all samples were the Portuguese oyster, C. angulata, rather than C. gigas. Multiple lines of evidence, including haplotypic and nucleotide diversity of the COI gene, demographic history, and population genetics, suggest that Taiwanese C. angulata is unique, probably experienced a sudden population expansion after the Last Glacial Maxima around 20,000 years ago, and has a significantly limited genetic connectivity across the Taiwan Strait. Our study applies an extended sampling and DNA barcoding to confirm the absence of C. gigas in natural and cultivated populations in Taiwan and southern China, where we only found C. angulata. We highlight the importance of conserving the gene pool of the C. angulata population in Taiwan, particularly considering the current threats by large-scale environmental disturbances such as marine pollution, habitat destruction, and climate change.

  3. The late Cenomanian oyster Lopha staufferi (Bergquist, 1944) - the oldest ribbed oyster in the Upper Cretaceous of the Western Interior of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Stephen C.; Cobban, William A.

    2016-12-01

    Lopha staufferi (Bergquist, 1944) is a medium-sized, ribbed, Late Cretaceous oyster with a slightly curved axis and a zigzag commissure; it appears suddenly and conspicuously in upper Cenomanian rocks in the Western Interior Basin of the United States. At maturity, the ribs on both valves thicken into steep flanks that allow the oyster to increase interior volume without increasing its exterior footprint on the seafloor. Lopha staufferi is the first (earliest) ribbed oyster in the Late Cretaceous of the Western Interior, but has no ancestor in the basin. It disappears from the rock record as suddenly as it appeared, leaving no direct descendent in the basin. In the southern part of the basin where it is well constrained, L. staufferi is restricted stratigraphically to the upper Cenomanian Metoicoceras mosbyense Zone (= Dunveganoceras conditum Zone in the north). Lopha staufferi has an unusual paleogeographic distribution, occurring in only two, widely scattered areas in the basin. It has been found at several localities near the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous Seaway in west-central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona, and in localities 1,900 km (1,200 mi) to the northeast near the eastern shoreline in northeastern Minnesota, but nowhere in between. In west-central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona, L. staufferi is a guide fossil to the Twowells Tongue of the Dakota Sandstone.

  4. DNA barcoding reveals that the common cupped oyster in Taiwan is the Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata (Ostreoida; Ostreidae), not C. gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Tai; Chuang, Shin-Chang; Chen, Kao-Sung; Ho, Ping-Ho; Wu, Chi-Lun; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, is one of the major aquacultural shellfish species that has been introduced to Europe and America from its native source in the West Pacific. In Taiwan, the cultivated cupped oysters along the west coast have been identified as C. gigas for over centuries; however, several molecular phylogenetic studies have cast doubt upon the existence of this species in Taiwan and adjacent waters. Indeed, our analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from 313 Crassostrea collected from 12 locations along Taiwanese and southern Chinese coastlines confirm that all samples were the Portuguese oyster, C. angulata, rather than C. gigas. Multiple lines of evidence, including haplotypic and nucleotide diversity of the COI gene, demographic history, and population genetics, suggest that Taiwanese C. angulata is unique, probably experienced a sudden population expansion after the Last Glacial Maxima around 20,000 years ago, and has a significantly limited genetic connectivity across the Taiwan Strait. Our study applies an extended sampling and DNA barcoding to confirm the absence of C. gigas in natural and cultivated populations in Taiwan and southern China, where we only found C. angulata. We highlight the importance of conserving the gene pool of the C. angulata population in Taiwan, particularly considering the current threats by large-scale environmental disturbances such as marine pollution, habitat destruction, and climate change. PMID:27666088

  5. Virulence of metalloproteases produced by Vibrio species on Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Lind, Erin J; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-06-10

    Vibrio tubiashii, a pathogen of shellfish larvae and juveniles, produces several extracellular products. Here, we document that culture supernatants of several marine Vibrio species showed toxicity to oyster larvae. Treatment of these supernatants with EDTA not only severely diminished proteolytic activities, but also dramatically reduced toxicity to the larvae. Culture supernatants of metalloprotease-deficient mutants of V. tubiashii, V. cholerae, and V. splendidus were impaired in their ability to cause larval death compared to the wild type strains. Culture supernatants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, known to contain several secreted proteases, showed virtually no toxicity to oyster larvae. Purified V. tubiashii protease A (VtpA), but not the prototype metalloprotease, thermolysin from Bacillus thermoproteolyticus, was highly toxic to the larvae. In addition, toxicity of purified VtpA was much greater for 6-d-old oyster larvae than for 16-d-old larvae. Together, these results indicated that culture supernatants of a variety of Vibrio species are highly toxic to oyster larvae and that the production of a metalloprotease is required for this effect. We propose that there are, as yet uncharacterized, specific substrates contained in larval tissue that are degraded by VtpA as well as certain homologous metalloproteases produced by other marine Vibrio species which, in turn, may contribute to vibriosis.

  6. Oyster reef restoration supports increased nekton biomass and potential commercial fishery value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T. Humphries

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Across the globe, discussions centered on the value of nature drive many conservation and restoration decisions. As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1 biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2 monetary valuation of these services. For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources. Here, we quantified species biomass and potential commercial value of nekton collected from restored oyster (Crassostrea virginica reefs in coastal Louisiana over a 3-year period, providing multiple snapshots of biomass support over time. Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m−2. The additional biomass of commercial species is equivalent to an increase of local fisheries value by 226%, or $0.09 m−2. Understanding the ecosystem value of restoration projects, and how they interact with regional management priorities, is critical to inform local decision-making and provide testable predictions. Quantitative estimates of potential commercial fisheries enhancement by oyster reef restoration such as this one can be used directly by local managers to determine the expected return on investment.

  7. Oyster condition index in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding 1828) from a heavy-metal polluted coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, M F; Amaral, M C R; Pfeiffer, W C

    2005-05-01

    The condition index (CI) of oysters represents an ecophysiological approach to estimate meat quality and yield in cultured bivalve mollusks. In the present study, the CI of oysters from a heavy-metal polluted bay was analyzed with respect to Zn and Cd contamination in soft tissues, spawning, and polychaete infestation. The CI was calculated through a new technique based on molds made to measure the volume of oyster-shell internal cavities. The higher CI values (over 9 in the dry season) were probably related availability of suspended particles rich in organic matter in the bay, while the rapid reduction in the CI from one season to the next at some stations suggests the effect of spawning. Polychaete infestation was considered low (18.7%) and produced no clear CI effects. The Cd in the oyster tissue collected during the rainy season was weak, although still significantly correlated with the CI (r = -0.36; p < 0.05). All other comparisons of CI and metal concentrations demonstrated a non-significant correlation. The CI variations observed on the temporal and spatial scale were likely to have been caused by availability of organic matter and spawning, rather than spionid infestation or metal body burdens.

  8. Bioaccumulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Mercury in Oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae from Two Brazilian Estuarine Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo J. Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, organisms are increasingly being used in biomonitoring to assess bioavailability and bioaccumulation of contaminants. This approach can use both native and transplanted organisms in order to accomplish this task. In Brazil, most of the studies related to bioaccumulation of contaminants in oysters deal with metals. The present work employs this kind of test in Brazilian coastal estuaries (Santos and Paranaguá to evaluate total mercury and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in sediments and oysters (native and caged Crassostrea rhizophorae. The methodologies employed were based on known USEPA methods. Results have shown a significant contamination in Santos sediments and consequent bioavailability of organisms. Paranaguá sediments presented lower contamination in sediments, but native oysters were able to accumulate total Hg. The experiments done with caged oysters did not show significant bioaccumulation of Hg and PAHs in the Paranaguá site, but proved to be an excellent tool to assess bioavailability in the Santos estuary since they were able to bioaccumulate up to 1,600% of total PAH in the samples from the inner part of this estuary when compared to control organisms. Multivariate statistical analyses employed to these results have separated the sites evaluated and the most contaminated samples from the least contaminated.

  9. Histological survey of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg) in Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, David; Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Luis; Azevedo, Carlos; Montes, Jaime

    2012-11-01

    In Galicia, there is an increasingly interest among representatives of the oyster industry in the development of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas culture. Nevertheless severe mortalities and emerging health problems in this species have been recently reported in European farming areas. A histological survey was performed from 2004 to 2009 to assess health status in both cultured and wild Galician oysters. Different symbiotic organisms and conditions were detected, including viral gametocytic hypertrophy (VGH) which is reported here for first time in Spanish coast. VGH, prokaryote-like colonies and ciliates were observed in oyster tissues without causing host damage. A haplosporidian infection, copepods inducing lesions and a cellular proliferative disorder were detected in some samples causing moderate host damage; their low prevalence suggests these parasites are not a threat for C. gigas in Galicia. None of the parasites detected is OIE (Office International des Epizooties: the World Organization for Animal Health) notifiable. Although the current study did not identify any pathogens or diseases of concern, it provides important prevalence baseline data for future health and epidemiological assessments needed to better understanding the existing and emerging health problems in this species.

  10. Oyster condition index in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828 from a heavy-metal polluted coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Rebelo

    Full Text Available The condition index (CI of oysters represents an ecophysiological approach to estimate meat quality and yield in cultured bivalve mollusks. In the present study, the CI of oysters from a heavy-metal polluted bay was analyzed with respect to Zn and Cd contamination in soft tissues, spawning, and polychaete infestation. The CI was calculated through a new technique based on molds made to measure the volume of oyster-shell internal cavities. The higher CI values (over 9 in the dry season were probably related availability of suspended particles rich in organic matter in the bay, while the rapid reduction in the CI from one season to the next at some stations suggests the effect of spawning. Polychaete infestation was considered low (18.7% and produced no clear CI effects. The Cd in the oyster tissue collected during the rainy season was weak, although still significantly correlated with the CI (r = -0.36; p < 0.05. All other comparisons of CI and metal concentrations demonstrated a non-significant correlation. The CI variations observed on the temporal and spatial scale were likely to have been caused by availability of organic matter and spawning, rather than spionid infestation or metal body burdens.

  11. Ostrincola breviseti n. sp., a copepod parasite of an oyster from Penang, Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Ju-shey; Kim, Il-Hoi

    1990-01-01

    A new species of poecilostomatoid copepod, Ostrincola breviseti, is described from the mantle cavity of the oyster, Saccostrea cucullata (Born), collected at Penang, Malaysia. The new species is distinguished by the short terminal setae on leg 5. The species of Ostrincola are discussed in terms of t

  12. Moderate establishment success of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, on a sheltered intertidal mussel bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per;

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg 1793) is introduced into marine ecosystems worldwide. In Denmark, C. gigas was introduced into the micro tidal Limfjord, around 1972 for aquaculture. This study describes the population structure of C. gigas at Agger Tange in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011...

  13. Characterization of calcium carbonate obtained from oyster and mussel shells and incorporation in polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Regina Rosa Hamester

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a high content of calcium carbonate in mussel and oyster shells, which can be used in the formulation of medicine, in construction or as filler in polymer materials. This work has as its main objective to obtain calcium carbonate from mussel and oyster shells and used as filler in polypropylene compared their properties with polypropylene and commercial calcium carbonate composites. The shellfish was milling and heated at 500 ºC for 2 hours. The powder obtained from shellfish were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray fluorescence, particle size distribution and abrasiveness and compared with commercial CaCO3 and mixed with polypropylene. The thermal and mechanical properties of polypropylene with CaCO3 obtained from oyster and mussel shells and with commercial CaCO3 were analysed. The results showed that CaCO3­ can be obtained from oyster and mussel shell and is technically possible to replace the commercial CaCO3 for that obtained from the shells of shellfish in polypropylene composites.

  14. Response to Selection for Fast Growth in the Second Generation of Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingzhi; LI Qi; KONG Lingfeng; YU Ruihai

    2012-01-01

    Mass selection for fast growth was conducted in three Pacific oyster(Crassostrea gigas)stocks from China,Japan and Korea using previously established lines(CS1,JS 1,and KS 1).To determine whether continuous progress can be achieved by selection for growth,the progeny of three second-generation Pacific oyster lines was selected for shell height and evaluated via a 400-day farming experiment.When harvested at the end of the experiment,the selected crosses of CS2,JS2,and KS2 lines grew by 9.2%,10.2% and 9.6% larger than the control crosses,respectively.During grow-out stage,the genetic gain of three selected lines was (10.2 ± 1.4)%,(10.4 ± 0.3)%,and(8.4 ± 1.6)%,respectively;and the corresponding realized heritability was 0.457 ± 0.143,0.312 ±0.071 and 0.332 ± 0.009,respectively.These results indicated that the selection for fast growth achieved steady progress in the second generation of oyster.Our work provides supportive evidence for the continuity of the Pacific oyster selective breeding program.

  15. Vocal production complexity correlates with neural instructions in the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, C. P. H.; Mensinger, A. F.; Rome, L. C.

    2014-01-01

    frequencies are determined directly by the firing rate of a vocal-acoustic neural network that drives the contraction frequency of superfast swimbladder muscles. The oyster toadfish boatwhistle call starts with an irregular sound waveform that could be an emergent property of the peripheral nonlinear sound...

  16. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Roberts, Steven

    2012-09-13

    The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase) and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase), suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster's stress and/or immune responses.

  17. Production of Biodiesel from Chlorella sp. Enriched with Oyster Shell Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Soon Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the cultivation of the marine microalga Chlorella sp. without supplying an inorganic carbon source, but instead with enriching the media with extracts of oyster shells pretreated by a high-pressure homogenization process. The pretreated oyster shells were extracted by a weak acid, acetic acid, that typically has harmful effects on cell growth and also poses environmental issues. The concentration of the residual dissolved carbon dioxide in the medium was sufficient to maintain cell growth at 32 ppm and pH 6.5 by only adding 5% (v/v of oyster shell extracts. Under this condition, the maximum cell density observed was 2.74 g dry wt./L after 27 days of cultivation. The total lipid content was also measured as 18.1 (%, w/w, and this value was lower than the 23.6 (%, w/w observed under nitrogen deficient conditions or autotrophic conditions. The fatty acid compositions of the lipids were also measured as 10.9% of C16:1 and 16.4% of C18:1 for the major fatty acids, which indicates that the biodiesel from this culture process should be a suitable biofuel. These results suggest that oyster shells, environmental waste from the food industry, can be used as a nutrient and carbon source with seawater, and this reused material should be important for easily scaling up the process for an outdoor culture system.

  18. Characterization of the bacterial community in the sediment of a brackish lake with oyster aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander-De Leon, Sheila Mae S; Okunishi, Suguru; Kihira, Masaki; Nakano, Miyo; Nuñal, Sharon N; Hidaka, Masayasu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    The physicochemical properties and bacterial community in sediments of Lake Shiraishi, a lake with brackish water, were characterized to elucidate the influence of oyster farming and seawater and freshwater inflow. Physicochemical analyses suggested the marine origin of the sediment at the mouth of the lake, while higher organic matter load and the resultant anaerobic, reductive condition of the sediments of the inner part were observed. The bacterial community in the sediments reflects these sediment environments: the bacterial community in the vicinities of oyster farms included sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) , although sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were found at all the sampling sites. In addition, similarity of the band profiles obtained with 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) -denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) decreased in proportion to the distance from the mouth of the lake to the oyster farms in the inner part. This study was able to characterize the microbial community shift in brackish lake sediments with an oyster aquaculture system through the molecular fingerprinting technique, DGGE, in relation to their physicochemical characteristics.

  19. Linkage disequilibrium in wild and cultured populations of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) can be applied for mapping the actual genes responsible for variation of economically important traits through association mapping. The feasibility and efficacy of association studies are strongly dependent on the extent of LD which determines the number and density of markers in the studied population, as well as the experimental design for an association analysis. In this study, we first characterized the extent of LD in a wild population and a cultured mass-selected line of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas). A total of 88 wild and 96 cultured individuals were selected to assess the level of genome-wide LD with 53 microsatellites, respectively. For syntenic marker pairs, no significant association was observed in the wild population; however, three significant associations occurred in the cultured population, and the significant LD extended up to 12.7 cM, indicating that strong artificial selection is a key force for substantial increase of genome-wide LD in cultured population. The difference of LD between wild and cultured populations showed that association studies in Pacific oyster can be achieved with reasonable marker densities at a relatively low cost by choosing an association mapping population. Furthermore, the frequent occurrence of LD between non-syntenic loci and rare alleles encourages the joint application of linkage analysis and LD mapping when mapping genes in oyster. The information on the linkage disequilibrium in the cultured population is useful for future association mapping in oyster.

  20. Assessing the contribution of aquaculture and restoration to wild oyster populations in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decline of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) has led to renewed interest in restoration and aquaculture efforts. Recent field surveys suggest that wild populations in Rhode Island are increasing, yet the factors contributing to expansion are unknown. We used molecular tools to determine...

  1. Production of biodiesel from Chlorella sp. enriched with oyster shell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Cheol Soon; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the cultivation of the marine microalga Chlorella sp. without supplying an inorganic carbon source, but instead with enriching the media with extracts of oyster shells pretreated by a high-pressure homogenization process. The pretreated oyster shells were extracted by a weak acid, acetic acid, that typically has harmful effects on cell growth and also poses environmental issues. The concentration of the residual dissolved carbon dioxide in the medium was sufficient to maintain cell growth at 32 ppm and pH 6.5 by only adding 5% (v/v) of oyster shell extracts. Under this condition, the maximum cell density observed was 2.74 g dry wt./L after 27 days of cultivation. The total lipid content was also measured as 18.1 (%, w/w), and this value was lower than the 23.6 (%, w/w) observed under nitrogen deficient conditions or autotrophic conditions. The fatty acid compositions of the lipids were also measured as 10.9% of C16:1 and 16.4% of C18:1 for the major fatty acids, which indicates that the biodiesel from this culture process should be a suitable biofuel. These results suggest that oyster shells, environmental waste from the food industry, can be used as a nutrient and carbon source with seawater, and this reused material should be important for easily scaling up the process for an outdoor culture system.

  2. A POTENTIAL ECOFORECAST FOR PROTOZOAL INFECTIONS OF THE EASTERN OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Shawn M. and Stephen J. Jordan. 2003. Potential Ecoforecast for Protozoal Infections of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. In: Ecological Forecasting: New Tools for Coastal Marine Ecosystem Management. Nathalie Valette-Silver and D...

  3. LONG-TERM PROJECTIONS OF EASTERN OYSTER POPULATIONS UNDER VARIOUS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time series of fishery-dependent and fishery-independent data were used to parameterize a model of oyster population dynamics for Maryland's Chesapeake Bay. Model parameters are (1) fishing mortality, estimated from differences between predicted and reported landings scaled to a ...

  4. Streptomyces effect on the bacterial microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bernal, M; Trabal Fernández, N; Saucedo Lastra, P E; Medina Marrero, R; Mazón-Suástegui, J M

    2017-03-01

    To determine the composition and diversity of the microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea treated during 30 days with Streptomyces strains N7 and RL8. DNA was extracted from oysters followed by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing. The highest and lowest species diversity richness was observed in the initial and final control group, whereas Streptomyces-treated oysters exhibited intermediate values. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (81·4-95·1%), followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The genera Anderseniella, Oceanicola, Roseovarius, Ruegeria, Sulfitobacter, Granulosicoccus and Marinicella encompassed the core microbiota of all experimental groups. The genus Bacteriovorax was detected in all groups except in the final control and the depurated N7, whereas Vibrio remained undetected in all Streptomyces-treated groups. RL8 was the only group that harboured the genus Streptomyces in its microbiota. Principal component analysis showed that Streptomyces strains significantly changed oyster microbiota with respect to the initial and final control. Crassostrea sikamea treated with Streptomyces showed high species diversity and a microbiota composition shift, characterized by keeping the predator genus Bacteriovorax and decreasing the pathogenic Vibrio. This is the first culture-independent study showing the effect of Streptomyces over the oyster microbiota. It also sheds light about the potential use of Streptomyces to improve mollusc health and safety for consumers after the depuration process. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Determination of iodine in oyster tissue by isotope dilution laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, J D; Murphy, T J

    1990-02-15

    The technique of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been combined with isotope dilution analysis to determine iodine in oyster tissue. The long-lived radioisotope, 129I, was used to spike the samples. Samples were equilibrated with the 129I, wet ashed under controlled conditions, and iodine separated by coprecipitation with silver chloride. The analyte was dried as silver ammonium iodide upon a tantalum filament from which iodine was thermally desorbed in the resonance ionization mass spectrometry instrument. A single-color, two-photon resonant plus one-photon ionization scheme was used to form positive iodine ions. Long-lived iodine signals were achieved from 100 ng of iodine. The precision of 127I/129I measurement has been evaluated by replicate determinations of the spike, the spike calibration samples, and the oyster tissue samples and was 1.0%. Measurement precision among samples was 1.9% for the spike calibration and 1.4% for the oyster tissue. The concentration of iodine determined in SRM 1566a, Oyster Tissue, was 4.44 micrograms/g with an estimate of the overall uncertainty for the analysis of +/- 0.12 microgram/g.

  6. Trojan Horse Strategy for Non-invasive Interference of Clock Gene in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marcel, Anjara; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Tran, Damien

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In this Trojan horse strategy, the unicellular alga Heterocapsa triquetra is the food supply used as a vector to feed oysters with Escherichia coli strain HT115 engineered to express the double-stranded RNA targeting gene. To test the efficacy of the method, the Clock gene, a central gene of the circadian clock, was targeted for knockout. Results demonstrated specific and systemic efficiency of the Trojan horse strategy in reducing Clock mRNA abundance. Consequences of Clock disruption were observed in Clock-related genes (Bmal, Tim1, Per, Cry1, Cry2, Rev.-erb, and Ror) and triploid oysters were more sensitive than diploid to the interference. This non-invasive approach shows an involvement of the circadian clock in oyster bioaccumulation of toxins produced by the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum.

  7. Niche dimension differs among life-history stages of Pacific oysters in intertidal environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, Brenda; Smaal, Aad C.; Herman, Peter M.J.; Ysebaert, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Structure-building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal protection, which depends on long-term sustainability and persistence of their structures. For reef-building oysters, reefs are maintained through accumulation of shell material, which depend

  8. Niche dimension differs among life-history stages of Pacific oysters in intertidal environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, B.; Smaal, A.C.; Herman, P.M.J.; Ysebaert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal protection, which depends on long-term sustainability and persistence of their structures. For reef-building oysters, reefs are maintained through accumulation of shell material, which depends o

  9. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and s

  10. Parasites of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis cultured in Nayarit, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Vasquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; Padilla-Lardizábal, Gloria

    2010-09-01

    The pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is collected and cultured in Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, and the improvement and promotion of its culture are seen as a possible source for the economic development of coastal populations. However, information about the parasite fauna of the pleasure oyster is almost completely lacking. A histopathological survey carried out in two estuaries, Boca del Camichín and Pozo Chino, revealed the presence of hypertrophied gametes, rickettsiales-like prokaryotes (RLPs), the protozoan Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan Nematopsis sp., Ancistrocoma-like ciliates (ALCs), Sphenophrya-like ciliates, a turbellarian Urastoma sp., and encysted crustaceans. In general, prevalence and intensity of parasites were similar in both localities except that ALCs and encysted crustaceans were more prevalent in Pozo Chino than in Boca del Camichín. Perkinsus marinus and RLPs seem to represent a more significant risk for the health of pleasure oysters than do the other parasites, and surveillance and control of these parasites are needed for the development of pleasure oyster culture.

  11. Oyster hemocyte mobilization and increased adhesion activity after beta glucan administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) hemocytes are important effector cells for maintenance of defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Various forms of ß-glucans have been suggested for use in shrimp and fish aquaculture because of their potential to enhance disease resistance via hemoc...

  12. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF BREVETOXIN TO OYSTERS AND GRASS SHRIMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Calvin C., James T. Winstead, Steven S. Foss, Janis C. Kurtz, James Watts, Jeanne E. Scott and William S. Fisher. In press. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Brevetoxin to Oysters and Grass Shrimp (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November ...

  13. Investigation of antioxidative, antityrosinase and cytotoxic effects of extract of irradiated oyster mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutsuda Banlangsawan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus Fries. is rich in nutrition and has many medicinal properties such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. It also contains a high amount of ergosterol which can be converted to vitamin D2 when exposing to UV light. Oyster mushroom powder was irradiated with UV-B for 180 min and extracted with 95% ethanol. Mushroom extract was determined for vitamin D2 concentration, total phenolic compound, antioxidative activity, tyrosinase inhibitory property and cytotoxicity effect on human keratinocytes (HaCaT and murine melanoma cells (B16F10 by MTT assay. The results demonstrated that the concentration of vitamin D2 of irradiated oyster mushroom extract was 153.96 µg/g, which is 13 times higher than that of non-irradiated mushroom extract. Total phenolic content, antioxidative and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the two mushroom extracts were not significantly different. Neither oyster mushroom extract had a cytotoxic effect on keratinocytes, but on the other hand both inhibited the growth of murine melanoma cells.

  14. Calcium mobilisation following shell damage in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, J K; Ramesh, K; Melzner, F; Sundh, H; Sundell, K

    2016-06-01

    Shell growth of oysters requires calcium uptake from the environment and transport to the area of shell formation. A shell regeneration assay in combination with radiolabelled calcium was used to investigate uptake and distribution of calcium to different tissues and hemolymph fractions in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia, Ostreoida). Oysters were notched at the shell margin and subsequently sampled for hemolymph and grading of shell regeneration during a two week experimental period. Half of the oysters were additionally exposed to (45)Ca and sampled for hemolymph and tissues. Total plasma calcium concentrations increased in notched oysters compared to controls on 1, 2 and 7days after notching. A decrease in plasma calcium levels was apparent on day 4, for both total and ionic calcium. The shell regeneration assay in the notched oysters resulted in a visible deposition of CaCO3 onto the regenerate from day 7 onwards. This was coinciding with an increased uptake of total calcium on days 11 and 14 as well as free, i.e. ionic and ligand-bound calcium, on day 14. At day 1, notching also increased calcium uptake into the mantle tissues, in areas above the notch and near the hinge. During the experiment, both the total hemocyte count and the number of granulocytes increased in notched compared to control oysters. The present study suggests that induced shell damage results in a dynamic regulation of the calcium uptake from the environment and the distribution of calcium within the body, starting directly after notching. Increases in both total calcium concentrations and uptake rates coincided with the visible depositions of CaCO3 on the regenerate shell. C. gigas was found to transport calcium mainly in the ionic form in the hemolymph, with only minor parts being bound to proteins or smaller ligands. Hemolymph measurement also revealed that C. gigas is able to regulate the extracellular concentrations of calcium and potassium. The changes in plasma calcium

  15. Detection of a parasitic amoeba (Order Dactylopodida) in the female gonads of oysters in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sühnel, Simone; Ivachuk, Celene da S; Schaefer, Ana L C; Pontinha, Vitor A; Martins, Maurício L; Figueras, Antonio; Meyer, Gary R; Jones, Simon R M; Stewart, Johnson C; Gurney-Smith, Helen J; Magalhães, Aimê R M; Bower, Susan M

    2014-07-03

    The impacts of oocyte parasites on the reproductive success of molluscs are largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the presence of gonad parasites in 6 species of marine bivalve molluscs native to southern Brazil. Cultured bivalves included the mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar (sometimes called C. brasiliana), the brown mussel Perna perna, the lion's paw scallop Nodipecten nodosus and the wing pearl oyster Pteria hirundo. Another species of mangrove oyster, C. rhizophorae, and the carib pointed venus clam Anomalocardia brasiliana (syn. A. flexuosa) were collected from the wild. Molluscs were collected in winter 2009 and summer 2010 for histopathological and molecular evaluation. An unknown ovarian parasite (UOP) was observed in histopathological sections of female gonads of C. gasar and C. rhizophorae. The UOP possessed features suggestive of amoebae, including an irregular outer membrane, frothy cytoplasm, a nucleus with a prominent central nucleolus and a closely associated basophilic parasome. PCR analysis was negative for Marteilioides chungmuensis, Perkinsus spp. and Paramoeba perurans. However, real-time PCR successfully amplified DNA from oyster gonads when using universal Paramoeba spp. primers. Also, conventional PCR amplified DNA using primers specific for Perkinsela amoebae-like organisms (syn. Perkinsiella), which are considered as endosymbionts of Parameoba spp., previously thought to be the parasome. Our results suggest that this UOP is a species of amoeba belonging to 1 of the 2 families of the order Dactylopodida, possibly related to Paramoeba spp. This study represents the first report of this type of organism in oysters. We found that C. gasar and C. rhizophorae were the most susceptible molluscs to these UOPs.

  16. Alien parasitic copepods in mussels and oysters of the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Nikolaus O.; Jacobsen, Sabine; Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten

    2011-09-01

    Molluscan intestinal parasites of the genus Mytilicola, specifically M. intestinalis, were initially introduced into bivalves in the North Sea in the 1930s. It was presumably introduced from the Mediterranean with ship-fouling mussels, then attained epidemic proportions in Mytilus edulis in the 1950s and is now widely established in the North Sea region. Mytilicola orientalis was co-introduced with Pacific oysters to France in the 1970s and in the southern North Sea in the early 1990s. Its main host Crassostrea gigas has massively invaded the Wadden Sea with a concomitant decline in mussels. To explore whether introduced mytilicolid parasites could play a role in the shifting dominance from native mussels to invasive oysters, we analysed 390 mussels and 174 oysters collected around the island of Sylt in the northern Wadden Sea. We show that M. intestinalis has a prevalence >90% and a mean intensity of 4 adult copepods in individual mussels with >50 mm shell length at all sheltered sites. By contrast, none were found in the oysters. However, at one site, we found M. orientalis in C. gigas with a prevalence of 10% and an intensity of 2 per host individual (August 2008). This constitutes the most northern record in Europe for this Pacific parasite until now. Alignments of partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene and the nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 18S rDNA sequences each show a distinct difference between the two species, which confirms our morphological identification. We suggest that the high parasite load in mussels compared to oysters may benefit the continued expansion of C. gigas in the Wadden Sea.

  17. Survival, growth and reproduction of cryopreserved larvae from a marine invertebrate, the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Suquet

    Full Text Available This study is the first demonstration of successful post-thawing development to reproduction stage of diploid cryopreserved larvae in an aquatic invertebrate. Survival, growth and reproductive performances were studied in juvenile and adult Pacific oysters grown from cryopreserved embryos. Cryopreservation was performed at three early stages: trochophore (13±2 hours post fertilization: hpf, early D-larvae (24±2 hpf and late D-larvae (43±2 hpf. From the beginning (88 days at the end of the ongrowing phase (195 days, no mortality was recorded and mean body weights did not differ between the thawed oysters and the control. At the end of the growing-out phase (982 days, survival of the oysters cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and at 43±2 hpf was significantly higher (P<0.001 than those of the control (non cryopreserved larvae. Only the batches cryopreserved at 24±2 hpf showed lower survival than the control. Reproductive integrity of the mature oysters, formely cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and 24±2 hpf, was estimated by the sperm movement and the larval development of their offspring in 13 crosses gamete pools (five males and five females in each pool. In all but two crosses out of 13 tested (P<0.001, development rates of the offspring were not significantly different between frozen and unfrozen parents. In all, the growth and reproductive performances of oysters formerly cryopreserved at larval stages are close to those of controls. Furthermore, these performances did not differ between the three initial larval stages of cryopreservation. The utility of larvae cryopreservation is discussed and compared with the cryopreservation of gametes as a technique for selection programs and shellfish cryobanking.

  18. Fragmentation of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene in oyster mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milbury Coren A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discontinuous genes have been observed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Gene discontinuity occurs in multiple forms: the two most frequent forms result from introns that are spliced out of the RNA and the resulting exons are spliced together to form a single transcript, and fragmented gene transcripts that are not covalently attached post-transcriptionally. Within the past few years, fragmented ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes have been discovered in bilateral metazoan mitochondria, all within a group of related oysters. Results In this study, we have characterized this fragmentation with comparative analysis and experimentation. We present secondary structures, modeled using comparative sequence analysis of the discontinuous mitochondrial large subunit rRNA genes of the cupped oysters C. virginica, C. gigas, and C. hongkongensis. Comparative structure models for the large subunit rRNA in each of the three oyster species are generally similar to those for other bilateral metazoans. We also used RT-PCR and analyzed ESTs to determine if the two fragmented LSU rRNAs are spliced together. The two segments are transcribed separately, and not spliced together although they still form functional rRNAs and ribosomes. Conclusions Although many examples of discontinuous ribosomal genes have been documented in bacteria and archaea, as well as the nuclei, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotes, oysters are some of the first characterized examples of fragmented bilateral animal mitochondrial rRNA genes. The secondary structures of the oyster LSU rRNA fragments have been predicted on the basis of previous comparative metazoan mitochondrial LSU rRNA structure models.

  19. Collapse of a historic oyster fishery: diagnosing causes and identifying paths toward increased resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward V. Camp

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing causal factors of change at the ecosystem level is challenging because multiple drivers often interact at various spatial and temporal scales. We employ an integrated natural and social science approach to assess potential mechanisms leading to the collapse of an estuarine social-ecological system, and recommend future paths to increased system resilience. Our case study is the collapse of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica fishery in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA, and the associated impacts on local resource dependent communities. The oyster fishery collapse is the most recent in a series of environmental stressors to this region, which have included hurricanes and tropical storms, drought, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We found it likely that the oyster collapse was not related to contamination from the recent oil spill, but rather to factors affecting oyster recruitment and survival, which may have been mediated by both human, e.g., fishing-related habitat alteration, and environmental, e.g., increased natural mortality from predators and disease, factors. The relative impact of each of these factors is likely to increase in the future because of changing climate and increased demand for fishery, water, and petroleum resources. Successful restoration and persistence of a viable oyster fishery will depend on: (1 implementation of some minimal best management practices, e.g., extensive habitat restoration via shell addition, and some spatial closures to harvest, (2 improving environmental knowledge and promoting episodic learning through enhanced monitoring and experimental management, and (3 continued community engagement necessary to produce adaptable governance suitable to responding to future unexpected challenges.

  20. The impact of calicivirus mixed infection in an oyster-associated outbreak during a food festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jinan; Shen, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Despite calicivirus food-borne outbreaks posing major public health concern worldwide, little information is at present available about the impact of caliciviruses mixed infection in an oyster-associated outbreak in China. To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of an oyster-associated calicivirus outbreak initiated by a food festival in Shanghai, China, in April 2014. Molecular epidemiological studies based on nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of calicivirus strains from patients. A total of 65 of the 78 (83%) cases from this outbreak were associated with raw oyster consumption. Forty-six calicivirus strains were identified from 25 stool specimens with norovirus (NoV) GII.4 Sydney_2012, GII.13, GI.2, GI.5 and sapovirus (SaV) GI.2 being predominant genotypes and with a prevalence of triple-, double- and single-infection being 20%, 48% and 28%, respectively. Meanwhile, 13 putative NoV recombinants were indicated by the phylogenetic inconsistency between capsid and polymerase genotype, mainly including GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney_2012. Molecular epidemiological investigation showed possible multiple route transmission in the field. The clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of the mixed point-source calicivirus outbreak also conformed to Kaplan's criteria. This is the first reported oyster-associated calicivirus outbreak with a high prevalence of mixed infection during a food festival described in China. Our investigation underscores the importance of early surveillance and comprehensive etiologic identification of mixed point-source outbreaks and the need for reliable standards of monitoring oysters to prevent and control calicivirus food-borne outbreaks in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental setting of deep-water oysters in the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooij, D.; De Mol, L.; Le Guilloux, E.; Wisshak, M.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Moeremans, R.; Henriet, J.-P.

    2010-12-01

    We report the northernmost and deepest known occurrence of deep-water pycnodontine oysters, based on two surveys along the French Atlantic continental margin to the La Chapelle continental slope (2006) and the Guilvinec Canyon (2008). The combined use of multibeam bathymetry, seismic profiling, CTD casts and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) made it possible to describe the physical habitat and to assess the oceanographic control for the recently described species Neopycnodonte zibrowii. These oysters have been observed in vivo in depths from 540 to 846 m, colonizing overhanging banks or escarpments protruding from steep canyon flanks. Especially in the Bay of Biscay, such physical habitats may only be observed within canyons, where they are created by both long-term turbiditic and contouritic processes. Frequent observations of sand ripples on the seabed indicate the presence of a steady, but enhanced bottom current of about 40 cm/s. The occurrence of oysters also coincides with the interface between the Eastern North Atlantic Water and the Mediterranean Outflow Water. A combination of this water mass mixing, internal tide generation and a strong primary surface productivity may generate an enhanced nutrient flux, which is funnelled through the canyon. When the ideal environmental conditions are met, up to 100 individuals per m² may be observed. These deep-water oysters require a vertical habitat, which is often incompatible with the requirements of other sessile organisms, and are only sparsely distributed along the continental margins. The discovery of these giant oyster banks illustrates the rich biodiversity of deep-sea canyons and their underestimation as true ecosystem hotspots.

  2. WFC3 UVIS Detector: Improved Flat Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Mack, J.; Sabbi, E.; WFC3 Team

    2012-01-01

    We describe the improved flat field calibration for a set of UVIS broad-band filters that were delivered to MAST in August 2011. The total change peak-to-peak with respect to the previous pipeline flats ranges from 3.6% to 5.6%, increasing with wavelength. The flat-fields previously used in the pipeline were obtained during ground testing and contained a large reflection ghost (or flare) that affected 40% of the field. A simplified geometric model of the internal light reflections has been used to remove the flare from the ground flats. Residual low-frequency structures caused by differences in the ground-based and in-flight optical paths were then computed using photometry of Omega Centauri, observed at various roll angles and with large dithered steps. Furthermore, photometry in a range of apertures has been used to study the UVIS PSF in detail. For radii smaller than 0.4" (10 pixels) the PSF is strongly dependent on both the detector position and on the telescope focus at the time of observation. Therefore, the new pipeline flat fields have been normalized to "infinite" aperture by applying local aperture corrections to 10 pixels, making them more generally applicable.

  3. Oxygen isotope fluctuations in a modern North Sea oyster (Crassostrea gigas) compared with annual variations in seawater temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Wiechert, Uwe; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A total of 181 oxygen isotope values from sequential samples of the left shell of a modern Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) that lived on a sub-tidal oyster bank in the List Basin (North Sea, Germany) shows periodically varying values between + 1.3‰ and -2.5‰. In order to test whether these d18O...... fluctuations reflect seawater temperature changes, the isotope values of the shell were compared to actual seawater temperature variations from the region. C. gigas serves as an excellent proxy for temperature of palaeoseawater and the results show that the examined oyster precipitated its shell in d18O...... equilibrium with the ambient seawater. A cessation of the oyster shell calcification starts at water temperatures below 6 °C, at lower temperatures than previously thought for Crassostrea. For palaeoclimate investigations the termination of shell production is important because the lowest temperatures might...

  4. Trade-off between increased survival and reduced growth for blue mussels living on Pacific oyster reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Christensen, Helle Torp

    2011-01-01

    Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) have been introduced into the Wadden Sea (North Sea, Germany) in the mid of the 1980s and have invaded native blue mussel Mytilus edulis (L.) beds. The latter turned into oyster reefs where mussels seem to be relegated to the bottom in between...... 22days. Shell growth was significantly reduced for mussels placed on the bottom compared to mussels at the top of an oyster reef. Condition index was lower for mussels on the bottom of the reef irrespective of whether placed between dead or living oysters. We conclude that mussels experience a trade......-off between survival and food supply and prefer to take refuge from predation even when this decreases growth and condition. This mechanism may have facilitated the take-over of C. gigas on M. edulis beds in the European Wadden Sea....

  5. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 5.1) to Oyster Bay NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Oyster...

  6. Temporal changes in TBT pollution in water, sediment, and oyster from Jinhae Bay after the total ban in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Sook; Hong, Sang Hee; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Shim, Won Joon

    2014-09-15

    Temporal change in tributyltin (TBT) levels in Jinhae Bay, which has various TBT sources, was investigated in water, sediments, and oysters from 2003 to 2013 after its total ban in South Korea. The seawater TBT levels decreased over 500-fold from 1995/97 to 2008/09. The oyster TBT levels were about fourfold lower in 2012/13 than in 1995/97. However, the sediment TBT levels did not significantly change, even 10 years after the partial TBT ban on small ships and 7 years after the total TBT ban on all oceangoing vessels in Korea. The total ban of TBT use effectively reduced water and oyster TBT levels in Jinhae Bay, but TBT levels in water, oysters, and sediment remained above the global environmental quality standards established to protect marine organisms.

  7. Investigating the Role of Oysters in Altering Net N2 Fluxes Using Novel In-Situ Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal nutrient over-enrichment represents one of the most pressing environmental management issues faced worldwide. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via increasing benthic denitrification rates in coastal systems. Howe...

  8. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, C. [Fermilab

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  9. Witten spinors on maximal, conformally flat hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Frauendiener, Jörg; Szabados, László B

    2011-01-01

    The boundary conditions that exclude zeros of the solutions of the Witten equation (and hence guarantee the existence of a 3-frame satisfying the so-called special orthonormal frame gauge conditions) are investigated. We determine the general form of the conformally invariant boundary conditions for the Witten equation, and find the boundary conditions that characterize the constant and the conformally constant spinor fields among the solutions of the Witten equations on compact domains in extrinsically and intrinsically flat, and on maximal, intrinsically globally conformally flat spacelike hypersurfaces, respectively. We also provide a number of exact solutions of the Witten equation with various boundary conditions (both at infinity and on inner or outer boundaries) that single out nowhere vanishing spinor fields on the flat, non-extreme Reissner--Nordstr\\"om and Brill--Lindquist data sets. Our examples show that there is an interplay between the boundary conditions, the global topology of the hypersurface...

  10. Expression Characterization of Stress Genes Under High and Low Temperature Stresses in the Pacific Oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qihui; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-04-01

    As a characteristic sessile inhabitant of the intertidal zone, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas occupies one of the most physically stressful environments on earth. With high exposure to terrestrial conditions, oysters must tolerate broad fluctuations in temperature range. However, oysters' cellular and molecular responses to temperature stresses have not been fully characterized. Here, we analyzed oyster transcriptome data under high and low temperatures. We also identified over 30 key temperature stress-responsive candidate genes, which encoded stress proteins such as heat shock proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins. The expression characterization of these genes under short-term cold and hot environments (5 and 35 °C) and long-term cold environments (5 °C) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Most of these genes reached expression peaks during the recovery stage after 24 h of heat stress, and these genes were greatly induced around day 3 in long-term cold stress while responded little to short-term cold stress. In addition, in the second heat stress after 2 days of recovery, oysters showed milder expression in these genes and a lower mortality rate, which indicated the existence of plasticity in the oyster's response to heat stress. We confirmed that homeostatic flexibility and anti-apoptosis might be crucial centers of temperature stress responses in oysters. Furthermore, we analyzed stress gene families in 11 different species and found that the linage-specific expansion of stress genes might be implicated in adaptive evolution. These results indicated that both plasticity and evolution played an important role in the stress response adaptation of oysters.

  11. Association among growth, food consumption-related traits and amylase gene polymorphism in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    OpenAIRE

    Huvet, Arnaud; Jeffroy, F; Fabioux, C.; Daniel, Jean-Yves; Quillien, Virgile; Van Wormhoudt, A; Moal, Jeanne; Samain, Jean-francois; Boudry, Pierre; Pouvreau, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    To examine further a previously reported association between amylase gene polymorphism and growth in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, ecophysiological parameters and biochemical and molecular expression levels of alpha-amylase were studied in Pacific oysters of different amylase genotypes. Genotypes that previously displayed significantly different growth were found to be significantly different for ingestion and absorption efficiency. These estimated parameters, used in a dynamic energy...

  12. Insight into Invertebrate Defensin Mechanism of Action OYSTER DEFENSINS INHIBIT PEPTIDOGLYCAN BIOSYNTHESIS BY BINDING TO LIPID II

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Paulina; Wilmes, Miriam; Pugniere, Martine; Aumelas, Andre; Bachere, Evelyne; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Destoumieux-Garzon, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    Three oyster defensin variants (Cg-Defh1, Cg-Defh2, and Cg-Defm) were produced as recombinant peptides and characterized in terms of activities and mechanism of action. In agreement with their spectrum of activity almost specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, oyster defensins were shown here to be specific inhibitors of a bacterial biosynthesis pathway rather than mere membrane-active agents. Indeed, at lethal concentrations, the three defensins did not compromise Staphylococcu...

  13. Characterization of a defensin from the oyster Crassostrea gigas - Recombinant production, folding, solution structure, antimicrobial activities, and gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gueguen, Yannick; Herpin, Amaury; Aumelas, André; Garnier, Julien; Fievet, Julie; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Bulet, Philippe; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Lelong, Christophe; Favrel, Pascal; Bachere, Evelyne

    2006-01-01

    In invertebrates, defensins were found in arthropods and in the mussels. Here, we report for the first time the identification and characterization of a defensin (Cg-Def) from an oyster. Cg-def mRNA was isolated from Crassostrea gigas mantle using an expressed sequence tag approach. To gain insight into potential roles of Cg-Def in oyster immunity, we produced the recombinant peptide in Escherichia coli, characterized its antimicrobial activities, determined its solution structure by NMR spec...

  14. Insight into Invertebrate Defensin Mechanism of Action: OYSTER DEFENSINS INHIBIT PEPTIDOGLYCAN BIOSYNTHESIS BY BINDING TO LIPID II*

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Paulina; Wilmes, Miriam; Pugnière, Martine; Aumelas, André; Bachère, Evelyne; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    Three oyster defensin variants (Cg-Defh1, Cg-Defh2, and Cg-Defm) were produced as recombinant peptides and characterized in terms of activities and mechanism of action. In agreement with their spectrum of activity almost specifically directed against Gram-positive bacteria, oyster defensins were shown here to be specific inhibitors of a bacterial biosynthesis pathway rather than mere membrane-active agents. Indeed, at lethal concentrations, the three defensins did not compromise Staphylococcu...

  15. Taming Past LTL and Flat Counter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Demri, Stéphane; sangnier, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Reachability and LTL model-checking problems for flat counter systems are known to be decidable but whereas the reachability problem can be shown in NP, the best known complexity upper bound for the latter problem is made of a tower of several exponentials. Herein, we show that the problem is only NP-complete even if LTL admits past-time operators and arithmetical constraints on counters. Actually, the NP upper bound is shown by adequately combining a new stuttering theorem for Past LTL and the property of small integer solutions for quantifier-free Presburger formulae. Other complexity results are proved, for instance for restricted classes of flat counter systems.

  16. Scalar Curvature and Intrinsic Flat Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present open problems and survey examples and theorems concerning sequences of Riemannian manifolds with uniform lower bounds on scalar curvature and their limit spaces. Examples of Gromov and of Ilmanen which naturally ought to have certain limit spaces do not converge with respect to smooth or Gromov-Hausdorff convergence. Thus we focus here on the notion of Intrinsic Flat convergence, developed jointly with Wenger. This notion has been applied successfully to study sequences that arise in General Relativity. Gromov has suggested it should be applied in other settings as well. We first review intrinsic flat convergence, its properties, and its compactness theorems, before presenting the applications and the open problems.

  17. Static cylindrical symmetry and conformal flatness

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, L; Marcilhacy, G; Santos, N O

    2004-01-01

    We present the whole set of equations with regularity and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful static cylindrically symmmetric distributions of matter, smoothly matched to Levi-Civita vacuum spacetime. It is shown that the conformally flat solution with equal principal stresses represents an incompressible fluid. It is also proved that any conformally flat cylindrically symmetric static source cannot be matched through Darmois conditions to the Levi-Civita spacetime. Further evidence is given that when the Newtonian mass per unit length reaches 1/2 the spacetime has plane symmetry.

  18. The flat phase of quantum polymerized membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Coquand, O

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the flat phase of quantum polymerized phantom membranes by means of a nonperturbative renormalization group approach. We first implement this formalism for general quantum polymerized membranes and derive the flow equations that encompass both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We then deduce and analyze the flow equations relevant to study the flat phase and discuss their salient features : quantum to classical crossover and, in each of these regimes, strong to weak coupling crossover. We finally illustrate these features in the context of free standing graphene physics.

  19. Ultimate resolution of indefinite metamaterial flat lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bénédicto, Jessica; Pollès, Rémi; Moreau, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We show that any metallo-dielectric multilayer with a hyperbolic dispersion relation can actually be characterized by a complex effective index. This refractive index, extracted from the complex Bloch band diagram, can be directly linked to the super-resolution of a flat lens made of this so- called indefinite metamaterials. This allows for a systematic optimization of the lens design, leading to structures that are outperforming state-of-art flat lenses. We show that, even when fully taking absorption into account, our design provides super-resolved images for visible light up to a distance of one wavelength from the lens edge.

  20. Cultivation of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus on oil palm residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongwised, A.

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to use oil palm residues to cultivate the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, which is one of the most important mushrooms cultivated worldwide. Spawn was prepared on sorghum seeds and inoculated on substrate in plastic bags. Oil palm fronds were cut and used to grow Pleurotus ostreatus. The first fructification occurred 20 days after waterring. The biological efficiency reached at 28.6%. When sawdust of para rubber logs was added to the cut oil palm fronds at the rate of 1:1 (vol : vol., the biological efficiency reached at 39.3%.Supplementary material at the rate of 5% was also added into the combination of cut oil palm frond and sawdust. The result showed that rice bran, corn meal or oil palm-kernel meal give yields between 142.2-165.0 g/bag (B.E. = 42.8-49.6, which were not statistically different. Oil palm pericarp waste was also used as main substrate for P. ostreatus cultivation. The average yield obtained during 40 days havesting period was 112.6 g/bag (B.E. = 64.3%. Addition of sawdust or rice bran into pericarp waste decreased the yield of the basidiocarps. Palm-kernel meal at the rate of 5-20% was used as a supplement material. Addition of 20% palmkernel meal into sawdust supported higher yield. The biological efficiency reached 55.8%. From the above results, four formulae of the substrate were prepared. Treatment of oil palm pericarp waste + 3% rice bran + 3% corn meal + 0.75% Ca(OH2 supported higher yield of the basidiocarps. The average yield obtained from 950 g of substrate was 190.2 g during 60 days havesting (B.E. = 57.2%. Using 6% palm-kernel substitute 3% rice bran + 3% corn meal supported the same yield (B.E. = 56.2% Using sawdust as the main substrate, the yield achieved was less than that obtained with oil palm pericarp waste. The average yield from treatment of sawdust + 3% rice bran + 3% corn meal + 0.75% Ca (OH2 was 154.0 g/bag (B.E. = 46.3% while treatment of sawdust + 6% palm-kernel meal + 0

  1. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Preliminary stochastic model for managing Vibrio parahaemolyticus and total viable bacterial counts in a Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Piquer, Judith; Bowman, John P; Ross, Tom; Estrada-Flores, Silvia; Tamplin, Mark L

    2013-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus can accumulate and grow in oysters stored without refrigeration, representing a potential food safety risk. High temperatures during oyster storage can lead to an increase in total viable bacteria counts, decreasing product shelf life. Therefore, a predictive tool that allows the estimation of both V. parahaemolyticus populations and total viable bacteria counts in parallel is needed. A stochastic model was developed to quantitatively assess the populations of V. parahaemolyticus and total viable bacteria in Pacific oysters for six different supply chain scenarios. The stochastic model encompassed operations from oyster farms through consumers and was built using risk analysis software. Probabilistic distributions and predictions for the percentage of Pacific oysters containing V. parahaemolyticus and high levels of viable bacteria at the point of consumption were generated for each simulated scenario. This tool can provide valuable information about V. parahaemolyticus exposure and potential control measures and can help oyster companies and regulatory agencies evaluate the impact of product quality and safety during cold chain management. If coupled with suitable monitoring systems, such models could enable preemptive action to be taken to counteract unfavorable supply chain conditions.

  3. Two Perkinsus spp. infect Crassostrea gasar oysters from cultured and wild populations of the Rio São Francisco estuary, Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Scardua, Marcos Paiva; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Mendonça, Raoani Cruz; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Dungan, Christopher F; Scott, Gail P; Reece, Kimberly S

    2014-06-01

    Brazilian production of bivalve molluscs is small but expanding, especially in the northeastern region where the native oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar are abundant, and tropical weather promotes their rapid growth. Studies on bivalve pathology are scarce in Brazil, with only a few employing techniques for detecting protozoan pathogens listed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In 2008, a Perkinsus sp. was reported for the first time in Brazil, infecting C. rhizophorae oysters from a wild population in Ceará state, NE Brazil. Recently P. marinus was detected in the same oyster species in nearby Paraíba state. These findings highlighted the need to expand knowledge on the presence and impacts of Perkinsus spp. on Brazilian oyster populations. The current investigation evaluated Perkinsus sp. infections among wild and cultured C. gasar mangrove oysters from the estuary of the Rio São Francisco, Sergipe state, NE Brazil. Our results show that Perkinsus sp. infections occurred commonly in oysters of both groups, at prevalences that were frequently higher among cultured oysters. Prevalences varied seasonally, with maximum values during summer (January) of 57% and 80% for wild and cultured oysters respectively, and minimum values during winter (July). Results of DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization assays, and phylogenetic analyses showed dual- and single-pathogen infections by P. marinus and/or P. olseni in the tested oysters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. First record of protozoan parasites, Tetrahymena rostrata and Callimastix equi from the edible oyster in Sundarbans region of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tanima; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Several protozoan parasites have been found infecting the edible oysters, hence deteriorating the meat quality. Protozoan parasites such as, Tetrahymena rostrata and Callimastix equi infested the edible oyster in Sundarbans region, West Bengal, India, are first record from this region. Due to filter feeding habit of the organisms, oysters provides excellent ecological services in regard to efficient cleaning of infectious agents from surrounding water as a potential measure to improve water quality. However, these environmental benefits are associated with public heath risks from contaminated oysters intended for human consumption.

  5. Comparative chlorine and temperature tolerance of the oyster Crassostrea madrasensis: implications for cooling system fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S; Venugopalan, V P; van der Velde, G; Jenner, H A

    2003-04-01

    Crassostrea madrasensis is an important fouling oyster in tropical industrial cooling water systems. C. madrasensis individuals attach to surfaces by cementing one of their two valves to the substratum. Therefore, oyster fouling creates more problems than mussel fouling in the cooling conduits of power stations, because unlike the latter, the shell of the former remains attached to the substratum even after the death of the animal. However, there are no published reports on the tolerance of this species to chlorination and heat treatment. The mortality pattern and physiological behaviour (oxygen consumption and filtration rate) of three size groups (13 mm, 44 mm and 64 mm mean shell length) of C. madrasensis were studied at different residual chlorine concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3 to 5 mg 1-1) and temperatures (30 degrees C to 45 degrees C). The effect of shell size (= age) on C. madrasensis mortality in the presence of chlorine and taking into account temperature was significant, with the largest size group oysters showing highest resistance. At 1 mg l-1 residual chlorine, the 13 mm and 64 mm size group oysters, took 504 h (21 d) and 744 h (31 d), respectively to reach 100% mortality. At 39 degrees C, the 13 mm size group oysters took 218 min to reach 100% mortality, whereas the 64 mm size group oysters took 325 min. The oxygen consumption and filtration rate of C. madrasensis showed progressive reduction with increasing residual chlorine concentrations. However, the filtration rate and oxygen consumption responses of C. madrasensis were not significantly different between 30 degrees C (control) and 37.5 degrees C. There was a sharp decrease in the filtration rate and oxygen consumption at 38.5 degrees C. A comparison of the present mortality data with previous reports on other bivalves suggests that the chlorine tolerance of C. madrasensis lies in between that of Perna viridis and Perna perna, while its temperature tolerance is significantly higher

  6. Noncommutative Topological Half-flat Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García-Compéan, H; Ramírez, C

    2004-01-01

    We formulate a noncommutative description of topological half-flat gravity in four dimensions. BRST symmetry of this topological gravity is deformed through a twisting of the usual BRST quantization of noncommutative gauge theories. Finally it is argued that resulting moduli space of instantons is characterized by the solutions of a noncommutative version of the Plebanski's heavenly equation.

  7. Affleck Dine leptogenesis via multiple flat directions

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, Kohei

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the Affleck-Dine mechanism when multiple flat directions have large values simultaneously. We consider in detail the case when both $LH_u$ and $H_uH_d$ flat directions are operative with a non-renormalizable superpotential. In case Hubble induced A-terms are present for these two flat directions, their initial values are determined completely by the potential and there are no ambiguities how they are mixed. Moreover, CP is violated even when the Hubble parameter is large due to the Hubble induced A-term and cross coupling in F-term, so that the lepton asymmetry is generated just after the end of inflation. As a result, compared with the case of single flat direction, the resultant lepton-to-entropy ratio is enhanced by a factor of $H_{osc}/m_{3/2}$, where $H_{osc}$ is the Hubble parameter at the onset of oscillation and $m_{3/2}$ is the gravitino mass. However, when Hubble induced A-terms do not exist, there remains indefiniteness of initial phases and CP is violated spontaneously by the phase ...

  8. η-Invariant and Flat Vector Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We present an alternate definition of the mod Z component of the AtiyahPatodi-Singer η invariant associated to (not necessary unitary) fiat vector bundles, which identifies explicitly its real and imaginary parts. This is done by combining a deformation of flat connections introduced in a previous paper with the analytic continuation procedure appearing in the original article of Atiyah, Parodi and Singer.

  9. Chemically patterned flat stamps for microcontact printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharpe, Ruben B.A.; Burdinski, Dirk; Huskens, Jurriaan; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Poelsema, Bene

    2005-01-01

    Locally oxidized patterns on flat poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamps for microcontact printing were used as a platform for the transfer of a hydrophilic fluorescent ink to a glass substrate. The contrast was found to be limited. These locally oxidized patterns were conversely used as barriers for the tra

  10. Minimal Flat Resolutions of Artinian Modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sh. Payrovi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish connection between the minimal flat resolutions of Artinian modules and the concept of cosequences in commutative algebra.The main result of this paper leads to a characterization of local Cohen-Macaulay rings in terms of vanishing property of the dual Bass numbers of certain Artinian modules.

  11. Wideband Flat Radomes Using Inhomogeneous Planar Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khalaj-Amirhosseini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhomogeneous planar layers (IPLs are optimally designed as flat radomes in a desired frequency range. First, the electric permittivity function of the IPL is expanded in a truncated Fourier series. Then, the optimum values of the coefficients of the series are obtained through an optimization approach. The performance of the proposed structure is verified using some examples.

  12. Design scenarios for flat panel photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential of algae production for biofuel and other products at various locations throughout the world requires assessment of algae productivity under varying light conditions and different reactor layouts. A model was developed to predict algae biomass production in flat panel

  13. Holography of 3d Flat Cosmological Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Arjun; Fareghbal, Reza; Simon, Joan

    2013-01-01

    We provide a first derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of 3d flat cosmological horizons in terms of the counting of states in a dual field theory. These horizons appear in the shifted-boost orbifold of R^{1,2}, the flat limit of non-extremal rotating BTZ black holes. These 3d geometries carry non-zero charges under the asymptotic symmetry algebra of R^{1,2}, the 3d Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS3) algebra. The dual theory has the symmetries of the 2d Galilean Conformal Algebra, a contraction of two copies of the Virasoro algebra, which is isomorphic to BMS3. We study flat holography as a limit of AdS3/CFT2 to semi-classically compute the density of states in the dual, exactly reproducing the bulk entropy in the limit of large charges. Our flat horizons, remnants of the BTZ inner horizons also satisfy a first law of thermodynamics. We comment on how the dual theory reproduces the bulk first law and how cosmological bulk excitations are matched with boundary quantum numbers.

  14. Effects of furadan in the brown mussel Perna perna and in the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sandra R C; Severino, Patricia C; Ibbotson, Dominique P; da Silva, Angela Z; Lopes, Franklin R A S; Sáenz, Luis A; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2002-01-01

    Furadan is a carbamate pesticide used widely to combat agricultural pests. However little information is available about the toxicity of furadan in aquatic macroinvertebrates. The in vivo effects of furadan were evaluated in mussels, Perna perna, and oysters, Crassostrea rhizophorae. Glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT) and cholinesterase (ChE) activities were measured in the gills of both species exposed to furadan (100 microg/l) for 96 h. No changes were observed in GST activity in the exposed groups. CAT activity was higher (9%) in the oysters exposed to furadan. ChE activity was inhibited by 64 and 35%, respectively, in C. rhizophorae and P. perna exposed to furadan, suggesting that the former is more susceptible to the toxic effects of furadan.

  15. RAW TROPICAL OYSTERS AS VEHICLES FOR MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Renata Albuquerque; Araújo, Rayza Lima; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva Dos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    The following study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from fresh and frozen oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae sold in Fortaleza-Brazil. An antibiogram was performed on 87 isolates using nine antibiotics: gentamicin (Gen 10 µg), ampicillin (Amp 10 µg), penicillin G (Pen 10U), ciprofloxacin (Cip 5 µg), chloramphenicol (Chl 30 µg), nalidixic acid (Nal 30 µg), tetracycline (Tet 30 µg), vancomycin (Van 30 µg) and erythromycin (Ery 15 µg). All strains were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 85 (97.7%) were multi-resistant, with predominance of the Van+ Pen+Amp resistance profile (n = 46). Plasmid resistance to Pen, Amp and Ery was detected. Thus, the risk that raw oyster consumption poses to the health of consumers is highlighted, due to the fact that these bivalves may host antibacterial-resistant microorganisms.

  16. RAW TROPICAL OYSTERS AS VEHICLES FOR MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Albuquerque COSTA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The following study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from fresh and frozen oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae sold in Fortaleza-Brazil. An antibiogram was performed on 87 isolates using nine antibiotics: gentamicin (Gen 10 µg, ampicillin (Amp 10 µg, penicillin G (Pen 10U, ciprofloxacin (Cip 5 µg, chloramphenicol (Chl 30 µg, nalidixic acid (Nal 30 µg, tetracycline (Tet 30 µg, vancomycin (Van 30 µg and erythromycin (Ery 15 µg. All strains were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 85 (97.7% were multi-resistant, with predominance of the Van+ Pen+Amp resistance profile (n = 46. Plasmid resistance to Pen, Amp and Ery was detected. Thus, the risk that raw oyster consumption poses to the health of consumers is highlighted, due to the fact that these bivalves may host antibacterial-resistant microorganisms.

  17. Temporal distribution of heavy metal concentrations in oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae from the central Venezuelan coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Juan A; Handt, Helga; Mora, Abrahan; Vásquez, Yaneth; Azocar, José; Marcano, Eunice

    2013-08-15

    The oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is a bivalve abundant in Venezuelan estuaries and consumed by local populations. No known values have been reported on trace metals in oysters from the central Venezuelan coast. We report the concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in the soft parts of C. rhizophorae, which were collected bimonthly between March 2008 and March 2009, at two sampling areas from the Central Venezuelan Coast: Buche estuary and Mochima estuary. Our results show that for each metal there is a similar temporal variation pattern. The concentrations of the heavy metals reported in this work are useful as reliable baselines and can be used for comparison in future environment studies. Concentrations in C. rhizophorae from the Buche estuary can be interpreted to be high on a global scale for Cd, Cu, Ni and Mn, indicating atypically raised bioavailabilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Health assessment of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the southern coast of Bahia, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Rosana Pinho; Boehs, Guisla; Silva, Patrícia Mirella da

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the health of natural stocks of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the southern coast of Bahia in northeastern Brazil, during summer and winter 2010, at three localities (sampling points) in the estuaries of the Maraú (Camamu Bay) and Graciosa rivers. A total of 180 oysters (30/sampling point/season) were examined macroscopically for the presence of pathogens and anatomical changes. The specimens were subsequently fixed in Davidson solution, processed for paraffin embedding, sectioned and stained with Harris' hematoxylin and eosin. Histological analysis revealed the presence of Rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs), Ancistrocoma, Trichodina, Sphenophrya, Nematopsis, Urastoma, Bucephalus in the sporocyst phase, a nonspecific metacercaria, and a metacestode of genus Tylocephalum. The prevalence of infection was low except for parasitism by Nematopsis sp. which also caused histopathological changes. The presence of Bucephalus sp. caused parasitic castration. These two pathogens significantly affect the health of C. rhizophorae.

  19. Application of macrobenthic diversity to estimate ecological health of artificial oyster reef in Yangtze Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Weiwei; Huang, Youhui; Liu, Zhiquan; Yang, Yang; Fan, Bin; Zhao, Yunlong

    2016-02-15

    In this study, several macrobenthic diversity investigations were performed in Yangtze Estuary Oyster Reef, the largest artificial oyster reef in China, from 2012 to 2014. The sampling sites of the south branch showed considerably higher diversity than those of the north branch. The richness measures exhibited a significant increasing trend from low- to high-salinity zone; however, the evenness measures were typically high in the middle-salinity zone. During the past decade, the results were combined with historical data to detect the changes in macrobenthos. The variation in substrate organisms and macrobenthic diversity followed a steady trend after a major fluctuation. Redundancy analysis indicated that the water salinity and substrate factors were the main indicators that influence macrobenthic distribution. All sampling sites in the south branch were protected by a nature reserve. However, the N2 and N6 sites in the north branch were subjected to severe and mild human interventions, respectively.

  20. Selenium uptake by edible oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sp.) from selenium-hyperaccumulated wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Poonam; Prakash, Ranjana; Prakash, N Tejo

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to produce selenium (Se)-fortifying edible mushrooms, five species of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.), were cultivated on Se-rich wheat straw collected from a seleniferous belt of Punjab, India. Total selenium was analyzed in the selenium hyperaccumulated wheat straw and the fruiting bodies. Significantly high levels (pmushrooms grown on Se-rich wheat straw. To the best of our knowledge, accumulation and quantification of selenium in mushrooms has hitherto not been reported with substrates naturally enriched with selenium. The results demonstrate the potential of selenium-rich agricultural residues as substrates for production of Se-enriched mushrooms and the ability of different species of oyster mushrooms to absorb and fortify selenium. The study envisages potential use of selenium-rich agricultural residues towards cultivation of Se-enriched mushrooms for application in selenium supplementation or neutraceutical preparations.