WorldWideScience

Sample records for flap breast reconstruction

  1. Defining the Role of Free Flaps in Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark L; Molina, Bianca J; Dayan, Erez; Jablonka, Eric M; Okwali, Michelle; Kim, Julie N; Dayan, Joseph H

    2018-03-01

     Free flaps have a well-established role in breast reconstruction after mastectomy; however, their role in partial breast reconstruction remains poorly defined. We reviewed our experience with partial breast reconstruction to better understand indications for free tissue transfer.  A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing partial breast reconstruction at our center between February 2009 and October 2015. We evaluated the characteristics of patients who underwent volume displacement procedures versus volume replacement procedures and free versus pedicled flap reconstruction.  There were 78 partial breast reconstructions, with 52 reductions/tissue rearrangements (displacement group) and 26 flaps (replacement group). Bra cup size and body mass index (BMI) were significantly smaller in the replacement group. Fifteen pedicled and 11 free flaps were performed. Most pedicled flaps (80.0%) were used for lateral or upper pole defects. Most free flaps (72.7%) were used for medial and inferior defects or when there was inadequate donor tissue for a pedicled flap. Complications included hematoma, cellulitis, and one aborted pedicled flap.  Free and pedicled flaps are useful for partial breast reconstruction, particularly in breast cancer patients with small breasts undergoing breast-conserving treatment (BCT). Flap selection depends on defect size, location, and donor tissue availability. Medial defects are difficult to reconstruct using pedicled flaps due to arc of rotation and intervening breast tissue. Free tissue transfer can overcome these obstacles. Confirming negative margins before flap reconstruction ensures harvest of adequate volume and avoids later re-operation. Judicious use of free flaps for oncoplastic reconstruction expands the possibility for breast conservation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Boomerang flap reconstruction for the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumholtz, Michael A; Al-Shunnar, Buthainah M; Dabb, Richard W

    2002-07-01

    The boomerang-shaped latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction offers a stable platform for breast reconstruction. It allows for maximal aesthetic results with minimal complications. The authors describe a skin paddle to obtain a larger volume than either the traditional elliptical skin paddle or the extended latissimus flap. There are three specific advantages to the boomerang design: large volume, conical shape (often lacking in the traditional skin paddle), and an acceptable donor scar. Thirty-eight flaps were performed. No reconstruction interfered with patient's ongoing oncological regimen. The most common complication was seroma, which is consistent with other latissimus reconstructions.

  3. Bilateral simultaneous breast reconstruction with SGAP flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jaime I; Magarakis, Michael; Venkat, Raghunandan; Shridharani, Sachin M; Rosson, Gedge D

    2012-07-01

    Two work-horse approaches to postmastectomy breast reconstruction are the deep inferior epigastric perforator flap and the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap [and its variation, the lateral septocutaneous superior gluteal artery perforator flap]. Our purpose was fourfold: 1) to analyze our experience with the SGAP flaps for simultaneous bilateral breast reconstruction; 2) to analyze our experience with lateral septocutaneous superior gluteal artery perforator flaps for that procedure; 3) to compare our results with those in the literature; and 4) to highlight the importance of preoperative three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography. A retrospective chart review was completed for 23 patients who underwent breast reconstruction between December 2005 and January 2010 via an SGAP flap (46 flaps). We reviewed flap weight, ischemia time, length of stay, overall flap survival, fat necrosis development, and emergency re-exploration. Mean weights were 571.2 ± 222.0 g (range 186-1,117 g) and 568.0 ± 237.5 g (range 209-1,115 g) for the left and right buttock flap, respectively. Mean ischemia time was 129.1 ± 15.7 and 177.7 ± 24.7 minutes for the first and second flap, respectively. Mean hospital stay was 5.3 ± 2.5 days. All flaps survived. Fat necrosis developed in five flaps (10.8%), and emergency re-exploration was required in three patients (three flaps). When harvesting abdominal tissue is a poor option, the SGAP flap is an efficacious procedure for patients desiring autologous breast reconstruction, and bilateral procedures can be performed simultaneously. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Pedicled versus free TRAM flap for breast reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, T J; Lukas, B; Feller, A M

    1999-03-01

    In breast reconstruction, the free TRAM-flap offers many advantages over the pedicled TRAM-flap. Due to its superior perfusion, the free flap rarely develops necrosis. Shaping of the flap is easier due to the lack of the thick muscle pedicle. Because the rectus muscle is spared, there is minimal donor site morbidity. However, the necessary microvascular anastomoses reduced the acceptance of the free TRAM-flap. During a 13-months period, 51 breast reconstructions were performed in 41 patients, 31 unilateral and ten bilateral. 45 flaps served for delayed reconstruction and six flaps for immediate reconstruction. The operations were performed by two teams working simultaneously. The average operating time was 3.9 hours for unilateral and 6.9 hours for bilateral delayed reconstruction. For immediate reconstruction, 6.2 and 6.3 hours were required for uni- and bilateral procedures, respectively. In 38 flaps, the thoracodorsal vessels served as recipient vessels; 13 flaps were anastomosed to the internal mammary artery and vein. Postoperative complications were observed in 13 patients. Three vessel anastomoses had to be revised. In one flap, a partial necrosis occurred; in two flaps hematoma evacuation was necessary. Two patients suffered from fat necroses at the abdomen and one umbilicus was lost. Skin irritations and seromas at the abdomen occurred in five patients. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in one patient three weeks postoperatively. Abdominal hernias or bulging in the epigastric area were not observed up to 15 months after reconstruction. These results reveal a low complication rate for breast reconstruction with the free TRAM-flap. The advantages of this technique as compared to the pedicled technique are discussed.

  5. The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap for breast reconstruction: guidelines for flap and patient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeller, Thomas; Huemer, Georg M; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2008-07-01

    The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has received little attention in the literature as a valuable alternative source of donor tissue in the setting of breast reconstruction. The authors give an in-depth review of their experience with breast reconstruction using the TMG flap. A retrospective review of 111 patients treated with a TMG flap for breast reconstruction in an immediate or a delayed setting between August of 2002 and July of 2007 was undertaken. Of these, 26 patients underwent bilateral reconstruction and 68 underwent unilateral reconstruction, and 17 patients underwent reconstruction unilaterally with a double TMG flap. Patient age ranged between 24 and 65 years (mean, 37 years). Twelve patients had to be taken back to the operating room because of flap-related problems and nine patients underwent successful revision microsurgically, resulting in three complete flap losses in a series of 111 patients with 154 transplanted TMG flaps. Partial flap loss was encountered in two patients, whereas fat tissue necrosis was managed conservatively in six patients. Donor-site morbidity was an advantage of this flap, with a concealed scar and minimal contour irregularities of the thigh, even in unilateral harvest. Complications included delayed wound healing (n = 10), hematoma (n = 5), and transient sensory deficit over the posterior thigh (n = 49). The TMG flap is more than an alternative to the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap in microsurgical breast reconstruction in selected patients. In certain indications, such as bilateral reconstructions, it possibly surpasses the DIEP flap because of a better concealed donor scar and easier harvest.

  6. Saphenous vein grafts for perforator flap salvage in autologous breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jaime I; Rad, Ariel N; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Rosson, Gedge D

    2009-01-01

    Although the use of saphenous vein grafts in free-flap salvage and extremity replantation is relatively common, their use in breast reconstruction is rare. These two case reports represent extreme alternatives for breast reconstruction flap salvage. In our normal daily practice, the overwhelming majority of elective breast reconstructions proceed smoothly. However, the occasional patient may require saphenous vein graft flap rescue for completion of the reconstruction. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A TRAM flap design refinement for use in delayed breast reconstruction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Patel, A J K

    2009-09-01

    Autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy is commonly achieved using the free Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (TRAM) flap. Since its first description, refinements and modifications have resulted in improved operative techniques and more aesthetically pleasing reconstructions. Pre-operative flap design, however, is a relatively new concept that has not received much attention in the literature. Patients who undergo breast reconstruction may have large, ptotic contralateral breasts. In these patients there is a tendency to raise a large abdominal flap in an attempt to achieve symmetry, or simply a larger breast. This has the potential to lead to tight closure of the abdomen and the risk of subsequent wound problems. Reconstructions that are too small or have inadequate ptosis commit the patient to contralateral breast surgery to achieve symmetry. Pre-operatively designing the flap, using a template created from the opposite breast, can help achieve a good match, often reducing the need for contralateral breast surgery. Even when contralateral breast reduction surgery is planned in advance, many of these patients still require, and prefer, a large reconstruction in order to achieve a well-proportioned result. We present a design template that addresses these particular issues and in the senior author\\'s hands has proved to be a very effective technique. Our technique allows raising an abdominal flap of less vertical height than traditionally used (thus reducing the risk of tight abdominal closure) and incorporates an inverted V-shaped flap of skin from the inferior mastectomy skin flap into the reconstruction. This allows more flap tissue to be available to fill the upper poles of the reconstructed breast and at the same time produces good ptosis.

  8. An international comparison of reimbursement for DIEAP flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A W N; Szpalski, C; Sheppard, N N; Morrison, C M; Blondeel, P N

    2015-11-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flap is currently considered the gold standard for autologous breast reconstruction. With the current economic climate and health cutbacks, we decided to survey reimbursement for DIEAP flaps performed at the main international centres in order to assess whether they are funded consistently. Data were collected confidentially from the main international centres by an anonymous questionnaire. Our results illustrate the wide disparity in international DIEAP flap breast reconstruction reimbursement: a unilateral DIEAP flap performed in New York, USA, attracts €20,759, whereas the same operation in Madrid, Spain, will only be reimbursed for €300. Only 35.7% of the surgeons can set up their own fee. Moreover, 85.7% of the participants estimated that the current fees are insufficient, and most of them feel that we are evolving towards an even lower reimbursement rate. In 55.8% of the countries represented, there is no DIEAP-specific coding; in comparison, 74.4% of the represented countries have a specific coding for transverse rectus abdominis (TRAM) flaps. Finally, despite the fact that DIEAP flaps have become the gold standard for breast reconstruction, they comprise only a small percentage of all the total number of breast reconstruction procedures performed (7-15%), with the only exception being Belgium (40%). Our results demonstrate that DIEAP flap breast reconstruction is inconsistently funded. Unfortunately though, it appears that the current reimbursement offered by many countries may dissuade institutions and surgeons from offering this procedure. However, substantial evidence exists supporting the cost-effectiveness of perforator flaps for breast reconstruction, and, in our opinion, the long-term clinical benefits for our patients are so important that this investment of time and money is absolutely essential. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons

  9. Obesity Should Not Prevent from TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Sadaf; Omranipour, Ramesh; Akrami, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common procedure performed for breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Obesity is a relative contraindication, and complex modifications have been proposed in the pedicled technique for obese patients. We studied ischemic complications in our patients to investigate the effect of body weight on the outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction. Pertinent data from medical records of patients receiving a TRAM flap surgery from 1986 to 2011 were extracted. Patients were divided into three groups based on the body mass index (BMI): normal (obese (>30 kg/m(2)). Flap necrosis is defined as any visible nonviable tissue in the reconstructed breast. It was observed that 117 patients had received TRAM flap reconstruction. Fifty-eight patients were excluded. Of the remaining 59 cases, 24 had normal BMI, 21 were overweight, and 14 were obese. No patient was found to develop flap necrosis. Outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction in obese patients is similar to nonobese patients. No major necrosis in need of reoperation was identified in the studied obese patients. It was concluded that categorizing obesity as a relative contraindication to TRAM flap breast reconstruction should be revisited based on larger cohort studies.

  10. An innovative method of planning and displaying flap volume in DIEP flap breast reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelink, S; Verhulst, Arico C; Maal, Thomas J J; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L; Schultze Kool, Leo J; Ulrich, Dietmar J O

    2017-07-01

    Determining the ideal volume of the harvested flap to achieve symmetry in deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstructions is complex. With preoperative imaging techniques such as 3D stereophotogrammetry and computed tomography angiography (CTA) available nowadays, we can combine information to preoperatively plan the optimal flap volume to be harvested. In this proof-of-concept, we investigated whether projection of a virtual flap planning onto the patient's abdomen using a projection method could result in harvesting the correct flap volume. In six patients (n = 9 breasts), 3D stereophotogrammetry and CTA data were combined from which a virtual flap planning was created comprising perforator locations, blood vessel trajectory and flap size. All projected perforators were verified with Doppler ultrasound. Intraoperative flap measurements were collected to validate the determined flap delineation volume. The measured breast volume using 3D stereophotogrammetry was 578 ± 127 cc; on CTA images, 527 ± 106 cc flap volumes were planned. The nine harvested flaps weighed 533 ± 109 g resulting in a planned versus harvested flap mean difference of 5 ± 27 g (flap density 1.0 g/ml). In 41 out of 42 projected perforator locations, a Doppler signal was audible. This proof-of-concept shows in small numbers that flap volumes can be included into a virtual DIEP flap planning, and transferring the virtual planning to the patient through a projection method results in harvesting approximately the same volume during surgery. In our opinion, this innovative approach is the first step in consequently achieving symmetric breast volumes in DIEP flap breast reconstructions. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bone scan in breast cancer patients with mastectomy and breast reconstruction with a myocutaneous TRAM flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Rosanna; Cano, Roque; Delgado, Ricardo; Munive, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To report findings in bone scans for breast cancer patients with mastectomy and breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (TRAM). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria were: confirmed breast cancer, mastectomy, breast reconstruction with TRAM flap and bone scan performed after TRAM. Exclusion criteria were: Absence of bone scan image, breast reconstruction by other approaches. Results: Absence of uptake in TRAM flap in six patients, diminished uptake in skin near TRAM, with peripheral increased uptake in three and increased uptake in TRAM flap, in a patient with cancer recurrence, confirmed by biopsy. Conclusions: Bone scans in breast cancer patients with mastectomy and TRAM flap can have different imaging presentations, procedure details diminish reporting errors. TRAM flap may present fat necrosis areas, which should be differentiated from recurrence in bone scans. Additional imaging and biopsy will be needed to diagnose this finding. (authors).

  12. "Apron" flap and re-creation of the inframammary fold following TRAM flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, A; Silfen, R; Hauben, D J

    2000-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the recreation of an inframammary fold after TRAM flap breast reconstruction has not yet been described. This article offers a technique for the creation of an inframammary fold as a secondary procedure. The technique has been performed thus far in two patients with good aesthetic outcomes and no postoperative complications. It may also be suitable for adding bulk to the TRAM flap, especially in bilateral breast reconstruction, and for other minor chest deformities.

  13. Complications Following Autologous Latissimus Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufid Burgić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of an autologous latissimus flap in breast reconstruction accounts for a supple and natural look of reconstructed breast. Most common postoperative complication, seroma, became more of a rule then an exception when it comes to postoperative evaluation of the patients who underwent this reconstructive procedure. A retrospective study analysing and evaluating different complication rates in 20 patients who underwent breast reconstruction by autologous latissimus flap, was conducted. All patients included in the study were operated at the Department of plastic surgery of Hôpital Civil in Strasbourg, France, between 1996 and 2008. The complication rates were noted as follows: seroma in 19 of our 20 patients (95%, late hypertrophic scarring in 3 patients (15%, postoperative surgical site hematoma in 3 patients (15%, and 2 patients (10% presented postoperative chronic back pain. Different options used in seroma treatment and prevention (subcutaneous-fascia anchor sutures of donor site, application of corticosteroids by injection into donor site postoperatively, passive drainage can reduce seroma formation and thus overall complication rates, leading to much faster patient’s recovery time and return to normal daily activities.

  14. Funding analysis of bilateral autologous free-flap breast reconstructions in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shiba; Ruskin, Olivia; McCombe, David; Morrison, Wayne; Webb, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral breast reconstructions are being increasingly performed. Autologous free-flap reconstructions represent the gold standard for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction but are resource intensive. This study aims to investigate the difference between hospital reimbursement and true cost of bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions. Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent bilateral autologous free-flap reconstructions at a single Australian tertiary referral centre was performed. Hospital reimbursement was determined from coding analysis. A true cost analysis was also performed. Comparisons were made considering the effect of timing, indication and complications of the procedure. Forty-six bilateral autologous free-flap procedures were performed (87 deep inferior epigastric perforators (DIEPs), four superficial inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps (SIEAs) and one muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (MS-TRAM)). The mean funding discrepancy between hospital reimbursement and actual cost was $12,137 ± $8539 (mean ± standard deviation (SD)) (n = 46). Twenty-four per cent (n = 11) of the cases had been coded inaccurately. If these cases were excluded from analysis, the mean funding discrepancy per case was $9168 ± $7453 (n = 35). Minor and major complications significantly increased the true cost and funding discrepancy (p = 0.02). Bilateral free-flap breast reconstructions performed in Australian public hospitals result in a funding discrepancy. Failure to be economically viable threatens the provision of this procedure in the public system. Plastic surgeons and hospital managers need to adopt measures in order to make these gold-standard procedures cost neutral. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap for treatment of capsular contracture in tertiary breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pülzl, Petra; Huemer, Georg M; Schoeller, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Capsular contracture is a common complication associated with implant-based breast reconstruction and augmentation leading to pain, displacement, and rupture. After capsulectomy and implant exchange, the problem often reappears. We performed 52 deepithelialized free transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flaps in 33 patients for tertiary breast reconstruction or augmentation of small- and medium-sized breasts. The indications for implant removal were unnatural feel and emotion of their breasts with foreign body feel, asymmetry, pain, and sensation of cold. Anyway, most of the patients did not have a severe capsular contracture deformity. The TMG flap is formed into a cone shape by bringing the tips of the ellipse together. Depending on the contralateral breast, the muscle can also be shaped in an S-form to get more projection if needed. The operating time for unilateral TMG flap breast reconstruction or augmentation was on average 3 hours and for bilateral procedure 5 hours. One patient had a secondary revision of the donor site due to disruption of the normal gluteal fold. Eighty percent of the unilateral TMG flap reconstructions had a lipofilling procedure afterward to correct small irregularities or asymmetry. The advantages of the TMG flap such as short harvesting time, inconspicuous donor site, and the possibility of having a natural breast shape make it our first choice to treat capsular contracture after breast reconstruction and augmentation.

  16. The Versatile Extended Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Flap for Breast Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Jordan; Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Gunnarsson, Gudjon L.

    2016-01-01

    complications occurred in 10 of 106 (10%) cases and included hematoma (1/108), venous congestion (2/108), and partial flap necrosis (7/108). The reconstructive goal was achieved in 103 of 106 (97%) flaps. CONCLUSIONS: The TAP flap is a pedicled, fasciocutaneous flap that can be used for total breast...

  17. An innovative method of planning and displaying flap volume in DIEP flap breast reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummelink, S.L.; Verhulst, A.C.; Maal, T.J.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Ulrich, D.J.O.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determining the ideal volume of the harvested flap to achieve symmetry in deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstructions is complex. With preoperative imaging techniques such as 3D stereophotogrammetry and computed tomography angiography (CTA) available

  18. A Nationwide Analysis of Cost Variation for Autologous Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Jessica I; Lu, Yiwen; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-11-01

    Cost variation among hospitals has been demonstrated for surgical procedures. Uncovering these differences has helped guide measures taken to reduce health care spending. To date, the fiscal consequence of hospital variation for autologous free flap breast reconstruction is unknown. To investigate factors that influence cost variation for autologous free flap breast reconstruction. A secondary cross-sectional analysis was performed using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample database from 2008 to 2010. The dates of analysis were September 2016 to February 2017. The setting was a stratified sample of all US community hospitals. Participants were female patients who were diagnosed as having breast cancer or were at high risk for breast cancer and underwent autologous free flap breast reconstruction. Variables of interest included demographic data, hospital characteristics, length of stay, complications (surgical and systemic), and inpatient cost. The study used univariate and generalized linear mixed models to examine associations between patient and hospital characteristics and cost. A total of 3302 patients were included in the study, with a median age of 50 years (interquartile range, 44-57 years). The mean cost for autologous free flap breast reconstruction was $22 677 (interquartile range, $14 907-$33 391). Flap reconstructions performed at high-volume hospitals were significantly more costly than those performed at low-volume hospitals ($24 360 vs $18 918, P Logistic regression demonstrated that hospital volume correlated with increased cost (Exp[β], 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; P = .003). Fewer surgical complications (16.4% [169 of 1029] vs 23.7% [278 of 1174], P cost variation among patients undergoing autologous free flap breast reconstruction. Experience, as measured by a hospital's volume, provides quality health care with fewer complications but is more costly. Longer length of stay contributed to regional

  19. Venous coupler use for free-flap breast reconstructions: specific analyses of TMG and DIEP flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Frédéric; Brunetti, Stefania; Dissaux, Caroline; Erik, A Sauleau; Facca, Sybille; Bruant-Rodier, Catherine; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to present the results of comparisons of anastomotic data and flap complications in the use of venous coupler in breast reconstruction with the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap and the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Over a three-year period, 95 patients suffering from breast cancer were treated with mastectomy and breast reconstruction using free flaps. We performed 121 mechanical venous anastomoses for 105 flap procedures (80 DIEP and 25 TMG). The coupler size, anastomotic duration, number of anastomoses and postoperative complications were assessed for the entire series. The coupling device was perfectly suitable for all end-to-end anastomoses between the vein(s) of the flap and the internal mammary vein(s). No venous thrombosis occurred. The mean anastomotic time did not significantly differ between the DIEP (330 seconds) and TMG flap procedures (352 seconds) (P = 0.069). Additionally, there were no differences in coupling time observed following a comparison of seven coupler sizes (P = 0.066). The mean coupler size used during the TMG flap procedure was smaller than that used with the DIEP (2.4 mm versus 2.8 mm) (P TMG flap (28%) than with the DIEP flap (11%). The coupler size used was smaller for the TMG procedure and when double venous anastomosis was performed. Additionally, anastomotic time was not affected by the flap type or coupler size used or by anastomosis number. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with natural tissue

  1. Endoscope-assisted breast reconstruction. 1. Immediate breast reconstruction after lateral quadrantectomy with endoscopically harvested latissimus dorsi muscle flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Takamitsu; Kurihara, Kazunao; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kim, Shiei; Wakamatsu, Shingo.

    1996-01-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) now is widely accepted in Japan. Quadrantectomy has been chosen from among the several available breast conserving operations for its minimal recurrence rate. Quadrantectomy, or excision of one-quarter volume of the breast, leaves a moderate degree of deformity which diminishes the quality of life. The authors have introduced immediate post-ectomy breast reconstruction utilizing an endoscopically harvested latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle flap which results in a minimal donor site scar. Five cases of endoscope-assisted LD muscle reconstruction of a quadrantectomized breast have been followed by irradiation therapy. Prior to reconstruction, with the patient in the supine position, quadrantectomy and dissection of axillary lymphnodes are performed through an incision extending from the anterior axillary to the inflamammary line. The patient then is placed in the lateral supine position. LD muscle flap dissection by electrocautery begins through the initial incision. Dissections of posterior portions of the muscle continue, under endoscopic visualization, through one or two ports along the anterior margin of the muscle. Moderate amount of adipose tissue is left attached to the muscle to obtain full augmentation. The raised flap then is transferred and secured to the post-quandrantectomy defect. Some post-irradiation shrinkage of the inserted LD muscle has been a common occurrence of breast reconstruction. An ample amount of adipose tissue left attached to the muscle margin will solve this matter since fatty tissue is more resistant to post-irradiation atrophy. (J.P.N.)

  2. Endoscope-assisted breast reconstruction. 1. Immediate breast reconstruction after lateral quadrantectomy with endoscopically harvested latissimus dorsi muscle flap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satake, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Takamitsu; Kurihara, Kazunao; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kim, Shiei [Kawaguchi Municipal Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Wakamatsu, Shingo

    1996-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) now is widely accepted in Japan. Quadrantectomy has been chosen from among the several available breast conserving operations for its minimal recurrence rate. Quadrantectomy, or excision of one-quarter volume of the breast, leaves a moderate degree of deformity which diminishes the quality of life. The authors have introduced immediate post-ectomy breast reconstruction utilizing an endoscopically harvested latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle flap which results in a minimal donor site scar. Five cases of endoscope-assisted LD muscle reconstruction of a quadrantectomized breast have been followed by irradiation therapy. Prior to reconstruction, with the patient in the supine position, quadrantectomy and dissection of axillary lymphnodes are performed through an incision extending from the anterior axillary to the inflamammary line. The patient then is placed in the lateral supine position. LD muscle flap dissection by electrocautery begins through the initial incision. Dissections of posterior portions of the muscle continue, under endoscopic visualization, through one or two ports along the anterior margin of the muscle. Moderate amount of adipose tissue is left attached to the muscle to obtain full augmentation. The raised flap then is transferred and secured to the post-quandrantectomy defect. Some post-irradiation shrinkage of the inserted LD muscle has been a common occurrence of breast reconstruction. An ample amount of adipose tissue left attached to the muscle margin will solve this matter since fatty tissue is more resistant to post-irradiation atrophy. (J.P.N.)

  3. Pilot study of breast sensation after breast reconstruction: evaluating the effects of radiation therapy and perforator flap neurotization on sensory recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarakis, Michael; Venkat, Raghunandan; Dellon, A Lee; Shridharani, Sachin M; Bellamy, Justin; Vaca, Elbert E; Jeter, Stacie C; Zoras, Odysseas; Manahan, Michele A; Rosson, Gedge D

    2013-09-01

    Some sensation to the breast returns after breast reconstruction, but recovery is variable and unpredictable. We primarily sought to assess the impact of different types of breast reconstruction [deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps versus implants] and radiation therapy on the return of sensation. Thirty-seven patients who had unilateral or bilateral breast reconstruction via a DIEP flap or implant-based reconstruction, with or without radiation therapy (minimum follow-up, 18 months; range, 18-61 months) were studied. Of the 74 breasts, 27 had DIEP flaps, 29 had implants, and 18 were nonreconstructed. Eleven breasts with implants and 10 with DIEP flaps had had prereconstruction radiation therapy. The primary outcome was mean patient-perceived static and moving cutaneous pressure threshold in nine areas. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess what independent factors affected the return of sensation (significance, P sensation (P = 0.041) than did DIEP flaps. However, among irradiated breasts, skin over DIEP flaps had significantly better sensation than did that over implants (static, P = 0.019; moving, P = 0.028). Implant reconstructions with irradiated skin had significantly worse static (P = 0.002) and moving sensation (P = 0.014) than did nonirradiated implant reconstructions. Without irradiation, skin overlying implants is associated with better sensation recovery than DIEP flap skin. However, with irradiation, DIEP flap skin had better sensation recovery than did skin over implants. Neurotization trended toward improvement in sensation in DIEP flaps. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Immediate Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Unilateral Deep Superior Epigastric Artery and Superficial Circumflex Iliac Artery Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S. Hansen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autologous breast reconstruction utilizing a perforator flap is an increasingly popular method for reducing donor site morbidity and implant-related complications. However, aberrant anatomy not readily visible on computed tomography angiography is a rare albeit real risk when undergoing perforator flap reconstruction. We present an operative case of a patient who successfully underwent a bilateral breast reconstruction sourced from a unilateral abdominal flap divided into deep superior epigastric artery and superficial circumflex iliac artery flap segments.

  5. Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Expander Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Flap after Skin Sparing Mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, H.M.; Shallan, M.A.; Fouad, F.A.; Elsayed, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The latissimus dorsi my-ocutaneous flap (LDMF) used to. be the standard practice far breast reconstruction; haw ever, with the increased use of tissue expanders and the development of the transverse rectus-abdomen's myocutaneaus flap for autologous tissue breast reconstruction, its use has decreased. To. reassess the role of the LDMF in breast reconstruction, a prospective study was performed to. evaluate women who. had a skin sparing mastectomy followed by immediate reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi flap and tissue expander implant. Patients and Methods: Twenty-five women with early breast cancer underwent immediate latissimus dorsi my-ocutaneaus flaps with tissue expander after skin sparing mastectamy. The ancalagic safety at skin sparing mastectamy, the pastaperative aesthetic results and camplicatians were evaluated. Results: Between May 2003 and April 2005, 25 can-secutive wamen diagnased with breast cancer underwent skin sparing mas tecta my and expander assisted immediate latissimus darsi breast recanstructian. Their median age was 42 years, ranging fram 34 to 48 years. The pracedure duratian ranged fram 2.5 to. 6 haurs, with a median at 3.9 haurs, hawever, expansian was campleted by 4 manths (range I to. 8 manths). Patients were discharged 7 days after surgery with a range af 5 to. 15 days. The camplicatian rate was law, manifesting with skin flap necrosis in 12%, waund infectian in 4%, and part site extrusian in 4%. There was no. flap lass. With the exceptian af serama farmatian, the danar site marbidity was law (seroma 40%, hematama 4%, back pain 8%, and limited arm mavement 4%). No. lacal recurrence was recorded. The aesthetic result af surgery was rated as excellent in 20%, gaad in 60%, fair in 24%, and paar in 4% af cases. The duratian af past-aperative fallaw up was 14.7 manths, ranging fram 6 to 24 manths. Conclusions: Skin sparing mastectamy and immediate breast recanstructian is an ancalagically safe technique. The use

  6. Autologous breast reconstruction using the immediately lipofilled extended latissimus dorsi flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, N; Fairbairn, N; Trail, M; Ewing, A; Yong, L; Raine, C; Dixon, J M

    2018-02-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is a popular choice for autologous breast reconstruction. To dramatically improve volume, we report our experience of using the immediately lipofilled extended latissimus dorsi (ELD) flap and show it as a valid option for autologous breast reconstruction. Patients undergoing the procedure between December 2013 and June 2016 were included. Demographic, clinical and operative factors were analysed, together with in-hospital morbidity and duration of postoperative hospital stay. A total of 71 ELD flaps with immediate lipofilling were performed. Forty-five reconstructions were immediate and the remaining 26 delayed. Median (range) volume of autologous fat injected immediately was 171 ml (40-630 ml). Contralateral reductions were performed in 25 patients with the median reduction volume 185 g (89-683 g). Median duration of admission was 6.5 (3-18) days and patients were followed up for 12 months (1-37). Three total flap failures occurred and had to be excised (4%). One haematoma occurred requiring drainage (1%). Signs of infection requiring intravenous antibiotics occurred in five patients (7%). In 5 patients wound dehiscence occurred, and only two of these required resuturing (3%). In total, 7 patients developed a seroma requiring repeated drainage (10%). Three reconstructions experienced mild mastectomy flap necrosis with no needing reoperation (4%). Our experience represents the largest series to date and shows that in carefully selected patients the technique is safe, can avoid the requirement for implants, and has the potential to streamline the reconstructive journey. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients' Aesthetic Concerns After Horizontally Placed Abdominal Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Key; Suh, Young Chul; Maldonado, Andrés A; Yun, Jiyoung; Lee, Taik Jong

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to analyze patients' aesthetic concerns after breast reconstruction with abdominal free flap by reporting secondary cosmetic procedures performed based on the patients' request, and analyzed the effect of adjuvant therapies and other variables on such outcomes. All patients who underwent unilateral immediate reconstruction were enrolled prospectively. Free abdominal flaps were placed horizontally with little manipulation. Secondary procedures were actively recommended during the follow-up period to meet the patients' aesthetic concerns. The numbers and types of the secondary procedures and the effects of various factors were analyzed. 150 patients met the eligibility criteria. The average number of overall secondary surgeries per patient was 1.25. Patients with skin-sparing mastectomy required significantly higher number of secondary surgeries compared with those who underwent nipple-areolar skin-sparing mastectomy. When confined to the cosmetic procedures, 58 (38.7 %) patients underwent 75 operations. The most common procedures were flank dog ear revision, fat injection of the reconstructed breast, and breast liposuction. None of the radiated patients underwent liposuction of the flap. Most commonly liposuctioned regions were the central-lateral and lower-lateral, while fat was most commonly injected to the upper-medial and upper-central part of the breast. The present study delineated the numbers and types of the secondary operations after horizontally placed abdominal free flap transfer with analysis of the influence of various factors. Addressing such issues during the primary reconstruction would help to reduce the need and extent of the secondary operations and to maximize aesthetic outcome. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  8. Autologous Latissimus Dorsi Breast Reconstruction Flap Salvage: Microvascular Anastomosis with Serratus Branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kuta, BScH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Autologous breast reconstruction has become a standard option during the recovery of breast cancer survivors. Although pedicle damage is a rare complication of this procedure, extensive torsion or tension can lead to partial or total flap failure. We report a case of partial flap salvage after accidental transection of the pedicled blood supply within the intramuscular course of a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. This salvage technique involved microvascular anastomosis between the remaining vasculature of the latissimus dorsi pedicle and the serratus branch of the thoracodorsal artery and vein.

  9. Improving outcomes in microsurgical breast reconstruction: lessons learnt from 406 consecutive DIEP/TRAM flaps performed by a single surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, Tim H C; Morritt, Andrew N; Zhong, Toni; Ahmad, Jamil; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2013-08-01

    Multiple preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative decisions can influence the outcome of microsurgical breast reconstruction. We have simplified the decision-making process by incorporating a number of algorithms into our microsurgical breast reconstruction practice and critically review our results in this study. Prospectively maintained databases for all microsurgical breast reconstructions performed by a single surgeon over a nine-year period were examined to determine: patient demographics; operative details including flap choice, donor and recipient vessel selection; and, details of intraoperative and early postoperative (406 Consecutive free flap microsurgical breast reconstructions (164 unilateral and 121 bilateral) were performed in 285 patients over the study period. Deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (88%, n=359) were used most commonly followed by muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (MS-TRAM) flaps (11%, n=44), and fascial-sparing TRAM (FS-TRAM) flaps (0.7%, n=3). One-hundred-seventy-one (48%) DIEP flaps were based on a single perforator while 188 (52%) had multiple perforators. The internal mammary (IM) artery and vein were used as the recipient vessels for 99% (n=403) of flaps. A second venous anastomosis was required for 11.8 percent (n=48) of flaps. Partial flap failure occurred in nine (2.2%) flaps while total flap failure occurred in two flaps (0.5%). Minimum follow-up was three months. Incorporating a number of algorithms into our practice has enabled us to simplify the decision-making processes involved in microsurgical breast reconstruction and to consistently obtain successful surgical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Breast reconstruction using a latissimus dorsi flap after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højvig, Jens B; Bonde, Christian Torsten

    2015-01-01

    of 13 patients (10%) had local complications and were re-operated within the first 30 days. We observed one flap loss and only one systemic complication; a urinary tract infection. In all, 38 patients (28%) received antibiotic treatment after the operations and 27 (20%) developed a seroma at the donor...... of the clinical pathway and post-operative regimen could be future focus-points for this procedure. FUNDING: The review was performed as part of the pre-graduate research year project, "Donor-site morbidity after m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction", funded by Concordiafonden. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.......INTRODUCTION: The latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap has long been regarded as the second choice flap for autologous breast reconstruction following a mastectomy in our department. Despite uncertainty about donor-site morbidity, it is regarded as a relatively safe procedure; moreover...

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and free flap complications after autologous breast reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian; Khorasani, Hoda; Hoejvig, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key component of modern analgesics is the use of multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia (MOSA). In the past, our analgesic regime after autologous breast reconstruction (ABR) included either NSAID or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor. COX-2 inhibitors are superior to NSAID...... or gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Multimodal analgesia using a COX-2 inhibitor is safe in ABR with free flaps and does not increase flap failure. COX-2 inhibitors seem superior to NSAID with reduced risk of post-operative haematomas.......BACKGROUND: A key component of modern analgesics is the use of multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia (MOSA). In the past, our analgesic regime after autologous breast reconstruction (ABR) included either NSAID or a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor. COX-2 inhibitors are superior to NSAIDs...... because of the well-known side effects of NSAID treatment (bleeding/gastrointestinal ulcers). However, COX-2 inhibitors have been suggested to increase flap failure rates. We report our experience in using COX-2 inhibitors as part of our post-operative MOSA after ABR using free flaps. MATERIALS...

  12. [Application of serratus anterior muscle flap combined with breast implants for breast reconstruction after modified radical mastectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lijun; Zhang, Xuehui

    2017-09-01

    To investigate effectiveness of the combination of serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants for breast reconstruction after modified radical mastectomy. Between January 2015 and December 2015, 25 female patients with breast cancer were enrolled, aged 24-62 years (mean, 40.6 years). The tumor located at left side in 9 cases and right side in 16 cases; 14 cases were in the left upper quadrant, 4 cases were in the left lower quadrant, 7 cases were on the top of the breast. All cases were invasive ductal carcinoma. According to TNM staging, 14 cases were at stageⅠand 11 cases were at stageⅡA. The diameter of lumps were all less than 3 cm. All those lumps were solitary and without distant metastasis. The sentinel nodes were all negative. After modified radical mastectomy, the breasts were reconstructed by serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants. The nipples were spared in 22 cases. The operation time was 113-148 minutes (mean, 136 minutes). All breasts survived and incisions healed at stageⅠ. There was no complication such as hematoma, infection, etc . All patients were followed up 6-18 months (mean, 15 months). Except 1 case, the others were evaluated according to the criteria of the reconstructed breast at 12 months after operation. Among them, 23 cases were evaluated as good and 1 case as fair. There was no tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. The combination of serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants after the modified radical mastectomy is a handy approach of breast reconstruction which is less harmful with few postoperative complications. It also gains a high degree of satisfaction from patients for good breast shape.

  13. The evolving breast reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally...... not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized...... for oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery and will certainly become an invaluable addition to breast reconstructive methods....

  14. Preoperative TRAM free flap volume estimation for breast reconstruction in lean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Kyung Won; Hong, Ki Yong; Lee, Sang Woo

    2010-04-01

    To obtain pleasing symmetry in breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) free flap, a large amount of abdominal flap is elevated and remnant tissue is trimmed in most cases. However, elevation of abundant abdominal flap can cause excessive tension in donor site closure and increase the possibility of hypertrophic scarring especially in lean patients. The TRAM flap was divided into 4 zones in routine manner; the depth and dimension of the 4 zones were obtained using ultrasound and AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA), respectively. The acquired numbers were then multiplied to obtain an estimate of volume of each zone and the each zone volume was added. To confirm the relation between the estimated volume and the actual volume, authors compared intraoperative actual TRAM flap volumes with preoperative estimated volumes in 30 consecutive TRAM free flap breast reconstructions. The estimated volumes and the actual elevated volumes of flap were found to be correlated by regression analysis (r = 0.9258, P Autodesk Inc.) allow the authors to attain the precise volume desired for elevation. This method provides advantages in terms of minimal flap trimming, easier closure of donor sites, reduced scar widening and symmetry, especially in lean patients.

  15. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy between Breast Cancer Patients with and without Immediate Flap Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT between breast cancer patients with and without immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap reconstruction.The study included 492 patients with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM and chemotherapy followed by PMRT between 1997 and 2011. Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups.Among 492 patients, 213 patients had immediate TRAM flap reconstruction. The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 11-191 months. The 5-year and 10-year disease free survival rates were 81% and 76% for the TRAM flap group and 78% and 73% for the non-flap group. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 89% and 73% for the TRAM flap group and 83% and 74% for the non-flap group.There exists no statistically significant difference in the rates of local recurrence, distant metastasis, disease-free and overall survival when comparing immediate TRAM flap reconstruction with no reconstruction. Our results suggest that immediate TRAM flap reconstruction does not compromise long term clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients requiring PMRT.

  16. Increased Flap Weight and Decreased Perforator Number Predict Fat Necrosis in DIEP Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn L. Mulvey, BS

    2013-05-01

    Conclusions: Flaps with increasing weight have increased risk of fat necrosis. These data suggest that inclusion of more than 1 perforator may decrease odds of fat necrosis in large flaps. Perforator flap breast reconstruction can be performed safely; however, considerations concerning race, body mass index, staging with tissue expanders, perforator number, and flap weight may optimize outcomes.

  17. Direct delayed breast reconstruction with TAP flap, implant and acellular dermal matrix (TAPIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Udesen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap is considered one of the working horses within the field of breast reconstruction and it offers several advantages. However, donor-site morbidity may pose a problem. This article describes a new and modified technique for delayed breast reconstruction...... there is a learning curve, this simple modified technique does not demand any perforator or other vessel dissection. Any trained plastic surgeon should be able to adopt the technique into the growing armamentarium of breast reconstruction possibilities....

  18. Double Back Cut in Post-mastectomy Breast Skin (Fish-Shaped Skin Paddle) in Delayed Pedicled TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovsky, Alexander Bogdanov; Pagkalos, Vasileios A; Shoham, Yaron; Krieger, Yuval; Silberstein, Eldad

    2015-08-01

    Breast reconstruction has become standard of care for female patients with breast cancer. The transverse rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous flap (TRAMf) is the most common method of immediate or delayed autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy. We share our experience with modified, double back cut of post-mastectomy skin in delayed pedicled TRAMf breast reconstruction, resulting in fish-shaped skin paddle. This sort of back cut is a simple, reliable way to obtain a natural, esthetically pleasant breast mound with inconspicuous hidden scars.

  19. Infection of PTFE mesh 15 years following pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction: mechanism and aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfaki, A; Gkorila, A; Khatib, M; Malata, C M

    2018-01-01

    The pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap procedure is still widely used for breast reconstruction. The repair of the flap harvest site in the transverse rectus abdominis muscle and sheath is often assisted by the use of prosthetic meshes. This decreases the risk of abdominal wall weakness and herniation but, being a foreign body, it also carries the risk of infection. In this report, we describe the case of a 63-year-old patient who, whilst receiving chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer, presented with an infected polytetrafluoroethylene mesh 15 years after pedicled TRAM flap immediate breast reconstruction. This necessitated mesh removal to treat the infection. Following a thorough review of the English literature, this is the longest recorded presentation of an abdominal prosthetic mesh infection. The mechanism and aetiology of such a late complication are discussed.

  20. Decision making in double-pedicled DIEP and SIEA abdominal free flap breast reconstructions: An algorithmic approach and comprehensive classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M Malata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP free flap is the gold standard for autologous breast reconstruction. However, using a single vascular pedicle may not yield sufficient tissue in patients with midline scars or insufficient lower abdominal pannus. Double-pedicled free flaps overcome this problem using different vascular arrangements to harvest the entire lower abdominal flap. The literature is, however, sparse regarding technique selection. We therefore reviewed our experience in order to formulate an algorithm and comprehensive classification for this purpose. Methods: All patients undergoing unilateral double-pedicled abdominal perforator free flap breast reconstruction (AFFBR by a single surgeon (CMM over 40 months were reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Results: Of the 112 consecutive breast free flaps performed, 25 (22% utilised two vascular pedicles. The mean patient age was 45 years (range=27-54. All flaps but one (which used the thoracodorsal system were anastomosed to the internal mammary vessels using the rib-preservation technique. The surgical duration was 656 minutes (range=468-690 mins. The median flap weight was 618g (range=432-1275g and the mastectomy weight was 445g (range=220-896g. All flaps were successful and only three patients requested minor liposuction to reduce and reshape their reconstructed breasts.Conclusion: Bipedicled free abdominal perforator flaps, employed in a fifth of all our AFFBRs, are a reliable and safe option for unilateral breast reconstruction. They, however, necessitate clear indications to justify the additional technical complexity and surgical duration. Our algorithm and comprehensive classification facilitate technique selection for the anastomotic permutations and successful execution of these operations.

  1. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eSchmauss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction, as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue, the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction.

  2. Postmastectomy reconstruction: comparative analysis of the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap versus breast implant reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederna, P S; Yates, W R; Chang, P; Cram, A E; Ricciardelli, E J

    1995-11-01

    Over 40,000 postmastectomy breast reconstructions are performed annually. In this study, we investigated the psychosocial, functional, and cosmetic effects of transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap versus breast implant reconstruction. Thirty-three women who had undergone postmastectomy breast reconstruction were contacted by telephone and agreed to participate in the study. Twenty-two women completed the self-assessment questionnaires regarding their quality of life, psychological symptoms, functional status, body image, and global satisfaction. The TRAM and implant groups contained 8 and 14 patients, respectively. The groups were well matched for age, employment status, marital status, race, religion, and severity of medical and surgical illnesses. The average follow-up was 36 months. Statistical analysis of the responses revealed that women who had undergone TRAM flap reconstruction were more satisfied with how their reconstructed breast felt to the touch (p = .01), and there was a trend toward greater satisfaction with the appearance of their reconstructed breast (p = .08). However, these same patients identified more difficulties as far as functioning at work or school, performing vigorous physical activities, participating in community or religious activities, visiting with relatives, and interacting with male friends (p physical impairments as a result of their reconstruction.

  3. A Simple Flap Design for the Salvage of Immediate Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Sukru; Altinkaya, Altug; Karadag, Emine Cigdem; Kara, Halil; Uras, Cihan

    2018-02-01

    Breast reconstruction with implants is a real challenge in patients with large breast volume. Skin-reducing inverted-T mastectomy is the best solution for these patients. Delayed wound healing or necrosis at the T-junction area can be seen in this procedure, although it may also lead to severe conditions such as the exposure and loss of implant. In this article, the use of local pedicled flap for the management of these situations was discussed. Between April 2010 and July 2015, 54 patients underwent breast reconstruction by inverted-T skin-reducing mastectomy and immediate implant-based breast reconstruction at our clinic. During the postoperative follow-up period, necrosis at the T-junction area was observed in 8 patients. All the patients received proper wound care, and the necrosis was surgically debrided. The defect was closed with Limberg-like rectangular flap. The mean age was 45.2 (range, 33-54) years. The mean body mass index was 25.57 ± 6.53 (range, 21.2-35.2) kg/m. The mean follow-up was 10.9 (range, 4-19) months. Two patients had implant exposure at the defect site after the debridement. There was no implant loss in any of the patients. The Limberg-like rectangular flap can be used as a salvage option in complicated skin-reducing mastectomies and can be considered as a safe and effective method because of its easy-to-use nature, low cost, and no need for microsurgery experience.

  4. Aesthetic refinements and reoperative procedures following 370 consecutive DIEP and SIEA flap breast reconstructions: important considerations for patient consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enajat, Morteza; Smit, Jeroen M; Rozen, Warren M; Hartman, Ed H M; Liss, Anders; Kildal, Morten; Audolfsson, Thorir; Acosta, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    Breast reconstruction often requires multiple operations. In addition to potential complications requiring reoperation, additional procedures are frequently essential in order to complete the reconstructive process, with aesthetic outcome and breast symmetry shown to be the most important factors in patient satisfaction. Despite the importance of these reoperations in decision-making and the consent process, a thorough review of the need for such operations has not been definitively explored. A review of 370 consecutive autologous breast reconstructions (326 patients) was undertaken, comprising 365 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps and 5 superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flaps. The need for additional procedures for either complications or aesthetic refinement following initial breast reconstruction was assessed. Overall, there was an average of 1.06 additional interventions for every patient carried out after primary reconstructive surgery. Of 326 patients, 46 underwent early postoperative operations for surgical complications (0.17 additional operations per patient as a consequence of complications). Procedures for aesthetic refinement included those performed on the reconstructed breast, contralateral breast, or abdominal donor site. Procedures for aesthetic refinement included nipple reconstruction, nipple-areola complex tattooing, dog-ear correction, liposuction, lipofilling, scar revision, mastopexy, and reduction mammaplasty. While DIEP flap surgery for breast reconstruction provides favorable results, patients frequently require additional procedures to improve aesthetic outcomes. The need for reoperation is an important part of the consent process prior to reconstructive surgery, and patients should recognize the likelihood of at least one additional procedure following initial reconstruction.

  5. Optimization of breast reconstruction results using TMG flap in 30 cases: Evaluation of several refinements addressing flap design, shaping techniques, and reduction of donor site morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickl, Stefanie; Nedomansky, Jakob; Radtke, Christine; Haslik, Werner; Schroegendorfer, Klaus F

    2018-01-31

    The transverse myocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap is a widely used alternative to abdominal flaps in autologous breast reconstruction. However, secondary procedures for aesthetic refinement are frequently necessary. Herein, we present our experience with an optimized approach in TMG breast reconstruction to enhance aesthetic outcome and to reduce the need for secondary refinements. We retrospectively analyzed 37 immediate or delayed reconstructions with TMG flaps in 34 women, performed between 2009 and 2015. Four patients (5 flaps) constituted the conventional group (non-optimized approach). Thirty patients (32 flaps; modified group) underwent an optimized procedure consisting of modified flap harvesting and shaping techniques and methods utilized to reduce denting after rib resection and to diminish donor site morbidity. Statistically significant fewer secondary procedures (0.6 ± 0.9 versus 4.8 ± 2.2; P < .001) and fewer trips to the OR (0.4 ± 0.7 versus 2.3 ± 1.0 times; P = .001) for aesthetic refinement were needed in the modified group as compared to the conventional group. In the modified group, 4 patients (13.3%) required refinement of the reconstructed breast, 7 patients (23.3%) underwent mastopexy/mammoplasty or lipofilling of the contralateral breast, and 4 patients (13.3%) required refinement of the contralateral thigh. Total flap loss did not occur in any patient. Revision surgery was needed once. Compared to the conventional group, enhanced aesthetic results with consecutive reduction of secondary refinements could be achieved when using our modified flap harvesting and shaping techniques, as well as our methods for reducing contour deformities after rib resection and for overcoming donor site morbidities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Recovery of sensation in immediate breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps after breast-conservative surgery and skin-sparing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2011-04-01

    In breast reconstruction, sensation in the reconstructed breasts affects the patients' quality of life along with its aesthetic outcome. Fortunately, less invasive procedures such as breast-conservative surgery (BCS) and skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) have greatly contributed to the improved aesthetic outcome in immediate breast reconstruction. However, there are few reports on the recovery of breast sensation after BCS and SSM. We retrospectively reviewed 104 consecutive patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap between 2001 and 2006 at our institution. The sensations of pain, temperature, touch, and vibration were examined at the nipple and skin envelope during the follow-up period (range: 12-61 months, mean: 31 months), and a stratified analysis was performed to determine the critical factors affecting the sensation recovery after BCS and SSM. We found that large breast size significantly impaired the recovery of sensation in the nipple and skin envelope after BCS as well as SSM. Older age and high body mass index value were the factors which negatively affected the sensation in the skin envelope after SSM. While all our BCS patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy, it did not negatively affect the recovery of sensation in SSM patients. On the basis of these findings, we could further improve the sensation of the reconstructed breasts after BCS and SSM. Especially after SSM, the use of innervated flaps is recommended in the patients with large breast, increased age, or obesity when the nipple-areola complex is resected.

  7. Pre-operative CT angiography and three-dimensional image post processing for deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D L; Mitsumori, L M; Neligan, P C; Warren, B H; Shuman, W P; Dubinsky, T J

    2012-12-01

    Autologous breast reconstructive surgery with deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps has become the mainstay for breast reconstructive surgery. CT angiography and three-dimensional image post processing can depict the number, size, course and location of the DIEA perforating arteries for the pre-operative selection of the best artery to use for the tissue flap. Knowledge of the location and selection of the optimal perforating artery shortens operative times and decreases patient morbidity.

  8. The transverse musculo-cutaneous gracilis flap for breast reconstruction: How to avoid complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Frédéric; Dissaux, Caroline; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Schohn, Thomas; Fiquet, Caroline; Bruant-Rodier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has become a common solution for breast reconstruction. However, the safe skin paddle limits are not yet understood. In this study, we attempted to address this issue based on our experiences with inferior and posterior skin paddle extension. Forty-four breast reconstructions with TMG flaps performed between November 2010 and January 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. For the first 20 cases, the flap skin paddle was extended 3 cm posteriorly to the middle thigh (group 1). For the next 20 flaps (group 2), the posterior tip was limited to this line, whereas more fat was recruited inferiorly. In the four cases of group 3, the skin flap was extended posteriorly with a second vascular pedicle from the profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap. The weights and the dimensions of the flaps, operating durations, and postoperative complications of the entire series were analyzed. Groups 1 and 2 were statistically compared. Flap complications were statistically more frequent in group 1 compared with group 2 (45 vs. 0%, P = 0.0012); 40% posterior flap tip necrosis was observed in group 1. Conversely, donor site complications were statistically more frequent in group 2 than in group 1 (40 vs. 5%, P = 0.019) with 35% inner thigh dehiscence. In the TMG with extended PAP flap group, the operating duration was 77 min longer compared with the rest of the series with no donor site complications. In one case, limited necrosis occurred at the anterior skin tip. Harvesting the posterior portion of the TMG up to the middle of the posterior thigh may lead to partial flap necrosis. Extending subcutaneous fat removal under the inferior skin incision may increase the risk of donor site complications. Adding a second vascular pedicle from the PAP flap may improve posterior TMG tip perfusion at the expense of a longer operation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Long-term follow-up of changing practice patterns in breast reconstruction due to increased use of tissue expanders and perforator flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Michele A; Prucz, Roni B; Shridharani, Sachin M; Baltodano, Pablo A; Rosson, Gedge D

    2014-11-01

    As the science of breast reconstruction evolves, significant changes in reconstruction strategies and outcomes are expected. The purpose of this study is to determine the changes in breast reconstruction trends and outcomes that occurred at a multidisciplinary academic institution during the last decade. We compared 265 patients over two distinct 6-month intervals separated by 5 years (2002 vs. 2007) and performed long-term follow-up (4.75 ± 3.38 years 2002, 2.99 ± 2.25 years 2007). We studied patients seeking prophylactic mastectomy, patients with early breast cancer, and patients with locally advanced disease. We analyzed demographic data, breast cancer history and treatment, type and timing of reconstruction, and complications. Implant to flap reconstruction ratio was 48:49 in 2002 and 76:102 in 2007. Use of transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap declined from 57 to 4%; conversely, deep inferior epigastric perforator flap increased from 27 to 91% (P < 0.001). Correspondingly, donor site chronic pain (4 vs. 0, P = 0.012) and postoperative abdominal wall bulge (9 vs. 3, P = 0.004) rates decreased. Timing of reconstruction showed increased staged cases in 2007 compared to 2002 (P = 0.045). Post-final reconstruction radiation therapy was reduced in 2007 (P = 0.016), with subsequent lower rates of implant rupture (P < 0.001). At our institution and over the last decade, increasing staged reconstructions have successfully reduced the rates of post-final reconstruction radiotherapy with optimized outcomes. Contrary to national trends, the rates of autologous flap reconstructions have increased with reduced donor site morbidity. This suggests that academic breast reconstruction trends are independent from national trends. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Breast cancer in the lower jaw after reconstructive surgery with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestle-Kraemling C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For head and neck as well as for oromaxillofacial surgery, the use of the pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC flap is a standard reconstructive technique after radical surgery for cancers in this region. We report to our knowledge for the first development of breast cancer in the PMMC flap in a 79 year old patient, who had undergone several operations in the past for recurring squamous cell carcinoma of the jaw. The occurrence of a secondary malignancy within the donor tissue after flap transfer is rare, but especially in the case of transferred breast tissue and the currently high incidence of breast cancer theoretically possible. Therefore preoperative screening mammography seems advisable to exclude a preexisting breast cancer in female patients undergoing such reconstruction surgery. Therapy for breast cancer under these circumstances is individual and consists of radical tumor resection followed by radiation if applicable and a standard systemic therapeutic regimen on the background of the patients individual prognosis due to the primary cancer.

  11. Breast sensation after breast reconstruction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Stapleton, Sahael M; Basdag, Basak; Seal, Stella M; Rosson, Gedge D

    2010-07-01

    Studies show some return of breast sensation after breast reconstruction; however, recovery is variable and unpredictable. Efforts are being made to restore innervation by reattaching nerves (neurotization). We sought to systematically review the literature addressing breast sensation after reconstruction. The following databases were searched: EMBASE, Cochrane, and PubMed. Additionally, the PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY journal was hand searched from 1960 to 2009. Inclusion criteria included breast reconstruction for cancer, return of sensation with objective results, and patients aged 18 to 90 years. Studies with purely cosmetic procedures, case reports, studies with less than 10 patients, and studies involving male patients were excluded. The initial search yielded 109 studies, which was refined to 20 studies with a total pool of 638 patients. Innervated flaps have a greater magnitude of recovery, which occurs at an earlier stage compared with the noninnervated flaps. Overall, sensation to deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps may recover better sensation than transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, followed by latissimus dorsi flaps, and finally implants. Women's needs and expectations for sensation have led plastic surgeons to investigate ways to facilitate its return. Studies, however, depict conflicting data. Larger series are needed to define the role of neurotization as a modality for improving sensory restoration. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  12. Flap Lymphedema after Successful Reconstruction of the Chronic Inguinal Wound with a Vertical Rectus Abdominis Flap (VRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of extensive and complex wounds represents a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeon. The reconstructive options to provide cover-age following debridment of these complicated wounds are local, distant flaps, or freetissue transfer. Vertical rectus abdominis flaps have been used succes-sully to repair defects in the groin, hip, perineal, trunk, and breast regions. We encountered flap lymphedema after successful reconstruction of the chronic in-guinal wound with a vertical rectus abdominis (VRAM flap. As far as were able to ascertain, there is no report in the literature related to flap lymphedema.

  13. Three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography to predict weight and volume of deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Gedge D; Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Manahan, Michele A; Stapleton, Sahael M; Gilson, Marta M; Flores, Jaime I; Basdag, Basak; Fishman, Elliot K

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D CTA) can be used preoperatively to evaluate the course and caliber of perforating blood vessels for abdominal free-flap breast reconstruction. For postmastectomy breast reconstruction, many women inquire whether the abdominal tissue volume will match that of the breast to be removed. Therefore, our goal was to estimate preoperative volume and weight of the proposed flap and compare them with the actual volume and weight to determine if diagnostic imaging can accurately identify the amount of tissue that could potentially to be harvested. Preoperative 3D CTA was performed in 15 patients, who underwent breast reconstruction using the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. Before each angiogram, stereotactic fiducials were placed on the planned flap outline. The radiologist reviewed each preoperative angiogram to estimate the volume, and thus, weight of the flap. These estimated weights were compared with the actual intraoperative weights. The average estimated weight was 99.7% of the actual weight. The interquartile range (25th to 75th percentile), which represents the "middle half" of the patients, was 91-109%, indicating that half of the patients had an estimated weight within 9% of the actual weight; however, there was a large range (70-133%). 3D CTA with stereotactic fiducials allows surgeons to adequately estimate abdominal flap volume before surgery, potentially giving guidance in the amount of tissue that can be harvested from a patient's lower abdomen. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Two-Stage Latissimus Dorsi Flap with Implant for Unilateral Breast Reconstruction: Getting the Size Right

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    Jiajun Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy is to craft a natural-looking breast with symmetry. The latissimus dorsi (LD flap with implant is an established technique for this purpose. However, it is challenging to obtain adequate volume and satisfactory aesthetic results using a one-stage operation when considering factors such as muscle atrophy, wound dehiscence and excessive scarring. The two-stage reconstruction addresses these difficulties by using a tissue expander to gradually enlarge the skin pocket which eventually holds an appropriately sized implant.MethodsWe analyzed nine patients who underwent unilateral two-stage LD reconstruction. In the first stage, an expander was placed along with the LD flap to reconstruct the mastectomy defect, followed by gradual tissue expansion to achieve overexpansion of the skin pocket. The final implant volume was determined by measuring the residual expander volume after aspirating the excess saline. Finally, the expander was replaced with the chosen implant.ResultsThe average volume of tissue expansion was 460 mL. The resultant expansion allowed an implant ranging in volume from 255 to 420 mL to be placed alongside the LD muscle. Seven patients scored less than six on the relative breast retraction assessment formula for breast symmetry, indicating excellent breast symmetry. The remaining two patients scored between six and eight, indicating good symmetry.ConclusionsThis approach allows the size of the eventual implant to be estimated after the skin pocket has healed completely and the LD muscle has undergone natural atrophy. Optimal reconstruction results were achieved using this approach.

  15. Shoulder-related donor site morbidity and patient-reported satisfaction after delayed breast reconstruction with pedicled flaps from the back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindom, Mikkel Børsen; Gunnarsson, Gudjon L.; Lautrup, Marianne D.

    2018-01-01

    reconstructed using the TAP flap had a difference of 3.2 points for pain (p-value 0.003) and 5.5 points for ROM (p-value 0.011). The factors ADL and strength were of equal magnitude in both groups. Conclusions: Patients who undergo delayed breast reconstruction by the TAP flap seem less prone to suffer from...

  16. Optimizing Aesthetic Outcomes in Delayed Breast Reconstruction

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    Wojciech Dec, MD

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions:. Optimal aesthetic results can be achieved with: (1 restoration of breast skin envelope with tissue expansion when possible, (2 optimal positioning of a small skin paddle to be later incorporated entirely into a nipple areola reconstruction when adequate breast skin surface area is present, (3 limiting the reconstructed breast mound to 2 skin tones when large area skin resurfacing is required, (4 increasing breast volume by deepithelializing, not discarding, the inferior mastectomy flap skin, (5 eccentric division of abdominal flaps when an immediate and delayed bilateral breast reconstructions are performed simultaneously; and (6 performing second-stage breast reconstruction revisions and fat grafting.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of implants versus autologous perforator flaps using the BREAST-Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matros, Evan; Albornoz, Claudia R; Razdan, Shantanu N; Mehrara, Babak J; Macadam, Sheina A; Ro, Teresa; McCarthy, Colleen M; Disa, Joseph J; Cordeiro, Peter G; Pusic, Andrea L

    2015-04-01

    Reimbursement has been recognized as a physician barrier to autologous reconstruction. Autologous reconstructions are more expensive than prosthetic reconstructions, but provide greater health-related quality of life. The authors' hypothesis is that autologous tissue reconstructions are cost-effective compared with prosthetic techniques when considering health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer perspective, including patient input, was performed for unilateral and bilateral reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and implants. The effectiveness measure was derived using the BREAST-Q and interpreted as the cost for obtaining 1 year of perfect breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year. Costs were obtained from the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was generated. A sensitivity analysis for age and stage at diagnosis was performed. BREAST-Q scores from 309 patients with implants and 217 DIEP flap reconstructions were included. The additional cost for obtaining 1 year of perfect breast-related health for a unilateral DIEP flap compared with implant reconstruction was $11,941. For bilateral DIEP flaps compared with implant reconstructions, the cost for an additional breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year was $28,017. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the cost for an additional breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year for DIEP flaps compared with implants was less for younger patients and earlier stage breast cancer. DIEP flaps are cost-effective compared with implants, especially for unilateral reconstructions. Cost-effectiveness of autologous techniques is maximized in women with longer life expectancy. Patient-reported outcomes findings can be incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses to demonstrate the relative value of reconstructive procedures.

  18. Breast Reconstruction with Flap Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... augmented with a breast implant to achieve the desired breast size. Surgical methods Autologous tissue breast reconstruction ... as long as a year or two before feeling completely healed and back to normal. Future breast ...

  19. Internal Mammary Vessels’ Impact on Abdominal Skin Perfusion in Free Abdominal Flap Breast Reconstruction

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    Solveig Nergård, MD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions:. Using the IMV in free abdominal flap breast reconstruction had a significant effect on abdominal skin perfusion and may contribute to abdominal wound healing problems. The reperfusion of the abdominal skin was a dynamic process showing an increase in perfusion in the affected areas during the postoperative days.

  20. The Pedicled LICAP Flap Combined with a Free Abdominal Flap In Autologous Breast Reconstructions

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    Thomas Sjøberg, MD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion:. In selected patients with insufficient abdominal flap tissue, a combination of a free abdominal flap and a pedicled LICAP flap is a valuable option to increase breast size and cosmetic outcome. Additional symmetrizing surgery might still be necessary.

  1. Shaping the breast in secondary microsurgical breast reconstruction: single- vs. two-esthetic unit reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravvanis, Andreas; Smith, Roger W

    2010-10-01

    The esthetic outcome is dictated essentially not only by the position, size, and shape of the reconstructed breast, but also by the extra scaring involved. In the present study, we conducted a visual analog scale survey to compare the esthetic outcome in delayed autologous breast reconstruction following two different abdominal flaps inset. Twenty-five patients had their reconstruction using the Single-esthetic Unit principle and were compared with 25 patients that their breast was reconstructed using the Two-Esthetic Unit principle. Photographic images were formulated to a PowerPoint presentation and cosmetic outcomes were assessed from 30 physicians, by means of a Questionnaire and a visual analog scale. Our data showed that the single-esthetic unit breast reconstruction presents significant advantages over the traditional two-esthetic units, due to inconspicuous flap reconstruction, better position of the inframammary fold, and more natural transition from native and reconstructed tissues. Moreover, patient self-evaluation of esthetic outcome and quality of life showed that single-esthetic unit reconstruction is associated with higher patient satisfaction, therefore should be considered the method of choice. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Does Fibrin Sealant Reduce Seroma after Immediate Breast Reconstruction Utilizing a Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap?

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    Han Gyu Cha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common complication of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in breastreconstruction is seroma formation in the back. Many clinical studies have shown that fibrinsealant reduces seroma formation. We investigated any statistically significant differences inpostoperative drainage and seroma formation when utilizing the fibrin sealant on the site ofthe latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap harvested for immediate breast reconstruction afterskin-sparing partial mastectomy.Methods A total of 46 patients underwent immediate breast reconstruction utilizing alatissimus dorsi myocutaneous island flap. Of those, 23 patients underwent the procedurewithout fibrin sealant and the other 23 were administered the fibrin sealant. All flaps wereelevated with manual dissection by the same surgeon and were analyzed to evaluate thepotential benefits of the fibrin sealant. The correlation analysis and Mann-Whitney U testwere used for analyzing the drainage volume according to age, weight of the breast specimen,and body mass index.Results Although not statistically significant, the cumulative drainage fluid volume was higherin the control group until postoperative day 2 (530.1 mL compared to 502.3 mL, but thefibrin sealant group showed more drainage beginning on postoperative day 3. The donor sitecomparisons showed the fibrin sealant group had more drainage beginning on postoperativeday 3 and the drain was removed 1 day earlier in the control group.Conclusions The use of fibrin sealant resulted in no reduction of seroma formation. Becausethe benefits of the fibrin sealant are not clear, the use of fibrin sealant must be fully discussedwith patients before its use as a part of informed consent.

  3. An Algorithmic Approach to Total Breast Reconstruction with Free Tissue Transfer

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    Seong Cheol Yu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As microvascular techniques continue to improve, perforator flap free tissue transfer is now the gold standard for autologous breast reconstruction. Various options are available for breast reconstruction with autologous tissue. These include the free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap, deep inferior epigastric perforator flap, superficial inferior epigastric artery flap, superior gluteal artery perforator flap, and transverse/vertical upper gracilis flap. In addition, pedicled flaps can be very successful in the right hands and the right patient, such as the pedicled TRAM flap, latissimus dorsi flap, and thoracodorsal artery perforator. Each flap comes with its own advantages and disadvantages related to tissue properties and donor-site morbidity. Currently, the problem is how to determine the most appropriate flap for a particular patient among those potential candidates. Based on a thorough review of the literature and accumulated experiences in the author’s institution, this article provides a logical approach to autologous breast reconstruction. The algorithms presented here can be helpful to customize breast reconstruction to individual patient needs.

  4. Biologic collagen cylinder with skate flap technique for nipple reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Brian P; Hodde, Jason P; Changkuon, Daniela I

    2014-01-01

    A surgical technique using local tissue skate flaps combined with cylinders made from a naturally derived biomaterial has been used effectively for nipple reconstruction. A retrospective review of patients who underwent nipple reconstruction using this technique was performed. Comorbidities and type of breast reconstruction were collected. Outcome evaluation included complications, surgical revisions, and nipple projection. There were 115 skate flap reconstructions performed in 83 patients between July 2009 and January 2013. Patients ranged from 32 to 73 years old. Average body mass index was 28.0. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (39.8%) and smoking (16.9%). After breast reconstruction, 68.7% of the patients underwent chemotherapy and 20.5% underwent radiation. Seventy-one patients had immediate breast reconstruction with expanders and 12 had delayed reconstruction. The only reported complications were extrusions (3.5%). Six nipples (5.2%) in 5 patients required surgical revision due to loss of projection; two patients had minor loss of projection but did not require surgical revision. Nipple projection at time of surgery ranged from 6 to 7 mm and average projection at 6 months was 3-5 mm. A surgical technique for nipple reconstruction using a skate flap with a graft material is described. Complications are infrequent and short-term projection measurements are encouraging.

  5. Biologic Collagen Cylinder with Skate Flap Technique for Nipple Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Tierney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A surgical technique using local tissue skate flaps combined with cylinders made from a naturally derived biomaterial has been used effectively for nipple reconstruction. A retrospective review of patients who underwent nipple reconstruction using this technique was performed. Comorbidities and type of breast reconstruction were collected. Outcome evaluation included complications, surgical revisions, and nipple projection. There were 115 skate flap reconstructions performed in 83 patients between July 2009 and January 2013. Patients ranged from 32 to 73 years old. Average body mass index was 28.0. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (39.8% and smoking (16.9%. After breast reconstruction, 68.7% of the patients underwent chemotherapy and 20.5% underwent radiation. Seventy-one patients had immediate breast reconstruction with expanders and 12 had delayed reconstruction. The only reported complications were extrusions (3.5%. Six nipples (5.2% in 5 patients required surgical revision due to loss of projection; two patients had minor loss of projection but did not require surgical revision. Nipple projection at time of surgery ranged from 6 to 7 mm and average projection at 6 months was 3–5 mm. A surgical technique for nipple reconstruction using a skate flap with a graft material is described. Complications are infrequent and short-term projection measurements are encouraging.

  6. The limitations of tissue-oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography as additional methods for postoperative breast reconstruction free-flap monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Niemi, Tarja; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Minn, Heikki; Vahlberg, Tero; Kalliokoski, Kari; Suominen, Erkki; Grénman, Reidar; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2010-02-01

    Twelve patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a microvascular flap were monitored postoperatively with continuous partial tissue oxygenation (p(ti)O(2)) measurement. The regional blood flow (BF) of the entire flap was evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET) using oxygen-15-labelled water on the first postoperative (POP) morning to achieve data of the perfusion of the entire flap. A re-exploration was carried out if the p(ti)O(2) value remained lower than 15 mmHg for over 30 min. The mean p(ti)O(2) value of the flaps was 52.9+/-5.5 mmHg, whereas the mean BF values were 3.3+/-1.0 ml per 100 g min(-1). One false-positive result was detected by p(ti)O(2) measurement, resulting in an unnecessary re-exploration. Another re-operation suggested by the low p(ti)O(2) results was avoided due to the normal BF results assessed with PET. Totally, three flaps were re-explored. This prospective study suggests that continuous tissue-oxygen measurement with a polarographic needle probe is reliable for monitoring free breast flaps from one part of the flap, but assessing perfusion of the entire flap requires more complex monitoring methods, for example, PET. Clinical examination by experienced personnel remains important in free-breast-flap monitoring. PET could be useful in assessing free-flap perfusion in selected high-risk patients as an alternative to a re-operation when clinical examination and evaluation by other means are unreliable or present controversial results. 2008 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation Therapy Versus No Radiation Therapy to the Neo-breast Following Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Autologous Free Flap Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: Patient-Reported and Surgical Outcomes at 1 Year-A Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Diaz-Abele, Julian; Hayakawa, Tom; Buchel, Ed; Dalke, Kimberly; Lambert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is associated with adverse patient-reported outcomes and surgical complications 1 year after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer. We compared 24 domains of patient-reported outcome measures 1 year after autologous reconstruction between patients who received adjuvant RT and those who did not. A total of 125 patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2015 at our institution were included from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study database. Adjusted multivariate models were created incorporating RT technical data, age, cancer stage, estrogen receptor, chemotherapy, breast size, body mass index, and income to determine whether RT was associated with outcomes. At 1 year after surgery, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire breast symptoms were significantly greater in 64 patients who received RT (8-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, PBREAST-Q (Post-operative Reconstruction Module), Patient-Report Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile 29, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF) score, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-were not statistically different between groups. Surgical complications were uncommon and did not differ by treatment. RT to the neo-breast compared with no RT following immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer is well tolerated at 1 year following surgery despite patients undergoing RT also having a higher cancer stage and more intensive surgical and systemic treatment. Neo-breast symptoms are more common in patients receiving RT by the EORTC Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire but not by the BREAST-Q. Patient-reported results at 1 year after surgery suggest RT following immediate autologous free flap breast reconstruction is well tolerated

  8. A New Local Flap Nipple Reconstruction Technique Using Dermal Bridge and Preoperatively Designed Tattoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahira, Yoshiko

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nipple–areolar reconstruction is the final step in breast reconstruction. Reconstruction using local flaps and tattooing is useful in cases of bilateral reconstruction, a small nipple–areolar complex (NAC) as the donor site, and avoiding disturbance of the normal side and other body parts. However, this method can cause projection loss and color fading of the nipple. Moreover, the breast mound is reconstructed with an implant. Methods: We performed nipple–areolar reconstruction of 90 nipples using clover-designed flaps oriented at 120 degrees and tattooing after breast silicone implantation in 64 women. The tattoo was designed before flap operation and stained darker. Following donor site closure, a dermal flap was made as a bridge for nipple support. The nipple space was separated by the dermal flap from the breast mound and was filled with subcutaneous tissue. The size of the reconstructed nipple projection was measured postoperatively and 1 year later. The projection maintenance rate was calculated. Results: The heights of the nipple projection were 11.3 ± 1.8 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.9–11.7) just after the operation and 6.09 ± 2.4 mm (95% CI: 5.6–6.6) 1 year later. The actual range of nipple projection between these 2 heights was 5.2 ± 2.4 mm (95% CI: 4.7–5.7). The maintenance rate of the reconstructed nipple projection after 12 months was 54.1 ± 20.9 (95% CI: 49.7–58.5). The nipple color was maintained for over a year. Conclusions: Our nipple–areolar reconstruction technique could maintain the projection and color of the reconstructed nipple for a long period. Good outcomes were obtained in this implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:28507843

  9. Tumescent mastectomy technique in autologous breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G L; Ho, Olivia A; Ricci, Joseph A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Use of the tumescent mastectomy technique has been reported to facilitate development of a hydrodissection plane, reduce blood loss, and provide adjunct analgesia. Previous studies suggest that tumescent dissection may contribute to adverse outcomes after immediate implant reconstruction; however, its effect on autologous microsurgical reconstruction has not been established. A retrospective review was conducted of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstruction procedures at a single academic center between January 2004 and December 2013. Records were queried for age, body mass index, mastectomy weight, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, preoperative radiation, reconstruction flap type, and autologous flap weight. Outcomes of interest were mastectomy skin necrosis, complete and partial flap loss, return to the operating room, breast hematoma, seroma, and infection. There were 730 immediate autologous breast reconstructions performed during the study period; 46% with the tumescent dissection technique. Groups were similar with respect to baseline patient and procedural characteristics. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis, complete or partial flap loss, return to the operating room, operative time, estimated blood loss, recurrence, breast hematoma, seroma, or infection in patients undergoing tumescent mastectomy. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated no significant association between the use of tumescent technique and postoperative breast mastectomy skin necrosis (P = 0.980), hematoma (P = 0.759), or seroma (P = 0.340). Use of the tumescent dissection technique during mastectomy is not significantly associated with adverse outcomes after microsurgical breast reconstruction. Despite concern for its impact on implant reconstruction, our findings suggest that this method can be used safely preceding autologous procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endoscopic latissimus dorsi muscle flap for breast reconstruction after skin-sparing total mastectomy: report of 14 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Martin; Gonzalez-Chapa, Diego R

    2013-08-01

    Some authors have mentioned that the endoscopic harvesting of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap for breast reconstruction is an uncommon technique that has been abandoned due to its technical complexity. Therefore, its use for immediate breast reconstruction after skin-sparing total mastectomies is reported for only a few patients, without clinical images of the reconstructed breast or of the donor site. This report describes 14 breast reconstructions using the aforementioned approach, with the latissimus dorsi muscle flap harvested by endoscopy plus the insertion of a breast implant in a single surgical procedure. The objective is to show images of the long-range clinical aesthetic results, both in the reconstructed breast and at the donor site as well as the complications so the reader can evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. From 2008 to 2011, 12 women who experienced skin-sparing total mastectomy and 2 women who underwent modified radical mastectomy were reconstructed using the aforementioned technique. The average age was 42 years (range 30-58 years), and the average body mass index was 29 kg/m(2) (range 22-34 kg/m(2)). Three patients were heavy smokers: one had undergone a previous abdominoplasty; one had hepatitis C; and one had undergone massive weight loss. Immediate reconstructions were performed for 11 patients, and 3 reconstructions were delayed. The implant volume ranged from 355 to 640 ml. The average endoscopic harvesting time was 163.5 min (range 120-240 min), and the average bleeding was 300 ml. Four patients experienced seromas at the donor site. Acceptance of the reconstructed breast was good in six cases, moderate in seven cases, and poor in one case. Acceptance of the donor site was good in 13 cases and moderate for 1 case. Endoscopic harvesting of the latissimus dorsi muscle has technical difficulties that have limited its acceptance. However, this technique offers the same quality of breast reconstruction as the

  11. Mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G; Anderson, Katarina E; Paul, Marek A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis represents a significant clinical morbidity after immediate breast reconstruction. In addition to aesthetic deformity, necrosis of the native mastectomy skin may require debridement, additional reconstruction, or prolonged wound care and potentially delay oncologic treatment. This study aims to evaluate patient and procedural characteristics to identify predictors of mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstructions performed at a single academic center. Patient records were queried for age, diabetes, active smoking, previous breast surgery, preoperative radiation, preoperative chemotherapy, body mass index, mastectomy type, mastectomy weight, flap type, autologous flap type, and postoperative mastectomy skin flap necrosis. There were 746 immediate autologous microsurgical flaps performed by three plastic surgeons at our institution during the study period. The incidence of mastectomy skin flap necrosis was 13.4%. Univariate analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis in patients with higher mastectomy weight (P mastectomy type. Multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant associations between mastectomy skin necrosis and both increasing mastectomy weight (odds ratio 1.348 per quartile increase, P = 0.009) and diabetes (odds ratio 2.356, P = 0.011). Increasing mastectomy weight and coexisting diabetes are significantly associated with postoperative mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical reconstruction. These characteristics should be considered during patient counseling, procedure selection, operative planning, and intraoperative tissue viability assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation and Analysis of a Lean Six Sigma Program in Microsurgery to Improve Operative Throughput in Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Kim, Sendia; Lee, Clara N; Wu, Cindy; Dodge, Becky; Hultman, Chloe Elizabeth; Roach, S Tanner; Halvorson, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Perforator flaps have become a preferred method of breast reconstruction but can consume considerable resources. We examined the impact of a Six Sigma program on microsurgical breast reconstruction at an academic medical center. Using methods developed by Motorola and General Electric, we applied critical pathway planning, workflow analysis, lean manufacturing, continuous quality improvement, and defect reduction to microsurgical breast reconstruction. Primary goals were to decrease preoperative-to-cut time and total operative time, through reduced variability and improved efficiency. Secondary goals were to reduce length of stay, complications, and reoperation. The project was divided into 3 phases: (1) Pre-Six Sigma (24 months), (2) Six Sigma (10 months), (3) and Post-Six Sigma (24 months). These periods (baseline, intervention, control) were compared by Student t test and χ analysis. Over a 5-year period, 112 patients underwent 168 perforator flaps for breast reconstructions, by experienced microsurgeons. Total operative time decreased from 714 to 607 minutes (P Six Sigma program in microsurgical breast reconstruction was associated with better operational and financial outcomes. These incremental gains were maintained over the course of the study, suggesting that these benefits were due, in part, to process improvements. However, continued reductions in total operative time and length of stay, well after the intervention period, support the possibility that "learning curve" phenomenon may have contributed to the improvement in these outcomes.

  13. A Novel Nipple Reconstruction Technique for Maintaining Nipple Projection: The Boomerang Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Eun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nipple-areolar complex (NAC reconstruction is the final step in the long journey of breast reconstruction for mastectomy patients. Successful NAC reconstruction depends on the use of appropriate surgical techniques that are simple and reliable. To date, numerous techniques have been used for nipple reconstruction, including contralateral nipple sharing and various local flaps. Recently, it has been common to utilize local flaps. However, the most common nipple reconstruction problem encountered with local flaps is the loss of nipple projection; there can be approximately 50% projection loss in reconstructed nipples over long-term follow-up. Several factors might contribute to nipple projection loss, and we tried to overcome these factors by performing nipple reconstructions using a boomerang flap technique, which is a modified C–V flap that utilizes the previous mastectomy scar to maintain long-term nipple projection.

  14. A Novel Nipple Reconstruction Technique for Maintaining Nipple Projection: The Boomerang Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Eun; Hong, Ki Yong; Minn, Kyung Won; Jin, Ung Sik

    2016-09-01

    Nipple-areolar complex (NAC) reconstruction is the final step in the long journey of breast reconstruction for mastectomy patients. Successful NAC reconstruction depends on the use of appropriate surgical techniques that are simple and reliable. To date, numerous techniques have been used for nipple reconstruction, including contralateral nipple sharing and various local flaps. Recently, it has been common to utilize local flaps. However, the most common nipple reconstruction problem encountered with local flaps is the loss of nipple projection; there can be approximately 50% projection loss in reconstructed nipples over long-term follow-up. Several factors might contribute to nipple projection loss, and we tried to overcome these factors by performing nipple reconstructions using a boomerang flap technique, which is a modified C-V flap that utilizes the previous mastectomy scar to maintain long-term nipple projection.

  15. [Transposition of the cephalic vein in free flap breast reconstruction: Technical note].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silhol, T; Suffee, T; Hivelin, M; Lantieri, L

    2018-02-01

    Free flaps have become a reliable practice for breast reconstruction. However, the venous congestion is still the most frequent reason of flap failure. It is due to bad quality of the internal mammary veins, a preferential superficial venous outflow of the flap or due to venous thrombosis. The transposition of the cephalic vein could useful in some cases. We describe the surgical technique and suggest an intraoperative algorithm. Seventeen patients (15 DIEP and 2 PAP) were included. Twenty nine point four percent had an unusable internal mammary vein, 23.5% a preferential superficial venous outflow and 47.1% a venous thrombosis. The length of the cephalic vein dissected varied from 15 to 25cm. The mean time of dissection was 39min. There was no flap failure after cephalic vein transposition. The sequelae were one or two scars on the arm without any functional morbidity. The transposition of the cephalic vein is a reliable, less morbid alternative in case of bad quality internal mammary vein with a good quality internal mammary artery, in case of an additional venous outflow necessity or in case of venous thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomical basis of the lateral superior gluteal artery perforator (LSGAP) flap and role in bilateral breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fade, Geraldine; Gobel, Fabienne; Pele, Eric; Chaput, Benoit; Garrido, Ignacio; Pinsolle, Vincent; Pelissier, Philippe; Sinna, Raphael

    2013-06-01

    Deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap is one of the gold standards in autologous breast reconstruction. When the abdominal tissue is not available, the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) is often a second option with its drawback, especially the donor-site deformity. Reports have highlighted that a higher and more lateral SGAP flap can be harvested to overcome several drawbacks of the classical SGAP, allowing in the same procedure a body-contouring procedure. In order to set the anatomical basis of this flap, we proposed to study the characteristics of a reliable and easily identifiable superior and lateral perforator of the superior gluteal artery (lateral SGAP (LSGAP)) situated in the region of the lower body-lift resection allowing to perform bilateral breast reconstruction at the same time. The anatomical study of 50 scans (or 100 buttocks) allows us to set forth a diagnostic assumption on the localisation of the perforator with respect to osseous landmarks (coccyx, iliac crest and great trochanter) which will be verified during the dissection of 10 cadavers (or 20 buttocks) and during the 20 colour Doppler examination (or 40 buttocks). In our computed tomography (CT) scan study, in 96% of cases, the perforator was situated in a circle with a radius≤3 cm with a 95% confidence interval and located at the junction of the proximal third-middle third of the distance summit of the posterior iliac crest (point B), most lateral point of the greater trochanter (point C). This assumption was verified by the cadaveric dissection and in vivo studies. Our study sets the anatomical landmarks of the LSGAP flap. This option allows the raising of an SGAP flap avoiding the main drawbacks of this flap and allows harvesting a flap with the tissue that is often discarded during the body-lift procedure. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preoperative CT angiography reduces surgery time in perforator flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jeroen M.; Dimopoulou, Angeliki; Liss, Anders G.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Kildal, Morten; Whitaker, Iain S.; Magnusson, Anders; Acosta, Rafael

    The use of perforator flaps in breast reconstructions has increased considerably in the past decade. A disadvantage of the perforator flap is difficult dissection, which results in a longer procedure. During spring 2006, we introduced CT angiography (CTA) as part of the diagnostic work-up in

  18. BREAST RECONSTRUCTIONS AFTER BREAST CANCER TREATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Vrabič

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breasts are an important symbol of physical beauty, feminity, mothering and sexual desire through the entire history of mankind. Lost of the whole or part of the breast is functional and aesthetic disturbance for woman. It is understandable, that the woman, who is concerned over breast loss, is as appropriate as another person´s concern over the loss of a limb or other body part. Before the 1960, breast reconstruction was considered as a dangerous procedure and it was almost prohibited. Considering the psychological importance of the breast in modern society, the possibility of breast reconstruction for the woman about to undergo a mastectomy is a comforting alternative. We can perform breast reconstruction with autologous tissue (autologous reconstruction, with breast implants and combination of both methods. For autologous reconstruction we can use local tissue (local flaps, or tissue from distant parts of the body (free vascular tissue transfer. Tissue expansion must be performed first, in many cases of breast reconstructions with breast implants. Conclusions. Possibility of breast reconstruction made a big progress last 3 decades. Today we are able to reconstruct almost every defect of the breast and the entire breast. Breast reconstruction rise the quality of life for breast cancer patients. Breast reconstruction is a team work of experts from many medicine specialites. In Slovenia we can offer breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients in Ljubljana, where plastic surgeons from Clinical Department for Plastic Surgery and Burns cooperate with oncologic surgeons. Ten years ago a similar cooperation between plastic surgeons and surgeons of the Centre for Breast Diseases was established in Maribor.

  19. Usefulness of a Lateral Thoracodorsal Flap after Breast Conserving Surgery in Laterally Located Breast Cancer

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    Jung Dug Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBreast-conserving surgery is widely accepted as an appropriate method in breast cancer, and the lateral thoracodorsal flap provides a simple, reliable technique, especially when a mass is located in the lateral breast. This study describes the usefulness of a lateral thoracodorsal flap after breast conserving surgery in laterally located breast cancer.MethodsFrom September 2008 to February 2013, a lateral thoracodorsal flap was used in 20 patients with laterally located breast cancer treated at our institution. The technique involves a local medially based, wedge shaped, fasciocutaneous transposition flap from the lateral region of the thoracic area. Overall satisfaction and aesthetic satisfaction surveys were conducted with the patients during a 6-month postoperative follow-up period. Aesthetic results in terms of breast shape and symmetry were evaluated by plastic surgeons.ResultsThe average specimen weight was 76.8 g. The locations of the masses were the upper lateral quadrant (n=15, the lower lateral quadrant (n=2, and the central lateral area (n=3. Complications developed in four of the cases, partial flap necrosis in one, wound dehiscence in one, and fat necrosis in two. The majority of the patients were satisfied with their cosmetic outcomes.ConclusionsPartial breast reconstruction using a lateral thoracodorsal flap is well matched with breast color and texture, and the surgery is less aggressive than other techniques with few complications. Therefore, the lateral thoracodorsal flap can be a useful, reliable technique in correcting breast deformity after breast conserving surgery, especially in laterally located breast cancer.

  20. Usefulness of a Lateral Thoracodorsal Flap after Breast Conserving Surgery in Laterally Located Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Yong Park

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast-conserving surgery is widely accepted as an appropriate method in breast cancer, and the lateral thoracodorsal flap provides a simple, reliable technique, especially when a mass is located in the lateral breast. This study describes the usefulness of a lateral thoracodorsal flap after breast conserving surgery in laterally located breast cancer.Methods From September 2008 to February 2013, a lateral thoracodorsal flap was used in 20 patients with laterally located breast cancer treated at our institution. The technique involves a local medially based, wedge shaped, fasciocutaneous transposition flap from the lateral region of the thoracic area. Overall satisfaction and aesthetic satisfaction surveys were conducted with the patients during a 6-month postoperative follow-up period. Aesthetic results in terms of breast shape and symmetry were evaluated by plastic surgeons.Results The average specimen weight was 76.8 g. The locations of the masses were the upper lateral quadrant (n=15, the lower lateral quadrant (n=2, and the central lateral area (n=3. Complications developed in four of the cases, partial flap necrosis in one, wound dehiscence in one, and fat necrosis in two. The majority of the patients were satisfied with their cosmetic outcomes.Conclusions Partial breast reconstruction using a lateral thoracodorsal flap is well matched with breast color and texture, and the surgery is less aggressive than other techniques with few complications. Therefore, the lateral thoracodorsal flap can be a useful, reliable technique in correcting breast deformity after breast conserving surgery, especially in laterally located breast cancer.

  1. Combined Continuous Paravertebral and TAP Blocks for Pain Management after TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. RaoKadam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transverse Rectus Abdominis Musculocutaneous (TRAM flap surgery is a prolonged and extensive procedure that requires multiple incisions. Recently, Transverse Abdominis Plane (TAP blocks have been found to be reliable method of providing regional analgesia for lower abdominal surgery and paravertebral block for pain management after breast surgery. Since the TRAM flap surgery involves both abdomen and thorax, the combination of these two blocks to manage post operative pain could be effective. This manuscript is one of the initial cases reporting of the use of these techniques in which triple catheters with ropivacaine infusion in breast reconstruction surgery were successfully used with reduced pain scores and opioid consumption.

  2. Introducing the fast track surgery principles can reduce length of stay after autologous breast reconstruction using free flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian; Khorasani, Hoda; Eriksen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    , planned early discharge, and multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia. The results from all unilateral, breast reconstructions in the first 5 years after the implementation of the FTS (n = 177) were compared to results prior to the FTS (n = 292). Flap type, operating time, blood loss and ischaemic time, LOS...

  3. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation

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    Laurenz Weitgasser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction.

  4. Optimizing aesthetic outcomes for breast reconstruction in patients with significant macromastia or ptosis

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    Wojciech Dec

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving excellent aesthetic outcomes in reconstruction of large or ptotic breasts is especially challenging. Incorporating a Wise pattern into the mastectomy design is effective in reducing the excess breast skin, however it increases the risk of mastectomy skin necrosis. The aim of this study is to describe surgical maneuvers which optimize aesthetic outcomes, anticipate flap volume requirements, and limit mastectomy skin necrosis in autologous reconstruction in patients with macromastia and grade III ptosis. Methods: This is a retrospective review of operative and clinical records of patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral breast reconstruction with autologous tissue between August 2015 and May 2017. Patients were divided into macromastia and ptosis groups. Key surgical maneuvers for safely achieving aesthetically optimal results were identified. Results: A total of 29 breasts were successfully reconstructed in 19 patients with a Wise pattern mastectomy skin reduction. Free flap weights were similar in both groups, mastectomy weights were greater in the macromastia group, p < 0.05. Complications were limited to three cases of wound breakdown and one case of mastectomy skin necrosis. Total number of revision stages was reduced in unilateral reconstructions when a contralateral breast reduction or mastopexy was performed during the first stage. Conclusions: A Wise pattern can safely and effectively be incorporated into a mastectomy incision design in patients who are not candidates for a nipple sparing mastectomy. Optimal aesthetics are achieved with similar volume flaps for both macromastia and ptosis patients. In cases of unilateral breast reconstruction a contralateral breast reduction or mastopexy should be performed at the time of the immediate breast reconstruction. Keywords: Breast reconstruction, Aesthetic breast reconstruction, Macromastia breast reconstruction, Ptosis breast reconstruction

  5. Head and neck reconstruction with pedicled flaps in the free flap era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, R; Colletti, G; Bonomo, P; Parrinello, G; Iavarone, A; Dolivet, G; Livi, L; Deganello, A

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, the transposition of microvascular free flaps is the most popular method for management of head and neck defects. However, not all patients are suitable candidates for free flap reconstruction. In addition, not every defect requires a free flap transfer to achieve good functional results. The aim of this study was to assess whether pedicled flap reconstruction of head and neck defects is inferior to microvascular free flap reconstruction in terms of complications, functionality and prognosis. The records of consecutive patients who underwent free flap or pedicled flap reconstruction after head and neck cancer ablation from 2006 to 2015, from a single surgeon, in the AOUC Hospital, Florence Italy were analysed. A total of 93 patients, the majority with oral cancer (n = 59), were included, of which 64 were pedicled flap reconstructions (69%). The results showed no significant differences in terms of functional outcome, flap necrosis and complications in each type of reconstruction. Multivariate regression analysis of flap necrosis and functional impairments showed no associated factors. Multivariate regression analysis of complicated flap healing showed that only comorbidities remained an explaining factor (p = 0.019). Survival analysis and proportional hazard regression analysis regarding cancer relapse or distant metastasis, showed no significant differences in prognosis of patients concerning both types of reconstruction. In this retrospective, non-randomised study cohort, pedicled flaps were not significantly inferior to free flaps for reconstruction of head and neck defects, considering functionality, complications and prognosis. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  6. DIEP breast reconstruction following multiple abdominal liposuction procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mohammed; Nicholson, Simon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Akali, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Previous abdominal wall surgery is viewed as a contraindication to abdominal free tissue transfer. We present two patients who underwent multiple abdominal liposuction procedures, followed by successful free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We review the literature pertaining to reliability of abdominal free flaps in those with previous abdominal surgery. Review of case notes and radiological investigations of two patients, and a PubMed search using the terms "DIEP", "deep inferior epigastric", "TRAM", "transverse rectus abdominis", "perforator" and "laparotomy", "abdominal wall", "liposuction", "liposculpture", "fat graft", "pfannenstiel", with subsequent appraisal of relevant papers by the first and second authors. Patient 1 had 3 episodes of liposuction from the abdomen for fat grafting to a reconstructed breast. Subsequent revision reconstruction of the same breast with DIEP flap was preceded by CT angiography, which demonstrated normal perforator anatomy. The reconstruction healed well with no ischaemic complications. Patient 2 had 5 liposuction procedures from the abdomen to graft fat to a wide local excision defect. Recurrence of cancer led to mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with free DIEP flap. Preoperative MR angiography demonstrated a large perforator right of the umbilicus, with which the intraoperative findings were consistent. The patient had an uneventful recovery and good healing with no fat necrosis or wound dehiscence. We demonstrate that DIEP flaps can safely be raised without perfusion-related complications following multiple liposuction procedures to the abdomen. The safe interval between procedures is difficult to quantify, but we demonstrate successful free flap after 16 months.

  7. Evaluating the Use of Tissue Oximetry to Decrease Intensive Unit Monitoring for Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Joseph A; Vargas, Christina R; Ho, Olivia A; Lin, Samuel J; Tobias, Adam M; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative free flap care has historically required intensive monitoring for 24 hours in an intensive care unit. Continuous monitoring with tissue oximetry has allowed earlier detection of vascular compromise, decreasing flap loss and improving salvage. This study aims to identify whether a fast-track postoperative paradigm can be safely used with tissue oximetry to decrease intensive monitoring and costs. All consecutive microsurgical breast reconstructions performed at a single institution were reviewed (2008-2014) and cases requiring return to the operating room were identified. Data evaluated included patient demographics, the take back time course, and complications of flap loss and salvage. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to analyse the utility of a postoperative intensive monitoring setting. There were 900 flaps performed and 32 required an unplanned return to the operating room. There were 16 flaps that required a reexploration within the first 24 hours; the standard length of intensive unit monitoring. After 4 hours, there were 7 flaps (44%) detected by tissue oximetry for reexploration. After 15 hours of intensive monitoring postoperatively, cost analysis revealed that the majority (15/16; 94%) of failing flaps had been identified and the cost of identifying each subsequent failing flap exceeded the cost of another hour of intensive monitoring. The postoperative paradigm for microsurgical flaps has historically required intensive unit monitoring. Using tissue oximetry, a fast-track pathway can reduce time spent in an intensive monitoring setting from 24 to 15 hours with significant cost savings and minimal risk of missing a failing free flap.

  8. Surgical outcomes and nipple projection using the modified skate flap for nipple-areolar reconstruction in a series of 422 implant reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Toni; Antony, Anu; Cordeiro, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Numerous techniques have been used in an attempt to achieve long-term nipple projection following nipple-areolar reconstruction (NAR). A common setback, however, is the diminution of projection over time; this phenomenon is particularly evident following implant based breast reconstruction. The purpose of this report was thus to evaluate surgical outcomes and long-term nipple projection with the use of "modified skate flap" technique in exclusively implant based postmastectomy reconstructions. A retrospective review was performed for the period between 1993 and 2007. All consecutive patients with 2-staged tissue expander/implant reconstructions followed by NAR using the modified skate flap technique performed by the senior author (P.C.) were identified in a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database. Only patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were included in the study. Patients with a history of irradiation to the breast were excluded from nipple projection assessment. Clinical outcome measurements included long-term nipple projection as well as incidence of complications from the NAR procedure using the modified skate flap technique. Over the 15-year study period, 475 patients underwent 2-staged tissue expander/implant reconstruction followed by NAR using the modified skate flap technique. Of these, there was a total of 292 patients with the minimum requirement of 1-year follow-up post NAR (61% follow-up rate). The total number of reconstructed nipple areolar complexes evaluated in this series was 422 (130 bilateral and 162 unilateral NAR). Forty patients (28 unilateral and 12 bilateral NAR) who received radiation to their breasts were excluded from nipple projection assessment. At a median follow-up of 44 months (range: 12-84 months), mean nipple projection was 2.5 mm (range: 1-4 mm). Minor complications occurred in 7.2% of the patients (n = 292). Skin graft donor site dehiscence was the most common complication (3.1%) followed by partial skin

  9. Skin Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction (SSMIR for early breast cancer: Eight years single institution experience

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    Bobin Jean

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin Sparing Mastectomy (SSM and immediate breast reconstruction has become increasingly popular as an effective treatment for patients with breast carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of skin sparing mastectomy in early breast cancer at a single population-based institution. Methods Records of ninety-five consecutive patients with operable breast cancer who had skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstructions between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed. Patient and tumor characteristic, type of reconstruction, postoperative complications, aesthetic results and incidence of recurrence were analyzed. Results Mean age of the patients was 51.6(range 33–72 years. The AJCC pathologic stages were 0 (n = 51, 53.7%, I (n = 20, 21.1%, and II (n = 2, 2.1%. Twenty of the patients had recurrent disease (21.1%. The immediate breast reconstructions were performed with autologus tissue including latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in 63 (66.3% patients and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap in 4 (4.2% patients. Implants were used in 28 (29.4% patients. The average hospital stay was 7.7 days. Flap complication occurred in seven (10.4% patients resulting in four (6% re-operations and there were no delay in accomplishing postoperative adjuvant therapy. At a median follow-up of 69 months (range 48 to 144, local recurrence was seen in one patient (1.1% and systemic recurrence was seen in two patients (2.1%. Conclusion Skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for early breast cancer is associated with low morbidity and low rate of local recurrence.

  10. Facebook Facts: Breast Reconstruction Patient-Reported Outcomes Using Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sherry Y Q; Israel, Jacqueline S; Poore, Samuel O; Afifi, Ahmed M

    2018-05-01

    Social media are used for information sharing among patients with similar health conditions, and analysis of social media activity could inform clinical decision-making. The aim of this study was to use Facebook to evaluate a cohort of individuals' perceptions of and satisfaction with breast reconstruction. In this observational study, the authors collected and analyzed posts pertaining to autologous and implant-based breast reconstruction from active Facebook groups. Patient satisfaction data were categorized, and a thematic analysis of posts was conducted. Qualitative posts were grouped based on common themes and quantitatively compared using frequency and chi-square analysis. The authors evaluated 500 posts from two Facebook groups. Two hundred sixty-four posts referenced deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction and 117 were related to implant-based reconstruction. Among individuals referencing DIEP flap reconstruction, 52 percent were satisfied, compared with 20 percent of individuals who referenced satisfaction with implant-based reconstruction (p < 0.0001). Individuals posting about DIEP flaps reported a higher rate of unexpected side effects (p < 0.001) and numbness (p = 0.004). When referencing implant-based reconstruction, individuals reported significantly higher rates of infection, contracture, and implant failure (p < 0.001). Based on the authors' review of social media activity, individuals undergoing DIEP flap breast reconstruction expressed relatively high individual satisfaction despite difficult postoperative recovery. Individuals who referenced implant-based reconstruction mentioned infection and implant failure, leading to high rates of dissatisfaction. Social media appear to provide informational and emotional support to patients. Plastic surgeons can use social media to gather unbiased information of patients' experience to inform clinical conversation and guide clinical practice.

  11. Evolution in Monitoring of Free Flap Autologous Breast Reconstruction after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy: Is There a Best Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jordan D; Stranix, John T; Chiodo, Michael V; Alperovich, Michael; Ahn, Christina Y; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Levine, Jamie P

    2018-05-01

    Free flap monitoring in autologous reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy remains controversial. The authors therefore examined outcomes in nipple-sparing mastectomy with buried free flap reconstruction versus free flap reconstruction incorporating a monitoring skin paddle. Autologous free flap reconstructions with nipple-sparing mastectomy performed from 2006 to 2015 were identified. Demographics and operative results were analyzed and compared between buried flaps and those with a skin paddle for monitoring. Two hundred twenty-one free flaps for nipple-sparing mastectomy reconstruction were identified: 50 buried flaps and 171 flaps incorporating a skin paddle. The most common flaps used were deep inferior epigastric perforator (64 percent), profunda artery perforator (12.1 percent), and muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (10.4 percent). Patients undergoing autologous reconstructions with a skin paddle had a significantly greater body mass index (p = 0.006). Mastectomy weight (p = 0.017) and flap weight (p < 0.0001) were significantly greater in flaps incorporating a skin paddle. Comparing outcomes, there were no significant differences in flap failure (2.0 percent versus 2.3 percent; p = 1.000) or percentage of flaps requiring return to the operating room (6.0 percent versus 4.7 percent; p = 0.715) between groups. Buried flaps had an absolute greater mean number of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy (0.82) compared with the skin paddle group (0.44); however, rates of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy were statistically equivalent between the groups (p = 0.296). Although buried free flap reconstruction in nipple-sparing mastectomy has been shown to be safe and effective, the authors' technique has evolved to favor incorporating a skin paddle, which allows for clinical monitoring and can be removed at the time of secondary revision. Therapeutic, III.

  12. One-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following areola-sparing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Ri; Lim, Jin Soo; Kim, Sue Min; Jung, Sung No; Yoo, Gyeol; Rha, Eun Young

    2013-09-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is increasingly becoming a proven surgical option for early-stage breast cancer patients. Areola-sparing mastectomy (ASM) has also recently become a popular procedure. The purpose of this article is to investigate the reconstructive and aesthetic issues experienced with one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction using ASM. Among the patients who underwent mastectomy between March 2008 and March 2010, 5 women with a low probability of nipple-areolar complex malignant involvement underwent ASM and immediate breast reconstruction with simultaneous nipple reconstruction using the modified C-V flap. The cosmetic outcomes of this series were reviewed by plastic surgeons and patient self-assessment and satisfaction were assessed via telephone interview. During the average 11-month follow-up period, there were no cases of cancer recurrence, the aesthetic outcomes were graded as excellent to very good, and all of the patients were satisfied. Two patients developed a gutter-like depression around the reconstructed nipple, and one patient developed skin erosion in a small area of the areola, which healed with conservative dressing. The other complications, such as necrosis of the skin flap or areola, seroma, hematoma, or fat necrosis did not occur. Since one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following ASM is an oncologically safe, cost-effective, and aesthetically satisfactory procedure, it is a good surgical option for early breast cancer patients.

  13. The Economics of Prepectoral Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasberg, Scot Bradley

    2017-12-01

    The world of breast reconstruction over the last several years has seen a dramatic shift in focus to discussion and the application of placing tissue expanders and implants back into the prepectoral space. Although this technique failed during the early advent of breast reconstruction, newer technologies such as advances in fat grafting, improved acellular dermal matrices, better methods of assessing breast flap viability, and enhanced implants appear to have set the stage for the resurgence and positive early results seen with this technique. The main benefits of a switch to prepectoral breast reconstruction clinically appears to be less associated pain, lower incidence of animation deformities, and its associated symptoms as well as presumably better aesthetics. Early data suggest that the results are extremely promising and early adopters have attempted to define the ideal patients for prepectoral breast reconstruction. As with any new operative procedure, an assessment of finances and costs are crucial to its successful implementation. Although current data are minimal, this article attempts to build the fundamentals of an economic model that exhibits and displays potential savings through the use of prepectoral breast reconstruction.

  14. Fat injection to correct contour deformities of the reconstructed breast: a single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Tahiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Autologous fat grafting has gained acceptance as a technique to improve aesthetic outcomes in breast reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to share our clinical experience using autologous fat injection to correct contour deformities during breast reconstruction. Methods: A single surgeon, prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent autologous fat injection during breast reconstruction from January 2008 to November 2013 at McGill University Health Center was reviewed. Patient characteristics, breast history, type of breast reconstruction, volume of fat injected, and complications were analyzed. Results: One hundred and twenty-four patients benefited from autologous fat injection from January 2008 to November 2013, for a total of 187 treated breasts. The patients were on average 49.3 years old (΁ 8.9 years. Fat was harvested from the medial thighs (20.5%, flanks (39.1%, medial thighs and flanks (2.9%, trochanters (13.3%, medial knees (2.7%, and abdomen (21.9%. An average of 49.25 mL of fat was injected into each reconstructed breast. A total of 187 breasts in 124 patients were lipo-infiltrated during the second stage of breast reconstruction. Thirteen breasts (in 12 separate patients were injected several years after having undergone lumpectomy and radiotherapy. Of the 187 treated breasts, 118 were reconstructed with expanders to implants, 45 with deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps, 9 with latissimus dorsi flaps with implants, 4 with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, and 13 had previously undergone lumpectomy and radiotherapy. Six complications were noted in the entire series, for a rate of 3.2%. All were in previously radiated breasts. Average follow-up time was 12 months (range: 2-36 months. Conclusion: Fat injection continues to grow in popularity as an adjunct to breast reconstruction. Our experience demonstrates a low complication rate as compared to most surgical interventions of the breast

  15. One-Stage Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Bertozzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One-stage direct-to-implant immediate breast reconstruction (IBR is performed simultaneously with breast cancer resection. We explored indications, techniques, and outcomes of IBR to determine its feasibility, safety, and effectiveness. Material and Methods. We reviewed the available literature on one-stage direct-to-implant IBR, with or without acellular dermal matrix (ADM, synthetic mesh, or autologous fat grafting. We analyzed the indications, preoperative work-up, surgical technique, postoperative care, outcomes, and complications. Results. IBR is indicated for small-to-medium nonptotic breasts and contraindicated in patients who require or have undergone radiotherapy, due to unacceptably high complications rates. Only patients with thick, well-vascularized mastectomy flaps are IBR candidates. Expandable implants should be used for ptotic breasts, while anatomical shaped implants should be used to reconstruct small-to-medium nonptotic breasts. ADMs can be used to cover the implant during IBR and avoid muscle elevation, thereby minimizing postoperative pain. Flap necrosis, reoperation, and implant loss are more common with IBR than conventional two-staged reconstruction, but IBR has advantages such as lack of secondary surgery, faster recovery, and better quality of life. Conclusions. IBR has good outcomes and patient-satisfaction rates. With ADM use, a shift from conventional reconstruction to IBR has occurred. Drawbacks of IBR can be overcome by careful patient selection.

  16. Impact of contra-lateral breast reshaping on mammographic surveillance in women undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Maurizio B; Rocco, Nicola; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Falco, Giuseppe; Capalbo, Emanuela; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Spano, Andrea; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    The ultimate goal of breast reconstruction is to achieve symmetry with the contra-lateral breast. Contra-lateral procedures with wide parenchymal rearrangements are suspected to impair mammographic surveillance. This study aims to evaluate the impact on mammographic detection of mastopexies and breast reductions for contralateral adjustment in breast reconstruction. We retrospectively evaluated 105 women affected by uni-lateral breast cancer who underwent mastectomy and immediate two-stage reconstruction between 2002 and 2007. We considered three groups according to the contra-lateral reshaping technique: mastopexy or breast reduction with inferior dermoglandular flap (group 1); mastopexy or breast reduction without inferior dermoglandular flap (group 2); no contra-lateral reshaping (group 3). We assessed qualitative mammographic variations and breast density in the three groups. Statistically significant differences have been found when comparing reshaped groups with non reshaped groups regarding parenchymal distortions, skin thickening and stromal edema, but these differences did not affect cancer surveillance. The surveillance mammography diagnostic accuracy in contra-lateral cancer detection was not significantly different between the three groups (p = 0.56), such as the need for MRI for equivocal findings at mammographic contra-lateral breast (p = 0.77) and the need for core-biopsies to confirm mammographic suspect of contra-lateral breast cancer (p = 0.90). This study confirms previous reports regarding the safety of mastopexies and breast reductions when performed in the setting of contra-lateral breast reshaping after breast reconstruction. Mammographic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are not affected by the glandular re-arrangement. These results provide a further validation of the safety of current reconstructive paradigms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. One-Stage Nipple and Breast Reconstruction Following Areola-Sparing Mastectomy

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    Hye Ri Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSkin-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is increasingly becoming a proven surgical option for early-stage breast cancer patients. Areola-sparing mastectomy (ASM has also recently become a popular procedure. The purpose of this article is to investigate the reconstructive and aesthetic issues experienced with one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction using ASM.MethodsAmong the patients who underwent mastectomy between March 2008 and March 2010, 5 women with a low probability of nipple-areolar complex malignant involvement underwent ASM and immediate breast reconstruction with simultaneous nipple reconstruction using the modified C-V flap. The cosmetic outcomes of this series were reviewed by plastic surgeons and patient self-assessment and satisfaction were assessed via telephone interview.ResultsDuring the average 11-month follow-up period, there were no cases of cancer recurrence, the aesthetic outcomes were graded as excellent to very good, and all of the patients were satisfied. Two patients developed a gutter-like depression around the reconstructed nipple, and one patient developed skin erosion in a small area of the areola, which healed with conservative dressing. The other complications, such as necrosis of the skin flap or areola, seroma, hematoma, or fat necrosis did not occur.ConclusionsSince one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following ASM is an oncologically safe, cost-effective, and aesthetically satisfactory procedure, it is a good surgical option for early breast cancer patients.

  18. Free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot limb salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Yana, Yuichiro; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Although free flap is gaining popularity for the reconstruction of diabetic foot ulcers, it is unclear whether free flap reconstruction increases the chances of postoperative independent ambulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between free flap success and postoperative ambulation. This study reviewed 23 cases of free flap reconstruction for diabetic foot ulcers between January 2007 and March 2014. Free rectus abdominis, latissimus dorsi, and anterolateral thigh flaps were used in ten, eight, and five patients, respectively. A comparison was made between free flap success and postoperative independent ambulation using Fisher's exact test. Two patients developed congestive heart failure with fatal consequences within 14 days postoperatively, resulting in an in-hospital mortality rate of 8.7%. Five patients lost their flaps (21.7%). Of the 16 patients who had flap success, 12 achieved independent ambulation. Five patients with flap loss did not achieve independent ambulation, except one patient who underwent secondary flap reconstruction using a distally based sural flap. Fisher's exact test revealed that independent ambulation was associated with free flap success (p = 0.047). The present study indicates that free flap reconstruction may increase the possibility of independent ambulation for patients with extensive tissue defects due to diabetic ulcers. Intermediate limb salvage rates and independent ambulation rates were favourable in patients with successful reconstruction. The use of foot orthoses and a team approach with pedorthists were effective to prevent recurrence.

  19. One-Stage Nipple and Breast Reconstruction Following Areola-Sparing Mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ri Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is increasinglybecoming a proven surgical option for early-stage breast cancer patients. Areola-sparingmastectomy (ASM has also recently become a popular procedure. The purpose of this articleis to investigate the reconstructive and aesthetic issues experienced with one-stage nippleand breast reconstruction using ASM.Methods Among the patients who underwent mastectomy between March 2008 and March2010, 5 women with a low probability of nipple-areolar complex malignant involvement underwentASM and immediate breast reconstruction with simultaneous nipple reconstructionusing the modified C-V flap. The cosmetic outcomes of this series were reviewed by plasticsurgeons and patient self-assessment and satisfaction were assessed via telephone interview.Results During the average 11-month follow-up period, there were no cases of cancer recurrence,the aesthetic outcomes were graded as excellent to very good, and all of the patientswere satisfied. Two patients developed a gutter-like depression around the reconstructednipple, and one patient developed skin erosion in a small area of the areola, which healedwith conservative dressing. The other complications, such as necrosis of the skin flap or areola,seroma, hematoma, or fat necrosis did not occur.Conclusions Since one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following ASM is an oncologicallysafe, cost-effective, and aesthetically satisfactory procedure, it is a good surgical optionfor early breast cancer patients.

  20. Enhancing breast projection in autologous reconstruction using the St Andrew's coning technique and 3D volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Patel, Nakul Gamanlal; Hunter-Smith, David J; Ramakrishnan, Venkat

    2017-12-01

    An increasing number of women undergo mastectomy for breast cancer and post-mastectomy autologous breast reconstruction has been shown to significantly improve the psychosexual wellbeing of the patients. A goal of treatment is to achieve symmetry and projection to match the native breast, and/or the contralateral breast in the case of a unilateral reconstruction. Autologous reconstruction, particularly with the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap, is particularly advantageous as it can be manipulated to mimic the shape and turgor of the native breast. However, very few techniques of shaping the breast conus when insetting the DIEP flap to enhance aesthetic outcome have been reported to date. With the aide of three-dimension (3D) photography and 3D-printed mirrored image of the contralateral breast as a guide intraoperatively, we describe our St Andrew's coning technique to create a personalized flap projection. We report a prospective case series of 3 delayed unilateral breast reconstructions where symmetrization procedure to the contralateral breast was not indicated. Using a commercial 3D scanner (VECTRA XR, Canfield Scientific), the breast region was imaged. The mirrored image was 3D-printed in-house using a desktop 3D printer. In all cases, projection of the breast mound was able to be safely achieved, with a demonstrated central volume (or 'cone') able to be highlighted on imaging and a 3D printed breast. A 3D print of the contralateral breast was able to be used intraoperatively to guide the operative approach. The St Andrew's coning technique is a useful aesthetic maneuver for achieving breast projection during DIEP flap breast reconstruction, with 3D imaging techniques able to assist in perioperative assessment of breast volume.

  1. The Temporalis Muscle Flap in Maxillofacial Reconstruction

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    ElSheikh, M; Zeitoun, I; ElMassry, M A K

    1991-01-01

    The temporalis muscle flap is a very versatile and valuable axial flap, which could be used in various reconstructive procedures in and around the oro-maxillofacial region. The surgical anatomy, vascular pattern and technique of elevation of the flap are described, together with our experience in different reconstructive situations. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of this flap are thoroughly discussed taking into consideration the potentiality of cancer recurrence under cover of the flap. (author)

  2. Pedicled Temporalis Muscle Flap for Craniofacial Reconstruction: A 35-Year Clinical Experience with 366 Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanio di Spilimbergo, Stefano; Nordera, Paolo; Mardini, Samir; Castiglione, Giusy; Chim, Harvey; Pinna, Vittore; Brunello, Massimo; Cusino, Claudio; Roberto, Squaquara; Baciliero, Ugo

    2017-02-01

    In the past 130 years, the temporalis muscle flap has been used for a variety of different indications. In this age of microsurgery and perforator flaps, the temporalis muscle flap still has many useful applications for craniofacial reconstruction. Three hundred sixty-six temporalis muscle flaps were performed in a single center between 1978 and 2012. The authors divided the cases into two series-before and after 1994-because, after 1994, they started to perform free flap reconstructions, and indications for reconstruction with a temporalis muscle flap were changed RESULTS:: In the series after 1994, flaps were most commonly used for reconstruction of defects in the maxilla, mandible, and oropharynx, in addition to facial reanimation and filling of orbital defects. Complications included total flap necrosis (1.6 percent) and partial flap necrosis (10.7 percent). The rate of material extrusion at the donor site decreased after porous polyethylene was uniformly used for reconstruction from 17.1 to 7.9 percent. The pedicled temporalis muscle flap continues to have many applications in craniofacial reconstruction. With increasing use of free flaps, the authors' indications for the pedicled temporalis muscle flap are now restricted to (1) orbital filling for congenital or acquired anophthalmia; (2) filling of unilateral maxillectomy defects; and (3) facial reanimation in selected cases of facial nerve palsy. Therapeutic, IV.

  3. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

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    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRobots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngeal tumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction is new but essential for oropharyngeal defects that result from robotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction of head and neck defects to exemplify the necessity for robotic reconstruction.MethodsWe investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgery and free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 5 cases were performed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstruction methods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time were investigated.ResultsAmong five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and one was an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and one flap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flap insetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured robotic instrument. The total operation time was 1,041.0 minutes (range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, and complications including flap necrosis, hematoma, and wound dehiscence did not occur.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates the clinically applicable use of robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insetting the flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditional mandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methods and is accepted as the most up-to-date method.

  4. Reconstruction of the pelvic floor and the vagina after total pelvic exenteration using the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap.

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    Kaartinen, Ilkka S; Vuento, Maarit H; Hyöty, Marja K; Kallio, Jukka; Kuokkanen, Hannu O

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) is a rare operation in which the pelvic contents are removed entirely. Several options for pelvic floor and vaginal reconstruction have been described including transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has been introduced for breast reconstruction as a free flap. We adopted the pedicled TMG flap for reconstructions after TPE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this method in the literature. Between November 2011 and February 2014, 12 patients underwent TPE and reconstruction with unilateral (six patients) or bilateral (six patients) pedicled TMG flaps. Five patients underwent vaginal reconstruction with bilateral TMG flaps. We describe the operative procedure and the outcome of the operation in these patients. The total mean operative times for TPE with or without vaginal reconstruction were 467 ± 12 and 386 ± 59 min, respectively. The TMG flaps had enough vascular tissue and mobility for reconstructing the TPE defects. There was distal edge necrosis in one out of 18 flaps, while the rest survived completely. During the follow-up, complete wound healing with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor was observed in all cases. Soft-tissue reconstructions are needed to reduce complications associated with TPE, to secure the pelvic floor and to reconstruct the vagina in select patients. The TMG flap is a logical flap choice that does not lead to functional deficits, complicate the abdominal ostomies or weaken the abdominal wall. It reduces the length of operation compared to that of abdominal flaps. IV, therapeutic. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Latissimus Dorsi and Immediate Fat Transfer (LIFT for Complete Autologous Breast Reconstruction

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    James M. Economides, MD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion:. Autologous augmentation of the LD flap with lipotransfer has been used to avoid placement of an implant. We improve the technique by performing lipotransfer during index reconstruction. Furthermore, we perform lipotransfer prior to disorigination of the LD muscle to minimize trauma to the flap and increase the efficiency of fat grafting. Our experience demonstrates that this technique is a viable autologous alternative to microsurgical breast reconstruction.

  6. Parasacral Perforator Flaps for Reconstruction of Sacral Pressure Sores.

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    Lin, Chin-Ta; Chen, Shih-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chang, Shun-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, pressure sores continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The parasacral perforator flap is a reliable flap that preserves the entire contralateral side as a future donor site. On the ipsilateral side, the gluteal muscle itself is preserved and all flaps based on the inferior gluteal artery are still possible. We present our experience of using parasacral perforator flaps in reconstructing sacral defects. Between August 2004 and January 2013, 19 patients with sacral defects were included in this study. All the patients had undergone surgical reconstruction of sacral defects with a parasacral perforator flap. The patients' sex, age, cause of sacral defect, flap size, flap type, numbers of perforators used, rotation angle, postoperative complications, and hospital stay were recorded. There were 19 parasacral perforator flaps in this series. All flaps survived uneventfully except for 1 parasacral perforator flap, which failed because of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The overall flap survival rate was 95% (18/19). The mean follow-up period was 17.3 months (range, 2-24 months). The average length of hospital stay was 20.7 days (range, 9-48 days). No flap surgery-related mortality was found. Also, there was no recurrence of sacral pressure sores or infected pilonidal cysts during the follow-up period. Perforator-based flaps have become popular in modern reconstructive surgery because of low donor-site morbidity and good preservation of muscle. Parasacral perforator flaps are durable and reliable in reconstructing sacral defects. We recommend the parasacral perforator flap as a good choice for reconstructing sacral defects.

  7. Oncoplastic Resection of Retroareolar Breast Cancer: Central Quadrantectomy and Reconstruction by Local Skin-Glandular Flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with central breast neoplasms account for 5 to 20% of breast cancer cases and, for a long time, they have been denied Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS) and conventionally treated with mastectomy. The high incidence of Nipple-Areola-Complex (NAC) involvement usually associated with these tumors necessitates nipple and areolar resection together with an adequate safety margin around the tumor, which yields an unacceptable cosmetic result. With the help of Oncoplastic Surgical Techniques, BCS can be offered to these patients. In this study central quadrantectomy and breast reconstruction by an infero-Iaterally based pedicled flap were evaluated. Patients and Methods: This study comprised 23 women with central breast tumors treated at the National Cancer Institute (NC]), Cairo University and at the Aswan Cancer Center, Egyptian Ministry of Health. Their ages ranged from 31 to 62 years (mean: 48.4±10.2 years). Twenty-two had a palpable mass, while only I had Paget's disease of the nipple without mass. The size of their tumors ranged from 4 to 33mm (mean: 16.9±8.6mm). Only 9 women showed clinical suspicion of NAC involvement in the form of nipple retraction. Seventeen cases had their tumors strictly in the retro-areolar region, while 5 had tumors extending for a maximum of I.5Cm beyond the areolar edge. All patients underwent central quadrantec-tomy with NAC resection removing a cylinder of breast tissue reaching down to the pectoral muscle together with axillary dissection. Advancement of an infero-Iaterally based skin-glandular flap was then carried out. All patients received adjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Results: Fourteen patients showed pathological evidence of nipple infiltration (60.8%). The free safety margin (SM) ranged from 9 to 13mm (mean: 10. 0.9mm). This could be accomplished from the first attempt in 18 patients; however, in 5 patients a second wider excision was needed to obtain an adequate

  8. Versatality of Nasolabial Flap in Orofacial Reconstruction

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    Nandesh Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Materials and Methods: A total of 10 patients were selected based on the size of surgical defect. Nasolabial flap was used to reconstruct defects of small to moderate size in the oro-facial region and post-operative follow up was done. Results: All of the patients underwent inferiorly based Transposition Island flap for reconstruction of different oro-facial defects. Few complications like bulky size of the flap, slight donor site distortion (scar formation and intra-oral hair growth were seen in six patients. Two incidences of infection in the transferred flap were seen. Conclusion: It is a safe minor procedure done under general anesthesia with good reconstructive results over small or moderately sized maxillofacial defects. Proper attention to flap design, operative technique and post - operative management are useful in reducing the incidence of complications.

  9. Tailoring through Technology: A Retrospective Review of a Single Surgeon's Experience with Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction before and after Implementation of Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, Christin A; Jacobson, Steven R

    2016-05-01

    Reported complication rates of implant-based breast reconstruction in the literature exceed 50%, with mastectomy skin flap necrosis reported to occur in up to 25% of cases. Laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (LA-ICGA) technology allows the surgeon to optimize preservation of the mastectomy skin flap while avoiding skin necrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if outcomes of breast reconstruction are beneficially affected by using LA-ICGA. A total 269 consecutive women (467 breast reconstructions) undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction from 2008 to 2013 were examined. The complication rates of those who underwent reconstruction prior to the implementation of LA-ICGA were compared with those who were reconstructed after implementation of LA-ICGA. A total of 254 consecutive breast reconstructions were performed prior to implementation of LA-ICGA, and 213 breasts were reconstructed with the use of LA-ICGA. After implementation of LA-ICGA System, the rate of mastectomy skin flap necrosis decreased by 86% (6.7% versus 0.9%, p = 0.02). The overall complication rate prior to LA-ICGA was 13.8% compared with 6.6% with the use of LA-ICGA (p = 0.01). After LA-ICGA was incorporated, the percentage of patients undergoing single-stage reconstruction increased from 12% to 32% (p = <0.001). Implementation of LA-ICGA provides the surgeon with an objective assessment of mastectomy flap perfusion resulting in a trend toward overall reduction in complications as well as an 86% decrease in the rate of subsequent skin necrosis. The objective assessment of mastectomy flap perfusion allows the surgeon to tailor breast reconstruction intraoperatively, in real-time, adjusting for the individual patient's mastectomy flap perfusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reconstruction of eyelids with Washio flap in anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdek, M; Kozák, J

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with anophthalmia in whom retroauriculo-temporal flap (Washio flap) was used for reconstruction of eyelids. This flap, which is mostly used for reconstructions of nasal defects, was not used in this way according to available literature.

  11. Reconstruction of the Lower Extremity Using Free Flaps

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    Min Jo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of lower-extremity reconstruction has focused on wound coverage and functional recovery. However, there are limitations in the use of a local flap in cases of extensive defects of the lower-extremities. Therefore, free flap is a useful option in lower-extremity reconstruction.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of 49 patients (52 cases who underwent lower-extremity reconstruction at our institution during a 10-year period. In these patients, we evaluated causes and sites of defects, types of flaps, recipient vessels, types of anastomosis, survival rate, and complications.ResultsThere were 42 men and 10 women with a mean age of 32.7 years (range, 3-72 years. The sites of defects included the dorsum of the foot (19, pretibial area (17, ankle (7, heel (5 and other sites (4. The types of free flap included latissimus dorsi muscle flap (10, scapular fascial flap (6, anterolateral thigh flap (6, and other flaps (30. There were four cases of vascular complications, out of which two flaps survived after intervention. The overall survival of the flaps was 96.2% (50/52. There were 19 cases of other complications at recipient sites such as partial graft loss (8, partial flap necrosis (6 and infection (5. However, these complications were not notable and were resolved with skin grafts.ConclusionsThe free flap is an effective method of lower-extremity reconstruction. Good outcomes can be achieved with complete debridement and the selection of appropriate recipient vessels and flaps according to the recipient site.

  12. Medial canthal reconstruction with multiple local flaps

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    Akihiro Ogino

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: This method is somewhat complicated compared to reconstruction with a single flap, but it is a combination of standard local flaps and is a simple reconstructive procedure. By adding additional resection, the suture line is consistent with the border of the facial unit, so postoperative scarring is inconspicuous. This technique is aesthetically useful because of the continuity of colour and texture resulting from the use of adjacent flaps.

  13. Quadrantectomy and Nipple Saving Mastectomy in Treatment of Early Breast Cancer: Feasibility and Aesthetic Results of Adjunctive Latissmus Dorsi Breast Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiouny, M.; El-Marakby, H.H.; Saber, N.; Zayed, S.B.; Shokry, A.

    2005-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery has been a recognised method of treatment of early breast cancer. The treatment methods include quadrantectomy or skin sparing mastectomy combined with ipsilateral axillary nodal dissection followed by radiotherapy. In the current study we evaluate the feasibility and oncologic safety of the quadrantectomy and SSM operations with preservation of the nipple and areola, and the cosmetic results of immediate reconstruction by using the latissmus dorsi flap. Materials and Methods: A breast conservative surgery (quadrantectomy or nipple sparing mastectomy) was carried out in a group of 55 patients with invasive breast cancer treated at the Department of Surgical Oncology, NCl, between January 2001 and April 2004. The selection criteria included those patients who presented with TI or T2 breast cancer and were located at least 2 cm from the nipple as the centre for the nipple areola complex. The age of the patients ranged from 32 years to 65 years. The follow up period ranged from 2 to 33 months with an average of 21 months. Pathological assessment of the specimens showed a negative safety margin in all cases. Most of our cases were invasive duct carcinoma grade 1-2 (42) (75%). The complications of the flap reconstruction included one major sloughing of the Iatissmus dorsi flap, 4 partial flap sloughing, 4 sloughing of the nipple and fat necrosis in 6 patients. The donor site healed normally in all of our cases except for one patient who suffered from a hypertrophic scar which settled down during the follow up period. The aesthetic assessment of the patients, showed an excellent to good results in the majority of cases (42) (75%) while in 6 (12%) results were fair and in 7 (13%) results were poor. Breast conservative surgery with quadrantectomy or skin sparing technique with preservation of the nipple and areola combined with immediate LD flap reconstruction is a valid procedure for treatment of early breast cancer. Immediate reconstruction by

  14. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

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    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  15. Comparison of Dorsal Intercostal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Bilateral Rotation Flaps in Reconstruction of Myelomeningocele Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenekeci, Goktekin; Basterzi, Yavuz; Unal, Sakir; Sari, Alper; Demir, Yavuz; Bagdatoglu, Celal; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2018-04-09

    Bilateral rotation flaps are considered the workhorse flaps in reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Since the introduction of perforator flaps in the field of reconstructive surgery, perforator flaps have been used increasingly in the reconstruction of various soft tissue defects all over the body because of their appreciated advantages. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and surgical outcomes between bilateral rotation flaps and dorsal intercostal artery perforator (DICAP) flaps in the soft tissue reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Between January 2005-February 2017, we studied 47 patients who underwent reconstruction of myelomeningocele defects. Patient demographics, operative data, and postoperative data were reviewed retrospectively and are included in the study. We found no statistically significant differences in patient demographics and surgical complications between these two groups; this may be due to small sample size. With regard to complications-partial flap necrosis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, necessity for reoperation, and wound infection-DICAP propeller flaps were clinically superior to rotation flaps. Partial flap necrosis was associated with CSF leakage and wound infection, and CSF leakage was associated with wound dehiscence. Although surgical outcomes obtained with DICAP propeller flaps were clinically superior to those obtained with rotation flaps, there was no statistically significant difference between the two patient groups. A well-designed comparative study with adequate sample size is needed. Nonetheless, we suggest using DICAP propeller flaps for reconstruction of large myelomeningocele defects.

  16. Orbital floor reconstruction with free flaps after maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathirao, Leela Mohan C S R; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Duraisamy, Sriprakash; Hedne, Naveen; Sharma, Mohit; Mathew, Jimmy; Iyer, Subramania

    2013-06-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of orbital floor reconstruction with free flaps after maxillectomy. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 34 consecutive patients who underwent maxillectomy with orbital floor removal for malignancies, reconstructed with free flaps. A cross-sectional survey to assess the functional and esthetic outcome was done in 28 patients who were alive and disease-free, with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Results Twenty-six patients had bony reconstruction, and eight had soft tissue reconstruction. Free fibula flap was the commonest flap used (n = 14). Visual acuity was normal in 86%. Eye movements were normal in 92%. Abnormal globe position resulted in nine patients. Esthetic satisfaction was good in 19 patients (68%). Though there was no statistically significant difference in outcome of visual acuity, eye movement, and patient esthetic satisfaction between patients with bony and soft tissue reconstruction, more patients without bony reconstruction had abnormal globe position (p = 0.040). Conclusion Free tissue transfer has improved the results of orbital floor reconstruction after total maxillectomy, preserving the eye. Good functional and esthetic outcome was achieved. Though our study favors a bony orbital reconstruction, a larger study with adequate power and equal distribution of patients among the groups would be needed to determine this. Free fibula flap remains the commonest choice when a bony reconstruction is contemplated.

  17. The Type of Breast Reconstruction May Not Influence Patient Satisfaction in the Chinese Population: A Single Institutional Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaying; Chen, Ying; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Guangyu; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with four common types of breast reconstruction performed at our institution: latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap reconstruction with or without implants, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction, and free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction. Methods A custom survey consisting of questions that assessed general and aesthetic satisfaction was sent to patients who had undergone breast reconstruction in the last 5 years. The clinical data and details of the surgery were also collected from the patients who returned the surveys. We compared satisfaction rates across the four breast reconstruction types and analyzed the effects of various factors on overall general and aesthetic satisfaction rates using a binary logistic regression model. Result A total of 207 (72%) patients completed the questionnaires. Overall, significant differences in general and aesthetic satisfaction among the four procedures were not observed. A multivariate analysis revealed that the factor “complications” (p = 0.001) played a significant role in general satisfaction and that the factors “> 2 years since reconstruction” (p = 0.043) and “age > 35 years” (p = 0.05) played significant roles in overall aesthetic satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the type of breast reconstruction might not influence satisfaction in Chinese patients. PMID:26562294

  18. Scrotal reconstruction with superomedial fasciocutaneous thigh flap

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    DANIEL FRANCISCO MELLO

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe the use of a superomedial fasciocutaneous thigh flap for scrotal reconstruction in open areas secondary to the surgical treatment of perineal necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier’s gangrene. Methods: retrospective analysis of cases treated at the Plastic Surgery Service of Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo, from 2009 to 2015. Results: fifteen patients underwent scrotal reconstruction using the proposed flap. The mean age was 48.9 years (28 to 66. Skin loss estimates in the scrotal region ranged from 60 to 100%. Definitive reconstruction was performed on average 30.6 days (22 to 44 after the initial surgical treatment. The mean surgical time was 76 minutes (65 to 90 to obtain the flaps, bilateral in all cases. Flap size ranged from 10cm to 13cm in the longitudinal direction and 8cm to 10cm in the cross-sectional direction. The complication rate was 26.6% (four cases, related to the occurrence of segmental and partial dehiscence. Conclusion: the superomedial fasciocutaneous flap of thigh is a reliable and versatile option for the reconstruction of open areas in the scrotal region, showing adequate esthetic and functional results.

  19. Skin Flap Necrosis After Mastectomy With Reconstruction: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Cindy B; Mehrara, Babak; Eaton, Anne; Capko, Deborah; Berg, Anastasia; Stempel, Michelle; Van Zee, Kimberly J; Pusic, Andrea; King, Tari A; Cody, Hiram S; Pilewskie, Melissa; Cordeiro, Peter; Sclafani, Lisa; Plitas, George; Gemignani, Mary L; Disa, Joseph; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Morrow, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Rates of mastectomy with immediate reconstruction are rising. Skin flap necrosis after this procedure is a recognized complication that can have an impact on cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction, and in worst cases can potentially delay adjuvant therapies. Many retrospective studies of this complication have identified variable event rates and inconsistent associated factors. A prospective study was designed to capture the rate of skin flap necrosis as well as pre-, intra-, and postoperative variables, with follow-up assessment to 8 weeks postoperatively. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed for factors associated with skin flap necrosis. Of 606 consecutive procedures, 85 (14 %) had some level of skin flap necrosis: 46 mild (8 %), 6 moderate (1 %), 31 severe (5 %), and 2 uncategorized (0.3 %). Univariate analysis for any necrosis showed smoking, history of breast augmentation, nipple-sparing mastectomy, and time from incision to specimen removal to be significant. In multivariate models, nipple-sparing, time from incision to specimen removal, sharp dissection, and previous breast reduction were significant for any necrosis. Univariate analysis of only moderate or severe necrosis showed body mass index, diabetes, nipple-sparing mastectomy, specimen size, and expander size to be significant. Multivariate analysis showed nipple-sparing mastectomy and specimen size to be significant. Nipple-sparing mastectomy was associated with higher rates of necrosis at every level of severity. Rates of skin flap necrosis are likely higher than reported in retrospective series. Modifiable technical variables have limited the impact on rates of necrosis. Patients with multiple risk factors should be counseled about the risks, especially if they are contemplating nipple-sparing mastectomy.

  20. Versatility of Capsular Flaps in the Salvage of Exposed Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beniamino Brunetti, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Breast implant exposure due to poor tissue coverage or previous irradiation represents a surgical challenge both in the reconstructive and aesthetic plastic surgery practice. In case of implant extrusion or incipient exposure, the commonly suggested strategies, such as targeted antibiotic therapy, drainage and lavage of the cavity, fistulectomy, and primary closure, may be ineffective leading the surgeon to an unwanted implant removal or to adopt more invasive flap coverage procedures. Breast implant capsule, in its physiological clinical behavior, can be considered as a new reliable source of tissue, which can be used in a wide range of clinical situations. In our hands, capsular flaps proved to be a versatile solution not only to treat breast contour deformities or inframammary fold malpositions but also to salvage exposed breast implants. In this scenario, the use of more invasive surgical techniques can be avoided or simply saved and delayed for future recurrences.(Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2015;3:e340; doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000000307; Published online 30 March 2015.

  1. Reconstruction of the Lower Extremity Using Free Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of lower-extremity reconstruction has focused on wound coverage andfunctional recovery. However, there are limitations in the use of a local flap in cases of extensivedefects of the lower-extremities. Therefore, free flap is a useful option in lower-extremityreconstruction.Methods We performed a retrospective review of 49 patients (52 cases who underwentlower-extremity reconstruction at our institution during a 10-year period. In these patients,we evaluated causes and sites of defects, types of flaps, recipient vessels, types of anastomosis,survival rate, and complications.Results There were 42 men and 10 women with a mean age of 32.7 years (range, 3-72years. The sites of defects included the dorsum of the foot (19, pretibial area (17, ankle(7, heel (5 and other sites (4. The types of free flap included latissimus dorsi muscle flap(10, scapular fascial flap (6, anterolateral thigh flap (6, and other flaps (30. There werefour cases of vascular complications, out of which two flaps survived after intervention. Theoverall survival of the flaps was 96.2% (50/52. There were 19 cases of other complications atrecipient sites such as partial graft loss (8, partial flap necrosis (6 and infection (5. However,these complications were not notable and were resolved with skin grafts.Conclusions The free flap is an effective method of lower-extremity reconstruction. Goodoutcomes can be achieved with complete debridement and the selection of appropriaterecipient vessels and flaps according to the recipient site.

  2. Head and neck reconstruction with pedicled flaps in the free flap era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahieu, R.; Colletti, G.; Bonomo, P.; Parrinello, G.; Iavarone, A.; Dolivet, G.; Livi, L.; Deganello, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the transposition of microvascular free flaps is the most popular method for management of head and neck defects. However, not all patients are suitable candidates for free flap reconstruction. In addition, not every defect requires a free flap transfer to achieve good functional results.

  3. Innervated boomerang flap for finger pulp reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Chiou, Tai-Fung

    2007-11-01

    The boomerang flap originates from the dorsolateral aspect of the proximal phalanx of an adjacent digit and is supplied by the retrograde blood flow through the vascular arcades between the dorsal and palmar digital arteries. To provide sensation of the boomerang flap for finger pulp reconstruction, the dorsal sensory branch of the proper digital nerve and the superficial sensory branch of the corresponding radial or ulnar nerve are included within the skin flap. After transfer of the flap to the injured site, epineural neurorrhaphies are done between the digital nerves of the pulp and the sensory branches of the flap. We used this sensory flap in five patients, with more than 1 year follow-up, and all patients achieved measurable two-points discrimination. The boomerang flap not only preserves the proper palmar digital artery but also provides an extended and innervated skin paddle. It seems to be an alternative choice for one-stage reconstruction of major pulp defect.

  4. Reconstruction of Facial Defect Using Deltopectoral Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldelaimi, Tahrir N; Khalil, Afrah A

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenge for otolarygology surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons as well as plastic surgeons. Defects caused by the resection and/or trauma should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Deltopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the facial defects. This study report a patient presenting with tragic Road Traffic Accident (RTA) admitted to maxillofacial surgery department at Ramadi Teaching Hospital, Anbar province, Iraq. An incision, medially based, was done and deltopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure and closure of defects after RTA. There was no major complication. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Deltopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation.

  5. Revisit of Nasolabial flap in the reconstruction of defects involving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Data from this study suggest that NL flap is a reliable option for reconstruction of the oral floor, in form as well as function, without esthetic compromise and has a major role even in this era of free flaps. Keywords: Floor of mouth defects, local flaps, nasolabail flap, oral cavity defects, reconstruction, regional flaps ...

  6. Unit Advancement Flap for Lower Lip Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Akihiro; Onishi, Kiyoshi; Okada, Emi; Nakamichi, Miho

    2018-05-01

    Lower lip reconstruction requires consideration of esthetic and functional outcome in selecting a surgical procedure, and reconstruction with local tissue is useful. The authors reconstructed full-thickness defects with a unit advancement flap. Reconstruction was performed using this method in 4 patients with lower lip squamous cell carcinoma in whom tumor resection with preservation of the mouth angle was possible. The lower lip resection width was 30 to 45 mm, accounting for 50% to 68% of the entire width of the lower lip. The flap was prepared by lateral extension from above the mental unit and matched with the potential wrinkle line of the lower lip in order to design a unit morphology surrounded by the anterior margin of the depressor labii inferioris muscle. It was elevated as a full-thickness flap composed of the orbicularis oris muscle, skin, and mucosa of the residual lower lip from the bilateral sides, and advanced to the defect. Flap transfer was adjusted by small triangular resection of the skin on the lateral side of the mental unit. The postoperative scar was inconspicuous in all patients and there was no impairment of the mouth opening-closing or articulation functions. This was a relatively simple surgical procedure. A blood supply of the flap was stable, and continuity of the orbicularis oris muscle was reconstructed by transferred the residual lower lip advancement flap from the bilateral sides. The postoperative mouth opening-closing function was sufficient, and dentures could be placed from an early phase in elderly patients. The postoperative scar was consistent with the lip unit morphology, being esthetically superior. This procedure may be applicable for reconstruction of defects approximately 1/3 to 2/3 the width of the lower lip where the mouth angle is preserved.

  7. Propeller TAP flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  8. The Functional Impact of Breast Reconstruction: An Overview and Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas A. Nelson, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As rates of bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction rise, the aesthetic and psychosocial benefits of breast reconstruction are increasingly well understood. However, an understanding of functional outcome and its optimization is still lacking. This endpoint is critical to maximizing postoperative quality of life. All reconstructive modalities have possible functional consequences. Studies demonstrate that implant-based reconstruction impacts subjective movement, but patients’ day-to-day function may not be objectively hindered despite self-reported disability. For latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction, patients also report some dysfunction at the donor site, but this does not seem to result in significant, long-lasting limitation of daily activity. Athletic and other vigorous activities are most affected. For abdominal free flaps, patient perception of postoperative disability is generally not significant, despite the varying degrees of objective disadvantage that have been identified depending on the extent of rectus muscle sacrifice. With these functional repercussions in mind, a broader perspective on the attempt to ensure minimal functional decline after breast surgery should focus not only on surgical technique but also on postoperative rehabilitation. Early directed physical therapy may be an instrumental element in facilitating return to baseline function. With the patient’s optimal quality of life as an overarching objective, a multifaceted approach to functional preservation may be the answer to this continued challenge. This review will examine these issues in depth in an effort to better understand postoperative functional outcomes with a focus on the younger, active breast reconstruction patient.

  9. The Reliability of Pectorals Major Myocutaneous Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Marakby, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The pectorals major myocutaneous pedicle flap (PMMPF) has been considered to be the workhorse of pedicled flaps in head and neck reconstruction. Several series of PMMPF procedures in head and neck reconstruction have been reported in the literature. Even with the worldwide use of free flaps, the flap is still considered the mainstay head and neck reconstructive procedures in many centers. However, the flap is usually associated with a high incidence of complications in addition 10 its large bulk compared with the free fasciocutaneous flaps. Also the final functional and the aesthetic results are not comparable to free flaps head and neck reconstruction. Aim of the Study: The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of such flap in selected cases of head and neck reconstruction. The indications, technique, complications and the functional as well as the aesthetic results of the flap utilization were evaluated. Patients and Methods: Between May 2002 and May 2005 a 26 consecutive head and neck reconstruction procedures using the PMMPF were carried out on 25 patients at the Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. The indications for the flap use were defects due to resection of stage II-IV cancer in the head and neck region. The site, stage of the disease and the presence or absence of distant metastasis were assessed. Also preoperative assessment included the fitness of patients for such an extensive procedure. The total operative time, the need for blood transfusion, the postoperative complications, were all documented. The length of hospital stay, the follow-up of patients as well as the incidence of local recurrence underneath the flap were all evaluated. Results: Pectorals major myocutaneous pedicled flap reconstructions were used to reconstruct defects in the following sites: oral cavity (LO patients); oropharynx/hypopharynx, (5 patients); and neck or face (10 patients). Of the 26 PMMPF reconstructions. 22 flaps were

  10. Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis on the clinical outcomes and cost of deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP flap versus implants for breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Khajuria

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastectomy in the context of breast malignancy can have a profoundly negative impact on a woman’s self-image, impairing personal, sexual and social relationships. The deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP flap and implants are the two commonest reconstructive modalities that can potentially overcome this psychological trauma. The comparative data on clinical outcomes and costs of the two modalities is limited. We aim to synthesise the current evidence on DIEP versus implants to establish which is the superior technique for breast reconstruction, in terms of clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods A comprehensive search will be undertaken of EMBASE, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, CENTRAL and Science citation index databases (1994 up to August 2017 to identify studies relevant for the review. Primary human studies evaluating clinical outcomes and cost of DIEP and implant-based reconstruction in context of breast malignancy will be included. Primary outcomes will be patient satisfaction and cosmetic outcome from patient-reported outcome measures (scores from validated tools, e.g. BREAST-Q tool, complications and cost-analysis. The secondary outcomes will be duration of surgery, number of surgical revisions, length of stay, availability of procedures and total number of clinic visits. Discussion This will be the first systematic review and meta-analysis in available literature comparing the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of DIEP and implants for breast reconstruction. This review is expected to guide worldwide clinical practice for breast reconstruction. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42017072557 .

  11. Risk of severe and refractory postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing diep flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Michele A; Basdag, Basak; Kalmar, Christopher L; Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Jacobs, Lisa K; Thomsen, Robert W; Rosson, Gedge D

    2014-02-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are commonly feared after general anesthesia and can impact results. The primary aim of our study was to examine incidence and severity of PONV by investigating complete response, or absence of PONV, to prophylaxis used in patients undergoing DIEP flaps. Our secondary aims were definition of the magnitude of risk, state of the art of interventions, clinical sequelae of PONV, and interaction between these variables, specifically for DIEP patients. A retrospective chart review occurred for 29 patients undergoing DIEP flap breast reconstruction from September 2007 to February 2008. We assessed known patient and procedure-specific risks for PONV after DIEPs, prophylactic antiemetic regimens, incidence, and severity of PONV, postoperative antiemetic rescues, and effects of risks and treatments on symptoms. Three or more established risks existed in all patients, with up to seven risks per patient. Although 90% of patients received diverse prophylaxis, 76% of patients experienced PONV, and 66% experienced its severe form, emesis. Early PONV (73%) was frequent; symptoms were long lasting (average 20 hours for nausea and emesis); and multiple rescue medications were frequently required (55% for nausea, 58% for emesis). Length of surgery and nonsmoking statistically significantly impacted PONV. We identify previously undocumented high risks for PONV in DIEP patients. High frequency, severity, and refractoriness of PONV occur despite standard prophylaxis. Plastic surgeons and anesthesiologists should further investigate methods to optimize PONV prophylaxis and treatment in DIEP flap patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reconstruction of pressure sores with perforator-based propeller flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubietz, Rafael G; Jakubietz, Danni F; Zahn, Robert; Schmidt, Karsten; Meffert, Rainer H; Jakubietz, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Perforator flaps have been successfully used for reconstruction of pressure sores. Although V-Y advancement flaps approximate debrided wound edges, perforator-based propeller flaps allow rotation of healthy tissue into the defect. Perforator-based propeller flaps were planned in 13 patients. Seven pressure sores were over the sacrum, five over the ischial tuberosity, and one on the tip of the scapula. Three patients were paraplegic, six were bedridden, and five were ambulatory. In three patients, no perforators were found. In 10 patients, propeller flaps were transferred. In two patients, total flap necrosis occurred, which was reconstructed with local advancement flaps. In two cases, a wound dehiscence occurred and had to be revised. One hematoma required evacuation. No further complications were noted. No recurrence at the flap site occurred. Local perforator flaps allow closure of pressure sores without harvesting muscle. The propeller version has the added benefit of transferring tissue from a distant site, avoiding reapproximation of original wound edges. Twisting of the pedicle may cause torsion and venous obstruction. This can be avoided by dissecting a pedicle of at least 3 cm. Propeller flaps are a safe option for soft tissue reconstruction of pressure sores. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  13. Nonexpansive immediate breast reconstruction using human acellular tissue matrix graft (AlloDerm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, C Andrew

    2006-07-01

    Immediate breast reconstruction has become a standard of care following mastectomy for cancer, largely due to improved esthetic and psychologic outcomes achieved with this technique. However, the current historical standards--transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction and expander--implant surgery-still have limitations as regards patient morbidity, short-term body-image improvements, and even cost. To address these shortcomings, we employ a novel concept of human tissue replacement to enhance breast shape and provide total coverage, enabling immediate mound reconstruction without the need for breast expansion prior to permanent implant placement. AlloDerm (human acellular tissue matrix) is a human-derived graft tissue with extensive experience in various settings of skin and soft tissue replacement surgery. This report describes the success using acellular tissue matrix to provide total coverage over the prosthesis in immediate reconstruction, with limited muscle dissection. In this population, 49 patients (76 breasts) successfully underwent the acellular tissue matrix-based immediate reconstruction, resulting in durable breast reconstruction with good symmetry. These findings may predict that acellular tissue matrix-supplemented immediate breast reconstruction will become a new technique for the immediate reconstruction of the postmastectomy breast.

  14. Vascularized Fibula Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For decades, osseous vascularised flaps have been used for reconstruction of the mandible with the vascularised fibula flap (VFF) remaining the commonly used osseous free flap, reasons ranging from its adequate bone and pedicle length to its receptive dental implant placement quality. This report considers a modest use ...

  15. Use of the Anterolateral Thigh and Vertical Rectus Abdominis Musculocutaneous Flaps as Utility Flaps in Reconstructing Large Groin Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jonathan Aslim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGroin dissections result in large wounds with exposed femoral vessels requiring soft tissue coverage, and the reconstructive options are diverse. In this study we reviewed our experience with the use of the pedicled anterolateral thigh and vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flaps in the reconstruction of large groin wounds.MethodsGroin reconstructions performed over a period of 10 years were evaluated, with a mean follow up of two years. We included all cases with large or complex (involving perineum defects, which were reconstructed with the pedicled anterolateral thigh musculocutaneous or the vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (VRAM flaps. Smaller wounds which were covered with skin grafts, locally based flaps and pedicled muscle flaps were excluded.ResultsTwenty-three reconstructions were performed for large or complex groin defects, utilising the anterolateral thigh (n=10 and the vertical rectus abdominis (n=13 pedicled musculocutaneous flaps. Femoral vein reconstruction with a prosthetic graft was required in one patient, and a combination flap (VRAM and gracilis muscle flap was performed in another. Satisfactory coverage was achieved in all cases without major complications. No free flaps were used in our series.ConclusionsThe anterolateral thigh and vertical rectus abdominis pedicled musculocutaneous flaps yielded consistent results with little morbidity in the reconstruction of large and complex groin defects. A combination of flaps can be used in cases requiring extensive cover.

  16. The Effect of Sterile Acellular Dermal Matrix Use on Complication Rates in Implant-Based Immediate Breast Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction has been increasing. The current ADMs available for breast reconstruction are offered as aseptic or sterile. No published studies have compared aseptic and sterile ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction. The authors performed a retrospective study to evaluate the outcomes of aseptic versus sterile ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction.MethodsImplant-based immediate breast reconstructions with ADM conducted between April 2013 and January 2016 were included. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the aseptic ADM (AlloDerm group and the sterile ADM (MegaDerm group. Archived records were reviewed for demographic data and postoperative complication types and frequencies. The complications included were infection, flap necrosis, capsular contracture, seroma, hematoma, and explantation for any cause.ResultsTwenty patients were reconstructed with aseptic ADM, and 68 patients with sterile ADM. Rates of infection (15.0% vs. 10.3%, flap necrosis (5.0% vs. 7.4%, capsular contracture (20.0% vs. 14.7%, seroma (10.0% vs. 14.7%, hematoma (0% vs. 1.5%, and explantation (10.0% vs. 8.8% were not significantly different in the 2 groups.ConclusionsSterile ADM did not provide better results regarding infectious complications than aseptic ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction.

  17. Recipient vessel selection in immediate breast reconstruction with free abdominal tissue transfer after nipple-sparing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung Jun; Eom, Jin Sup; Lee, Taik Jong; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho

    2012-05-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is gaining popularity due to its superior aesthetic results. When reconstructing the breast with free abdominal tissue transfer, we must readdress the recipient vessel, because NSM can cause difficulty in access to the chest vessel. Between June 2006 and March 2011, a total of 92 women underwent NSM with free abdominal tissue transfer. A lateral oblique incision was used for the nipple-sparing mastectomy. For recipient vessels, the internal mammary vessels were chosen if the mastectomy flap did not block access to the vessels. If it did, the thoracodorsal vessels were used. Age, degree of breast ptosis, weight of the mastectomy specimen, and related complications of the internal mammary vessel group and the thoracodorsal vessel group were compared. Thoracodorsal vessels were used as recipient vessels in 59 cases, and internal mammary vessels in 33 cases including 4 cases with perforators of the internal mammary vessels. Breast reconstruction was successful in all cases except one case involving a total flap failure, which was replaced by a silicone gel implant. The internal mammary group and the thoracodorsal group were similar in terms of age, height, breast weight, and degree of ptosis. The flap related complications such as flap loss and take-back operation rates were not significantly different between the two groups. The rate of nipple necrosis was higher in the internal mammary group. The thoracodorsal vessels could produce comparable outcomes in breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomies. If access to internal mammary vessels is difficult, the thoracodorsal vessel can be a better choice.

  18. Recipient Vessel Selection in Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Free Abdominal Tissue Transfer after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jun Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM is gaining popularity due to its superior aesthetic results. When reconstructing the breast with free abdominal tissue transfer, we must readdress the recipient vessel, because NSM can cause difficulty in access to the chest vessel.MethodsBetween June 2006 and March 2011, a total of 92 women underwent NSM with free abdominal tissue transfer. A lateral oblique incision was used for the nipple-sparing mastectomy. For recipient vessels, the internal mammary vessels were chosen if the mastectomy flap did not block access to the vessels. If it did, the thoracodorsal vessels were used. Age, degree of breast ptosis, weight of the mastectomy specimen, and related complications of the internal mammary vessel group and the thoracodorsal vessel group were compared.ResultsThoracodorsal vessels were used as recipient vessels in 59 cases, and internal mammary vessels in 33 cases including 4 cases with perforators of the internal mammary vessels. Breast reconstruction was successful in all cases except one case involving a total flap failure, which was replaced by a silicone gel implant. The internal mammary group and the thoracodorsal group were similar in terms of age, height, breast weight, and degree of ptosis. The flap related complications such as flap loss and take-back operation rates were not significantly different between the two groups. The rate of nipple necrosis was higher in the internal mammary group.ConclusionsThe thoracodorsal vessels could produce comparable outcomes in breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomies. If access to internal mammary vessels is difficult, the thoracodorsal vessel can be a better choice.

  19. Free vascularized flaps for reconstruction of the mandible: complications, success, and dental rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes T M; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; van der Bilt, Andries; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate complications and success of mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flaps, iliac crest flaps, and forearm flaps with reconstruction plates and to evaluate dental rehabilitation after these reconstructions. Eighty-three patients with segmental mandibular defects were included. Correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between reconstruction type and clinical parameters with recipient-site complications and success. The dental rehabilitation was evaluated in successfully reconstructed survivors. Multivariate analyses showed significant correlations between flap type and success (P < .0001). Of the patients, 51 (61%) were alive 2 years after the reconstruction. Mandibular reconstruction with a free forearm flap and reconstruction plate was associated with higher complication rates at the recipient site and higher failure rates compared with reconstruction with free vascularized bone flaps. Of the 32 successfully reconstructed survivors, 14 (44%) had a complete dental rehabilitation, of which 10 had dental implants and 4 did not. Only 6 (29%) of the edentulous survivors ultimately had an implant-supported prosthesis. Reconstruction of the mandible with a free vascularized bone flap is superior to reconstruction with a free forearm flap with a reconstruction plate. Complete dental rehabilitation was reached in fewer than half of the surviving patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Free gracilis flap for chest wall reconstruction in male patient with Poland syndrome after implant failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubino, Mario; Maggiulli, Francesca; Pellegatta, Igor; Valdatta, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Poland's syndrome (PS) is a congenital monolateral deformity that may involve breast, chest wall, and upper limb with different degrees of clinical expressions. In some cases, the problem is mainly cosmetic, and the reconstruction should be performed to achieve minimal scarring and donor site morbidity. The authors describe a case report of a male patient with PS who developed a severe capsular contraction after 25 years implant reconstruction, who was treated after explantation using free gracilis flap (FGF). In this patient, only the pectoralis major muscle was missing. An FGF was performed to reconstruct the anterior axillary fold and the soft tissue defect. There was no flap loss, the patient had a clearly improved appearance of the chest wall, and the pain syndrome was solved. In this case report, we demonstrate our experience with the use of an FGF for chest wall reconstruction in male patients with PS after prosthesis explantation.

  1. The association between complications and quality of life after mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, John P; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Gulliver-Clarke, Carmel; Pereira, Jerome; Caddy, Christopher M; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2017-09-15

    Medical treatment for breast cancer is associated with substantial toxicity and patient burden. There is less known about the impact of surgical complications. Understanding this impact could provide important information for patients when they are considering surgical options. Between 2008 and 2009, the UK National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit recorded surgical complications for a prospective cohort of 17,844 women treated for breast cancer at 270 hospitals; 6405 of these women were surveyed about their quality of life 18 months after surgery. Breast appearance, emotional well-being, and physical well-being were quantified on 0- to 100-point scales. Linear multiple regression models, controlling for a range of baseline prognostic factors, were used to compare the scores of patients who had complications with the scores of those who did not. The overall complication rate was 10.2%. Complications were associated with little or no impairment in women undergoing mastectomy without reconstruction or with delayed reconstruction. The association was much larger for flap-related complications suffered during immediate reconstruction. The breast-appearance scores (adjusted mean difference, -23.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], -31.0 to -16.6) and emotional well-being scores (adjusted mean difference, -14.0; 95% CI, -22.0 to -6.0) of these patients were much lower than those of any other patient group. Implant-related complications were not associated with a lower quality of life in any surgical group. There is a strong case for prospectively collecting flap-complication rates at the surgeon and surgical unit level and for allowing patients to access these data when they make choices about their breast cancer surgery. Cancer 2017;123:3460-7. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: complications and cosmesis with TRAM versus tissue expander/implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Ashish K.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Zapton, Daniel T.; Powell, Simon N.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) has an important role in breast cancer treatment after modified radical mastectomy. Many of these patients also undergo breast reconstruction. We reviewed our institutions' experience to determine the outcome of patients treated with breast reconstruction and RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1999, 48 breast cancer patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, breast reconstruction, and ipsilateral breast RT during their treatment course. Reconstruction either preceded or followed RT. Autologous reconstruction with a transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous (TRAM) flap was performed in 30 patients, and 18 underwent expander and implant (E/I) reconstruction. The primary endpoint was the quality of the reconstructed, irradiated breast, as measured by analyzing the actuarial incidence of complications. The cosmetic outcome was also assessed by multidisciplinary review of the follow-up visits. Results: The median follow-up from reconstruction was 32 months. The actuarial 2-year complication rate was 53% for patients receiving E/I vs. 12% for those receiving TRAM reconstruction (p<0.01). No other patient or treatment-related factors had a significant impact on complications. The cosmetic outcome was also significantly better in the TRAM subgroup than in the E/I subgroup. Conclusion: The tolerance and cosmetic outcome of breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients in irradiated sites depends significantly on the type of reconstruction used

  3. Triple flap technique for vulvar reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercut, R; Sinna, R; Vaucher, R; Giroux, P A; Assaf, N; Lari, A; Dast, S

    2018-04-09

    Perineal defects are encountered ever more frequently, in the treatment of vulvar cancers or abdominoperineal resection. The surgical treatment of vulvar cancer leads to significant skin defect. The aim of the reconstruction is not to provide volume but rather to resurface perineum. We propose a new solution to cover the extensive skin defect remaining after excision. We report 3 patients who underwent large excision for vulvar cancer, with lymph node dissection. For reconstruction, we performed 3 advancement flaps. Two V-Y flaps cantered on the infra-gluteal folds and based on pudendal perforator arteries were used to cover the postero-lateral parts of the defect. The third advancement flap from the superior aspect of the defect was a Y-V Mons pubis flap. The defects were successfully covered by the 3 flap technique. The first patient suffered a non-union that slowly healed by secondary intention. For the other cases, we used the same technique, but applied negative pressure wound therapy on the sutures, with excellent results. The 3 flap technique is a simple and reliable method and the donor site morbidity is minimal. It can be realised without changing the position of the patient after tumour excision, and does not require delicate perforator dissection. This surgical option can be easily applied, allowing better management of these cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nasoseptal flap for palatal reconstruction after hemi-maxillectomy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwashahi, M K; Battaglia, P; Turri-Zanoni, M; Castelnuovo, P

    2018-01-01

    Palatal reconstruction following maxillectomy is a surgical challenge, and a nasoseptal flap is a feasible approach. This paper reports the first known successful clinical case of a nasoseptal pedicle flap applied for the reconstruction of maxillary bone following hemi-maxillectomy. This report describes hemi-maxillectomy in a 60-year-old Italian male diagnosed with stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxilla. Endoscopic transnasal extended medial maxillectomy was performed, followed by a transoral modified midfacial degloving technique for removal of the maxillary bone. The contralateral nasoseptal pedicle flap was used to reconstruct the defect. The case was followed up prospectively for the assessment of flap reception and healing. The locally accessible nasoseptal flap is a viable alternative for palatal reconstruction; therefore, a second surgical procedure with its associated donor site morbidity can be avoided. Large-scale studies may help in establishing the cosmetic and functional outcomes.

  5. Cost analysis of postmastectomy reconstruction: A comparison of two staged implant reconstruction using tissue expander and acellular dermal matrix with abdominal-based perforator free flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bao Ngoc N; Fadayomi, Ayotunde; Lin, Samuel J; Singhal, Dhruv; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-09-01

    Two staged tissue expander-implant with acellular dermal matrix (TE/I + ADM) and deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap are the most common implant and autologous methods of reconstruction in the U.S. Implant-based techniques are disproportionally more popular, partially due to its presumed cost effectiveness. We performed a comprehensive cost analysis to compare TE/I + ADM and DIEP flap. A comparative cost analysis of TE/I + ADM and DIEP flap was performed. Medicare reimbursement costs for each procedure and their associated complications were calculated. Pooled probabilities of complications including cellulitis, seroma, skin necrosis, implant removal, flap loss, partial flap loss, and fat necrosis, were calculated using published studies from 2010 to 2016. Average actual cost for successful TE/I + ADM and DIEP flap were $13 304.55 and $10 237.13, respectively. Incorporating pooled complication data from published literature resulted in an increase in cost to $13 963.46 for TE/I + ADM and $12 624.29 for DIEP flap. The expected costs for successful TE/I + ADM and DIEP flap were $9700.35 and $8644.23, which are lower than the actual costs. DIEP flap breast reconstruction incurs lower costs compared to TE/I + ADM. These costs are lower at baseline and when additional costs from pooled complications are incorporated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. BIOLOGICAL AND SYNTHETIC MATERIALS IN RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY FOR BREAST CANCER TREATMENT (LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Zikiryakhodzhaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years has been a worldwide trend towards rejuvenating breast cancer, and the evolution of reconstructive breast surgery is proceeding at a rapid pace. The surgical method is the primary method in the combined and complex treatment of breast cancer, and radical mastectomy is still the main option for surgical treatment in most Russian clinics. Most women who need a mastectomy prefer a one-stage breast reconstruction, because the woman is quickly rehabilitated psychologically and physically after this operation. Nevertheless, the use of silicone endoprostheses did not solve the problems of breast reconstruction in combined treatment in oncology. The issue remains unresolved of various complications, related not only to infections, but also to the development of capsular contracture after radiotherapy. Many patients with a one-stage breast reconstruction using a silicone endoprostheses lack the volume of their own tissues for reliable shelter of the endoprosthesis. In such cases, synthetic reticulated implants, biological implants or autologous flaps are used to cover and strengthen the lower slope of the reconstructed breast.

  7. Prefabricated fibula free flap with dental implants for mandibular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, D; Pigot, J-L; Chabolle, F; Bach, C-A

    2018-03-02

    Free fibula transplant is routinely used for mandibular reconstruction in head and neck cancer. Dental rehabilitation, the objective of mandibular reconstruction, requires the use of dental implants as supports for fixed or removable dentures. Positioning of fibular bone grafts and implants determines implant osseointegration and the possibilities of dental rehabilitation. Prefabrication of a fibula free flap with dental implants prior to harvesting as a free flap can promote implant osseointegration. The position of the implants must then be precisely planned. Virtual surgery and computer-assisted design and prefabrication techniques are used to plan the reconstruction and then reproduce this planning by means of tailored fibula and mandible cutting guides, thereby ensuring correct positioning of fibular bone fragments and implants. The prefabricated fibula free flap technique requires two surgical procedures (prefabrication and flap transfer) and precise preoperative planning. Prefabricated fibula free flap with dental implants, by improving the quality of osseointegration of the implants before flap transfer, extends the possibilities of prosthetic rehabilitation in complex secondary mandibular reconstructions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of gluteal perforator flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flaps for reconstruction of sacral pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chou; Huang, Eng-Yen; Lin, Pao-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    The gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap was considered the workhorse that reconstructed sacral pressure sores, but was gradually replaced by fasciocutaneous flap because of several disadvantages. With the advent of the perforator flap technique, gluteal perforator (GP) flap has gained popularity nowadays. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and outcomes between GP flaps and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation (FR) flaps in the treatment of sacral pressure sores. Between April 2007 and June 2012, 63 patients underwent sacral pressure sore reconstructions, with a GP flap used in 31 cases and an FR flap used in 32 cases. Data collected on the patients included patient age, gender, co-morbidity for being bedridden and follow-up time. Surgical details collected included the defect size, operative time and estimated blood loss. Complications recorded included re-operation, dehiscence, flap necrosis, wound infection, sinus formation, donor-site morbidity and recurrence. The complications and clinical outcomes were compared between these two groups. We found that there was no significant difference in patient demographics, surgical complications and recurrence between these two groups. In gluteal FR flap group, all recurrent cases (five) were treated by reuse of previous flaps. Both methods are comparable, good and safe in treating sacral pressure sores. Gluteal FR flap can be performed without microsurgical dissection, and re-rotation is feasible in recurrent cases. The authors suggest using gluteal FR flaps in patients with a high risk of sore recurrence. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of cica-contracture on the face and neck with skin flap and expanded skin flap pedicled by anterior branch of transverse cervical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoguo; Song, Huifeng; Xu, Minghuo; Gao, Quanwen

    2016-09-01

    A high-quality flap is necessary for repairing faciocervical scar contractures. The supraclavicular region and chest wall are the preferred choices for reconstruction. The supraclavicular island flap (SIF) pedicled by the transverse cervical artery (TCA) has been reported. Compared to the traditional SIF flap, another type of flap pedicled by the anterior perforator of transverse cervical artery (ap-TCA) is more convenient for transfer to the faciocervical area. In this article, we use this type of perforator flap and expanded perforator flap to repair the faciocervical contracture. In this study, 10 cases (deformity caused by burn or trauma to the face and neck sites) with an average age of 32 years-old, were treated by ap-TCA flap and this type of expanded flap. In between, the flap was pre-expanded for approximately 3 months prior to transfer in 6 patients. Another 4 cases did not want the expander because of the long duration required for saline filling and potential complications of the expander. Bilateral prefabricated flaps were designed in two female cases. All 12 flaps in 10 patients were transferred tension-free to the defects and no flap was lost. The size of the flap ranged from 12 cm × 8 cm to 15 cm × 20 cm. All 12 flaps survived completely. The donor sites were closed directly in the above 6 patients where an expander had been used and reconstructed by split skin graft in 4 patients where no expander had been employed. Through a mean time of 6 months' follow-up, only one female patient was disappointed with the cicatrix that presented on the upper polar skin of both breasts, the other 9 patients were satisfied with both recipient function and appearance. The color and the texture matched well with the recipient area. The ap-TCA flap and expanded ap-TCA flap can be considered reliable options for faciocervical deformities as it can be easily elevated and it matches well with faciocervical area in color. With regards to the expanded flap, we

  10. A review of the surgical management of breast cancer: plastic reconstructive techniques and timing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Gedge D; Magarakis, Michael; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Jacobs, Lisa K; Manahan, Michele A; Flores, Jaime I

    2010-07-01

    The oncologic management of breast cancer has evolved over the past several decades from radical mastectomy to modern-day preservation of chest and breast structures. The increased rate of mastectomies over recent years made breast reconstruction an integral part of the breast cancer management. Plastic surgery now offers patients a wide variety of reconstruction options from primary closure of the skin flaps to performance of microvascular and autologous tissue transplantation. Well-coordinated partnerships between surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and patients address concerns of tumor control, cosmesis, and patients' wishes. The gamut of breast reconstruction options is reviewed, particularly noting state-of-the-art techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various timing modalities.

  11. Digital artery perforator (DAP) flaps: modifications for fingertip and finger stump reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, Narushima; Mihara, Makoto; Koshima, Isao; Gonda, Koichi; Takuya, Iida; Kato, Harunosuke; Araki, Jun; Yamamoto, Yushuke; Yuhei, Otaki; Todokoro, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Shoichi; Eri, Uehara; Mundinger, Gerhard S

    2010-08-01

    Various fingertip reconstructions have been reported for situations where microsurgical finger replantation is impossible. One method is the digital artery perforator (DAP) flap. Herein we report 13 DAP flaps for fingertip and finger stump reconstruction following traumatic finger amputations, highlighting modifications to the originally described DAP flap. From October 1998 to December 2007, a total of 13 fingers (11 patients) underwent fingertip and finger stump reconstruction with modified DAP flaps following traumatic finger amputations. We performed six adipocutaneous flaps, three adipose-only flaps, two supercharged flaps and two extended flaps. Flap size ranged from 1.44 to 8 cm(2) (average 3.25 cm(2)). All flaps survived completely with the exception of partial skin necrosis in two cases. One of these cases required debridement and skin grafting. Our initial three cases used donor-site skin grafting. The donor site was closed primarily in the 10 subsequent cases. No patients showed postoperative hypersensitivity of repaired fingertips. Semmes-Weinstein (SW) test result for flaps including a digital nerve branch did not differ from those without (average 4.07 vs. 3.92). Modified DAP flaps allow for preservation of digital length, volume and finger function. They can be raised as adiposal-only flaps or extended flaps and supercharged through perforator-to-perforator anastomoses. The donor defect on the lateral pulp can be closed primarily or by skin grafting. For traumatic fingertip and finger stump reconstructions, DAP flaps deliver consistent aesthetic and functional results. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Free gracilis flap for chest wall reconstruction in male patient with Poland syndrome after implant failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cherubino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland's syndrome (PS is a congenital monolateral deformity that may involve breast, chest wall, and upper limb with different degrees of clinical expressions. In some cases, the problem is mainly cosmetic, and the reconstruction should be performed to achieve minimal scarring and donor site morbidity. The authors describe a case report of a male patient with PS who developed a severe capsular contraction after 25 years implant reconstruction, who was treated after explantation using free gracilis flap (FGF. In this patient, only the pectoralis major muscle was missing. An FGF was performed to reconstruct the anterior axillary fold and the soft tissue defect. There was no flap loss, the patient had a clearly improved appearance of the chest wall, and the pain syndrome was solved. In this case report, we demonstrate our experience with the use of an FGF for chest wall reconstruction in male patients with PS after prosthesis explantation.

  13. Long-term Outcomes After Flap Reconstruction in Pediatric Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firriolo, Joseph M; Ganske, Ingrid M; Pike, Carolyn M; Caillouette, Catherine; Faulkner, Heather R; Upton, Joseph; Labow, Brian I

    2018-02-01

    Pressure ulcers refractory to nonoperative management may undergo flap reconstruction. This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcomes and recurrence rates of flap reconstruction for pediatric pressure ulcers. We reviewed the records of patients who underwent flap reconstruction for pressure ulcer(s) from 1995 to 2013. Twenty-four patients with 30 pressure ulcers, requiring 52 flaps were included. Ulcers were stages III and IV and mostly involved either the ischia (15/30) or sacrum (8/30). Flaps were followed for a median of 4.9 years. Twenty-three patients were wheelchair dependent, and 20 had sensory impairment at their ulcer site(s). Ten patients had a history of noncompliance with preoperative management, 8 of whom experienced ulcer recurrence. Twenty-one ulcers had underlying osteomyelitis, associated with increased admissions (P = 0.019) and cumulative length of stay (P = 0.031). Overall, there was a 42% recurrence rate in ulceration after flap reconstruction. Recurrence was associated with a preoperative history of noncompliance with nonoperative therapy (P = 0.030), but not with flap type or location, age, sex, body mass index, osteomyelitis, or urinary/fecal incontinence (P > 0.05, all). Flap reconstruction can be beneficial in the management of pediatric pressure ulcers. Although high rates of long-term success with this intervention have been reported in children, we found rates of ulcer recurrence similar to that seen in adults. Poor compliance with nonoperative care and failure to modify the biopsychosocial perpetuators of pressure ulcers will likely eventuate in postoperative recurrence. Despite the many comorbidities observed in our patient sample, compliance was the best indicator of long-term skin integrity and flap success.

  14. The scarless latissimus dorsi flap for full muscle coverage in device-based immediate breast reconstruction: an autologous alternative to acellular dermal matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, L Franklyn; Ghazi, Bahair H; Otterburn, David M

    2011-07-01

    Thin patients have fewer autologous options in postmastectomy reconstruction and are frequently limited to device-based techniques. The latissimus dorsi flap remains a viable option with which to provide autologous coverage, although for certain patients the donor scar can be a point of contention. The scarless latissimus dorsi flap is a way of mitigating these concerns. The authors present their 6-year single-surgeon experience with scarless latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction. A retrospective review of scarless latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction was performed. Charts from 2003 to 2009 were queried for demographic characteristics, nonoperative therapies, and short- and long-term complications. Results were compared with historical data. Thirty-one patients with 52 flaps were identified. Fifty-one flaps were immediate reconstructions, with an average age of 47 years and body mass index of 22.8 kg/m. Thirteen patients were treated with chemotherapy and four were irradiated, two preoperatively. The single drain was removed on average at 21 days. Complications included three hematomas (5.8 percent), two capsular contractures (3.8 percent), and two infections (3.8 percent). Average time to secondary reconstruction was 143 days. There were five unplanned revisions (9.6 percent). There were no flap failures or tissue expander losses. The scarless latissimus dorsi flap is an effective method for providing durable homogenous device coverage in the thinner patient (body mass index cost. Coverage is thin, the matrix is not initially vascularized, and products are expensive. For these reasons, use of the scarless latissimus dorsi flap is an excellent alternative, particularly in the patient with a low body mass index. Therapeutic, IV.(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  15. Subjective versus objective assessment of breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Helga; Smith, Joanna; Bowman, Adrian; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ju, Xiangyang; Ayoub, Ashraf; Ray, Arup K

    2013-05-01

    To date breast assessment has been conducted mainly subjectively. However lately validated objective three-dimensional (3D) imaging was developed. The study aimed to assess breast reconstruction subjectively and objectively and conduct a comparison. In forty-four patients after immediate unilateral breast reconstruction with solely the extended latissimus dorsi flap the breast was captured by validated 3D imaging method and standardized 2D photography. Breast symmetry was subjectively evaluated by six experts who applied the Harris score giving a mark of 1-4 for a poor to excellent result. An error study was conducted by examination of the intra and inter-observer agreement and agreement on controls. By Procrustes analysis an objective asymmetry score was obtained and compared to the subjective assessment. The subjective assessment showed that the inter-observer agreement was good or substantial (p-value: value: fair (p-values: 0.159, 0.134, 0.099) to substantial (p-value: 0.005) intra-observer agreement. The objective assessment revealed that the reconstructed breast showed a significantly smaller volume compared to the opposite side and that the average asymmetry score was 0.052, ranging from 0.019 to 0.136. When comparing the subjective and objective method the relationship between the two scores was highly significant. Subjective breast assessment lacked accuracy and reproducibility. This was the first error study of subjective breast assessment versus an objective validated 3D imaging method based on true 3D parameters. The substantial agreement between established subjective breast assessment and new validated objective method supported the value of the later and we expect its future role to expand. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Versatile Naso-Labial Flaps in Facial Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Marakby, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Surgical excision of tumors from the face may create a defect that is difficult to restore. Skin grafts can only cover superficial defects and has a natural tendency to contract and may not take properly. Also, because of the colour mismatch, it is not cosmetically identical to the face. The use of regional flaps such as the median forehead flaps are usually bulky, can not cover a wide range of facial reconstruction and usually require the donor area to be grafted. The naso-labial flaps are very useful and versatile local flaps, with robust vascularity that can be readily elevated without a delay. The flap can be superiorly based to reconstruct defects on the cheek, side wall or the dorsum of the nose, alae, collumula and the lower eye lid. Inferiorly based flaps can be used to reconstruct defects in the upper lip, anterior floor of the mouth and the lower lip. The flap can be turned over and used as a lining of the nose and the lip. Aim of the Study: In the current study we present our experience with utilization of the nasolabial flaps in facial reconstruction. We evaluated the indications, flap designs, technique, and complications. We will also assess the final functional and aesthetic results. Material and Methods: The study included 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) presented at the surgical department, National Cancer Institute (NCl) Cairo University with skin cancer at different areas of the face. Preoperative assessment includes. Assessment of the stage of the disease, the flap design and patient general condition. The mean age of the patients was 56.3±6 years (range ]6-62 years). Fifteen patients presented with basal cell carcinoma, 2 squamous cell carcinoma, one malignant melanoma, one keratoacanthoma, and one xeroderma pigmentosa. Nasal defects constituted 75% of cases, the rest were lower eye lid (2), one upper lip and one oral commisure beside a case of cheek reconstruction. There was no major complication; only one patient suffered a reactionary

  17. Restrictive use of perioperative blood transfusion does not increase complication rates in microvascular breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Anne C; Barandun, Marina; Cha, Jieun; Zhong, Toni; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2016-08-01

    With increasing appreciation of the possible adverse effects of peri-operative blood transfusion, restrictive policies regarding use of blood products have been adopted in many surgical specialties. Although microvascular breast reconstruction has become a routine procedure, high peri-operative transfusion rates continue to be reported in the literature. In this study we examine the impact of our restrictive approach on blood transfusion rates and postoperative complications in patients undergoing microvascular blood transfusion. A retrospective review of patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps at a single institution was performed. Patient age and body mass index as well as type, timing and laterality of reconstruction was recorded. Pre-operative and post-operative hemoglobin and hematocrit were recorded. Peri-operative blood transfusion rates were calculated. Post-operative complication rates were compared between patients with higher and lower post-operative hemoglobin levels. Five hundred and twelve patients were included in this study. The peri-operative transfusion rate was 0.98% in this series. There was no significant difference between transfusion rates in unilateral and bilateral reconstructions (0.68 vs 1.36% p = 0.08) or immediate and delayed reconstructions (1.02 vs 0.51% p = 0.72 and 1.01 vs 1.60% p = 0.09 for unilateral and bilateral respectively). Lower post-operative hemoglobin levels were not associated with increased flap related, surgical or medical complications rates. A restrictive approach to peri-operative blood transfusion can be safely adopted in microvascular breast reconstruction without compromising flap viability or overall complication rates. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Versatility of radial forearm free flap for intraoral reconstruction

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    Jeremić Jelena V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The radial forearm free flap has an important role in reconstruction of the oncologic defects in the region of head and neck. Objective. The aim was to present and evaluate clinical experience and results in the radial forearm free transfer for intraoral reconstructions after resections due to malignancies. Methods. This article illustrates the versatility and reliability of forearm single donor site in 21 patients with a variety of intraoral oncologic defects who underwent immediate (19 patients, 90.5% or delayed (2 patients, 9.5% reconstruction using free flaps from the radial forearm. Fascio-cutaneous flaps were used in patients with floor of the mouth (6 cases, buccal mucosa (5 cases, lip (1 case and a retromolar triangle (2 cases defects, or after hemiglossectomy (7 cases. In addition, the palmaris longus tendon was included with the flap in 2 patients that required oral sphincter reconstruction. Results. An overall success rate was 90.5%. Flap failures were detected in two (9.5% patients, in one patient due to late ischemic necrosis, which appeared one week after the surgery, and in another patient due to venous congestion, which could not be salvaged after immediate re-exploration. Two patients required re-exploration due to vein thrombosis. The donor site healed uneventfully in all patients, except one, who had partial loss of skin graft. Conclusion. The radial forearm free flap is, due to multiple advantages, an acceptable method for reconstructions after resection of intraoral malignancies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41006

  19. Freestyle multiple propeller flap reconstruction (jigsaw puzzle approach) for complicated back defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Woo; Oh, Tae Suk; Eom, Jin Sup; Sun, Yoon Chi; Suh, Hyun Suk; Hong, Joon Pio

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of the posterior trunk remains to be a challenge as defects can be extensive, with deep dead space, and fixation devices exposed. Our goal was to achieve a tension-free closure for complex defects on the posterior trunk. From August 2006 to May 2013, 18 cases were reconstructed with multiple flaps combining perforator(s) and local skin flaps. The reconstructions were performed using freestyle approach. Starting with propeller flap(s) in single or multilobed design and sequentially in conjunction with adjacent random pattern flaps such as fitting puzzle. All defects achieved tensionless primary closure. The final appearance resembled a jigsaw puzzle-like appearance. The average size of defect was 139.6 cm(2) (range, 36-345 cm(2)). A total of 26 perforator flaps were used in addition to 19 random pattern flaps for 18 cases. In all cases, a single perforator was used for each propeller flap. The defect and the donor site all achieved tension-free closure. The reconstruction was 100% successful without flap loss. One case of late infection was noted at 12 months after surgery. Using multiple lobe designed propeller flaps in conjunction with random pattern flaps in a freestyle approach, resembling putting a jigsaw puzzle together, we can achieve a tension-free closure by distributing the tension to multiple flaps, supplying sufficient volume to obliterate dead space, and have reliable vascularity as the flaps do not need to be oversized. This can be a viable approach to reconstruct extensive defects on the posterior trunk. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Elbow Reconstruction Using Island Flap for Burn Patients

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    Gi Yeun Hur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDeep burns of the elbow lead to soft tissue necrosis and infection, with exposure of deep structures. Adequate wound coverage of this area requires thin, pliable, and durable tissue, while optimal functional recovery requires early coverage and functional rehabilitation. We have found 3 types of island flaps that provide reliable coverage for the elbow.MethodsA retrospective study was performed on all patients who underwent flap coverage of an elbow defect at our hospital. The patients' data including age, sex, cause of injury, wound dimensions, timing of flap coverage, postoperative elbow motion, and complications were investigated.ResultsBetween 2001 and 2012, 16 patients were treated at our hospital. The mean age was 53.3 years. Three kinds of flaps were performed: 9 latissimus dorsi flaps, 4 lateral arm flaps, and 4 radial forearm flaps. The average defect size was 183.5 cm2 (range, 28 to 670 cm2. Wound coverage was performed at mean duration of 45.9 days (range, 14 to 91 days. The mean postoperative active elbow flexion was 98° (range, 85° to 115°. Partial flap failure occurred in 1 latissimus dorsi flap. Minor complications included partial flap loss (11.8%, hematoma (23.5%, seroma (35.3%, and wound infection (5.9%.ConclusionsFlap selection for elbow reconstruction is determined by the defect size and the extent of the adjacent tissue injury. Elbow reconstruction using an island flap is a single-staged, reliable, and relatively simple procedure that permits initiation of early rehabilitation, thereby improving a patient's functional outcome.

  1. Reconstruction of Nasal Skin Cancer Defects with Local Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Salgarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of nasal defects must preserve the integrity of complex facial functions and expressions, as well as facial symmetry and a pleasing aesthetic outcome. The reconstructive modality of choice will depend largely on the location, size, and depth of the surgical defect. Individualized therapy is the best course, and numerous flaps have been designed to provide coverage of a variety of nasal-specific defects. We describe our experience in the aesthetic reconstruction of nasal skin defects following oncological surgery. The use of different local flaps for nasal skin cancer defects is reported in 286 patients. Complications in this series were one partial flap dehiscence that healed by secondary intention, two forehead flaps, and one bilobed flap with minimal rim necrosis that resulted in an irregular scar requiring revision. Aesthetic results were deemed satisfactory by all patients and the operating surgeons. The color and texture matches were aesthetically good, and the nasal contour was distinct in all patients. All scars were inconspicuous and symmetrical. No patient had tenting or a flat nose.

  2. Reconstruction of Nasal Skin Cancer Defects with Local Flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgarelli, A. C.; Bellini, P.; Multinu, A.; Consolo, U.; Magnoni, C.; Francomano, M.; Fantini, F.; Seidenari, S.

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction of nasal defects must preserve the integrity of complex facial functions and expressions, as well as facial symmetry and a pleasing aesthetic outcome. The reconstructive modality of choice will depend largely on the location, size, and depth of the surgical defect. Individualized therapy is the best course, and numerous flaps have been designed to provide coverage of a variety of nasal-specific defects. We describe our experience in the aesthetic reconstruction of nasal skin defects following oncological surgery. The use of different local flaps for nasal skin cancer defects is reported in 286 patients. Complications in this series were one partial flap dehiscence that healed by secondary intention, two forehead flaps, and one bilobed flap with minimal rim necrosis that resulted in an irregular scar requiring revision. Aesthetic results were deemed satisfactory by all patients and the operating surgeons. The color and texture matches were aesthetically good, and the nasal contour was distinct in all patients. All scars were inconspicuous and symmetrical. No patient had tenting or a flat nose.

  3. Secondary free-flap reconstruction following ablation for acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Jordan J; Troob, Scott H; Weaver, Tyler S; Gonzalez, Javier D; Petrisor, Daniel; Wax, Mark K

    2017-04-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis (AIFS) is a frequently fatal infection for which extensive and debilitating surgical debridement is a mainstay of therapy. Resulting defects are often composite in nature, mandating free tissue-transfer reconstruction. Outcomes data for free flap reconstruction are limited. The purpose of this study was to examine surgical outcomes and survival in patients undergoing free flap transfer following invasive fungal sinusitis. Retrospective case series. Between 1995 and 2015, patients undergoing operative debridement for AIFS were identified. Surgical records were used to identify survivors of acute infection who subsequently underwent free flap reconstructive surgery. Patient demographics, cause of immune compromise, defect description, flap type, perioperative complications, indications for revision surgery, functional outcomes, and long-term survival were reviewed. Forty-four patients were treated for AIFS, of those, 30 (68%) survived acute infection. Ten patients underwent maxillectomy, six with orbital exenteration, and were designated candidates for reconstruction. Eight patients underwent reconstruction. Median time from debridement to reconstruction was 67.5 days. Flap types included latissimus dorsi, scapula, anterolateral thigh, rectus, radial forearm, and fibula. Median follow-up was 7.7 months. No perioperative complications were encountered, and all subjects remained disease-free, able to speak and eat normally without prosthetic supplementation. Seven patients (87%) are currently alive. Reconstruction of defects left by invasive fungal sinusitis using free-tissue transfer resulted in successful flap survival, with no disease recurrence for all defects and flap types reviewed. Survivors of AIFS are able to tolerate midface reconstruction, with favorable functional outcomes and survival rates. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:815-819, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Onco plastic volume replacement with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in patients with large ptotic breasts. Is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Marakby, H.H.; Kotb, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Onco plastic breast conservative surgery has evolved as a safe alternative to the standard mastectomy in the treatment of early breast cancer. The procedure involves tumour resection with an adequate safety margin and either breast reshaping with volume displacement procedures (large or pt otic breasts) or volume replacement with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (LDF) (small to medium sized non-ptotic breasts). A contra lateral mastopexy procedure is usually necessary with the volume displacement Onco plastic surgery, a procedure that is often rejected by a significant number of patients. This limits the choice of the reconstruction of breast defects in such patients to autologous tissues i.e. LDF. Aim: Aim is to evaluate the feasibility of volume replacement onco plastic breast conservative surgery with lemmatise dorsi myocutaneous flaps for patients with large ptotic breasts. This involves testing the oncologic safety in terms of adequate safety margin, the complications rate and the final cosmetic outcome. The loco regional recurrence rate will be recorded and compared with oncoplastic volume displacement for similar sized breast defects. Patients and methods: A group of 50 female patients with early breast cancers (T2) who presented to the department of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo, Egypt in the period between carried out in all patient groups and was used to annually follow up the patients. All patients were detected with T2 NO breast cancer by both clinical and radiological examinations. All patients underwent partial mastectomy was and reconstruction with LDFs. Results: The average age at presentation was 46.5 ± 9 years and the range was 26-65 years. Most of the patients were subjected to partial mastectomy in 30 patients (60%), excision of a single quadrant from the four major quadrants was carried out in 15 patients (30%) where skin sparing wide local excision was carried out in only five patients (10%). The safety margin ranged from

  5. Elbow Reconstruction Using Island Flap for Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Yeun Hur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Deep burns of the elbow lead to soft tissue necrosis and infection, with exposureof deep structures. Adequate wound coverage of this area requires thin, pliable, and durabletissue, while optimal functional recovery requires early coverage and functional rehabilitation.We have found 3 types of island flaps that provide reliable coverage for the elbow.Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients who underwent flap coverageof an elbow defect at our hospital. The patients’ data including age, sex, cause of injury, wounddimensions, timing of flap coverage, postoperative elbow motion, and complications wereinvestigated.Results Between 2001 and 2012, 16 patients were treated at our hospital. The mean agewas 53.3 years. Three kinds of flaps were performed: 9 latissimus dorsi flaps, 4 lateral armflaps, and 4 radial forearm flaps. The average defect size was 183.5 cm2 (range, 28 to 670cm2. Wound coverage was performed at mean duration of 45.9 days (range, 14 to 91 days.The mean postoperative active elbow flexion was 98° (range, 85° to 115°. Partial flap failureoccurred in 1 latissimus dorsi flap. Minor complications included partial flap loss (11.8%,hematoma (23.5%, seroma (35.3%, and wound infection (5.9%.Conclusions Flap selection for elbow reconstruction is determined by the defect size andthe extent of the adjacent tissue injury. Elbow reconstruction using an island flap is a singlestaged,reliable, and relatively simple procedure that permits initiation of early rehabilitation,thereby improving a patient’s functional outcome.

  6. Free radial forearm adiposo-fascial flap for inferior maxillectomy defect reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Trivedi, Nirav P.; Sharma, Mohit; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Iyer, Subramania

    2009-01-01

    A free radial forearm fascial flap has been described for intraoral reconstruction. Adiposo-fascial flap harvesting involves few technical modifications from the conventional radial forearm fascio-cutaneous free flap harvesting. We report a case of inferior maxillectomy defect reconstruction in a 42-year-old male with a free radial forearm adiposo-fascial flap with good aesthetic and functional outcome with minimal primary and donor site morbidity. The technique of raising the flap and closing the donor site needs to be meticulous in order to achieve good cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:19881028

  7. Free radial forearm adiposo-fascial flap for inferior maxillectomy defect reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thankappan Krishnakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A free radial forearm fascial flap has been described for intraoral reconstruction. Adiposo-fascial flap harvesting involves few technical modifications from the conventional radial forearm fascio-cutaneous free flap harvesting. We report a case of inferior maxillectomy defect reconstruction in a 42-year-old male with a free radial forearm adiposo-fascial flap with good aesthetic and functional outcome with minimal primary and donor site morbidity. The technique of raising the flap and closing the donor site needs to be meticulous in order to achieve good cosmetic and functional outcome.

  8. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction in Patients with Breast Ptosis: 2-Stage Reconstruction Using 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Tomita, MD, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions:. The method described here may allow even inexperienced surgeons to achieve reconstruction of symmetrical, non-ptotic breasts with ease and in a short time. While the requirement of two surgeries is a potential disadvantage, our method will be particularly useful in cases involving TEs, i.e., delayed reconstruction or immediate reconstruction involving significant skin resection.

  9. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  10. Banking a hemi-abdominal DIEP flap: a pilot report of indications, technique, and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M; Singh, Navin K; Taylor, Jesse A; Rosson, Gedge D

    2009-01-01

    We present a pilot report of "banking" the contralateral hemi-abdominal deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap under the abdominal closure in patients undergoing unilateral autologous breast reconstruction when a hemi-abdominal flap suffices. Four patients undergoing unilateral autologous breast reconstruction with a hemi-abdominal DIEP or superficial inferior epigastric artery flap had their contralateral hemi-abdominal flap left in position, or "banked," under their abdominal closure to be used in case of failure. This novel method may be of assistance when a free microvascular hemi-abdominal flap is felt to be threatened or suspect. It provides a life-boat for the younger and experienced surgeon alike, and most importantly, for the breast cancer survivor. Economic analysis of the technique reveals that the contralateral hemi-abdominal flap should be banked more often than intuition alone would suggest. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Reconstruction of Nasal Cleft Deformities Using Expanded Forehead Flaps: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Manikandhan; Sneha, Pendem; Parameswaran, Ananthnarayanan; Jayakumar, Naveen; Sailer, Hermann F

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of the nasal clefts is a challenging task considering the nasal anatomic complexity and their possible association with craniofacial defects. The reconstruction of these defects needs extensive amounts of soft tissue that warrant the use of forehead flaps. Often presence of cranial defects and low hairline compromise the amount of tissue available for reconstruction warrenting tissue expansion. To evaluate the efficacy of tissue expansion in reconstruction of congenital nasal clefts. 9 patients with congenital nasal clefts involving multiple sub units were taken up for nasal reconstruction with expanded forehead flaps. The average amount of expansion needed was 200 ml. The reconstruction was performed in 3 stages. Expanded forehead flaps proved to be best modality for reconstruction providing the skin cover needed for ala, columella and dorsum with minimal scarring at the donor site. Expansion of the forehead flap is a viable option for multiple sub unit reconstruction in congenital nasal cleft deformities.

  12. Feasibility of Use of a Barbed Suture (V-Loc 180 for Quilting the Donor Site in Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap Breast Reconstruction

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    Dinesh Kumar Thekkinkattil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Latissimus dorsi (LD myocutaneous flap is a popular method of breastreconstruction which can be associated with high incidence of seroma formation. Quiltingsutures at the harvest site are used to reduce this. Barbed sutures are self anchoring sutureswhich avoid multiple knotting and can be useful in quilting.Methods A retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained database of patients whounderwent LD flap breast reconstruction between January 2009 and January 2011 was carriedout. Seroma formation at the harvest site, wound related complications, inpatient stay andduration of surgery were analysed and a comparison was made between two groups wherequilting was done with barbed (V-Loc suture and conventional polydioxanone (PDS II sutures.Results Fifty-seven patients were included of which 33 had quilting by V-Loc sutures and in24 patients PDS II suture was used. Median age in the PDS group was 55 years (interquartilerange [IQR], 45 to 61 years which was comparable to the V-Loc group (53 years [IQR, 48to 59 years]; P-value 0.948. Sixteen patients (28% had significant seroma formation and5 (9% patients developed superficial wound dehiscence. Incidences of seroma or woundcomplications were comparable (P-value 0.378 and 1.00, respectively. Secondary outcomessuch as total duration of surgery, total inpatient stay, total amount of drain at the donor sitewere also similar in two groups.Conclusions Use of barbed sutures for quilting the donor site in LD flap reconstruction is afeasible option and the associated seroma formation and wound complications are comparablewith conventional sutures.

  13. Color Doppler Ultrasonography-Targeted Perforator Mapping and Angiosome-Based Flap Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Tei, Troels; Thomsen, Jørn Bo

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about perforators and angiosomes has inspired new and innovative flap designs for reconstruction of defects throughout the body. The purpose of this article is to share our experience using color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU)-targeted perforator mapping and angiosome-based flap reconstr......Knowledge about perforators and angiosomes has inspired new and innovative flap designs for reconstruction of defects throughout the body. The purpose of this article is to share our experience using color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU)-targeted perforator mapping and angiosome-based flap...

  14. Free toe pulp flap for finger pulp and volar defect reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoshid R Balan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fingertip injury requiring flap cover is very common in the modern era. The ideal cover should fulfill both functional and aesthetic improvement. Materials and Methods: From June 2015 to April 2016, we performed seven free toe pulp flaps for finger defect reconstruction. All patients were males. Five flaps were done in emergency post-traumatic cases, and two were done in elective set up. The cases included reconstruction of three thumbs, one index and one ring finger in an emergency set up and two ring fingers in the elective. Thumb reconstruction was done with great toe lateral pulp and the other digits reconstructed with second toe pulp flap. Follow-up evaluation included both functional and aesthetic assessment. Results: Five flaps survived completely, one suffered partial loss, and one flap failed completely. The median follow-up period was 9 months. The median duration of surgery was 255 min (range 210 to 300 min. The median two-point discrimination was 6.5 mm (range 4–8 mm. There was the return of temperature sensation in all patients; two had cold intolerance. The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament score varied from 3.61 to 5.07 (median filament index value 4.31/pressure value of 2 g/mm2. Three patients had delayed donor site wound healing. Conclusions: The free toe pulp flap is an efficient choice for fingertip and volar finger defects reconstruction with an excellent tissue match.

  15. Perforator chimerism for the reconstruction of complex defects: A new chimeric free flap classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan; Ghanem, Ali M

    2015-11-01

    Complex defects present structural and functional challenges to reconstructive surgeons. When compared to multiple free flaps or staged reconstruction, the use of chimeric flaps to reconstruct such defects have many advantages such as reduced number of operative procedures and donor site morbidity as well as preservation of recipient vessels. With increased popularity of perforator flaps, chimeric flaps' harvest and design has benefited from 'perforator concept' towards more versatile and better reconstruction solutions. This article discusses perforator based chimeric flaps and presents a practice based classification system that incorporates the perforator flap concept into "Perforator Chimerism". The authors analyzed a variety of chimeric patterns used in 31 consecutive cases to present illustrative case series and their new classification system. Accordingly, chimeric flaps are classified into four types. Type I: Classical Chimerism, Type II: Anastomotic Chimerism, Type III: Perforator Chimerism and Type IV Mixed Chimerism. Types I on specific source vessel anatomy whilst Type II requires microvascular anastomosis to create the chimeric reconstructive solution. Type III chimeric flaps utilizes the perforator concept to raise two components of tissues without microvascular anastomosis between them. Type IV chimeric flaps are mixed type flaps comprising any combination of Types I to III. Incorporation of the perforator concept in planning and designing chimeric flaps has allowed safe, effective and aesthetically superior reconstruction of complex defects. The new classification system aids reconstructive surgeons and trainees to understand chimeric flaps design, facilitating effective incorporation of this important reconstructive technique into the armamentarium of the reconstruction toolbox. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstructive plastic operations in the treatment of patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Letyagin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the efficiency of reconstructive plastic operations in treating patients with breast cancer. It describes the types of the similar operations, such as the application of silicone implants, a latissimus dorsi flap in its combination with the implants, free flaps using microsurgical techniques, tissue expanders, a TRAM flap and its various modifications, and other rarely used implants. The advantages and disadvantages of different reconstructive techniques are described.В.П. Летягин, Т.А. ГригорьеваФГБУ «РОНЦ им. Н.Н. Блохина РАМН», Москва Контакты: Виктор Павлович Летягин levipa@mail.ru

  17. The use of free musculocutaneous flaps to cover chronic radiation ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiguchi, Kounosuke; Tajima, Sadao; Tanaka, Yoshio; Hira, Michiya; Imai, Keisuke; Fukae, Eiichi; Omiya, Yuka.

    1992-01-01

    Three patients with chronic radiation ulcer treated with free musculocutaneous flap transfer are described. The first patient was a 66-year-old woman who developed sacral ulcer 7 years after radiation combined with surgery for uterine cancer. After debridement of this ulcer, interpositional vein grafts 30 cm in length was used to reconstruct an 'extended' latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. The second patient was a 62-year-old woman. She developed ulcer on her chest 15 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Radiation damage extended to the myocardium and pulmonary parenchyma. After careful debridement, reconstruction was performed by using the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. The last patient was a 72-year-old woman. Ulcer of the right axilla developed 19 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Reconstruction was performed by using a free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. In these patients in whom radiation-damaged tissue was not completely excised, favorable results could be attained by using the transfer of the free musculocutaneous flaps. (N.K.)

  18. Oral cavity reconstruction with the masseter flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahieu, R.; Russo, S.; Gualtieri, T.; Colletti, G.; Deganello, A.

    The purpose of this report is to highlight how an unusual, outdated, unpopular and overlooked reconstructive method such as the masseter flap can be a reliable, straightforward and effective solution for oral reconstruction in selected cases. We report the transposition of the masseter crossover

  19. Pedicled Descending Branch Latissimus Dorsi Mini-flap for Repairing Partial Mastectomy Defect: A New Technique

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    Ruizhao Cai, M.D.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Volume loss is 1 of the major factors influencing cosmetic outcomes of breast after partial mastectomy (PM, especially for smaller breasts, and therefore, volume replacement is critical for optimizing the final aesthetic outcome. We present a novel technique of raising a pedicled descending branch latissimus dorsi (LD mini-flap for reconstruction of PM defects via an axillary incision. After PM, the LD mini-flap is harvested through the existing axillary incision of the axillary dissection or the sentinel lymph node biopsy. The descending branches of thoracodorsal vessels and nerve are carefully identified and isolated. The transverse branches are protected to maintain muscle innervation and function. The LD muscle is then undermined posteriorly and inferiorly to create a submuscular pocket and a subcutaneous pocket between LD muscle and superficial fascia. Once the submuscular plane is created, the muscle is divided along the muscle fibers from the deep surface including a layer of fat above the muscle. Finally, the LD mini-flap is transferred to the breast defect. Given the limited length and mobility of the LD mini-flap, this approach is best utilized for lateral breast defects. However, for medial defects, the lateral breast tissue is rearranged to reconstruct the medial breast defect, and an LD mini-flap is then used to reconstruct the lateral breast donor site. This technique can therefore be employed to reconstruct all quadrants of the breast and can provide aesthetic outcomes without scars on the back, with minimal dysfunction of LD muscle.

  20. Fingertip reconstruction with simultaneous flaps and nail bed grafts following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Euna; Park, Byung Ho; Song, Seung Yong; Jung, Ho Sung; Kim, Chung Hun

    2013-07-01

    To report our technique and results with treating fingertip amputations with flaps and simultaneous nailbed grafts. We reconstructed 20 fingertip amputations with loss of bone and nail with flaps combined with nailbed grafts. We reconstructed the volar side of the fingertip with a flap, and the dorsal side of the fingertip with a nailbed grafted to the raw inner surface of the flap. We employed volar V-Y advancement flaps for transverse or dorsal oblique fingertip injuries and generally used abdominal flaps for volar oblique fingertip injuries. We harvested nailbeds from the amputated finger or from the patient's first toe. The length of the amputated fingertips was restored with the flaps, and the lost nailbeds were restored to their natural appearance with the nailbed grafts. We classified the results according to the length of the reconstructed fingertip and the appearance of the nail. Excellent or good results were achieved in 16 cases. Three cases had fair results and 1 had a poor result. We observed favorable results for distal fingertip amputations (Allen type II or III). In particular, most cases that were reconstructed with volar V-Y advancement flaps combined with nailbed grafts demonstrated favorable results. This method is useful for the restoration of dorsal oblique or transverse type fingertip amputations and is a good alternative when replantation is not an option. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reliability of Free Radial Forearm Flap for Tongue Reconstruction Following Oncosurgical Resection

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    Gaurab Ranjan Chaudhuri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Primary closure following oncosurgical resection of carcinoma tongue has been found to compromise tongue function in regards to speech and swallowing very badly. In contrast, reconstruction of tongue with free radial forearm flap following oncosurgical resection has shown promising functional outcome. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients (ten male and three female with squamous cell carcinoma involving anterior 2/3rd of tongue had undergone either hemiglossectomy or subtotal glossectomy. Reconstruction was done with free radial forearm flap following oncosurgical resection and neck dissection. All of them received postoperative radiotherapy. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 2 years. The age of the patients ranged between 32 and 65 years. Flap dimension ranged from 7x6 cm to 10x8 cm. Vascular anastomosis performed in an end-to-end manner with 8-0 Ethilon® under loupe magnifiacation. Results Venous congestion occurred in one patient after 48 hours postoperatively and the flap underwent complete necrosis on postoperative day 5. Postoperative hematoma was found in one patient within first 24 hours of reconstruction. Re-exploration was done immediately, blood clots were removed. No fresh bleeding point was seen and the flap survived. In this series, 12 out of 13 flaps survived completely (92%. Conclusion The free radial forearm flap has become a workhorse flap in head and reconstruction due to its lack of extra bulk, relative ease of dissection, long vascular pedicle, good calibre vessels, malleability and minimal donor site morbidity. Furthermore its low flap loss and complication rate offer the best choice for tongue reconstruction.

  2. Regional Myocutaneous Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional myocutaneous pedicle flaps (RMF) are known to be relevant in the reconstruction of major head and neck oncologic defects with pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicle flap (PMMC) being the best-known RMF. For over three decades, since first described by Ariyan in 1979, PMMC has continually been used in the ...

  3. Facial reconstruction with a unique osteomyocutaneous DCIA perforator flap variant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechselberger, G; Schwaiger, K; Hachleitner, J; Oberascher, G; Ensat, F; Larcher, L

    Anatomical variance of the deep circumflex iliac artery is of high clinical value in facial reconstruction using a deep circumflex iliac artery perforator (DCIAP) flap. We present the case of a 76-year-old woman treated with an osteomyocutaneous DCIAP flap variant for facial reconstruction. We also review here the literature on DCIA perforator flaps and the different anatomical variances, which might bring clinical benefits. The observed anatomy in our patient offered the possibility to raise a free flap variant with high mobility of a large skin paddle and a long vascular pedicle combined with a variable osteomuscular portion. The characteristics of the flap thus raised help overcome the disadvantages of the conventional DCIAP flap and offer excellent options for facial reconstruction.

  4. RECONSTRUCTION OF FACIAL SKIN DEFECT BY VARIOUS FLAPS : OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atishkumar B.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Face represents complete personality of human being. Cosmetically it is very important part of a person especially for woman. There are many situations when due to disease or trauma, facial defect arises, which requires reconstruction by either local or distant surgical flaps . METHODS AND MATERIALS : In rural places, we come across many patients suffering from trauma and skin malignancy of face. These patients require reconstruction done esthetically with local flaps. Objective of this study is to share our exper ience of providing esthetically good results at our secondary referral care center. Hereby, we present case series of 14 patients operated at our institute. These patients were analyzed according to the age, sex, nature of injury and anatomical location of lesion on the face. All these patients were operated and reconstruction of defect was done with various local flaps best suited for respective lesion, under local anesthesia or sedation. Post - operative nature of wound was analyzed for flap viability or fl ap necrosis . RESULTS : Amongst them were 7 male and 7 female, ages ranging from 4 to 80 years. 7out of 14 patients were of basal cell carcinoma, 4 were due to trauma, 2 were due to dog bite and 1 case of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma at root of nose. All patients had excellent flap viability at end of 6 months and flap achieving almost similar color and contour as that of surrounding skin. CONCLUSION : Reconstruction of facial defects by local flaps is very easy and cost effective technique. This can be don e even at secondary referral care centre with minimal availability of facilities

  5. Reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcer using a myocutaneous flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Okano, Shinji; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Mori, Tamotsu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shigeki, Sadayuki

    1990-01-01

    Problems in the surgical treatment of radionecrotic ulcers, using a myocutaneous flap, have been reviewed in 21 patients. These problems included poor wound healing, radiation damage to important nerves and vessels there by making dissection difficult, malignant changes, infections, continuing necrosis of the tissue, and bleeding during surgery and secondary hemorrhaging. The use of a myocutaneous flap has many advantages when compared with conventional flaps and free skin grafts in the reconstruction of radionecrotic ulcers. Flap survival was good, but an incomplete excision of the ulcer delayed primary wound healing. Therefore, complete excision of the radionecrotic ulcer is imperative. (author)

  6. Morbidity and cost differences between free flap reconstruction and pedicled flap reconstruction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer: Matched control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeele, Ludwig E.; Goldstein, David; Tsai, Vance; Gullane, Patrick J.; Neligan, Peter; Brown, Dale H.; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2006-01-01

    To compare morbidity and cost in patients who underwent primary reconstruction with free tissue transfer with those with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) reconstructions after ablation of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Over a 6-year period, 36 patients had PMMF

  7. Skin sparing mastectomy: Technique and suggested methods of reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahat, A.M.; Hashim, T.; Soliman, H.O.; Manie, T.M.; Soliman, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and accessibility of performing adequate mastectomy to extirpate the breast tissue, along with en-block formal axillary dissection performed from within the same incision. We also compared different methods of immediate breast reconstruction used to fill the skin envelope to achieve the best aesthetic results. Methods: 38 patients with breast cancer underwent skin-sparing mastectomy with formal axillary clearance, through a circum-areolar incision. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed using different techniques to fill in the skin envelope. Two reconstruction groups were assigned; group 1: Autologus tissue transfer only (n= 24), and group 2: implant augmentation (n= 14). Autologus tissue transfer: The techniques used included filling in the skin envelope using Extended Latissimus Dorsi flap (18 patients) and Pedicled TRAM flap (6 patients). Augmentation with implants: Subpectoral implants(4 patients), a rounded implant placed under the pectoralis major muscle to augment an LD reconstructed breast. LD pocket (10 patients), an anatomical implant placed over the pectoralis major muscle within a pocket created by the LD flap. No contra-lateral procedure was performed in any of the cases to achieve symmetry. Results: All cases underwent adequate excision of the breast tissue along with en-block complete axillary clearance (when indicated), without the need for an additional axillary incision. Eighteen patients underwent reconstruction using extended LD flaps only, six had TRAM flaps, four had augmentation using implants placed below the pectoralis muscle along with LD flaps, and ten had implants placed within the LD pocket. Breast shape, volume and contour were successfully restored in all patients. Adequate degree of ptosis was achieved, to ensure maximal symmetry. Conclusions: Skin Sparing mastectomy through a circum-areolar incision has proven to be a safe and feasible option for the management of breast cancer in Egyptian

  8. Soft Palate Reconstruction Using Bilateral Palatal Mucomuscular Flap and Pharyngeal Flap after Resection of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sik Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma infrequently occurs at the soft palate. Although various methodscan be used for reconstruction of soft palate defects that occur after resecting squamous cellcarcinoma, it is difficult to obtain satisfactory results from the perspective of the functionalrestoration of the soft palate. A combination of bilateral palatal mucomuscular flap for theoral side and superiorly based posterior pharyngeal flap for the nasal side were performed ontwo patients who were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate in orderto reconstruct the soft palate defects after surgical resection. After surgery, the patients werefollowed-up for a mean period of 11 months. The flaps were well maintained in both patients.The donor site defects were epithelialized and completely recovered. Additionally, no recurrenceof the primary sites was shown. Slight hyponasality was observed in the voice assessmentsthat were conducted 6 months after surgery. No food regurgitation or aspiration was observedin the swallowing tests. We used a combination of bilateral palatal mucomuscular flap andsuperiorly based posterior pharyngeal flap to reconstruct the soft palate defects that occurredafter resecting the squamous cell carcinomas. We reduced the donor site complications andachieved functionally satisfactory outcomes.

  9. Thermal injury in TAPIA breast reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Gunnarsson, Gudjon L.; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2017-01-01

    be due to the relative high frequency of this type of reconstructions. Reports of thermal injury to reconstructions using the Latissimus Dorsi flap are rare. The injuries previously described are most often caused by severe heat exposure. The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP)-flap can be used...... as an alternative to the Latissimus Dorsi flap but it may be more susceptible to thermal insult due to the total denervation, the restricted blood supply and the limited thickness of the flap. Precautions are recommended to avoid this type of injury....

  10. Reconstructive Surgery for Severe Penile Inadequacy: Phalloplasty with a Free Radial Forearm Flap or a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lumen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Severe penile inadequacy in adolescents is rare. Phallic reconstruction to treat this devastating condition is a major challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Phallic reconstruction using the free radial forearm flap (RFF or the pedicled anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF has been routinely used in female-to-male transsexuals. Recently we started to use these techniques in the treatment of severe penile inadequacy. Methods. Eleven males (age 15 to 42 years were treated with a phallic reconstruction. The RFF is our method of choice; the ALTF is an alternative when a free flap is contraindicated or less desired by the patient. The RFF was used in 7 patients, the ALTF in 4 patients. Mean followup was 25 months (range: 4–49 months. Aesthetic and functional results were evaluated. Results. There were no complications related to the flap. Aesthetic results were judged as “good” in 9 patients and “moderate” in 2 patients. Sensitivity in the RFF was superior compared to the ALTF. Four patients developed urinary complications (stricture and/or fistula. Six patients underwent erectile implant surgery. In 2 patients the erectile implant had to be removed due to infection or erosion. Conclusion. In case of severe penile inadequacy due to whatever condition, a phalloplasty is the preferred treatment nowadays. The free radial forearm flap is still the method of choice. The anterolateral thigh flap can be a good alternative, especially when free flaps are contraindicated, but sensitivity is markedly inferior in these flaps.

  11. Cost analysis of enhanced recovery after surgery in microvascular breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Christine; Moriarty, James; Borah, Bijan J; Mara, Kristin C; Harmsen, William S; Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lemaine, Valerie

    2018-06-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathways have been shown in multiple surgical specialties to decrease hospital length of stay (LOS) after surgery. ERAS in breast reconstruction has been found to decrease hospital LOS and inpatient opioid use. ERAS protocols can facilitate a patient's recovery and can potentially increase the quality of care while decreasing costs. A standardized ERAS pathway was developed through multidisciplinary collaboration. It addressed all phases of surgical care for patients undergoing free-flap breast reconstruction utilizing an abdominal donor site. In this retrospective cohort study, clinical variables associated with hospitalization costs for patients who underwent free-flap breast reconstruction with the ERAS pathway were compared with those of historical controls, termed traditional recovery after surgery (TRAS). All patients included in the study underwent surgery between September 2010 and September 2014. Predicted costs of the study groups were compared using generalized linear modeling. A total of 200 patients were analyzed: 82 in the ERAS cohort and 118 in the TRAS cohort. Clinical variables that were identified to potentially affect costs were found to have a statistically significant difference between groups and included unilateral versus bilateral procedures (p = 0.04) and the need for postoperative blood transfusion (p = 0.03). The cost regression analysis on the two cohorts was adjusted for these significant variables. Adjusted mean costs of patients with ERAS were found to be $4,576 lesser than those of the TRAS control group ($38,688 versus $43,264). Implementation of the ERAS pathway was associated with significantly decreased costs when compared to historical controls. There has been a healthcare focus toward prudent resource allocation, which dictates the need for plastic surgeons to recognize economic evaluation of clinical practice. The ERAS pathway can increase healthcare accountability by improving

  12. Methylene Blue Dye-Induced Skin Necrosis in Immediate Breast Reconstruction: Evaluation and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hwan Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background For early breast cancer patients, skin-sparing mastectomy or nipple-sparing mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy has become the mainstream treatment for immediate breast reconstruction in possible cases. However, a few cases of skin necrosis caused by methylene blue dye (MBD used for sentinel lymph node localization have been reported. Methods Immediate breast reconstruction using a silicone implant was performed on 35 breasts of 34 patients after mastectomy. For sentinel lymph node localization, 1% MBD (3 mL was injected into the subareolar area. The operation site was inspected in the postoperative evaluation. Results Six cases of immediate breast reconstruction using implants were complicated by methylene blue dye. One case of local infection was improved by conservative treatment. In two cases, partial necrosis and wound dehiscence of the incision areas were observed; thus, debridement and closure were performed. Of the three cases of wide skin necrosis, two cases underwent removal of the dead tissue and implants, followed by primary closure. In the other case, the breast implant was salvaged using latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap reconstruction. Conclusions The complications were caused by MBD toxicity, which aggravated blood disturbance and skin tension after implant insertion. When planning immediate breast reconstruction using silicone implants, complications of MBD should be discussed in detail prior to surgery, and appropriate management in the event of complications is required.

  13. Retention of a reconstructed nipple using a C-V flap with different layer thicknesses in the C-flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Yoshihiro; Itsukage, Sizu; Sakaguchi, Kouichi; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Numajiri, Toshiaki

    2018-04-01

    The C-V flap for nipple reconstruction is now one of standard surgical techniques. But decreased projection is still a problem. In recent years, it has been suggested that projection can be more easily maintained when raising of the C-flap is performed with a split thickness dermis. In this study, we examined whether decrease of projection can be prevented by raising of a C-flap with a split dermis rather than with full dermis. A total of 49 consecutive patients who underwent reconstruction of a nipple using the C-V flap technique were enrolled. The patients included 22 who underwent surgery using a C-flap with a full thickness dermis (Group F), and 27 who underwent surgery with raising of a flap with a split thickness dermis (Group S). The size of the reconstructed nipple was measured at 2 weeks, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively for comparison between Groups F and S. Partial necrosis of the C-flap end occurred in 4 subjects in only Group S. The decrease in projection after 1 year postoperatively in Group S was significantly lower than that in Group F. In contrast, the teat base size in Group F tended to be greater than that in Group S, suggesting a tendency for an expanded base using a flap with a full dermis. Our results indicated that it is recommended to use a C-flap with a split dermis for cases with high projection of the nipple on the contralateral side.

  14. Predictors of satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hannah; Carroll, Natalie; Renshaw, Derek; Turner, Andrew; Park, Alan; Skillman, Jo; McCarthy, Kate; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-01

    Breast reconstruction is associated with multiple psychological benefits. However, few studies have identified clinical and psychological factors associated with improved satisfaction and quality of life. This study examined factors, which predict satisfaction with breast appearance, outcome satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Women who underwent post-mastectomy breast reconstruction between 2010 and 2016 received a postal questionnaire consisting of The BREAST-Q Patient Reported Outcomes Instrument, The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-30 Questionnaire, The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, and a series of Visual-Analogue Scales. One hundredforty-eight women completed the questionnaire, a 56% response rate. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed psychosocial factors accounted for 75% of the variance in breast satisfaction, 68% for outcome satisfaction, and 46% forquality of life. Psychosocial well-being emerged as a significant predictor of satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .322) and outcome satisfaction (β = .406). Deep inferior epigastric perforator flap patients reported greater satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .120) and outcome satisfaction (β = .167). This study extends beyond the limited research by distinguishing between satisfaction with breast appearance and outcome satisfaction. The study provides evidence for the role of psychosocial factors predicting key patient reported outcomes and demonstrates the importance of psychosocial well-being and reconstruction type. The findings also highlight the need for healthcare providers to consider the psychosocial well-being of patients both preoperatively and post operatively and provide preliminary evidence for the use of deep inferior epigastric perforator reconstructions over other types of reconstructive procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Extending the use of the gracilis muscle flap in perineal reconstruction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Stephen J; Almasharqah, Riyadh; Fogg, Quentin A; Anderson, William

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum is required following oncological resections. Plastic surgical techniques can be used to restore the aesthetics and function of the perineum. The gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a substantial skin paddle, with minimal donor site morbidity. The flap is pedicled on a perforator from the medial circumflex femoral artery, giving it limited reach across the perineum. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle may free up more of the arterial pedicle, increasing its reach. On three female cadavers, bilateral gracilis flaps were raised in the standard surgical manner, giving six flaps in total. With the flaps pedicled across the perineum, the distance from the tip of each flap was measured to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). The flaps were then tunnelled under the adductor longus muscle. The distances to the ASIS were measured again. The average pedicle length was greater than 7 cm. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle increased the reach by more than 4 cm on average. Cadaveric dissection has shown that tunnelling of the flap in a novel way increase its reach across the perineum. This additional flexibility improves its use clinically and is of benefit to plastic surgeons operating in perineal reconstruction. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporalis myofascial flap for primary cranial base reconstruction after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaly, Ahmed; Magdy, Emad A; Nour, Yasser A; Gaafar, Alaa H

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the use of the temporalis myofascial flap in primary cranial base reconstruction following surgical tumor ablation and to explain technical issues, potential complications, and donor site consequences along with their management. Retrospective case series. Tertiary referral center. Forty-one consecutive patients receiving primary temporalis myofascial flap reconstructions following cranial base tumor resections in a 4-year period. Flap survival, postoperative complications, and donor site morbidity. Patients included 37 males and 4 females ranging in age from 10 to 65 years. Two patients received preoperative and 18 postoperative radiation therapy. Patient follow-up ranged from 4 to 39 months. The whole temporalis muscle was used in 26 patients (63.4%) and only part of a coronally split muscle was used in 15 patients (36.6%). Nine patients had primary donor site reconstruction using a Medpor((R)) (Porex Surgical, Inc., Newnan, GA) temporal fossa implant; these had excellent aesthetic results. There were no cases of complete flap loss. Partial flap dehiscence was seen in six patients (14.6%); only two required surgical débridement. None of the patients developed cerebrospinal leaks or meningitis. One patient was left with complete paralysis of the temporal branch of the facial nerve. Three patients (all had received postoperative irradiation) developed permanent trismus. The temporalis myofascial flap was found to be an excellent reconstructive alternative for a wide variety of skull base defects following tumor ablation. It is a very reliable, versatile flap that is usually available in the operative field with relatively low donor site aesthetic and functional morbidity.

  17. Reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores with pedicled anterolateral thigh myocutaneous flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Yi; Fu, Ju-Peng; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chen, Shao-Liang; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen

    2011-05-01

    To provide an alternative choice for covering trochanteric pressure sores, we report on a modified pedicle anterolateral thigh (ALT) myocutaneous flap based on the descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery. From August 2007 to January 2010, 20 consecutive patients (10 men and 10 women) underwent 21 pedicled ALT myocutaneous flaps for reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores. The flap was designed and elevated, resembling the ALT perforator flap including part of the vastus lateralis muscle but without skeletonisation of the perforators. The mean age of patients was 79.4 years (range: 46-103). The mean follow-up period was 13.9 months (range: 3-32). The flaps were 8-21 cm long and 5-11 cm wide. All flaps healed without major complications. All donor sites were closed primarily without skin grafting and showed good aesthetic results. No recurrence was observed. This modified design of pedicled ALT myocutaneous flap without skeletonisation of perforators is a reliable and easily harvested flap for reconstruction of trochanteric pressure sores with limited morbidity. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Salient points in reconstruction of nasal skin after tumor ablation with local flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A variety of nasal skin reconstruction methods are available to meet the esthetic patient's needs. In this article, we review some of modifications of these procedures and share our experience in reconstruction of different parts of the nasal skin following skin tumor ablation. Patients and Methods : From January 2010 to January 2014, 171 patients underwent nasal skin reconstruction after excising cancerous lesions of the involved nasal skin. The patient's history, pre- and post-operation photographs, and the surgery data were collected and assessed. Demographic data related to the type of cancer, defect size and location, type of reconstruction were collected. Results: A variety of local flaps were used based on location and defect features. Nearly all flaps healed primarily without postsurgical significant complications. Conclusion: According to the results and the outcomes of the operations, we concluded that a certain flaps are more effective than others in nasal skin reconstruction. Local flap reconstruction of the nose has good esthetic result with low complication rate.

  19. Reconstruction of palatal defect using mucoperiosteal hinge flap and pushback palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S I; Lee, H S; Hwang, K

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a simple, new surgical technique to provide a complete two-layer closure of palatal defect resulting from a surgical complication of trans palatal resection of skull base chordoma. The nasal layer was reconstructed with triangular shape oral mucoperiosteal turn over hinge flap based on anterior margin of palatal defect and rectangular shaped lateral nasal mucosal hinge flaps. The oral layer was reconstructed with conventional pushback V-Y advancement 2-flaps palatoplasty. Each layer of the flaps were secured with two key mattress suture for flap coaptation. This technique has some advantages: simple, short operation time, one-stage procedure, no need of osteotomy. It can close small- to medium-sized palatal defect of palate or wide cleft palate and can prevent common complication of oronasal fistula, which could be caused by tension.

  20. Lower abdominal wall reconstructions with pedicled rectus femoris flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arashiro, Ken; Nishizeki, Osamu; Ishida, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    During the past 10 years, seven pedicled rectus femoris muscle or musculocutaneous flaps were used to repair lower abdominal defects; three recalcitrant incisional hernias with previous radiotherapy, two long-standing wound infections after synthetic mesh reconstruction, one posttraumatic wall defect and one metastatic tumor. There were two flap complications, one skin paddle necrosis and one wound infection. There was no significant disability of the donor limb encountered. During the two-year and seven month average follow-up, there was no recurrence of the problems except for one minor fascial dehiscence in the patient with metastatic abdominal wall tumor. Easy approach, rapid harvest, relatively large and reliable overlying fascia lata, a single dominant neurovascular pedicle, easy primary closure of the donor site, and minimal donor site morbidity all make the rectus femoris flap a good alternative flap for lower abdominal wall reconstruction. It is especially useful in a condition where synthetic mesh would be unsuitable for defects with infection or recurrent incisional hernia after radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Scapular Free Vascularised Bone Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: Are Dental Implants Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lanzer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Free fibula flap remains the flap of choice for reconstruction of mandibular defects. If free fibula flap is not possible, the subscapular system of flaps is a valid option. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of dental implant placement in patients receiving a scapular free flap for oromandibular reconstruction. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients undergoing mandible reconstruction with a subscapular system free-tissue (lateral border of the scapula transfer at the University Hospital Zürich between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Bone density in cortical and cancellous bone was measured in Hounsfield units (HU. Changes of bone density, height and width were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22. Comparisons of bone dimensions as well as bone density were performed using a chi-square test. Results: Ten patients were included. Implantation was conducted in 50%. However, all patients could have received dental implants considering bone stock. Loss of bone height and width were significant (P < 0.001. There was a statistical significant increase in bone density in cortical (P < 0.001 and cancellous (P = 0.004 bone. Conclusions: Dental implants are possible after scapular free flap reconstruction of oromandibular defects. Bone height and width were reduced, while bone density increased with time.

  2. Reconstruction of various perinasal defects using facial artery perforator-based nasolabial island flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae Ho; Yun, In Sik; Rha, Dong Kyun; Lee, Won Jai

    2013-11-01

    Classical flaps for perinasal defect reconstruction, such as forehead or nasolabial flaps, have some disadvantages involving limitations of the arc of rotation and two stages of surgery. However, a perforator-based flap is more versatile and allows freedom in flap design. We introduced our experience with reconstruction using a facial artery perforator-based propeller flap on the perinasal area. We describe the surgical differences between different defect subtypes. Between December 2005 and August 2013, 10 patients underwent perinasal reconstruction in which a facial artery perforator-based flap was used. We divided the perinasal defects into types A and B, according to location. The operative results, including flap size, arc of rotation, complications, and characteristics of the perforator were evaluated by retrospective chart review and photographic evaluation. Eight patients were male and 2 patients were female. Their mean age was 61 years (range, 35-75 years). The size of the flap ranged from 1 cm×1.5 cm to 3 cm×6 cm. Eight patients healed uneventfully, but 2 patients presented with mild flap congestion. However, these 2 patients healed by conservative management without any additional surgery. All of the flaps survived completely with aesthetically pleasing results. The facial artery perforator-based flap allowed for versatile customized flaps, and the donor site scar was concealed using the natural nasolabial fold.

  3. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Genetics of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How do surgeons use implants to reconstruct a woman’s breast? How do surgeons ...

  4. Scrotal Reconstruction with a Pedicled Gracilis Muscle Flap after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several scrotal reconstructive options are available including split thickness skin grafts, scrotal advancement flaps, local fasciocutaneous, muscle or myocutaneous flaps, and free tissue transfer. We report a case of a 34 year old African male who presented as a referral from a district hospital with a scrotal defect and ...

  5. Complete Lower Lip Reconstruction with a Large Lip Switch Flap and a Composite Modiolus Advancement Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudjon L. Gunnarsson, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Total loss of the lower lip is debilitating and poses a reconstructive challenge. Aiming to restore oral continence and function and also cosmetic appearance, a successful reconstruction has a huge impact on the quality of life for the individual patient. Early sources of local tissue rearrangement for lip reconstruction date back 3000 years, with earliest reports of lip switch procedures more than 2 centuries ago in Europe, when noma was still endemic in Europe, indicating that the anatomy was better understood by the barber surgeons of the past than we like to acknowledge. We are still faced with such challenging cases all over the world where resources are limited. Our current understanding of perforator anatomy and blood supply makes more frequent revisits to flaps of the past with modern advances. Innovative solutions are imperative for salvage, and old ideas tend to reappear when they prove to be useful. Herein, we describe in open access a new reconstructive method where we combined a large lip switch flap together with a composite advancement modiolus flap to reconstruct a whole lower lip and the donor defect of the upper lip all at once, a procedure that is simple to perform and works in settings where it is greatly needed.

  6. Evaluation of dynamic infrared thermography as an alternative to CT angiography for perforator mapping in breast reconstruction: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weum, Sven; Mercer, James B.; Weerd, Louis de

    2016-01-01

    The current gold standard for preoperative perforator mapping in breast reconstruction with a DIEP flap is CT angiography (CTA). Dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT) is an imaging method that does not require ionizing radiation or contrast injection. We evaluated if DIRT could be an alternative to CTA in perforator mapping. Twenty-five patients scheduled for secondary breast reconstruction with a DIEP flap were included. Preoperatively, the lower abdomen was examined with hand-held Doppler, DIRT and CTA. Arterial Doppler sound locations were marked on the skin. DIRT examination involved rewarming of the abdominal skin after a mild cold challenge. The locations of hot spots on DIRT were compared with the arterial Doppler sound locations. The rate and pattern of rewarming of the hot spots were analyzed. Multiplanar CT reconstructions were used to see if hot spots were related to perforators on CTA. All flaps were based on the perforator selected with DIRT and the surgical outcome was analyzed. First appearing hot spots were always associated with arterial Doppler sounds and clearly visible perforators on CTA. The hot spots on DIRT images were always slightly laterally located in relation to the exit points of the associated perforators through the rectus abdominis fascia on CTA. Some periumbilical perforators were not associated with hot spots and showed communication with the superficial inferior epigastric vein on CTA. The selected perforators adequately perfused all flaps. This study confirms that perforators selected with DIRT have arterial Doppler sound, are clearly visible on CTA and provide adequate perfusion for DIEP breast reconstruction. Retrospectively registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier NCT02806518

  7. Free flap reconstructions of tibial fractures complicated after internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, H; Kuokkanen, H; Tukiainen, E; Asko-Seljavaara, S

    1995-04-01

    The cases of 15 patients are presented where microvascular soft-tissue reconstructions became necessary after internal fixation of tibial fractures. Primarily, seven of the fractures were closed. Eleven fractures had originally been treated by open reduction and internal fixation using plates and screws, and four by intramedullary nailing. All of the patients suffered from postoperative complications leading to exposure of the bone or fixation material. The internal fixation material was removed and radical revision of dead and infected tissue was carried out in all cases. Soft tissue reconstruction was performed using a free microvascular muscle flap (11 latissimus dorsi, three rectus abdominis, and one gracilis). In eight cases the nonunion of the fracture indicated external fixation. The microvascular reconstruction was successful in all 15 patients. In one case the recurrence of deep infection finally indicated a below-knee amputation. In another case, chronic infection with fistulation recurred postoperatively. After a mean follow-up of 26 months the soft tissue coverage was good in all the remaining 13 cases. All the fractures united. Microvascular free muscle flap reconstruction of the leg is regarded as a reliable method for salvaging legs with large soft-tissue defects or defects in the distal leg. If after internal fixation of the tibial fracture the osteosynthesis material or fracture is exposed, reconstruction of the soft-tissue can successfully be performed by free flap transfer. By radical revision, external fixation, bone grafting, and a free flap the healing of the fracture can be achieved.

  8. Surgical revirgination: Four vaginal mucosal flaps for reconstruction of a hymen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant A Saraiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over centuries, virginity has been given social, religious and moral importance. It is widely believed as a state of a female who has never engaged in sexual intercourse, and her hymen is intact. Hymenoplasty for torn hymen is carried out not only for the sake of cultural and religious traditions but also for the social status and interpersonal relationships. Materials and Methods: 2.5 cm long and 1 cm wide four vaginal mucosal flaps were raised from the anterior vaginal wall just behind labia minora. Two flaps were based proximally, and their two opposing flaps were based distally. These flaps were overlapped in a crisscross fashion and were sutured with 5/0 Polyglactin (Vicryl® sutures leaving no area raw. The donor area was closed primarily. When some remains of a torn hymen were found, one to three vaginal mucosal flaps were added to its remains as per the need for reconstruction. Results: We operated upon 11 patients. In nine cases, the hymen was reconstructed with four flaps. In remaining two, it was reconstructed from the remains using vaginal mucosal flaps. All flaps healed without any infection or disruption. Sutures got absorbed in 25-35 days. In all cases, this newly constructed barrier broke with only moderate pressure at the time of penetrative sex serving the purpose of the surgery completely. Conclusion: Erasing evidence of the sexual history simply by ′Surgical Revirgination′ is extremely important to women contemplating marriage in cultures where a high value is placed on virginity.

  9. The free vascularized flap and the flap plate options: comparative results of reconstruction of lateral mandibular defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpitzer, T.; Gullane, P. J.; Neligan, P. C.; Irish, J. C.; Freeman, J. E.; van den Brekel, M.; Gur, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Reconstruction of the mandible and oral cavity after segmental resection is a challenging surgical problem. Although osteocutaneous free flaps are generally accepted to be optimal for reconstruction of anterior defects, the need for bony reconstruction for a pure lateral

  10. Temporalis Myofascial Flap for Primary Cranial Base Reconstruction after Tumor Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaly, Ahmed; Magdy, Emad A.; Nour, Yasser A.; Gaafar, Alaa H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the temporalis myofascial flap in primary cranial base reconstruction following surgical tumor ablation and to explain technical issues, potential complications, and donor site consequences along with their management. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Participants: Forty-one consecutive patients receiving primary temporalis myofascial flap reconstructions following cranial base tumor resections in a 4-year period. Main Out...

  11. Upper lip reconstruction using a pedicel superficial temporal artery flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Al-Qattan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrate that the pedicle flap is much simpler than the free flap and is adequate for reconstruction of partial upper lip defects. We also demonstrate a good cosmetic and functional outcome; and highlight several technical points to ensure a satisfactory outcome.

  12. Free tissue transfer versus pedicled flap reconstruction of head and neck malignancy defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: With the advent of microsurgery the pedicled flap is considered by many to be an outdated surgical option. AIMS: To explore the relationship between flap survival and pre-morbid risk factors, conduct a comparative analysis of flap and systemic morbidities and complete a cosmesis and functionality assessment for oral and oropharyngeal reconstruction patients. METHODS: 114 patients, over a 13-year period, who had a one-stage reconstructive procedure employing the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) or radial forearm-free flap (RFFF). RESULTS: Variables, including age, smoking and radiation exposure were not statistically significant predictors of flap survival probability. Atelectasis was a significant post-op finding of RFFF patients. Flap dehiscence of >50% was a significant morbidity of PMMF. No statistical difference in cosmetic deformity, diet and socialisation was noted. CONCLUSIONS: Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap remains an enduring and safe flap; however, the RFFF has markedly improved speech performance over the PMMF.

  13. Cost minimisation analysis of using acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) for breast reconstruction compared with standard techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R K; Wright, C K; Gandhi, A; Charny, M C; Barr, L

    2013-03-01

    We performed a cost analysis (using UK 2011/12 NHS tariffs as a proxy for cost) comparing immediate breast reconstruction using the new one-stage technique of acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) with implant versus the standard alternative techniques of tissue expander (TE)/implant as a two-stage procedure and latissimus dorsi (LD) flap reconstruction. Clinical report data were collected for operative time, length of stay, outpatient procedures, and number of elective and emergency admissions in our first consecutive 24 patients undergoing one-stage Strattice reconstruction. Total cost to the NHS based on tariff, assuming top-up payments to cover Strattice acquisition costs, was assessed and compared to the two historical control groups matched on key variables. Eleven patients having unilateral Strattice reconstruction were compared to 10 having TE/implant reconstruction and 10 having LD flap and implant reconstruction. Thirteen patients having bilateral Strattice reconstruction were compared to 12 having bilateral TE/implant reconstruction. Total costs were: unilateral Strattice, £3685; unilateral TE, £4985; unilateral LD and implant, £6321; bilateral TE, £5478; and bilateral Strattice, £6771. The cost analysis shows a financial advantage of using acellular dermal matrix (Strattice) in unilateral breast reconstruction versus alternative procedures. The reimbursement system in England (Payment by Results) is based on disease-related groups similar to that of many countries across Europe and tariffs are based on reported hospital costs, making this analysis of relevance in other countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. RECONSTRUCTION OF POST ELECTRIC BURN DEFECTS OF UPPER LIMB WITH DIFFERENT FLAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: P ost electric burn defects are difficult to manage due to deep injury involving all the structures up to bony level. A good vascularized flap is required to resurface the defect for preventing the complication and for reconstruction of involved structures. AIM: Resurfacing the post electric burn defect with different flaps according to need of the defect. MATERIAL AND METHOD: All patients of electric burn hand and fore arm defect admitted to burn, p lastic and reconstructi ve department of SCB Medical College &hospital, Cuttack between January 2012 to December 2012 were included in the study. During this period the patients were followed up at weekly interval for first 2 month, then at 1 monthly interv al for next 6 - 8 month. OBSERVATION: Out of 40 cases of post electric burn forearm and hand reconstruction, 10 cases underwent groin flap cover, 6 cases underwent abdominal flap cover, 5 cases underwent cross finger flap cover 5 cases underwent free antero lateral thigh flap cover, 4 cases underwent free latissimus dorsi flap cover, 5 cases underwent first dorsal metacarpal artery flap cover, 5 cases reverse radial forearm flap cover. All the defects were resurfaced successfully with flaps. Four had marginal necrosis and six had wound infection. Eventually all flaps settled well without further intervention. Due to involvement of all important tendons & nerves, functional outcome is guarded. DISCUSSION: Hand and forearm are most commonly and most severely aff ected in electric burn injury because they are mostly first part of body to come in contact with electric circuit. Even though at initial part the injury appears to be superficial, deepe r structures like bone, tendon and neurovascular bundles are affected requiring flap cover for future reconstruction of these structures to get functional and sensate hand. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of post electric burn defect of distal forearm and hand represents great challenge due to

  15. Microsurgical free flap reconstructions of head and neck region in 406 cases: a 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerressen, Marcus; Pastaschek, Claudia Inge; Riediger, Dieter; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Hölzle, Frank; Noroozi, Nelson; Ghassemi, Alireza

    2013-03-01

    The reconstruction of extended soft tissue and bony defects in the maxillofacial region with microsurgical flaps is considered to be the therapy of first choice. The aim of this retrospective study was to detect different influencing factors concerning flap survival. We examined the data of 406 patient cases (121 female and 285 male cases; mean age, 57 years) undergoing reconstruction with a microsurgical flap in our facility between 1998 and 2010. In these cases 326 soft tissue flaps (radial forearm flap, scapula flap, latissimus dorsi flap, anterolateral thigh flap, lateral arm flap, and jejunum flap) and 80 bony flaps (fibula flap and deep circumflex iliac artery flap) were examined. Evaluated parameters were, among others, the timing of reconstruction, defect localization, and recipient vessels used (external vs internal jugular system), as well as anticoagulative management. We statistically analyzed data by means of a χ(2) test, taking account of the odds ratio with P < .05, which was deemed significant. The overall flap survival rate was approximately 92%, without any gender- or age-specific differences. Primary reconstructions proceeded distinctly more successfully than secondary reconstructions (P < .01). Likewise, the defect localization exerted a significant effect on the survival rate (P = .01), with a more caudal localization affecting flap survival positively. Finally, neither the anticoagulation regimen nor the choice of recipient vein system exercised an influence on the survival rate. Microsurgical tissue transfer is a convenient and reliable method in maxillofacial surgery, provided that one is aware of the determining factors for success. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical Appraisal of Nasolabial Flap for Reconstruction of Oral Cavity Defects in Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mebed, A.; Hussein, H.A.; Saber, T.Kh.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Re-evaluation of nasolabial flap in lip and oral cavity reconstruction and role of each of its variants in reconstructing various intermediate size defects was addressed. Patients and Methods: Case-series study was con-ducted in National Cancer Institute, Cairo University over the period from July 2005 - January 2009 which included 23 patients with clinically T-l N0, T-2 N0 invasive squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and the vermilion border of the lower lip. Immediately after surgical excision, one stage reconstruction of the defect was done using a type of nasolabial flap. All patients were followed and the median follow-up period was 7.5 month. Results: Twelve patients with the lower lip carcinoma and 11 patients with the carcinoma of buccal mucosa underwent surgical excision under frozen section control. 19 fasciocutaneous nasolabial flap and 4 facial artery musculomucosal flaps were used for reconstruction. Minor wound complications occurred in 2 flaps and one patient required secondary suture. Flap viability was reliable and was not affected by performance of a synchronous neck dissection. Functional results were satisfactory, cosmetic results were good in most of the patients and excellent when facial artery musculomucosal flap was used. Conclusion: The nasolabial flap is a reliable and minimally traumatic local flap for one stage reconstruction of medium size defects in the oral cavity. The abundant blood supply allowed its modification in order to cover larger defects or to obtain better cosmetic results. This versatility makes it more widely used thus minimizing the use of local tongue flaps and split thickness grafts for covering these medium size defects in cases of buccal mucosa cancer or affecting the other lip or commissure in cases of lip cancer. It has a high viability rate, low complication rate; it is quick and easy to perform in addition to its satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  17. [Surgery guided by customized devices: reconstruction with a free fibula flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouman, T; Bertolus, C; Chaine, C; Ceccaldi, J; Goudot, P

    2014-02-01

    The reconstruction of jaws with a free fibula flap can be anticipated virtually. The simulation can be transferred to the operating theater using customized devices obtained from computer-assisted design and manufacturing in a complete digital workflow. Several alternatives are available, from cutting guides to customized titanium osteosynthesis plates, to obtain the best accuracy and reproducibility of reconstruction. Moreover, these new processes allow integrating prosthetic planning concomitantly with reconstruction. We present the virtual three-dimensional planning method for jaw reconstruction with a free fibula flap and the various alternatives of surgery guided by customized devices provided by this planning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Multicenter evaluation of quality of life and patient satisfaction after breast reconstruction, a long-term retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménez, T; Michot, A; Tamburino, S; Weigert, R; Pinsolle, V

    2018-04-01

    Breast reconstruction techniques are multiple and they should be chosen in order to improve women's satisfaction and well-being, thus obtaining a personalized treatment. This report's major purpose was to study, through the Breast-Q questionnaire, how the functional and aesthetic outcomes, as well as the complications, of the main autologous breast reconstruction techniques, can affect patients quality of life and well-being at long-term. The secondary purpose was to analyse, thus to identify, the independent factors characterizing the different reconstructive techniques, which may affect patients' satisfaction. Women who underwent autologous breast reconstruction through deep inferior epigastric artery perforator or Latissimus dorsi muscle flap from May 2006 to May 2013 were included. The assessment was based on the Breast-Q reconstruction questionnaire. All times of post-mastectomy reconstruction were concerned: immediate, delayed, after previous procedure failure or conversion to another reconstructive technique due to the patient's dissatisfaction. A total of 98 patients were included. Concerning patients satisfaction, the breast-Q score is highest in patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction, while scores after delayed breast reconstruction, previous surgery failure or conversion to another technique are generally equivalent. Higher scores have been observed in patients who underwent reconstruction through autologous Latissimus dorsi compared to Latissimus dorsi with prosthetic implant reconstruction. The authors identified factors of higher patients' satisfaction, like absence of major complication and advanced patient's age, in order to personalize the surgical planning according to the patient's priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Reverse Abdominoplasty Flap in Reconstruction of Post-Bilateral Mastectomies Anterior Chest Wall Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William HC Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse abdominoplasty was originally described for epigastric lift. Since the work by Baroudi and Huger in the 1970s, it has become clear that reverse abdominoplasty application can be extended beyond just aesthetic procedure. Through the knowledge of anterior abdominal wall vascularity, its application had included reconstructive prospect in the coverage of various chest wall defects. To date, reverse abdominoplasty flap has been used to reconstruct unilateral anterior chest wall defect or for larger defect but only in combination with other reconstructive techniques. Here, we presented a case where it is used as a standalone flap to reconstruct bilateral anterior chest wall soft tissue defect post-bilateral mastectomies in oncological resection. In conclusion, reverse abdominoplasty flap provided us with a simple, faster, and satisfactory reconstructive outcome.

  20. Anterior Cranial Base Reconstruction with a Reverse Temporalis Muscle Flap and Calvarial Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Gee Kwon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCranial base defects are challenging to reconstruct without serious complications. Although free tissue transfer has been used widely and efficiently, it still has the limitation of requiring a long operation time along with the burden of microanastomosis and donor site morbidity. We propose using a reverse temporalis muscle flap and calvarial bone graft as an alternative option to a free flap for anterior cranial base reconstruction.MethodsBetween April 2009 and February 2012, cranial base reconstructions using an autologous calvarial split bone graft combined with a reverse temporalis muscle flap were performed in five patients. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed and postoperative computed tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiography findings were examined to evaluate graft survival and flap viability.ResultsThe mean follow-up period was 11.8 months and the mean operation time for reconstruction was 8.4±3.36 hours. The defects involved the anterior cranial base, including the orbital roof and the frontal and ethmoidal sinus. All reconstructions were successful. Viable flap vascularity and bone survival were observed. There were no serious complications except for acceptable donor site depressions, which were easily corrected with minor procedures.ConclusionsThe reverse temporalis muscle flap could provide sufficient bulkiness to fill dead space and sufficient vascularity to endure infection. The calvarial bone graft provides a rigid framework, which is critical for maintaining the cranial base structure. Combined anterior cranial base reconstruction with a reverse temporalis muscle flap and calvarial bone graft could be a viable alternative to free tissue transfer.

  1. Computed tomography angiographic study of internal mammary perforators and their use as recipient vessels for free tissue transfer in breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya V Kanoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The internal mammary artery perforator vessels (IMPV as a recipient in free flap breast reconstruction offer advantages over the more commonly used thoracodorsal vessels and the internal mammary vessels (IMV. Aims: This study was designed to assess the anatomical consistency of the IMPV and the suitability of these vessels for use as recipients in free flap breast reconstruction. Patients and Methods: Data from ten randomly selected female patients who did not have any chest wall or breast pathology but had undergone a computed tomography angiography (CTA for unrelated diagnostic reasons from April 2013 to October 2013 were analysed. Retrospective data of seven patients who had undergone mastectomy for breast cancer and had been primarily reconstructed with a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator free flap transfer using the IMPV as recipient vessels were studied. Results: The CTA findings showed that the internal mammary perforator was consistently present in all cases bilaterally. In all cases, the dominant perforator arose from the upper four intercostal spaces (ICS with the majority (55% arising from the 2nd ICS. The mean distance of the perforators from the sternal border at the level of pectoralis muscle surface on the right side was 1.86 cm (range: 0.9–2.5 cm with a mode value of 1.9 cm. On the left side, a mean of 1.77 cm (range: 1.5–2.1 cm and a mode value of 1.7 cm were observed. Mean perforator artery diameters on the right and left sides were 2.2 mm and 2.4 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Though the internal mammary perforators are anatomically consistent, their use as recipients in free tissue transfer for breast reconstruction eventually rests on multiple variables.

  2. Early and late complications in the reconstructed mandible with free fibula flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes T M; Abbink, Jan H; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of mandibular reconstructions with free fibula flaps. Identification of factors associated with major recipient site complications, that is, necessitating surgical intervention under general anaesthesia. Seventy-nine reconstructions were included. The following factors were analyzed: fixation type, number of osteotomies, site of defect (bilateral/unilateral), surgeon, sex, ASA classification, continuous smoking, pathological N-stage, age, defect size, flap ischemic time, and postoperative radiotherapy. Proportional hazards regression was used to test the effect on the time between reconstruction and intervention. Sixty-nine (87%) of the 79 fibula flaps were successful at the last follow-up. Forty-eight major recipient site complications occurred in 41 reconstructions. Nineteen complications required surgical intervention within six weeks and were mostly vascular problems, necessitating immediate intervention. These early complications were associated with defects crossing the midline, with an estimated relative risk of 5.3 (CI 1.1-20, P = 0.01). Twenty-nine complications required surgical intervention more than 6 weeks after the reconstruction. These late complications generally occurred after months or years, and were associated with smoking, with an estimated relative risk of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3, P = 0.05). Fibula flaps crossing the midline have a higher risk of early major recipient site complications than unilateral reconstructions. Smoking increases the risk of late complications. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Surgical Oncology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort. Increasing age was not associated with an increasing likelihood of complications (P = 0.75). Age-related factors play a role in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. Younger women typically present with more aggressive features requiring oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. Mastectomy and reconstructive choices also demonstrate age-dependent characteristics. Women in younger age groups are more

  4. Long-term outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy/skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap reconstruction: Comparison with conventional mastectomy in a single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sae Byul; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Ko, Beom Seok; Son, Byung Ho; Eom, Jin Sup; Lee, Taik Jong; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the oncological outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM)/skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), followed by immediate reconstruction, as compared to conventional mastectomy (CM).SSM/NSM has been increasingly used to treat women with breast cancer who wish to preserve the overlying breast skin, but concern exist regarding its oncological safety due to the potential for residual breast tissue. We report our experience performing SSM/NSM for breast cancer treatment compared to CM with a long follow-up period.All consecutive patients who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer at Asan Medical Center between January 1993 and December 2008 were identified by retrospective medical chart review. The patients who underwent NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction with a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (TRAM), were compared to the patients who underwent CM in terms of breast-cancer specific survival (BCSS) rate, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rate, and local recurrence (LR) rate.During the study period, 6028 patients underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. Of these, 1032 and 4996 underwent NSM/SSM with TRAM and CM, respectively. Their median follow-up durations were 94.4 (range, 8.1-220.2) and 110.8 (range, 6.1-262.0) months, respectively. Their 5 year BCSS rates were 95.4% and 88.1%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001). Their 5 year DMFS rates were 93.0% and 85.6%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001).Relative to CM, NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction, may be a viable and oncologically safe surgical treatment in selected patients with breast cancer.

  5. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, M

    2011-05-01

    The optimum sequencing of breast reconstruction (BR) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial. A comprehensive search of published studies that examined postoperative morbidity following immediate or delayed BR with combined radiotherapy was performed. Medical (MEDLINE & EMBASE) databases were searched and cross-referenced for appropriate studies where morbidity following BR was the primary outcome measured. A total of 1,105 patients were identified from 11 appropriately selected studies. Patients undergoing PMRT and BR are more likely to suffer morbidity compared with patients not receiving PMRT (OR = 4.2; 95% CI, 2.4-7.2 [no PMRT vs. PMRT]). Reconstruction technique was also examined with outcome when PMRT was delivered after BR, and this demonstrated that autologous reconstruction is associated with less morbidity in this setting (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4 [autologous vs. implant-based]). Delaying BR until after PMRT had no significant effect on outcome (OR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.47-1.62 [delayed vs. immediate]). PMRT has a detrimental effect on BR outcome. These results suggest that where immediate reconstruction is undertaken with the necessity of PMRT, an autologous flap results in less morbidity when compared with implant-based reconstruction.

  6. Risk factors for pedicled flap necrosis in hand soft tissue reconstruction: a multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xu; Cui, Jianli; Jiang, Ziping; Lu, Laijin; Li, Xiucun

    2018-03-01

    Few clinical retrospective studies have reported the risk factors of pedicled flap necrosis in hand soft tissue reconstruction. The aim of this study was to identify non-technical risk factors associated with pedicled flap perioperative necrosis in hand soft tissue reconstruction via a multivariate logistic regression analysis. For patients with hand soft tissue reconstruction, we carefully reviewed hospital records and identified 163 patients who met the inclusion criteria. The characteristics of these patients, flap transfer procedures and postoperative complications were recorded. Eleven predictors were identified. The correlations between pedicled flap necrosis and risk factors were analysed using a logistic regression model. Of 163 skin flaps, 125 flaps survived completely without any complications. The pedicled flap necrosis rate in hands was 11.04%, which included partial flap necrosis (7.36%) and total flap necrosis (3.68%). Soft tissue defects in fingers were noted in 68.10% of all cases. The logistic regression analysis indicated that the soft tissue defect site (P = 0.046, odds ratio (OR) = 0.079, confidence interval (CI) (0.006, 0.959)), flap size (P = 0.020, OR = 1.024, CI (1.004, 1.045)) and postoperative wound infection (P < 0.001, OR = 17.407, CI (3.821, 79.303)) were statistically significant risk factors for pedicled flap necrosis of the hand. Soft tissue defect site, flap size and postoperative wound infection were risk factors associated with pedicled flap necrosis in hand soft tissue defect reconstruction. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Oncological outcome and patient satisfaction with skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: a prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reefy, Sara; Patani, Neill; Anderson, Anne; Burgoyne, Gwyne; Osman, Hisham; Mokbel, Kefah

    2010-01-01

    The management of early breast cancer (BC) with skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is not based on level-1 evidence. In this study, the oncological outcome, post-operative morbidity and patients' satisfaction with SSM and IBR using the latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap and/or breast prosthesis is evaluated. 137 SSMs with IBR (10 bilateral) were undertaken in 127 consecutive women, using the LD flap plus implant (n = 85), LD flap alone (n = 1) or implant alone (n = 51), for early BC (n = 130) or prophylaxis (n = 7). Nipple reconstruction was performed in 69 patients, using the trefoil local flap technique (n = 61), nipple sharing (n = 6), skin graft (n = 1) and Monocryl mesh (n = 1). Thirty patients underwent contra-lateral procedures to enhance symmetry, including 19 augmentations and 11 mastopexy/reduction mammoplasties. A linear visual analogue scale was used to assess patient satisfaction with surgical outcome, ranging from 0 (not satisfied) to 10 (most satisfied). After a median follow-up of 36 months (range = 6-101 months) there were no local recurrences. Overall breast cancer specific survival was 99.2%, 8 patients developed distant disease and 1 died of metastatic BC. There were no cases of partial or total LD flap loss. Morbidities included infection, requiring implant removal in 2 patients and 1 patient developed marginal ischaemia of the skin envelope. Chemotherapy was delayed in 1 patient due to infection. Significant capsule formation, requiring capsulotomy, was observed in 85% of patients who had either post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMR) or prior radiotherapy (RT) compared with 13% for those who had not received RT. The outcome questionnaire was completed by 82 (64.6%) of 127 patients with a median satisfaction score of 9 (range = 5-10). SSM with IBR is associated with low morbidity, high levels of patient satisfaction and is oncologically safe for T(is), T1 and T2 tumours without extensive skin

  8. Vertical Inset of the Latissimus Dorsi Flap Improves Reconstruction Aesthetics by Reducing Scar Burden in the "Social Breast".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Caleb M; Day, Kristopher M; Gilson, Aaron J; Zoog, Evon; Brzezienski, Mark A

    2018-06-01

    The skin paddle of the latissimus dorsi flap is typically inset horizontally (HILD) in breast reconstruction. We describe our experience with the vertical inset of the latissimus dorsi (VILD) and its aesthetic benefit. We performed a case-control study comparing the most recent cases of both VILD and HILD. Scar, as seen on anterior-posterior photographs, was digitally measured and compared from 3 clinically relevant areas: (1) all visible scarring ("mirror view"), (2) scarring above the nipple ("self-view"), and (3) scarring above or medial to the nipple ("social view"). Demographics and outcomes were statistically compared. Fifty of the most recent patients receiving HILD or VILD were selected for each group. Average patient age was 55.6 and 51.6 years (P = 0.32), and average follow-up was 531.6 and 606.7 days (P = 0.20), respectively. The VILD scar-length ratios were decreased by 17% in the mirror view (P ≤ 0.01), 37% in the self-view (P ≤ 0.01), and 37% in the social view (P ≤ 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding smoking (P = 0.75), diabetes (P = 0.70), body mass index (P = 0.74), seroma (P = 0.46), infection (P = 1.0), or flap necrosis (P = 0.70). The VILD is safe and reliable. Measurements from anterior-posterior photographs illustrate statistically significant decreases in overall scar burden (mirror view) and statistically significant reductions in the highly visible self-view and social view. Our study is the first to quantify a reduction in scar burden by using VILD technique.

  9. Free-style puzzle flap: the concept of recycling a perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kuan-Ming; Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Jeng, Seng-Feng

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically, a flap can be supplied by any perforator based on the angiosome theory. In this study, the technique of free-style perforator flap dissection was used to harvest a pedicled or free skin flap from a previous free flap for a second difficult reconstruction. The authors call this a free-style puzzle flap. For the past 3 years, the authors treated 13 patients in whom 12 pedicled free-style puzzle flaps were harvested from previous redundant free flaps and recycled to reconstruct soft-tissue defects at various anatomical locations. One free-style free puzzle flap was harvested from a previous anterolateral thigh flap for buccal cancer to reconstruct a foot defect. Total flap survival was attained in 12 of 13 flaps. One transferred flap failed completely. This patient had received postoperative radiotherapy after the initial cancer ablation and free anterolateral thigh flap reconstruction. Another free flap was used to close and reconstruct the wound. All the donor sites could be closed primarily. The free-style puzzle flap, harvested from a previous redundant free flap and used as a perforator flap to reconstruct a new defect, has proven to be versatile and reliable. When indicated, it is an alternative donor site for further reconstruction of soft-tissue defects.

  10. Transversus Abdominis Plane Blocks with Single-Dose Liposomal Bupivacaine in Conjunction with a Nonnarcotic Pain Regimen Help Reduce Length of Stay following Abdominally Based Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Eric M; Lamelas, Andreas M; Kim, Julie N; Molina, Bianca; Molina, Nathan; Okwali, Michelle; Samson, William; Sultan, Mark R; Dayan, Joseph H; Smith, Mark L

    2017-08-01

    Side effects associated with use of postoperative narcotics for pain control can delay recovery after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. The authors evaluated a nonnarcotic pain control regimen in conjunction with bilateral transversus abdominis plane blocks on facilitating early hospital discharge. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction using abdominally based free flaps, with or without being included in a nonnarcotic protocol using intraoperative transversus abdominis plane blockade. During this period, the use of locoregional analgesia evolved from none (control), to continuous bupivacaine infusion transversus abdominis plane and catheters, to single-dose transversus abdominis plane blockade with liposomal bupivacaine solution. Demographic factors, length of stay, inpatient opioid consumption, and complications were reported for all three groups. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients (182 flaps) were identified. Forty patients (62 flaps) were in the infusion-liposomal bupivacaine group, 48 (66 flaps) were in the single-dose blockade-catheter group, and 40 (54 flaps) were in the control group. The infusion-liposomal bupivacaine patients had a significantly shorter hospital stay compared with the single-dose blockade-catheter group (2.65 ± 0.66 versus 3.52 ± 0.92 days; p plane blocks performed with single injections of liposomal bupivacaine help facilitate early hospital discharge after abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. A trend toward consistent discharge by postoperative day 2 was seen. This could result in significant cost savings for health care systems. Therapeutic, III.

  11. Pedicle Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction after Pelvic Tumor Resection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Whitfield

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old female with a locally advanced urologic malignancy previously managed with resection, diversion, and postoperative radiation therapy presented for management of her recurrent cancer that had eroded through the soft tissues of the left inner thigh and vulva. On all staging studies the tumor involved the left common femoral artery, and vein, both above and below the inguinal ligament. The difficulty with such tumors is the availability of tissue to reconstruct the defect. The patient had a history of deep venous thrombosis in the femoral venous system. A local flap was the most logical type of reconstruction. The patient had a right lower quadrant ureterostomy with a large parastomal hernia which further limited the local flap options. An anterolateral thigh flap from the opposite thigh was used to reconstruct the soft tissue deficit in this patient. This resurfaced the defect and provided coverage for the vascular reconstruction.

  12. Seromuscular Colonic Flap for Intrapelvic Soft-Tissue Coverage: A Reconstructive Option for Plastic Surgeons When Traditionally Used Flaps Are Not Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathon Aho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reconstruction of intrapelvic defects can be a challenging problem in patients with limited regional muscle flap options and previously resected omentum. In such situations, alternative methods of mobilizing vascularized tissue may be required. Methods. A case of a patient that underwent pelvic extirpation for recurrent rectal cancer who had limited donor sites for flap reconstruction is presented. The mucosa was removed from a blind loop of colon, and a pedicled seromuscular flap based on the colonic mesentery was placed into the pelvis for vascularized soft-tissue coverage and elimination of dead space. Results. The postoperative course was only complicated by a small subcutaneous fluid collection beneath the sacrectomy skin incision, which was drained with radiological assistance. The patient recovered without any major postoperative complications. Conclusion. Seromuscular colonic flap is a useful option for soft-tissue coverage after pelvic extirpation and should be considered by plastic surgeons when other reconstruction options are not available.

  13. Versatility of the facial artery myomucosal island flap in neopharyngeal reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    : Vitality of the flap was ascertained by fiber endoscopy. No donor-site morbidity was seen. Postoperatively, the patient had a minor stomal fistula with spontaneous healing. CONCLUSION: The pedicled FAMM island flap may be considered for smaller reconstructions of the upper hypopharynx. Accessibility, low...

  14. Reconstruction of the anterior floor of the mouth with the inferiorly based nasolabial flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, MP; Damen, A; Nauta, JM; Lichtendahl, DHE; Dhar, BK

    The results of reconstruction of the anterior floor of the mouth, using 105 nasolabial flaps in 79 patients were reviewed in a retrospective study. Of those flaps, 82% healed uneventfully; flap survival was 95%. Considerable flap loss occurred in 5%. Primary dehiscence was observed in 5% of all

  15. Predictors of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and the impact on breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinell-White, Ximena A; Kolegraff, Keli; Carlson, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is being performed with increased frequency. Predictors of CPM and their impact on breast reconstruction are examined. A retrospective review of a dually trained oncologic and plastic surgeon's experience with patients undergoing total mastectomy from 2002 to 2012 was performed. Patients who underwent bilateral therapeutic mastectomies or who had previous contralateral mastectomy were excluded from this series. Four hundred forty-six patients were treated with total mastectomy and 174 (39%) underwent CPM. The incidence of CPM nearly tripled over the period studied. Compared to women treated with unilateral mastectomy, women who elected for CPM were younger (mean age, 50.4 vs 56.8 years, P mastectomy. Incidental contralateral cancers were discovered in 4% of women who underwent CPM (n = 7), lobular carcinoma in situ in 2.3% (n = 4), and atypical lesions in an additional 11.6% (n = 20). Women who underwent CPM favored reconstruction with breast implants (60.9% vs 17.3%), whereas the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap predominated among their unilateral counterparts (38.6% vs 15.5%). Among women who underwent immediate breast reconstruction, the addition of a contralateral procedure expectedly increased breast complication rates (50.3% vs 35.0%, P = 0.007), especially the more severe complications that required hospitalization or reoperation (18.6% vs 5.0%, P procedure is significant.

  16. Results of auricular helical rim reconstruction with post-auricular tube flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iljin, Aleksandra; Lewandowicz, Edward; Antoszewski, Bogusław; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present our experience with post-auricular tube flap (ptf) and clinical evaluation of the results following auricular helical rim reconstruction with this technique in patients after trauma. We analyzed the results in 12 patients who underwent three-staged auricular helical rim reconstruction with ptf following trauma in the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery between 2005-2014. The patients were followed-up for at least 1 year. We evaluated early and long-term results after surgery including plastic surgeon's and patient's opinion. Postoperative results were satisfactory (very good) in 10 cases, both in the opinion of the plastic surgeon and patients. Transient venous congestion of the helix occurred in two cases (16.6%). This complication did not have any influence on estimation of the results after surgery. Delayed wound healing in the poles of the reconstructed helical edge, as well as non-aesthetic helical scars with imperfections of helical rim, were seen in another two patients (16.6%). 1. Post-auricular tube flap reconstructions after helical rim trauma allowed for complete restoration of contour, size and orientation of the helix and the whole operated ear, which confirms the efficiency of the applied technique. 2. Reconstructive surgery with post-auricular tube flap in patients with auricular helical rim defects contributed to postoperative satisfaction in both patients and doctors' estimations.

  17. Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144......Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144...

  18. Análisis de controversias en reconstrucción mamaria con colgajo DIEP Analysis of debated uses in mammary reconstruction with DIEP flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Casado Sánchez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción mamaria mediante colgajo DIEP (Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator se encuentra condicionada en muchas ocasiones por características de la paciente o del tratamiento oncológico recibido, de tal forma que diversos grupos de trabajo contraindican este método en caso de existir alguno de esos factores. Nosotros hemos realizado un estudio de los mismos, analizando su impacto sobre la viabilidad del colgajo y su correlación con las complicaciones postoperatorias, para optimizar así su indicación. Los condicionantes analizados son el tabaco, las intervenciones quirúrgicas previas que afecten en alguna medida la pared abdominal, el sobrepeso u obesidad de la paciente, el volumen de la mama contralateral, el tratamiento radioterápico anterior o posterior a la reconstrucción, y finalmente el gasto sanitario que supone. Estas controversias son a su vez las más discutidas en la literatura al respecto. Se valoran los resultados obtenidos tras 55 reconstrucciones mamarias mediante colgajo DIEP entre enero de 2000 y noviembre de 2005, así como los estudios y publicaciones más recientes existentes sobre esta materia. Hemos encontrado una pobre correlación entre los índices de fracaso del colgajo y las controversias estudiadas, determinando así dos contraindicaciones absolutas para que una paciente pudiese beneficiarse de un colgajo DIEP: abdominoplastia previa y radioterapia adyuvante tras reconstrucción inmediata. Los excelentes resultados que se obtienen globalmente, nos llevan a recomendar este colgajo por encima de otras opciones terapéuticas.The use of DIEP (Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator flap surgery in breast reconstruction is often conditioned by the patient and the oncologic treatment characteristics to such an extent that several working groups advise against this surgical procedure when any of these factors is present. In the study of this interaction, an analysis of its impact on the flap feasibility and its

  19. MUSTARDE’S FLAP FOR POST BASAL CELL CARCINOMA EXCISION LOWER EYELID RECONSTRUCTION: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To review the role of Mustarde’s flap for post basal cell carcinoma excision lower eyelid reconstruction , its clinical outcomes and complications. METHODS: The Mustarde’s rotational cheek flap has been used to reconstruct the lower eyelids of 16 patients from 2008 to 2015 in proven cases of bcc. RESULT S: Mustarde’s flaps have very high functionally as well as cosmetic acceptability with minimum patient morbidity. The most frequent complications were downward contraction and sagging of the flap and ectropion of the lid margin. To prevent them, the zygomatico - cheek flap must be carefully designed, rotated, and sutured as high as possible so that immediately postoperatively, t he palpebral fissure is only a narrow slit.

  20. Skin-Reducing Mastectomy in Immediate Reconstruction: How to Limit Complications and Failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechevy, Lolita; Carloni, Raphael; Guerid, Samia; Vincent, Pierre-Luc; Toussoun, Gilles; Delay, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    In hypertrophic and/or very ptotic breasts, skin-reducing mastectomy (SRM) is challenging and the risk of complications is high. Few publications have reported the use of an autologous latissimus dorsi flap (ALDF) in this indication. Most studies opt for implant reconstructions, with a high failure rate. We aimed to identify and present the technical refinements that reduce the risk of reconstruction failure in patients with hypertrophic and/or ptotic breasts with breast cancer or at risk of breast cancer after SRM with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) utilizing an ALDF. Our retrospective study, covering a period of 18 years, included a series of 60 patients with hypertrophic and/or ptotic breasts who underwent 67 SRM and IBR procedures utilizing an ALDF. The complications were recorded and the risk factors analyzed. Sixty-seven SRMs were reviewed. Forty-nine procedures were performed with an inverted-T scar technique and 18 with a vertical scar technique. The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was preserved in 10 cases. There were eight (11.9%) cases of minor mastectomy flap necrosis after skin-reducing reconstructions, 16 (23.8%) wound dehiscences, no infections, no breast seromas, and no reconstruction failures. Smoking increased the risk of minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.048) and wound dehiscence (P = 0.002). Previous radiotherapy was associated with minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.001). The use of an ALDF together with technical refinements that preserve the vascular supply of the skin envelope leads to successful IBR with consistently good aesthetic results. Above all, it avoids failure of the reconstruction in very large or ptotic breasts. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Reconstruction of fingers after electrical injury using lateral tarsal artery flap

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    Zhang MH

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Minghua Zhang, Mitao Huang, Pihong Zhang, Pengfei Liang, Licheng Ren, Jizhang Zeng, Jie Zhou, Xiong Liu, Tinghong Xie, Xiaoyuan Huang Department of Burns Reconstruction Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China Objective: Electrical injuries to the fingers account for the majority of total severe burns that occur each year. While several types of flaps have been used in covering finger defects, all have limitations or disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to introduce our clinical experiences of using the lateral tarsal artery (LTA flap to successfully restore fingers after electrical injury.Patients and methods: From 2005 to 2012, 10 patients with 14 severe electrical burns to their fingers, including six thumbs and four index and four middle fingers, were treated with LTA flap. The wound size ranged from 2.0×3.0 cm to 3.5×5.0 cm. The flap with free tendon graft was used to repair the tendon defect in four cases, free nerve graft was used to repair the feeling defect in two cases, and the flap with nerve was used to repair the feeling defect in two cases. All the patients were followed up for 3 months to 2 years.Results: All skin flaps adhered successfully and there were no complications. All patients were satisfied with the esthetic appearance and functional outcome of the finger reconstruction.Conclusion: LTA flap is a reliable method to restore fingers after severe electrical injuries. Keywords: electrical injuries to fingers, lateral tarsal artery flap

  2. Extended Islanded Reverse Sural Artery Flap for Staged Reconstruction of Foot Defects Proximal to Toes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, M.A.; Abidin, Z.U.; Khalid, K.; Haq, A.U.; Tarar, F.A.; Asif, M.U.; Tarar, M.N.

    2018-01-01

    To assess the outcome of extended delayed reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of foot defects proximal to toes in terms of flap survival, complication and extended area. Study Design:Case series. Place and Duration of Study:Jinnah Burn and Reconstructive Surgery Centre, Lahore, from February 2015 to April 2017. Methodology:Cases who underwent delayed sural artery flap were inducted. Preoperative hand-held doppler was done to confirm the location of perforator. Two suitable perforators were chosen to raise the extended flap by crossing the proximal limit in all cases. The pedicle was kept minimum 3 cm wide and perfusion was assessed. Flap was delayed for one week and vaccum-assisted closure (VAC) dressing was applied over wound. The second surgery was performed after one week. Proximal perforator was clamped and ligated after checking adequate perfusion of flap. Flap was insetted into defect. Results:Thirty-two patients were reconstructed with delayed reverse sural artery flap. The mean age of the patients was 26.5 +12.2 years. Twenty-four (75%) patients were males and 8 (25%) were females. Twenty-two (68.7%) cases were degloving wounds after road traffic accidents (RTA), 6 (18.7%) were diabetic foot wounds, 4 (12.5%) sustained injury after falling from height and 7 (21.8%) patients had fracture of metatarsals. Twenty-eight flaps were transferred after one week delay, and only in 4 cases, flap were transferred after two weeks. All flaps survived completely. Complications of infection noted in 3 (9.3%) flaps, 3 (9.3%) flaps showed tip necrosis, 2 (6.2%) flaps undergone epidermolysis and only 2 (6.2%) showed venous congestion. Conclusion:Delayed islanded reverse sural artery perforator flap is a reliable and versatile option for resurfacing soft tissue defects of lower limb proximal to the toes with lesser complications and extended coverage area. (author)

  3. Extended Islanded Reverse Sural Artery flap for Staged Reconstruction of Foot Defects Proximal to Toes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Amin; Abidin, Zain Ul; Khalid, Kamran; Haq, Ata Ul; Khalid, Farrukh Aslam; Tarar, Faraz Ahmad; Asif, Muhammad Umar; Tarar, Moazzam Nazeer

    2018-02-01

    Obective:To assess the outcome of extended delayed reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of foot defects proximal to toes in terms of flap survival, complication and extended area. Case series. Jinnah Burn and Reconstructive Surgery Centre, Lahore, from February 2015 to April 2017. Cases who underwent delayed sural artery flap were inducted. Preoperative hand-held doppler was done to confirm the location of perforator. Two suitable perforators were chosen to raise the extended flap by crossing the proximal limit in all cases. The pedicle was kept minimum 3 cm wide and perfusion was assessed. Flap was delayed for one week and vaccum-assisted closure (VAC) dressing was applied over wound. The second surgery was performed after one week. Proximal perforator was clamped and ligated after checking adequate perfusion of flap. Flap was insetted into defect. Thirty-two patients were reconstructed with delayed reverse sural artery flap. The mean age of the patients was 26.5 12.2 years. Twenty-four (75%) patients were males and 8 (25%) were females. Twenty-two (68.7%) cases were degloving wounds after road traffic accidents (RTA), 6 (18.7%) were diabetic foot wounds, 4 (12.5%) sustained injury after falling from height and 7 (21.8%) patients had fracture of metatarsals. Twenty-eight flaps were transferred after one week delay, and only in 4 cases, flap were transferred after two weeks. All flaps survived completely. Complications of infection noted in 3 (9.3%) flaps, 3 (9.3%) flaps showed tip necrosis, 2 (6.2%) flaps undergone epidermolysis and only 2 (6.2%) showed venous congestion. Delayed islanded reverse sural artery perforator flap is a reliable and versatile option for resurfacing soft tissue defects of lower limb proximal to the toes with lesser complications and extended coverage area.

  4. Reconstruction of hand contracture by reverse ulnar perforator flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Eser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hand burn scar contractures affect patients in aesthetic and functional aspects. After releasing these scars, the defects should be repaired. The reconstruction methods include primary suturation, Z plasty, skin grafting, local or free flaps, etc. All methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. One of the most useful flaps is the reverse ulnar perforator flap. We performed a two-staged procedure for repairing a post-burn contracture release defect in a 40-year-old male. In the first stage we applied reverse ulnar perforator flap for the hand defect, and ulnar artery and vein repair in the second stage. In conclusion, this two-staged procedure is a non-primary but useful option for hand and finger defects and prevents major vascular structure damage of the forearm. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 40-43

  5. Reconstruction of distal hand and foot defects with the free proximal peroneal artery perforator flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2016-03-01

    The proximal peroneal artery perforator (PPAP) flap is a reliable, thin fasciocutaneous flap. The purpose of this article was to report our experience with the use of free PPAP flaps for reconstruction of defects of the distal hand and foot. From November 2012 to September 2013, 9 patients received reconstruction with 10 free PPAP flaps. The defect locations included the big toe (2 cases), metatarsophalangeal joint (5 cases), dorsal finger (2 cases) and volar finger (1 case). Flaps were raised based on proximal peroneal perforator vessels without sacrificing the peroneal artery. The first dorsal metatarsal artery (5 cases) and digital artery (5 cases) were dissected as recipient vessels. The flap sizes varied from 2.5 x 2 cm to 9 x 5 cm. All of flaps were survival after surgery. One flap suffered from venous thrombosis and was successfully salvaged by performing a venous thrombectomy and vein graft. The donor sites were all primarily closed with minimal morbidities. Follow-up observations were conducted for 7 to 20 months, and all patients had good functional recovery with satisfying cosmetic results. Perforators arising from the peroneal artery in the proximal lateral leg can be used to design small, pliable fasciocutaneous flaps. Although the pedicle is short, the vessel diameter is adequate for microvascular anastomosis to the distal foot and hand recipient vessels. The free PPAP flap may be a good option for reconstructing distal hand and foot defects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. SURGICAL RECONSTRUCTION IN PRESSURE ULCERS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE WORKHORSE FLAP OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja Rajan T. M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pressure ulcers can significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality by chronic infections. Radical debridement of all devitalised and infected tissues followed by a reconstructive algorithm for soft tissue padding over bony prominences to prevent recurrent breakdown are the mainstay of surgical management of pressure ulcers. Choice of the soft tissue flap for reconstruction is influenced by the dimensions of ulcers, local tissue availability and surgeon’s preferences. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study includes 140 patients with spinal injuries having pressure ulcers of NPUAP grade III and IV treated surgically over a period of four years. The demographics of pressure ulcers, the workhorse flap options as well as the outcome were analysed. RESULTS The pressure ulcers were seen predominantly in males (93.6% of 40-49 years’ age group (42.8%. Ischial pressure ulcers (n=104 constituted 74.2% followed by sacral pressure ulcers (n=24 that is 17.1% and trochanteric pressure ulcers (n=12 in 8.6%. Debridement and direct closure of wound were possible only in 10 cases. Majority (92.8% of patients needed additional tissues for wound coverage. Our workhorse fasciocutaneous flaps were rotation flaps from the gluteal region or posterior thigh with medial or lateral based designs (34.2%. Local muscle tissue was used in 64 cases (46% either as gluteal, tensor fascia lata and biceps femoris myocutaneous flaps or gluteus maximus, hamstring or gracilis muscle fillers in myoplasty. CONCLUSIONS Rotation flap along with myoplasty were our workhorse flap options in majority of the pressure ulcers. But, our future perspective is to spare muscle and use more fasciocutaneous perforator flaps for reconstruction according to evidence-based clinical practice.

  7. Breast Reconstruction Following Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernd; Marx, Mario; Untch, Michael; Faridi, Andree

    2015-08-31

    About 8000 breast reconstructions after mastectomy are per - formed in Germany each year. It has become more difficult to advise patients because of the wide variety of heterologous and autologous techniques that are now available and because of changes in the recommendations about radiotherapy. This article is based on a review of pertinent articles (2005-2014) that were retrieved by a selective search employing the search terms "mastectomy" and "breast reconstruction." The goal of reconstruction is to achieve an oncologically safe and aestically satisfactory result for the patient over the long term. Heterologous, i.e., implant-based, breast reconstruction (IBR) and autologous breast reconstruction (ABR) are complementary techniques. Immediate reconstruction preserves the skin of the breast and its natural form and prevents the psychological trauma associated with mastectomy. If post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is not indicated, implant-based reconstruction with or without a net/acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is a common option. Complications such as seroma formation, infection, and explantation are significantly more common when an ADM is used (15.3% vs. 5.4% ). If PMRT is performed, then the complication rate of implant-based breast reconstruction is 1 to 48% ; in particular, Baker grade III/IV capsular fibrosis occurs in 7 to 22% of patients, and the prosthesis must be explanted in 9 to 41% . Primary or, preferably, secondary autologous reconstruction is an alternative. The results of ABR are more stable over the long term, but the operation is markedly more complex. Autologous breast reconstruction after PMRT does not increase the risk of serious complications (20.5% vs. 17.9% without radiotherapy). No randomized controlled trials have yet been conducted to compare the reconstructive techniques with each other. If radiotherapy will not be performed, immediate reconstruction with an implant is recommended. On the other hand, if post-mastectomy radiotherapy

  8. Anatomical basis of the extended TDAP flap: study of its territories of vascularization and its volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dast, Sandy; Havet, Eric; Dessena, Lidia; Abdulshakoor, Abeer; Alharbi, Mohammed; Vaucher, Richard; Herlin, Christian; Sinna, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    The concept of extended thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap was described in 2015 for breast reconstruction. Our anatomical study aims to identify the territories vascularised by the thoracodorsal artery perforator via the deep muscular fascial network. The second goal was to define the volume of the extended TDAP flap. Ten extended TDAP flaps were dissected on 5 fresh human cadavers. Around the classical skin paddle of a TDAP flap, the dissections were performed in a subfascial level, including the muscular fascia and the adipose tissue compartments to increase the volume of the flap. After injection of methylene blue in the thoracodorsal artery, we measured the length and width, the surface and the volume of the coloured flap. The mean sizes of the extended TDAP flap were 24.9 cm × 20.1 cm. The mean surface of the total vascularization zone was 441 cm 2 . The mean volume of the vascularized flap was 193 ml. The thoracodorsal artery perforator via the deep muscular fascial network allows us to harvest a flap of 25 cm × 20 cm with a mean surface of 441 cm² and a mean volume of 193 ml. The extended TDAP flap is a credible option in breast reconstruction.

  9. [Reconstruction of ankle and foot with combination of free perforator flaps and skin graft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Gong, Ketong; Yin, Zhonggang; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of free perforator flaps combined with skin graft for reconstruction of ankle and foot soft tissue defects. Between June 2014 and October 2015, 20 cases of ankle and foot soft tissue defects were treated. There were 16 males and 4 females, aged from 19 to 61 years (mean, 43.3 years). Injury was caused by traffic accident in 7 cases, by crashing in 9 cases, and machine twist in 4 cases. The locations were the ankle in 6 cases, the heel in 3 cases, the dorsum pedis in 4 cases, and the plantar forefoot in 7 cases of avulsion injury after toes amputation. The size of wound ranged from 15 cm×10 cm to 27 cm×18 cm. The time from injury to treatment was from 11 to 52 days (mean, 27 days). The anterolateral thigh perforator flap was used in 11 cases, thoracodorsal antery perforator flap in 3 cases, medial sural artery perforator flap in 4 cases, deep inferior epigastric perforator flap in 1 case, and anteromedial thigh perforator flap in 1 case, including 5 chimeric perforator flaps, 5 polyfoliate perforator flaps, 3 flow-through perforator flaps, and 3 conjoined perforator flaps. The size of the perforator flap ranged from 10.0 cm×6.5 cm to 36.0 cm×8.0 cm, the size of skin graft from 5 cm×3 cm to 18 cm×12 cm. Venous crisis occurred in 2 flaps which survived after symptomatic treatment; 18 flaps survived successfully and skin grafting healed well. The follow-up time ranged 4-18 months (mean, 8.3 months). The flaps had good appearance, texture and color, without infection. The patients could walk normally and do daily activities. Only linear scars were observed at the donor sites. Free perforator flap can be used to reconstruct defects in the ankle and foot, especially in the weight-bearing area of the plantar forefoot. A combination of free perforator flap and skin graft is ideal in reconstruction of great soft tissue defects in the ankle and foot.

  10. Total Reconstruction of the Upper Lip Using Bilateral Nasolabial Flaps, Submental Flap, and Mucosa Graft following Complete Resection for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Oseni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lip reconstruction following resection for tumour or following extensive trauma may pose a challenge. This is more so when the resection is total and a complete lip has to be constructed. We present a case of lip reconstruction following a total resection of the upper lip. The procedure used in this case was a combination of bilateral nasolabial flaps with a submental flap and buccal mucosal graft lining. We believe that this provides an alternative method of total upper lip reconstruction with minimal disruption of the facial aesthesis.

  11. Immediate reconstruction of maxillectomy defects using anterolateral thigh free flap in patients from a low resource region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei Wei; Peng, Han Wei; Guo, Zhu Ming; Zhang, Quan; Yang, An Kui

    2012-11-01

    To report the reliability and reconstructive outcome of using anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with or without titanium mesh to repair maxillectomy defects in a patient from a low resource region (LRR). Retrospective review. Clinical data of patients with oral-maxillofacial cancers who underwent maxillectomy and reconstruction using ALT flap in two tertiary cancer centers in southern China were retrospectively reviewed. Reconstructive techniques, flap survival, postoperative oral functions, and surgical complications were reported. Apart from one total flap loss, 18 of the 19 free ALT flaps survived. Titanium mesh was used in two patients with total maxillectomy defects. Eighteen of the 19 patients resumed a normal oral diet. Fourteen patients had good speech, except one patient with poor pronunciation, and four patients had average speech. One patient presented with postoperative palatal fistula. No other complications were observed. The application of ALT flaps with or without titanium mesh to repair maxillectomy defects is straightforward and reliable and has an acceptable reconstructive outcome. It might be a suitable procedure for patients from an LRR. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. [Psychological assessment of patients who have ++undergone breast reconstruction using 2 different technics: autologous tissue versus prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchelli, S; Leone, M S; Passarelli, B; Perniciaro, G; Capelli, M; Baracco, G; Alberisio, A; Santi, P L

    1995-05-01

    Breast reconstruction has become an available option for most patients undergoing mastectomy: in fact many authors agree that breast reconstruction does not interfere with possible therapies and improves the quality of life of women. The aim of the study was to evaluate the psychological adjustment of patients who had immediate or delayed reconstruction using 2 different methods: implants and autologous tissues. The study population (115 patients) was derived from patients who underwent breast reconstruction in the period January 1988-December 1991, in follow-up at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; no patient was undergoing psychological therapy. 58 patients underwent breast reconstruction using implants and 57 using Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap (TRAMF). Informations were gathered, including the patient's age, the number of offspring, the marital status, the scholastic education, the job and the relapse between mastectomy and reconstruction. The psychological instruments consisted in three standardized self-administered questionnaires: Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y (STAI), Eysenk Personality Inventory (EPQ-R). These tests were chosen to gauge the psychological distress, such anxiety, anger, depression and psychosocial maladjustment. To better perform the changes of body image after breast reconstruction, women were requested to answer three more specific questions about the sexual desire, physical image and social relationships. The 102 patients assessed in this study indicate low incidence of psychological distress and adaptive coping strategies. Impairment was reported, regarding body image, by patients undergoing delayed reconstruction; in these patients higher scores in distress tests were observed.

  13. Magnitude of Myocutaneous Flaps and Factors Associated With Loss of Volume in Oral Cancer Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Yanamoto, Souichi; Ota, Yoshihide; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Myocutaneous flaps are often used to repair oral and maxillofacial defects after surgery for oral cancer; however, their volume decreases during the postoperative period. To facilitate treatment planning, the authors measured the extent of such postoperative flap volume loss and identified associated factors in patients who underwent oral reconstruction with myocutaneous flaps. The authors designed and performed a retrospective observational study of patients who underwent reconstructive procedures involving rectus abdominal myocutaneous (RAM) or pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flaps at Tokai University Hospital, Kobe University Hospital, or Nagasaki University Hospital from April 2009 through March 2013. Flap type and other clinical variables were examined as potential predictors of flap loss. The primary outcome was flap loss at 6 months postoperatively. Correlations between each potential predictor and the primary outcome were examined using multiple regression analysis. The subjects were 75 patients whose oral defects were reconstructed with RAM flaps (n = 57) or PMMC flaps (n = 18). RAM flaps exhibited a mean volume shrinkage of 22% at 6 months postoperatively, which was less than the 27.5% displayed by the PMMC flaps, but the difference was not important. Renal failure, previous surgery of the oral region, postoperative radiotherapy, and postoperative serum albumin level were found to be meaningful risk factors for postoperative flap volume loss. The results of this study suggest that larger flaps should be used in patients who possess these risk factors or are scheduled to undergo postoperative radiotherapy. Future studies should examine the utility of postoperative nutritional management for preventing flap volume loss. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Total endoscopic free flap harvest of a serratus anterior fascia flap for microsurgical lower leg reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdmann, Alfons

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: A tremendous number of free flaps have been developed in the past. As the surgical result depends not only on a successful flap transfer but also on the harvest, this paper details the procedures for undertaking the first total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap transplantation to the lower leg. Patient and methods: In September 2012 we performed the first total endoscopic serratus anterior fascia free flap harvest. The incision of 2.5 cm length was made 10 cm in front of anterior muscle border of the latissimus dorsi at level with the midthorax. After insertion of a flexible laparoscopic single port system we started CO gas insufflation. We used this setting to meticulously prepare a neo cavity between atissimus dorsi and M. serratus anterior. The vessels were dissected and the thoraco-dorsal nerve was separated. With a second auxiliary incision we used a clamp to support the raising of the fascia flap from the underlying muscle. Finally we clipped the vessels to the latissimus dorsi muscle and the flap vessels at the Arteria and Vena axillaris. The flap was extracted via the 2.5 cm incision.Results: We were able to perform a total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap reconstruction of soft tissues. With this new operative technique we were able to avoid a long skin incision, which in our view lowers the morbidity at the harvest area.Conclusion: We describe a new method for the total endoscopic harvest of the serratus fascia flap for free flap transfer. The flap was harvested within reasonable time and following surgery leaves the patient with minimal donor site morbidity compared to the open technique.

  15. Breast reconstruction following mastectomy: current status in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelin, Kerstin; King, Elizabeth; Redman, Sally

    2003-09-01

    Although breast reconstruction provides some advantages for women following mastectomy, few Australian breast cancer patients currently receive reconstruction. In Australia, the routine provision of breast reconstruction will require the development of specific health service delivery models. The present paper reports an analysis of the provision of breast reconstruction in eight sites in Australia. A semi-structured telephone interview was conducted with 10 surgeons offering breast reconstruction as part of their practice, including nine breast or general surgeons and one plastic surgeon. Surgeons reported offering breast reconstruction to all women facing mastectomy; the proportion of women deciding to have breast reconstruction varied between sites with up to 50% of women having a reconstruction at some sites. Most sites offered three types of reconstruction. Two pathways emerged: either the breast surgeon performed the breast surgery in a team with the plastic surgeon who undertook the breast reconstruction or the breast surgeon provided both the breast surgery and the reconstruction. Considerable waiting times for breast reconstruction were reported in the public sector particularly for delayed reconstruction. Surgeons reported receiving training in breast reconstruction from plastic surgeons or from a breast surgery team that performed reconstructions; a number had been trained overseas. No audits of breast reconstruction were being undertaken. Breast reconstruction can be offered on a routine basis in Australia in both the private and public sectors. Women may be more readily able to access breast reconstruction when it is provided by a breast surgeon alone, but the range of reconstruction options may be more limited. If access to breast reconstruction is to be increased, there will be a need to: (i) develop effective models for the rural sector taking account of the lack of plastic surgeons; (ii) address waiting times for reconstruction surgery in the

  16. Extended Hair-bearing Lateral Orbital Flap for Simultaneous Reconstruction of Eyebrow and Eyelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Matsuo, MD

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: The procedure for raising an extended hair-bearing lateral orbital flap is relatively easy, although attention must be paid to the temporal facial nerve. This flap is useful for simultaneously reconstructing defects of the upper eyelid and lateral eyebrow.

  17. Pedicled Instep Flap and Tibial Nerve Reconstruction in a Cynomolgus Monkey [Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Weiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A male cynomolgus monkey experienced extensive soft tissue trauma to the right caudal calf area. Some weeks after complete healing of the original wounds, the monkey developed a chronic pressure sore on plantar surface of the heel of its right foot. A loss of sensitivity in the sole of the foot was hypothesized. The skin defect was closed by a medial sensate pedicled instep flap followed by counter transplantation of a full thickness graft from the interdigital webspace. The integrity of the tibial nerve was revised and reconstructed by means of the turnover flap technique. Both procedures were successful. This is an uncommon case in an exotic veterinary patient as it demonstrates a reconstructive skin flap procedure for the treatment of a chronic, denervated wound in combination with the successful reconstruction of 2.5 cm gap in the tibial nerve.

  18. Endoscopic endonasal double flap technique for reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Ricardo Landini Lutaif; Todeschini, Alexandre Bossi; Santos, Américo Rubens Leite Dos; Lazarini, Paulo Roberto

    2018-04-19

    One of the main concerns in endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base has been the high incidence and morbidity associated with cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The introduction and routine use of vascularized flaps allowed a marked decrease in this complication followed by a great expansion in the indications and techniques used in endoscopic endonasal approaches, extending to defects from huge tumours and previously inaccessible areas of the skull base. Describe the technique of performing endoscopic double flap multi-layered reconstruction of the anterior skull base without craniotomy. Step by step description of the endoscopic double flap technique (nasoseptal and pericranial vascularized flaps and fascia lata free graft) as used and illustrated in two patients with an olfactory groove meningioma who underwent an endoscopic approach. Both patients achieved a gross total resection: subsequent reconstruction of the anterior skull base was performed with the nasoseptal and pericranial flaps onlay and a fascia lata free graft inlay. Both patients showed an excellent recovery, no signs of cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, flap necrosis, chronic meningeal or sinonasal inflammation or cerebral herniation having developed. This endoscopic double flap technique we have described is a viable, versatile and safe option for anterior skull base reconstructions, decreasing the incidence of complications in endoscopic endonasal approaches. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Re-exploration of vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for vaginal reconstruction: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Rouch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM flap is a versatile and well-established reconstructive technique for many defects created as a result of colorectal and gynecologic extirpation. However, major re-operation in the pelvis following a VRAM flap reconstruction several months later is uncommon, and the safety and integrity of the VRAM flap in this setting has not been described. This case examines VRAM flap preservation during repeat exploratory laparotomy, and a unique view of the VRAM flap during interval exploration. We demonstrate an intact flap after lysis of adhesions with an audible Doppler signal, and maintenance of flap integrity in the postoperative period. This further substantiates its use as a durable rotational flap for perineal tissue defects.

  20. Abdominal wall reconstruction using De-epithelialized dermal flap: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall reconstruction using De-epithelialized dermal flap: A new technique. ... Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report ... Background: Although autogenous materials have been used in abdominal wall hernioplasty for a long time, the introduction of prosthetic materials diminished their popularity. However ...

  1. A Systematic Review of Outcomes and Complications of Primary Fingertip Reconstruction Using Reverse-Flow Homodigital Island Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Subhash; Gu, Jia-xiang; Zhang, Nai-chen; Liu, Hong-jun

    2016-04-01

    Fingertip reconstruction using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps has been very popular over the years. However, the outcomes of reconstruction have not been clearly understood. In these circumstances, a systematic review of available literature is warranted. To assess the outcomes and complications of fingertip reconstruction using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps. To justify the usage of reverse-flow homodigital island flaps for fingertip reconstruction. A PubMed [MEDLINE] electronic database was searched (1985 to 15 April 2015). Retrospective case series that met the following criteria were included: (1) Study reported primary data; (2) Study included at least five cases of fingertip defects treated using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps; (3) Study reported outcomes and complications of fingertip reconstruction, either primary or delayed, using reverse-flow homodigital island flaps; (4) The study presented at least one of the following functional outcomes: Static two-point discrimination, return-to-work time, range of motion of distal interphalangeal joints; (5) The study presented at least one complication. Two review authors independently assessed search results, and two other review authors analyzed the data and resolved disagreements. The following endpoints were analyzed: survival rate of the flap, sensibility, and functional outcomes and complications. Eight studies were included in this review. The included studies were published between 1995 and 2014, and a total of 207 patients with 230 fingertip defects were reported. The overall survival rate of the flap was 98 % (including partial survival). The mean static two-point discrimination (2PD) was 7.2 mm. The average range of motion of the DIP joint was 63°. The average return-to-work time was 7 weeks after injury. On average, 2 % of the patient had complete flap necrosis, 5 % had partial flap necrosis, 4 % developed venous congestion, 4 % developed flexion contracture, and 12 % experienced

  2. Pedicled perforator flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap...... to reconstruct the defect. The perforators are marked with a hand-held Doppler probe and multiple flaps are designed. The appropriate flap is elevated after identifying the perforator(s). Dissection of the perforator(s) or complete incision of the flap margins are not mandatory if the flap is mobilized...... adequately to cover the defect. Defects measuring 3 x 3 cm up to 20 x 20 cm at diverse locations were successfully reconstructed in 20 of 21 patients with 26 flaps. Pedicled perforator flaps offer us reliable and satisfactory results of reconstruction at different anatomic territories of the body. It sounds...

  3. Reverse peroneal artery flap for large defects of ankle and foot: A reliable reconstructive technique

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    Jose Tharayil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large soft tissue defects around the lower third of the leg, ankle and foot always have been challenging to reconstruct. Reverse sural flaps have been used for this problem with variable success. Free tissue transfer has revolutionised management of these problem wounds in selected cases. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients with large defects around the lower third of the leg, ankle and foot underwent reconstruction with reverse peroneal artery flap (RPAF over a period of 7 years. The mean age of these patients was 41.2 years. Results: Of the 22 flaps, 21 showed complete survival without even marginal necrosis. One flap failed, where atherosclerotic occlusion of peroneal artery was evident on the table. Few patients had minor donor site problems that settled with conservative management. Conclusions: RPAF is a very reliable flap for the coverage of large soft tissue defects of the heel, sole and dorsum of foot. This flap adds versatility in planning and execution of this extended reverse sural flap.

  4. [Reconstruction of oral mucosa with a micro-vascularized fascia-cutaneous flap from the forearm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgueño García, Miguel; Cebrián Carretero, José Luis; Muñoz Caro, Jesús Manuel; Arias Gallo, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Epidermoid carcinoma of jugal mucosa is an aggressive tumor. Its treatment is based on broad excision and reconstruction in order to avoid fibrosis and restriction of mouth opening. Neck dissection and radiotherapy are indicated in selected cases. We display our experience with microvascularized flaps with the aim of preventing the flaws. We reconsider 8 patients (representing 10 flaps) handle in our Department. Besides we discuss other therapeutic alternatives after the growth's removal. The conclusion reached is that the mucovascularized forearm flaps give a great quantity of thin tissue and therefore so results to be the best option for the reconstruction of the jugal mucosa.

  5. A Composite Buccal Flap for Alar Based Defect Reconstruction: A Technical Note

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    A. Khojasteh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to reconstruct an alar defect with cartilage involvement. Here in the authors report a case of traumatic alar loss during childhood in which an alar reconstruction was carried out with a composite auricular graft put over the pedicle buccal flap which was rotated and passed through the intraoral side. The lining skin and auricular cartilage for the flap was obtained from the auricular region which was acceptable for the patient. All procedures were performed under general anesthesia. One year follow up revealed satisfactory results with minimal contracture of the graft.

  6. Mastectomy Skin Necrosis After Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Analysis Between Autologous Reconstruction and Implant-Based Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Gloria R; Lee, Gordon K

    2018-05-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis is a significant problem after breast reconstruction. We sought to perform a comparative analysis on this complication between patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction and patients undergoing 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed on consecutive patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction or 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction by the senior author from 2006 through 2015. Patient demographic factors including age, body mass index, history of diabetes, history of smoking, and history of radiation to the breast were collected. Our primary outcome measure was mastectomy skin necrosis. Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis between the 2 patient cohorts. The treatment patterns of mastectomy skin necrosis were then analyzed. We identified 204 patients who underwent autologous breast reconstruction and 293 patients who underwent 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. Patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction were older, heavier, more likely to have diabetes, and more likely to have had prior radiation to the breast compared with patients undergoing implant-based reconstruction. The incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis was 30.4% of patients in the autologous group compared with only 10.6% of patients in the tissue expander group (P care in the autologous group, only 3.2% were treated with local wound care in the tissue expander group (P skin necrosis is significantly more likely to occur after autologous breast reconstruction compared with 2-stage expander implant-based breast reconstruction. Patients with autologous reconstructions are more readily treated with local wound care compared with patients with tissue expanders, who tended to require operative treatment of this complication. Patients considering breast reconstruction should be counseled appropriately regarding the differences in incidence and management of mastectomy skin

  7. Reconstructive approach for patients with augmentation mammaplasty undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy.

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    Alperovich, Michael; Choi, Mihye; Frey, Jordan D; Karp, Nolan S

    2014-09-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a recent advance in the therapeutic and prophylactic management of breast cancer; however, the procedure is associated with increased reconstructive complications. Data on NSM after previous breast augmentation are limited. The authors compared reconstructive complications after NSM between patients with previously augmented breasts and a larger cohort that had not undergone prior augmentation. An approach to NSM that involves 2-stage reconstruction in augmented patients is also described. Medical records of NSMs performed at New York University Langone Medical Center from 2006 to 2013 were reviewed. Data points evaluated included patient characteristics, comorbidities, breast implant plane, and reconstructive complications. Fisher's exact and t tests were used for the comparisons. During the study period, NSMs were performed in 17 augmented breasts at this institution. After NSM, 15 of these breasts underwent implant-based reconstruction and 2 breasts underwent microvascular free flaps. Reconstructive complications included 1 hematoma managed nonoperatively (5.9%) and 1 partial necrosis of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) (5.9%). Compared with the larger nonaugmented cohort (n=332), patients with previously augmented breasts had fewer complications, and there were no statistically significant differences in the rates of mastectomy flap necrosis, partial NAC necrosis, complete NAC necrosis, hematoma, capsular contracture, explantation, implant displacement, seroma, or breast cellulitis. The results indicate that NSM reconstruction is associated with minimal complications in patients with previous augmentation mammaplasty. 4. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  8. Cannula-Assisted Flap Elevation (CAFE): a novel technique for developing flaps during skin-sparing mastectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    One of the most challenging procedures in breast surgery is the skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM). Various techniques and incisions have evolved that characterize this procedure; however, what is common in all of them is the smaller the incision, the more difficult it is to develop the skin flaps. A procedure was developed that incorporates the use of liposuction cannulas (without suction) to create the skin flaps. The technique and results are described in this manuscript. From October of 2012 to April 2014, 289 mastectomies (171 patients) were performed using the CAFE procedure on women of all shapes and sizes. Postoperatively, no problems were experienced with flap viability using this technique. The main difference in side effects between the CAFE technique and other standard techniques for developing flaps in SSMs was more bruising than normal, but this resolved rapidly. The results for use of this technique were consistently impressive. The learning curve for this procedure is very short, especially for those who perform SSMs using sharp technique (scissors). Residents and fellows became proficient with the CAFE technique in a relatively short amount of time. Plastic surgeons were pleased with the cosmetic outcomes of their reconstructions that follow this type of mastectomy. Patients were extremely satisfied with their reconstructions as well. Incorporating the use of liposuction cannulas (without suction) makes the creation of flaps for SSM a relatively simple and rapid method. It is especially useful to assist in developing skin flaps with even the smallest of skin incisions.

  9. Immediate Reconstruction of a Soft-Tissue Defect in a Burn Patient whit a Peroforator-Based Propeller Flap: A Case Report

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    Burhan Özalp

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue reconstruction of the distal lower leg is a challenging issue for plastic surgeons. Immediate coverage of exposed anatomical structures with soft tissue after trauma prevents these structures from being infected, and this is very important for burn patients. Free flaps have recently been accepted as the gold-standard technique for ankle and foot reconstruction; however, this is changing with the increasing popularity of the perforator flaps. Today, perforator flaps are commonly performed for the reconstruction of the soft-tissue defects across the body. In this report, we want to present the reconstruction of a soft-tissue defect case using perforator-based propeller flap in a burn patient for immediate reconstruction. A 45-year-old male patient had a soft-tissue defect over the medial side of the ankle and foot due to a high-voltage electrical burn. The exposed bone tissue was covered with a propeller flap of 15×6 cm size, without any circulation problems during the postoperative period. In conclusion, we want to state that perforator-based propeller flaps are reliable, successful, and effective techniques for the immediate reconstruction of distal leg and foot. These flaps can be easily performed without requiring any microsurgical technique thus, they can be commonly performed by most of the plastic surgeons.

  10. Flap reconstruction for soft-tissue defects with exposed hardware following deep infection after internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Madanat, Rami; Tukiainen, Erkki; Pulliainen, Lea; Sintonen, Harri; Mäkinen, Tatu J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the outcome for patients treated with flap reconstruction following deep ankle fracture infection with exposed hardware. Out of 3041 consecutive ankle fracture operations in 3030 patients from 2006 to 2011, we identified 56 patients requiring flap reconstruction following deep infection. Thirty-two of these patients could be examined at a follow-up visit. Olerud-Molander Ankle (OMA) score, 15D score, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and clinical examination were used to assess the outcome. A total of 58 flap reconstructions were performed in 56 patients with a mean age of 57 years (range 25–93 years) and mean follow-up time of 52 months. The most commonly used reconstruction was a distally based peroneus brevis muscle flap with a split-thickness skin graft. A microvascular free flap was required in only one patient. 22 (39%) patients required subsequent surgical interventions because of a flap-related complication. With flap reconstruction, hardware could eventually be salvaged in 53% of patients with a non-consolidated fracture. The mean OMA score was fair or poor in 53% of the patients, and only 56% had recovered their pre-injury level of function. Half of the patients had shoe wear limitations. The 15D score showed a significantly poorer health-related quality of life compared to an age-standardised sample of the general population. The mean pain NRS was 2.1 (range 0–6), and the mean satisfaction NRS was 6.6 (range 0–10). Our study showed that successful treatment of a soft-tissue defect with exposed hardware following ankle fracture infections can be achieved with local flaps. Despite eventual reconstructive success, complications are common. Patients perceive a poorer health-related quality of life, have shoe wear limitations, and only half of them achieve their pre-injury level of function.

  11. Breast reconstruction using dermoglandular flaps and fat grafting following the resection of unilateral giant fibrocystic changes

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    Ismail Kucuker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Giant benign breast masses have been reported in the literature. Most of these reports are lipomas and fibroadenomas. Fibrocystic breast disease is also very common but has not been described as a giant mass in the breast as of yet. It can also be seen with fibroadenosis combined with micro- and macro-cyst formations. In this study, the aim was to present two-stage reconstructive management to restore a severe breast asymmetry caused by a rare benign lesion. A 39-year-old woman with unilateral asymmetry in her breast was admitted to the clinic. Preoperative USG revealed fibroglandular tissue in her right breast but did not show a well-circumscribed mass. It also showed micro- and macro-cysts. It was concluded that in case of severe breast asymmetry, a combination of different techniques is required. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(2.000: 100-103

  12. Health-related quality of life after segmental resection of the lateral mandible: Free fibula flap versus plate reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes; Holtslag, Irene; van der Bilt, Andries; Merkx, Matthias; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen

    2015-06-01

    Segmental resection of the mandible causes functional, aesthetic and social problems affecting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). It is often assumed that reconstruction with composite free flaps guarantees better function and aesthetics than bridging the defect with reconstruction plates. Using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35), we compared HRQoL in patients who received free fibula flaps versus reconstruction plates after segmental resection of the lateral mandible. Thirty-seven completed questionnaires (18 fibula reconstructions and 19 patients with reconstruction plates) were available. Reconstruction with a free fibula flap did not provide clear additional benefit to bridging the defect with a reconstruction plate after segmental resection of the lateral mandible. In particular aspects known to have the most impact on HRQoL like swallowing, speech and chewing were not influenced by the type of reconstruction. Reconstruction of segmental defects of the lateral mandible with free fibula flap and reconstruction plate resulted in comparable HRQoL. If dental rehabilitation by means of dental implants is not anticipated in the fibula, then plate reconstruction with adequate soft tissue remains a suitable technique for the reconstruction of segmental defects of the lateral mandible. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensation Following Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Jakob; Wickman, Marie; Hansson, Per

    2010-01-01

    Sensation is a neglected aspect of the outcome of breast reconstructions with implants. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the cutaneous somatosensory status in breasts following mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with permanent adjustable prostheses and to analyze the patients' subjective experience of the sensation. Twenty-four consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive or in situ breast carcinoma were examined preoperatively and 2 years after mastectomy and reconstruction, for assessment of perception thresholds for touch, cold, warmth, and heat pain above and below the areola. Von Frey filaments and a Peltier element-based thermode were used. The patients completed a questionnaire concerning their experienced sensation in the reconstructed breast. Using quantitative somato-sensory testing, the sensation to all the examined modalities was significantly impaired compared to preoperatively. Most affected was the area above the areola. Patients given postoperative radiotherapy (n = 9) did not differ from those without radiotherapy (n = 15) regarding any of the modalities. All patients reported reduced sensation in the reconstructed breast compared to that preoperatively. Twenty-three patients stated that the reconstructed breast felt different from the other breast; nevertheless 16 reported that the reconstructed breast felt like a real breast. The study revealed sensation impairment following mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with implants. Patients should be informed about this effect preoperatively to allow adequate expectations regarding the sensation outcome. However, two-thirds of the study patients considered that the reconstructed breast felt like a real breast, which must be one of the main purposes of a breast reconstruction.

  14. Scapular flap for maxillectomy defect reconstruction and preliminary results using three-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modest, Mara C; Moore, Eric J; Abel, Kathryn M Van; Janus, Jeffrey R; Sims, John R; Price, Daniel L; Olsen, Kerry D

    2017-01-01

    Discuss current techniques utilizing the scapular tip and subscapular system for free tissue reconstruction of maxillary defects and highlight the impact of medical modeling on these techniques with a case series. Case review series at an academic hospital of patients undergoing maxillectomy + thoracodorsal scapula composite free flap (TSCF) reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) models were used in the last five cases. 3D modeling, surgical, functional, and aesthetic outcomes were reviewed. Nine patients underwent TSCF reconstruction for maxillectomy defects (median age = 43 years; range, 19-66 years). Five patients (55%) had a total maxillectomy (TM) ± orbital exenteration, whereas four patients (44%) underwent subtotal palatal maxillectomy. For TM, the contralateral scapula tip was positioned with its natural concavity recreating facial contour. The laterally based vascular pedicle was ideally positioned for facial vessel anastomosis. For subtotal-palatal defect, an ipsilateral flap was harvested, but inset with the convex surface facing superiorly. Once 3D models were available from our anatomic modeling lab, they were used for intraoperative planning of the last five patients. Use of the model intraoperatively improved efficiency and allowed for better contouring/plating of the TSCF. At last follow-up, all patients had good functional outcomes. Aesthetic outcomes were more successful in patients where 3D-modeling was used (100% vs. 50%). There were no flap failures. Median follow-up >1 month was 5.2 months (range, 1-32.7 months). Reconstruction of maxillectomy defects is complex. Successful aesthetic and functional outcomes are critical to patient satisfaction. The TSCF is a versatile flap. Based on defect type, choosing laterality is crucial for proper vessel orientation and outcomes. The use of internally produced 3D models has helped refine intraoperative contouring and flap inset, leading to more successful outcomes. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:E8-E14

  15. Free flap transfer reconstruction in managing tongue carcinoma during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuko; Fukuda, Kenji; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Nishimoto, Soh; Terada, Tomonori; Wada, Ryu; Sotsuka, Yohei; Kawai, Kenichiro; Kakibuchi, Masao

    2017-08-01

    Malignant oral cancers do not commonly occur in pregnant women. But when they do, the presence of a foetus and maternal physiological changes complicate and limit the treatment options. Risk benefit assessment and balancing of them are always important. A 33-year-old woman, who was 25 weeks pregnant, presented with a squamous cell carcinoma on her tongue. She was clinically staged II (T2, N0 and M0). Discussions between the patient, surgical teams and obstetricians agreed to continue her pregnancy while managing the tumour. Hemi-glossectomy and ipsilateral neck dissection was performed. Free antero-lateral thigh flap was transferred to reconstruct the tongue defect, successfully. The patient gave birth to a healthy baby afterward. She is tumour free for 6 years. Free flap reconstruction can be an option, even if the patient is pregnant.

  16. NSQIP as a Predictor of Length of Stay in Patients Undergoing Free Flap Reconstruction

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    Charles A. Riley MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP calculator was created to improve outcomes and guide cost-effective care in surgery. Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC undergo ablative and free flap reconstructive surgery with prolonged postoperative courses. Methods A case series with chart review was performed on 50 consecutive patients with HNC undergoing ablative and reconstructive free flap surgery from October 2014 to March 2016 at a tertiary care center. Comorbidities and intraoperative and postoperative variables were collected. Predicted length of stay was tabulated with the NSQIP calculator. Results Thirty-five patients (70% were male. The mean (SD age was 67.2 (13.4 years. The mean (SD length of stay (LOS was 13.5 (10.3 days. The mean (SD NSQIP-predicted LOS was 10.3 (2.2 days ( P = .027. Discussion The NSQIP calculator may be an inadequate predictor for LOS in patients with HNC undergoing free flap surgery. Additional study is necessary to determine the accuracy of this tool in this patient population. Implications for Practice: Head and neck surgeons performing free flap reconstructive surgery following tumor ablation may find that the NSQIP risk calculator underestimates the LOS in this population.

  17. The Use of Harmonic Scalpel for Free Flap Dissection in Head and Neck Reconstructive Surgery

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    Sebastien Albert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgeons conventionally use electrocautery dissection and surgical clip appliers to harvest free flaps. The ultrasonic Harmonic Scalpel is a new surgical instrument that provides high-quality dissection and hemostasis and minimizes tissue injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and advantages of the ultrasonic Harmonic Scalpel compared to conventional surgical instruments in free flap surgery. This prospective study included 20 patients who underwent head and neck reconstructive surgery between March 2009 and May 2010. A forearm free flap was used for reconstruction in 12 patients, and a fibular flap was used in 8 patients. In half of the patients, electrocautery and surgical clips were used for free flap harvesting (the EC group, and in the other half of the patients, ultrasonic dissection was performed using the Harmonic Scalpel (the HS group. The following parameters were significantly lower in the HS group compared to the EC group: the operative time of flap dissection (35% lower in the HS group, blood loss, number of surgical clips and cost of surgical materials. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of the Harmonic Scalpel in forearm and fibular free flap dissections that may be extended to other free flaps.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and surgical delay improve flap survival of reverse pedicle flaps for lower third leg and foot reconstruction

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    Pradeoth Mukundan Korambayil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study is to present a management protocol for various types of soft tissue defects of the distal third region of leg and foot treated with pedicle flaps, by including hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy in the treatment regimen with flap delay. Methods: We present a prospective study of 23 patients with various types of soft tissue defects of the foot, and lower third of leg managed in our institution from December 2012 to December 2013. All soft tissue defects were treated by a reverse pedicle flap. Twelve patients were managed with flap delay with HBO therapy and 11 patients with immediate flaps without HBO therapy. The postoperative period, hospital course, and follow-up were documented. Results: Of 12 patients with flap delay and HBO, 10 patients did not suffer any complications secondary to flap transfer. One patient had discoloration of the tip of the flap, which settled without the intervention, and 1 patient had recurrent abscess formation, which required debridement and closure. Of 11 patients with direct transfer, 6 patients presented with complications including flap congestion, partial flap loss, and tip necrosis, which required secondary intervention. Conclusion: HBO therapy is a useful adjunct in flap delay of the reverse pedicle flap for soft tissue reconstruction of the lower third of the leg and foot regions.

  19. Elaboration of an algorithm for preserving a projective skin flap above the tumor when planning subcutaneous mastectomy from an aesthetically acceptable area in patients with breast nodule cancer

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    A. R. Khamitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indications for the conservation of the skin flap over the tumor for potential offset of the operational access in aesthetically acceptable zone in patients with primary nodular breast cancer are discussed in the article. The survey results of 203 patients (T1–2N0–3M0 are analyzed. The study revealed that the risk factors affecting the skin flap involvement are the presence of the skin flattening as well as topographic and anatomical characteristics: tumor < 3 cm, located at a depth of < 0.46 ± 0.2 cm, tumor ≥ 3 cm located at a depth of < 1.66 cm. Based on the data the algorithm for immediate breast reconstruction from aesthetically acceptable zone for surgical oncologist is compiled.

  20. Treatment of Implant Exposure due to Skin Necroses after Skin Sparing Mastectomy: Initial Experiences Using a Not Selective Random Epigastric Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echazarreta-Gallego, Estíbaliz; Pola-Bandrés, Guillermo; Arribas-Del Amo, María Dolores; Gil-Romea, Ismael; Sousa-Domínguez, Ramón; Güemes-Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Breast prostheses exposure is probably the most devastating complication after a skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) and implant-based, one-stage, breast reconstruction. This complication may occur in the immediate post-operative period or in the weeks and even months after the procedure. In most cases, the cause is poor skin coverage of the implant due to skin necrosis. Eight consecutive cases of implant exposure (or risk of exposure) due to skin necrosis in SSM patients over a period of 5 years, all patients were treated using a random epigastric rotation flap, executed by the same medical team. A random epigastric flap (island or conventional rotation flap) was used to cover the skin defect. All the patients completed the procedure and all prostheses were saved; there were no cases of flap necrosis or infection. Cases of skin necrosis after SSM and immediate implant reconstruction, in which the implant is at risk of exposure, can be successfully treated with a random epigastric rotation flap.

  1. Random Pattern Vertically Oriented, Partial Thickness Buccinator Myomucosal Flap for Intraoral Reconstruction: A Report of Two Cases

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    Amin Rahpeyma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reconstruction of the oral cavity witha flap design containing the buccal mucosa and buccinator muscle but excluding the facial artery and vein is the topic of these case reports. Case Reports: This article uses random pattern vertically oriented partial thickness buccinator myomucosal flap for intraoral reconstruction in two cases. The first was for lining the mandibular anterior vestibule in a trauma patient. The second was for oral side coverage of bone graft in special cleft patient. In both patients, this flap survived and good bone coverage with non-keratinized mucosa was obtained. Conclusion:  Thin long buccal myomucosal flap not including facial artery and vein can survive.

  2. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ashok R; Nahar, Sushil; Prabhu, Jagdish; Kale, Subhash M; Kumar, Praveen H P

    2011-09-01

    A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional "long" free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free "Boomerang-shaped" Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM) flap. This flap is the slightly modified and "free" version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs.

  3. Breast Reconstruction After Solid Organ Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Stephanie L; Giles, Brian; McLaughlin, Sarah A; Perdikis, Galen; Waldorf, James; Lemaine, Valerie; TerKonda, Sarvam

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplant patients frequently develop posttransplant malignancies including breast cancer. They may desire breast reconstruction after mastectomy, which could potentially be complicated by their transplant status, immunosuppressive regimen, and previous operations. We review our experience with patients who have undergone solid organ transplant and subsequent breast reconstruction after mastectomy After institutional review board approval, we queried our prospective breast reconstruction and solid organ transplant databases for corresponding patients. Inclusion criteria comprised breast reconstruction after solid organ transplant. A chart review was conducted of identified patients. Seventeen patients were identified: 1 pulmonary transplant, 4 cardiac transplants, 2 liver transplants, 1 pancreas transplant, 2 combined kidney/pancreas transplants, and 7 kidney transplants. Indications for mastectomy included posttransplant malignancy and prophylaxis. Median time from transplant to completion of reconstruction was 186 months (range, 11-336 months). Median age at transplant was 34.5 years (range, 21-65 years) with the median age of the patients at reconstructive surgery 51.5 years (range, 34-71 years). Median body mass index was 25.3 (range, 21.3-46.5). No significant complications were noted after reconstructive surgery. All patients were on full immunosuppression at time of reconstruction. Breast reconstruction is a viable option for transplant patients after mastectomy and should not be refused based on their transplant status. Close coordination with the transplant team and careful preoperative planning is essential for optimal outcomes.

  4. Ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator propeller flaps for the reconstruction of lower third leg soft- tissue defects

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    Thalaivirithan Margabandu Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lower third leg soft tissue defects with anatomical and pathological constraints are posing formidable challenges to reconstructive surgeon. Aim: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of ad hoc posterior tibial vessels perforator-propeller flaps for the reconstruction of small and medium sized soft tissue defects in the lower third leg. Patients and Methods: 22 patients (16 were males and 6 were females were involved in this study between period of January 2012 and December 2016.We followed the protocol of initial non delineating exploratory incision made to find out single best perforator in all patients. All the defects in leg reconstructed with adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps. Results: All 22 flaps survived well. All in an average of 13 months follow up period, had pain free walking, with minimal scarring and acceptable aesthesis at the reconstruction sites with no need for any secondary procedure. Conclusion: With inability of preoperatively dopplering the perforators in the lower third leg region, the exploratory posterior nondelineating incision was used in all cases to secure the single best perforator for the propeller flaps. Thus adhoc posterior tibial vessel propeller flaps are dependable, easily adoptable for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the lower third leg region.

  5. Reconstruction of cervical scar contracture using axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianjie; Li, Yang; Wang, Lu; Li, Weiyang; Dong, Liwei; Xia, Wei; Su, Yingjun

    2014-09-01

    Cervical scar contracture causes both physical and psychological distress for burn patients. Many pedicle flaps or skin grafting have been suggested for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture with variable results in the literature. The authors present the axial thoracic flap based on the thoracic branch of the supraclavicular artery (TBSA) for reconstruction of cervical scar contracture. Postburn scar contractures in anterior neck region of 66 patients had been reconstructed with the axial pattern thoracic flaps based on the TBSA, including 1 expanded and 10 nonexpanded pedicle flaps, and 9 expanded and 46 nonexpanded island pedicle flaps, during 1988 through 2012. After removing and releasing the cervical scar contracture, the flap was designed in the thoracic region. The axial artery of the flap is the TBSA bifurcating from the intersection point of sternocleidomastoid muscle and omohyoid muscle with several concomitant veins as the axial veins. The flap can be designed in a large area within the borders of the anterior border of the trapezius muscle superiorly, the middle part of the deltoid muscle laterally, the midsternal line medially, and the level 3 to 4 cm below nipples inferiorly. After incisions were made along the medial, inferior, and lateral border, dissection was performed toward the pedicle. Donor site was closed directly in expanded cases and with skin grafting in nonexpanded cases. Cervical scar contractures were repaired with good functional and cosmetic results in 64 cases among this cohort. Flap tip necrosis in other 2 cases, caused by postoperative hematoma, was repaired by skin grafting. The color and texture of all flaps were fitted with those of the surrounding skin. The donor sites all healed primarily. The flap sensation in the thoracic region regained in the early stage postoperatively and that in cervical area recovered completely after 6 months according to the report of the patients. With reliable blood supply based on the

  6. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  7. Free Vastus Intermedius Muscle Flap: A Successful Alternative for Complex Reconstruction of the Neurocranium in Preoperated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Dominik; Freudlsperger, Christian; Berger, Moritz; Freier, Kolja; Ristow, Oliver; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Sakowitz, Oliver; Engel, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The reconstruction of large cranial and scalp defects is a surgical and esthetic challenge. Single autologous tissue transfer can be insufficient due to the defect size and the anatomic complexity of the recipient site. Alloplastic patient-specific preformed implants can be used to recover hard tissue defects of the neurocranium. Nevertheless, for long-term success adequate soft tissue support is required. In this brief clinical study, the authors describe calvarian reconstruction in a 33-year-old patient with wound healing disorder after an initial resection of ependymoma. The patient suffered from osteonecrosis and wound breakdown in the fronto-parietal region. An alloplastic polymethylmethacrylate implant for hard tissue support was manufactured based on 3-dimensional visualization of a computed tomography scan. After the resection of remaining pathologic bone from earlier surgical procedures, the alloplastic implant was inserted to achieve functional coverage of the brain. Due to anatomic variation of donor site vessels during anterolateral thigh flap preparation, the authors performed a vastus intermedius free flap as a new muscular flap for craniofacial reconstruction. The authors achieved excellent functional and esthetic results. The muscular vastus intermedius free flap in combination with a split skin graft proves to be a new alternative to the anterolateral thigh flap for soft tissue reconstruction of the neurocranium.

  8. Sudden shrinkage of free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap 15 years after maxilla reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Mochizuki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male displayed sudden shrinkage of a left free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, which had been grafted to his left maxilla 15 years previously. No post-reconstructive irradiation had been performed, and no late occlusion of the vascular anastomosis, local infection, recurrence of the maxillary cancer, or body weight loss was observed. However, the shrinkage amounted to approximately 50%. This is considerably more than previously reported cases of shrinkage of various free flaps, which ranged between 10% and 25%. The resultant depression was successfully augmented with a right free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. The residual fat volume of the previously grafted shrunken flap was revealed to be compatible with that of the newly harvested contralateral perforator flap. Thus, the volume of the previously grafted flap may reflect the status of the intact contralateral donor site, although the mechanism of sudden flap shrinkage is unclear.

  9. Breast reconstruction: current and future options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Jr H

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Henry Paul Jr1, Tahira I Prendergast2, Bryson Nicholson2, Shenita White2, Wayne AI Frederick2,31Departments of Plastic Surgery, 2General Surgery, Howard University Hospital, 3Cancer Center, Howard University, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: When initiated by the devastating diagnosis of cancer, post ablative breast restoration has at its core the goal of restoring anatomic normalcy. The concepts of body image, wholeness, and overall well-being have been introduced to explain the paramount psychological influence the breast has on both individuals and society as a whole. Hence, a growing subspecialty has been established to recreate or simulate the lost breast. At least one third of breast cancer victims consider breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction post mastectomy may be offered at the time of mastectomy or delayed post mastectomy after adjuvant therapy. This may be utilizing autologous tissues or implants and each has risks and benefits, especially when considering adjuvant therapy. In addition, there has been a move away from a traditional mastectomy to less invasive, but still curative procedures, such as skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy. These procedures provide the breast envelope to facilitate reconstruction. This paper reviews the primary issues in breast reconstruction, as well as their psychologic, oncologic, and social impact.Keywords: breast restoration, body image, breast reconstruction, mastectomy

  10. Oral and Oropharyngeal Reconstruction with a Free Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Oh, Tae Suk

    2016-06-01

    Extensive surgical resection of the aerodigestive track can result in a large and complex defect of the oropharynx, which represents a significant reconstructive challenge for the plastic surgery. Development of microsurgical techniques has allowed for free flap reconstruction of oropharyngeal defects, with superior outcomes as well as decreases in postoperative complications. The reconstructive goals for oral and oropharyngeal defects are to restore the anatomy, to maintain continuity of the intraoral surface and oropharynx, to protect vital structures such as carotid arteries, to cover exposed portions of internal organs in preparation for adjuvant radiation, and to preserve complex functions of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Oral and oropharyngeal cancers should be treated with consideration of functional recovery. Multidisciplinary treatment strategies are necessary for maximizing disease control and preserving the natural form and function of the oropharynx.

  11. Using perforators as recipient vessels (supermicrosurgery) for free flap reconstruction of the knee region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joon Pio; Koshima, Isao

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the feasibility of a perforator as a recipient vessel to reconstruct soft tissue defects of the knee region.From December of 2006 to August of 2008, total of 25 patients underwent reconstructive procedure using either an anterolateral thigh or an upper medial thigh perforator flap. The flaps were anastomosed in a perforator to perforator manner using supermicrosurgery technique.Minimum of 3 perforators were traced around the knee defect. All flaps survived attached to a recipient perforator with artery diameter ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 mm and accompanying veins ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 mm. This approach allowed reduction in time for pedicle and recipient vessel dissection and minimized the trauma involved during isolation of the vessels.Using the perforator as recipient vessel allows an increase in selection for choice of recipient. By using a perforator as recipient, less time is consumed to secure the vessel, does not need long pedicles for flap, is not bound by the condition of major arteries, and minimizes any risk for major vessel injury while having acceptable flap survival.

  12. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities

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    Ashok R Koul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional "long" free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD and anterolateral thigh (ALT flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free "Boomerang-shaped" Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM flap. This flap is the slightly modified and "free" version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Results: Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. Conclusion: BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs.

  13. Use of microvascular flaps including free osteocutaneous flaps in reconstruction after composite resection for radiation-recurrent oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, I.B.; Bell, M.S.; Barron, P.T.; Zuker, R.M.; Manktelow, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen patients underwent microsurgical free flap procedures for reconstruction after composite resection of radiation-recurrent oral cancer. The use of attached metatarsal bone in nine patients for mandibular reconstruction is in our view a significant advance in this field. Two failures occurred, one due to sepsis and one to delayed thrombosis. Our experience indicates that this procedure deserves a place in the surgical treatment of patients afflicted with oral malignancy

  14. Distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap for foot and ankle reconstruction: Surgical modifications for flap pedicle and donor site closure without skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenglin; Chen, Yiheng; Chu, Tinggang; Gao, Weiyang; Li, Zhijie; Yan, Hede; Song, Yonghuan

    2018-02-01

    The conventional procedure of the sural neuro-fasciocutaneous flap enables the supply of blood and venous drainage by increasing the width of the adipofascial tissue and preserving tiny venous return routes. Moreover, skin graft is a common method for donor site closure, which may lead to some complications and influence the aesthetic appearance. We report modifications for a distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap and a relaying flap for donor site closure without skin graft. Twelve patients undergoing the modified flap for foot and ankle reconstruction were included in this study between 2014 and 2016. A peroneal-based perforator, a superficial vein, and the vascular axis of the sural nerve were included in the pedicle. A Z-shape skin incision was performed to explore the perforator vessels and a relaying island perforator flap was used to close the donor site. All flaps survived completely without necrosis. The area of the flaps ranged from 16 × 8 cm to 30 × 15 cm. The diameter width of the pedicle ranged from 1.0 to 2.0 cm. A relaying perforator island flap was used in 10 cases for donor site closure and no skin graft was performed. There were no serious donor site complications. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic outcome postoperatively at the final follow-up. The distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap is considered a reliable method for foot and ankle reconstruction. The modification for flap pedicle and donor site closure method without skin graft should be recommended. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Comparing the donor-site morbidity using DIEP, SIEA or MS-TRAM flaps for breast reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Rasmussen, Mads Kløvgaard; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2012-01-01

    Countless studies have compared the use of autologous tissue for breast reconstruction; however, rates of donor-site morbidity differ greatly. This study examined the donor-site morbidity of superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA), deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) and muscle-spari...

  16. Success of free flap anastomoses performed within the zone of trauma in acute lower limb reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendon, Charlotte L; Giele, Henk P

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, in free flap cover of lower limb injuries, every attempt is made to perform anastomoses proximal to the zone of injury. We report on the success of anastomoses within the zone of trauma, at the level of the fracture, avoiding further dissection and exposure. The records of free flap reconstructions for fractures of the lower extremity at a tertiary trauma centre between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 48 lower limb fractures required free flap reconstruction, performed at 28 days post injury (0-275 days). Anastomoses were proximal (21), distal (5) or within the zone of trauma (22). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in return to theatre, revision of anastomosis or flap survival between groups. Of the 22 performed within the zone of injury, five returned to theatre but only two for revision of anastomosis and 20 (91%) of these flaps survived. Of the 48 free flaps, arterial anastomoses were end to end in 34 (71%) and end to side in 14 (30%). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in return to theatre, revision of anastomosis or flap survival between the end-to-end and end-to-side groups. There was a tendency for arterial anastomoses to be performed end to end outside the zone of trauma (23/26) compared to within the zone of trauma (11/22). Our data suggest that free flap anastomoses can be performed safely in the zone of trauma in lower limb injuries. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. BIOLOGICAL AND SYNTHETIC MESH USE IN RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ermoshchenkova

    2017-01-01

    options for breast reconstruction. They are adequate substitutes for autologous muscle flaps if the patients for the operation are properly select.

  18. [The vola stress change of patients after operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Jun; Pan, Yong-Wei; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Lin, Shun-Fu; Zhu, Xian-Long; Jiang, Jun; Zeng, Yan-Feng

    2009-11-01

    To analyse the vola stress change after operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction,to know the influence of vola pressure change after operation of wrop-around flap. From 1996 to 2004, 23 patients after the operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction were measured the entire footprint, the vola stress of single foot and double feet on static state and walking status. There were 16 males and 7 females,with a mean age of 23.7 years (17 to 42 years). The time from operation to measuring was 1.6 to 6 years (meana 3.8 years). The results of measuring were analyzed. Whether static footprint analysis or dynamic mechanical analysis, the plantar pressure distribution of donated foot were obviously different with those of the opposite site. The weight bearing of heel and the fourth and fifth metatarsal heads were nearly consistent with normal foot. But the former feet were obviously different. The weight bearing of the first metatarsal head was obviously lower than normal foot. And the weight bearing of the second and third metatarsal heads were obviously higher than normal foot. The operation of wrop-around flap for thumb reconstruction has advantage of the cosmesis and function of the reconstructed thumbs nearly consistent with normal thumbs. But the operation influences the postoperative foot pressure.

  19. Breast reconstruction and post-mastectomy radiation practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susie A; Hiley, Crispin; Nickleach, Dana; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Andic, Fundagul; Riesterer, Oliver; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Torres, Mylin A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the perspectives and practice of radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer patients who have had breast reconstruction. In 2010, an original electronic survey was sent to all physician members of the American Society of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Research Institute-Breast Cancer Studies Group in the United Kingdom, Thai Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Swiss Society of Radiation Oncology, and Turkish Radiation Oncology Society. We identified factors associated with radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer patients with reconstruction performed prior to radiation and obtained information regarding radiation management of the breast reconstruction. 358 radiation oncologists responded, and 60% of the physicians were from the United States. While 64% of participants agree or strongly agree that breast image affects a woman’s quality of life during radiation, 57% feel that reconstruction challenges their ability to deliver effective breast radiation. Compared with other countries, treatment within the United States was associated with a high reconstruction rate (>/= 50% of mastectomy patients) prior to radiation (p < 0.05). Delayed-immediate reconstruction with a temporary tissue expander was more common in the United States than in other countries (52% vs. 23%, p = 0.01). Among physicians who treat patients with tissue expanders, the majority (60%) prefer a moderately inflated implant with 150-250 cc of fluid rather than a completely deflated (13%) or inflated expander (28%) during radiation. Among radiation oncologists who treat reconstructions, 49% never use bolus and 40% never boost a breast reconstruction. United States physicians were more likely than physicians from other countries to boost or bolus the reconstruction irrespective of the type of reconstruction seen in their clinic patients (p < 0.01). Great variation in practice is evident from our study of radiation treatment for breast

  20. Postoperative irradiation after reconstructive surgery: comparative study of radiosensitivity between free-skin grafts and skin flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Y.; Ueda, M.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.; Torii, S.; Sakuma, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects after reconstructive surgery (free-skin grafts and skin flaps) were studied in the rat, and the optimum time for irradiation was determined. The radiosensitivity of both free-skin grafts and skin flaps showed the same trend depending on time of irradiation after operation. The grafts or flaps irradiated in the hypervascular stage showed severe reactions to irradiation, whereas those irradiated in the hypovascular stage showed milder reactions in gross and microangiographic observation. Vascular damage should be given primary consideration when deciding the proper time for irradiation after reconstructive surgery. In general, free-skin grafts showed more severe reactions than skin flaps, especially in the grafts irradiated in the early stage after operation. The experimental results of this study cannot be readily transferred to a clinical setting, but they suggest that postoperative irradiation could be begun 3 to 4 weeks after operation with respect to graft or flap survival, and the results of the clinical cases almost coincide with these experimental results

  1. Reconstruction in extensive axillary Hidradenitis suppurativa with local fasciocutaneous V-Y advancement flaps

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    Sharma Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with the use of local fasciocutaneous V-Y advancement flaps in the reconstruction of 10 axillae in 6 patients for large defects following wide excision of long-standing Hidradenitis suppurativa of the axilla. The defects were closed with local V-Y subcutaneous island flaps. A single flap from the chest wall was sufficient for moderate defects. However, for larger defects, an additional flap was taken from the medial side of the ipsilateral arm. The donor defects could be closed primarily in all the patients. The local areas of the lateral chest wall and the medial side of the arm have a plentiful supply of cutaneous perforators and the flaps can be designed in a V-Y fashion without resorting to preoperative marking of the perforator. The flaps were freed sufficiently to allow adequate movement for closure of the defects. Although no attempt was made to identify the perforators specifically, many perforators were seen entering the flap. Some perforators can be safely divided to increase reach of the flap. All the flaps survived completely. A follow up of 2.5 years is presented.

  2. Safety of long-term subcutaneous free flap skin banking after skin-sparing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Ralph; Djedovic, Gabriel; Morandi, Evi Maria; Heiser, Dietmar; Rieger, Ulrich Michael; Bauer, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    A persistent problem in autologous breast reconstruction in skin-sparing mastectomies is skin restoration after skin necrosis or secondary oncological resection. As a solution to facilitate reconstruction, skin banking of free-flap skin has been proposed in cases where the overlying skin envelope must be resected, as this technique spares the patient an additional donor site. Herein, we present the largest series to date in which this method was used. We investigated its safety and the possibility of skin banking for prolonged periods of time. All skin-sparing mastectomies and immediate autologous breast reconstructions from December 2009 until June 2013 at our institution were analysed. We identified 31 patients who underwent 33 free flap reconstructions in which skin banking was performed. Our median skin banking period was 7 days, with a maximum duration of 171 days. In 22.5% of cases, the banked skin was used to reconstruct overlying skin defects, and in 9.6% of cases to reconstruct the nipple-areolar complex. Microbiological and histological investigations of the banked skin revealed neither clinical infections nor malignancies. In situ skin banking, even for prolonged periods of time, is a safe and cost-effective method to ensure that skin defects due to necrosis or secondary oncological resection can be easily reconstructed.

  3. The Use of Tensor Fascia Lata Pedicled Flap in Reconstructing Full Thickness Abdominal Wall Defects and Groin Defects Following Tumor Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifaat, M.A.; Abdel Gawad, W.S.

    2005-01-01

    The tensor fascia lata is a versatile flap with many uses in reconstructive plastic surgery. As a pedicled flap its reach to the lower abdomen and groin made it an attractive option for reconstructing soft tissue defects after tumor ablation. However, debate exists on the safe dimension of the flap, as distal tip necrosis is common. Also, the adequacy of the fascia lata as a sole substitute for abdominal wall muscles has been disputable. The aim of the current study is to report our experience and clinical observations with this flap in reconstructing those challenging defects and to discuss the possible options to minimize the latter disputable issues. Patients and Methods: From April 2001 to April 2004, 12 pedicled TFL flaps were used to reconstruct 5 central abdominal wall full thickness defects and 6 groin soft tissue defects following tumor resection. ]n one case, bilateral flaps were used to reconstruct a large central abdominal wall defect. There were 4 males and 7 females. Their age ranged from 19 to 60. From the abdominal wall defects group, all repairs were enforced primarily with a prolene mesh except for one patient who was the first in this study. Patients presenting with groin defects required coverage of exposed vessels following tumor resection. All patients in the current study underwent immediate reconstruction. The resulting soft tissue defects in this study were due to resection of 4 abdominal wall desmoid tumors, a colonic carcinoma infiltrating the abdominal wall, 4 primary groin soft developed in a flap used to cover a groin defect. In the former 3 cases, The flap was simply transposed without complete islanding of the flap. In the latter case, a very large flap was harvested beyond the safe limits with its distal edge just above the knee. In addition, wound dehiscence of the flap occurred in 2 other cases from the groin group. Nevertheless, all the wounds healed spontaneously with repeated dressings. Out of the 5 cases that underwent

  4. Reconstruction of the columella and the tip of the nose with an island-shaped forehead flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulović Dejan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posttraumatic and postoperative defects of columella and the tip of the nose are difficult to reconstruct. There are several operative methods described in the literature, and many of them are step-by-step procedures with long duration. The aim of this study was to present one-step procedure for reconstruction of the columella and the tip of the nose with island-shaped arterial forehead flap. Case report. A 45-year old man was submitted to surgical excision of basocellular skin cancer. After the excision, a defect of the columella and tip of the nose the remained, 3 × 2.5 cm in dimensions, with exposed alar cartilages. During the same operation, the defect was covered with an island-shaped arterial forehead flap. Postoperative one-year course was uneventful, without signs of tumor recurrence after one year, and further surgical corrections were unnecessary. Conclusion. Considering the results of our operative technique, we believe that middle island-shaped forehead flap is suitable for reconstruction of the columella and the tip of the nose, due to the following reasons: safe vascularization of flap, similarity of the transferred tissue with the excised one, the procedure is completed in one step, simple surgical technique and uncomplicated healing of a flap-harvesting site.

  5. Combination of Nasolabial V-Y Advancement Flap and Glabellar Subcutaneous Pedicled Flap for Reconstruction of Medial Canthal Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Matsuda

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of a right medial canthal tumor, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a basal cell carcinoma. After removal of the tumor with a 4-mm safety margin, the defect occupied the areas superior and inferior to the medial canthal tendon. We first reconstructed the lower part of the defect using a nasolabial V-Y advancement flap to make an elliptic defect in the upper part. We then created a glabellar subcutaneous pedicled flap to match the residual upper elliptic defect with the major axis set along a relaxed skin tension line. The pedicled glabellar flap was passed through a subcutaneous tunnel to the upper residual defect. At 6 months postoperatively, the patient showed no tumor recurrence and a good cosmetic outcome.

  6. Versatility of the Angularis Oris Axial Pattern Flap for Facial Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losinski, Sara L; Stanley, Bryden J; Schallberger, Sandra P; Nelson, Laura L; Towle Millard, Heather A M

    2015-11-01

    To describe the versatility of the axial pattern flap based on the cutaneous perforating branch of the angularis oris artery for reconstruction of large facial defects in dogs, including complications and clinical outcomes. Retrospective clinical case series. Client-owned dogs (n = 8). Facial flaps (n = 9) based at the commissure of the lip with a caudodorsal orientation were utilized, with established anatomical borders. Flaps were elevated deep to the panniculus carnosus in a caudal to rostral direction, preserving the angularis oris artery, its cutaneous perforator, and surrounding cutaneous vasculature. Flaps were rotated dorsally or ventrally to cover the defect. Primary closure of the donor site was by direct apposition in all cases. Angularis oris axial pattern flaps were most commonly used to close large defects of the nasomaxillary area rostral to the eyes (6 dogs), followed by orbital (2) and intermandibular (1) defects. Defects occurred because of tumor resection (6 dogs), trauma (2), and a chronic, non-healing wounding (1). All flaps healed with acceptable functional and cosmetic outcomes without major complications. Followup ranged from 10 days to 16 months. Minor postoperative complications included flap edema (8 dogs), partial incisional dehiscence (3), distal tip necrosis (2), and oroantral fistula recurrence (1). Angularis oris axial pattern flaps provided hirsute, full-thickness skin coverage of a variety of large facial defects with minor complications, and should be considered when restructuring large defects of the rostral face or chin. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. THE CHIMERIC ALT-VASTUS LATERALIS FREE FLAP IN RECONSTRUCTION OF ADVANCED BRONJ OF THE MAXILLA

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    Francesca Toia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ is a dangerous complication of bisphosphonates, a class of pharmaceutical agents used in numerous bone disorders. No gold standard therapy exists, but recent literature suggests that, in advanced stages, the best results are achieved with aggressive debridement. In this paper, we report our experience of treatment of stage 3 BRONJ of the maxilla with extensive surgical debridement and reconstruction with a chimeric ALT-Vastus lateralis flap. Methods Five selected patients with stage 3 BRONJ underwent partial maxillectomy with disease-free margins followed by immediate reconstruction with a chimeric ALT-Vastus lateralis free flap. Results Only two patients experienced minor complications. All other patients healed uneventfully within two weeks and donor site morbidity was minimal. Conclusions Our data suggest that aggressive debridement and reconstruction with a chimeric ALT -Vastus lateralis flap is an effective option for the treatment of stage III BRONJ of the maxilla.

  8. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  9. MR imaging appearances of soft tissue flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerkurth, Olaf [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Baden, Baden (Switzerland); Girish, Gandikota; Jacobson, Jon A.; Kim, Sung Moon; Brigido, Monica; Dong, Qian; Jamadar, David A. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2015-02-15

    MR imaging appearances of different types of reconstructive muscle flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity with associated post-surgical changes due to altered anatomy, radiation, and potential complications, can be challenging. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to tumors allows for limb salvage therapy in a majority of the patients. Decision-making for specific types of soft tissue reconstruction is based on the body region affected, as well as the size and complexity of the defect. Hematomas and infections are early complications that can jeopardize flap viability. The local recurrence of a tumor within six months after a complete resection with confirmed tumor-free margins and adjuvant radiation therapy is rare. Identification of a new lesion similar to the initial tumor favors a finding of tumor recurrence.

  10. Results from the ASPIRE study for breast reconstruction utilizing the AeroForm™ patient controlled carbon dioxide-inflated tissue expanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tony F

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy is often indicated for women with breast cancer, or for those at a high risk of developing cancer due to familial history or genetic mutations. Favorable aesthetic and psychological results make prosthetic reconstruction of the breast with placement of tissue expanders followed by permanent implant a popular choice for women diagnosed with breast cancer. This study describes the results of the ASPIRE trial, the objective of which was to provide supportive data to demonstrate the performance and safety of the AeroForm™ System in a population with broader selection criteria than previous studies. Results of the earlier PACE clinical studies (PACE 1 and 2) demonstrated that the AeroForm™ System could be used safely and effectively to achieve the desired expansion necessary for successful breast reconstruction. In the current ASPIRE trial described in the paper, performance of the device was evaluated by successful tissue expansion and exchange to breast implant(s) unless precluded by a non-device related event. Safety data was evaluated based on reported adverse events. A prospective, single center, open-label study in which subjects who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate were enrolled and implanted with the AeroForm expander either at the time of mastectomy (immediate) or sometime after mastectomy (delayed). In the event of a bilateral procedure, the expander was implanted in each side. Subjects were followed until the explant of the tissue expander(s) and exchange for silicone or saline breast implant(s). Thirty-four expanders were placed in 21 subjects in the clinical trial; the average age of subjects was 49.7 ± 8.6 years with average BMI of 26.1 ± 4.7. Bilateral procedures accounted for 62% of the total and 88% of the reconstructions were completed with a latissimus dorsi flap (anterior approach) per the investigators standard procedure. Four (12%) of the cases (12%) were completed in two subjects

  11. Reconstruction of the lower vermilion with a musculomucosal flap from the upper lip in the repair of extensive lower lip and chin defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Li; Lan, Shi-Jie; Zhang, Duo; Wang, Wang-Shu; Liu, Chao; Peng, Wei-Hai

    2014-09-01

    In the repair of extensive lower lip and chin defects, the reconstruction of vermilion at the same time is a great challenge to plastic surgeons. We describe a novel method for the reconstruction of lower vermilion with musculomucosal flap from the upper lip in the repair of extensive lower lip and chin defects. Two patients underwent extensive lower lip and chin reconstruction together with vermilion reconstruction. This technique used 3 basic components: musculomucosal flap from the upper lip, buccal mucosal advancement flap, and cutaneous rotational flap from the neck. All the flaps survived without significant complications. Labial function in the motions of expression and speaking was maintained. The patients could basically close their mouths completely, and there were no drooping or small-mouth deformities postoperatively. Functional and cosmetically acceptable lower-lip and chin reconstructions in both patients were achieved.

  12. Sinonasal outcomes following endoscopic anterior skull base surgery with nasoseptal flap reconstruction: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M; Patel, P M; Betz, C; Olson, S; Panizza, B; Wallwork, B

    2015-07-01

    To assess nasal morbidity resulting from nasoseptal flap use in the repair of skull base defects in endoscopic anterior skull base surgery. Thirty-six patients awaiting endoscopic anterior skull base surgery were prospectively recruited. A nasoseptal flap was used for reconstruction in all cases. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and 90 days post-operatively via the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 questionnaire and visual analogue scales for nasal obstruction, pain, secretions and smell; endoscopic examination findings and mucociliary clearance times were also recorded. Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 questionnaire data and visual analogue scale scores for pain, smell and secretions showed no significant differences between pre- and post-operative outcomes, with visual analogue scale scores for nasal obstruction actually showing a significant improvement (p = 0.0007). A significant deterioration for both flap and non-flap sides was demonstrated post-operatively on endoscopic examination (p = 0.002 and p = 0.02 respectively). Whilst elevation of a nasoseptal flap in endoscopic surgery of the anterior skull base engendered significant clinical deterioration on examination post-operatively, quality of life outcomes showed that no such deterioration was subjectively experienced by the patient. In fact, there was significant nasal airway improvement following nasoseptal flap reconstruction.

  13. The Boomerang-shaped Pectoralis Major Musculocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction of Circular Defect of Cervical Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Shuchi; Arikawa, Masaki; Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2017-11-01

    We report on a patient with a recurrence of oral cancer involving a cervical lymph node. The patient's postexcision cervical skin defect was nearly circular in shape, and the size was about 12 cm in diameter. The defect was successfully reconstructed with a boomerang-shaped pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap whose skin paddle included multiple intercostal perforators of the internal mammary vessels. This flap design is effective for reconstructing an extensive neck skin defect and enables primary closure of the donor site with minimal deformity.

  14. Review of nipple reconstruction techniques and introduction of v to y technique in a bilateral wise pattern mastectomy or reduction mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Charles A; Zeiderman, Matthew R; Chowdhry, Saeed; Wilhelmi, Bradon J

    2015-01-01

    Nipple-areola complex reconstruction (NAR) is the final procedure in breast reconstruction after the majority of mastectomies. Many methods of NAR have been described, each with inherent advantages and disadvantages depending on local healthy tissue availability, previous scarring and procedures, and the operative morbidity of the NAR technique. Nipple reconstructions may be complicated by scars or previous nipple reconstruction, making the procedure more challenging. We propose the use of the V-Y advancement flap as a new method that is suitable for both novice and experienced surgeons wishing to broaden their range of techniques for difficult nipple reconstructions. A traditional V-Y advancement flap is lifted at the site of the future nipple. Mastectomy scars from prior mastectomy, mammoplasty, or nipple reconstruction can be incorporated into the flap. The flap is folded caudally upon itself and the secondary defect at the apex of the flap is linearly closed. At 6-month postoperative evaluation, adequate nipple projection and patient satisfaction were achieved with this method. The V-Y advancement flap is a suitable method for achieving satisfactory results when faced with challenging NAR. The method is easy to perform, reproducible, has low operative morbidity, and incorporates previous wise pattern mastectomy or mammaplasty scars into the newly reconstructed nipple, thereby decreasing new scar formation on the breast and leading to favorable cosmetic results.

  15. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  16. Giant desmoid tumour of the thorax following latissimus dorsi and implant breast reconstruction: case report and review of the literature

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, AM

    2017-03-01

    The case of a giant thoracic desmoid tumour in a 44-year-old woman, who presented two years following a breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi (LD) flap and implant, is reported. Clinical findings included a rapidly growing, painless mass. Computed tomography (CT) suggested skin and intercostal soft tissue invasion. The tumour was resected en bloc with the LD muscle, implant capsule and underlying rib segments. The resultant thoracic and abdominal wall defects were reconstructed with Dualmesh® and polypropylene meshes respectively. There was no evidence of recurrence at thirty-six months follow-up.

  17. Modern use of smartphone applications in the perioperative management in microsurgical breast reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren Matthew; Marsh, Daniel; Chow, Whitney T.H.; Vickers, Tobias; Khan, Lubna; Miller, George S.; Hunter-Smith, David J.; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advances in mobile telecommunication, improved mobile internet and affordability have led to a significant increase in smartphone use within medicine. The capability of instant messaging, photography, videography, word processing, drawing and internet access allow significant potential in this small portable device. Smartphone use within medicine has grown tremendously worldwide given its affordability, improved internet and capabilities. Methods We have searched for apps specifically helpful in the perioperative care of microsurgical breast reconstructive patients. Results The useful apps have been subdivided: (I) communication apps—multimedia messaging, WhatsApp, PicSafeMedi: allow efficient communication via text, picture and video messages leading to earlier assessment and definitive management of free flaps; (II) storage apps—Notability, Elogbook: electronic storage of patient notes and logbooks of case which can be shared with others if required; (III) educational apps—FlapApp, Touch Surgery, PubMed on tap: step by step guides to surgical procedures to aid learning and medical journal database; (IV) flap monitoring app—SilpaRamanitor: free flap monitoring app based on photographic analysis for earlier detection of compromised flaps. Conclusions There has been remarkable growth in smartphones use among surgeons. Apps are being developed for every conceivable use. The future will be in wearable smart devices that allow continuous monitoring with the potential to instigate change should deviations from the norm occur. The smart watch is the start of this digital revolution. PMID:27047783

  18. Flap monitoring after head and neck reconstruction: evaluating an observation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, J C; Potter, L A; Magennis, P; Brown, J S; Vaughan, E D

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the postoperative free-flap monitoring frequency protocol used in a maxillofacial unit for patients receiving free-tissue transfer for reconstruction following orofacial cancer. All free-tissue transfers undertaken in the unit between January 1992 and October 1998 were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 370 patients evaluated, 46 returned to theatre with compromised free flaps. The compromise was purely venous in origin in 37 of these cases, arterial in three and due to a combination of arterial and venous problems in six. Thirty-five of the flaps were successfully salvaged. On average, the clinical manifestation of the problem occurred 25.5 hours postoperatively. However, there was a significant time difference between flaps that were salvaged successfully and those that were not: in the salvaged group the compromise was identified 17.5 hours postsurgery compared with 51 hours for the unsuccessful group. The timing of the return to theatre following the identification of the compromise was a significant factor in the success rate: 71 minutes for those salvaged and 103 minutes for those not salvaged. It is recommended that flaps are monitored hourly for the first 72 postoperative hours and observations recorded on a chart.

  19. Scapular tip and latissimus dorsi osteomyogenous free flap for the reconstruction of a maxillectomy defect: A minimally invasive transaxillary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Joon; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Ahn, Soon-Hyun

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a novel, minimally invasive transaxillary approach for harvesting the scapular tip and latissimus dorsi osteomyogenous free flap for the reconstruction of a maxillectomy defect. A retrospective case series study of 4 patients who underwent reconstruction using a scapular tip composite free flap through the transaxillary approach was conducted. The data (age, sex, pathology, previous treatment and adjuvant treatment) were collected and analysed. Total operation time, number of hospital days and the cosmetic and functional outcome of reconstruction were analysed. Two male and two female patients were enrolled in this study. The patients' ages ranged from 52 to 59 years. All the patients had maxillectomy defects, with at least a classification of Okay type II, which were successfully reconstructed using a scapular tip and latissimus dorsi free flap through a minimally invasive transaxillary approach. The entire operation time for the primary tumour surgery and reconstruction ranged from 6.2 to 12.1 h (mean, 11.1 h). The average length of the hospital stay was 13 days (range, 10-16 days). No major donor site morbidity was observed, and there was no graft failure that required revision or exploration surgery. The minimally invasive transaxillary approach for harvesting the scapular tip and latissimus dorsi osteomyogenous free flap for the reconstruction of maxillectomy defect is a promising approach for more favourable functional and aesthetic outcomes when compared to the use of other bone containing free flaps and the classic approach for harvesting scapular tip and latissimus dorsi free flap. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prosthetic breast reconstruction: indications and update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Tam T.; Miller, George S.; Rostek, Marie; Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite 82% of patients reporting psychosocial improvement following breast reconstruction, only 33% patients choose to undergo surgery. Implant reconstruction outnumbers autologous reconstruction in many centres. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. Inclusion required: (I) Meta-analyses or review articles; (II) adult patients aged 18 years or over undergoing alloplastic breast reconstruction; (III) studies including outcome measures; (IV) case series with more than 10 patients; (V) English language; and (VI) publication after 1st January, 2000. Results After full text review, analysis and data extraction was conducted for a total of 63 articles. Definitive reconstruction with an implant can be immediate or delayed. Older patients have similar or even lower complication rates to younger patients. Complications include capsular contracture, hematoma and infection. Obesity, smoking, large breasts, diabetes and higher grade tumors are associated with increased risk of wound problems and reconstructive failure. Silicone implant patients have higher capsular contracture rates but have higher physical and psychosocial function. There were no associations made between silicone implants and cancer or systemic disease. There were no differences in outcomes or complications between round and shaped implants. Textured implants have a lower risk of capsular contracture than smooth implants. Smooth implants are more likely to be displaced as well as having higher rates of infection. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) gives the best aesthetic outcome if radiotherapy is not required but has a higher rate of capsular contracture and implant failure. Delayed-immediate reconstruction patients can achieve similar aesthetic results to IBR whilst preserving the breast skin if radiotherapy is required. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) patients have fewer complications than IBR patients. Conclusions Implant reconstruction is a safe and popular

  1. The Boomerang-shaped Pectoralis Major Musculocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction of Circular Defect of Cervical Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchi Azuma, MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. We report on a patient with a recurrence of oral cancer involving a cervical lymph node. The patient’s postexcision cervical skin defect was nearly circular in shape, and the size was about 12 cm in diameter. The defect was successfully reconstructed with a boomerang-shaped pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap whose skin paddle included multiple intercostal perforators of the internal mammary vessels. This flap design is effective for reconstructing an extensive neck skin defect and enables primary closure of the donor site with minimal deformity.

  2. BREAST RECONSTRUCTIONS AFTER BREAST CANCER TREATING

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Vrabič

    2018-01-01

    Background. Breasts are an important symbol of physical beauty, feminity, mothering and sexual desire through the entire history of mankind. Lost of the whole or part of the breast is functional and aesthetic disturbance for woman. It is understandable, that the woman, who is concerned over breast loss, is as appropriate as another person´s concern over the loss of a limb or other body part. Before the 1960, breast reconstruction was considered as a dangerous procedure and it was almost prohi...

  3. Experience with peroneus brevis muscle flaps for reconstruction of distal leg and ankle defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Bajantri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peroneus brevis is a muscle in the leg which is expendable without much functional deficit. The objective of this study was to find out its usefulness in coverage of the defects of the lower leg and ankle. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the use of 39 pedicled peroneus brevis muscle flaps used for coverage of defects of the lower leg and ankle between November 2010 and December 2012 was carried out. The flaps were proximally based for defects of the lower third of the leg in 12 patients and distally based for reconstruction of defects of the ankle in 26 patients, with one patient having flaps on both ankles. Results: Partial flap loss in critical areas was found in four patients requiring further flap cover and in non-critical areas in two patients, which were managed with a skin graft. Three of the four critical losses occurred when we used it for covering defects over the medial malleolus. There was no complete flap loss in any of the patients. Conclusion: This flap has a unique vascular pattern and fails to fit into the classification of the vasculature of muscles by Mathes and Nahai. The unusual feature is an axial vessel system running down the deep aspect of the muscle and linking the perforators from the peroneal artery and anterior tibial artery, which allows it to be raised proximally or distally on a single perforator. The flap is simple to raise and safe for the reconstruction of small-to moderate-sized skin defects of the distal third of the tibia and all parts of the ankle except the medial malleolus, which is too far from the pedicle of the distally based flap. The donor site can be closed primarily to provide a linear scar. The muscle flap thins with time to provide a good result aesthetically at the primary defect.

  4. Median forehead flap - beyond classic indication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian R. Jecan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paramedian forehead flap is one of the best options for reconstruction of the median upper two-thirds of the face due to its vascularity, color, texture match and ability to resurface all or part of the reconstructed area. The forehead flap is the gold standard for nasal soft tissue reconstruction and the flap of choice for larger cutaneous nasal defects having a robust pedicle and large amount of tissue. Materials and Methods. We are reporting a clinical series of cutaneous tumors involving the nose, medial canthus, upper and lower eyelid through a retrospective review of 6 patients who underwent surgical excision of the lesion and primary reconstruction using a paramedian forehead flap. Results. The forehead flap was used for total nose reconstruction, eyelids and medial canthal reconstruction. All flaps survived completely and no tumor recurrence was seen in any of the patients. Cosmetic and functional results were favorable. Conclusions. The forehead flap continues to be one of the best options for nose reconstruction and for closure of surgical defects of the nose larger than 2 cm. Even though is not a gold standard, median forehead flap can be an advantageous technique in periorbital defects reconstruction.

  5. The clinical course of immediate breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Friis, Søren; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    The number of women suitable for breast conserving treatment as well as immediate reconstruction after breast cancer has been increasing, and studies of complications hereafter are needed.......The number of women suitable for breast conserving treatment as well as immediate reconstruction after breast cancer has been increasing, and studies of complications hereafter are needed....

  6. Immediate breast reconstruction using autologous skin graft associated with breast implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, A K; Andrade, W P; Carvalho, S M T; Makdissi, F B A; Yoshimatsu, E K; Domingues, M C; Maciel, M S

    2012-02-01

    Immediate breast reconstruction with skin graft is still little mentioned in the literature. Follow-up studies regarding the technique aspects are particularly scarce. The objective was to detail immediate breast reconstruction using autologous skin graft. Patients (n = 49) who underwent mastectomies and autologous immediate breast reconstruction with skin graft associated with a breast implant at A. C. Camargo Hospital (São Paulo, Brazil) between January 2007 and July 2010 were included. Information on clinical data, technique details and clinical outcome were prospectively collected. Following mastectomy, the autologous full-thickness skin graft was obtained through an inframammary fold incision along the contralateral breast in most patients. The skin graft was placed on the surface of the pectoralis major muscle after adjustments to conform to the mastectomy defect. A minimum of 10-month follow-up period was established. Patients' age ranged from 35 to 55 years and all received a silicone gel textured surface implant to obtain the necessary breast mound. The mean surgical time was 45 min, and the mean amount of skin resection was 4.5 cm in the largest diameter. Follow-up ranged from 10 to 35 months (median 23). All patients had silicone-gel textured surface implants to perform the breast mound reconstruction. No complications were observed in 87.8% of reconstructions. Forty-six patients (94%) had no complaints about the donor-site aesthetics. The result was a breast mound with a central ellipse of healed skin graft. Three (6%) poor results were observed. Thirty-six patients (67%) reported the results as good or very good. Our results lead us to conclude that autologous skin graft provided a reliable option in immediate breast reconstruction to skin-sparing mastectomy defects. The technique accomplished a single-stage implant breast reconstruction when there is inadequate skin coverage. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and

  7. RIB FRACTURE AFTER BREAST RECONSTRUCTION WITH TISSUE EXPANDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast reconstruction with tissue expansion and later exchange with prosthesis is one of the most common methods for breast reconstruction. Women that are not appropriate for reconstruction with autologous tissue, women that have small breast or have a positive family history for breast cancer are most suitable for this type of reconstruction. Surgical technique of tissue expansion is relatively easy. Complications are rarely seen. With this case report we want to show the common, although occult existence of skeletal deformities in thorax after breast tissue expansion that may lead to rib fractures.

  8. Modified Design of Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Pharyngolaryngectomy Reconstruction: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Yen; Chen, Cha-Chun; Lin, Hwang-Chi; Jeng, Chu-Hsu; Lin, Shang-Hsi; Chen, Wei-Nung Jim; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Hao, Sheng-Po

    2018-07-01

    Defects after total pharyngolaryngectomy for hypopharyngeal cancer often require reconstruction via free tissue transfer. Recently, anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has become the gold standard in many centers because of its advantages with respect to versatility, minimal donor-site morbidity, good speech quality, and relatively low fistula and anastomotic leakage rates. Moreover, ALT allows 2 surgical teams to work simultaneously. However, the height of the parallelogram in the ALT design for neoesophagus reconstruction is usually set at a minimum of 9.4 cm (circumference, 2πr) for smooth food passage. Because this height exceeds 8 cm, the donor site may not be closed primarily, which highly depends on the patient's body habitus and the skin tone or quality and requires other methods, such as local flap or skin graft for wound closure, which subsequently increase operating time and donor-site complication rate. Thus, we aimed to construct a simple and modified ALT design that will not only include the advantages described earlier but also provide adequate donor-site primary closure without jeopardizing complication rates. Ten patients with hypopharyngeal cancer underwent reconstructive surgery using our modified ALT design after total pharyngolaryngectomy between 2010 and 2017. Our modified ALT design converts this "classical" shape into a parallelogram so that the height of the modified design is always less than 8 cm, thus allowing for easy primary closure of the wound. The donor-site defects of all 10 patients were closed primarily. No donor-site complications and partial or total flap loss were observed. One patient experienced persistent wound infection with dehiscence, for which debridement was performed. The stricture and fistula rates were 10% (n = 1) and 20% (n = 2), respectively. The mean follow-up time is approximately 1 year. Minimizing donor-site morbidity is an important goal in reconstructive surgery. Our modified ALT flap design is simple, enabling

  9. Health-related quality of life, surgical and aesthetic outcomes following microvascular free flap reconstructions: an 8-year institutional review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, RT; Butler, JS; Murphy, SM; Cronin, KJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Microvascular free flap reconstruction has revolutionised the reconstruction of complex defects of traumatic, oncological, congenital and infectious aetiologies. Complications of microvascular free flap procedures impact negatively on patient post-operative course and outcome. METHODS We performed a retrospective analysis of 102 consecutive patients undergoing 108 free flap procedures at a tertiary referral centre over an 8-year period. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors pRedictive of free flap complications. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and aesthetic outcomes were assessed using the Short Form 36 questionnaire and a satisfaction visual analogue scale respectively. RESULTS In total, 108 free tissue transfers were performed; 23% were fasciocutaneous free flaps, 69% musculocutaneous and 8% osteoseptocutaneous. The overall flap success rate was 92.6%. Over a third of patients (34.3%) had flap-related complications ranging from minor wound dehiscence to total flap loss. ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≥2 (OR: 16.9, 95% CI: 15.3–18.1, pprocedure to restore functionality and quality of life for patients. PMID:22524928

  10. Safety of long-term subcutaneous free flap skin banking after skin-sparing mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Verstappen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background A persistent problem in autologous breast reconstruction in skin-sparing mastectomies is skin restoration after skin necrosis or secondary oncological resection. As a solution to facilitate reconstruction, skin banking of free-flap skin has been proposed in cases where the overlying skin envelope must be resected, as this technique spares the patient an additional donor site. Herein, we present the largest series to date in which this method was used. We investigated its safety and the possibility of skin banking for prolonged periods of time. Methods All skin-sparing mastectomies and immediate autologous breast reconstructions from December 2009 until June 2013 at our institution were analysed. Results We identified 31 patients who underwent 33 free flap reconstructions in which skin banking was performed. Our median skin banking period was 7 days, with a maximum duration of 171 days. In 22.5% of cases, the banked skin was used to reconstruct overlying skin defects, and in 9.6% of cases to reconstruct the nipple-areolar complex. Microbiological and histological investigations of the banked skin revealed neither clinical infections nor malignancies. Conclusions In situ skin banking, even for prolonged periods of time, is a safe and cost-effective method to ensure that skin defects due to necrosis or secondary oncological resection can be easily reconstructed.

  11. Axillary Reconstruction for Hidradenitis Suppurativa with an Inner-Arm Transposition Flap Creating a Brachioplasty Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Ching

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHidradenitis suppurativa (HS is a chronic skin condition that can affect any area with apocrine sweat glands and has the potential to involve multiple sites concurrently. Commonly affected sites include the axilla, groin, perineum and perianal areas. In this study we performed a literature review on the surgical methods for HS and describe an innovative technique for reconstructing axilla HS using an inner-arm transposition flap.MethodsWe reviewed all cases (5 cases from 4 patients of transposition flap reconstruction performed by the senior author at a single London tertiary hospital from 2008–2013. Patient related outcome measures were collected using the Derriford appearance scale (DAS 24 and a study specific questionnaire.ResultsAll patients were satisfied with their final result. One out of five cases had a complication but did not result in flap failure. There is no disease recurrence to date. DAS 24 scores collected demonstrated acceptable postoperative distress that did not deviate far from the norm tables while study specific questionnaire reveal desirable outcomes.ConclusionsWe have managed to achieve our aim through the use of the innovative inner-arm transposition flap. Our study hopes to provide an additional technique for axillary reconstruction. This technique offers the effective concealment of scars with the benefit of tightening of the arm tissue producing ‘brachioplasty like’ effects. All things considered it would be reasonable to conclude the innovative flap technique is a reliable, effective, and simple method that results in multiple benefits.

  12. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch to improve appearance of reconstructed fingers: Anatomical and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lin-Feng; Ju, Ji-Hui; Liu, Yue-Fei; Lan, Bo; Hou, Rui-Xing

    2018-02-01

    To investigate blood supply features of the flap based on the plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery, and the treatment of outcomes of reconstructed fingers by the plantar digital artery arch branch island flap. Eight fresh foot specimens were employed with red emulsion infusion and microdissection. The vascular organization was observed in the second toe, such as initiation site, the course, and the number of the plantar digital artery arch branch. There were 15 fingers of 13 patients (8 males and 5 females) with finger defects accompanied by toe transfer, using the plantar digital artery arch branch flap inserted in the neck of the second toe to correct the appearance defect caused by a narrow "neck" and a bulbous tip. The intact plantar digital arches were identified in all specimens. The plantar digital artery arch had 5 branches. The range of external diameter of the arch branch was 0.4-0.6 mm. All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and the reconstructed fingers survived. These cases were conducted with a follow-up period for 3-18 months (average, 9 months). All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and reconstructed fingers demonstrated a satisfactory appearance and favorable sense function. The reconstructed finger-tip characteristic was good, with no obvious scar hyperplasia. The range of flexion and extension of reconstructed fingers was favorable as well. The plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery possess regular vasa vasorum and abundant vascularity. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch is an ideal selection for plastic surgery of reconstructed fingers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteocutaneous Free Fibular Flap for Anatomical Reconstruction of the Mandible Following Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of microvascular free tissue transfer has revolutionized the current approaches for mandible reconstruction. It allowed one stage reconstruction of complex bony and soft tissue defects with high reliability. This study presents our experience using vascularized free fibular graft for reconstruction of different anatomical mandibular defects following tumor ablation. Methods: This study involves a total of 16 patients who were treated over 3-year period at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. All patients underwent mandibular resection and immediate reconstruction using free fibula osteocutaneous flap. Mandibular resections were performed due to either primary mandibular tumors, or tumors directly invading the mandible from adjacent areas. The extent of mandibular involvement by tumor was preoperatively assessed by X-ray panoramic view and CT scan. Mandibular defects were classified according to HCL system where H defects are lateral defect of any length including the condyle, L defects are the same without condyle and C defects represent the central segment between the mental foramina. The success rate, recipient vessels used, complications and functional as well as cosmetic outcome will be discussed. Results: Of sixteen patients, ten were males and 6 were females. The age ranged from 4 to 68 years. Five patients had preoperative chemotherapy; two had radiation therapy, while six patients received postoperative radiation therapy. All patients had preoperative histological diagnosis; squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histology. Mandibular defects consisted of central segment (3 C), lateral defect (9 L) and 4 patients with H defects. The skin island was used to provide inner mucosal lining in II patients and as external monitor in 5 patients. The free flap was successful in 13 patients. There were 3 complete free flap necrosis; all were due to venous thromboses. Salvage surgery was attempted in all failing flaps, however, it was

  14. Ten-year experience of superior gluteal artery perforator flap for reconstruction of sacral defects in Tri-Service General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ta Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, sacral sores continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP flap is a reliable flap that preserves the entire contralateral side as a future donor site. On the ipsilateral side, the gluteal muscle itself is preserved and all flaps based on the inferior gluteal artery are still possible. However, the dissection of the perforator is tedious and carries a risk of compromising the perforator vessels. Patients and Methods: During the period between April 2003 and March 2013, 30 patients presented to our section with sacral wounds causing by pressure sores or infected pilonidal cysts. Of a total of 30 patients, 13 were female and 17 were male. Their ages ranged from 22 to 92 years old (mean 79.8 years old. Surgical intervention was performed electively with immediate or delayed reconstruction using a SGAP flap. The characteristics of patients′ age, and sex, and cause of sacral defect, co-morbidities, wound culture, flap size, perforator number, hospital stay, and outcome were reviewed. Results: For all operations, the length of the pedicle dissection will not exceed 1 cm because of the vascular anatomy of the SGAP, which lies adjacent to the sacral region. Due to short pedicle dissection, all SGAP flap were elevated around an hour. All flaps survived except two, which had partial flap necrosis and were finally treated by contralateral V-Y advancement flaps coverage. The mean follow-up period was 14.8 months (range 3-24. No flap surgery-related mortality was found. Conclusion: Perforator-based flaps have become popular in modern reconstructive surgery because of low donor site morbidity and good preservation of muscle. Our study shows that deep pedicle dissection is unnecessary when the surgery involves an accurate indicating perforator, adequate flap size design, and correct selection of flap utilization between tunnel and rotation. The

  15. Acellular dermal matrix based nipple reconstruction: A modified technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Vidya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nipple areolar reconstruction (NAR has evolved with the advancement in breast reconstruction and can improve self-esteem and, consequently, patient satisfaction. Although a variety of reconstruction techniques have been described in the literature varying from nipple sharing, local flaps to alloplastic and allograft augmentation, over time, loss of nipple projection remains a major problem. Acellular dermal matrices (ADM have revolutionised breast reconstruction more recently. We discuss the use of ADM to act as a base plate and strut to give support to the base and offer nipple bulk and projection in a primary procedure of NAR with a local clover shaped dermal flap in 5 breasts (4 patients. We used 5-point Likert scales (1 = highly unsatisfied, 5 = highly satisfied to assess patient satisfaction. Median age was 46 years (range: 38–55 years. Nipple projection of 8 mm, 7 mm, and 7 mms were achieved in the unilateral cases and 6 mm in the bilateral case over a median 18 month period. All patients reported at least a 4 on the Likert scale. We had no post-operative complications. It seems that nipple areolar reconstruction [NAR] using ADM can achieve nipple projection which is considered aesthetically pleasing for patients.

  16. Oromandibular reconstruction with chimeric double-skin paddle flap based on peroneal vessel axis for synchronous opposite double oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Tsai; Liu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Synchronous double oral cancer represents the minority of cases of head and neck cancer. After tumor ablation, 2 separate oromandibular defects, even combined with a through-and-through oral defect, pose a serious reconstructive challenge. The ideal method for reconstruction remains controversial. Based on the peroneal vessel axis, a chimeric double-skin paddle peroneal fasciocutaneous or fibular osteomyocutaneous flap could be designed to accomplish the difficult reconstruction. Six male patients, each with 2 separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, received double-skin paddle flap reconstruction with 3 peroneal fasciocutaneous and 3 fibular osteomyocutaneous flaps. All 6 flaps survived; however, complications included 1 skin paddle lost due to insufficient perfusion of a visible perforator, and 1 superficial necrosis occurring over the tip of a longer skin paddle. One postoperative intraoral infection and 1 donor site infection were also reported. During follow-up, 3 months later, 1 patient succumbed to local recurrence and bony metastasis. One patient developed a new cancer in the maxillary gingiva, and another had osteoradionecrosis 8 months later. Four patients gained acceptable cosmesis with good oral competence. A chimeric flap based on the peroneal artery could provide a segment of fibular bone, 1 or 2 skin paddles, and a cuff of the flexor hallucis longus muscle simultaneously. For 1-stage reconstruction of separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, this design could provide all components at 1 transfer.

  17. Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmich, L.R.; During, M.; Henriksen, T.F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women......We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women...

  18. [CLINICAL APPLICATION AND EXPERIENCE IN RECONSTRUCTION OF SOFT TISSUE DEFECTS FOLLOWING MALIGNANT TUMOR REMOVAL OF LIMBS USING PERFORATOR PROPELLER FLAPS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shan; Liu, Yuanbo; Yu, Shengji; Zang, Mengqing; Zhao, Zhenguo; Xu, Libin; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Bo; Ding, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    To explore the feasibility and technical essentials of soft tissue defect reconstruction following malignant tumor removal of limbs using perforator propeller flaps. Between July 2008 and July 2015, 19 patients with malignant limb tumor underwent defect reconstruction following tumor removal using the perforator propeller flaps. There were 13 males and 6 females with an average age of 53.4 years (range, 20-82 years). The disease duration ranged from 1 to 420 months (mean, 82 months). The tumors located at the thigh in 10 cases, at the leg in 2 cases, at the arm in 1 case, at the forearm in 1 case, around the knee in 2 cases, and around the elbow joint in 3 cases. Totally 23 flaps (from 8 cm x 3 cm to 30 cm x 13 cm in size) were used to reconstruct defects (from 4 cm x 4 cm to 24 cm x 16 cm in size). The potential source arteries included the femoral artery (n = 2), profunda femoral artery (n = 3), superficial circumflex iliac artery (n = 1), lateral circumflex femoral artery (n = 6), superior lateral genicular artery (n = 2), peroneal artery (n = 2), anterior tibial artery (n = 1), brachial artery (n = 4), and radial artery (n = 1). The remaining one was a free style perforator flap. Partial distal flap necrosis occurred in 3 cases after surgery with rotation angles of 180, 150, and 100 degrees respectively, which were reconstructed after debridement using a free-style perforator flap in 1 case and using free skin grafting in the other 2 cases. The other 20 flaps survived completely after surgery. Primary healing of incisions was obtained at the donor and recipient sites. There was no severe complication such as infection, hematoma, and total flap failure. All patients were followed up 3 months to 5 years (mean, 19 months). One patient with malignant melanoma around the elbow joint had tumor recurrence, and underwent secondary tumor resection. The appearance, texture, and color of the flaps were similar to those at the recipient site. For patients with malignant

  19. Free Flap Reconstruction Monitoring Techniques and Frequency in the Era of Restricted Resident Work Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Urjeet A; Hernandez, David; Shnayder, Yelizaveta; Wax, Mark K; Hanasono, Matthew M; Hornig, Joshua; Ghanem, Tamer A; Old, Matthew; Jackson, Ryan S; Ledgerwood, Levi G; Pipkorn, Patrik; Lin, Lawrence; Ong, Adrian; Greene, Joshua B; Bekeny, James; Yiu, Yin; Noureldine, Salem; Li, David X; Fontanarosa, Joel; Greenbaum, Evan; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2017-08-01

    Free flap reconstruction of the head and neck is routinely performed with success rates around 94% to 99% at most institutions. Despite experience and meticulous technique, there is a small but recognized risk of partial or total flap loss in the postoperative setting. Historically, most microvascular surgeons involve resident house staff in flap monitoring protocols, and programs relied heavily on in-house resident physicians to assure timely intervention for compromised flaps. In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated the reduction in the hours a resident could work within a given week. At many institutions this new era of restricted resident duty hours reshaped the protocols used for flap monitoring to adapt to a system with reduced resident labor. To characterize various techniques and frequencies of free flap monitoring by nurses and resident physicians; and to determine if adapted resident monitoring frequency is associated with flap compromise and outcome. This multi-institutional retrospective review included patients undergoing free flap reconstruction to the head and/or neck between January 2005 and January 2015. Consecutive patients were included from different academic institutions or tertiary referral centers to reflect evolving practices. Technique, frequency, and personnel for flap monitoring; flap complications; and flap success. Overall, 1085 patients (343 women [32%] and 742 men [78%]) from 9 institutions were included. Most patients were placed in the intensive care unit postoperatively (n = 790 [73%]), while the remaining were placed in intermediate care (n = 201 [19%]) or in the surgical ward (n = 94 [7%]). Nurses monitored flaps every hour (q1h) for all patients. Frequency of resident monitoring varied, with 635 patients monitored every 4 hours (q4h), 146 monitored every 8 hours (q8h), and 304 monitored every 12 hours (q12h). Monitoring techniques included physical examination (n = 949 [87

  20. [Management of vascular crisis of free flaps after reconstruction of head and neck defects caused by tumor resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Song; Zhu, Yiming; Li, Dezhi; Liu, Jie; An, Changming; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Shaoyan

    2015-11-01

    To discuss the management of vascular crisis of free flaps after reconstruction of head and neck defects caused by tumor resection. A total of 259 cases of free flap reconstruction performed in the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from 2010 to 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including 89 cases of anterolateral thigh flaps, 48 cases of radial forearm flaps, 46 free fibula flaps, 5 cases of inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps, 5 cases of free latissimus dorsi flaps, one case of lateral arm flap, and one case of medial femoral flap. The surveillance frequency of free flaps was q1h on post-operative day (POD) 1, q2h on POD 2 and 3, and q4h after POD 3. Vascular crises were reviewed for analysis. The incidence rate of vascular crisis was 8.1% (21/259), with 15 males and 6 females. The average age was 54.8 years old (17-68), and the average time of vascular crisis was 100.8 h post-operation (3-432). There were 7 cases of free jejunum flaps and 14 dermal free flaps. Seven of these 21 cases with vascular crisis were rescued by surgery. The success rate of salvage surgery within 72 hours from the primary operation was 54.5% (6/11), significantly higher than that of salvage surgery performed later than 72 hours from primary operation (10.0%, 1/10, P=0.043). There were 14 cases of flap necrosis, two of which died of local infection. Early detection of vascular crisis can effectively improve the success rate of salvage, so as to avoid the serious consequences caused by free flap necrosis.

  1. Reconstructive breast implantation after mastectomy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Trine F; Fryzek, Jon P; Hölmich, Lisbet R

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical reports have raised concern about local complications following breast implantation used in reconstructive or cosmetic surgery, but there is a shortage of epidemiological studies in this area. OBJECTIVE: To assess in a prospective epidemiological manner the occurrence of short......-term local complications in a nationwide implantation registry. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast prospectively collects preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative information on Danish women undergoing breast augmentation. Through the registry, we...... collected data on short-term local complications among 574 women who underwent postmastectomy reconstruction with breast implants from June 1, 1999, through July 24, 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Complication incidence rates. RESULTS: Thirty-one percent of the women who underwent initial implantation...

  2. Superficial temporal artery flap for reconstruction of complex facial defects: A new algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Elbanoby

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background A variety of island flaps can be based on the superficial temporal artery with variable tissue composition. They can be used for defect reconstruction, cavity resurfacing, facial hair restoration, or contracture release. Methods Seventy-two patients underwent facial reconstruction using a superficial temporal artery island flap from October 2010 to October 2014. The defects had various etiologies, including trauma, burns, tumors, exposed hardware, and congenital causes. We classified the patients by indication into 5 groups: cavity resurfacing, contracture release, facial hair restoration, skin coverage, and combined. The demographic data of the patients, defect characteristics, operative procedures, postoperative results, and complications were retrospectively documented. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 54 months. Results A total of 24 females and 48 males were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 33.7±15.6 years. The flaps were used for contracture release in 13 cases, cavity resurfacing in 10 cases, skin coverage in 17 cases, facial hair restoration in 19 cases, and combined defects in 13 cases. No major complications were reported. Conclusion: Based on our experiences with the use of superficial temporal artery island flaps, we have developed a detailed approach for the optimal management of patients with composite facial defects. The aim of this article is to provide the reader with a systematic algorithm to use for such patients.

  3. [The sural medial perforator flap: Anatomical bases, surgical technique and indications in head and neck reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, S; Schaff, J-B; Qassemyar, Q

    2018-04-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is defined as a thin cutaneo-adipose perforator flap harvested on the medial aspect of the leg. The aims of this study were to describe the anatomical basis as well as the surgical technique and discuss the indications in head and neck reconstructive surgery. We harvested 10 MSAP flap on 5 fresh cadavers. For each case, the number and the location of the perforators were recorded. For each flap, the length of pedicle, the diameter of source vessels and the thickness of the flap were studied. Finally, we performed a clinical application of a MSAP flap. A total of 23 perforators with a diameter superior than 1mm were dissected on 10 legs. The medial sural artery provided between 1 and 4 musculocutaneous perforators. Perforators were located in average at 10.3cm±2cm from the popliteal fossa and at 3.6cm±1cm from the median line of the calf. The mean pedicle length was 12.1cm±2.5cm. At its origin, the source artery diameter was 1.8mm±0.25mm and source veins diameters were 2.45mm±0.9mm in average. There was no complication in our clinical application. This study confirms the reliability of previous anatomical descriptions of the medial sural artery perforator flap. This flap was reported as thin and particularly adapted for oral cavity reconstruction and for facial or limb resurfacing. Sequelae might be reduced as compared to those of the radial forearm flap with comparable results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Panorama of Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects: From Traditional Open to Endonasal Endoscopic Approaches, from Free Grafts to Microvascular Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A substantial body of literature has been devoted to the distinct characteristics and surgical options to repair the skull base. However, the skull base is an anatomically challenging location that requires a three-dimensional reconstruction approach. Furthermore, advances in endoscopic skull base surgery encompass a wide range of surgical pathology, from benign tumors to sinonasal cancer. This has resulted in the creation of wide defects that yield a new challenge in skull base reconstruction. Progress in technology and imaging has made this approach an internationally accepted method to repair these defects. Objectives Discuss historical developments and flaps available for skull base reconstruction. Data Synthesis Free grafts in skull base reconstruction are a viable option in small defects and low-flow leaks. Vascularized flaps pose a distinct advantage in large defects and high-flow leaks. When open techniques are used, free flap reconstruction techniques are often necessary to repair large entry wound defects. Conclusions Reconstruction of skull base defects requires a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, disease, and patient risk factors associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Various reconstruction techniques are available, from free tissue grafting to vascularized flaps. Possible complications that can befall after these procedures need to be considered. Although endonasal techniques are being used with increasing frequency, open techniques are still necessary in selected cases. PMID:25992142

  5. Reconstruction of Extensive Soft-Tissue Defects with Concomitant Bone Defects in the Lower Extremity with the Latissimus Dorsi-Serratus Anterior-Rib Free Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Wei Tee; Xu, Germaine Guiqin; Puhaindran, Mark Edward; Tan, Bien Keem; Cheng, Mathew Hern Wang; Chew, Winston Yoon Chong

    2015-07-01

    The combined latissimus dorsi-serratus anterior-rib (LD-SA-rib) free flap provides a large soft-tissue flap with a vascularized bone flap through a solitary vascular pedicle in a one-stage reconstruction. Seven LD-SA-rib free flaps were performed in seven patients to reconstruct concomitant bone and extensive soft-tissue defects in the lower extremity (tibia, five; femur, one; foot, one). The patients were all male, with an average age of 34 years (range, 20-48 years). These defects were secondary to trauma in five patients and posttraumatic osteomyelitis in two patients. All flaps survived and achieved bony union. The average time to bony union was 9.4 months. Bone hypertrophy of at least 20% occurred in all flaps. All patients achieved full weight-bearing ambulation without aid at an average duration of 23.7 months. Two patients developed stress fractures of the rib flap. There was no significant donor site morbidity, except for two patients who had pleural tears during harvesting of the flap. The LD-SA-rib flap provides a large soft-tissue component and a vascularized bone flap for reconstruction of composite large soft-tissue defects with concomitant bone defects of the lower extremity in a one-stage procedure. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Microvascular Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap for Palatomaxillary Reconstruction Following Malignant Tumor Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELSHERBINY, M.; MEBED, A.; MEBED, H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report on the patient's quality of life and outcomes after reconstruction of palatomaxillary defects by microvascular radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap (RFFF) and dental obturator. Material and Methods: During the period between 2005-2007, 10 patients who had palato maxillary defects were immediately reconstructed using RFFF to restore physiologic oronasal separation. All patients were treated for malignant tumors of hard palate or maxilla and all had preservation of orbital floor. Vascular anastomoses were done with the facial vessels in the neck. All the patients underwent a lateral thigh split-thickness skin graft for closure of the donor site. Outcome measurements included post-operative assessment of flap survival and healing, speech, swallowing and diet evaluation and quality of life. Dental rehabilitation was done 3 months postoperatively for all patients. Results: Flap survival was successful in all cases. In the first 2 weeks post operatively, 80% of patients had very good swallowing, speech and diet ability in the form of soft chewable foods and by the end of 6 months, all patients had very good swallowing and speech function and were able to eat all types of foods. Dental rehabilitation with obturator was easily applied and the presence of the flap did not interfere with its application. The technique improved chewing ability and cosmosis. Complications included, small oronasal fistula in 2 patients (20%) who required secondary sutures and delayed wound healing of donor site in one patient. Conclusion: RFFF for soft tissue reconstruction after maxillectomy is a reliable technique that provides a definitive physiologic separation between oral and nasal cavity. This allows very early improvement of speech and swallowing without being totally dependent on obturator. Dental rehabilitation to improve chewing and cosmoses can be done easily with minimal home care. Subsequently, the quality of life is markedly improved

  7. Immediate Direct-To-Implant Breast Reconstruction Using Anatomical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Eun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn 2012, a new anatomic breast implant of form-stable silicone gel was introduced onto the Korean market. The intended use of this implant is in the area of aesthetic breast surgery, and many reports are promising. Thus far, however, there have been no reports on the use of this implant for breast reconstruction in Korea. We used this breast implant in breast reconstruction surgery and report our early experience.MethodsFrom November 2012 to April 2013, the Natrelle Style 410 form-stable anatomically shaped cohesive silicone gel-filled breast implant was used in 31 breasts of 30 patients for implant breast reconstruction with an acellular dermal matrix. Patients were treated with skin-sparing mastectomies followed by immediate breast reconstruction.ResultsThe mean breast resection volume was 240 mL (range, 83-540 mL. The mean size of the breast implants was 217 mL (range, 125-395 mL. Breast shape outcomes were considered acceptable. Infection and skin thinning occurred in one patient each, and hematoma and seroma did not occur. Three cases of wound dehiscence occurred, one requiring surgical intervention, while the others healed with conservative treatment in one month. Rippling did not occur. So far, complications such as capsular contracture and malrotation of breast implant have not yet arisen.ConclusionsBy using anatomic breast implants in breast reconstruction, we achieved satisfactory results with aesthetics better than those obtained with round breast implants. Therefore, we concluded that the anatomical implant is suitable for breast reconstruction.

  8. Functional sequelae following bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with latissimus dorsi flap: medium-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Guido; Amoroso, Matteo; Pugliese, Pierfrancesco; Longo, Benedetto; Santanelli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Arm morbidity following unilateral Latissimus Dorsi (LD) flap harvest is controversial and bilateral harvest is considered potentially disabling. Arm and shoulder disability was investigated in patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy and immediate LD flap reconstruction. Thirty consecutive bilateral immediate reconstructions with denervated LD flaps, performed between 2005-2009, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were assessed for arm function by conducting the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) test, between 12-51 months after surgery (mean 23 months). Disability scores ranged from 1-100%, with 1-25% being regarded as mild dysfunction, 26-50% as moderate dysfunction, 51-75% as severe dysfunction, and 76-100% as total dysfunction. A statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test and the multivariate linear regression model for variables. The Global Mean Dash score was 14.8%. Twenty-four patients presented a mild functional deficit (50%). Five of them presented a score LD flaps (p test is a useful tool in terms of informing patients and helping the surgeon to choose the best surgical option.

  9. Trends in breast reconstruction: Implications for the National Health Insurance Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki Yong; Son, Yoosung; Chang, Hak; Jin, Ung Sik

    2018-05-01

    Breast reconstruction has become more common as mastectomy has become more frequent. In Korea, the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) began covering breast reconstruction in April 2015. This study aimed to investigate trends in mastectomy and breast reconstruction over the past 10 years and to evaluate the impact of NHIS coverage on breast reconstruction. Nationwide data regarding mastectomy and breast reconstruction were collected from the Korean Breast Cancer Society registry database. Multiple variables were analyzed in the records of patients who underwent breast reconstruction from January 2005 to March 2017 at a single institution. At Seoul National University Hospital, the total number of reconstruction cases increased 13-fold from 2005 to 2016. The proportion of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) cases out of all cases of total mastectomy increased from 4% in 2005 to 52.0% in 2016. The proportion of delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) cases out of all cases of breast reconstruction and the overall number of DBR cases increased from 8.8% (20 cases) in 2012 to 18.3% (76 cases) in 2016. After NHIS coverage was initiated, the proportions of IBR and DBR showed statistically significant increases (PNHIS coverage (PNHIS coverage. It is expected that breast reconstruction will be a routine option for patients with breast cancer under the NHIS.

  10. Health-related quality of life after maxillectomy: obturator rehabilitation compared with flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Rennie, A; Morrison, A; Dawson, D; Tipper, J; Rehman, K; Grew, N; Snee, D; Pigadas, N

    2016-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (QoL) reported by patients has the potential to improve care after ablative surgery of the midface, as existing treatment algorithms still generally revolve around outcomes assessed traditionally only by clinicians. Decisions in particular relate to reconstruction with a flap compared with rehabilitation with an obturator, the need for adjuvant treatment, and morbidity related to the size of the defect. We prospectively collected health-related QoL assessments for 39 consecutive patients treated by maxillectomy between 01 January 2010 and 31 December 2014 using the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire, and who had a mean (SD) duration of follow-up of 14 (4). We made sub-group analyses using paired t tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare reconstruction with a flap with rehabilitation with obturators, size of the vertical defect, and whether adjuvant treatment with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy adversely affected it. Overall there was a significant decrease in health-related QoL after treatment compared with before (p<0.001), but there was no significant difference in the effects of any of the paired reconstructive and rehabilitation treatments on it. Obturators remain an important option for rehabilitation in selected patients in addition to reconstruction with a flap. We found that neither increasing the size of the vertical defect (in an attempt to ensure clear margins) nor the use of postoperative radiotherapy seemed to have any adverse effect on QoL. More patients are required before we can conclude that the potential survival benefits of such measures may outweigh any adverse effects. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of the Upper Eyelid with Flaps and Free Grafts after Excision of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Guido Actis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe a reconstructive technique of the superior eyelid with flaps and free grafts after excision of a basal cell carcinoma. Methods: Single case report of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with a basal cell carcinoma of the upper eyelid margin with initial erosion. Results: A large and full-thickness excision of the carcinoma was performed. The reconstruction technique should be customized to the individual patient. In this case, the use of a full-thickness tarsal graft from the contralateral upper eyelid, followed by an ipsilateral bipedicled flap and finally by a skin graft, was an effective surgical procedure, performed in one stage, without complications, and with good functional and esthetic results. Conclusions: Malignant neoplasms represent the leading cause of plastic reconstruction in the orbital region. Surgical techniques must be individualized for each patient and for each type of carcinoma. Reconstructive techniques with free grafts and flaps yield excellent results in the orbital region, particularly when some advice and a few fundamental rules are followed, namely accurate hemostasis of the receiving graft bed by moderate use of diathermy, careful suturing of the edges, and application of a compressive dressing for at least 4 days. Postoperative complications are very rare.

  12. Total nasal reconstruction with 3D custom made porous titanium prosthesis and free thoracodorsal artery perforator flap: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qassemyar, Quentin; Assouly, Nathaniel; Madar, Yoni; Temam, Stéphane; Kolb, Frédéric

    2018-02-21

    Total nasal reconstruction is a challenging surgical procedure which usually involves a free flap, forehead flap, and cartilage grafts. In certain failure situations where patients do not accept the idea of anaplastology, possibilities become very limited. We report the case of a patient who underwent several reconstruction steps with multiple failures including free and local flaps and cartilage harvests which showed recurrent episodes of necrosis and infection leading to melting and collapse of reconstructed structures. Furthermore, the patient did not want any anaplastological rehabilitation. We proposed to the patient an innovative method that consists to print a three-dimensional custom-made porous titanium prosthesis, based on the original shape of his nose, to replace the cartilage support. This implant was first inserted in a thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for primary integration before the free transfer of the complete structure, two months later. The free transfer was successful without any complication. A stable reconstruction and satisfying result was obtained. The patient did not want additional surgical improvement 24 months post-operatively, and resumed his professional activities. The possibility of using three-dimensional custom titanium prostheses to replace the bone and cartilage support seems to be an interesting alternative for patients in the failure situation of nasal reconstruction. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Regional Analysis of Soft Tissue Thickness on Korean Buttocks and Application to Fasciocutaneous Flap Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Yup Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Various shapes and designs of the gluteal artery perforator flap have been used for treating sacral pressure sores and reconstructing breasts. To establish the ideal fasciocutaneous flap design for use in the gluteal area, the soft tissue thickness distribution was measured. Methods Twenty-one buttocks of adult Korean cadavers were analyzed through rectangular subfascial dissection. Each buttock was divided horizontally into 10 sections and vertically into 10 sections, and then, the thickness at the corners of the sections was measured. For the sake of comparison and statistical verification with living bodies, computed tomography (CT images of 120 buttocks of patients were randomly selected. Five horizontal sections and 4 vertical sections were made, and the thickness at each corner was recorded. Results According to the dissection and the CT images, the area with the thinnest soft tissues in the buttock was around the posterior superior iliac spine, close to the sacral area. The thickest area was the superolateral area of the buttock, which was 3.24 times and 2.15 times thicker than the thinnest area in the studies on cadaver anatomy and the CT images, respectively. Conclusions The thickness of the soft tissues in the buttocks differed by area. The superolateral area had the thickest soft tissues, and the superomedial area had the thinnest. This study includes information on the distribution of the thickness of the gluteal soft tissues of Koreans. The outcome of this study may contribute to the design of effective local flaps for pressure sore reconstruction and free flaps for breast reconstruction.

  14. Free tissue transfer of the rectus abdominis myoperitoneal flap for oral reconstruction in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, O I

    2001-12-01

    A five-month-old intact/male Boxer dog was presented 5-days following bite wound trauma to the maxillary region resulting in an oronasal fistula extending from the maxillary canine teeth to the soft palate. Multiple surgical procedures using local, buccal mucosal flaps failed to repair the oronasal fistula. Free tissue transfer of the rectus abdominis myoperitoneal flap using microvascular surgical techniques was successful in providing soft tissue reconstruction of the hard palate area. Complications of these surgical techniques included muscle contraction and subsequent muzzle distortion. Small, refractory oronasal fistulae at the perimeter of the myoperitoneal flap were repaired by primary wound closure.

  15. Aesthetic and Functional Outcomes of the Innervated and Thinned Anterolateral Thigh Flap in Reconstruction of Upper Limb Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Torres-Ortíz Zermeño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The anterolateral thigh (ALT flap has been widely described in reconstruction of the upper extremity. However, some details require refinement to improve both functional and aesthetic results. Methods. After reconstruction of upper extremity defects using thinned and innervated ALT flaps, functional and aesthetic outcomes were evaluated with the QuickDASH scale and a Likert scale for aesthetic assessment of free flaps, respectively. Results. Seven patients with a mean follow-up of 11.57 months and average flap thickness of 5 mm underwent innervation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The average percentage of disability (QuickDASH was 21.88% with tenderness, pain, temperature, and two-point discrimination present in 100% of cases, and the aesthetic result gave an overall result of 15.40 (good with the best scores in color and texture. Conclusions. Simultaneous thinning and innervation of the ALT flap lead to a good cosmetic result and functional outcome with a low percentage of disability, which could result in minor surgical procedures and better recovery of motor and sensory function. Level of Evidence. IV.

  16. Socioeconomic position and breast reconstruction in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B; Hölmich, Lisbet R; Frederiksen, Kirsten Skovsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the socioeconomic position of women undergoing breast reconstruction, and none have been conducted in the Danish population. We investigated the association between educational level and breast reconstruction in a nationwide cohort of Danish women with breast...

  17. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O'Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  18. A composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun; Zhuang, Yue-Hong; Xue, Lan; Zheng, He-Ping; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Gigantic pressure sores pose a daunting challenge for plastic surgeons. This paper presents a composite gluteofemoral flap for reconstruction of large pressure sores over the sacrococcygeal region. In this anatomical study, 30 embalmed cadaveric lower limbs were used for dissection to observe the musculocutaneous perforators of the inferior gluteal artery and the longitudinal nutritional vascular chain of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. In this clinical study, eight patients underwent surgical harvest of the composite gluteofemoral flap for coverage of grade IV sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The size of the pressure sores ranged between 16 × 9 cm and 22 × 10 cm. The inferior gluteal artery was present in 26 cases and absent in four cases. It gave off two to four musculocutaneous branches with a diameter larger than 0.5 mm to the gluteus maximus. A direct cutaneous branch was given off at the inferior margin of the gluteus maximus, serving as a nutritional artery for the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. The size of the flap harvested ranged between 22 × 9 cm and 32 × 10 cm. Flaps in seven patients survived uneventfully and developed epidermal necrosis at the distal margin in one case. An average 2-year follow-up revealed no recurrence of pressure sores. The composite gluteofemoral flap, being robust in blood supply, simple in surgical procedure, and large in donor territory, is an important addition to the armamentarium. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reconstruction of anterior auricular conchal defect after malignancy excision: revolving-door flap versus full-thickness skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, Luca Andrea; Figus, Andrea; Fioramonti, Paolo; Mazzocchi, Marco; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2010-05-01

    Skin tumours of the anterior auricular concha are not uncommon. Wider excision and immediate reconstruction are required to reduce the risks of recurrence of the disease, cartilage infection and external ear distortion. Many surgical methods have been described for reconstruction of conchal defects. Post-auricular island flaps, such as the revolving-door (RD) flap, and full-thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) are the most-performed procedures. Although the RD flap has been fully described, it is not widely accepted and many surgeons, in their daily practice, prefer to use FTSG. It is a common experience that FTSGs are more subjected to centripetal contraction, decreasing the structural firmness of the conchal cavity and affecting functional and aesthetic outcomes. Furthermore, FTSGs are more prone to delay in wound healing due to the difficult access to this region that hinders adequate tie-over dressings. Between March 2003 and January 2007, 40 patients affected by T1 and T2 non-melanotic skin cancer and T1 melanoma of the anterior conchal surface of the external ear were included in a prospective study and randomly assigned to the RD reconstructed group or to the FTSG reconstructed group to investigate, compare and define advantages and disadvantages of both the techniques. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the overall outcome and the colour and texture match. No flap or skin graft total loss was observed. Six patients (30%) showed partial failure of FTSG. The RD group demonstrated excellent cosmetic outcome, ideal colour match, adequate structure of external ear, projection and shape. Wilcoxon matched-pairs rank-sum test demonstrated statistically significant higher scores for the RD group compared to the FTSG group (p<0.0001). The RD harvesting technique is easy and quicker than the FTSG technique. RD flap should be considered as the first choice for reconstruction of anterior auricular conchal defects following wider excision of skin tumours

  20. Nonimaging aspects of follow-up in breast cancer reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W C

    1991-09-01

    Follow-up of patients with breast cancer is directed to the early detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and the detection of new primary breast cancer. The survival benefit of early detection is limited to some patients with local failure or new primary tumors. That imaging is not used in follow-up of patients who have had breast cancer reconstruction is related to possible interference with this putative benefit by the reconstructive procedure. Such follow-up is accomplished by the patient's own surveillance, clinical examination, and laboratory testing supplemented by imaging studies. Clinical follow-up trials of women who have undergone breast reconstructive surgery show no evidence that locally recurrent breast carcinoma is masked when compared with follow-up of women who did not undergo reconstructive procedures. Reshaping of the contralateral breast to match the reconstructed breast introduces the possibility of interference with palpation as well as mammographic distortion in some women. This is an uncommon practical problem except when complicated by fat necrosis.

  1. Dermatosurgery Rounds - The Island SKIN Infraorbital Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Tchernev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective in dermatologic surgery is complete excision of the tumour while achieving the best possible functional and cosmetic outcome. Also we must take into account age, sex, and tumour size and site. We should also consider the patient's expectations, the preservation of the different cosmetic units, and the final cosmetic outcome. Various reconstructive methods ranging from secondary healing to free flap applications are usedfor the reconstruction of perinasal or facial defects caused by trauma or tumour surgery. Herein, we describe the nasal infraorbital island skin flap for the reconstruction in a patient with basal cell carcinoma. No complications were observed in operation field. The infraorbital island skin flap which we describe for the perinasal area reconstruction is a safe, easily performed and versatile flap. The multidimensional use of this flap together with a relatively easy reconstruction plan and surgical procedure would be effective in flap choice.

  2. One stage reconstruction of the floor of the mouth with a subcutaneous pedicled nasolabial flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Marakby, H.H.; Fouad, F.A.; Ali, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nasolabial flaps have been recognised as versatile flaps for a variety of defects in the face, nose, lip and the oral cavity. Random pattern inferiorly based nasolabial flaps (NLF) have been utilised for covering small defects on the anterior floor of the mouth, but usually require a second stage procedure to divide the flap base. A subcutaneous pedicled inferiorly based nasolabial flap can provide a one stage repair of moderate sized defects of the floor of the mouth after de epithelialisation of the base of the flap. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of a single stage reconstruction of intermediate sized defects in the oral cavity with an inferiorly based pedicled NLF. The study includes the indications of use of the flap, flap design, technique, and the complications rate. The incidence of secondary procedures and the final functional and the aesthetic results will also be evaluated. Materials and methods: A group of 20 patients presented with (T1-2) squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have been treated at the Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Cairo; in the period between January 2008 and September 2010. The pathology was confirmed with an incision biopsy and all metastatic work were carried out confirming that all patients were free from distant metastasis at presentation. Preoperative assessment also included assessment of the stage of the disease, the flap design and patient fitness for general anaesthesia. All patients underwent surgical excision combined with reconstruction of the defect with a subcutaneous inferiorly based pedicled NLF. The proximal part of the flap was routinely de epithelialised before it has been tunnelled through the cheek so a one stage procedure could only be required. Results: The mean age of the patients was 62.3±6 years, range (52-69 years). All patients were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. The anterior floor of the mouth constituted 40% of the defects, the lateral floor of the mouth 20

  3. [The application of microvascular anastomotic coupler in vascular anastomosis of free tissue flap for reconstruction of defect after head and neck cancer resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y J; Wang, Z H; Li, C H; Chen, J

    2017-09-07

    Objective: To investigate the application and operation skills in vein anastomosis by microvascular anastomotic coupler (MAC) in reconstruction of defects after head and neck cancer resection. Methods: From August 2015 to July 2016, in Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sichuan Cancer Hosipital, 17 cases underwent the reconstruction of defects after head and neck cancer resection with free tissue flaps, including forearm flaps in 11 casess, anterolateral flaps in 4 casess and fibula flaps in 2 casess. Totally 17 MAC were used, including 14 MAC for end-to-end anastomosis and 3 MAC for end-to-side anastomosis. SPSS 22.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Venous anastomoses in 17 free tissue flaps were successfully completed, with no anastomotic errhysis. All flaps survived well. The time required for vascular anastomoses with MAC varied 2-9 min, with average time of (4.2±2.3) min, which was significantly shorter than that with manually anastomosis (17.4 ± 2.7) min ( t =15.1, P anastomosis in free tissue flap for reconstruction of defect after head and neck cancer resection, which requires for less operation time and shows good results.

  4. CAD/CAM-assisted breast reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchels, Ferry; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Wiggenhauser, Paul Severin; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Warne, David; Barry, Mark; Ong, Fook Rhu; Chong, Woon Shin

    2011-01-01

    The application of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques in the clinic is growing slowly but steadily. The ability to build patient-specific models based on medical imaging data offers major potential. In this work we report on the feasibility of employing laser scanning with CAD/CAM techniques to aid in breast reconstruction. A patient was imaged with laser scanning, an economical and facile method for creating an accurate digital representation of the breasts and surrounding tissues. The obtained model was used to fabricate a customized mould that was employed as an intra-operative aid for the surgeon performing autologous tissue reconstruction of the breast removed due to cancer. Furthermore, a solid breast model was derived from the imaged data and digitally processed for the fabrication of customized scaffolds for breast tissue engineering. To this end, a novel generic algorithm for creating porosity within a solid model was developed, using a finite element model as intermediate.

  5. Trends in breast reconstruction: Implications for the National Health Insurance Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Yong Hong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast reconstruction has become more common as mastectomy has become more frequent. In Korea, the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS began covering breast reconstruction in April 2015. This study aimed to investigate trends in mastectomy and breast reconstruction over the past 10 years and to evaluate the impact of NHIS coverage on breast reconstruction. Methods Nationwide data regarding mastectomy and breast reconstruction were collected from the Korean Breast Cancer Society registry database. Multiple variables were analyzed in the records of patients who underwent breast reconstruction from January 2005 to March 2017 at a single institution. Results At Seoul National University Hospital, the total number of reconstruction cases increased 13-fold from 2005 to 2016. The proportion of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR cases out of all cases of total mastectomy increased from 4% in 2005 to 52.0% in 2016. The proportion of delayed breast reconstruction (DBR cases out of all cases of breast reconstruction and the overall number of DBR cases increased from 8.8% (20 cases in 2012 to 18.3% (76 cases in 2016. After NHIS coverage was initiated, the proportions of IBR and DBR showed statistically significant increases (P<0.05. Among the IBR cases, the percentage of prosthesis-based reconstructions increased significantly (P<0.05, but this trend was not found with DBR. Total mastectomy became significantly more common after the expansion of NHIS coverage (P<0.05. Conclusions Over the last decade, there has been an increase in mastectomy and breast reconstruction, and the pace of increase accelerated after the expansion of NHIS coverage. It is expected that breast reconstruction will be a routine option for patients with breast cancer under the NHIS.

  6. Improved immediate breast reconstruction as a result of oncoplastic multidisciplinary meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Gammal MM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohsen M El Gammal,1 Maria Lim,1 Rajan Uppal,2 Richard Sainsbury1 1Department of Breast Surgery, Parapet Breast Centre, Frimley Health Foundation Trust, Windsor, 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wexham and Heatherwood Hospital, Frimley Health Foundation Trust, Slough, UK Introduction: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend that breast reconstruction should be available to all women undergoing mastectomy and discussed at the initial surgical consultation (2002, and updated 2009. The National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit (2009 showed that 21% of mastectomy patients underwent immediate breast reconstruction (IBR and 11% had delayed breast reconstruction (DBR. Breast reconstruction has been shown to have a positive effect on quality of life postmastectomy. This retrospective study investigated the impact of the introduction of a dedicated oncoplastic multidisciplinary meeting (OP MDM on our unit’s breast reconstruction rate.Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of 229 women who underwent mastectomy, of whom 81 (35% underwent breast reconstruction between April 2014 and March 2016. Data were analyzed before and after introduction of OP MDM in April 2015. Data on patient age, type of surgery (mastectomy only, mastectomy and reconstruction, timing of reconstruction (IBR, DBR, and type of reconstruction (implant, autologous were collected.Results: Between April 2015 and March 2016, following establishment of OP multidisciplinary team in April 2015, of the 120 patients who had mastectomy, 50 (42% underwent breast reconstruction with 78% (39/50 choosing IBR (56% implant reconstruction and 22% autologous. Compared to the period between April 2014 and March 2015 preceding the OP MDM, of 109 patients who underwent mastectomy, only 31 (28% had breast reconstruction with 64% (20/31 choosing IBR (45% implant reconstruction and 19% autologous. The rate of DBR was lower, 22% (11

  7. Microvascular free-flap reconstruction of a large defect of the scalp. Experience in a community hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, J.B.; Gulin, S.P.; Needham, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a patient who had postradiation necrosis of the skull and scalp measuring over 300 cm square which was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi muscle flap with overlying skin grafts. The procedure was performed in a community hospital with a team comprising two plastic surgeons and a neurosurgeon, with backup from physicians assistants and nursing staff. The successful outcome of this procedure was a direct result of the concerted effort of the surgical team. We believe that microvascular free-flap reconstruction, although a complicated procedure, can be performed at the community hospital as long as appropriate measures for the care of the patient are planned and carried out

  8. [A Patient with Lower Lip Verrucous Carcinoma Treated with a Tongue Flap for Functional and Esthetic Reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Takashi; Kanno, Takahiro; Karino, Masaaki; Sekine, Joji

    2017-11-01

    Surgery is generally indicated for the treatment of lower lip carcinoma. However, surgery can lead to esthetic as well as functional issues, with disturbances in eating and articulation. If the defect involves less than one-third of the width of the lower lip, primary closure is possible. If the defect is wider, reconstructive local flaps may be necessary for both esthetic and functional recovery. This report describes a case of lower lip verrucous carcinoma in which a tongue flap was used to treat a defect involving more than half the width of the lower lip following resection. The patient was a 91-year-old woman who complained of lower lip discomfort. A biopsy revealed verrucous carcinoma, and we performed resection. After a 3-week waiting period, we performed secondary tongue flap reconstruction. Satisfactory function and cosmetic results were achieved.

  9. How Tattoos Can Complement Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franczak, Lisa

    2018-04-01

    Tattooing offers expanded possibilities for creative expression for women who have undergone mastectomies and breast reconstruction surgeries. Tattoo techniques for areola restoration, such as repigmentation, do not address breast asymmetry or heavy scarring, but breast tattoos can embolden a woman's sexuality, self-confidence, and sense of body reclamation, as well as strengthen her postsurgical capacity for relating to her breasts and expressing her identity. There are many factors involved when a tattoo artist is asked to design an image for a patient. This article describes how I apply my artistic and trade talent to help mastectomy patients creatively reach beyond the limitations of surgical reconstruction possibilities. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  10. DIEP flap customization using Fluobeam® indocyanine green tissue perfusion assessment with large previous abdominal scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Fallucco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fluobeam® is a portable, near-infrared camera that is held and controlled by the surgeon to visualize tissue perfusion using indocyanine green (ICG fluorescence imaging. This case report describes how data obtained from ICG imaging allows intraoperative customization in a previously surgically scarred abdomen during autologous Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP flap bilateral breast reconstruction. The outcome was successful breast mound recreation without fat necrosis.

  11. Successful Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator Flap Harvest despite Preoperative Therapeutic Subcutaneous Heparin Administration into the Abdominal Pannus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncumb, Joseph W; Miyagi, Kana; Forouhi, Parto; Malata, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal free flaps for microsurgical breast reconstruction are most commonly harvested based on the deep inferior epigastric vessels that supply skin and fat via perforators through the rectus muscle and sheath. Intact perforator anatomy and connections are vital for subsequent optimal flap perfusion and avoidance of necrosis, be it partial or total. The intraflap vessels are delicate and easily damaged and it is generally advised that patients should avoid heparin injection into the abdominal pannus preoperatively as this may compromise the vascular perforators through direct needle laceration, pressure from bruising, haematoma formation, or perforator thrombosis secondary to external compression. We report three cases of successful deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap harvest despite patients injecting therapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin into their abdomens for thrombosed central venous lines (portacaths™) used for administering primary chemotherapy in breast cancer.

  12. Successful Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator Flap Harvest despite Preoperative Therapeutic Subcutaneous Heparin Administration into the Abdominal Pannus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W. Duncumb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal free flaps for microsurgical breast reconstruction are most commonly harvested based on the deep inferior epigastric vessels that supply skin and fat via perforators through the rectus muscle and sheath. Intact perforator anatomy and connections are vital for subsequent optimal flap perfusion and avoidance of necrosis, be it partial or total. The intraflap vessels are delicate and easily damaged and it is generally advised that patients should avoid heparin injection into the abdominal pannus preoperatively as this may compromise the vascular perforators through direct needle laceration, pressure from bruising, haematoma formation, or perforator thrombosis secondary to external compression. We report three cases of successful deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP flap harvest despite patients injecting therapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin into their abdomens for thrombosed central venous lines (portacaths™ used for administering primary chemotherapy in breast cancer.

  13. Vertical partial frontolateral laryngectomy with simultaneous pedunculated sternothyroid muscle flap reconstruction of the vocal fold - surgical procedure and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurek-Matusiak, Olga; Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Krzeski, Antoni

    2018-02-28

    The aim of the study was to present the treatment outcomes after vertical partial laryngectomy with or without pedunculated sternothyroid muscle flap reconstruction following the resection of neoplasm-infiltrated vocal fold. The procedure was used in a patient with glottic cancer. Oncological outcomes, morphology of neo-vocal fold and the act of swallowing were evaluated. 45 patients with T1-T2 glottic cancer were subjected to vertical partial laryngectomy with 26 patients undergoing a procedure with pedunculated sternothyroid muscle flap reconstruction and the remaining 19 patients undergoing a procedure without such a reconstruction. Two female and 43 male patients aged 35-82 years (mean age of 62.5 years) were enrolled in the study. Local tumor spread and the condition of reconstructed vocal fold were assessed in sequential videofiberoscopy examination conducted each month after surgery whereas the regional spread was assessed in ultrasound scans. Postoperative aspiration was graded according to the Pearson's scale. Six patients experienced local recurrence while 2 patients experienced regional recurrence of the tumor. The pedunculated sternothyroid muscle flap neo-fold was structurally resemblant of the non-affected vocal fold. Episodic, daily dysphagia was observed in 1 patient while normal act of swallowing with no Pearson's scale symptoms was observed in the remaining 44 patients. No necrosis of pedunculated flap was observed. Vertical partial laryngectomy with or without pedunculated sternothyroid muscle flap reconstruction is a good method for the treatment of low- or intermediate-stage glottic cancer, especially when endoscopic access to the tumor is limited and when CO2 laser cannot be used. No significant functional disorders were observed in operated larynges.

  14. A Comparison of the Local Flap and Skin Graft by Location of Face in Reconstruction after Resection of Facial Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Kim, Jun Oh; Kim, Nam Gyun; Lee, Yoon Jung; Park, Young Ji; Kim, Jun Sik

    2017-12-01

    Surgery for reconstruction of defects after surgery should be performed selectively and the many points must be considered. The authors conducted this study to compare the local flap and skin graft by facial location in the reconstruction after resection of facial skin cancer. The authors performed the study in patients that had received treatment in Department of Plastic Surgery, Gyeongsang National University. The cases were analyzed according to the reconstruction methods for the defects after surgery, sex, age, tumor site, and tumor size. Additionally, the authors compared differences of aesthetic satisfaction (out of 5 points) of patients in the local flap and skin graft by facial location after resection of facial skin cancer by dividing the face into eight areas. A total of 153 cases were confirmed. The most common facial skin cancer was basal cell carcinoma (56.8%, 87 cases), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (37.2%, 57 cases) and bowen's disease (5.8%, 9 cases). The most common reconstruction method was local flap 119 cases (77.7%), followed by skin graft 34 cases (22.3%). 86 patients answered the questionnaire and mean satisfaction of the local flap and skin graft were 4.3 and 3.5 ( p =0.04), respectively, indicating that satisfaction of local flap was significantly high. When comparing satisfaction of patients according to results, local flap shows excellent effects in functional and cosmetic aspects would be able to provide excellent results rather than using a skin graft with poor touch and tone compared to the surrounding normal skin.

  15. A case of incisional hernia repair using Composix mesh prosthesis after antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction following an esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Atsushi; Yasuda, Takushi; Kato, Hiroaki; Iwama, Mitsuru; Shiraishi, Osamu; Hiraki, Yoko; Tanaka, Yumiko; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Kimura, Yutaka; Imamoto, Haruhiko

    2017-12-01

    An incisional hernia in a case of antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap esophageal reconstruction after esophagectomy is a very rare occurrence, and this hernia was distinctive in that the reconstructed jejunum had passed through the hernial orifice; a standard surgical treatment for such a presentation has not been established. Herein, we describe a case of repair using mesh prosthesis for an atypical and distinctive incisional hernia after antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap esophageal reconstruction. A 77-year-old woman with a history of subtotal esophagectomy who had undergone antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction complained of epigastric prominence and discomfort without pain. On examination, she had an abdominal protrusion between the xiphoid process and the umbilicus that contained the small bowel. Computed tomography showed that the fenestration of the abdominal wall that was intentionally created for jejunum pull-up was dehisced in a region measuring 9 × 15 cm and the small intestine protruded through it into the subcutaneous space without strangulation. Because the hernial orifice was too large and the reconstructed jejunum was passing through the hernial orifice in this case, we applied a parastomal hernia repair method that was modified from the inguinal hernia repair using the Lichtenstein technique. After 3 years and 5 months following surgery, the patient has recovered without hernia recurrence or other complications. We consider this to be the first case of repair using Composix mesh prosthesis for repair of an atypical and distinctive incisional hernia after an antethoracic pedicled jejunal flap reconstruction. This method seems to be useful and could potentially be widely adopted as the surgical treatment for this condition.

  16. The value of dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT) in perforatorselection and planning of free DIEP flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Weerd, Louis; Weum, Sven; Mercer, James B

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT) as a technique to assist in preoperative perforator selection and planning of free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. Twenty-seven patients, scheduled for secondary autologous breast reconstruction with either a free DIEP flap or superficial inferior epigastric artery flap, were included in this prospective clinical study. Preoperative mapping of perforators was performed with a hand-held Doppler and DIRT. A multidetector computer tomography scan was additionally carried out in the last 8 patients. In 23 patients a DIEP flap was used. The perforator as selected from DIRT was a suitable perforator in all DIEP flaps. The location and quality of the selected perforator from DIRT corresponded well with the multidetector computer tomography scan results. Preoperative perforator selection and planning of DIEP flaps is facilitated with the use of DIRT. The technique is noninvasive and easy to use.

  17. Long-term outcome after mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stralman, K.; Mollerup, C.L.; Kristoffersen, U.S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to investigate long term outcome for women who had undergone mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient files of 167 immediately reconstructed breast cancer patients were reviewed for late surgical complications....... Furthermore, information of local recurrence rate, radiotherapy and death was obtained from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register. Histopatological high and low risk patients were compared with respect to locoregional recurrence rate, recurrence free survival and death. Unpaired t...... found no increase in the occurrence of capsular contracture in our study group in patients who received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Immediate breast reconstruction seems to be oncologically safe. Breast reconstruction performed with implants was associated with a higher risk of late complications...

  18. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our...... experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. METHODS: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus...... perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. RESULTS: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted...

  19. Changes in shoulder muscle activity pattern on surface electromyography after breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Joo; Kwon, YoungOk

    2018-02-01

    Alterations in muscle activation and restricted shoulder mobility, which are common in breast cancer patients, have been found to affect upper limb function. The purpose of this study was to determine muscle activity patterns, and to compare the prevalence of abnormal patterns among the type of breast surgery. In total, 274 breast cancer patients were recruited after surgery. Type of breast surgery was divided into mastectomy without reconstruction (Mastectomy), reconstruction with tissue expander/implant (TEI), latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, or transverse rectus abdominis flap (TRAM). Activities of shoulder muscles were measured using surface electromyography. Experimental analysis was conducted using a Gaussian filter smoothing method with regression. Patients demonstrated different patterns of muscle activation, such as normal, lower muscle electrical activity, and tightness. After adjusting for BMI and breast surgery, the odds of lower muscle electrical activity and tightness in the TRAM are 40.2% and 38.4% less than in the Mastectomy only group. The prevalence of abnormal patterns was significantly greater in the ALND than SLNB in all except TRAM. Alterations in muscle activity patterns differed by breast surgery and reconstruction type. For breast cancer patients with ALND, TRAM may be the best choice for maintaining upper limb function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Complications After Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: A Claims-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Pierce, Lori J.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate complications after post-mastectomy breast reconstruction, particularly in the setting of adjuvant radiotherapy. Summary-Background Data Most studies of complications after breast reconstruction have been conducted at centers of excellence; relatively little is known about complication rates in radiated patients treated in the broader community. This information is relevant for breast cancer patients' decision-making. Methods Using the claims-based MarketScan database, we described complications in 14,894 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998-2007 who received immediate autologous reconstruction (n=2637), immediate implant-based reconstruction (n=3007), or no reconstruction within the first two postoperative years (n=9250). We used a generalized estimating equation to evaluate associations between complications and radiotherapy over time. Results Wound complications were diagnosed within the first two postoperative years in 2.3% of patients without reconstruction, 4.4% with implants, and 9.5% with autologous reconstruction (pimplants, and 20.7% with autologous reconstruction (pimplant removal in patients with implant reconstruction (OR 1.48, pbreast reconstruction differ by approach. Radiation therapy appears to modestly increase certain risks, including infection and implant removal. PMID:25876011

  1. Risk factors for thirty-day readmission following flap reconstruction of oncologic defects of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Heather A; Rathi, Vinay K; Tjoa, Tjoson; Goyal, Neerav; Yarlagadda, Bharat B; Rich, Debbie L; Emerick, Kevin S; Lin, Derrick T; Deschler, Daniel G; Durand, Marlene L

    2018-02-01

    Unplanned 30-day readmission rate following hospital discharge is an important metric of healthcare quality. This study sought to characterize the rate, risk factors, and common causes of readmission in head and neck cancer patients following free or pedicled flap reconstruction. Retrospective cohort study. Charts were reviewed of all patients who underwent free or pedicled flap reconstruction following resection of head and neck cancer at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 2009 to 2014. Readmission risk factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Of 682 patients with free (76%) or pedicled flap reconstruction, 135 patients (19.8%) were readmitted. Factors not associated with readmission included age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, operative time, prior radiation therapy, primary cancer site, and free (vs. pedicled) flap type. Significant readmission risk factors included surgical site infections (SSI) (45.2% vs. 9.9%), use of hardware (18.5% vs. 11.3%), and clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery (15.2% vs. clean 8.2%). Surgical site infections (P readmission on multiple regression analysis. Primary reasons for readmission included wound complications (61.5%) and supportive care (15.6%). The median time to readmission was 8 days, and 41% of readmissions occurred within 1 week. Seventy percent of readmissions occurred within 2 weeks, including 77% of readmissions for SSIs and 86% for supportive care. Readmissions occurred in nearly one-fifth of patients following flap surgery. SSIs and use of hardware were risk factors, whereas wound complications were the most common cause of readmission. 4. Laryngoscope, 128:343-349, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Meta-analysis for psychological impact of breast reconstruction in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanjing; Lv, Xiaoai; Xu, Xiaohong; Gao, Xiufei; Wang, Bei

    2018-07-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the impact of breast reconstruction on the psychological aspects in patients with breast cancer. A literature search on PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect and Google scholar databases was conducted up to September 2017. The pooled risk radio (RR) or standard mean difference (SMD) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 5 studies were included in this meta-analysis. There were 551 breast cancer patients receiving mastectomy plus breast reconstruction and 574 breast cancer patients receiving mastectomy alone. The results showed that breast reconstruction can significantly decrease the incidence of anxiety (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.82, P = 0.0006)/depression (RR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.93, P = 0.02) and scale score for evaluating anxiety (SMD = - 0.20, 95% CI - 0.37 to - 0.03, P = 0.02)/depression (SMD = - 0.22, 95% CI - 0.39 to - 0.66, P = 0.007) compared with mastectomy alone. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy was benefit for improving the psychological damages in patients with breast cancer.

  3. What Is Safe Limit of the Perforator Flap in Lower Extremity Reconstruction? Do We Have Answers Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S. Panse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We make an attempt to define the safe extent of local perforator flap for lower limb reconstruction by comparing it with the limb length of the patient. The maximum flap length from the perforator was compared to the limb length in 35 patients using EPI info 6.04 D software. On comparison of flaps that were less than one-third of limb length to those which were more than one-third of limb length, the statistical values were significant. The odds ratio calculated was 6, which means that there is a six times more chance that a local perforator flap will necrose if it is more than one-third of the limb length as compared to a flap which is less than one-third of the limb length.

  4. Airway management after maxillectomy with free flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Daniel S; Reh, Douglas D; Schneider, Daniel S; Bush, Ben; Rosenthal, Eben L; Wax, Mark K

    2013-08-01

    Maxillectomy defects require complex 3-dimensional reconstructions often best suited to microvascular free tissue transfer. Postoperative airway management during this procedure has little discussion in the literature and is often dictated by surgical dogma. The purpose of this article was to review our experience in order to evaluate the effect of airway management on perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing maxillectomy with free flap reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients receiving maxillectomy with microvascular reconstruction at 2 institutions between 1999 and 2011. Patient's airways were managed with or without elective tracheotomy at the surgical team's discretion and different perioperative outcomes were measured. The primary outcome was incidence of airway complication including pneumonia and need for further airway intervention. Secondary outcome was measured as factors leading to perioperative performance of the tracheotomy. Seventy-nine of 143 patients received elective tracheotomy perioperatively. The incidence of airway complication was equivalent between groups (10.1% vs 9.4%; p = .89). Patients with cardiopulmonary comorbidities were more likely to receive perioperative tracheotomy (74.1% vs 50.9%; p = .03) without a difference in airway complications. Other patient cofactors did not have an impact on perioperative tracheotomy or airway complication rate. Elective tracheotomy may safely be avoided in a subset of patients undergoing maxillectomy with microvascular reconstruction. Elective tracheotomy should be considered in patients with cardiopulmonary risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Patients' experience of breast reconstruction after mastectomy and its influence on postoperative satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jana L; Wetzel, Cordula M; Lange, Klaus W; Heine, Norbert; Ortmann, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer patients have the option to choose a breast reconstruction after mastectomy. A range of studies have postulated that patients' individually appraised significance of their breast is an important factor in the decision for or against breast reconstruction. This study explored the individually perceived significance of the breast among patients with and without breast reconstruction and its correlation with postoperative satisfaction. Ten patients without breast reconstruction, and ten patients with immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy participated in the study. The perceived importance of the breast and the pre-and postoperative esthetic satisfaction of the patients were obtained using an 11-point Likert scale. Qualitative interviews explored patients' views on the meaning of their breast and their experience after surgery. Patients who had decided for breast reconstruction rated the importance of their breast for femininity (p = 0.004) and attractiveness (p = 0.037) significantly higher than patients without reconstruction. The qualitative data provide evidence that the breast of a woman fulfills a variety of intrapsychic and interactional functions. Difficulties in integrating the reconstructed breast into the body image were reported. A high importance of the breast correlated significantly with a decrease in satisfaction with the breast after reconstruction (rs = -0.652, p = 0.041). Patients who found their breast to be highly important were more likely to decide for a reconstruction. Mastectomy has an impact on various psychosocial variables but impairments may also occur after breast reconstruction. Patients reporting a high significance of their breast showed the greatest decrease in satisfaction with their breast after reconstruction.

  6. Satisfacción en pacientes con reconstrucción mamaria con colgajo D.I.E.P. Patient’s satisfaction after diep flap reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cabrera Sánchez

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción mamaria tras mastectomía se realiza primordialmente para proporcionar calidad de vida a la paciente. Este estudio se desarrolló para valorar la satisfacción y calidad de vida de las pacientes reconstruidas mediante colgajo D.I.E.P. (Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator y evaluar el resultado estético de la reconstrucción. Treinta y tres pacientes, de 51 reconstrucciones mamarias con colgajo DIEP realizadas entre enero de 2000 y noviembre de 2004 fueron preguntadas acerca de aspectos generales relativos a la cirugía, imagen corporal y sensación subjetiva. El resultado de imagen corporal fue evaluado por dos observadores externos, un cirujano plástico y una enfermera, además de por la propia paciente. Para valorar la reconstrucción mamaria, se utilizó una escala de 4 puntos. La satisfacción general de nuestro estudio fue más elevada que la observada en estudios precedentes. Hemos conseguido una valoración alta en simetría, dentro de los parámetros objetivos y en integridad corporal entre los subjetivos. Hemos encontrado una correlación alta entre las respuestas de los observadores comparada con las respuestas de las propias pacientes. Por último, hemos visto una fuerte correlación entre integridad corporal y satisfacción generalBreast reconstructions after breast cancer surgery are primarily performed to improve patient’s quality of life. This study investigates patient’s satisfaction and quality of life with breast reconstruction after deep inferior epigastric perforator (D.I.E.P. flap surgery and to evaluate the aesthetic result of the breast reconstruction. Thirty-three patiens, from fifty-one DIEP breast reconstruction made between january 2000 and december 2004 were answered about three questionnaires concerning to general aspect, body image, and subjective sensation. The body image outcome was also evaluated by one plastic surgeon and a nurse. The panel evaluated breast reconstruction on 4 subescales

  7. The sural artery and vein as recipient vessels in free flap reconstruction about the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P E; Harris, G D; Nagle, D J; Lewis, V L

    1987-04-01

    The sural artery and vein were used successfully as recipient vessels in nine patients who required free flap reconstruction about the knee. The anatomy of the sural vessels and the potential advantages of their use as free flap recipients are reviewed and discussed. Indications include popliteal vessels that are absent or severely damaged, as determined by preoperative angiography. No anastomotic complications were encountered in this series, indicating that the sural artery and vein can be used successfully as recipient vessels.

  8. Optimizing Functional Outcomes in Mandibular Condyle Reconstruction With the Free Fibula Flap Using Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z-Hye; Avraham, Tomer; Monaco, Casian; Patel, Ashish A; Hirsch, David L; Levine, Jamie P

    2018-05-01

    Mandibular defects involving the condyle represent a complex reconstructive challenge for restoring proper function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) because it requires precise bone graft alignment for full restoration of joint function. The use of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology can aid in accurate reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects with a vascularized free fibula flap without the need for additional adjuncts. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and functional outcomes after reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects using only a free fibula graft with the help of virtual surgery techniques. A retrospective review was performed to identify all patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with only a free fibula flap without any TMJ adjuncts after a total condylectomy. Three-dimensional modeling software was used to plan and execute reconstruction for all patients. From 2009 through 2014, 14 patients underwent reconstruction of mandibular defects involving the condyle with the aid of virtual surgery technology. The average age was 38.7 years (range, 11 to 77 yr). The average follow-up period was 2.6 years (range, 0.8 to 4.2 yr). Flap survival was 100% (N = 14). All patients reported improved facial symmetry, adequate jaw opening, and normal dental occlusion. In addition, they achieved good functional outcomes, including normal intelligible speech and the tolerance of a regular diet with solid foods. Maximal interincisal opening range for all patients was 25 to 38 mm with no lateral deviation or subjective joint pain. No patient had progressive joint hypomobility or condylar migration. One patient had ankylosis, which required release. TMJ reconstruction poses considerable challenges in bone graft alignment for full restoration of joint function. The use of CAD/CAM technology can aid in accurate reconstruction of mandibular condyle defects with a vascularized free fibula flap through precise

  9. The Versatility of Perforator-Based Propeller Flap for Reconstruction of Distal Leg and Ankle Defects

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    Durga Karki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Soft tissue coverage of distal leg and ankle region represents a challenge and such defect usually requires a free flap. However, this may lead to considerable donor site morbidity, is time consuming, and needs facility of microsurgery. With the introduction of perforator flap, management of small- and medium-size defects of distal leg and ankle region is convenient, less time consuming, and with minimal donor site morbidity. When local perforator flap is designed as propeller and rotated to 180 degree, donor site is closed primarily and increases reach of flap, thus increasing versatility. Material and Methods. From June 2008 to May 2011, 20 patients were treated with perforator-based propeller flap for distal leg and ankle defects. Flap was based on single perforator of posterior tibial and peroneal artery rotated to 180 degrees. Defect size was from 4 cm × 3.5 cm to 7 cm × 5 cm. Results. One patient developed partial flap necrosis, which was managed with skin grafting. Two patients developed venous congestion, which subsided spontaneously without complications. Small wound dehiscence was present in one patient. Donor site was closed primarily in all patients. Rest of the flaps survived well with good aesthetic results. Conclusion. The perforator-based propeller flap for distal leg and ankle defects is a good option. This flap design is safe and reliable in achieving goals of reconstruction. The technique is convenient, less time consuming, and with minimal donor site morbidity. It provides aesthetically good result.

  10. Mammographic findings after reshaping with autoprosthesis in women undergoing contralateral breast reconstruction and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Capalbo, Emanuela; Ferranti, Claudio; Falco, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio B; Di Leo, Gianni; Marchesini, Monica; Suman, Laura; Panizza, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Breast reduction and mastopexy combined with inferior dermo-lipo-glandular flap (autoprosthesis) gives good breast shape, long-term projection, and upper pole fullness. We assess the impact on breast oncologic surveillance compared to other techniques. A total of 105 patients who underwent mastectomy and reconstruction were divided into 3 groups of 35 patients each: groups 1 and 2 include patients with contralateral breast symmetrization performed with and without autoprosthesis technique, respectively. Group 3 is a control group without contralateral breast reshaping. On mammography, edema, skin thickening, architectural distortion, and calcifications were recorded, as well as further diagnostic examinations, biopsies, and surgical treatments required. Statistically significant differences (p<0.001) in the first follow-up mammography between groups 1 and 2 were stromal edema (6% vs 51%) and architectural distortion (74% vs 63%). The latest findings meant architectural distortion also have significant difference (p<0.001) in the last mammography (79% vs 66%). Microcalcification has statistically significant difference (p<0.001) in the latest postsurgical mammography, increased in group 1. Skin thickening had a similar course in either group. Mammography follow-up was not impaired in most cases notwithstanding the parenchyma distortion as compared with mammography after breast-conserving surgery. Four core biopsies were performed in both groups: 3 new breast cancers and 1 benign epithelial hyperplasia were found. No difficulties were found impairing mammographic evaluation in patients treated with autoprosthesis as compared to other techniques.

  11. The Pedicled Buccal Fat Pad: Anatomical Study of the New Flap for Skull Base Defect Reconstruction After Endoscopic Endonasal Transpterygoid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbin, Denis A.; Lasunin, Nikolay V.; Cherekaev, Vasily A.; Polev, Georgiy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using a buccal fat pad for endoscopic skull base defect reconstruction. Design Descriptive anatomical study with an illustrative case presentation. Setting Anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh human cadaver specimens with injected arteries (24 sides). Internal carotid artery was exposed in the coronal plane via the endoscopic transpterygoid approach. The pedicled buccal fat pad was used for reconstruction. Participants: 12 human cadaver head specimens; one patient operated using the proposed technique. Main outcome measures: Proximity of the buccal fat pad flap to the defect, compliance of the flap, comfort and safety of harvesting procedure, and compatibility with the Hadad–Bassagasteguy nasoseptal flap. Results: Harvesting procedure was performed using anterior transmaxillary corridor. The pedicled buccal fat pad flap can be used to pack the sphenoid sinus or cover the internal carotid artery from cavernous to upper parapharyngeal segment. Conclusion The buccal fat pad can be safely harvested through the same approach without external incisions and is compliant enough to conform to the skull base defect. The proposed pedicled flap can replace free abdominal fat in central skull base reconstruction. The volume of the buccal fat pad allows obliteration of the sphenoid sinus or upper parapharyngeal space. PMID:28180047

  12. Colgajo lateral de brazo en reconstrucción de la cavidad oral Lateral arm flap in oral cavity reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dean Ferrer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La posibilidad de emplear una piel fácilmente plegable ha permitido reconstruir defectos de la cavidad oral consiguiendo una gran funcionalidad. Aunque el colgajo radial es el colgajo que se utiliza con más frecuencia para reconstruir defectos de superficie de la cavidad oral, el colgajo lateral de brazo puede ser de elección en algunas situaciones. Objetivos. El objetivo del presente trabajo es mostrar las ventajas e inconvenientes y nuestras indicaciones y resultados del colgajo lateral de brazo en reconstrucción de defectos de la cavidad oral. Material y método. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo sobre la utilización del colgajo lateral de brazo en la reconstrucción de defectos de la cavidad oral tras cirugía ablativa. Se ha valorado: la viabilidad del colgajo, la morbilidad del lecho donante, la longitud del pedículo, la selección de vasos receptores, las complicaciones y los resultados funcionales de la zona reconstruida. Resultados. Hemos utilizado el colgajo lateral de brazo en 10 pacientes en reconstrucciones primarias tras cirugía ablativa por carcinoma epidermoide de la cavidad oral. Hubo un caso de necrosis por trombosis venosa. El defecto donante se cerró en 8 casos de modo directo y en 2 con un injerto libre de espesor parcial. La longitud media del pedículo ha sido de 8,75 cm. En 9 casos el resultado funcional de los pacientes ha sido satisfactorio. Conclusiones. El colgajo fasciocutáneo lateral de brazo permite la reconstrucción de la cavidad oral consiguiendo buenos resultados funcionales. Además la morbilidad de la zona donante es mínima y puede realizarse cierre directo del defecto cutáneo del brazo en la mayoría de los casos.Introduction. The availability of easily pliable skin has allowed the functional reconstruction of oral cavity defects. Although the radial forearm free flap is the most frequently used flap for the reconstruction of surface defects of the oral cavity, the lateral arm free

  13. Reconstruction of soft-tissue lesions of the foot with the use of the medial plantar flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To study use of the medial plantar flap for reconstruction of the heel and foot. METHOD: The authors share their clinical experience with the use of the medial plantar artery flap for coverage of tissue defects around the foot and heel after trauma. Twelve cases of medial plantar artery flap performed from January 2001 to December 2013 were included. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients, ten were male and two were female. The indications were traumatic loss of the heel pad in ten cases and the dorsal foot in two cases. All the flaps healed uneventfully without major complications, except one case with partial flap loss. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The flaps had slightly inferior protective sensation compared with the normal side. CONCLUSION: From these results, the authors suggest that the medial plantar artery flap is a good addition to the existing armamentarium for coverage of the foot and heel. It is versatile flap that can cover defects on the heel, over the Achilles tendon and plantar surface, as well as the dorsal foot. It provides tissue to the plantar skin with a similar texture and intact protective sensation.

  14. The freestyle pedicle perforator flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Jackson, Ian T; Westvik, Tormod S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perforating vessels are a consistent anatomical finding and well described in the current literature. Any skin flap can be raised on a subcutaneous pedicle as long as it contains at least one supplying perforator. Perforator flaps have been interlinked with microsurgery and generally...... not widely performed by the general plastic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to present the simplicity of pedicled perforator flap reconstruction of moderate-sized defects of the extremities and torso. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34 patients reconstructed using 34 freestyle pedicled...... perforator flaps for moderate-sized defects of the truncus and extremities. We registered indications, flap size and localization, success rate, and complications. Most importantly, we describe a simple approach to the design of freestyle pedicled perforator flaps and elaborate on technical aspects...

  15. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Among Patients Seeking Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Drew B; Duggal, Claire S; Gabriel, Allen; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Carlson, Grant W; Losken, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance. It has significant implications for patients who desire breast reconstruction, because patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is a substantial contributor to the success of the procedure. The authors estimated the prevalence of BDD among women seeking breast reconstruction by surveying patients with the previously validated Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ). One hundred eighty-eight women who presented for immediate or delayed breast reconstruction completed the DCQ anonymously, during initial consultation with a plastic surgeon. Two groups of respondents were identified: those who desired immediate reconstruction and those who planned to undergo delayed reconstruction. The prevalence of BDD among breast reconstruction patients was compared between the 2 groups, and the overall prevalence was compared with published rates for the general public. Body dysmorphic disorder was significantly more prevalent in breast reconstruction patients than in the general population (17% vs 2%; P < .001). It also was much more common among patients who planned to undergo delayed (vs immediate) reconstruction (34% vs 13%; P = .004). Relative to the general public, significantly more women who sought breast reconstruction were diagnosed as having BDD. Awareness of the potential for BDD will enable clinicians to better understand their patients' perspectives and discuss realistic expectations at the initial consultation. Future studies are warranted to examine the implications of BDD on patient satisfaction with reconstructive surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  16. Reconstruction of large upper eyelid defects with a free tarsal plate graft and a myocutaneous pedicle flap plus a free skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    To review and present the results of a one-step method employing a free tarsal plate graft and a myocutaneous pedicle flap plus a free skin graft for reconstruction of large upper eyelid defects after tumour surgery. This was a retrospective case-series of 8 patients who underwent reconstruction of the upper eyelid after tumour removal. The horizontal defect involved 50-75% of the lid (3 pts.), more than 75% (3 pts.), and more than 75% plus the lateral canthus (2 pts.). The posterior lamella was reconstructed with contralateral upper eyelid tarsal plate. The anterior lamella was reconstructed with a laterally based myocutaneous pedicle flap in 7 patients, leaving a raw surface under the brow which was covered with a free skin graft. In 1 patient with little skin left under the brow, the anterior lamella was reconstructed with a bi-pedicle orbicularis muscle flap together with a free skin graft. All patients healed without necrosis, did not suffer from lagophthalmos, achieved reasonable cosmesis, and did not need lubricants. In one patient, a contact lens was necessary for three weeks because of corneal erosion. One patient still needs a contact lens 3 months after excision to avoid eye discomfort. Large upper eyelid defects can be reconstructed with a free tarsal plate graft and a laterally based myocutaneous pedicle flap in combination with a free skin graft. Two-step procedures can probably be avoided in most cases.

  17. THORACO - ABDOMINAL FLAP FOR RESURFACING LARGE POST MASTECTOMY DEFECTS IN LOCALLY ADVANCED CA. BREAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Covering of large wounds after mastectomy in locally advanced Ca breast with skin that can withstand radiotherapy is a challenge to the surgeon. Here this study we used a local advancement flap from the adjacent area called Thoraco - A bdominal F la p (TA flap for such giant defects. This is based on superficial and lumbar arteries and is thick to with stand consequent RT . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Of the total 107 cases of LABC 32 had post mastectomy defects of larger than 12 cm and could not be closed by simple approximation. Among the 32 cases 17 cases are covered by split thickness skin grafting. 15 cases are covered by TA flap. These cases are assessed for mean operating time, mean blood loss, post - operative stay, flap necrosis and viability of the f lap after radiotherapy. RESULTS: There is minimal extra time or blood loss in these cases . All the flaps healed well except for small edge necrosis in 4 cases. In all the patients we could start radiotherapy in the fourth week of surgery and all the flaps withstood RT well. After further evaluation probably this can be recommended as procedure for giant post mastectomy defects particularly for those who require RT early

  18. Foot reconstruction using a free proximal peroneal artery perforator flap: Anatomical study and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Yeon Ji; Moon, Suk-Ho

    2018-02-22

    When a small, thin, and durable flap is required for coverage of the foot, the proximal peroneal artery perforator (PPAP) free flap may be a novel option. However, few clinical results and anatomical studies on the PPAP flap have been published. A total of 24 PPAP flaps used in 22 patients from January 2013 to December 2016 were analyzed. All flaps were elevated in the subfascial plane based on a single perforator from the peroneal artery between the soleus and peroneus muscles. The average harvested flap size was 18.9 cm 2 (range, 9-40 cm 2 ), pedicle length was 4.3 cm (range, 3.1-5.5 cm), and pedicle artery diameter was 1.1 mm (range, 0.8-1.5 mm). Twenty-three of the 24 PPAP flaps survived. Average time to harvest the flap was 35 minutes (range, 20-55 minutes). Perforator location (ratio by fibula length) was confirmed at the 0.32 site (standard deviation, ±0.04) from the fibular head. Percentages of septocutaneous and musculocutaneous types were 42% (10/24) and 58% (14/24), respectively, for perforator vessel course; average intramuscular course was 1.3 cm (range, 0.7-2.4 cm). Vessel graft was conducted in four cases, with an average length of 2.2 cm (range, 1.5-3.0 cm). The PPAP flap is one of the thinnest flaps available and is relatively easy to elevate. Moreover, it can be elevated in the same operative field as the foot, and primary closure is available for the donor site. Thus, the PPAP flap may be a good surgical option for soft tissue coverage of the foot. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adipofascial sural artery flap for foot and ankle reconstruction in children: for better aesthetic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, F.

    2015-01-01

    Wheel spoke injury of the ankle and foot is very common in children and its reconstruction is challenging. Reverse flow sural artery fasciocutaneous flap is versatile for this area but lead to significant donor site morbidity. Free tissue transfer is an option in children which needs a micro-vascular expertise, expensive equipment and long operating time. Method: Fifteen adipofascial flaps were done for foot and ankle coverage from June 2011 to June 2014 at CH and ICH Lahore. The efficacy of adipofascial sural artery flap for the coverage of these defects was evaluated. Results: Fifteen children presented with defects of foot and ankle, 11 (73%) were male and 4 (27%) were female. Their age ranged from 1 - 13 years. All patients had trauma to the foot due to wheel spoke injury. Flaps were used to cover tendoachilles and malleoli. In one patient there was flap tip necrosis with partial graft loss which healed with dressings. Donor site aesthetic outcome was satisfactory in all cases. Mean follow-up was I year. Conclusion: Adipofascial Sural artery flap is quick and safe with wide arc of rotation, minimal donor site morbidity and better aesthetic outcome and it does not sacrifice major extremity vessel. (author)

  20. [TREATMENT OBSERVATION OF NASAL TIP DEFECTS RECONSTRUCTED BY BILOBED FLAPS AFTER GAINT NEVI EXCISION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengyong; Pu, Yi; Cen, Ying; Wu, Junliang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-11-08

    To discuss a reliable and aesthetic surgery method for the reconstruction of large defects on the top of nose after giant nevi resection. Between January 2011 and June 2015, 46 cases of nasal tip defects caused by giant nevi resection were treated. Of 46 cases, 22 were male and 24 were female, aged 15-59 years (median, 28 years). The right ala nasi was involved in 28 cases, the apex nasi in 8 cases, and the left ala nasi in 10 cases. The diameters of nevi were from 8 to 12 mm (mean, 9.75 mm); no alar cartilage was invaded. Hair growth was seen in 14 cases. The duration of nasal nevi was from 3 years to 49 years (mean, 9.8 years). There were 9 recurrent patients who received laser therapy before surgery. The defects sizes after excision were from 10 mm×10 mm to 14 mm×14 mm. The bilobed flaps were used for one-stage reconstruction, which sizes were from 11 mm×10 mm to 15 mm×14 mm and from 10 mm×10 mm to 15 mm×14 mm. All the incisions healed by first intention, and the flaps survived. No complication of intracranial hemorrhage or subdural hemorrhage occurred. The patients were followed up 6 months to 5 years (mean, 18 months). The appearance of nasal tip and nasolabial fold was satisfactory, and no recurrence was found during follow-up. One-stage bilobed flap reconstruction for nasal tip defects after giant nevus resection is one of the effective, safe, and aesthetic surgery methods.

  1. Surgical removal of infraauriculer recurrent dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and reconstruction with bilobed flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Bulut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance is a rare skin tumor which has slowly growing, low metastasis capacity but can be locally agressive. This is a case report about a patient who was operated in an other medical center for dermatofibrosarkom protüberans and the tumor recurred after a short time. The tumor was reexcised with free surgical 2 cm margin with also superficial parotidektomy was done. Skin defect was covered by bilobed flap. The pathological specimen was reported as dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. There is no recurrence or metastasis for 12 months follow-up of patient. A rare is use of the bilobed flap in the head and neck region after large tumoral lesion excision. In our opinion, the revised reconstructive technique provides lots of advantages, improves aesthetical results and provides more natural appearance.

  2. Sternocleidomastoid myofascial flap for reconstruction after composite resection of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region: technique and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, Ollivier; Ménard, Madeleine; Behm, Eva; Garcia, Dominique; Cauchois, Régis; Holsinger, F Christopher

    2006-11-01

    To present the surgical technique and determine the efficacy of sternocleidomastoid myofascial (SCMF) flap reconstruction after composite resection with intent to cure. Retrospective review of 73 consecutive patients with a previously isolated and untreated moderately to well-differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar region and a minimum of 3 years follow-up, managed at a tertiary referral care center during the years 1970 to 2002, with an ipsilateral superiorly based SCMF flap after composite resection. The surgical procedure is presented in detail. Potential technical pitfalls are highlighted. Survival, mortality, and morbidity are documented. Univariate analysis for potential correlation between the incidence for postoperative flap complications and various variables is also performed. The 1, 3, and 5 year Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival estimates were 82.2%, 64.4%, and 49.3%, respectively. Death never appeared to be related to the completion of the SCMF flap. Thirty-three (45.2%) patients had some kind of significant postoperative surgical complication, and nine (12.3%) patients had some kind of significant postoperative medical complication. The most common significant postoperative complication was partial SCMF flap necrosis and pharyngocutaneous fistula noted in 30.1% and 10.9% of patients, respectively. Complete SCMF flap necrosis was never encountered. No patient developed carotid artery rupture or died as a result of the SCMF flap, and none required additional surgery. In univariate analysis, no significant statistical relation was noted between the significant postoperative surgical complications related to the use of the SCMF flap and the variables under analysis. The superiorly based SCMF flap appears to be simple to perform and useful for reconstruction of defects after composite resection.

  3. The Pacman Perforator-Based V-Y Advancement Flap for Reconstruction of Pressure Sores at Different Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Stefano; Salval, André; Brenta, Federica; Rapisarda, Vincenzo; Settembrini, Fernanda

    2016-09-01

    Many procedures have been proposed for the treatment of pressure sores, and V-Y advancement flaps are widely used to repair a defect. Unfortunately, the degree of mobility of a V-Y advancement flap is dependent on the laxity of the underlying subcutaneous tissue. This is an important disadvantage of traditional V-Y advancement flap and limits its use.We used V-Y advancement flaps as perforator-based to overcome mobility restriction problem, with a further modification (Pacman-like shape) to improve the covering surface area of the flap. Between January 2012 and December 2014, the authors used 37 V-Y Pacman perforator-based flaps in 33 consecutive patients for coverage of defects located at sacral (n = 21), ischial (n = 13), trochanter (n = 1) regions. There were 27 male and 6 female patients with a mean age of 49.9 years (range, 15-74 years). All flaps survived completely (92.3%) except 3 in which one of them had undergone total necrosis due to hematoma and the other 2 had partial necrosis. No venous congestion was observed. The mean follow-up period was 14.9 months (range, 2-38 months). No flap surgery-related mortality or recurrence of pressure sores was noted. The V-Y Pacman perforator-based advancement flaps are safe and very effective for reconstruction of pressure sores at various regions. The advantage of our modification procedure include shorter operative time, lesser pedicle dissection, low donor site morbidity, good preservation of muscle, and offers remarkable excursion to the V-Y flap, which make the V-Y Pacman perforator-based flaps an excellent choice for large pressure sore coverage.

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes following Breast Conservation Therapy and Barriers to Referral for Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Somogyi, Ron B; Snell, Laura; McMillan, Catherine; Vesprini, Danny; Lipa, Joan E

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported aesthetic outcome of breast conservation therapy in a generalized sample of patients, and to describe potential barriers to referral for partial breast reconstruction. Consecutive breast conservation therapy patients completing radiotherapy over a 1-year period at a regional cancer center were identified. Eligible patients were contacted by means of mail/e-mail and invited to participate. Participants completed the BREAST-Q breast conservation therapy module along with a questionnaire examining feelings about breast reconstruction. Multiple regression analysis was performed using the satisfaction with breasts scale as the dependent variable. Surveys were completed by 185 of 592 eligible participants (response rate, 31.3 percent; mean age, 61 years) an average of 38 months after lumpectomy. The mean score for the BREAST-Q satisfaction with breasts scale was 59 of 100. Younger age (p = 0.038), lumpectomy reexcision (p = 0.018), and lumpectomy at a nonacademic center (p = 0.026) were significantly associated with lower satisfaction. Bra size, months from lumpectomy, and tumor quadrant/size were not significantly associated with satisfaction (p > 0.05). The most common statements regarding reconstruction were "I don't feel the need for it" (60.0 percent), "I don't like the thought of having breast implants" (22.7 percent), and "I don't want any more surgeon/doctor visits" (22.2 percent). Before lumpectomy, only 1.6 percent had a consultation for reconstruction, and only 22.7 percent were aware of this option. If offered, 33.1 percent of patients would have attended this consultation. There is an unmet demand for partial breast reconstruction, with an opportunity to advocate and increase awareness on behalf of patients undergoing breast conservation therapy.

  5. Microvascular anastomosis using the vascular closure device in free flap reconstructive surgery: A 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Chaitan; Pennington, David; Stern, Harvey

    2012-02-01

    The achievement of patency of the microvascular anastomosis in free flap surgery is dependent on a number of factors, central to which is atraumatic handling of the vessel lumen, and intimal apposition. Initial laboratory studies demonstrating the superiority of the non-penetrating vascular closure staple (VCS - Anastoclip ®) were followed by our report in 1999 on a series of free flaps. There is still a paucity of data in the literature on the use of non-penetrating devices for microvascular anastomosis, and our review gives evidence to support the routine use of the VCS in microsurgical free flap surgery. We now report on its successful use over a thirteen year period in 819 free flap reconstructions. Our data indicates the VCS device to be as effective as sutured anastomoses in free tissue transfer surgery. There is also statistically significant data (Barnard's Exact Test) to demonstrate a higher vascular patency rate of the VCS device over sutured anastomoses when sub group analysis is performed. 'Take-back' revision rates were lower amongst flaps that employed VCS use. For arterial anastomoses, this equated to 3/654(0.05%) vs 4/170(2.4%) with hand-sewn anastomoses (p = 0.02). Similarly, for venous anastomoses the 'take-back' revision rate was 7/661(1.1%) vs 8/165(4.8%) with hand-sewn anastomoses (p = 0.003). Furthermore, the major advantage of the VCS is reduction in anastomosis time, from approximately 25 min per anastomosis for sutures to between five and 10 min for staples. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced Morbidity of Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap Used for Salvage after Previously Failed Oncological Treatment and Unsuccessful Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Maria Ribeiro Salles Vanni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The reconstruction of complex cervicofacial defects arising from surgical treatment for cancer is a real challenge for head and neck surgeons, especially in salvage reconstruction surgery and/or failed previous reconstruction. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF has been widely used in these specific situations due to its reliability and low rate of failure or complications. Objectives. Identify factors that determine complications and influence the final outcome of the reconstructions with PMMF in salvage cancer surgery or in salvage reconstruction. Methods. A cross-sectional study design was used to evaluate a sample including 17 surgical patients treated over a period of ten years that met the inclusion criteria. Results. Reconstruction was successful in 13 cases (76.5%, with two cases of partial flap loss and no case of total loss. Complications occurred in 13 cases (76.5% and were specifically related to the flap in nine instances (52.9%. An association was identified between the development of major complications and reconstruction of the hypopharynx (=0.013 as well as in patients submitted to surgery in association with radiation therapy as a previous cancer treatment (=0.002. The former condition is also associated with major reconstruction failure (=0.018. An even lower incidence of major complications was noted in patients under the age of 53 (=0.044. Conclusion. Older patients, with hypopharyngeal defects and submitted to previous surgery plus radiation therapy, presented a higher risk of complications and reconstruction failure with PMMF.

  7. [Tibia reconstruction using cross-leg pedicled fibular flaps: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molski, M

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of treatment of two children with cross-leg pedicle fibular flaps. A boy (10 years old) was operated because of an extensive defect of the proximal tibial shaft (15 cm) and soft tissue deficit due to osteosarcoma. He had been previously operated several times: tumor resection with chemiotherapy, bone reconstruction using allografts and two other procedures because of inflammatory complications. The second case was a 9-year old girl who underwent an extensive excision of congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia due to neurofibroma and reconstruction of the further fragment of the tibia. Vascularized fibula was nailed deep into the tibial shaft, beyond the previously implanted metal elements. This allowed to maintain a correct axis of the limb, a firm stabilization of the transplant and probably evoked a quick periosteal reaction of the tibia. Plaster of Paris was used to immobilize the limb. Postoperative course showed no complications. The flap pedicle was cut off after 3-4 weeks. Progressive bone healing followed by bony hypertrophy was observed after 8 weeks. The children were able to fully load the operated extremities and ambulate without crutches (the boys 12 months post-surgery and the girl 6 months post-surgery).

  8. Use of a hard palate mucoperiosteal flap for rostral muzzle reconstruction in a dog after a traumatic premaxillary degloving injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurach, Lindsey; Plesman, Rhea; Grier-Lowe, Candace; Linn, Kathleen; Anthony, James

    2013-02-01

    To describe a technique for reconstruction of the rostral aspect of the muzzle of a dog after traumatic amputation. Clinical report. Adult female dog. A 6-year-old, intact, female, mixed-breed dog was admitted for facial reconstructive surgery after traumatic amputation of the rostral aspect of the muzzle. The nasal planum and the rostral portion of the upper lips were missing. A hard palate mucoperiosteal flap and lateral labial advancement flaps were used to reconstruct the nasal philtrum and borders of the nares. This reconstructive technique resulted in adequate nostril function and an acceptable cosmetic outcome. One naris developed partial obstruction with granulation tissue that may have occurred because of a lack of circumferential nasal mucosa to appose the skin on that side. The mucoperiosteum of the hard palate can be used to reconstruct the rostral aspect of the muzzle after traumatic amputation, resulting in an acceptable cosmetic outcome. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Consideration of safety of implant-based breast reconstruction with postreconstruction radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Tei, Seika; Haraoka, Goichi

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy as to whether immediate autologous breast reconstruction followed by postoperative radiotherapy has acceptable complications and aesthetic outcomes. To evaluate the interval between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy and immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and cosmesis in these patients. Between 2011 and 2015, 9 patients with breast cancer were treated at our institution with definitive mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by immediate tissue expander placement and postreconstruction radiotherapy. We reviewed the complications of implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postreconstruction radiotherapy. The timing of irradiation was after implant insertion for 8 patients and after tissue expander insertion for 1 patient. The mean follow-up was 601 days. There were no unacceptable complications or local recurrences. For the majority of patients, overall symmetry, aesthetic results, and patient satisfaction were high. Breast reconstruction using tissue expansion and implants is an acceptable option for the subset of patients who may undergo postreconstruction radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Body image dissatisfaction in patients undergoing breast reconstruction: Examining the roles of breast symmetry and appearance investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Irene; Reece, Gregory P; Huang, Sheng-Cheng; Mahajan, Kanika; Andon, Johnny; Khanal, Pujjal; Sun, Clement; Nicklaus, Krista; Merchant, Fatima; Markey, Mia K; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2018-03-01

    Reconstruction as part of treatment for breast cancer is aimed at mitigating body image concerns after mastectomy. Although algorithms have been developed to objectively assess breast reconstruction outcomes, associations between objectively quantified breast aesthetic appearance and patient-reported body image outcomes have not been examined. Further, the role of appearance investment in explaining a patient's body image is not well understood. We investigated the extent to which objectively quantified breast symmetry and patient-reported appearance investment were associated with body image dissatisfaction in patients undergoing cancer-related breast reconstruction. Breast cancer patients in different stages of reconstruction (n = 190) completed self-report measures of appearance investment and body image dissatisfaction. Vertical extent and horizontal extent symmetry values, which are indicators of breast symmetry, were calculated from clinical photographs. Associations among breast symmetry, appearance investment, body image dissatisfaction, and patient clinical factors were examined. Multi-variable regression was used to evaluate the extent to which symmetry and appearance investment were associated with body image dissatisfaction. Vertical extent symmetry, but not horizontal extent symmetry, was associated with body image dissatisfaction. Decreased vertical extent symmetry (β = -.19, P image dissatisfaction while controlling for clinical factors. Breast symmetry and patient appearance investment both significantly contribute to an understanding of patient-reported body image satisfaction during breast reconstruction treatment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Sequential chimeric medial femoral condyle and anterolateral thigh flow-through flaps for one-stage reconstructions of composite bone and soft tissue defects: Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Dominic; Abouarab, Mohamed H; Hirche, Christoph; Hernekamp, Jochen F; Schmidt, Volker J; Kneser, Ulrich; Kremer, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Small recalcitrant non-unions with poor perfusion require reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps. Cases with concomitant large soft tissue defects are especially challenging, since vascularized soft tissue transfer is often indicated and distant microvascular anastomoses may be required. We introduce a sequential chimeric free flap composed of a medial femoral condyle corticoperiosteal flap anastomosed to an anterolateral thigh flow-through flap (MFC-ALT flap) and report its use for reconstruction of small non-unions with concomitant large soft tissue defects in three exemplary patients. Two female and one male patients ages 39-58 years suffered from composite bone and soft tissue defects of the lower extremity and clavicle caused by tumor resection and postoperative radiation resp. infected tibial pilon fracture. The sizes of the soft tissue defects ranged from 15-23 × 4.5-6 cm and the sizes of the bone defects ranged from 1.5-4 × 2-4 cm. Defect reconstructions were performed in all cases with sequential chimeric MFC-ALT flaps with sizes ranging from 2-4 × 1.6-4 cm for the MFC and 21-23 × 7-8 cm for the ALT skin paddles. Functional reconstructions were achieved in all cases resulting in stable unions and soft tissue coverage enabling the patients to bear full weight without assistance on 5-months follow-up. Postoperative course was uneventful and complications were restricted to a small skin necrosis at the suture line in one case. MFC-ALT flaps may be a safe, and effective procedure for one-stage reconstructions of small, irregularly shaped bone defects with concomitant large soft tissue loss or surrounding instable scarring, particularly in cases of recalcitrant non-unions after radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Distally based saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap combined with vac therapy for soft tissue reconstruction and hardware salvage in the lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gen; Wang, Chun-Yang; Chai, Yi-Min; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Ming; Yi-Min, L V

    2013-11-01

    The complex wound with the exposed hardware and infection is one of the common complications after the internal fixation of the tibia fracture. The salvage of hardware and reconstruction of soft tissue defect remain challenging. In this report, we presented our experience on the use of the distally based saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy for the coverage of the soft tissue defect and the exposed hardware in the lower extremity with fracture. Between January 2008 and July 2010, seven patients underwent the VAC therapy followed by transferring a reversed saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap for reconstruction of the wound with exposed hardware around the distal tibia. The sizes of the flaps ranged from 6 × 3 cm to 15 × 6 cm. Six flaps survived completely. Partial necrosis occurred in one patient. There were no other complications of repair and donor sites. Bone healing was achieved in all patients. In conclusion, the reversed saphenous neurocutaneous perfortor flaps combined with the VAC therapy might be one of the options to cover the complex wound with exposed hardware in the lower extremities. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of a novel breast reconstruction technique using the Braxon® acellular dermal matrix: a new muscle-sparing breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Giorgio; Cawthorn, Simon J; Papaccio, Guido; Balestrieri, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Implant-based breast reconstruction is becoming increasingly popular because of the widespread adoption of acellular dermal matrix (ADM), which allows surgeons to obtain good aesthetic results with fewer operations. To develop more conservative surgical techniques, a retrospective, three-centre, proof-of-concept study was performed to study the effectiveness of a new, immediate, muscle-sparing breast reconstruction technique using the patented Braxon ® ADM, which enables subcutaneous positioning of the breast implant without detaching the pectoralis major. Ethics committee of the study coordinating centre approved medical record review on 19 women who underwent muscle-sparing breast reconstruction between November 2012 and January 2014. The first 10 implants were performed using 0.9-mm-thick porcine ADM, with preservatives. In the subsequent 15 implants, the product was changed to 0.6-mm-thick porcine dry ADM, without preservatives. Nineteen patients (25 implants) received six bilateral and 13 unilateral muscle-sparing breast reconstructions. For the first type of ADM used (0.9-mm-thick with preservatives), the rate of implant loss was 12% (n = 3) because of seroma (8%, n = 2) and infection (4%, n = 1). Minor complications, such as seroma (8%, n = 2), occurred when using the 0.6-mm-thick Braxon ® ADM and were treated by aspiration. Symmetrical and natural breasts with good shape, ptosis and softness to the touch were obtained. None of the patients reported experiencing pain. The preliminary results are encouraging from aesthetic and clinical viewpoints. Further studies are planned to evaluate long-term results. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Modified frontolateral partial laryngectomy operation: combined muscle-pedicle hyoid bone and thyrohyoid membrane flap in laryngeal reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Dian; Liu, Tian-Run; Chen, Yan-Feng; Wang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Laryngeal reconstruction is needed to preserve laryngeal function in patients who have undergone extensive vertical or frontal partial laryngectomy. However, the procedure remains a difficult challenge. Several reconstruction techniques have been described, but these techniques pose risks of complications such as laryngeal stenosis. This study aimed to evaluate the postoperative course and functional outcomes of a new technique that combined a muscle-pedicle hyoid bone and a thyrohyoid flap during laryngeal reconstruction after tumor resection. Four patients underwent extensive vertical partial or frontal partial laryngectomy for cancer. After tumor resection, laryngeal reconstruction was performed using the proposed technique. Postoperative recovery time, complications, and oncologic results were evaluated. The four patients were successfully treated with the proposed technique. No dyspnea, dysphagia, or death occurred during the postoperative course. Decannulation was performed after a median of 3 days. The average postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. Short-term postoperative functional recovery was normal. No laryngeal stenosis or tumor recurrence was observed in any of the four patients after a follow-up period of more than 24 months. The combination of the muscle-pedicle hyoid bone and the thyrohyoid flap is a reliable procedure for laryngeal reconstruction after extensive vertical partial or frontal partial laryngectomy

  15. Reporting clinical outcomes of breast reconstruction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S; Brigic, A; Whiting, P F; Cawthorn, S J; Avery, K N L; Donovan, J L; Blazeby, J M

    2011-01-05

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy for cancer requires accurate evaluation to inform evidence-based participatory decision making, but the standards of outcome reporting after breast reconstruction have not previously been considered. We used extensive searches to identify articles reporting surgical outcomes of breast reconstruction. We extracted data using published criteria for complication reporting modified to reflect reconstructive practice. Study designs included randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case series. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to critically appraise all study designs. Other criteria used to assess the studies were selection and funding bias, statistical power calculations, and institutional review board approval. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare the breadth and frequency of study outcomes, and χ² tests were used to compare the number of studies in each group reporting each of the published criteria. All statistical tests were two-sided. Surgical complications following breast reconstruction in 42,146 women were evaluated in 134 studies. These included 11 (8.2%) randomized trials, 74 (55.2%) cohort studies, and 49 (36.6%) case series. Fifty-three percent of studies demonstrated a disparity between methods and results in the numbers of complications reported. Complications were defined by 87 (64.9%) studies and graded by 78 (58.2%). Details such as the duration of follow-up and risk factors for adverse outcomes were omitted from 47 (35.1%) and 58 (43.3%) studies, respectively. Overall, the studies defined fewer than 20% of the complications they reported, and the definitions were largely inconsistent. The results of this systematic review suggest that outcome reporting in breast reconstruction is inconsistent and lacks methodological rigor. The development of a standardized core outcome set is recommended to improve outcome reporting in breast reconstruction.

  16. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I have a nipple also? Will I have feeling in my new breast? What are the risks of each type of breast reconstruction? If I do not have reconstruction, what are my options? Can I wear a prosthesis? How can I get my home ready before ...

  17. Does breast reconstruction impact the decision of patients to pursue cosmetic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vivian M; Tahiri, Youssef; Wes, Ari M; Yan, Chen; Selber, Jesse C; Nelson, Jonas A; Kovach, Stephen J; Serletti, Joseph M; Wu, Liza C

    2014-12-01

    Breast reconstruction is an integral component of breast cancer treatment, often aiding in restoring a patient's sense of femininity. However, many patients choose to have subsequent cosmetic surgery. The purpose of this study is to investigate the reasons that motivate patients to have cosmetic surgery after breast reconstruction. The authors performed a retrospective study examining patients who had breast reconstruction and subsequent cosmetic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Health System between January 2005 and June 2012. This cohort received a questionnaire assessing the influences and impact of their reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. A total of 1,214 patients had breast reconstruction, with 113 patients (9.3%) undergoing cosmetic surgery after reconstruction. Of 42 survey respondents, 35 had autologous breast reconstruction (83.3%). Fifty-two cosmetic procedures were performed in survey respondents, including liposuction (26.9%) and facelift (15.4%). The most common reason for pursuing cosmetic surgery was the desire to improve self-image (n = 26, 61.9%), with 29 (69.0%) patients feeling more self-conscious of appearance after reconstruction. Body image satisfaction was significantly higher after cosmetic surgery (P = 0.0081). Interestingly, a multivariate analysis revealed that patients who experienced an improvement in body image after breast reconstruction were more likely to experience a further improvement after a cosmetic procedure (P = 0.031, OR = 17.83). Patients who were interested in cosmetic surgery prior to reconstruction were also more likely to experience an improvement in body image after cosmetic surgery (P = 0.012, OR = 22.63). Cosmetic surgery may improve body image satisfaction of breast reconstruction patients and help to further meet their expectations.

  18. Breast reconstruction rate and profile in a Singapore patient population: a National University Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Nadia; Soh, Sharon; Ang, Chuan Han; Hing, Chor Hoong; Lee, Han Jing; Nallathamby, Vigneswaran; Yap, Yan Lin; Ong, Wei Chen; Lim, Thiam Chye; Lim, Jane

    2017-05-15

    Breast reconstruction is an integral part of breast cancer management, with the aim of restoring a breast to its natural form. There is increasing awareness among women that it is a safe procedure and its benefits extend beyond aesthetics. Our aim was to establish the rate of breast reconstruction and provide an overview of the patients who underwent breast reconstruction at National University Hospital (NUH), Singapore. We evaluated factors, such as ethnicity, age, time and type of implant, for their impact on a patient's decision to proceed with breast reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of women who had breast cancer and underwent breast surgery at NUH between 2001 and 2010. The breast reconstruction rate in this study was 24.3%. There were 241 patients who underwent breast reconstruction surgeries (including delayed and immediate procedures) among 993 patients for whom mastectomies were done for breast cancer. Chinese patients were the largest ethnic group who underwent breast reconstruction after mastectomy (74.3%). Within a single ethnic patient group, Malay women had the largest proportion of women undergoing breast reconstruction (60.0%). The youngest woman in whom cancer was detected in our study was aged 20 years. Malay women showed the greatest preference for autologous tissue breast reconstruction (92.3%). The median age at cancer diagnosis of our cohort was 46 years. We noted increases in the age of patients undergoing breast reconstruction and the proportion of breast reconstruction cases over the ten-year study period.

  19. Versatility of Pedicled Tensor Fascia Lata Flap: A Useful and Reliable Technique for Reconstruction of Different Anatomical Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sohaib Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the versatility of pedicled tensor fascia lata flap for reconstruction of various anatomical regions. Materials and Methods. In this retrospective study a total of 34 patients with defects over various anatomical regions were included. The defects were located over the trochanter (n=12, groin (n=8, perineum (n=6, lower anterior abdomen (n=6, gluteal region (n=1, and ischial region (n=1. The etiology of defects included trauma (n=12, infection (n=8, pressure sores (n=8, and malignancy (n=6. Reconstruction was performed using pedicled tensor fascia lata flaps. Patients were evaluated in terms of viability of the flap and donor site morbidity. The technical details of the operative procedure have also been outlined. Results. All the flaps survived well except 5 patients in which minor complications were noted and 1 who experienced complete flap loss. Of those with minor complications, 1 patient developed distal marginal necrosis and 1 developed infection which subsided within three days by dressings and antibiotics and in 2 patients partial loss of the skin graft occurred at the donor site out of which 1 required regrafting and another one healed completely with dressing and antibiotics. All the patients were followed up for an average period of 6 months, ranging from 1 to 12 months. Donor site morbidity was minimal. Conclusion. It was concluded that the pedicled tensor fascia lata flap is a versatile, reliable, easy, and less time consuming procedure for the coverage of defects around trochanter, groin, lower anterior abdomen, perineum, and ischial region.

  20. The superomedial thigh flap in scrotal reconstruction: Technical steps to improve cosmetic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayat Allah Oufkir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The superomedial thigh flap is a reliable and easy method for scrotal reconstruction described in 1980 and infrequently reported in the literature since its description. We used it for four patients presenting scrotal defects after Fournier′s gangrene with some technical modifications to improve the esthetic results and to facilitate the closure of the donor area. We describe the technical steps and the results.

  1. Mandibular Reconstruction Using Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap and Titanium Plates after Ablative Surgery for Locally Advanced Tumors of the Oral Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zohairy, M.A.F.; Mostafa, A.; Amin, A.; Abd El-Fattah, H.; Khalifa, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    The most common indication for mandible resection remains ablative surgery for cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The use of vascularized bone grafts has become state-of-the-art for mandibular reconstruction. However, the high cost of such surgery may not be justified in patients with advanced disease and poor prognosis, or poor performance status. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after ablative surgery for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and methods: The study involves a total of 33 patients with locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity that were treated over 5 year period (2003-2008) at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt. Mandibular resections were performed for treatment of patients with primary oral cavity tumors invading the mandible followed by mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates covered with a pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results: Of 33 patients, 25 (75.75%) were males and 8 (24.25%) were females. The age ranged from 42 to 70 years (mean 52.3±5.9 years). Tongue cancer was the most common tumor, it affects 17 (51.5%) of the patients, 24 patients received post operative radiation therapy. The flap survival was 100%; partial necrosis of the flap skin was observed in 3 patients. One patient developed wound dehiscence. Oro-cutaneous fistula occurred in 5 patients that closed spontaneously. There were 4 cases of plate failure, one patient experienced plate fracture at 13 months after reconstruction. Three patients developed external plate exposure. All patients achieved good functional and acceptable aesthetic outcome. The overall cause-specific cumulative survival was 72.7% at one year and 56.1% at two years. Conclusions: Titanium plate and pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is a safe and reliable option for composite mandibular defects

  2. Successful vaginal delivery at term after vaginal reconstruction with labium minus flaps in a patient with vaginal atresia: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Yi-Feng

    2017-07-01

    We report a case of successful vaginal delivery after vaginal reconstruction with labium minus flaps in a 23-year-old patient with congenital vaginal atresia. The patient primarily presented with amenorrhea and cyclic abdominal pain; transabdominal ultrasonography revealed an enlarged uterus due to hematometra and absence of the lower segment of the vagina. Eight years ago, she had undergone an unsuccessful attempt at canalization at a local hospital. Upon referral to our hospital, she underwent vaginal reconstruction with labium minus flaps. Four months after this procedure, she became pregnant and, subsequently, successfully and safely vaginally delivered a healthy female baby weighing 3250 g at 38 +1 weeks' gestation. The delivery did not involve perineal laceration by lateral episiotomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful vaginal delivery at term after vaginal reconstruction with labium minus flaps in a patient with vaginal atresia. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Bilateral Free Flap Breast Reconstruction Outcomes: Do Abdominal Scars Affect Bilateral Flaps?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Unukovych, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion:. Surgical outcomes of bilateral reconstructions in patients with abdominal scars are generally comparable with ones in patients without prior surgery; however, some problems have been identified. These procedures might have some intraoperative considerations and often require increased operative times. Apart from the traditional preoperative computed tomography angiography, intraoperative imaging (e.g., fluorescence angiography may be advocated in patients with abdominal scars.

  4. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodders, J.N.; Parmar, S.; Stienen, N.-L.M.; Martin, T.J.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Heymans, M.W.; Nandra, B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods: Desired data was retrieved

  5. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodders, J.N.; Parmar, S.; Stienen, N.L.M.; Martin, T.J.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Heymans, M.W.; Nandra, B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications afte