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Sample records for fixed dose rate

  1. Design of movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongyu; Cheng Wen; Li Jikai; Huang Hong; Shen Qiming; Zhang Qiang; Liu Zhengshan

    2005-10-01

    Movable fixed area γ dose rate monitor has not only the characteristics of fixed area γ dose rate monitor, but that of portable meter as well. Its main function is to monitor the areas where dose rate would change without orderliness to prevent unplanned radiation exposure accidents from happening. The design way of the monitor, the main indicators description, the working principle and the comprising of software and hardware are briefly introduced. The monitor has the characteristics of simple installation, easy maintenance, little power consumption, wide range, notability of visual and audible alarm and so on. Its design and technique have novelty and advancement. (authors)

  2. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Andrew H.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Venook, Alan P.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Dito, Elizabeth R.N.; Schillinger, Brian R.N.; Tempero, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m 2 at 10 mg/m 2 /min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m 2 orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation

  3. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  4. A phase I/II trial of intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G) in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M

    2012-12-01

    Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 1,500/mm(3), platelets ≥ 100,000/mm(3), creatinine CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of ≥1500/mm 3 , platelets ≥100,000/mm 3 , creatinine 2 /100 min intravenously) was given on days −22 and −15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) ≥3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to ≥3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy.

  6. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  7. Regulatory requirements for marketing fixed dose combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B G Jayasheel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs is becoming increasingly important from a public health perspective. FDCs have advantages when there is an identifiable patient population for whom treatment with a particular combination of actives in a fixed ratio is safe and effective and when all of the actives contribute to the overall therapeutic effect. Such combinations of drugs are particularly useful in the management of chronic diseases. In addition, there can be real clinical benefits in the form of increased efficacy and/or a reduced incidence of adverse effects. Additional advantages of FDCs are potentially lower costs of manufacturing compared to the costs of producing separate products administered concurrently, simpler logistics of distribution and reduced development of resistance in the case of antimicrobials. Above all, FDC therapy reduces pill burden and improves medication compliance. Although, FDCs seem to be ideal under certain pre-defined circumstances, if a dosing adjustment is warranted, there may not be an FDC available in the most appropriate strength for the patient and if an adverse drug reaction occurs from using an FDC, it may be difficult to identify the active ingredient responsible for causing the reaction. Appendix VI of Schedule Y (Drugs & Cosmetics Rules 1945, India states the requirements for marketing approval of various types of FDCs. The same is further elaborated in this article to provide a detailed guidance including the clinical trial requirements. However, the heterogeneity of the therapeutic field makes it difficult to develop a standard guidance document.

  8. Fixed Dose Combination for TB treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, a third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis. The disease is responsible for nearly 2 million deaths each year and over 8 million were developing active diseases. Moreover, according to WHO (2000, tuberculosis deaths are estimated to increase to 35 million between 2000-2020. The majority of tuberculosis patients worldwide are still treated with single drugs, or with 2-drug fixed-dose combinations (FDCs. To improve tuberculosis treatment, 2- and 3-drug FDCs were recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO as part of the DOTS strategy. Since 1999 a 4-drug FDC was included on the WHO Model List of Essential Drugs. Today, FDCs are important tools to further improve the quality of care for people with TB, and accelerate DOTS expansion to reach the global TB control targets. Fixed dose combination TB drugs could simplifies both treatment and management of drug supply, and may prevent the emergence of drug resistance .Prevention of drug resistance is just one of the potential benefits of the use of FDCs. FDCs simplify administration of drugs by reducing the number of pills a patient takes each day and decreasing the risk of incorrect prescriptions. Most tuberculosis patients need only take 3–4 FDCs tablets per day during the intensive phase of treatment, instead of the 15–16 tablets per day that is common with single-drug formulations It is much simpler to explain to patients that they need to take four tablets of the same type and colour, rather than a mixture of tablets of different shapes, colours and sizes. Also, the chance of taking an incomplete combination of drugs is eliminated, since the four essential drugs are combined into one tablet. FDCs are also simpler for care-givers as they minimize the risk of confusion. Finally, drug procurement, in all its components (stock management, shipping, distribution, is simplified by FDCs. Adverse reactions to drugs are not more

  9. Low-dose fixed-target serial synchrotron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Axford, Danny; Sherrell, Darren A; Kuo, Anling; Ernst, Oliver P; Schulz, Eike C; Miller, R J Dwayne; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M

    2017-04-01

    The development of serial crystallography has been driven by the sample requirements imposed by X-ray free-electron lasers. Serial techniques are now being exploited at synchrotrons. Using a fixed-target approach to high-throughput serial sampling, it is demonstrated that high-quality data can be collected from myoglobin crystals, allowing room-temperature, low-dose structure determination. The combination of fixed-target arrays and a fast, accurate translation system allows high-throughput serial data collection at high hit rates and with low sample consumption.

  10. SIDE EFFECTS OF TUBERCULOSIS TREATMENT WITH FIXED-DOSE COMBINATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Q; Xi, X E; Wang, Y L; Han, W; Zhang, C X; Jiao, J H

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore the therapeutic effect and safety of Fixed-dose Combinations (FDCs) on tuberculosis. A computer search was carried out to review the literature related to clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trails (CCTs) on the curative effect and safety of treating pulmonary tuberculosis with FDCs. The results demonstrated that, in the 22 studies examined, comparison of sputum negative conservation rate of treating smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis with FDCs and single drug, the relative risk (RR) value and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 1.02 (1.01, 1.03) and 1.01 (1.00, 1.02), respectively, at the end of the 2nd month and 6th month (P0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in total occurrence of the rates of side effects pertaining to skin reaction, gastrointestinal tract side reaction, occurrence rate of liver and gall side reaction or occurrence rate of drug withdrawal because of side effects (P>0.05). After sensitivity analysis, it was found that occurrence rate of gastrointestinal tract side effects and occurrence rate of liver and gall side effects were unstable. All the findings suggest that the curative effect of treating tuberculosis with FDCs is better than that of a single drug. More reliable evidence is required since the safety evaluation results are not stable.

  11. Fixed-dose combination therapy in hypertension: cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Fabio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Garofoli, Marta; Ramundo, Elisa; Poltronieri, Cristina; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    The goal of antihypertensive therapy is to reduce the risk associated with blood pressure elevation. Although the choice of first-line drug therapy may exert some effects on different long-term cardiovascular endpoints, randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses demonstrated that blood pressure reduction per se is the primary determinant in primary and secondary prevention. Numerous analyses carried out over the last years have repeatedly shown that many patients require the combination of two or more drugs to reach the recommended level of blood pressure control. Within this context, combination therapy with separate agents or fixed-dose combination pills offers an attractive ability to lower blood pressure more quickly, decrease adverse effects and reach blood pressure target. It is not clear whether fixed combinations of antihypertensive agents in a single tablet provide a greater benefit than the corresponding components given separately. In other words, it is not clear if the use of fixed combinations translates into a clearly improved blood pressure control and cardiovascular prevention in clinical practice. Fixed-dose combinations may simplify the treatment regimen by reducing the number of pills and may be attractive for many hypertensive patients. However, single-pill (fixed) drug combinations have some disadvantages: (i) branded fixed combinations may be more expensive than equivalent free combinations; (ii) the duration of action of individual components may not be equivalent, and this may not justify a single daily dosing of the combination; and (iii) the use of fixed combinations implies less flexibility in modifying the doses of individual components and the exposure of patients to unnecessary therapy. Moreover, should a patient develop side effects to one component, the entire combination should be discontinued and replaced by free drugs. The following three types of fixed-dose tablets have been recently proposed to give additional flexibility: (i

  12. 4. Evaluation of the quality of fixed dose combination anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Methodology: This was a cross sectional study whose objective was to determine the quality of 3 types of fixed dose combination (FDC) anti TB drugs namely 4FDC, 3FDC and 2FDC tablets available in Lusaka District by assessing the presence of active ingredients and the percentage content of these active ingredients ...

  13. Fixed-dose lercanidipine/enalapril for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne, Jan; Haller, Hermann

    2008-04-01

    The dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker lercanidipine and the ACE inhibitor enalapril are frequently used in the treatment of hypertensive patients. In April 2007, a fixed-dose combination of the two drugs was approved in Germany for the treatment of patients not responding to monotherapy. It is expected that the drug will soon be available in the other European Union markets. In this review the present literature is summarized. Two doses will be available with 10 mg lercanidipine each and 10 or 20 mg enalapril. The medication should be taken once daily, optimally =15 minutes before a meal and the consumption of grapefruit juice should be avoided. The fixed-dose combination of the two drugs has a stronger blood pressure-lowering effect than monotherapy with 20 mg enalapril or 10 mg lercanidipine. The combination is well tolerated and few patients stopped the treatment because of side effects. As expected, the most common side effects reported are cough, peripheral edema, flushing, dizziness and vertigo, occurring in 1-5% of patients. This new fixed-dose combination is a useful adjunct to the present treatment and should increase compliance and help reduce hypertension-related costs. 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors

  14. 12 CFR 619.9170 - Fixed interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed interest rate. 619.9170 Section 619.9170 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9170 Fixed interest rate. The rate of interest specified in the note or loan document which will prevail as the maximum...

  15. Estimated rates of recurrence, cure, and treatment abandonment in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated with a -four-drug fixed-dose combination regimen at a tertiary health care facility in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vangie Dias da; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Figueiredo, Sonia Catarina de Abreu

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the rates of recurrence, cure, and treatment abandonment in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated with a four-drug fixed-dose combination (FDC) regimen, as well as to evaluate possible associated factors. This was a retrospective observational study involving 208 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis enrolled in the Hospital Tuberculosis Control Program at the Institute for Thoracic Diseases, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Between January of 2007 and October of 2010, the patients were treated with the rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide (RHZ) regimen, whereas, between November of 2010 and June of 2013, the patients were treated with the rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide-ethambutol FDC (RHZE/FDC) regimen. Data regarding tuberculosis recurrence and mortality in the patients studied were retrieved from the Brazilian Case Registry Database and the Brazilian Mortality Database, respectively. The follow-up period comprised two years after treatment completion. The rates of cure, treatment abandonment, and death were 90.4%, 4.8%, and 4.8%, respectively. There were 7 cases of recurrence during the follow-up period. No significant differences in the recurrence rate were found between the RHZ and RHZE/FDC regimen groups (p = 0.13). We identified no factors associated with the occurrence of recurrence; nor were there any statistically significant differences between the treatment groups regarding adverse effects or rates of cure, treatment abandonment, or death. The adoption of the RHZE/FDC regimen produced no statistically significant differences in the rates of recurrence, cure, or treatment abandonment; nor did it have any effect on the occurrence of adverse effects, in comparison with the use of the RHZ regimen. Estimar as taxas de recidiva, cura e abandono de tratamento em pacientes com tuberculose pulmonar tratados com o esquema de dose fixa combinada (DFC) de quatro drogas e avaliar possíveis fatores associados

  16. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  17. Spillover adherence effects of fixed-dose combination HIV therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauf TL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Kauf1, Keith L Davis2, Stephanie R Earnshaw2, E Anne Davis31Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Independent consultant, Pittsboro, NC, USAAbstract: The impact of fixed-dose combination (FDC products on adherence to other, non-fixed regimen components has not been examined. We compared adherence to a third antiretroviral (ART component among patients receiving a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone consisting of the FDC Epzicom®, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, Research Triangle Park, NC (abacavir sulfate 600 mg + lamivudine 300 mg; FDC group versus NRTI combinations taken as two separate pills (NRTI Combo group using data from a national sample of 30 health plans covering approximately 38 million lives from 1997 to 2005. Adherence was measured as the medication possession ratio (MPR. Multivariate logistic regression compared treatment groups based on the likelihood of achieving ≥95% adherence, with sensitivity analyses using alternative thresholds. MPR was assessed as a continuous variable using multivariate linear regression. Covariates included age, gender, insurance payer type, year of study drug initiation, presence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, and third agent class. The study sample consisted of 650 FDC and 1947 NRTI Combo patients. Unadjusted mean adherence to the third agent was higher in the FDC group than the NRTI Combo group (0.92 vs 0.85; P < 0.0001. In regression analyses, FDC patients were 48% and 39% more likely to achieve 95% and 90% third agent adherence, respectively (P ≤ 0.03. None of the other MPR specifications achieved comparable results. Among managed care patients, use of an FDC appears to substantially improve adherence to a third regimen component and thus the likelihood of achieving the accepted standard for adherence to HIV therapy of 95%.Keywords

  18. On The Weight Distribution of Fixed-Rate Raptor Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro, Francisco; Paolini, Enrico; Liva, Gianluigi; Bauch, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper Raptor code ensembles with linear random precodes in a fixed-rate setting are considered. An expression for the average distance spectrum is derived and this expression is used to obtain the asymptotic exponent of the weight distribution. The asymptotic growth rate analysis is then exploited to develop a necessary and sufficient condition under which the fixed-rate Raptor code ensemble exhibits a strictly positive typical minimum distance.

  19. Fixed-dose combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonde, Lawrence; San Juan, Zinnia T; Bolton, Peggy

    2014-12-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often requires combinations of antihyperglycemic medications with complementary mechanisms of action. Inadequate adherence to combination therapy, possibly related to pill burden (greater number of pills and higher administration frequency) and poor tolerability, may lead to suboptimal clinical outcomes. One potential means of addressing these problems is the use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) that simplify the treatment regimen by reducing pill burden compared with the same combination delivered as separate pills. The present study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of FDCs in the treatment of T2DM patients and provides an overview of dosing, costs, and adherence. A review of FDCs, with particular attention to those that contain metformin extended-release (XR) and allow once-daily dosing. Many FDCs contain metformin as one of the component drugs. However, the standard immediate-release (IR) formulation of metformin requires twice-daily dosing and may have tolerability problems related to adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects. The XR formulations of metformin can be administered once daily and have been shown to reduce the occurrence of GI effects frequently observed with metformin IR; consequently, they may have significant advantages for inclusion in FDCs. The long-term cost-effectiveness of FDCs remains to be fully determined. For patients taking metformin, FDCs containing metformin XR offer equivalent efficacy with reduced dose frequency and, potentially, fewer GI events compared with standard IR formulation, as well as a reduced number of pills compared with separate-pill regimens. By reducing pill burden and improving tolerability, FDCs may improve adherence.

  20. Fixed dose 131-I treatment in Basedow patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klisarova, A; Bochev, P.; Hristosov, K.

    2003-01-01

    The choice of a treatment for Basedow patients is still unsolved problem. The treatment with 131-I has certain advantages but the determination of the individual therapeutic dose is impossible. The aim of the study is to assess the efficiency of the treatment with a fixed dose. 23 patient have been treated, 30 women and 3 men, age between 48 and 78. All patients are with chronic disease with relapses (1 to 4 relapses). 5 of the patients are with a thyrotoxic heart, 3 - with ophtalmopatia, 2 - with toxic medicamentous hepatitis and 2 with allergies to thyreostatics. Before the treatment with 131-I all patients have been in euthyroid state with normal levels of the peripheral hormones. All patients have received initial doses of 5 mCi 131-I. The hormone levels have been followed on 3rd, 6th, 12th and 24th month after the uptake. From a total of 23 patients, in 3 cases a transitional hypothyroidism has been found between 3th and 6th month, in 3 patients - permanent hypothyroidism. In 5 patients after the 6th month an additional dose of 5 mCi 131-I is given (in one woman a permanent hypothyroidism is reached). Four of the patients have been with a significant thyroid hyperplasia with volume above 60 ml. In three patients in the period between 6th and 12th month a slight hyperthyroidism is registered, which have been suppressed by a low dose thyreostatic. A year after the treatment they have been found euthyroid. The decision for giving a second dose have been based on the evident heptahydrate symptomatic s and the persisting increased thyroid volume. In one case it is observed an acute thyrotoxicosis for 3-5 days after the 131 I uptake. No cases of worsening of the eye symptoms are observed. In conclusion, the treatment with 131 I is a appropriate method for patients with cardiovascular complications, contraindication for surgery or side effects of the thyreostatic treatment. the dose od 5 mCi is sufficient for patients with mild to medium form of Basedow disease and a

  1. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses

  2. Radiation dose rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorber, R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable device is described for in-field usage for measuring the dose rate of an ambient beta radiation field, comprising: a housing, substantially impervious to beta radiation, defining an ionization chamber and having an opening into the ionization chamber; beta radiation pervious electrically-conductive window means covering the opening and entrapping, within the ionization chamber, a quantity of gaseous molecules adapted to ionize upon impact with beta radiation particles; electrode means disposed within the ionization chamber and having a generally shallow concave surface terminating in a generally annular rim disposed at a substantially close spacing to the window means. It is configured to substantially conform to the window means to define a known beta radiation sensitive volume generally between the window means and the concave surface of the electrode means. The concave surface is effective to substantially fully expose the beta radiation sensitive volume to the radiation field over substantially the full ambient area faced by the window means

  3. A fixed/variable bit-rate data compression architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigle, Gregary C.; Venbrux, Jack; Yeh, Pen-Shu

    1993-01-01

    A VLSI architecture for an adaptive data compression encoder capable of sustaining fixed or variable bit-rate output has been developed. There are three modes of operation: lossless with variable bit-rate, lossy with fixed bit-rate and lossy with variable bit-rate. For lossless encoding, the implementation is identical to the USES chip designed for Landsat 7. Obtaining a fixed bit-rate is achieved with a lossy DPCM algorithm using adaptive, nonuniform scalar quantization. In lossy mode, variable bit-rate coding uses the lossless sections of the encoder for post-DPCM entropy coding. The encoder shows excellent compression performance in comparison to other current data compression techniques. No external tables or memory are required for operation.

  4. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  5. Yosprala: A Fixed Dose Combination of Aspirin and Omeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Keith T

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Patients who survive a primary cerebrovascular or cardiovascular event are at increased risk of a subsequent occurrence. Antiplatelet therapy plays an essential role for secondary prevention in individuals with stroke, transient ischemic attack, acute or chronic artery disease, or peripheral arterial disease. Maintaining high-risk patients on low-dose aspirin therapy is a fundamental component of management. However, poor adherence, secondary to the drug's gastrointestinal side effects, has been associated with negative cardiovascular outcomes. Numerous studies have indicated that proton-pump inhibitors significantly reduce the risk of upper gastrointestinal adverse events in aspirin-treated patients. The US Food and Drug Administration approved Yosprala (Aralez Pharmaceuticals), a fixed-dose combination of delayed-release aspirin and immediate-release omeprazole, on September 15, 2016. It is the first product to become available in the United States that combines these 2 pharmacologic drug classes, and represents a new therapeutic option for patients and healthcare providers who strive to improve adherence to daily aspirin therapy.

  6. Dose-rate dependence of thermoluminescence response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Chen, R.; Groom, P.J.; Durrani, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The previously observed dose-rate effect of thermoluminescence in quartz at high dose-rates is given at theoretical formulation. Computer calculations simulating the experimental conditions yield similar results to the experimental ones. (orig.)

  7. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  8. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  9. Randomized clinical trial comparing fixed-time split dosing and split dosing of oral Picosulfate regimen for bowel preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae Hyuck; Han, Koon Hee; Park, Jong Kyu; Seo, Hyun Il; Kim, Young Don; Lee, Sang Jin; Jun, Baek Gyu; Hwang, Min Sik; Park, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, Myeong Jong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2017-08-28

    To compare the efficacy of fixed-time split dose and split dose of an oral sodium picosulfate for bowel preparation. This is study was prospective, randomized controlled study performed at a single Institution (2013-058). A total of 204 subjects were assigned to receive one of two sodium picosulfate regimens ( i.e ., fixed-time split or split) prior to colonoscopy. Main outcome measurements were bowel preparation quality and subject tolerability. There was no statistical difference between the fixed-time split dose regimen group and the split dose regimen group (Ottawa score mean 2.57 ± 1.91 vs 2.80 ± 2.51, P = 0.457). Cecal intubation time and physician's satisfaction of inspection were not significantly different between the two groups ( P = 0.428, P = 0.489). On subgroup analysis, for afternoon procedures, the fixed-time split dose regimen was equally effective as compared with the split dose regimen (Ottawa score mean 2.56 ± 1.78 vs 2.59 ± 2.27, P = 0.932). There was no difference in tolerability or compliance between the two groups. Nausea was 21.2% in the fixed-time split dose group and 14.3% in the split dose group ( P = 0.136). Vomiting was 7.1% and 2.9% ( P = 0.164), abdominal discomfort 7.1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.484), dizziness 1% and 4.8% ( P = 0.113), cold sweating 1% and 0% ( P = 0.302) and palpitation 0% and 1% ( P = 0.330), respectively. Sleep disturbance was two (2%) patients in the fixed-time split dose group and zero (0%) patient in the split dose preparation ( P = 0.143) group. A fixed-time split dose regimen with sodium picosulfate is not inferior to a split dose regimen for bowel preparation and equally effective for afternoon colonoscopy.

  10. Fixed-dose combination for adults accessing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA HIV Clinicians Society

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This document serves to guide clinicians and programme managers on how to switch from 3 separate antiretroviral (ARV drugs to the new, single, fixed-dose combination (FDC tablet containing tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabine (FTC and efavirenz (EFV. Summary Transitioning from individual drugs to an FDC tablet needs to be managed carefully, particularly regarding stock management, ordering processes, supply-chain integrity and comprehensive patient counselling. Priority groups • Initially, FDC supply will be insufficient to provide for all FDC-suitable patients • Therefore, the National Department of Health (NDoH has recommended that the following patient groups be prioritized for FDC initiation/switch: • Priority group 1: All HIV-positive patients newly initiating ART – adults, adolescents and pregnant women (regardless of CD4 count (amendment to the guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT anticipated in April 2013 – and who do not have contra-indications to the FDC component drugs • Priority group 2: HIV-positive pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers currently stable on lamivudine (3TC, TDF and EFV • Priority group 3: Virologically suppressed patients on a stavudine (d4T-based regimen and who have normal renal function • Priority group 4: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have tuberculosis (TB co-infection • Priority group 5: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have other co-morbidites (e.g. hypertension, diabetes • Priority group 6: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who request to switch to the FDC treatment • Priority group 7: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who, after counselling, agree to switch to the FDC treatment. Important: Clinic staff must co-ordinate this process and only switch as many patients to the FDC tablet as stock allows. This should avoid patients being switched back and forth

  11. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  12. Concrete spent fuel storage casks dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bace, M.; Jecmenica, R.; Trontl, K.

    1998-01-01

    Our intention was to model a series of concrete storage casks based on TranStor system storage cask VSC-24, and calculate the dose rates at the surface of the casks as a function of extended burnup and a prolonged cooling time. All of the modeled casks have been filled with the original multi-assembly sealed basket. The thickness of the concrete shield has been varied. A series of dose rate calculations for different burnup and cooling time values have been performed. The results of the calculations show rather conservative original design of the VSC-24 system, considering only the dose rate values, and appropriate design considering heat rejection.(author)

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  15. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  16. Dose equivalent rate calculation tool for FBFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porte, R.; Lengele, C.; Favier, Th.; Duval, A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the results obtained by a software designed to compute dose equivalent rate for the critical workstations of the FBFC plant in Romans, France, which will have to deal with an uranium more heavily loaded with U 232 . The uranium spectrum and the ageing time can be varied in order to visualize the evolution of the dose equivalent rate in different locations with respect to the ageing time

  17. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1991-08-01

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60 Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  18. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  19. Dose rate calculations for a reconnaissance vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, L.; Mackey, J.; Salmon, M.; Smith, C.; Wall, S.

    2005-01-01

    A Chemical Nuclear Reconnaissance System (CNRS) has been developed by the British Ministry of Defence to make chemical and radiation measurements on contaminated terrain using appropriate sensors and recording equipment installed in a land rover. A research programme is under way to develop and validate a predictive capability to calculate the build-up of contamination on the vehicle, radiation detector performance and dose rates to the occupants of the vehicle. This paper describes the geometric model of the vehicle and the methodology used for calculations of detector response. Calculated dose rates obtained using the MCBEND Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code in adjoint mode are presented. These address the transient response of the detectors as the vehicle passes through a contaminated area. Calculated dose rates were found to agree with the measured data to be within the experimental uncertainties, thus giving confidence in the shielding model of the vehicle and its application to other scenarios. (authors)

  20. Reference Dose Rates for Fluoroscopy Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geleijns, J.; Broerse, J.J.; Hummel, W.A.; Schalij, M.J.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Teeuwisse, W.; Zoetelief, J.

    1998-01-01

    The wide diversity of fluoroscopy guided interventions which have become available in recent years has improved patient care. They are being performed in increasing numbers, particularly at departments of cardiology and radiology. Some procedures are very complex and require extended fluoroscopy times, i.e. longer than 30 min, and radiation exposure of patient and medical staff is in some cases rather high. The occurrence of radiation-induced skin injuries on patients has shown that radiation protection for fluoroscopy guided interventions should not only be focused on stochastic effects, i.e. tumour induction and hereditary risks, but also on potential deterministic effects. Reference dose levels are introduced by the Council of the European Communities as an instrument to achieve optimisation of radiation protection in radiology. Reference levels in conventional diagnostic radiology are usually expressed as entrance skin dose or dose-area product. It is not possible to define a standard procedure for complex interventions due to the large inter-patient variations with regard to the complexity of specific interventional procedures. Consequently, it is not realistic to establish a reference skin dose or dose-area product for complex fluoroscopy guided interventions. As an alternative, reference values for fluoroscopy guided interventions can be expressed as the entrance dose rates on a homogeneous phantom and on the image intensifier. A protocol has been developed and applied during a nationwide survey of fluoroscopic dose rate during catheter ablations. From this survey reference entrance dose rates of respectively 30 mGy.min -1 on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom with a thickness of 21 cm, and of 0.8 μGy.s -1 on the image intensifier have been derived. (author)

  1. Artesunate-amodiaquine fixed dose combination for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvikar Anupkumar R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT has been recommended for the treatment of falciparum malaria by the World Health Organization. Though India has already switched to ACT for treating falciparum malaria, there is need to have multiple options of alternative forms of ACT. A randomized trial was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of the fixed dose combination of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ and amodiaquine (AQ for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria for the first time in India. The study sites are located in malaria-endemic, chloroquine-resistant areas. Methods This was an open label, randomized trial conducted at two sites in India from January 2007 to January 2008. Patients between six months and 60 years of age having Plasmodium falciparum mono-infection were randomly allocated to ASAQ and AQ arms. The primary endpoint was 28-day PCR-corrected parasitological cure rate. Results Three hundred patients were enrolled at two participating centres, Ranchi, Jharkhand and Rourkela, Odisha. Two patients in AQ arm had early treatment failure while there was no early treatment failure in ASAQ arm. Late treatment failures were seen in 13 and 12 patients in ASAQ and AQ arms, respectively. The PCR-corrected cure rates in intent-to-treat population were 97.51% (94.6-99.1% in ASAQ and 88.65% (81.3-93.9% in AQ arms. In per-protocol population, they were 97.47% (94.2-99.2% and 88.30% (80-94% in ASAQ and AQ arms respectively. Seven serious adverse events (SAEs were reported in five patients, of which two were reported as related to the treatment. All SAEs resolved without sequel. Conclusion The fixed dose combination of ASAQ was found to be efficacious and safe treatment for P. falciparum malaria. Amodiaquine also showed acceptable efficacy, making it a suitable partner of artesunate. The combination could prove to be a viable option in case India opts for fixed dose combination ACT. Clinical trial registry

  2. Maximal safe dose therapy of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Seok, Ju Won; Uh, Jae Sun

    2005-01-01

    In patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy presents an awkward situation in terms of treatment decision making. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration base on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We investigated the efficacy of MSD in differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy. Forty-six patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who had non-responsible residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. The postoperative pathology consisted of 43 papillary carcinomas and 3 follicular carcinomas. MSD was calculated according the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. MSDs were administered at intervals of at least 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole body scan (WBS) and serum thyroglobulin measurements. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq. Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 (41.3%) stable disease, and 6 (13.0%) disease progression. Thus, about a half of the patients showed complete or partial remission, and of these patients, 14 (67%) showed response after a single MSD administration and 6 (29%) showed response after the second dose of MSD administrations. Twenty-nine patients (63%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, and recovered spontaneously with the exception of one. MSD administration is an effective method even in the patients who failed to be treated by conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD therapy of I-131 can be considered in the patients who failed by fixed dose therapy

  3. Fixed-dose combinations for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonde, Lawrence; San Juan, Zinnia T

    2012-01-01

    Combining antihyperglycemic agents with complementary mechanisms of action is a cornerstone of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) management. Although several fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) are available, representing standard types of combination therapy in T2DM, use of these products has been limited. To address the likely concerns of prescribers and patients regarding the use of FDCs in the treatment of T2DM, literature searches were performed to ascertain the bioavailability, efficacy, tolerability, and cost-effectiveness of the currently approved FDCs compared with their individual component drugs given as separate pills in combination. Additionally, data were collected on rates of adherence, clinical outcomes, and overall treatment costs with FDCs versus dual therapy with the same constituent drugs. Bioavailability is equivalent for FDCs and dual therapy used in T2DM. Efficacy and tolerability also appear to be at least as good with FDCs as with dual therapy. Retrospective analyses have suggested that FDCs can enhance adherence to therapy, presumably as a result of the reduction in pill burden, and improved adherence may result in improved glycemic control and reduced disease management costs. In addition, because currently available FDCs come in two or more dose-strength formulations, they also afford some measure of dosing flexibility. The available evidence supports the wider use of FDCs in the treatment of patients with T2DM.

  4. Spontaneous mutation rates and the rate-doubling dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Borstel, R.C.; Moustaccki, E.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of radiation required to double the frequency of mutations or tumours over the rate of those that occur spontaneously is called the rate-doubling dose. An equivalent concept has been proposed for exposure to other environmental mutagens. The doubling dose concept is predicated on the assumption that all human populations have the same spontaneous mutation rate, and that this spontaneous mutation rate is known. It is now established for prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes that numerous genes control the spontaneous mutation rate, and it is likely that the same is true for human cells as well. Given that the accepted mode of evolution of human populatons is from small, isolated groups of individuals, it seems likely that each population would have a different spontaneous mutation rate. Given that a minimum of twenty genes control or affect the spontaneous mutation rate, and that each of these in turn is susceptible to spontaneously arising or environmentally induced mutations, it seems likely that every individual within a population (except for siblings from identical multiple births) will have a unique spontaneous mutation rate. If each individual in a population does have a different spontaneous mutation rate, the doubling dose concept, in rigorous terms, is fallacious. Therefore, as with other concepts of risk evaluation, the doubling dose concept is subject to criticism. Nevertheless, until we know individual spontaneous mutation rates with precision, and can evaluate risks based on this information, the doubling dose concept has a heuristic value and is needed for practical assessment of risks for defined populations. (author)

  5. 1.Evaluation of the quality of fixed dose combination anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    46987.2

    serious implications on treatment outcomes for TB hence the moderately high rate of multi drug resistance (MDR) cases that were recorded in the. 9 country. Another study was done in Botswana in 1999 that involved quantitative analysis of 13 FDC anti TB samples and the results obtained showed that 31%. (4/13) of the ...

  6. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  7. Biology of dose rate in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles underlying brachytherapy, to understand why current treatment regimes are the way they are, and to discuss what the future may hold in store. Brachytherapy has a long history. It was suggested as long ago as 1903 by Alexander Graham Bell, and the optimal application of this technique has been a subject of debate ever since. 'Brachy' means 'short', and the essential features of conventional brachytherapy are: positioning of the source a short distance from, or in, the tumor, allowing good dose distributions; short overall treatment times, to counter tumor repopulation; low dose rate, enabling a good therapeutic advantage between tumor control and damage to late-responding tissue. The advantages of good dose distributions speak for themselves; in some situations, as we shall see, computer-based dose optimization can be used to improve them still further. The advantages of short overall times stem from the fact that accelerated repopulation of the tumor typically begins a few weeks after the start of a radiation treatment. If all the radiation can be crammed in before that time, the risks of tumor repopulation can be considerably reduced. In fact even external-beam radiotherapy is moving in this direction, with the use of highly accelerated protocols. The advantages of low dose rate stem from the differential response to fractionation of early- and late-responding tissues. Essentially, lowering the dose rate spares late-responding tissue more than it does early-responding tissue such as tumors. We shall also discuss some recent innovations in the context of the general principles that have been outlined. For example, High dose rate brachytherapy, particularly for the uterine cervix: Does it work? If so, when and why? Use of Ir-192 sources, with a half life of 70 days: Should corrections be made for changing biological effectiveness as the dose

  8. Fixed dose of I-131 therapy for the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Lee, K.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate short-term (6 month) efficacy of fixed-dose (555 MBq, 15 mCi) approach in the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism and analyze the relationship between clinical outcome (hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and euthyroidism) and variances (patient age, thyroid weight, absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue, and radioactive iodine uptake value). Methods: 38 patients of Graves' hyperthyroidism were treated with 555MBq of radioactive iodine (in the form of capsule). Follow-up was done 3 and 6 months post therapy and the following clinical outcome was monitored: persistent hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and euthyroidism. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software (version 11.5). P<0.05 was taken as indicating a statistically significant effect. Results: Of the 38 subjects, 14 (36.8%) were identified as euthyroidism, 18 (47.4%) hypothyroidism, and 6 (15.8%) hyperthyroidism. Cure rate (euthyroidism+hypothyroidism) was 84.2%. Statistical analysis revealed that there is a statistically significant difference of absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue and thyroid weight (F=17.639, P=0.000; F=28.453, P=0.000), but there is no statistically significant difference in terms of patient age and RAIU (F=1.375, P-0.266; F=2.453, P=0.101) among euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism patients. Conclusion: We concluded that fixed-dose approach is very effective in the quickly restoration of thyroid function. There is a statistically significant difference of absorbed activity per gram of thyroid tissue and thyroid weight, but there is no statistically significant difference in terms of patient age and RAIU among euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism patients. (authors)

  9. Maximal safe dose of I-131 after failure of standard fixed dose therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kang, Won-Jun; Park, Do-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo; Cho, Bo-Youn; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2008-01-01

    The maximal safe dose (MSD) on the basis of bone marrow irradiation levels allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue. The efficacy of MSD therapy in differentiated metastatic thyroid cancers that persisted after conventional fixed dose therapy is investigated. Forty-seven differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with non-responsive residual disease despite repetitive fixed dose I-131 therapy were enrolled in this study. Their postoperative pathologies were 43 papillary carcinomas and 4 follicular carcinomas. The MSD was calculated with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center protocol using serial blood samples. The MSDs were administered at intervals of 6 months. Treatment responses were evaluated using I-131 whole-body scans and serum thyroglobulin measurements. The mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (339.6±57.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 7 (14.9%) showed complete remission, 15 (31.9%) partial remission, 19 (40.4%) stable disease, and 6 (12.8%) disease progression. Of the patients who showed complete or partial remission, 15 (65%) showed response after the first MSD session and 6 (26%) showed response after the second session. Twenty-nine patients (62%) experienced transient cytopenia after therapy, but three did not recover to the baseline level. The maximal safe dose provides an effective means of treatment in patients who failed to respond adequately to conventional fixed dose therapy. I-131 MSD therapy can be considered in patients who fail fixed dose therapy. (author)

  10. Tramadol/paracetamol fixed-dose combination in the treatment of moderate to severe pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergolizzi Jr JV

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph V Pergolizzi Jr,1,2 Mart van de Laar,3 Richard Langford,4 Hans-Ulrich Mellinghoff,5 Ignacio Morón Merchante,6 Srinivas Nalamachu,7,8 Joanne O'Brien,9 Serge Perrot,10 Robert B Raffa111Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Association of Chronic Pain Patients, Houston, TX, USA; 3Arthritis Center Twente (MST and UT, Enschede, The Netherlands; 4Anaesthetics Laboratory, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK; 5Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Osteology, Kantonsspital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 6Centro de Salud Universitario Goya, Madrid, Spain; 7Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 8International Clinic Research, Leawood, KS, USA; 9Department of Pain Management, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin, Ireland; 10Service de Médecine Interne et Consultation de la Douleur, Hôpital Dieu, Paris, France; 11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Pain is the most common reason patients seek medical attention and pain relief has been put forward as an ethical obligation of clinicians and a fundamental human right. However, pain management is challenging because the pathophysiology of pain is complex and not completely understood. Widely used analgesics such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and paracetamol (acetaminophen have been associated with adverse events. Adverse event rates are of concern, especially in long-term treatment or at high doses. Paracetamol and NSAIDs are available by prescription, over the counter, and in combination preparations. Patients may be unaware of the risk associated with high dosages or long-term use of paracetamol and NSAIDs. Clinicians should encourage patients to disclose all medications they take in a "do ask, do tell" approach that includes patient education about the risks and benefits of common pain relievers. The ideal pain reliever would have few risks and

  11. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  12. Low, fixed dose defibrotide in management of hepatic veno-occlusive disease post stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagal, Bhausaheb; Chandrasekharan, Arun; Chougle, Aliya; Khattry, Navin

    2018-03-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is well recognized potentially serious regimen-related toxicity seen after stem cell transplantation. Severe VOD is associated with poor long-term outcomes with very high mortality. Besides supportive care, only defibrotide has been found to be effective in the management of VOD. The recommended dose of defibrotide is 25mg/kg/d but there has been no classical dose finding study done for this drug. A higher dose of defibrotide is associated with increased risk of bleeding and this drug is prohibitively expensive. We report our experience of using fixed low dose of defibrotide in patients with VOD. We retrospectively evaluated 511 patients who underwent stem cell transplant at our center from November 2007 and December 2015. All patients received ursodeoxycholic acid as VOD prophylaxis. Modified Seattle criterion was used for diagnosis and severity grading of VOD. Patients developing VOD were initially treated with furosemide and adequate analgesia. Defibrotide was started within 12 to 24 hours of diagnosis of VOD. All adult patients received defibrotide at a fixed dose of 200mg twice daily while two children were given dose of 100mg and 50mg twice daily. Nine (1.7%) of our patients developed VOD. Daily dose of defibrotide ranged from 5mg/kg/d to 20mg/kg/d till resolution of VOD. All patients had complete resolution of VOD. None of our patients required ventilator support or dialysis. No episodes of bleeding were observed. No dose response relationship was observed between defibrotide dose and time to resolution of VOD. Low fixed dose defibrotide initiated early seems to be effective and safe in treatment of VOD. This is relevant in a resource limited setting and warrants prospective evaluation. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  14. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  15. Single fixed-dose oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol for acute postoperative pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Cooper, Tess E; Phillips, Tudor

    2016-09-22

    Combining two different analgesics in fixed doses in a single tablet can provide better pain relief than either drug alone in acute pain. This appears to be broadly true across a range of different drug combinations, in postoperative pain and migraine headache. A new combination of dexketoprofen (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) plus tramadol (an opioid) has been tested in acute postoperative pain conditions. It is not yet licensed for use. This review is one of a series on oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain. Individual reviews have been brought together in two overviews to provide information about the relative efficacy and harm of the different interventions. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of a single fixed-dose of oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol, compared with placebo, for moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults, using methods that permit comparison with other analgesics evaluated in standardised trials using almost identical methods and outcomes. A secondary objective was to compare the combination with the individual analgesics alone. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via CRSO, MEDLINE via Ovid, and Embase via Ovid from inception to 31 May 2016. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and two online clinical trial registries. Randomised, double-blind trials of oral dexketoprofen plus tramadol administered as a single oral dose, for the relief of acute postoperative pain in adults, and compared to placebo. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, examined issues of study quality and potential bias, and extracted data. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for dexketoprofen plus tramadol, compared with placebo with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We collected information on the number of participants with at least 50% of

  16. The long-term effectiveness of generic adult fixed-dose combination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Treatment with generic adult FDC for HIV-infected Ugandan children led to sustained clinical, immunologic and virologic response during 96 weeks of ART. Early initiation of ART is key to achieving virological success. Key words: Children, HIV, antiretroviral treatment, Sub-Saharan Africa, fixed dose ...

  17. A dose-escalating phase I of imatinib mesylate with fixed dose of metronomic cyclophosphamide in targeted olid tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Adenis, A; Ray-Coquard, I; Italiano, A; Chauzit, E; Bui-Nguyen, B; Blay, J-Y; Tresch-Bruneel, E; Fournier, C; Clisant, S; Amela, E Y; Cassier, P A; Molimard, M; Penel, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preclinical findings suggest that imatinib mesylate (IM) and metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) combination provides synergistic antiangiogenic activity on both pericytes and endothelial cells. Methods: We have designed a 3+3 dose-escalating phase I trial with a fixed dose of MC (50 mg two times daily) plus IM (400 mg per day; 300 and 400 mg two times daily). Enrolled patients had IM- and sutininib-refractory advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) (n=17), chordoma (n=7) an...

  18. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.; Vivanco, M.; Castro, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) we use the chemical dosimetry Astm-E-1026 Fricke as a standard dosimetric system of reference and different routine dosimetric systems of high doses, according to the applied doses to obtain the desired effects in the treated products and the doses range determined for each type of dosimeter. Fricke dosimetry is a chemical dosimeter in aqueous solution indicating the absorbed dose by means an increase in absorbance at a specific wavelength. A calibrated spectrophotometer with controlled temperature is used to measure absorbance. The adsorbed dose range should cover from 20 to 400 Gy, the Fricke solution is extremely sensitive to organic impurities, to traces of metal ions, in preparing chemical products of reactive grade must be used and the water purity is very important. Using the referential standard dosimetric system Fricke, was determined to March 5, 2013, using the referential standard dosimetric system Astm-1026 Fricke, were irradiated in triplicate Fricke dosimeters, to 5 irradiation times (20; 30; 40; 50 and 60 seconds) and by linear regression, the dose rate of 5.400648 kGy /h was determined in the central point of the irradiation chamber (irradiator Gamma cell 220 Excel), applying the decay formula, was compared with the obtained results by manufacturers by means the same dosimetric system in the year of its manufacture, being this to the date 5.44691 kGy /h, with an error rate of 0.85. After considering that the dosimetric solution responds to the results, we proceeded to the irradiation of a sample of 200 g of cereal instant food, 2 dosimeters were placed at the lateral ends of the central position to maximum dose and 2 dosimeters in upper and lower ends as minimum dose, they were applied same irradiation times; for statistical analysis, the maximum dose rate was 6.1006 kGy /h and the minimum dose rate of 5.2185 kGy /h; with a dose uniformity of 1.16. In medical material of micro pulverized bone for

  19. Efficacy of fixed low dose hydroxyurea in Indian children with sickle cell anemia: a single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipti L; Apte, Mohini; Colah, Roshan; Sarathi, Vijaya; Desai, Saumil; Gokhale, Amruta; Bhandarwar, Amol; Jain, Harshwardhan L; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2013-10-01

    Data on the efficacy of hydroxyurea (HU) in Indian children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is limited. Hence, we have evaluated the efficacy of fixed low dose HU in Indian children. The study cohort consisted of 144 children (<18 years of age) with SCA having severe manifestations (≥ 3 episodes of vasocclusive crisis or blood transfusions, or having ≥ 1 episode of acute chest syndrome or cerebrovascular stroke or sequestration crisis) who were started on fixed low dose HU (10 mg/kg/day). They were followed up for two years and monitored for the hematological and clinical efficacy and safety. There was significant increase in the fetal hemoglobin level (HbF%), total hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume. Vasoocclusive crises, blood transfusions, acute chest syndrome, sequestration crises and hospitalizations decreased significantly. Baseline HbF% had significant positive correlation with HbF% at 24 months. There was significant negative correlation between baseline HbF% and change in HbF% from baseline to 24 months. No significant correlation was found between HbF% at baseline and clinical event rates per year after HU. No major adverse events occurred during the study period. Fixed low dose HU is effective and safe in Indian children with SCA.

  20. Automatic dose-rate controlling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, T.; Nagy Czirok, Cs.; Batki, L.; Antal, S.

    1977-01-01

    The patent of a dose-rate controlling equipment that can be attached to X-ray image-amplifiers is presented. In the new equipment the current of the photocatode of the image-amplifier is led into the regulating unit, which controls the X-ray generator automatically. The advantages of the equipment are the following: it can be simply attached to any type of X-ray image-amplifier, it accomplishes fast and sensitive regulation, it makes possible the control of both the mA and the kV values, it is attached to the most reliable point of the image-transmission chain. (L.E.)

  1. Dose rate correction in medium dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, F.D.; Negi, P.S.; Sharma, S.C.; Kapoor, R.; Singh, D.P.; Ghoshal, S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the magnitude of brachytherapy dose reduction required for stage IIB and III carcinoma cervix patients treated by external radiation and medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A.Materials and methods: In study-I, at the time of MDR brachytherapy application at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A, patients received either 3060 cGy, a 12.5% dose reduction (MDR-12.5), or 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-30), to point A and they were compared to a group of previously treated LDR patients who received 3500 cGy to point A at a dose rate of 55-65 cGy/h. Study-II was a prospective randomized trial and patients received either 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-II (30)) or 2800 cGy, a 20% dose reduction (MDR-II (20)), at point A. Patients were evaluated for local control of disease and morbidity. Results: In study-I the 5-year actuarial local control rate in the MDR-30 and MDR-12.5 groups was 71.7±10% and 70.5±10%, respectively, compared to 63.4±10% in the LDR group. However, the actuarial morbidity (all grades) in the MDR-12.5 group was 58.5±14% as against 34.9±9% in the LDR group (P 3 developed complication as against 62.5% of those receiving a rectal BED of (140 3 (χ 2 =46.43; P<0.001). Conclusion: We suggest that at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A the brachytherapy dose reduction factor should be around 30%, as suggested by radiobiological data, to keep the morbidity as low as possible without compromising the local control rates. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Generating interest-rate scenarios for fixed-income portfolio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the main sources of uncertainty in the analysis of the risk and return properties of a portfolio of fixed-income securities is the stochastic evolution of the shape of the yield curve. The authors have estimated a model that fits the South African yield curve, using a Kalman filter. The model includes four latent factors and ...

  3. Is the fixed-dose combination of telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide a good approach to treat hypertension?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Marc P Maillard, Michel BurnierService of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, SwitzerlandAbstract: Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with selective AT1 receptor antagonists is recognized as an effective mean to lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Among the class of AT1 receptor antagonists, telmisartan offers the advantage of a very long half-life. This enables blood pressure control over 24 hours using once-daily administration. The combination of telmisartan with hydrochlorothiazide is a logical step because numerous previous studies have demonstrated that sodium depletion enhances the antihypertensive efficacy of drugs interfering with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. In accordance with past experience using similar compounds blocking the RAS, several controlled studies have now demonstrated that the fixed-dose combination of telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide is superior in lowering blood pressure than either telmisartan or hydrochlorothiazide alone. Of clinical interest also is the observation that the excellent clinical tolerance of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist is not affected by the association of the low-dose thiazide. Thus telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide is an effective and well-tolerated antihypertensive combination. Finally, the development of fixed-dose combinations should improve drug adherence because of the one-pill-a-day regimen.Keywords: telmisartan, hydrochlorothiazide, fixed-dose combinations, antihypertensive agent, safety, compliance

  4. A cost-minimization analysis of combination therapy in hypertension: fixed-dose vs extemporary combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bellone

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease management and prevention represent the leading cost driver in Italian healthcare expenditure. In order to reach the target blood pressure, a large majority of patients require simultaneous administration of multiple antihypertensive agents.OBJECTIVE: To assess the economic impact of the use of fixed dose combinations of antihypertensive agents, compared to the extemporary combination of the same principles.METHODS: A cost minimization analysis was conducted to determine the pharmaceutical daily cost of five fixed dose combinations (olmesartan 20 mg + amlodipine 5 mg, perindopril 5 mg + amlodipine 5 mg, enalapril 20 mg + lercanidipine 10 mg, felodipine 5 mg + ramipril 5 mg, and delapril 30 mg + manidipine 10 mg compared with extemporary combination of the same principles in the perspective of the Italian NHS. Daily acquisition costs are estimated based on current Italian prices and tariffs.RESULTS: In three cases the use of fixed‑dose combination instead of extemporary combination induces a lower daily cost. Fixed combination treatment with delapril 30 mg + manidipine 10 mg induces greater cost savings for the National Health System (95,47 €/pts/year, as compared to free drugs combination therapy.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with free drug combinations, fixed‑dose combinations of antihypertensive agents are associated with lower daily National Health Service acquisition costs.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v14i4.886

  5. The financial and service implications of splitting fixed-dose antiretroviral drugs - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R; Carlin, E; Sadique, Z; Ahmed, I; Adams, E J

    2015-02-01

    In 2010/2011, regional commissioners withdrew payment for the fixed-dose combination Combivir, forcing a switch to component drugs. This was deemed clinically acceptable and annual savings of £44 k expected. We estimated the true costs of switching and examined patient outcomes. Information for 46 patients using Combivir was extracted from case notes for each clinical contact in the 12 months pre- and post-switch (clinician seen, tests, antiretrovirals). Post-switch care costs £93/patient more annually versus pre-switch (95% CI £424 to £609), yielding £4278/year more post-switch for all patients. Drug and pathology costs were more expensive post-switch and extra clinical visits required. None of these results were statistically significant. Forty-two per cent of patients switched directly or in the subsequent year to an alternative fixed-dose combination rather than generics. Costs in this group were significantly higher post-switch driven by drug cost. Six patients (13%) reported problems with the switch including confusion around dosing and new side effects. As less-expensive generic antiretroviral drugs become available, it may appear cheaper to switch from fixed-dose combinations to component drugs. However, the additional clinical costs involved may outweigh the initial cost savings of the drugs and switching may cause confusion for some patients, risking loss of adherence. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in pregnancy using fixed thyroxine daily doses of 75 μg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Manuel; Trigo, Cristina; López, Yolanda; Barragáns, María

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of hypothyroid pregnant women is usually calculated based on weight (1 μg/kg/day) and TSH levels. This study assessed the usefulness of treating these women with a fixed dose of 75 μg/day. All women with pregnancy diagnosed from January to August 2012 in the Vigo Health Area (Spain) without previous diagnosis of thyroid disease or thyroxine treatment and with TSH levels over 4,5 mUI/ml were enrolled by consecutive sampling. All 116 women in the sample were treated with a fixed daily dose of thyroxine 75 μg-thyroxine levels were measured at two, four, and six months, and thyroxine dose was modified if TSH level was lower than 0.3 or higher than 4.5 mUI/ml. A woman had a TSH level less than 0.3 mUI/ml in a test; reduction of thyroxine dose to 50 μg/day allowed for maintaining TSH level within the desired range until delivery. Six women had TSH levels over 4.5 mUI/ml in one test; in all of them, increase in thyroxine dose to 100 μg/day allowed for maintaining the level within the desired range until delivery. Fixed daily doses of thyroxine 75 μg allowed for achieving goal TSH levels in most of our pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, irrespective of their weight and baseline TSH level. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practices on fixed dose combinations among postgraduate dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnakota, Narayana R.; Krishna, V.; Viswanath, V.; Ahmed, Zaheer; Shaik, Kamal S.; Boppana, Naveen K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices of fixed dose combination drugs among postgraduate dental students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among postgraduate dental students of dental colleges in coastal Andhra Pradesh. Three colleges were randomly selected and students of all the three years were included. Data was collected from the specialities of oral medicine and radiology, oral surgery, endodontics, pedodontics, periodontics, and public heal...

  8. Effectiveness of Fixed Dose Radioactive Iodine (RAI for the Treatment of Hyperthyroidism: Experience of a Teaching Hospital in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karounwi Omotayo Ogunjobi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Using radioactive iodine (RAI as the first line therapy for Graves’ hyperthyroidism and as the treatment of choice for relapsed Graves’ disease is increasing in recent times. However, there has been little consensus on the most appropriate dose to use. So this study is to determine the response of hyperthyroidism to fixed doses of 370 MBq and 555 MBq RAI therapies and determine the incidence of hypothyroidism at 6 months post therapy. Methods: Hyperthyroid patients’ case records treated with radioiodine was retrospectively reviewed to determine the response rate of hyperthyroidism to the two fixed dose regimens. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS version 15.0 and the level of statistical significance was taken as p<0.05. Forty subjects, 6 males (15% and 34 females (85% received RAI therapy for Graves’ hyperthyroidism, mean age was 49.4 years (range, 25-75years. The thyroid function status at 6 months post therapy was available for all subjects. 24 patients (60% received 370 MBq while 16 patients (40% received 555 MBq. Results: The response for fixed doses of 370 MBq and 555 MBq were similar (100%. Also, the incidence of hypothyroidism in these subjects which was 66.6% with fixed dose of 370 MBq and 62.5% with fixed dose of 555 MBq within 6 months post RAI therapy were similar. Conclusion: SRAI is highly effective for the treatment of hyperthyroidism, with a cure rate of 100%. However, it has proved impossible to determine a fixed dose regimen for individual patients accurately to guarantee an euthyroid state. This is because hypothyroidism is a natural predictable sequel of RAI therapy.

  9. A Fix-Price Trade Model with Perfect Capital Mobility : Fixed versus Flexible Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Cuddington, John T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper extends the two-sector analysis of macroeconomic policies in temporary equilibrium with quantity rationing to include both money and internationally traded bonds as financial assets. By eliminating the assumption that money is the only asset, an acceptable treatment of flexible exchange rate regimes becomes possible. The efficacy of Monetary, fiscal, and wage policies is compared under alternative non-market-clearing regimes and exchange rate systems. Noteworthy is the dramatic dif...

  10. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h{sup -1}, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month{sup -1}, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h{sup -1} associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h{sup -1} with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h{sup -1}). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h{sup -1}, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h{sup -1}. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h{sup -1} (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month{sup -1}), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h{sup -1}. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all

  11. 78 FR 29063 - Survey of Urban Rates for Fixed Voice and Fixed Broadband Residential Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... that consumers in high-cost areas pay some minimum amount to support the cost of the network before turning to the federal support mechanism, which ultimately is borne by consumers across the nation. As the... of service for some consumers that pay local service rates that are significantly lower than the...

  12. A dose-escalating phase I of imatinib mesylate with fixed dose of metronomic cyclophosphamide in targeted olid tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenis, A; Ray-Coquard, I; Italiano, A; Chauzit, E; Bui-Nguyen, B; Blay, J-Y; Tresch-Bruneel, E; Fournier, C; Clisant, S; Amela, E Y; Cassier, P A; Molimard, M; Penel, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preclinical findings suggest that imatinib mesylate (IM) and metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) combination provides synergistic antiangiogenic activity on both pericytes and endothelial cells. Methods: We have designed a 3+3 dose-escalating phase I trial with a fixed dose of MC (50 mg two times daily) plus IM (400 mg per day; 300 and 400 mg two times daily). Enrolled patients had IM- and sutininib-refractory advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) (n=17), chordoma (n=7) and mucosal melanoma (n=2). Dose-limiting toxicities were monitored for the first 6 weeks. Progression-free survival (PFS) and response assessment are based on RECIST 1.0 guidelines. Pharmacokinetics of IM were measured before and after exposure to MC. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Fourteen patients of the expanded cohort received 400 mg two times daily of IM with MC. Apart from a case of possibly related acute leukaemia occurring after 4 years of treatment, we did not see unexpected toxicity. No drug–drug pharmacokinetic interaction was observed. There was no objective response. We have observed long-lasting stable disease in chordoma patients (median PFS=10.2 months; range, 4.2–18+) and short-term stable disease in heavily GIST pretreated patients (median PFS=2.3 months; range, 2.1–6.6). Conclusion: This combination is feasible and may warrant further exploration in refractory GIST or chordoma patients. PMID:24149182

  13. A dose-escalating phase I of imatinib mesylate with fixed dose of metronomic cyclophosphamide in targeted solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenis, A; Ray-Coquard, I; Italiano, A; Chauzit, E; Bui-Nguyen, B; Blay, J-Y; Tresch-Bruneel, E; Fournier, C; Clisant, S; Amela, E Y; Cassier, P A; Molimard, M; Penel, N

    2013-11-12

    Preclinical findings suggest that imatinib mesylate (IM) and metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) combination provides synergistic antiangiogenic activity on both pericytes and endothelial cells. We have designed a 3+3 dose-escalating phase I trial with a fixed dose of MC (50 mg two times daily) plus IM (400 mg per day; 300 and 400 mg two times daily). Enrolled patients had IM- and sutininib-refractory advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) (n=17), chordoma (n=7) and mucosal melanoma (n=2). Dose-limiting toxicities were monitored for the first 6 weeks. Progression-free survival (PFS) and response assessment are based on RECIST 1.0 guidelines. Pharmacokinetics of IM were measured before and after exposure to MC. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Fourteen patients of the expanded cohort received 400 mg two times daily of IM with MC. Apart from a case of possibly related acute leukaemia occurring after 4 years of treatment, we did not see unexpected toxicity. No drug-drug pharmacokinetic interaction was observed. There was no objective response. We have observed long-lasting stable disease in chordoma patients (median PFS=10.2 months; range, 4.2-18+) and short-term stable disease in heavily GIST pretreated patients (median PFS=2.3 months; range, 2.1-6.6). This combination is feasible and may warrant further exploration in refractory GIST or chordoma patients.

  14. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  15. MONTEC, an interactive fortran program to simulate radiation dose and dose-rate responses of populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, K.A.; Szekely, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    The computer program MONTEC was written to simulate the distribution of responses in a population whose members are exposed to multiple radiation doses at variable dose rates. These doses and dose rates are randomly selected from lognormal distributions. The individual radiation responses are calculated from three equations, which include dose and dose-rate terms. Other response-dose/rate relationships or distributions can be incorporated by the user as the need arises. The purpose of this documentation is to provide a complete operating manual for the program. This version is written in FORTRAN-10 for the DEC system PDP-10

  16. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-23

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value.

  17. Effect of fixed-dose combinations of ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia: MRS-ROZE (Multicenter Randomized Study of ROsuvastatin and eZEtimibe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Yoon, Young Won; Rha, Seung-Woon; Hong, Soon-Jun; Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Kim, Weon; Nam, Chang-Wook; Rhee, Moo-Yong; Park, Tae-Ho; Hong, Taek-Jong; Park, Sungha; Ahn, Youngkeun; Lee, Namho; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Jeon, Dong-Woon; Han, Kyoo-Rok; Moon, Keon-Woong; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to compare the effects of fixed-dose combinations of ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin to rosuvastatin alone in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia, including a subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or metabolic syndrome (MetS). This multicenter eight-week randomized double-blind phase III study evaluated the safety and efficacy of fixed-dose combinations of ezetimibe 10 mg plus rosuvastatin, compared with rosuvastatin alone in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. Four hundred and seven patients with primary hypercholesterolemia who required lipid-lowering treatment according to the ATP III guideline were randomized to one of the following six treatments for 8 weeks: fixed-dose combinations with ezetimibe 10 mg daily plus rosuvastatin (5, 10, or 20 mg daily) or rosuvastatin alone (5, 10, or 20 mg daily). Fixed-dose combination of ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin significantly reduced LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared with rosuvastatin alone. Depending on the rosuvastatin dose, these fixed-dose combinations of ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin provided LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride reductions of 56%-63%, 37%-43%, and 19%-24%, respectively. Moreover, the effect of combination treatment on cholesterol levels was more pronounced in patients with DM or MetS than in non-DM or non-MetS patients, respectively, whereas the effect of rosuvastatin alone did not differ between DM vs non-DM or MetS vs non-MetS patients. Fixed-dose combinations of ezetimibe and rosuvastatin provided significantly superior efficacy to rosuvastatin alone in lowering LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Moreover, the reduction rate was greater in patients with DM or MetS. © 2016 The Authors Cardiovascular Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Amlodipine and valsartan as components of a rational and effective fixed-dose combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Waeber

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Waeber1, Luis M Ruilope21Division of Clinical Pathophysiology, University Hospital, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Hypertension Unit, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Pharmacological treatment of hypertension is effective in preventing cardiovascular and renal complications. Calcium antagonists and blockers of the renin-angiotensin system are widely used today to initiate antihypertensive therapy but, when given as monotherapy, do not suffice in most patients to normalize blood pressure. Combining the two types of agents considerably increases the antihypertensive efficacy, but not at the expense of a deterioration of tolerability. This is exemplified by the experience accumulated with the recently developed fixed dose combination containing the AT1-receptor blocker valsartan (160 mg and the dihydropyridine amlodipine (5 or 10 mg. In a randomized trial, an 8-week treatment normalized blood pressure (<140/90 mmHg within 8 weeks in a large fraction of hypertensive patients (78.4% and 85.2% using the 5/160 [n = 371] and 10/160 mg [n = 377] dosage, respectively. Like all AT1-receptor blockers valsartan has a placebo-like tolerability. Valsartan prevents to a large extent the occurrence amlodipine-induced peripheral edema. Both amlodipine and valsartan have beneficial effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as well as protective effects on renal function. The co-administration of these two agents is therefore very attractive, as it enables a rapid and sustained blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. The availability of a fixed-dose combination based on amlodipine and valsartan is expected therefore to facilitate the management of hypertension, to improve long-term adherence with antihypertensive therapy and, ultimately, to have a positive impact on cardiovascular and renal outcomes.Keywords: antihypertensive therapy, fixed-dose combination, calcium antagonists

  19. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of lamivudine and zidovudine in fixed dose combinations using multivariate calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Grangeiro Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous determination of two or more active components in pharmaceutical preparations, without previous chemical separation, is a common analytical problem. Published works describe the determination of AZT and 3TC separately, as raw material or in different pharmaceutical preparations. In this work, a method using UV spectroscopy and multivariate calibration is described for the simultaneous measurement of 3TC and AZT in fixed dose combinations. The methodology was validated and applied to determine the AZT+3TC contents in tablets from five different manufacturers, as well as their dissolution profile. The results obtained employing the proposed methodology was similar to methods using first derivative technique and HPLC.

  20. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  1. Determinants of virological outcome and adverse events in African children treated with paediatric nevirapine fixed-dose-combination tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienczak, A.; Denti, P.; Cook, A.; Wiesner, L.; Mulenga, V.; Kityo, C.; Kekitiinwa, A.; Gibb, D.M.; Burger, D.M.; Walker, A.S.; McIlleron, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nevirapine is the only nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor currently available as a paediatric fixed-dose-combination tablet and is widely used in African children. Nonetheless, the number of investigations into pharmacokinetic determinants of virological suppression in African

  2. A graphical review of radiogenic animal cancer data using the 'dose and dose-rate map'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Hoshi, Yuko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    We have been investigating the effects of low dose or low dose rate irradiation on mice, using our low dose-rate irradiation facilities. In these studies, we found that the effects were highly dependent on both total dose and dose rate. To show this visually, we proposed the 'dose/dose rate map', and plotted the results of our laboratory and our co-workers. The map demonstrated that dose/dose rate plane could be divided into three areas; 1) An area where harmful effects are observed, 2) An area where no harmful effects are observed, and 3) Another area, between previous two areas, where certain protective functions are enhanced. As this map would be a powerful tool to find some trend among the vast numbers of data relating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, we have developed a computer program which plots the collected data on the dose/dose rate map sorting by experimental conditions. In this study, we graphically reviewed and analyzed the data relating to the lifespan studies of animals with a view to determining the relationships between doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation and cancer incidence. The data contains about 800 sets of experiments, which concerns 187,000 animals exposed to gamma ray or X-ray and their 112,000 controls, and total of about 30,000 cancers in exposed animals and 14,000 cancers in controls. About 800 points of data were plotted on the dose/dose rate map. The plot showed that 1) The divided three areas in the dose/dose rate map were generally confirmed by these 800 points of data, and 2) In some particular conditions, e.g. sarcoma by X-rays, the biologically effective area is extended to relatively high dose/dose rate area. (author)

  3. Quality assurance of rifampicin-containing fixed-drug combinations in South Africa: dosing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, R; Chirehwa, M T; Wiesner, L; Wright, B; Smythe, W; Kramer, N; McIlleron, H

    2018-05-01

    Rifampicin (RMP) drives treatment response in drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Low RMP concentrations increase the risk of poor outcomes, and drug quality needs to be excluded as a contributor to low RMP exposure. We performed an open-label, three-way cross-over study of three licensed RMP-containing formulations widely used in South Africa to evaluate the bioavailability of RMP in a two-drug fixed-dose combination tablet (2FDC) and a four-drug FDC (4FDC) against a single-drug reference. RMP dosed at 600 mg was administered 2 weeks apart in random sequence. Plasma RMP concentrations were measured pre-dose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h post-dose. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of the FDCs was compared to the single drug reference. Simulations were used to predict the impact of our findings. Twenty healthy volunteers (median age 22.8 years, body mass index 24.2 kg/m2) completed the study. The AUC0-12 of the 4FDC/reference (geometric mean ratio [GMR] 78%, 90%CI 69-89) indicated an average 20% reduction in RMP bioavailability in the 4FDC. The 2FDC/reference (GMR 104%, 90%CI 97-111) was bioequivalent. Simulations suggested dose adjustments to compensate for the poor bioavailability of RMP with the 4FDC, and revised weight-band doses to prevent systematic underdosing of low-weight patients. Post-marketing surveillance of in vivo bioavailability of RMP and improved weight band-based dosing are recommended.

  4. 13 CFR 120.213 - What fixed interest rates may a Lender charge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Lender charge? 120.213 Section 120.213 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... have a reasonable fixed interest rate. SBA periodically publishes the maximum allowable rate in the... government determines the interest rate on direct loans. SBA publishes the rate periodically in the Federal...

  5. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Porwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n=109 or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n=108, intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID. Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P<0.0001, PID at 8 hours (P=0.002, and SAPID0–8 hours (P=0.004. The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic.

  6. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwal, A.; Mahajan, A. D.; Oswal, D. S.; Erram, S. S.; Sheth, D. N.; Balamurugan, S.; Kamat, V.; Enadle, R. P.; Badadare, A.; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Walvekar, R. S.; Dhorepatil, S.; Naik, R. C.; Basu, I.; Kshirsagar, S. N.; Keny, J. V.; Sengupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD) injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n = 109) or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n = 108), intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID). Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P < 0.0001), PID at 8 hours (P = 0.002), and SAPID0–8 hours (P = 0.004). The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic. PMID:22577544

  7. Evaluation of radioiodine therapy with fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadas, Viviane; Vilar, Lucio; Moura, Eliane; Brito, Ana; Castellar, Enio

    2007-01-01

    The treatment options for the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease are antithyroid drugs, surgery and radioiodine, none of which is considered ideal, as they do not act directly on the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Radioiodine has been increasingly used as the treatment of choice because it is a safe and definitive therapy whose administration is very easy. Some authors prefer to administer higher doses in order to deliberately induce hypothyroidism, while others recommend lower doses that result in a lower incidence of hypothyroidism and a greater incidence of euthyroidism. There is no consensus for the optimal regimen of fixed doses to be used and this is the main focus of the present study, where doses of 10 and 15 mCi of 131 I were compared. Among the 164 patients analyzed, 61 (37.2%) were submitted to 10 mCi and 103 (62.8%) to 15 mCi. In the longitudinal analysis it was observed that remission of the hyperthyroidism was statistically different in the sixth month (p 131 I brought about a similar remission of the hyperthyroidism after 12 months of treatment. Moreover, the remission rate of the hyperthyroidism had no association with age, sex or previous therapy with antithyroid drugs. (author)

  8. Empagliflozin/metformin fixed-dose combination: a review in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingbo; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Zhou, Minzhi; Tan, Xueying

    2016-12-01

    Most patients with type 2 diabetes, who receive monotherapy, are unable to maintain glucose levels with the progress of disease. Therefore, combination therapy with two or more anti-diabetic agents of different classes is highly desired. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors improve glycemic control through increasing urinary glucose excretion, which is independent of β-cell function. In addition, they are generally well tolerated and associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. SGLT2 inhibitors as add-on therapy to metformin have an additive effect on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, and fixed-dose tablet is likely to reduce pill burden and then improve patients' adherence. Areas covered: This article reviews empagliflozin/metformin combination therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The clinical efficacy and tolerability of empagliflozin/metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes are discussed based on the available literature. Expert opinion: It was found that empagliflozin/metformin combination therapy could significantly improve glycemic control, body weight and blood pressure with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. In addition, the empagliflozin/metformin fixed-dose tablets, supported by bioequivalence studies, could reduce pill burden to further achieve the improved patients' adherence, better glycemic control and optimized cost-effectiveness.

  9. Formulation design, challenges, and development considerations for fixed dose combination (FDC) of oral solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Divyakant; Wang, Jennifer; Wen, Hong; Li, Xuhong; Timmins, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fixed dose combination (FDC) products are common in the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, and tuberculosis. They make it possible to combine two or more drug molecules with different modes of pharmacological actions in a single dosing unit and optimize the treatment. From a patient perspective, they offer convenience, reduced dosing unit burden, and cost savings. From a clinical perspective, aging population in developed countries will need multiple medications to treat age related diseases and co-morbidities. FDC products simplify dosing regimen and enhance patient compliance. As outlined in the article, the number of FDC products has grown over the years and the trend is likely to continue. This review article gives an overview to pharmaceutical scientists about recent trends in the formulation development of the FDC products and provides decision trees to select most optimum formulation development strategy. While some formulation technologies such as multi-layer tablets, multiparticulate systems, active film coating, and hot-melt granulation are discussed in more detail, a few specialized technologies are also introduced briefly to the readers.

  10. Larger Blood Pressure Reduction by Fixed-Dose Compared to Free Dose Combination Therapy of ACE Inhibitor and Calcium Antagonist in Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Valeria; Finelli, Rosa; Pascale, Antonietta Valeria; Giannotti, Rocco; Fabbricatore, Davide; Ragosa, Nicola; Ciccarelli, Michele; Iaccarino, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of fixed combination of ACEi+CCB (Fixed) has significantly increased patients compliance and adherence to therapy. At the moment, however, there are no data suggesting the better control of once-daily fixed (Fixed) over free doses in separate administrations combination therapy in hypertensives. In a population of 39 consecutive outpatient patients referred to the departmental Hypertension clinic of the University Hospital of Salerno Medical School with the first diagnosis of arterial hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that the Fixed achieve a better control of blood pressure than the Free combination. Patients were randomized to either strategy and after 3 months patients underwent a clinical assessment to evaluate the antihypertensive effect. The two groups, matched for anthropometric and clinical parameters, received Amlodipine (5-10 mg/daily) and Perindopril (5-10 mg/daily). Perindopril and Amlodipine doses did not significantly differ between the two groups. After 3 months BP control was improved in both groups and BP targets were similarly reached in both groups (SBP; Fixed: 61.54%; Free 69.23%; n.s. DPB; Fixed: 80.77%; Free 84.62%; n.s.). The reduction in systolic blood pressure was similar in both groups (Fixed:7.64±2.49%; Free: 7.81±4.00%, n.s.), while the reduction of diastolic blood pressure was greater in the Fixed group (Fixed: 14.22±2.03%; Free: 4.92±5.00%, p<0.05). Although both strategies are effective in reducing BP, the use of Fixed dose has an advantage in the reduction of BP. The present study does not allow to identify the mechanisms of this difference, which can be assumed to be due to the pharmacokinetics of the drugs administered in once-daily fixed combination.

  11. Safety and pharmacokinetic profile of fixed-dose ivermectin with an innovative 18mg tablet in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jose; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Gich, Ignasi; Rodríguez, Montse; Colli, Enrico; Gold, Silvia; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J

    2018-01-01

    Ivermectin is a pivotal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, which is increasingly identified as a useful drug for the control of other Neglected Tropical Diseases. Its role in the treatment of soil transmitted helminthiasis through improved efficacy against Trichuris trichiura in combination with other anthelmintics might accelerate the progress towards breaking transmission. Ivermectin is a derivative of Avermectin B1, and consists of an 80:20 mixture of the equipotent homologous 22,23 dehydro B1a and B1b. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and safety profile of ivermectin allow to explore innovative uses to further expand its utilization through mass drug administration campaigns to improve coverage rates. We conducted a phase I clinical trial with 54 healthy adult volunteers who sequentially received 2 experimental treatments using a new 18 mg ivermectin tablet in a fixed-dose strategy of 18 and 36 mg single dose regimens, compared to the standard, weight based 150–200 μg/kg, regimen. Volunteers were recruited in 3 groups based on body weight. Plasma concentrations of ivermectin were measured through HPLC up to 168 hours post treatment. Safety data showed no significant differences between groups and no serious adverse events: headache was the most frequent adverse event in all treatment groups, none of them severe. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed a half-life between 81 and 91 h in the different treatment groups. When comparing the systemic bioavailability (AUC0t and Cmax) of the reference product (WA-ref) with the other two study groups using fixed doses, we observed an overall increase in AUC0t and Cmax for the two experimental treatments of 18 mg and 36 mg. Body mass index (BMI) and weight were associated with t1/2 and V/F, probably reflecting the high liposolubility of IVM with longer retention times proportional to the presence of more adipose tissue. Systemic exposure to ivermectin (AUC0t or Cmax) was not associated with BMI

  12. Safety and pharmacokinetic profile of fixed-dose ivermectin with an innovative 18mg tablet in healthy adult volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Muñoz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivermectin is a pivotal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, which is increasingly identified as a useful drug for the control of other Neglected Tropical Diseases. Its role in the treatment of soil transmitted helminthiasis through improved efficacy against Trichuris trichiura in combination with other anthelmintics might accelerate the progress towards breaking transmission. Ivermectin is a derivative of Avermectin B1, and consists of an 80:20 mixture of the equipotent homologous 22,23 dehydro B1a and B1b. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and safety profile of ivermectin allow to explore innovative uses to further expand its utilization through mass drug administration campaigns to improve coverage rates. We conducted a phase I clinical trial with 54 healthy adult volunteers who sequentially received 2 experimental treatments using a new 18 mg ivermectin tablet in a fixed-dose strategy of 18 and 36 mg single dose regimens, compared to the standard, weight based 150–200 μg/kg, regimen. Volunteers were recruited in 3 groups based on body weight. Plasma concentrations of ivermectin were measured through HPLC up to 168 hours post treatment. Safety data showed no significant differences between groups and no serious adverse events: headache was the most frequent adverse event in all treatment groups, none of them severe. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed a half-life between 81 and 91 h in the different treatment groups. When comparing the systemic bioavailability (AUC0t and Cmax of the reference product (WA-ref with the other two study groups using fixed doses, we observed an overall increase in AUC0t and Cmax for the two experimental treatments of 18 mg and 36 mg. Body mass index (BMI and weight were associated with t1/2 and V/F, probably reflecting the high liposolubility of IVM with longer retention times proportional to the presence of more adipose tissue. Systemic exposure to ivermectin (AUC0t or Cmax was not

  13. Fixed tile rate codec for bandwidth saving in video processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachine, Vladimir; Dinh, Chon-Tam Le; Le, Dinh Kha; Wong, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an image compression circuit for bandwidth saving in video display processors. This is intra frame tile based compression algorithm offering visually lossless quality for compression rates between 1.5 and 2.5. RGB and YCbCr (4:4:4, 4:2:2 and 4:2:0) video formats are supported for 8/10 bits video signals. The Band Width Compressor (BWC) consists of Lossless Compressor (LC) and Quantization Compressor (QC) that generate output bit streams for tiles of pixels. Size of output bit stream generated for a tile by the LC may be less or greater than a required size of output memory block. The QC generates bit stream that always fits output memory block of the required size. The output bit stream generated by the LC is transmitted if its size is less than the required size of the output memory block. Otherwise, the output bit stream generated by the QC is transmitted. The LC works on pixel basis. A difference between original and predicted pixel's values for each pixel of a tile is encoded as prefix and suffix. The prefix is encoded by means of variable length code, and suffix is encoded as is. The QC divides a tile of pixels on a set of blocks and quantizes pixels of each block independently of the other blocks. The number of quantization bits for all pixels of a block depends on standard deviation calculated over the block. A difference between pixel's value and average value over the block is quantized and transmitted.

  14. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamer Refaat

    2011-06-12

    Jun 12, 2011 ... from common iliac nodes. The following borders were used: 2.3.2. AP-PA portals. Superior: One centimeter above the inferior aspect of the sacro- iliac joints, extended ... Based on linear quadratic model, bio- logic effective dose ..... tive evidence suggests that this protein functions as a mediator of cellular ...

  15. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Itami, Jun

    1994-01-01

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  16. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...

  17. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  18. Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine how the dose and rate of NO• treatment affects mutagenic responses. Methods: Shuttle vector ... Conclusion: These results provide important clues to how dose and dosing rate of introducing NO• may contribute to potential ..... Arroyo PL, Hatch-Pigott V, Mower HF, Cooney RV. Mutagenicity of nitric ...

  19. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1989-01-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is defined as the electron dose at a given point in phantom divided by the number of monitor units given for any one stationary electron beam. For a given depth of isocenter di the electron dose rates at dmax are linearly dependent on the nominal field width w, while for a given w the dose rates are inversely proportional to di. The dose rates for rotational electron beams with different di are related through the inverse square law provided that the two beams have (di,w) combinations which give the same characteristic angle beta. The photon dose at the isocenter depends on the arc angle alpha, field width w, and isocenter depth di. For constant w and di the photon dose at isocenter is proportional to alpha, for constant alpha and w it is proportional to di, and for constant alpha and di it is inversely proportional to w. The w and di dependence implies that for the same alpha the photon dose at the isocenter is inversely proportional to the electron dose rate at dmax

  20. The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J.

    1997-12-01

    This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly

  1. Bioequivalence of a fixed-dose repaglinide/metformin combination tablet and equivalent doses of repaglinide and metformin tablets
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hea-Young; Ngo, Lien; Kim, Sang-Ki; Choi, Yoonho; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2018-04-12

    This study was conducted to determine whether a fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablet of repaglinide/metformin (2/500 mg) is equivalent to coadministration of equivalent doses of individual (EDI) tablets of repaglinide (2 mg) and metformin (500 mg) in healthy Korean male subjects. This study was conducted as an open-label, randomized, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence crossover design in 50 healthy Korean male subjects who received an FDC tablet or EDI tablets. Plasma concentrations of repaglinide and metformin were determined for up to 24 hours using a validated UPLC-MS/MS method. Bioequivalence was assessed according to current guidelines issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Korean legislation. Tolerability was also evaluated throughout the study via subject interview, vital signs, and blood sampling. Point estimates (90% CIs) for AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and Cmax based on EDI tablets were 110.07 (102.25 - 118.49), 109.90 (101.70 - 118.39), and 112.60 (101.49 - 124.85), respectively, for repaglinide. They were 95.18 (89.62 - 101.05), 95.00 (89.74 - 100.65), and 98.44 (92.72 - 104.50), respectively, for metformin. These results satisfied the bioequivalence criteria of 80.00 - 125.00% proposed by the FDA and Korean legislation. Results of pharmacokinetic analysis suggested that repaglinide and metformin in FDC tablets were bioequivalent to EDI tablets of repaglinide (2 mg) and metformin (500 mg) in healthy Korean male subjects. Both formulations appeared to be well tolerated.
.

  2. Low - level doses and exposure rating issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis is carried out of current state of the issue regarding biological effects of low - level irradiation doses in order to evaluate impact of low irradiation levels onto human health, which is required to generally understand the problem as a whole. Some proposals are offered to the state officials on developing general approaches related to preparation of a radiation safety concept for the population of Ukraine

  3. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  4. Recommended de minimis radiation dose rates for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    A de minimis dose or dose rate as used in this report represents a level of risk which is generally accepted as being of no significance to an individual, or in the case of a population, of no significance to society. The doses corresponding to these levels of risk are based on current scientific knowledge. Dose rates recommended in this report are as follows: a de minimis individual dose rate of 10 μSv a -1 , based on a risk level that would generally be regarded as negligible in comparison with other risks; and a de minimis collective dose rate of 1 person-Sv a -1 , based on an imperceptible increase above the normal incidences of cancer and genetic defects in the exposed population. The concept of de minimis is to be distinguished from 'exempt from regulation' (below regulatory concern). The latter involves broader social and economic factors which encompass but are not limited to the purely risk-based factors addressed by the de minimis dose. De minimis is one of the factors that determine the exemption of sources or practices that may result in doses below or above the de minimis level. Although these de minimis dose rates should be considered in developing criteria and guidelines for deriving quantities and concentrations of radioactive substances that may be exempted from regulation, this document is only concerned with establishing de minimis dose rates, not with exempting sources and practices

  5. Dose rate analysis for Tank 101 AZ (Project W151)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, R.A.; Hillesland, K.E.; Carter, L.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document describes the expected dose rates for modification to tank 101 AZ including modifications to the steam coil, mixer pump, and temperature probes. The thrust of the effort is to determine dose rates from: modification of a steam coil and caisson; the installation of mixer pumps; the installation of temperature probes; and estimates of dose rates that will be encountered while making these changes. Because the dose rates for all of these configurations depend upon the photon source within the supernate and sludge, comparisons were also made between measured dose rates within a drywell and the corresponding calculated dose rates. The calculational tool used is a Monte Carlo (MCNP 2 ) code since complicated three dimensional geometries are involved. A summary of the most important results of the entire study is given in Section 2. The basic calculational geometry model of the tank is discussed in Section 3, along with a tabulation of the photon sources that were used within the supernate and the sludge, and a discussion of uncertainties. The calculated dose rates around the steam coil and caisson before and after modification are discussed in Section 4. The configuration for the installation of the mixer pumps and the resulting dose rates are given in Section 5. The predicted changes in dose rates due to a possible dilution of the supernate source are given in Section 6. The calculational configuration used to model the installation of temperature probes and the resulting predicted dose rates are discussed in Section 7. Finally, comparisons of measured to calculated dose rates within a drywell are summarized in Section 8. Extended discussions of calculational models and Monte Carlo optimization techniques used are included in Appendix A

  6. Description of the local dose rate measuring system for the Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Lilian Rose Sobral da; Souza Mendes, Jorge Eduardo de

    1995-01-01

    The equipment used and the measured value processing involved in the Local Dose Rate Measuring System is described including the installation points for the measuring equipment in the reactor building, the auxiliary building and at the main gate of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant. Under normal operating conditions protecting of the personnel is ensured by measuring the local dose rate at those points which are generally accessible. In some cases , fixed sensors are not suitable so that mobile equipment is used. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig

  7. Terrestrial gamma dose rate in Pahang state Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola; Ramli, A.T.; Sanusi, M.S.; Saleh, M.A.; Garba, N.N.; Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria

    2014-01-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiations (TGR) were measured in Pahang state Malaysia between January and April 2013. The TGR dose rates ranged from 26 to 750 nGy h -1 . The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGR dose rate was found to be 176 ± 5 nGy h -1 . Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were located in Raub, Temerloh, Bentong and Rompin districts. These areas have external gamma dose rates of between 500 and 750 nGy h -1 . An Isodose map of the state was produced using ArcGIS9 software version 9.3. To evaluate the radiological hazard due to terrestrial gamma dose, the annual effective dose equivalent and the mean population weighted dose rate were calculated and found to be 0.22 mSv year -1 and 168 nGy h -1 respectively. (author)

  8. Co-extruded solid solutions as immediate release fixed-dose combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, L; Van Snick, B; Monteyne, T; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop by means of co-extrusion a multilayer fixed-dose combination solid dosage form for oral application characterized by immediate release for both layers, the layers containing different drugs with different water-solubility. In this study polymers were selected which can be combined in a co-extruded dosage form. Several polymers were screened on the basis of their processability via hot-melt extrusion, macroscopic properties, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) decomposition and in vitro drug release. ASA and fenofibrate (FF) were incorporated as hydrophilic and hydrophobic model drugs, respectively. Based on the polymer screening experiments Kollidon® PF 12 and Kollidon® VA 64 were identified as useful ASA carriers (core), while Soluplus®, Kollidon® VA 64 and Kollidon® 30 were applicable as FF carriers (coat). The combination of Kollidon® 30 (coat) with Kollidon® PF 12 or Kollidon® VA 64 (core) failed in terms of processability via co-extrusion. All other combinations (containing 20% ASA in the core and 20% FF in the coat) were successfully co-extruded (diameter core: 2mm/thickness coat: 1mm). All formulations showed good adhesion between core and coat. ASA release from the core was complete within 15-30 min (Kollidon® PF 12) or 30-60 min (Kollidon® VA 64), while FF release was complete within 20-30 min (Kollidon® VA 64) or 60 min (Soluplus®). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that both drugs were molecularly dispersed in the carriers. Raman mapping exposed very little intermigration of both drugs at the interface. Fixed-dose combinations with good in vitro performance were successfully developed by means of co-extrusion, both layers providing immediate release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and practices about prescribing fixed dose combinations among resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimit Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs improve patient compliance and decrease pill burden. However, irrational prescribing of FDCs is a major health concern. As resident doctors are primarily involved in patient management at tertiary care hospitals, knowledge about prescribing FDCs is of paramount importance. Objective: To evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice, regarding use of FDCs by resident doctors at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among resident doctors working at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, a tertiary care teaching hospital. One hundred resident doctors from the departments of medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, surgery, paediatrics, skin and psychiatry, who gave their informed consent, were enrolled. A prevalidated questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and prescribing practice of fixed dose combinations was filled up. Data was analyzed with suitable statistical tests. Results: Out of the 100 residents recruited for the study, 34, 33 and 33 residents were selected from the 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd year respectively. The resident doctors were not aware about all of the advantages and disadvantages of FDCs. On an average, only 31% of the residents (lowest 16% among 1 st year residents had knowledge about the Essential Medicine List (EML. Knowledge about rationality of given FDCs was lacking in 81% of the residents. Only 47% could name a single banned FDC in India. Common sources of information about FDCs were medical representatives, colleagues/peers, the Monthly Index of Medical Specialities (MIMS and Continuous Medical Education (CMEs. A majority of residents (96% agreed that FDCs should be allowed to be marketed. The residents opined that most commonly prescribed FDCs were of antimicrobial drugs, amongst which amoxicillin + clavulanic acid was the most frequent. Conclusion: There is need to improve knowledge about rationality, EML, usage and banned FDCs in post graduate

  10. Assessing the Risk of Birth Defects Associated with Exposure to Fixed-Dose Combined Antituberculous Agents during Pregnancy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Awodele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the risks of disease progression and transmission to the newborn, treatment of tuberculosis is often pursued during pregnancy and fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents have been found to be beneficial. Unfortunately, there is paucity of data on the safety of the fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs during pregnancy. This study intends to assess the teratogenic effect of fixed-dose combined antituberculous drugs on the organogenesis stage of fetal development and also investigate the possible roles of vitamin C in modulating the teratogenic effects of these agents on the fetus using animal model. Pregnant rats were divided into 3 groups with 12 animals per group: group 1 received distilled water (10 mL/kg orally; group 2 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents orally; group 3 received 51.4 mg/kg/day of fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents plus vitamin C (10 mg/kg/day orally. Six rats in each group were randomly selected and sacrificed on day 20 by cervical dislocation prior to day 21 of gestation, and the foetuses were harvested through abdominal incision for physical examination. Blood samples were collected from the 1st filial rats of the remaining six animals for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver, kidney, heart, and brain of all the sacrificed animals were used for histopathological examination. There were significant (≤0.05 low birth weights of the foetuses of the animals that were treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents. The haematological parameters also revealed a reduction in the platelets counts and neutrophiles at the first filial generation. Significant (≤0.05 elevations in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in the foetuses of the animals treated with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents were also observed. However, the combination of vitamin C with fixed-dose combined antituberculous agents

  11. The choice of food consumption rates for radiation dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The practical problem in estimating radiation doses due to radioactive contamination of food is the choice of the appropriate food intakes. To ensure compliance or to compare with dose equivalent limits, higher than average intake rates appropriate to critical groups should be used. However for realistic estimates of health detriment in the whole exposed population, average intake rates are more appropriate. (U.K.)

  12. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    ABSTRACT. The absorbed dose rate in air in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni uranium mining project located in Singida region, Tanzania, was determined so as to establish the baseline data for background radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven villages ...

  13. Changes in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate during Fixed-Interval Responding in Squirrel Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeese, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Episodic and sustained increases in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure can occur with recurring patterns of schedule-controlled behavior. Most previous studies were conducted under fixed-ratio schedules, which maintained a consistent high rate of responding that alternated with periods of no responding during times when the schedule was…

  14. Conversion Factors for Predicting Unshielded Dose Rates in Shielded Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapham, M.; Seamans Jr, J.V.; Arbon, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the methodology developed and used by the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project for determining the activity content and the unshielded surface dose rate for lead lined containers contaminated with transuranic waste. Several methods were investigated: - Direct measurement of the dose rate after removing the shielding. - Use of a MicroShield R derived dose conversion factor, (mRem/hr unshielded )/(mRem/hr shielded ), applied to the measured surface dose rate to estimate the unshielded surface dose rate. - Use of a MicroShield R derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. - Use of an empirically derived activity conversion factor, mRem/hr unshielded /Ci, applied to the measured activity to estimate the unshielded dose rate. The last approach proved to be the most efficacious by using a combination of nondestructive assay and empirically defined dose rate conversion factors. Empirically derived conversion factors were found to be highly dependent upon the matrix of the waste. Use of conversion factors relied on activity values corrected to address the presence of a lead liner. (authors)

  15. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  16. Profile of once-daily darunavir/cobicistat fixed-dose combination for the treatment of HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Navarro, Adrian Curran Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Efficacy is the main objective of antiretroviral treatment and adherence is one of the cornerstones to achieve it. For this reason, treatment simplification is of key importance with regard to antiretroviral regimens. Rezolsta® (darunavir/cobicistat is the first fixed-dose combination containing a protease inhibitor approved for HIV treatment. This coformulation includes darunavir, a protease inhibitor that has shown its efficacy and safety in naïve and treatment-experienced patients, and cobicistat, the new pharmacokinetic enhancer that is expected to replace ritonavir. Bioequivalence between ritonavir and cobicistat as darunavir boosters has been shown in studies involving healthy volunteers. Furthermore, efficacy and safety of darunavir/cobicistat observed in phase III studies, including naïve and pretreated patients without darunavir-associated resistance mutations, are comparable to historical data of darunavir/ritonavir 800/100 mg once-daily formulation. Adverse events with darunavir/cobicistat are scarce and mild, and basically include skin reactions and gastrointestinal disturbances. Although small increases in plasma creatinine are expected in patients receiving cobicistat due to the inhibition of creatinine transporters in kidney tubules, actual glomerular filtrate rate remains unaltered. Cobicistat does not have an inducer effect on metabolic pathways and shows much more selective inhibition than ritonavir. Therefore, isoenzyms different from CYP3A4 are supposed to be less affected by cobicistat, and thus fewer drug–drug interactions are expected. Keywords: darunavir, cobicistat, fixed-dose combination, HIV infection, antiretroviral treatment

  17. Dose rate effects on the radiation induced oxidation of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttafava, A.; Tavares, A.; Arimondi, M.; Zaopo, A.; Nesti, S.; Dondi, D.; Mariani, M.; Faucitano, A.

    2007-01-01

    The yields and spatial distribution of the products arising from the in source oxidation of 50 μm LDPE films induced by 60-Co gamma radiations and by 300 kev electrons have been investigated as a function of the dose rate. The dose rate was found to have a strong influence on the reaction, the hydroperoxides and carbonyls yields at the lowest gamma dose rate of 0.04 kGy/h being decreased by a factor of about three with increasing the gamma dose rate up to 0.69 kGy/h and by a factor of about 30 when operating at the e-beam dose rate of 1.5 kGy/s. The carbonyls depth concentration profiles, the EPR measurements on radicals intermediates and the experiments of post-irradiation oxidation are consistent with the conclusion that, as far as the gamma irradiation is concerned, the observed dose rate effects cannot be imputed to oxygen diffusion control and/or to the chain branching via hydroperoxides decomposition coupled to the longer times between the initiation events. The hypothesis of the dose rate acting on the kinetic chain length of the radioxidation which in turn implies a substantially uniform distribution of radicals in the amorphous phase attained through spur expansion is proposed

  18. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  19. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  20. An independent dose-to-point calculation program for the verification of high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Amols, Howard I.; Zaider, Marco

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We describe computer software that performs, quickly and accurately, secondary dose calculations for high-dose-rate (HDR) treatment plans, including those employed for prostate treatments. Methods: The program takes as primary input the data file used by the HDR remote afterloader console for treatment. Dosimetric calculations are performed using the Meisberger polynomial and the anisotropy table for the HDR Iridium-192 source. For standard applicators, treatment geometry is automatically reconstructed and the dose is calculated at relevant reference point(s). Template-based treatment plans (e.g., prostate) require additional user input; the dose calculation is then performed at user-selected reference points. A total dwell time calculation for volume and planar implants using the Manchester tables was also implemented. Results: For fixed-geometry HDR procedures, secondary dose calculations are within 2% of the treatment plan, and results are available for review instantly. For more general applications, the calculated and planned doses are typically within 3% at the prescription isodose line. The Manchester-based dwell time calculation is within 10% of the planned time

  1. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  2. Randomized comparative study of intravenous infusion of three different fixed doses of milrinone in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing open heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease is a common problem in pediatric patients presenting for open heart surgery. Milrinone has been shown to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery pressure in pediatric patients and neonates postcardiac surgery. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative outcome in such patients with three different fixed maintenance doses of milrinone. Methodology: Patients were randomized into three groups. All patients received fixed bolus dose of milrinone 50 μg/kg on pump during rewarming. Following this, patients in low-dose group received infusion of milrinone at the rate of 0.375 μg/kg/min, medium-dose group received 0.5 μg/kg/min, and high-dose group received 0.75 μg/kg/min over 24 h. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP, mean airway pressure (MaP, oxygenation index (OI, and central venous pressure (CVP were compared at baseline and 24 h postoperatively. Dose of inotropic requirement, duration of ventilatory support and Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay were noted. Results: MAP, MaP, OI, and CVP were comparable in all three groups postoperatively. All patients in the low-dose group required low inotropic support while 70% of patients in the high-dose group needed high inotropic support to manage episodes of hypotension (P = 0.000. Duration of ventilatory support and ICU stay in all three groups was comparable (P = 0.412, P = 0.165. Conclusion: Low-dose infusions while having a clinical impact were more beneficial in avoiding adverse events and decreasing inotropic requirement without affecting duration of ventilatory support and duration of ICU stay.

  3. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyoung Dal; Jae, Young Wan; Yoon, Il Kyu; Lee, Jae Hee; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  4. Microfluidic thrombosis under multiple shear rates and antiplatelet therapy doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Li

    Full Text Available The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s(-1 and therapy concentrations (0-2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0-2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA, 3.5-40 Units/L for heparin using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose. Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment.

  5. Relative bioavailability of an empagliflozin 25-mg/linagliptin 5-mg fixed-dose combination tablet
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glund, Stephan; Mattheus, Michaela; Runge, Frank; Rose, Peter; Friedrich, Christian

    2017-04-01

    This relative bioavailability study compared a fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablet of empagliflozin 25 mg/linagliptin 5 mg with the corresponding individual components. In addition, the effect of food on the bioavailability of the FDC was studied, and the standard-dissolving formulation FDC was compared with a slow-dissolving side batch. An open-label, randomized, crossover study design was used (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01189201). Healthy volunteers (n = 42) each received three single-dose treatments: FDC standard dissolution, individual tablets, and either FDC standard dissolution with food or FDC slow dissolution. Primary endpoints for relative bioavailability comparisons were area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) over time 0 to the last time point with the plasma concentration above the quantification limit (AUC0-tz) for empagliflozin, AUC from 0 to 72 hours (AUC0-72) for linagliptin, and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) for both drugs. In all three comparisons, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of AUCs were within the standard acceptance range (80 - 125%) for bioequivalence. Empagliflozin and linagliptin both showed reductions in Cmax after food compared with the fasted state, although overall exposure remained similar. The empagliflozin/linagliptin combinations were well tolerated. This study shows that the FDC of empagliflozin 25 mg/linagliptin 5 mg can be regarded as bioequivalent to the individual tablets. Administering the tablet after food or a tablet with a slow-dissolution profile did not have a clinically-relevant impact on the bioavailability of empagliflozin/linagliptin FDC tablets.
.

  6. Development of Sustained Release "NanoFDC (Fixed Dose Combination" for Hypertension - An Experimental Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjuman Arora

    Full Text Available The present study was planned to formulate, characterize and evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a novel "NanoFDC" comprising three commonly prescribed anti-hypertensive drugs, hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic, candesartan (ARB and amlodipine (a calcium channel blocker.The candidate drugs were loaded in Poly (DL-lactide-co-gycolide (PLGA by emulsion- diffusion-evaporation method. The formulations were evaluated for their size, morphology, drug loading and in vitro release individually. Single dose pharmacokinetic profiles of the nanoformulations alone and in combination, as a NanoFDC, were evaluated in Wistar rats.The candidate drugs encapsulated inside PLGA showed entrapment efficiencies ranging from 30%, 33.5% and 32% for hydrochlorothiazide, candesartan and amlodipine respectively. The nanoparticles ranged in size from 110 to 180 nm. In vitro release profile of the nanoformulation showed 100% release by day 6 in the physiological pH 7.4 set up with PBS (phosphate buffer saline and by day 4-5 in the intestinal pH 1.2 and 8.0 set up SGF (simulated gastric fluid and SIF (simulated intestinal fluid respectively. In pharmacokinetic analysis a sustained-release for 6 days and significant increase in the mean residence time (MRT, as compared to the respective free drugs was noted [MRT of amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide and candesartan changed from 8.9 to 80.59 hours, 11 to 69.20 hours and 9 to 101.49 hours respectively].We have shown for the first time that encapsulating amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide and candesartan into a single nanoformulation, to get the "NanoFDC (Fixed Dose Combination" is a feasible strategy which aims to decrease pill burden.

  7. Population Pharmacokinetics of Fixed Dose Combination of Ceftriaxone and Sulbactam in Healthy and Infected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Singla, Aman; Chaudhary, Manu; Taneja, Manish

    2016-10-01

    Increased antibacterial resistance (ABR) and limited drug discovery warrant optimized use of available antibiotics. One option is to rationally combine two antibiotics (fixed dose combination (FDC)) that may delay or prevent emergence of ABR in notorious pathogen. Major concern with FDC is the mutual interaction of its components that might influence their pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, requiring reassessing of whole formulation (adding cost and time). The interaction can be identified by comparing PK profile of a drug present in FDC with its independent entity. An open-label, crossover, single-dose comparative PK study of FDC (ceftriaxone and sulbactam) with their individual reference formulations was performed in 24 healthy adult subjects. No mutual PK interactions between ceftriaxone and sulbactam were observed. Pharmacokinetic data was used to develop a population-PK model to understand between-subject variability (BSV). Pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone/sulbactam was explained by one and two compartment models, respectively. The subject's "weight" was identified as a covariate explaining BSV. Both internal and external validations (healthy/infected subjects) were done. The model-derived population-PK parameters of FDC's active components in infected subjects were similar to literature reported values of individual components. Efficacies of various FDC dosage regimens over a range of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were assessed by Monte Carlo simulations using population-PK parameters of infected/healthy subjects. In infected subjects, 3 g FDC/24 h can treat bacteria with MIC ≤8 μg/mL, while for MIC 8-32 μg/mL, 3 g FDC/12 h is recommended. Lastly, the developed population-PK model was successfully used to predict drug exposure in pediatric population.

  8. Estimating average glandular dose by measuring glandular rate in mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Sachiko; Azuma, Yoshiharu; Sumimoto, Tetsuhiro; Eiho, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    The glandular rate of the breast was objectively measured in order to calculate individual patient exposure dose (average glandular dose) in mammography. By employing image processing techniques and breast-equivalent phantoms with various glandular rate values, a conversion curve for pixel value to glandular rate can be determined by a neural network. Accordingly, the pixel values in clinical mammograms can be converted to the glandular rate value for each pixel. The individual average glandular dose can therefore be calculated using the individual glandular rates on the basis of the dosimetry method employed for quality control in mammography. In the present study, a data set of 100 craniocaudal mammograms from 50 patients was used to evaluate our method. The average glandular rate and average glandular dose of the data set were 41.2% and 1.79 mGy, respectively. The error in calculating the individual glandular rate can be estimated to be less than ±3%. When the calculation error of the glandular rate is taken into consideration, the error in the individual average glandular dose can be estimated to be 13% or less. We feel that our method for determining the glandular rate from mammograms is useful for minimizing subjectivity in the evaluation of patient breast composition. (author)

  9. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  10. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  11. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering

  12. Dose rate from the square volume radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The expression for determining the dose rate from a three-dimensional square flat-parallel source of any dimensions is obtained. A simplified method for integrating the resultant expression is proposed. A comparison of the calculation results with the results by the Monte Carlo method has shown them to coincide within 6-8%. Since buildings and structures consist of rectangular elements, the method is recommended for practical calculations of dose rates in residential buildings

  13. Hardness, function, emotional well-being, satisfaction and the overall sexual experience in men using 100-mg fixed-dose or flexible-dose sildenafil citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströberg, P; Kaminetsky, J C; Park, N C; Goldfischer, E R; Creanga, D L; Stecher, V J

    2010-01-01

    The prescribing information for sildenafil citrate (VIAGRA, Pfizer, New York, NY, USA) recommends flexible dosing (50 mg initially, adjusted to 100 or 25 mg based on effectiveness and tolerability) in most men with erectile dysfunction (ED). In many men, however, 100 mg may be the most appropriate initial dose because it would reduce the need for titration and could prevent discouragement and treatment abandonment should 50 mg be insufficient. Results of two previously published double-blind, placebo-controlled sildenafil trials of similar design except for a fixed-dose vs flexible-dose regimen were analyzed. Relative to the flexible-dose, approximately one-third more men were satisfied with an initial and fixed dose of 100 mg. In addition, tolerability was similar, and improvements from baseline in outcomes on validated, ED-specific, patient-reported questionnaires were either similar (erectile function and the percentage of completely hard and fully rigid erections) or greater (emotional well-being and the overall sexual experience). The similarity in outcomes is not surprising given that almost 90% of the men in the flexible-dose trial titrated to 100 mg after 2 weeks. These data suggest prescription of an initial dose of 100 mg for men with ED, except in those for whom it is inappropriate. PMID:20596083

  14. Dose-Response Analysis of RNA-Seq Profiles in Archival Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of archival resources has been limited to date by inconsistent methods for genomic profiling of degraded RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. RNA-sequencing offers a promising way to address this problem. Here we evaluated transcriptomic dose responses us...

  15. Use of antibacterial fixed-dose combinations in the private sector in eight Latin American Countries between 1999 and 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, Veronika J.; Mol, Peter G. M.; Verdijk, Jonneke; Stichele, Robert H. Vander; Taxis, Katja

    OBJECTIVE: To assesses the safety and rationale of antibacterial fixed-dose combinations in the private sector in Latin America and determine the extent of their use. METHODS: Analysis of FDCs was based on retail sales data for eight Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia,

  16. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davidson, Carolyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McLaren, Joyce [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Miller, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  17. Choice of exchange rate regimes for African countries: Fixed or Flexible Exchange rate regimes?

    OpenAIRE

    Simwaka, Kisu

    2010-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate exchange rate regime has been a subject of ongoing debate in international economics. The majority of African countries are small open economies and thus where the choice of the exchange rate regime is an important policy issue. Aside from factors such as interest rates and inflation, the exchange rate is one of the most important determinants of a country’s relative level of economic health. For this reason, exchange rates are among the most watched analyzed and ...

  18. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  19. Pharmacokinetic profiling of efavirenz-emtricitabine-tenofovir fixed dose combination in pregnant and non-pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Muddana, Nageswararao; Saralaya, Ramanatha; Komarneni, Prashanth; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Mukkanti, K

    2012-07-01

    During pregnancy, the disposition of various drugs is altered due to changes in physiological condition, maternal gastrointestinal absorption, gastric secretion and motility. A fixed dose combination of antiretrovirals is commonly prescribed for the treatment of HIV infection. There is a need to understand the pharmacokinetics and placental transfer of efavirenz-emtricitabine-tenofovir in fixed dose combination during pregnancy. The pharmacokinetics and placental transfer of efavirenz-emtricitabine-tenofovir fixed dose combination was evaluated in timed pregnant and non-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats at 30, 10, 15 mg/kg p.o., respectively. The plasma, placental tissue, amniotic fluid and fetal tissue concentrations were measured using high performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometric detector (LC-MS/MS). To summarize, the pharmacokinetic profile of efavirenz remained similar in the pregnant and non-pregnant rats. However, a considerable difference in the pharmacokinetics of emtricitabine and tenofovir was observed in pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Efavirenz and emtricitabine showed appreciable placental, amniotic fluid and fetal exposure compared with tenofovir. The present study suggests that a profound impact on antiretroviral pharmacokinetics was observed during pregnancy and there is a need to monitor the exposure levels of each drug when administered as a fixed dose combination during pregnancy. Further studies to explore the pharmacokinetic parameters of fixed dose antiretrovirals during the preclinical stage in a timed-pregnancy rat model are required. Such studies can help in the development of safe and effective medications with a reduced risk of perinatal transmission of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  1. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Radiation damage in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy: effects of dose and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppasamy, Manikandan; Karimi Nejadasl, Fatemeh; Vulovic, Milos; Koster, Abraham J.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dose and dose-rate were investigated for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy using stroboscopic data collection. A dose-rate effect was observed favoring lower flux densities. Radiation damage is an important resolution limiting factor both in macromolecular X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Systematic studies in macromolecular X-ray crystallography greatly benefited from the use of dose, expressed as energy deposited per mass unit, which is derived from parameters including incident flux, beam energy, beam size, sample composition and sample size. In here, the use of dose is reintroduced for electron microscopy, accounting for the electron energy, incident flux and measured sample thickness and composition. Knowledge of the amount of energy deposited allowed us to compare doses with experimental limits in macromolecular X-ray crystallography, to obtain an upper estimate of radical concentrations that build up in the vitreous sample, and to translate heat-transfer simulations carried out for macromolecular X-ray crystallography to cryo-electron microscopy. Stroboscopic exposure series of 50–250 images were collected for different incident flux densities and integration times from Lumbricus terrestris extracellular hemoglobin. The images within each series were computationally aligned and analyzed with similarity metrics such as Fourier ring correlation, Fourier ring phase residual and figure of merit. Prior to gas bubble formation, the images become linearly brighter with dose, at a rate of approximately 0.1% per 10 MGy. The gradual decomposition of a vitrified hemoglobin sample could be visualized at a series of doses up to 5500 MGy, by which dose the sample was sublimed. Comparison of equal-dose series collected with different incident flux densities showed a dose-rate effect favoring lower flux densities. Heat simulations predict that sample heating will only become an issue for very large dose rates (50 e − Å −2 s

  3. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  4. Enhanced activity of deoxycytidine kinase after pulsed low dose rate and single dose gamma irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigmond, J.; Haveman, J.; Kreder, N. Castro; Loves, W. J.; van Bree, C.; Franken, N. A.; Peters, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    In both pulsed low dose rate (LDR) and single high dose radiation schedules, gemcitabine pretreatment sensitizes tumor cells to radiation. These radiosensitizing effects could be the result of decreased DNA repair. In this study, the effect of irradiation on the deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) needed for

  5. Evaluation of radioiodine therapy with fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi in patients with Graves disease; Avaliacao da radioiodoterapia com doses fixas de 10 e 15 mCi em pacientes com doenca de Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, Viviane; Vilar, Lucio; Moura, Eliane; Brito, Ana; Castellar, Enio [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: vivi2207@ig.com.br

    2007-10-15

    The treatment options for the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease are antithyroid drugs, surgery and radioiodine, none of which is considered ideal, as they do not act directly on the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Radioiodine has been increasingly used as the treatment of choice because it is a safe and definitive therapy whose administration is very easy. Some authors prefer to administer higher doses in order to deliberately induce hypothyroidism, while others recommend lower doses that result in a lower incidence of hypothyroidism and a greater incidence of euthyroidism. There is no consensus for the optimal regimen of fixed doses to be used and this is the main focus of the present study, where doses of 10 and 15 mCi of {sup 131}I were compared. Among the 164 patients analyzed, 61 (37.2%) were submitted to 10 mCi and 103 (62.8%) to 15 mCi. In the longitudinal analysis it was observed that remission of the hyperthyroidism was statistically different in the sixth month (p < 0.001), being higher in the group that used the dose of 15 mCi, but similar in both groups at 12 and 24 months. It may be concluded that the administration of fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi of {sup 131}I brought about a similar remission of the hyperthyroidism after 12 months of treatment. Moreover, the remission rate of the hyperthyroidism had no association with age, sex or previous therapy with antithyroid drugs. (author)

  6. 48 CFR 1552.216-73 - Fixed rates for services-indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.216-73 Fixed rates for services—indefinite delivery... rates for services in indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contracts. When the contract contains... option periods. Fixed Rates for Services—Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Contract (APR 1984) The...

  7. Apoptosis supression of cultured mouse brain cells by low dose rate irradiation of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, S.; Nojima, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Suzuki, M.

    2003-01-01

    An environment of low dose rate radiation of heavy particles was achieved in an incubator by using off-centered scattered beam of accelerator (HIMAC). Cultured hole brain cells prepared from newborn mice of C3H, SCID and B6 were incubated in 10% FBS-DMEM medium for five days in the HIMAC incubator irradiating the low dose rate of heavy particles. The heavy particle irradiation was passively occurred while the HIMAC beam port was activated during the other experiments in the night period. The radiation doses inside and outside the incubator were continuously measured by LIULIN detectors. The accumulated dose during incubation varied 0.5-10mGy depend on the frequency of HIMAC operations. The apoptotic sensitivities of the brain cells were evaluated by fixing and Hoechst33342 staining after additional acute exposure of 200 KV X-ray within 4 Gy. A slight increase in apoptotic fraction without the acute irradiation was observed in cells inside the incubator compared to the laboratory control. The apoptosis induction was however suppressed when the additional X-ray irradiation was applied in a range of 0.25- 0.75Gy. This suggested that an adaptive response may be induced when heavy particle irradiation of the low dose rate was applied prior to the acute X-ray irradiation. This paper will discuss effects of the accumulated doses of the preceding irradiation of heavy particles and periods until the subsequent acute irradiation

  8. Dose rates evaluation of HiPER facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.juarez@upm.es [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Dept. Ingenieria Energetica UNED, Madrid (Spain); Perlado, Jose M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear/UPM, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid (Spain); Le Garrec, Bruno [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2011-10-15

    During the operation of the HiPER first engineering facility, up to 1.2 x 10{sup 5} MJ/yr of fusion neutrons yields are foreseen. This irradiation level could be distributed in 100 MJ detonations, accounting up to 100 detonations in a single burst, with 10 Hz repetition rate. A burst would take place every month. The dose rates are computed and different concrete shields are evaluated within the target bay. During the operation of the facility the entrance is forbidden inside the bioshield. Between bursts, manual maintenance might be performed inside the bioshield but outside the final optics assembly (FOA) shield. Inside the FOA shield the residual dose rates are so high that only remote maintenance is allowed. The FOA shield reduces the delivered dose rate to optics in a factor of 30.3.

  9. Pharmacokinetic bioequivalence studies of a fixed-dose combination of tamsulosin and dutasteride in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossler, Michael J; Collins, David A; Thompson, Meg M; Nino, Antonio; Bianco, Joseph J; Chetty, Dushen

    2014-05-01

    The combination of dutasteride and tamsulosin may be more effective for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia than either treatment alone. We report the results of three pharmacokinetics and tolerability studies, which used a dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl (0.5 mg/0.2 mg) fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsules containing a small dutasteride soft gelatin capsule (smaller than commercial Avodart™) and modified-release tamsulosin pellets that have different amounts of enteric coating. These studies compared the test products to commercial Avodart™ (dutasteride 0.5 mg) and two different commercial tamsulosin HCl 0.2 mg products, Harnal™ Capsules or Harnal-D™ Tablets, which are reportedly bioequivalent to each other. All three studies were randomized single-dose studies in healthy male adults. Study 1 [N = 86 (NCT01254071)] was a two-period crossover study of a dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC versus coadministered Avodart™ and Harnal-D™ Tablets. The pharmacokinetics of both dutasteride and tamsulosin were studied. Study 2 [N = 27 (NCT01471678)] was a four-period crossover study of dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations versus Avodart™ and Harnal™ Capsules or Harnal-D™ Tablets. Only the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin were studied. Study 3 [N = 40 (NCT01495026)] was a two-period study of dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations versus coadministered Avodart™ and Harnal-D™ Tablets. In this study, only the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin were studied. Study 2 assessed fed-state pharmacokinetics. Studies 1 and 3 assessed fed- and fasted-state pharmacokinetics. All dutasteride/tamsulosin HCl FDC formulations and coadministered treatments were well-tolerated. In Study 1, the FDC dutasteride was bioequivalent to Avodart™ coadministered with tamsulosin under fed and fasted conditions. In Study 1, the FDC tamsulosin had a slower release than commercial Harnal-D™ Tablets coadministered with dutasteride (fed and fasted

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of mefloquine, administered as a fixed-dose combination of artesunate-mefloquine in Indian patients for the treatment of acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Vincent; Valecha, Neena; Srivastava, Bina; Sharma, Bhawna; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2014-05-23

    Fixed-dose combinations of artemisinin combination therapy are strongly recommended to facilitate drug administration and compliance. New fixed-dose combinations must nevertheless be evaluated in relevant populations in terms of efficacy and pharmacokinetics. A single-arm, open-label, clinical trial was performed in Indian patients with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria to investigate the efficacy and the pharmacokinetics of mefloquine when combined with artesunate in a fixed-dose combination (400/200 mg of mefloquine base/artesunate). The pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a population approach. Seventy-seven patients were included in the study. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics obeys a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Mean parameter estimates (% inter-individual variability) were as follows: 0.16 h(-1) (75%) for the absorption rate constant, 1.13 L/h (30%) for the apparent plasma clearance, 271 L (21%) for the apparent central distribution volume, 344 L (54%) for the apparent peripheral distribution volume, and 1.43 L/h for the apparent distribution clearance. These values were consistent with the pharmacokinetic results described in Thai patients. No significant covariate was found for clearance. Body weight explained the inter-individual variability of the apparent central and peripheral distribution volumes. The PCR-adjusted efficacy of the treatment was 100%. The lack of significant covariate explaining the inter-individual variability of mefloquine clearance, combined with the excellent efficacy, supports the use of the standard 200/400 mg of artesunate-mefloquine fixed-dose combination in Indian patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. ISRCTN70618692.

  11. Co-extrusion as manufacturing technique for fixed-dose combination mini-matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, L; Saerens, L; Almeida, A; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a multilayer (core/coat) dosage form via co-extrusion, the core providing sustained drug release and the coat immediate drug release. In this study polymers were selected which can be combined in a co-extruded dosage form. Several thermoplastic polymers were hot-melt extruded and evaluated for processability and macroscopic properties (surface smoothness, die swell). Metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) were incorporated as sustained and immediate release model drugs, respectively. Based on the polymer screening experiments a combination of polycaprolactone (core) and polyethylene oxide (coat) was selected for co-extrusion trials, taking into account their drug release profiles and extrusion temperature (70 °C). This combination (containing 10% HCT in the coat and 45% MPT in the core) was successfully co-extruded (diameter core: 3 mm/thickness coat: 0.5 mm). Adhesion between the two polymer layers was good. HCT release from the coat was complete within 30 min, while MPT release was sustained over 24 h (55%, 70%, 85% and 100% after 4, 8, 12 and 2 4h, respectively). DSC, XRD and Raman spectroscopy revealed that MPT remained crystalline during extrusion, whereas HCT was dissolved in the polyethylene oxide matrix. The in vivo study revealed no significant differences between the experimental formulation and the reference formulation (Zok-Zid tablet). Fixed-dose combination mini-tablets with good in vitro and in vivo performance were successfully developed by means of co-extrusion, using a combination of polycaprolactone and polyethylene oxide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and evaluation of fixed dose bi therapy sublingual tablets for treatment stress hypertension and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A El-Nabarawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A stress induced rise in the blood pressure. Some believe that patients with hypertension are characterized by a generalized state of increased anxiety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to prepare a fixed dose bi therapy using bisoprolol hemifumarate (BH as antihypertensive drug and buspirone hydrochloride (BuHCl as anxiolytic drug, which can be used to treat both diseases concomitantly. Using sublingual tablets is hopeful to improve the BuHCl poor oral bioavailability and to facilitate administration to patients experiencing problems with swallowing. Materials and Methods: A total of 5mg BH and 10mg BuHCl were selected based on compatibility study. A 3×22 full factorial design was adopted for the optimization of the tablets prepared by direct compression method. The effects of the filler type, the binder molecular weight, and the binder type were studied. The prepared formulae were evaluated according to their physical characters as hardness, friability, disintegration time (new modified method and in vivo disintegration time and wetting properties. In vitro drugs dissolute, permeation through the buccal mucosa and the effect of storage were analyzed by a new valid high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC method. Bioavailability study of the selected formula study was carried out and followed by the clinical. Results: The optimized tablet formulation showed accepted average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, disintegration time (less than 3 min. Maximum drug release could be achieved with in 10 min. In addition enhancing drug permeation through the buccal mucosa and, the maximum concentration of the drug that reached the blood was in the first 10 min which means a rapid onset of action and improved the extent of both drug′s absorption. Conclusion: The results revealed that sublingual (F6 tablets containing both drugs would maintain rapid onset of action, and increase bioavailability. BuHCl with BH

  13. Fludarabine with pharmacokinetically-guided IV busulfan is superior to fixed-dose delivery in pretransplant conditioning of AML/MDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Borje S.; Thall, Peter F.; Valdez, Benigno C.; Milton, Denái R.; Al-Atrash, Gheath; Chen, Julianne; Gulbis, Alison; Chu, Diem; Martinez, Charles; Parmar, Simrit; Popat, Uday; Nieto, Yago; Kebriaei, Partow; Alousi, Amin; de Lima, Marcos; Rondon, Gabriela; Meng, Qing H.; Myers, Alan; Kawedia, Jitesh; Worth, Laura L.; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Madden, Timothy; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Jones, Roy B.; Champlin, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that IV Busulfan (Bu) dosing could be safely intensified through pharmacokinetic (PK-) dose guidance to minimize the inter-patient variability in systemic exposure (SE) associated with body-sized dosing, and this should improve outcome of AML/MDS patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). To test this hypothesis, we treated 218 patients (median age 50.7 years, male/female 50/50%) with fludarabine (Flu) 40 mg/m2 once daily ×4, each dose followed by IV Bu, randomized to 130 mg/m2 (N=107) or PK-guided to average daily SE, AUC of 6,000 µM-min (N=111), stratified for remission-status, and allo-grafting from HLA-matched donors. Toxicity and graft vs. host disease (GvHD) rates in the groups were similar; the risk of relapse or treatment-related mortality remained higher in the fixed-dose group throughout the 80-month observation period. Further, PK-guidance yielded safer disease-control, leading to improved overall and progression-free survival, most prominently in MDS-patients and in AML-patients not in remission at allo-HSCT. We conclude that AML/MDS patients receiving pretransplant conditioning treatment with our 4-day regimen may benefit significantly from PK-guided Bu-dosing. This could be considered an alternative to fixed dose delivery since it provides the benefit of precise dose delivery to a predetermined SE without increasing risk(s) of serious toxicity and/or GvHD. PMID:27991894

  14. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  15. Precedents For Authorization Of Contents Using Dose Rate Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-01-01

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  16. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Kushin, V.V.; Akatov, Yu A.; Myltseva, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 deg. inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 μGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 μSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 μGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 μSv/day, respectively

  17. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Kushin, V V; Akatov YuA; Myltseva, V A

    1999-06-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 degree inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 microGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 microSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 microGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 microSv/day, respectively.

  18. Co-extrusion as a processing technique to manufacture a dual sustained release fixed-dose combination product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynckier, An-Katrien; Voorspoels, Jody; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to design a fixed-dose combination dosage form which provides a sustained release profile for both the freely water-soluble metformin HCl and the poorly soluble gliclazide, two antidiabetic compounds used to treat diabetes mellitus. Hot-melt co-extrusion was used as an innovative manufacturing technique for a pharmaceutical fixed-dose combination product. In this way, a matrix formulation that sustained metformin release could be developed, despite the high drug load in the formulation and the freely soluble nature of the drug. It was clear that co-extrusion was perfectly suited to produce a fixed-dose combination product with adequate properties for each of the incorporated APIs. A coat layer, containing at least 30% CAPA(®) 6506 as a hydrophobic polymer, was necessary to adequately sustain the release of the highly dosed freely soluble drug from the 70% metformin HCl-loaded CAPA(®) 6506 core of the co-extrudate. To obtain a complete gliclazide release over 24-h solubilization in Kollidon(®) VA, added as a second polymer to the CAPA(®) 6506 in the coat, was needed. Both active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which have different physicochemical characteristics, were formulated in a single dosage form, using co-extrusion. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

  19. Fixed and variable-rate mortgages, business cycles and monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Rubio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. First, I study how the proportion of fixed and variable-rate mortgages in an economy can affect the way shocks are propagated. Second, I analyze optimal implementable simple monetary policy rules and the welfare implications of this proportion. I develop and solve a New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model that features a housing market and a group of constrained individuals who need housing collateral to obtain loans. A given proportion of ...

  20. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  1. Design of simple UV Spectrophotometric and HPLC methods for assay of artesunate and amodiaquine in fixed dose tablet formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashie, Agatha Dei

    2013-07-01

    Artesunate and Amodiaquine combination is one of the first line drugs for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. To prevent treatment failures and emergence of resistant strains of the Plasmodium parasite, patients are entreated to comply with treatment regimens. Thus fixed dose tablet formulations came as a relieve to patients, ensuring proper compliance as the number of tablets to be taken was reduced. It is therefore important to develop simple methods of assay for these formulations to ensure that quality drugs are available and to prevent resistance to these drugs. This thesis describes Ultraviolet (UV) and High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) methods of assay for Artesunate (AS) and Amodiaduine Hydrochloride (AMQ) in fixed dose tablet formulations. The UV absorption spectroscopy was used to establish a wavelength of maximum absorption and the Beer’s plot generated. At 339nm, Amodiaquine Hydrochloride was assayed accurately in methanol with a high r 2 value of 0.998, an intra and inter day precision of Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) of 1.52% and 1.86% respectively. The Beer’s plot was obeyed in a concentration range of 3.5 - 24.8(µg/mL). The limit of detection and limit of quantification was 1.23(µg/mL) and 3.73(µg/mL) respectively. However the UV method could not be used to assay AS simultaneously with AMQ. A mobile phase of 60% acetonitrile and 40% of 0.05% trifluoroacetic acid, flow rate of 1ml/min, wavelength of detection of 225nm and a C 18 stationary phase are the parameters for the HPLC method. The r 2 for the HPLC method was 0.996 and 0.995 for Amodiaquine hydrochloride and Artesunate respectively. The intra and inter day precision were 1.07% and 1.42% respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.015%w/v and 0.0465%w/v for Amodiaquine hydrochloride and 0.054%w/v and 0.019%w/v for Artesunate respectively. The concentration ranges were 0.01 - 0.16%w/v for Amodiaquine hydrochloride and 0.01 – 0.2%w/v for

  2. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  3. Optimization of planar high-dose-rate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicker, Robert D.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Mohan, Radhe; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy has long been used to deliver localized radiation to the breast and other cancer sites. For interstitial implants, proper source positioning is critical in obtaining satisfactory dose distributions. The present work examines techniques for optimizing source guide placement in high-dose-rate (HDR) biplanar implants, and examines the effects of suboptimal catheter placement. Methods and Materials: Control of individual dwell times in HDR implants allows a high degree of dose uniformity in planes parallel to the implant planes. Biplanar HDR implants can be considered optimized when the dose at the implant center is equal to the dose at the symmetric target boundaries. It is shown that this optimal dose uniformity is achieved when the interplanar separation is related to the target thickness T through the direct proportionality, s = T/√2. To quantify the significance of source positioning, the average dose and a related quantity, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), were calculated inside the treatment volume for two conditions of suboptimal catheter geometry. In one case, the interplanar spacing was varied from 1 cm up to the target thickness T, while a second study examined the effects of off-center placement of the implant planes. Results: Both the average dose and EUD were minimized when the interplanar spacing satisfied the relationship s = T/ √2. EUD, however, was significantly smaller than the average dose, indicating a reduced relative cell killing in the high dose regions near the dwell points. It was also noted that in contrast to the average dose, the EUD is a relatively weak function of catheter misplacement, suggesting that the biological consequences of suboptimal implant geometry may be less significant than is indicated by the increase in average dose. Conclusion: A concise formula can be used to determine the interplanar separation needed for optimal dose uniformity in Manchester-type implants. Deviations from optimal source

  4. Dose rate modelled for the outdoors of a gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J

    2012-01-01

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach's the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation as far as 200 m is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on graphics (author)

  5. An overview of zinc addition for BWR dose rate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, W.J. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the BWRs employing feedwater zinc addition to reduce primary system dose rates. It identifies which BWRs are using zinc addition and reviews the mechanical injection and passive addition hardware currently being employed. The impact that zinc has on plant chemistry, including the factor of two to four reduction in reactor water Co-60 concentrations, is discussed. Dose rate results, showing the benefits of implementing zinc on either fresh piping surfaces or on pipes with existing films are reviewed. The advantages of using zinc that is isotopically enhanced by the depletion of the Zn-64 precursor to Zn-65 are identified.

  6. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  7. The Influence of Post in Endodontically Treated Molar Abutment on Fixed Dentures Success Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralita Kusumawardhini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Many dentists believe that the tooth need reinforcement provided by post before the definite restoration is placed. However, others suggest not to use post when posterior teeth especially molars, still have significant amount of tooth structure. Therefore, when endodontically treated molar is considered to be used as fixed denture abut-ment, clinicians must have proper knowledge about the impact of post placement. This literature will describe considerations regarding post placement in endodontically treated molar abutment in fixed partial dentures and their influence to the success rate. Previous studies implied the need of proper measurement of the amount of remaining tooth structure, the type of intracoronal reinforcement of the abutment, and the functional loads to ensure the success of fixed denture treatment. When planning definitive restorations for endodontically treated abutment teeth, some even suggest to use post and core to fulfill the need of reinforcement. On the contrary, others find that when a post is use in endodontically treated abutment teeth, the failure of custom made-tapered cast post and core is relatively high, whereas the use of amalgam or composite core in posterior teeth especially molars with adequate amount of tooth structure is sufficient due to post system’s limited influence on the suc-cess rate. Based on literature review, for cases with adequate tooth stucture, it can be concluded that the influ-ence of post placement in endodontically treated molar abutment to fixed partial dentures success rate is very limited.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.64

  8. Dose rate constants for the quantity Hp(3) for frequently used radionuclides in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szermerski, Bastian; Bruchmann, Iris; Behrens, Rolf; Geworski, Lilli

    2016-12-01

    According to recent studies, the human eye lens is more sensitive to ionising radiation than previously assumed. Therefore, the dose limit for personnel occupationally exposed to ionising radiation will be lowered from currently 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Currently, no data base for a reliable estimation of the dose to the lens of the eye is available for nuclear medicine. Furthermore, the dose is usually not monitored. The aim of this work was to determine dose rate constants for the quantity H p (3), which is supposed to estimate the dose to the lens of the eye. For this, H p (3)-dosemeters were fixed to an Alderson Phantom at different positions. The dosemeters were exposed to radiation from nuclides typically used in nuclear medicine in their geometries analog to their application in nuclear medicine, e.g. syringe or vial. The results show that the handling of high-energy beta (i.e. electron or positron) emitters may lead to a relevant dose to the lens of the eye. For low-energy beta emitters and gamma emitters, an exceeding of the lowered dose limit seems to be unlikely. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  10. Comparative evaluation of the two fixed dose methods of radioiodine therapy (185 MBq and 370 MBq) for the treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, A.F.; Fallahi, B.; Kakhki, V.R.D.; Eftekhari, M.; Beiki, D.; Saghari, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy is the safest, simplest, least expensive and most effective method for treatment of Graves' disease. But optimal method for determining iodine-131 treatment doses for Graves' hyperthyroidism is unknown, and techniques have varied from a fixed dose to more elaborate calculations based upon gland size, iodine uptake, and iodine turnover. Due to difficulties in previous methods for dose determination, fixed dose method of I-131 is now considered the best practical method for I-131 therapy in Graves' disease, but there is no consensus on the dose. We compared two routinely recommended fixed doses of 185 and 370 MBq for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism (n = 59) who had not been previously treated with radioactive iodine were randomized in two groups of 185 MBq (5 Ci) and 370 MBq (10 mCi). l patients were followed for two years, with 6-month intervals for following clinical outcomes: hyperthyroid requiring further radioiodine, and hypothyroid requiring life-long replacement therapy. Euthyroid and hypothyroid states were considered successful therapy (cure) and hyperthyroid state was considered failure (no response or relapse). Results: Totally, among 59 patients treated with I-131, 20 (33.9%) patients became euthyroid and 19(32.2%) became hypothyroid, while failed therapy was noticed in 20 patients (33.9%). In the group treated by 185 MBq (33 patients), 10(30.3%) were euthyroid, 6(18.2%) were hypothyroid (overall cure rate of 48.5%), while 17(51.5%) remained hyperthyroid by the end of the follow-up period. From the 26 patients treated with 370 MBq, the euthyroid and hypothyroid states were observed in 10(38.5%) and 13(50%) patients, respectively (overall cure rate of 88.5%), and hyperthyroid state in 3(11.5%). No relationship was noted between the outcome and age, sex, size of the thyroid gland and thyroid uptake, but the relationship between the disease outcome and the amount of administered

  11. Serum thyroxine concentrations following fixed-dose radioactive iodine treatment in hyperthyroid cats: 62 cases (1986-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meric, S.M.; Rubin, S.I.

    1990-01-01

    The medical records of 62 hyperthyroid cats treated with a fixed dose of 4 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) were reviewed. In 60 cats, serum thyroxine concentrations were determined after treatment, allowing evaluation of treatment success. Eighty-four percent of the cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations after treatment. Five of the 60 cats (8%) remained hyperthyroxinemic after treatment. Five cats (8%) were hypothyroxinemic when evaluated within 60 days of treatment. Three of these cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations 6 months after treatment, and none had clinical signs of hypothyroidism. The administration of a fixed dose of 4 mCi of 131I was determined to be an effective treatment for feline hyperthyroidism

  12. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Cienfuegos (Cuba))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Hernandez, C.M.; Sanchez-Llull, M.; Cartas-Aguila, H.; Diaz-Asencio, M.; Munoz-Caravaca, A.; Morera-Gomez, Y.; Acosta-Melian, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the level of background radiation for Cienfuegos Province, Cuba. Measurements of outdoor gamma radiation (of terrestrial and cosmic origin) in air were performed at 198 locations using a GPS navigator and a dose meter (SRP-68-01, 30 x 25 mm NaI detector). The average absorbed dose was found to be 73.9 nGy h -1 (17.2-293.9 nGy h -1 ), corresponding to an annual effective dose of 74.7 μSv (21-324 μSv). When compared with the data available for other places, the absorbed gamma doses obtained in this study indicate a background radiation level that falls within natural limits for the Damuji, Salado and Caonao watersheds; however, the Arimao and Gavilanes watersheds present levels of the absorbed dose and annual effective dose comparable with high background radiation areas. An isodose map of the terrestrial gamma dose rate in Cienfuegos was drawn using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This study provides important baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. (authors)

  13. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  14. The impact of the oxygen scavenger on the dose-rate dependence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC type polymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muzafar; Heilemann, Gerd; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Berg, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Recent developments in radiation therapy aimed at more precise dose delivery along with higher dose gradients (dose painting) and more efficient dose delivery with higher dose rates e.g. flattening filter free (FFF) irradiation. Magnetic-resonance-imaging based polymer gel dosimetry offers 3D information for precise dose delivery techniques. Many of the proposed polymer gels have been reported to exhibit a dose response, measured as relaxation rate ΔR2(D), which is dose rate dependent. A lack of or a reduced dose-rate sensitivity is very important for dosimetric accuracy, especially with regard to the increasing clinical use of FFF irradiation protocols with LINACs at high dose rates. Some commonly used polymer gels are based on Methacrylic-Acid-Gel-Initiated-by-Copper (MAGIC). Here, we report on the dose sensitivity (ΔR2/ΔD) of MAGIC-type gels with different oxygen scavenger concentration for their specific dependence on the applied dose rate in order to improve the dosimetric performance, especially for high dose rates. A preclinical x-ray machine (‘Yxlon’, E  =  200 kV) was used for irradiation to cover a range of dose rates from low \\dot{D} min  =  0.6 Gy min-1 to high \\dot{D} max  =  18 Gy min-1. The dose response was evaluated using R2-imaging of the gel on a human high-field (7T) MR-scanner. The results indicate that all of the investigated dose rates had an impact on the dose response in polymer gel dosimeters, being strongest in the high dose region and less effective for low dose levels. The absolute dose rate dependence \\frac{(Δ R2/Δ D)}{Δ \\dot{D}} of the dose response in MAGIC-type gel is significantly reduced using higher concentrations of oxygen scavenger at the expense of reduced dose sensitivity. For quantitative dose evaluations the relative dose rate dependence of a polymer gel, normalized to its sensitivity is important. Based on this normalized sensitivity the dose rate sensitivity was reduced distinctly

  15. The impact of the oxygen scavenger on the dose-rate dependence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC type polymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muzafar; Heilemann, Gerd; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Berg, Andreas

    2018-03-12

    Recent developments in radiation therapy aimed at more precise dose delivery along with higher dose gradients (dose painting) and more efficient dose delivery with higher dose rates e.g. flattening filter free (FFF) irradiation. Magnetic-resonance-imaging based polymer gel dosimetry offers 3D information for precise dose delivery techniques. Many of the proposed polymer gels have been reported to exhibit a dose response, measured as relaxation rate ΔR2 (D) , which is dose rate dependent. A lack of or a reduced dose-rate sensitivity is very important for dosimetric accuracy, especially with regard to the increasing clinical use of FFF irradiation protocols with LINACs at high dose rates. Some commonly used polymer gels are based on Methacrylic-Acid-Gel-Initiated-by-Copper (MAGIC). Here, we report on the dose sensitivity (ΔR2/ΔD) of MAGIC-type gels with different oxygen scavenger concentration for their specific dependence on the applied dose rate in order to improve the dosimetric performance, especially for high dose rates. A preclinical x-ray machine ('Yxlon', E  =  200 kV) was used for irradiation to cover a range of dose rates from low [Formula: see text] min   =  0.6 Gy min -1 to high [Formula: see text] max   =  18 Gy min -1 . The dose response was evaluated using R2-imaging of the gel on a human high-field (7T) MR-scanner. The results indicate that all of the investigated dose rates had an impact on the dose response in polymer gel dosimeters, being strongest in the high dose region and less effective for low dose levels. The absolute dose rate dependence [Formula: see text] of the dose response in MAGIC-type gel is significantly reduced using higher concentrations of oxygen scavenger at the expense of reduced dose sensitivity. For quantitative dose evaluations the relative dose rate dependence of a polymer gel, normalized to its sensitivity is important. Based on this normalized sensitivity the dose rate sensitivity was reduced

  16. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  17. Construction of Fixed Rate Non-Binary WOM Codes Based on Integer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yoju; Wadayama, Tadashi

    In this paper, we propose a construction of non-binary WOM (Write-Once-Memory) codes for WOM storages such as flash memories. The WOM codes discussed in this paper are fixed rate WOM codes where messages in a fixed alphabet of size $M$ can be sequentially written in the WOM storage at least $t^*$-times. In this paper, a WOM storage is modeled by a state transition graph. The proposed construction has the following two features. First, it includes a systematic method to determine the encoding regions in the state transition graph. Second, the proposed construction includes a labeling method for states by using integer programming. Several novel WOM codes for $q$ level flash memories with 2 cells are constructed by the proposed construction. They achieve the worst numbers of writes $t^*$ that meet the known upper bound in many cases. In addition, we constructed fixed rate non-binary WOM codes with the capability to reduce ICI (inter cell interference) of flash cells. One of the advantages of the proposed construction is its flexibility. It can be applied to various storage devices, to various dimensions (i.e, number of cells), and various kind of additional constraints.

  18. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination regimen and separate formulations for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Ting Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Fixed-dose combination formulations, which simplify the administration of drugs and prevent the development of drug resistance, have been recommended as a standard anti-tuberculosis treatment regimen. However, the composition and dosage recommendations for fixed-dose combination formulations differ from those for separate formulations. Thus, questions about the effectiveness and side effects of combination formulations remain. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of these two types of anti-tuberculosis regimens for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. METHOD: A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted using the directly observed treatment short-course strategy. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two short-course regimens. One year after completing the treatment, these patients’ outcomes were analyzed. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979290. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were enrolled, 142 of whom were evaluable for safety assessment. The two regimens had a similar incidence of adverse effects. In the per-protocol population, serum bilirubin concentrations at the peak level, at week 4, and at week 8 were significantly higher for the fixed-dose combination formulation than for the separate formulations. All patients had negative sputum cultures at the end of the treatment, and no relapse occurred after one year of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized study, transient higher serum bilirubin levels were noted for the fixed-dose combination regimen compared with the separate formulations during treatment. However, no significant difference in safety or efficacy was found between the groups when the directly observed treatment short-course strategy was used.

  19. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mountford, P.J.; O' Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J. (Kent and Canterbury Hospital (United Kingdom))

    1991-09-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight {sup 99}Tc{sup m} studies, an {sup 123}I thyroid, an {sup 111}In leucocyte or a {sup 201}Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an {sup 111}In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 {mu}Sv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a {sup 99}Tc{sup m} marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author).

  20. Does grandchild care influence grandparents' self-rated health? Evidence from a fixed effects approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Merih

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to identify, whether and how supplementary grandchild care is causally related to grandparents' self-rated health (SRH). Based on longitudinal data drawn from the German Aging Survey (DEAS; 2008-2014), I compare the results of pooled OLS, pooled OLS with lagged dependant variables (POLS-LD), random and fixed effects (RE, FE) panel regression. The results show that there is a positive but small association between supplementary grandchild care and SRH in POLS, POLS-LD, and RE models. However, the fixed effects model shows that the intrapersonal change in grandchild care does not cause a change in grandparents' SRH. The FE findings indicate that supplementary grandchild care in Germany does not have a causal impact on grandparents' SRH, suggesting that models with between-variation components overestimate the influence of grandchild care on grandparents' health because they do not control for unobserved (time-constant) heterogeneity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose rate of restroon in facilities using radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Gwi [Dept. of uclear Medicine, Inha University hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); An, Seong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study is therefore aimed at measuring the surface dose rate and the spatial dose rate in and outside the radionuclide facility in order to ensure safety of the patients, radiation workers and family care-givers in their use of such equipment and to provide a basic framework for further research on radiation protection. The study was conducted at 4 restrooms in and outside the radionuclide facility of a general hospital in Incheon between May 1 and July 31, 2014. During the study period, the spatial contamination dose rate and the surface contamination dose rate before and after radiation use were measured at the 4 places−thyroid therapy room, PET center, gamma camera room, and outpatient department. According to the restroom use survey by hospitals, restrooms in the radionuclide facility were used not only by patients but also by family care-givers and some of radiation workers. The highest cumulative spatial radiation dose rate was 8.86 mSv/hr at camera room restroom, followed by 7.31 mSv/hr at radioactive iodine therapy room restroom, 2.29 mSv/hr at PET center restroom, and 0.26 mSv/hr at outpatient department restroom, respectively. The surface radiation dose rate measured before and after radiation use was the highest at toilets, which are in direct contact with patient's excretion, followed by the center and the entrance of restrooms. Unsealed radioactive sources used in nuclear medicine are relatively safe due to short half lives and low energy. A patient who received those radioactive sources, however, may become a mobile radioactive source and contaminate areas the patient contacts−camera room, sedation room, and restroom−through secretion and excretion. Therefore, patients administered radionuclides should be advised to drink sufficient amounts of water to efficiently minimize radiation exposure to others by reducing the biological half-life, and members of the public−family care-givers, pregnant women, and children−be as far away from

  2. Dose rate of restroon in facilities using radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gwi; An, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    This study is therefore aimed at measuring the surface dose rate and the spatial dose rate in and outside the radionuclide facility in order to ensure safety of the patients, radiation workers and family care-givers in their use of such equipment and to provide a basic framework for further research on radiation protection. The study was conducted at 4 restrooms in and outside the radionuclide facility of a general hospital in Incheon between May 1 and July 31, 2014. During the study period, the spatial contamination dose rate and the surface contamination dose rate before and after radiation use were measured at the 4 places−thyroid therapy room, PET center, gamma camera room, and outpatient department. According to the restroom use survey by hospitals, restrooms in the radionuclide facility were used not only by patients but also by family care-givers and some of radiation workers. The highest cumulative spatial radiation dose rate was 8.86 mSv/hr at camera room restroom, followed by 7.31 mSv/hr at radioactive iodine therapy room restroom, 2.29 mSv/hr at PET center restroom, and 0.26 mSv/hr at outpatient department restroom, respectively. The surface radiation dose rate measured before and after radiation use was the highest at toilets, which are in direct contact with patient's excretion, followed by the center and the entrance of restrooms. Unsealed radioactive sources used in nuclear medicine are relatively safe due to short half lives and low energy. A patient who received those radioactive sources, however, may become a mobile radioactive source and contaminate areas the patient contacts−camera room, sedation room, and restroom−through secretion and excretion. Therefore, patients administered radionuclides should be advised to drink sufficient amounts of water to efficiently minimize radiation exposure to others by reducing the biological half-life, and members of the public−family care-givers, pregnant women, and children−be as far away from

  3. A Case of Self-treatment Induced Recurrent Fixed Drug Eruptions Associated with the Use of Different Fixed Dose Combinations of Fluoroquinolone-Nitroimidazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnik Pal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A young male patient used fixed dose combinations of different fluoroquinolones and nitroimidazoles several times in the last few years for self-treating repeated episodes of diarrhea and loose motion. Each time, he experienced fixed drug eruptions that increased in number and severity on subsequent occasions. Suspecting association between the drug and the rashes, the patient each time discontinued the treatment prematurely, and preferred to switch to a similar formulation next time, but with different molecules of fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin and nitroimidazole (tinidazole or ornidazole.He could not however avoid the rash. This time the patient presented with multiple, round-to-oval, well-defined, hyperpigmented cutaneous patches of different dimensions, all over the body. He appeared to have run out of options and therefore consulted us seeking advice on how he should treat himself next time he suffered from diarrhea. Causality assessment by Naranjo’s algorithm revealed a definite relationship between the cutaneous adverse reaction and the offending drug. He was counselled regarding medication in general and advised, in particular, to avoid the tendency to self-treat any future episode of diarrhea.

  4. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorobogatov, P.K.; Nikiforov, A.Y.; Demidov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  5. HIGH-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY IN CARCINOMA CERVIX STAGE IIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya Maruthavanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced (IIB-IVA and early inoperable cases. The current standard of practice with curable intent is concurrent chemoradiation in which intracavitary brachytherapy is an integral component of radiotherapy. This study aims at assessing the efficacy of HDR ICBT (High-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy in terms local response, normal tissue reactions, and feasibility. METHODS AND MATERIALS A total of 20 patients of stage IIIB cancer of the uterine cervix were enrolled in the study and were planned to receive concurrent chemotherapy weekly along with EBRT (external beam radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 Fr. Suitability for ICBT was assessed at 40 Gy/20 Fr. 6/20 patients were suitable at 40 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 5.5 Gy to point A in 4 sessions (5.5 Gy/4 Fr. The remaining 14/20 patients completed 50 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 6 Gy to point A in 3 sessions (6 Gy/3 Fr. RESULTS A total of 66 intracavitary applications were done and only one application required dose modification due to high bladder dose, the pelvic control rate was 85% (17/20. 10% (2/20 had stable disease and 5% (1/20 had progressive disease at one year of follow up. When toxicity was considered only 15% developed grade I and grade II rectal complications. Patient compliance and acceptability was 100%. Patients were very comfortable with the short treatment time as compared with patients on LDR ICBT (low-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment interviewed during the same period. CONCLUSION This study proves that HDR brachytherapy is efficacious and feasible in carcinoma of cervix stage IIIB. It also proves that good dose distribution can be achieved with HDR intracavitary facility by the use of dose optimization. The short treatment time in HDR ICBT makes it possible to maintain this optimised dose distribution throughout the treatment providing a gain in the therapeutic ratio and

  6. Total dose and dose rate models for bipolar transistors in circuit simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for total dose effects in bipolar junction transistors for use in circuit simulation. The components of the model are an electrical model of device performance that includes the effects of trapped charge on device behavior, and a model that calculates the trapped charge densities in a specific device structure as a function of radiation dose and dose rate. Simulations based on this model are found to agree well with measurements on a number of devices for which data are available.

  7. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  8. A double-blind efficacy and safety study of duloxetine fixed doses in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Graham J; Prakash, Apurva; Zhang, Qi; Pangallo, Beth A; Bangs, Mark E; March, John S

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of duloxetine fixed dose in the treatment of children (7-11 years) and adolescents (12-17 years) with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients (n=463) in this 36 week study (10 week acute and 26 week extension treatment) received duloxetine 60 mg QD (n=108), duloxetine 30 mg QD (n=116), fluoxetine 20 mg QD (n=117, active control), or placebo (n=122). Measures included: Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Neither active drug (duloxetine or fluoxetine) separated significantly (psuicides or deaths occurred during the study. A total of 7 (6.7%) duloxetine 60 mg, 6 (5.2%) duloxetine 30 mg, 9 (8.0%) fluoxetine, and 11 (9.4%) placebo patients had worsening of suicidal ideation from baseline during acute treatment. Of the patients with suicidal ideation at baseline, 13/16 (81%) duloxetine 60 mg, 16/17 (94%) duloxetine 30 mg, 11/16 (69%) fluoxetine, and 13/15 (87%) placebo had improvement in suicidal ideation at end-point during acute treatment. One fluoxetine, one placebo, and six duloxetine patients had treatment-emergent suicidal behavior during the 36 week study. Trial results were inconclusive, as neither the investigational drug (duloxetine) nor the active control (fluoxetine) separated from placebo on the CDRS-R at 10 weeks. No new duloxetine safety signals were identified relative to those seen in adults. Clinical Trial Registry Number ( www.ClinicalTrials.gov ): NCT00849693.

  9. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandar, Dadong; Syarbaini, Sutarman; Bunawas, Kusdiana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world, comprising five main islands - Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua - as well as 30 archipelagoes totaling 17,508 islands with about 6000 of those inhabited. Mapping the outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is a research project conducted by National Nuclear Energy Agency since 2005 aiming to produce a baseline data map as an overview for planning purposes. In these three years 4 main islands has been measured. The grid system has been used in the research. In Sumatra Island the grid is 50 x 50 km 2 , while in Java 40 x 40 km 2 , in Kalimantan 60 x 60 km 2 , and in Sulawesi 40 x 40 km 2 . The gamma dose rates have been measured by Mini Gamma Ray Spectrometer Model GR-130 made by Exploranium-Canada. Figure 1 shows the map of outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia. Range of dose rate are in Sumatra from 22,96 ± 0,46 n Sv/h to 186,08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h, in Java 11,32 ± 0,72 n Sv/h to 127,54 ± 6,14 n Sv/h, in Kalimantan 10.72 ± 8.32 n Sv/h to 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h, and in Sulawesi 17.7 ± 11,5 n Sv/h to 467 ± 102 n Sv/h. The arithmetic and geometric mean of dose rate in Indonesia are 68 n Sv/h and 53 n Sv/h, respectively. In general, outdoor gamma dose rate in Indonesia is in a normal range. There are some regions have anomaly of gamma dose rate, for examples at North Sumatra 186.08 ± 3,72 n Sv/h (N 2.12727, E 99.80909), at West Kalimantan 349,48 ± 57,21 n Sv/h (S 1.39507, E 110.57584), at West Sulawesi 487 ± 103 n Sv/h (S 2.95781, E 118.86995), etc. These data is very useful as a radiation baseline in Indonesia. (author)

  10. Method of simulation of low dose rate for total dose effect in 0.18 {mu}m CMOS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Baoping; Yao Zhibin; Guo Hongxia; Luo Yinhong; Zhang Fengqi; Wang Yuanming; Zhang Keying, E-mail: baopinghe@126.co [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710613 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Three methods for simulating low dose rate irradiation are presented and experimentally verified by using 0.18 {mu}m CMOS transistors. The results show that it is the best way to use a series of high dose rate irradiations, with 100 {sup 0}C annealing steps in-between irradiation steps, to simulate a continuous low dose rate irradiation. This approach can reduce the low dose rate testing time by as much as a factor of 45 with respect to the actual 0.5 rad (Si)/s dose rate irradiation. The procedure also provides detailed information on the behavior of the test devices in a low dose rate environment.

  11. Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose no Brasil High-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carlos Barros Esteves

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose foi introduzida em nosso meio em janeiro de 1991. Desde então, houve uma mudança significativa na abordagem das neoplasias malignas em relação às vantagens do novo método, e também resolução da demanda reprimida de braquiterapia para as neoplasias ginecológicas. Nos primeiros dez anos de atividade, o Brasil tratou, em 31 serviços, 26.436 pacientes com braquiterapia, sendo mais de 50% das pacientes portadoras de neoplasias do colo uterino. Este estudo mostra o número e o perfil de pacientes tratados com esse método e a sua distribuição no território nacional, deixando explícito o benefício da braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose para o Brasil.High-dose rate brachytherapy was first introduced in Brazil in January 1991. Significant changes in the management of malignant neoplasms were observed since utilization of high-dose rate brachytherapy. The high number of gynecological patients awaiting for brachytherapy also decreased during this period. In the first ten years 26,436 patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. More than 50% of these patients presented neoplasms of the uterine cervix. In this study we present the number and profile of the patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy as well as the distribution of these patients in the Brazilian territory, proving the benefit of the use of high-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil.

  12. Treatment of hyperthyroidism by 131-iodine; Traitement des hyperthyroidies par l'iode 131: dose calculee versus dose fixe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieffe, S.; Cuif-Joba, A.; Testard, A.; Fortuna, I.; Pocharta, J.M.; Papathanassioua, D.; Schvartz, C. [Service d' endocrinologie et medecine nucleaires, institut Jean-Godinot, 1, rue du General Koeing, 51056 Reims, (France)

    2009-05-15

    In a first time, we chose to modify the dose to be administered, on using always the Marinelli formula but on increasing the absorbed dose. In a second time, we wanted to simplify the determination of the dose to be administered by modulating it only in function of the thyroid volume. Two groups of patients were managed for hyperthyroidism recurrence. In a first group the iodine dose ({sup 131}I) was determined with the help of the simplified Marinelli formula: chosen absorbed dose was 150 Gy, gland volume determined by echography, measurement of the fixation at the sixth hour. In the second group, the thyroid volume was determined by echography. The patients with a thyroid from 5 to 30 g received 185 MBq, from 30 to 50 g 370 MBq and superior to 50 g 555 MBq of iodine 131. The two groups of patients have the same characteristics. the results of treatment by iodine 131, evaluated on the dosages of T4L and TSH at three and six months, show the preservation of euthyroidism or the passage in hypothyroidism among 94% of patients in the group 1 and 80% of patients in the group 2. These results are not significantly different. The easiness of the realisation of the treatment in the group 2 lead us to continue this simplified therapy scheme that allows equally to improve the radiation protection of medical personnel by avoiding the use of iodine 131. (N.C.)

  13. Effect of dose rate on radical and property of gelatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Shengrong; Chen Yuxia; Zu Xiaoyan; Li Xin; Jiang Hongyou

    2015-01-01

    The gelatin was irradiated respectively in the range of 0-32 kGy by dose rates of 60 Gy/min 60 Co, 480 Gy/min 60 Co and 12000 Gy/min accelerator, and the relationships of the radical character and gelatin property with dose rate were investigated through electron spin resonance (ESR) and gelatin permeation chromatogram. The results show that there is weak ESR signal from unirradiated gelatin, but irradiated one presents typical double peak. The order of ESR signal intensity of gelatin with the same absorbed dosage from high to low is 60 Gy/min 60 Co, 480 Gy/min 60 Co and 12000 Gy/min accelerator. The linear relationship between ESR signal intensity from 60 Co irradiated gelatin and absorbed dose is y= 26.983x 2 +1 641.8x-205.69. The intrinsic viscosity, average relative molecular weight, gelatin strength and breaking elongation of irradiated gelatin from high to low are 480 Gy/min 60 Co, 12000 Gy/min accelerator and 60 Gy/min 60 Co. The protection mechanism of high dose rate radiation on gelatin degradation is that the production of effective long life free radicals reduces. (authors)

  14. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  15. [Dairy cattle pregnancy rate in fixed time artificial insemination program with and without ultrasonic gynecologic screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes Grillo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pregnancy rate and the importance of ultrasound gynecological screening (US performed prior to fixed time artificial insemination programs (TAI, 120 Girolando cows, over two breeding seasons (2013 and 2014, were divided into two groups: (C / T; n = 58 and without (S / T; n = 62 gynecological screening by ultrasound, using three protocols, and the same for the groups with and without screening. Protocol I - “OvSynch” (OV in which received 0.025 mg of buserelin acetate in D0; 0.15 mg d-cloprostenol on D7; 0.025 mg buserelin acetate D9; It is inseminated at fixed time in D10. Protocol II - “OvSynch” + progesterone (OP4 and III Protocol - “OvSynch” + LH + P4 (OP4LH. Protocols II and III followed the same dosages of “OvSynch” associated with the introduction of intravaginal device containing 1g first use of progesterone in D0 and D7 in withdrawal. In Protocol III, LH replaced buserelin acetate in ovulation induction (D9; 25mg. Gestation diagnosis was made by US 45 days after TAI, and the animals not pregnant were reinseminated as presented heat. Parameters pregnancy rate at TAI (TP, total pregnancy rate (TPT = TAI + Return heat were analyzed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact with 5% significance level. The use of progesterone favored the pregnancy rate of cyclic and acyclic animals, this has not occurred with LH job as ovulation inductor, providing no increase in pregnancy rates and overall pregnancy rate of dairy cows referred to the rated protocol. The gynecological screening by ultrasonography allowed evaluating the cyclicity of the studied females, indicating that its previous execution to the TAI, can provide good results with the use of better efficiency protocols for TAI programs.

  16. Genotoxic effects of high dose rate X-ray and low dose rate gamma radiation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M; Brede, Dag A; Ellender, Michele; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Oughton, Deborah H; Bouffler, Simon D; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann Karin

    2017-10-01

    Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer in humans are based on epidemiological data largely drawn from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor studies, which received an acute high dose rate (HDR) ionising radiation. Limited knowledge exists about the effects of chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure, particularly with respect to the application of the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor. As part of a study to investigate the development of colon cancer following chronic LDR vs. acute HDR radiation, this study presents the results of genotoxic effects in blood of exposed mice. CBAB6 F1 Apc +/+ (wild type) and Apc Min/+ mice were chronically exposed to estimated whole body absorbed doses of 1.7 or 3.2 Gy 60 Co-γ-rays at a LDR (2.2 mGy h -1 ) or acutely exposed to 2.6 Gy HDR X-rays (1.3 Gy min -1 ). Genotoxic endpoints assessed in blood included chromosomal damage (flow cytometry based micronuclei (MN) assay), mutation analyses (Pig-a gene mutation assay), and levels of DNA lesions (Comet assay, single-strand breaks (ssb), alkali labile sites (als), oxidized DNA bases). Ionising radiation (ca. 3 Gy) induced genotoxic effects dependent on the dose rate. Chromosomal aberrations (MN assay) increased 3- and 10-fold after chronic LDR and acute HDR, respectively. Phenotypic mutation frequencies as well as DNA lesions (ssb/als) were modulated after acute HDR but not after chronic LDR. The Apc Min/+ genotype did not influence the outcome in any of the investigated endpoints. The results herein will add to the scant data available on genotoxic effects following chronic LDR of ionising radiation. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:560-569, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 The Authors Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  17. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.

    2015-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm -1 which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm -1 which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm -1 which were associated with NH stretch of NH 2 and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  18. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InsTEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  19. Pigment abnormalities in irradiated hair follicles: effects of low doses, dose rate, and LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fu-Du; Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are reported concerning the effect of dose-rate and LET on the induction of pigment abnormalities in mice. The distribution of abnormalities among individual follicles at low doses was also measured. The radiations were 137 Cs γ-rays delivered at 5 Gy/min, 60 Co γ-rays at 0.0005 Gy/min, and collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons at 0.005, 0.015, or 0.15 Gy/min. Results indicated that pigment clumping responds to dose-rate and LET, and that the assay could be used to resolve acute γ-ray doses of 0.3 Gy or more. Zigzag hair follicles had a lower threshold dose than the less numerous but larger guard hair follicles. The RBE value for neutrons was 2.3. From 0 to 1.25 Gy γ-rays or at 0.30 Gy neutrons, the distribution of clumps per follicle was approximately Poisson. At doses of γ-rays greater than 1.25 Gy, the distribution diverged from a Poisson, with more highly-affected follicles and fewer lightly-affected follicles observed than would be expected. Follicles lacking pigment cells or containing 'albino' pigment cells could not apparently be induced by radiation to exhibit pigment clumping. (U.K.)

  20. Zero-Outage Cellular Downlink with Fixed-Rate D2D Underlay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Popovski, Petar

    2015-01-01

    Two of the emerging trends in wireless cellular systems are Device-to-Device (D2D) and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications. D2D enables efficient reuse of the licensed spectrum to support localized transmissions, while M2M connections are often characterized by fixed and low transmission rates....... D2D connections can be instrumental in localized aggregation of uplink M2M traffic to a more capable cellular device, before being finally delivered to the Base Station (BS). In this paper we show that a fixed M2M rate is an enabler of efficient Machine-Type D2D underlay operation taking place...... simultaneously with another downlink cellular transmission. In the considered scenario, a BS B transmits to a user U, while there are NM Machine-Type Devices (MTDs) attached to U, all sending simultaneously to U and each using the same rate RM. While assuming that B knows the channel B 􀀀 U...

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculations for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using GPU-accelerated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, M; Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Jiang, S B; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are typically based on the Association of American Physicists in Medicine Task Group report 43 (TG-43) guidelines, which approximate patient geometry as an infinitely large water phantom. This ignores patient and applicator geometries and heterogeneities, causing dosimetric errors. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is commonly recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This article presents our recent developments of a fast MC dose calculation package for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, gBMC, built on a graphics processing unit (GPU) platform. gBMC-simulated photon transport in voxelized geometry with physics in (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy energy range considered. A phase-space file was used as a source model. GPU-based parallel computation was used to simultaneously transport multiple photons, one on a GPU thread. We validated gBMC by comparing the dose calculation results in water with that computed TG-43. We also studied heterogeneous phantom cases and a patient case and compared gBMC results with Acuros BV results. Radial dose function in water calculated by gBMC showed GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gBMC, for HDR brachytherapy make it attractive for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interest about possible 3 H induced health detriment corresponding to low dose domain is justified by the use of nuclear power as well as by the ongoing research on fusion reactor technology. During the past decade a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for 3 H, most of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. A point of interest concerning the tritium induced low-level effects came from the research on the adaptive response of mitogen stimulated human lymphocytes to low-LET (linear energy transfer) radiation exposure. The present paper reports the results of two different types of experiments: one is referring to in vitro induced effects on human lymphocytes, while the other one is referring to in vivo effects observed on internally contaminated animals. The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. The response induced by the pre-treatment of the human lymphocytes with HTO of different specific 3 H activities and for different time intervals was subsequently provoked by acute gamma irradiation of the cells. The frequency of micronucleus induction, used as biological end-point, was evaluated after culturing the whole blood. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to HTO (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with 1 Gy gamma-rays showed an induction frequency of micronuclei significantly lower (40%) than the sum of the yields induced by HTO and gamma-rays separately. The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated

  3. Biological equivalence of low dose rate to multifractionated high dose rate irradiations: investigations in mouse lip mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueben, Georg; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Schueren, Emmanuel van der

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological equivalence of continuous low dose rate (LDR) irradiations to multifractionated high dose rate (HDR) regimes. The applicability of the LQ model was analysed for fraction sizes and dose rates relevant for the clinic. Material and methods: Investigations were performed in mouse lip mucosa. HDR fractions were given in an overall treatment time ranging from 10 h to 3.5 days. The dose rate effect was analysed in the range of 84 to 0.76 Gy/h. For an assessment of biological equivalence in comparison to LDR, HDR irradiations have been performed in the same overall treatment time as the corresponding LDR regimes. Results: Recovery leads to sparing of radiation damage as the dose rate is reduced from 84 to 0.76 Gy/h (20.0 versus 45.7 Gy ED 50 ). No significant additional sparing from 0.9 to 0.76 Gy/h could be demonstrated (44.9 versus 45.7 Gy ED 50 ). Even 30 HDR fractions in 24 h were not sufficient to match the effect of LDR over the same time period (38.2 versus 41.1 Gy ED 50 ). The present data give evidence for a bi-exponential repair process in mouse lip mucosa (T 1/2fast 27 min, T 1/2slow 150 min). Repair is dominated by the faster component (>80%). Conclusions: LDR is the most efficient way to deliver radiation if recovery is to be maximised and the overall time kept as short as possible. When used with realistic parameters the LQ model is capable of providing quantitative guidelines in areas of clinical interest

  4. Clinical utility of fixed-dose combinations in hypertension: evidence for the potential of nebivolol/valsartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varagic J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina Varagic,1–3 Henry Punzi,4,5 Carlos M Ferrario2,3,61Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, 2Division of Surgical Sciences, 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC USA; 4Trinity Hypertension and Diagnostic Research Center, Carrollton, TX, USA; 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 6Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USAAbstract: Despite significant advances in pharmacologic approaches to treat hypertension during the last decades, hypertension- and hypertension-related organ damage are still a high health and economic burden because a large proportion of patients with hypertension do not achieve optimal blood pressure control. There is now general agreement that combination therapy with two or more antihypertensive drugs is required for targeted blood pressure accomplishment and reduction of global cardiovascular risk. The goals of combination therapies are to reduce long-term cardiovascular events by targeting different mechanism underlying hypertension and target organ disease, to block the counterregulatory pathways activated by monotherapies, to improve tolerability and decrease the adverse effects of up-titrated single agents, and to increase persistence and adherence with antihypertensive therapy. Multiple clinical trials provide evidence that fixed-dose combinations in a single pill offer several advantages when compared with loose-dose combinations. This review discusses the advances in hypertension control and associated cardiovascular disease as they relate to the prospect of combination therapy targeting a third-generation beta (β 1-adrenergic receptor (nebivolol and an angiotensin II receptor blocker (valsartan in fixed-dose single-pill formulations.Keywords: blood pressure control, hypertension, β1-adrenergic receptor, renin angiotensin system

  5. Experimental study of radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the BAEC TRIGA Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajijul Hoq, M; Malek Soner, M A; Salam, M A; Haque, M M; Khanom, Salma; Fahad, S M

    2017-12-01

    The 3MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been under operation for about thirty years since its commissioning at 1986. In accordance with the demand of fundamental nuclear research works, the reactor has to operate at different power levels by utilizing a number of experimental facilities. Regarding the enquiry for safety of reactor operating personnel and radiation workers, it is necessary to know the radiation level at different strategic points of the reactor where they are often worked. In the present study, neutron, beta and gamma radiation dose rate at different strategic points of the reactor facility with reactor power level of 2.4MW was measured to estimate the rising level of radiation due to its operational activities. From the obtained results high radiation dose is observed at the measurement position of the piercing beam port which is caused by neutron leakage and accordingly, dose rate at the stated position with different reactor power levels was measured. This study also deals with the gamma dose rate measurements at a fixed position of the reactor pool top surface for different reactor power levels under both Natural Convection Cooling Mode (NCCM) and Forced Convection Cooling Mode (FCCM). Results show that, radiation dose rate is higher for NCCM in compared with FCCM and increasing with the increase of reactor power. Thus, concerning the radiological safety issues for working personnel and the general public, the radiation dose level monitoring and the experimental analysis performed within this paper is so much effective and the result of this work can be utilized for base line data and code verification of the nuclear reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [First fixed dose combination perindopril arginine-indapamide-amlodipine: new approach in combination therapy in hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, Jiří

    2014-09-01

    Use of fixed combination of antihypertensive drugs clearly improves compliance to the pharmacological therapy, control of hypertension and prognosis. Based on the current guidelines triple antihypertensive therapy with RAS-blocker, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and diuretic represents the standard and best option. The article introduces first and innovative fixed triple combination of perindopril arginine + indapamide + amlodipine (Triplixam®). This type of therapy is suitable for patients already treated with free combinations of three antihypertensive drugs or in those hypertensives with uncontrolled hypertension on two antihypertensive molecules (approx. 60% of all hypertensive population). Fixed combination of perindopril arginine + indapamid + amlodipin is indicated also in severe hypertension (approx. 30% of pts). Large clinical data from various morbidity-mortality studies related to each of these substances are discussed as well as basic pharmacological characteristics. Based on the results from ADVANCE-CCB study combination of perindopril arginine + indapamide + CCB decreases total mortality in hypertension by 28%. Another discussed study-PIANIST confirmed significant antihypertensive effect of Triplixam® on large sample of patients with various stages of hypertension. Triplixam® in addition to that has very good tolerance with low side effects profile, flexibility of the dosages and large body of evidence of positive impact on prognosis of hypertensive patients. Use of Triplixam® may improve control of hypertension in the Czech Republic.Key words: amlodipine - fixed combination - hypertension - indapamide - perindopril arginine - therapy.

  7. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Cac, Franky Eduardo

    2004-10-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192 Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192 Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192 Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192 Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192 Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  8. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  9. Calculation method for gamma-dose rates from spherical puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1993-05-01

    The Lagrangian puff-models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of atmospheric releases. Basic output from such models are concentrations of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for points far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using the volume integral requires significant computer time. The volume integral for the gamma dose could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor due to the fact that the same correction factors are used for all isotopes. The authors describe a more elaborate correction method. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma-dose rate as a function of the puff dispersion parameter (δ p ) and the distance from the puff centre for four energy groups. The release of energy for each radionuclide in each energy group has been calculated and tabulated. Based on these tables and a suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses takes very short time and is almost independent of the number of radionuclides. (au) (7 tabs., 7 ills., 12 refs.)

  10. Clinical benefit of fixed-dose dual bronchodilation with glycopyrronium and indacaterol once daily in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Long-acting bronchodilators are the preferred option for maintenance therapy of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the clinical studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of the once-daily fixed-dose du...... for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] spirometric criteria). Furthermore, a very recent study has shown that fixed-dose indacaterol/glycopyrronium improves exercise endurance time compared with placebo, although no significant difference was observed between fixed-dose indacaterol...

  11. Relationship of dose rate and total dose to responses of continuously irradiated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Norris, W.P.; Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Young-adult beagles were exposed continuously (22 hours/day) to 60 Co gamma rays in a specially constructed facility. The exposure rates were 5, 19, 17 or 35 R/day, and the exposures were terminated at 600, 1400, 2000 or 4000 R. A total of 354 dogs were irradiated; 221 are still alive as long-term survivors, some after more than 2000 days. The data on survival of these dogs, coupled with data from similar preliminary experiments, allow an estimate of the LD 50 for gamma-ray exposures given at a number of exposure rates. They also allow comparison of the relativeimportance of dose rate and total dose, and the interaction of these two variables, in the early and late effects after protracted irradiation. The LD 50 for the beagle increases from 344 R (258 rads) delivered at 15 R/minute to approximately 4000 R (approximately 3000 rads) at 10 R/day. Over this entire range, the LD 50 is dependent upon haematopoietic damage. At 5 R/day and less, no definitive LD 50 can be determined; there is nearly normal continued haematopoietic function, survival is prolonged, and the dogs manifest varied individual responses in the organ systems. Although the experiment is not complete, interim data allow serveral important conclusions. Terminated exposures, while not as effective as irradiation continued until death, can produce myelogenous leukaemia at the same exposure rate, 10 R/day. More importantly, at the same total accumulated dose, lower exposure rates appear more damaging than higher rates on the basis of the rate and degree of haematological recovery that occurs after termination of irradiation. Thus, the rate of haematologic depression, the nadir of the depression and the rate of recovery are dependent upon exposure rate; the latter is inversely related and the first two are directly related to exposure rate. ( author)

  12. Relationship of dose rate and total dose to responses of continuously irradiated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Norris, W.P.; Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    Young-adult beagles were exposed continuously (22 hours/day) to 60 Co γ rays in a specially constructed facility. The exposure rates were either 5, 10, 17, or 35 R/day, and the exposures were terminated at either 600, 1400, 2000, or 4000 R. A total of 354 dogs were irradiated; 221 are still alive as long-term survivors, some after more than 2000 days. The data on survival of these dogs, coupled with data from similar preliminary experiments, allow an estimate of the LD 50 for γ-ray exposures given at a number of exposure rates. They also allow comparison of the relative importance of dose rate and total dose, and the interaction of these two variables, in the early and late effects after protracted irradiation. The LD 50 for the beagle increases from 258 rad delivered at 15 R/minute to approximately 3000 rad at 10 R/day. Over this entire range, the LD 50 is dependent upon hematopoietic damage. At 5 R/day and less, no meaningful LD 50 can be determined; there is nearly normal continued hematopoietic function, survival is prolonged, and the dogs manifest varied individual responses in other organ systems. Although the experiment is not complete, interim data allow several important conclusions. Terminated exposures, while not as effective as radiation continued until death, can produce myelogenous leukemia at the same exposure rate, 10 R/day. More importantly, at the same total accumulated dose, lower exposure rates are more damaging than higher rates on the basis of the rate and degree of hematological recovery that occurs after termination of irradiation. Thus, the rate of hematologic depression, the nadir of the depression, and the rate of recovery are dependent upon exposure rate; the latter is inversely related and the former two are directly related to exposure rate

  13. Fixed-dose combinations at the front line of multimodal pain management: perspective of the nurse-prescriber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Joanne O’Brien,1 Joseph V Pergolizzi Jr,2 Mart van de Laar3, Hans-Ulrich Mellinghoff,4 Ignacio Morón Merchante,5 Srinivas Nalamachu,6 Serge Perrot,7 Robert B Raffa81Department of Pain Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Association of Chronic Pain Patients, Houston, TX; Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Arthritis Center Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands; 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Osteology, Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland; 5Centro de Salud Universitario Goya, Madrid, Spain; 6Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, and International Clinic Research, Leawood, KS, USA; 7Service de Médecine Interne et Consultation de la Douleur, Hôpital Hotel Dieu, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 8Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia PA, USAAbstract: Pain should be treated promptly and effectively to restore the patient to full function, avoid pain chronification, and preserve quality of life. A recent pain specialists' meeting discussed the use of different pharmacological treatment options, such as topical analgesics, nonopioid agents (such as paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, weak and strong opioids, and fixed-dose combination products in the management of moderate to severe pain from different etiologies. One of the topics discussed in, and subsequent to, this meeting was the role of fixed-dose combination products for nurse-prescribers who are in many ways at the front line of managing both acute and chronic pain syndromes. The panel agreed that proper product selection should take into account the patient's age, condition, type of pain, and comorbidities, as well as balance safety with effectiveness. Although nurse-prescribers need to be aware of cumulative paracetamol dosing, fixed-dose

  14. Quantitative evaluation of radiation dose rates for depleted uranium in PRIDE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Il Je; Sim, Jee Hyung; KIm, Yong Soo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiation dose rates in PRIDE facility is evaluated quantitatively for assessing radiation safety of workers because of large amounts of depleted uranium being handled in PRIDE facility. Even if direct radiation from depleted uranium is very low and will not expose a worker to significant amounts of external radiation. ORIGEN-ARP code was used for calculating the neutron and gamma source term being generated from depleted uranium (DU), and the MCNP5 code was used for calculating the neutron and gamma fluxes and dose rates. The neutron and gamma fluxes and dose rates due to DU on spherical surface of 30 cm radius were calculated with the variation of DU mass and density. In this calculation, an imaginary case in which DU density is zero was added to check the self-shielding effect of DU. In this case, the DU sphere was modeled as a point. In case of DU mixed with molten salt of 50-250 g, the neutron and gamma fluxes were calculated respectively. It was found that the molten salt contents in DU had little effect on the neutron and the gamma fluxes. The neutron and the gamma fluxes, under the respective conditions of 1 and 5 kg mass of DU, and 5 and 19.1 g.cm{sup -3} density of DU, were calculated with the molten salt (LiCl+KCl) of 50 g fixed, and compared with the source term. As the results, similar tendency was found in neutron and gamma fluxes with the variation of DU mass and density when compared with source spectra, except their magnitudes. In the case of the DU mass over 5 kg, the dose rate was shown to be higher than the environmental dose rate. From these results, it is concluded that if a worker would do an experiment with DU having over 5 kg of mass, the worker should be careful in order not to be exposed to the radiation.

  15. Variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere. Gamma dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, D. E.; Solecki, A. T.

    2018-02-01

    The purposes of research were following: observation and interpretation of variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere - vertical, seasonal, spatial and analysis of relation between average annual radon concentration and ground natural radiation and gamma dose rate. Moreover we wanted to check the occurrence of radon density currents and the possibility of radon accumulation at the foot of the spoil tip. The surveys were carried out in Okrzeszyn (SW Poland) in the area of the spoil tip formed during uranium mining that took place in 60's of 20th century. The measurements were carried out in 20 measurements points at three heights: 0.2 m, 1 m and 2 m a.g.l. using SSNTD LR-115. The survey lasted one year and detectors were exchanged at the beginning of every season. Uranium eU (ppm), thorium eTh (ppm) and potassium K (%) contents were measured using gamma ray spectrometer Exploranium RS-230, ambient gamma dose rate using radiometer RK-100. The average radon concentration on this area was 52.8 Bq m-3. The highest radon concentrations were noted during autumn and the lowest during winter. We observed vertical variations of radon concentration. Radon concentrations decreased with increase of height above ground level. The decrease of radon with increase of height a.g.l. had logarithmic character. Spatial variations of radon concentrations did not indicate the occurrence of radon density currents and accumulation of radon at the foot of the spoil tip. The analysis of relation between average radon concentrations and ground natural radiation (uranium and thorium content) or gamma dose rate revealed positive relation between those parameters. On the base of results mentioned above we suggested that gamma spectrometry measurements or even cheaper and simpler ambient gamma dose rate measurements can be a useful tool in determining radon prone areas. This should be confirmed by additional research.

  16. Installation and commissioning of instantaneous dose rate monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Iaydjiev, Plamen

    2018-01-01

    INRNE-Sofia was working on the installation and commissioning of new instantaneous dose rate monitoring system for the GIF++ facility at CERN. The final device, containing an 8-channels readout board was designed and tested at the CERN facility during November 2017, in an irradiation campaign supported by the AIDA-2020 TA program. The system is designed to be fully integrated in the GIF++ control system and the data measured are available to the users.

  17. Basis for dose rate to curie assay method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedeon, S.R.

    1996-10-31

    Disposition of low-level solid waste packages at the Hanford Site requires quantifying the radioactive contents of each container. This study generated conversion factors to apply to the results of contact surveys that are performed with standard dose rate survey instruments by field health physics technicians. This study determined the accuracy of this method, and identified the major sources of uncertainty. It is concluded that the dominant error is associated with the possibility that the radioactive source is not homogeneously distributed.

  18. Global shutdown dose rate maps for a DEMO conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichtle, D., E-mail: dieter.leichtle@f4e.europa.eu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanz, J.; Catalan, J.P.; Juarez, R. [Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia(UNED), E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, C/ Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of R2S-method on high-resolution full torus sector mesh for DEMO. • Absorbed dose rates after shutdown for a variely of RH equipment at typical locations. • Idenification of radiation levels at several port based locations. - Abstract: For the calculations of highly reliable shutdown dose rate (SDR) maps in fusion devices like a DEMO plant, the Rigorous-2-step (R2S) method is nowadays routinely applied using high-resolution decay gamma sources from initial high-resolution neutron flux meshes activating all materials in the system. This approach has been utilized in the present paper with the objective to provide SDR results relevant for RH systems of a conceptual DEMO design developed in the EU. The primary objective was to assess specific locations of interest for RH equipment inside the vessel and along the extension of maintenance ports. To this end, a provisional DEMO MCNP model has been used, featuring HCLL-type blankets, tungsten/copper divertor, manifolds, vacuum vessel with ports and toroidal field coils. The operational scenario assumed 2.1 GW fusion power and a life-time of 20 years with plant availability of 30%, where removable parts will be extracted after 5.2 years. Results of absorbed dose rate distributions for several relevant materials are presented and discussed in terms of the different contributions from the various activated components.

  19. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E γ , σ y , the asymmetry factor - σ y /σ z , the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R xy . To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs

  20. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  1. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  2. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  3. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K.; Powell, Matthew A.; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group

  4. Robust ray-tracing algorithms for interactive dose rate evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotte, L.

    2011-01-01

    More than ever, it is essential today to develop simulation tools to rapidly evaluate the dose rate received by operators working on nuclear sites. In order to easily study numerous different scenarios of intervention, computation times of available softwares have to be all lowered. This mainly implies to accelerate the geometrical computations needed for the dose rate evaluation. These computations consist in finding and sorting the whole list of intersections between a big 3D scene and multiple groups of 'radiative' rays meeting at the point where the dose has to be measured. In order to perform all these computations in less than a second, we first propose a GPU algorithm that enables the efficient management of one big group of coherent rays. Then we present a modification of this algorithm that guarantees the robustness of the ray-triangle intersection tests through the elimination of the precision issues due to floating-point arithmetic. This modification does not require the definition of scene-dependent coefficients ('epsilon' style) and only implies a small loss of performance (less than 10%). Finally we propose an efficient strategy to handle multiple ray groups (corresponding to multiple radiative objects) which use the previous results.Thanks to these improvements, we are able to perform an interactive and robust dose rate evaluation on big 3D scenes: all of the intersections (more than 13 million) between 700 000 triangles and 12 groups of 100 000 rays each are found, sorted along each ray and transferred to the CPU in 470 milliseconds. (author) [fr

  5. Mathematical model for evaluation of dose-rate effect on biological responses to low dose γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose, dose-rate and irradiation time. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and [ 3 H] thymidine uptake in human cells as indices of biological response to gamma radiation, and analyzed mathematically and statistically the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/low dose-rate. Effective dose (ED x ) was mathematically estimated by fitting a general function of logistic model to the dose-response relationship. Assuming that biological response depends on not only cumulative dose but also dose-rate and irradiation time, a multiple logistic function was applied to express the relationship of the three variables. Moreover, to estimate the effect of radiation at very low dose, we proposed a modified exponential model. From the results of fitting curves to the inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake and micronucleus formation, it was obvious that ED 50 in proportion of inhibition of [ 3 H] thymidine uptake increased with longer irradiation time. As for the micronuclei, ED 30 also increased with longer irradiation times. These results suggest that the biological response depends on not only total dose but also irradiation time. The estimated response surface using the three variables showed that the biological response declined sharply when the dose-rate was less than 0.01 Gy/h. These results suggest that the response does not depend on total cumulative dose at very low dose-rates. Further, to investigate the effect of dose-rate within a wider range, we analyzed the relationship between ED x and dose-rate. Fitted curves indicated that ED x increased sharply when dose-rate was less than 10 -2 Gy/h. The increase of ED x signifies the decline of the response or the risk and suggests that the risk approaches to 0 at infinitely low dose-rate

  6. Dose rate reduction method for NMCA applied BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Varela, Juan; Caine, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    BRAC (BWR Radiation Assessment and Control) dose rate is used as an indicator of the incorporation of activated corrosion by products into BWR recirculation piping, which is known to be a significant contributor to dose rate received by workers during refueling outages. In order to reduce radiation exposure of the workers during the outage, it is desirable to keep BRAC dose rates as low as possible. After HWC was adopted to reduce IGSCC, a BRAC dose rate increase was observed in many plants. As a countermeasure to these rapid dose rate increases under HWC conditions, Zn injection was widely adopted in United States and Europe resulting in a reduction of BRAC dose rates. However, BRAC dose rates in several plants remain high, prompting the industry to continue to investigate methods to achieve further reductions. In recent years a large portion of the BWR fleet has adopted NMCA (NobleChem TM ) to enhance the hydrogen injection effect to suppress SCC. After NMCA, especially OLNC (On-Line NobleChem TM ), BRAC dose rates were observed to decrease. In some OLNC applied BWR plants this reduction was observed year after year to reach a new reduced equilibrium level. This dose rate reduction trends suggest the potential dose reduction might be obtained by the combination of Pt and Zn injection. So, laboratory experiments and in-plant tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of Pt and Zn on Co-60 deposition behaviour. Firstly, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of noble metal deposition on Co deposition on stainless steel surfaces. Polished type 316 stainless steel coupons were prepared and some of them were OLNC treated in the test loop before the Co deposition test. Water chemistry conditions to simulate HWC were as follows: Dissolved oxygen, hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide were below 5 ppb, 100 ppb and 0 ppb (no addition), respectively. Zn was injected to target a concentration of 5 ppb. The test was conducted up to 1500 hours at 553 K. Test

  7. Efficacy and safety of benzalkonium chloride-free fixed-dose combination of latanoprost and timolol in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagat P

    2014-06-01

    concomitantly at all time points (mean IOP difference and 95% confidence interval within ±1.5 mmHg; P=0.4223 to P=0.9981. The fixed-dose combination of latanoprost/timolol demonstrated significantly better IOP-lowering efficacy than timolol monotherapy at all time points (P=0.001 to P<0.0001 and significantly better IOP-lowering efficacy than latanoprost monotherapy at all time points. Responder rates on at least one time point and on at least two time points with fixed-dose combination ­latanoprost/timolol were similar to those with concomitant latanoprost plus timolol (85.5% versus 82.1%, P=0.6360; 78.2% versus 75%, P=0.6923, but significantly better than either latanoprost or timolol monotherapy (68.5%, P=0.0355; 55.4%, P=0.0005; 57.4%, P=0.0202; and 46.4%, P=0.0006, respectively. No significant differences in ocular and nonocular treatment-emergent adverse events were found between the treatment groups. Conclusion: A BAK-free, fixed-dose combination of latanoprost 0.005%/timolol 0.5% was as effective and well tolerated as concomitant latanoprost and timolol for treatment of elevated IOP in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Keywords: open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, pharmaceutical preservatives, benzalkonium chloride, latanoprost, timolol

  8. Simulation of internal contamination screening with dose rate meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, T. C. F.; Mendes, B. M.; Hunt, J. G.

    2017-11-01

    Assessing the intake of radionuclides after an accident in a nuclear power plant or after the intentional release of radionuclides in public places allows dose calculations and triage actions to be carried out for members of the public and for emergency response teams. Gamma emitters in the lung, thyroid or the whole body may be detected and quantified by making dose rate measurements at the surface of the internally contaminated person. In an accident scenario, quick measurements made with readily available portable equipment are a key factor for success. In this paper, the Monte Carlo program Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) and MCNPx code are used in conjunction with voxel phantoms to calculate the dose rate at the surface of a contaminated person due to internally deposited radionuclides. A whole body contamination with 137Cs and a thyroid contamination with 131I were simulated and the calibration factors in kBq per μSv/h were calculated. The calculated calibration factors were compared with real data obtained from the Goiania accident in the case of 137Cs and the Chernobyl accident in terms of the 131I. The close comparison of the calculated and real measurements indicates that the method may be applied to other radionuclides. Minimum detectable activities are discussed.

  9. Light dose versus rate of delivery: implications for macroalgal productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Matthew J; Pritchard, Daniel W; Hepburn, Christopher D

    2017-06-01

    The role of how light is delivered over time is an area of macroalgal photosynthesis that has been overlooked but may play a significant role in controlling rates of productivity and the structure and persistence of communities. Here we present data that quantify the relative influence of total quantum dose and delivery rate on the photosynthetic productivity of five ecologically important Phaeophyceae species from southern New Zealand. Results suggested that greater net oxygen production occurs when light is delivered at a lower photon flux density (PFD) over a longer period compared to a greater PFD over a shorter period, given the same total dose. This was due to greater efficiency (α) at a lower PFD which, for some species, meant a compensatory effect can occur. This resulted in equal or greater productivity even when the total quantum dose of the lower PFD was significantly reduced. It was also shown that light limitation at Huriawa Peninsula, where macroaglae were sourced, may be restricting the acclimation potential of species at greater depths, and that even at shallow depth periods of significant light limitation are likely to occur. This research is of particular interest as the variability of light delivery to coastal reef systems increases as a result of anthropogenic disturbances, and as the value of in situ community primary productivity estimates is recognised.

  10. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  11. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  12. Cost-utility analysis of the fixed-dose combination of dolutegravir/abacavir/lamivudine as initial treatment of HIV+ patients in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Moreno Guillen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fixed-dose combinations of antiretroviral drugs have meant an important step forward in simplifying treatment and improving compliance and has led to an increased effectiveness of therapy, a viral load decrease and improving the quality of life of patients. The single-table formulation of dolutegravir with abacavir and lamivudine (DTG/ABC/3TC is a highly efficacious and well-tolerated once-daily regimen for HIV-infected patients. The objective of the study was to assess the incremental cost-utility ratio of the fixed-dose combination of (DTG/ABC/3TC versus the combinations emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz (FTC/TDF/EFV, and darunavir/r (DRV/r or raltegravir (RAL with emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF or abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC as initial antiretroviral therapy in patients infected with HIV-1 from the perspective of the Spanish National Health System. Method: The ARAMIS model, which uses a microsimulation approach to simulate the individual changes in each patient from the start of treatment to death through a Markov chain of descriptive health states of the disease, was adapted to Spain. The alternatives used for comparison were the fixed-dose combination of emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz (FTC/TDF/EFV, and the fixed- dose combinations of emtricitabine/tenofovir (FTC/TDF or abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC with darunavir/r (DRV/r or raltegravir (RAL. The probability of achieving virological suppression by the treatments included in the model was obtained from clinical trials SINGLE, SPRING-2 and FLAMINGO and the costs were expressed in € (2015. The model use the perspective of the Spanish National Health System, with a lifetime horizon and a discount rate of 3% was applied to cost and effectiveness. Results: Treatment initiation with DTG/ABC/3TC was dominant when it was compared with treatment initiation with all the comparators: vs. FTC/TDF/EFV (-67 210.71€/QALY, vs. DRV/r + FTC/TDF or ABC/3TC (-1 787 341.44€/QALY, and vs

  13. THE CURRENT ACCOUNT DEFICIT AND THE FIXED EXCHANGE RATE. ADJUSTING MECHANISMS AND MODELS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HATEGAN D.B. Anca

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to explain what measures can be taken in order to fix the trade deficit, and the pressure that is upon a country by imposing such measures. The international and the national supply and demand conditions change rapidly, and if a country doesn’t succeed in keeping a tight control over its deficit, a lot of factors will affect its wellbeing. In order to reduce the external trade deficit, the government needs to resort to several techniques. The desired result is to have a balanced current account, and therefore, the government is free to use measures such as fixing its exchange rate, reducing government spending etc. We have shown that all these measures will have a certain impact upon an economy, by allowing its exports to thrive and eliminate the danger from excessive imports, or vice-versa. The main conclusion our paper is that government intervention is allowed in order to maintain the balance of the current account.

  14. [Medical expert consensus in AH on the clinical use of triple fixed-dose antihypertensive therapy in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazón, P; Galve, E; Gómez, J; Gorostidi, M; Górriz, J L; Mediavilla, J D

    The opinion of experts (different specialties) on the triple fixed-dose antihypertensive therapy in clinical practice may differ. Online questionnaire with controversial aspects of the triple therapy answered by panel of experts in hypertension (HT) using two-round modified Delphi method. The questionnaire was completed by 158 experts: Internal Medicine (49), Nephrology (26), Cardiology (83). Consensus was reached (agreement) on 27/45 items (60%); 7 items showed differences statistically significant. Consensus was reached regarding: Predictive factors in the need for combination therapy and its efficacy vs. increasing the dose of a pretreatment, and advantage of triple therapy (prescription/adherence/cost/pressure control) vs. free combination. This consensus provides an overview of the clinical use of triple therapy in moderate-severe and resistant/difficult to control HT. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose rate to the inner ear during Moessbauer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliauga, P.; Khanna, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The most widely used technique for studying vibrations of the inner ear utilises the Moessbauer effect; this requires placement of a radioactive source on the basilar membrane. This source, although small in size and less than 37 MBq(1 mCi) in strength, is placed in close proximity to sensitive receptor cells. Using a series solution for the radiation field of a rectangular source the absorbed dose rate delivered to receptor cells at various depths and at points off-axis from the centre of the source is calculated. It is concluded that the dose delivered during the course of a Moessbauer experiment may well be sufficient to damage receptor cells and cause a loss of response. (author)

  16. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  17. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  18. [Indapamide SR/Amlodipine Fixed Dose Combination: Novel Approach to Effective Control of Systolic Arterial Pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachyeva, O N; Kotovskaya, Y V; Dudinskaya, E N

    2017-11-01

    Effective control of arterial pressure (AP) is achieved only in ⅓ of patients with arterial hypertension. It is especially difficult to achieve control of systolic (S) AP in elderly patients in whom SAP is the strongest prognostic factor of cardiovascular complications. Thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics and calcium antagonists are effective for lowering of elevated SAP and pulse (P) AP including aortic PAP elevation of which is associated with high stiffness of arterial wall and is typical for elderly people. Combination of a thiazide diuretic and a calcium antagonist has been recommended by modern guidelines on arterial hypertension (AH) management but until recently it has not found wide application because of absence of a fixed preparation. Evidence base of indapamide-retard and amlodipine use in AH, their profiles of efficacy and safety are such that their combination can become an alternative variant for treatment of patients with AH. Appearance of a fixed indapamide-retard/amlodipine combination opens new perspectives of effective therapy of AH with high SAP and PAP in elderly and other patients with high stiffness of arterial wall.

  19. Critical appraisal of a fixed combination of esomeprazole and low dose aspirin in risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Vachhani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ravi Vachhani1, Doumit Bouhaidar1, Alvin Zfass1, Bimaljit Sandhu1, Ali Nawras21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298–0341, USA; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio 43606-3390, USAAbstract: Low dose aspirin (≤325 mg is routinely used for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. The use of low dose aspirin is associated with two-to four-fold greater risk of symptomatic or complicated peptic ulcers. Risk factors associated with low dose aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity includes prior history of ulcer or upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding, concomitant use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid or warfarin, dual antiplatelet therapy, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, and advanced age. Esomeprazole, like other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs is very effective in decreasing the risk of aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity. Although evidence to support esomeprazole or other PPIs for primary prophylaxis in aspirin induced gastrointestinal toxicity is limited, its role in secondary prophylaxis is well established.Keywords: esomeprazole, proton pump inhibitors, low dose aspirin, gastrointestinal toxicity, gastrointestinal bleeding

  20. Usefulness of Guided Breathing for Dose Rate-Regulated Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han-Oh, Sarah; Yi, Byong Yong; Berman, Barry L.; Lerma, Fritz; Yu, Cedric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of guided breathing for dose rate-regulated tracking (DRRT), a new technique to compensate for intrafraction tumor motion. Methods and Materials: DRRT uses a preprogrammed multileaf collimator sequence that tracks the tumor motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography and the corresponding breathing signals measured before treatment. Because the multileaf collimator speed can be controlled by adjusting the dose rate, the multileaf collimator positions are adjusted in real time during treatment by dose rate regulation, thereby maintaining synchrony with the tumor motion. DRRT treatment was simulated with free, audio-guided, and audiovisual-guided breathing signals acquired from 23 lung cancer patients. The tracking error and duty cycle for each patient were determined as a function of the system time delay (range, 0-1.0 s). Results: The tracking error and duty cycle averaged for all 23 patients was 1.9 ± 0.8 mm and 92% ± 5%, 1.9 ± 1.0 mm and 93% ± 6%, and 1.8 ± 0.7 mm and 92% ± 6% for the free, audio-guided, and audiovisual-guided breathing, respectively, for a time delay of 0.35 s. The small differences in both the tracking error and the duty cycle with guided breathing were not statistically significant. Conclusion: DRRT by its nature adapts well to variations in breathing frequency, which is also the motivation for guided-breathing techniques. Because of this redundancy, guided breathing does not result in significant improvements for either the tracking error or the duty cycle when DRRT is used for real-time tumor tracking

  1. Spotlight on empagliflozin/metformin fixed-dose combination for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedia R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rohit Kedia,1 Supriya Kulkarni,1 Meredith Ross,1 Vijay Shivaswamy1,2 1Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 2VA Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System, Omaha, NE, USA Abstract: The dramatic rise in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and public health care costs worldwide. The need for new, effective, and long-lasting drugs is urgent. Recent research has focused on the role of the inhibitors of sodium–glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2. Clinical trials have shown that SGLT-2 inhibitors have glycemic efficacy and weight-lowering potential. Dual drug therapy is a recommended therapy for patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes who need significant glycemic control. Fixed-dose combination therapy represents a particularly attractive option as it may reduce pill burden and improve adherence. The combination of metformin and empagliflozin was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 and represents a safe and effective means to combat glycemic control and weight gain. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the background of the SGLT-2 inhibitors, particularly empagliflozin, and focus on the safety and efficacy of the fixed-dose combination of empagliflozin and metformin. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, empagliflozin, metformin, hyperglycemia, systematic review

  2. Solifenacin/tamsulosin fixed-dose combination therapy to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has traditionally focused on the management of benign prostatic obstruction, but the contribution of bladder dysfunction has been recently recognized. Therefore, it is well understood that LUTS have multifactorial etiology and often occur in clusters and not in isolation. Voiding LUTS are highly prevalent in men, but storage LUTS have been proved to be more bothersome. α1-Blockers are the most widely used pharmacologic agents for the treatment of symptoms relating to benign prostatic enlargement due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), while antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of the two drug classes would be a reasonable approach to treat men with both storage and voiding symptoms, and several short-term studies have proved the efficacy and safety of different combinations with an α1-blocker and an antimuscarinic. Following previous studies on the separate administration of solifenacin and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination tablet of tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) 0.4 mg and solifenacin succinate 6 mg has been recently introduced, and the current review evaluates the available data on the use of this fixed-dose combination in the treatment of LUTS in men with BPH. PMID:25834406

  3. The combined fixed-dose antituberculous drugs alter some reproductive functions with oxidative stress involvement in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Awodele, B.Pharm M.Sc MPH PhD D.Sc FPCPharm FASI

    Full Text Available The reproductive toxicity of combined fixed-dose first-line antituberculosis (CFDAT regimen was assessed in rats. Thirty-two (32 Wistar rats weighing 168.1 ± 8.0 g were divided into four groups of eight rats per group. Two groups of male and female rats were administered oral distilled water (1.6 ml and CFDAT drugs containing rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol (RIPE, 92.5 mg/m2 per body surface area respectively for forty-five days. Serum follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing and testosterone were reduced significantly (p  0.05 levels in the treated females. In addition, RIPE reduced (p < 0.05 total proteins levels and increased (p < 0.05, 53% catalase levels in male but not female animals. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione levels as well as lipid peroxidation were unaltered in all rats respectively. Histopathological studies revealed congested peritesticular vessels and no changes in the ovary when compared with control. Overall, our results demonstrate reproductive toxicity potentials of RIPE in the rat, thus, suggesting that these reproductive parameters be monitored during antituberculous chemotherapy. Keywords: Fixed dose combined antituberculous drugs, Sub-chronic study, Reproductive toxicity, Rats

  4. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  5. Absorbed dose rate produced by patients with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Vila, V.; Luis-Simon, J.; Gomez-Puerto, A.; Rodriguez, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper shows the values of absorbed dose rates per unit of activity produced by patients treated with Iodine 131 due to Thyroid cancer. Average values related to disease extension, age and sex are established according to out current schedule of Radiological Protection Measures. From this data we have obtained a more accurate calculation for the value used in clinical emergency : 1471 nGy/>MBq over the relevant tissue. 40 treatment performed during 14 months are studied and comments are made on the Iodine retention by thyroideal tissue related to patient's clinical conditions as well size and site of thyroideal tissue and/or TSH simulation. (author)

  6. Problems of dose rate in radiation protection regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Some modern problems of Radiation Safety Standards are discussed. It is known that Standards are based on the Linear-Non-Threshold Concept (LNTC) of radiation risk, which is now called by many experts as conservative. It is thought it is necessary to include in the Standards such factor as dose rate or duration of irradiation. Some model of effects of radiation exposure with taking into account the reparation of cell damage is presented. The practical method for assessment of effects of duration of irradiation on detriments is proposed.(author)

  7. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; D R, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  8. Analysis of the spatial rates dose rates during dental panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Safety Management Commission, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Myeong Hwan [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A dental panoramic radiography which usually uses low level X-rays is subject to the Nuclear Safety Act when it is installed for the purpose of education. This paper measures radiation dose and spatial dose rate by usage and thereby aims to verify the effectiveness of radiation safety equipment and provide basic information for radiation safety of radiation workers and students. After glass dosimeter (GD-352M) is attached to direct exposure area, the teeth, and indirect exposure area, the eye lens and the thyroid, on the dental radiography head phantom, these exposure areas are measured. Then, after dividing the horizontal into a 45°, it is separated into seven directions which all includes 30, 60, 90, 120 cm distance. The paper shows that the spatial dose rate is the highest at 30 cm and declines as the distance increases. At 30 cm, the spatial dose rate around the starting area of rotation is 3,840 μSv/h, which is four times higher than the lowest level 778 μSv/h. Furthermore, the spatial dose rate was 408 μSv/h on average at the distance of 60 cm where radiation workers can be located. From a conservative point of view, It is possible to avoid needless exposure to radiation for the purpose of education. However, in case that an unintended exposure to radiation happens within a radiation controlled area, it is still necessary to educate radiation safety. But according to the current Medical Service Act, in medical institutions, even if they are not installed, the equipment such as interlock are obliged by the Nuclear Safety Law, considering that the spatial dose rate of the educational dental panoramic radiography room is low. It seems to be excessive regulation.

  9. Analysis of the spatial rates dose rates during dental panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Jong Kyung; Park, Myeong Hwan; Kim, Yong Min

    2016-01-01

    A dental panoramic radiography which usually uses low level X-rays is subject to the Nuclear Safety Act when it is installed for the purpose of education. This paper measures radiation dose and spatial dose rate by usage and thereby aims to verify the effectiveness of radiation safety equipment and provide basic information for radiation safety of radiation workers and students. After glass dosimeter (GD-352M) is attached to direct exposure area, the teeth, and indirect exposure area, the eye lens and the thyroid, on the dental radiography head phantom, these exposure areas are measured. Then, after dividing the horizontal into a 45°, it is separated into seven directions which all includes 30, 60, 90, 120 cm distance. The paper shows that the spatial dose rate is the highest at 30 cm and declines as the distance increases. At 30 cm, the spatial dose rate around the starting area of rotation is 3,840 μSv/h, which is four times higher than the lowest level 778 μSv/h. Furthermore, the spatial dose rate was 408 μSv/h on average at the distance of 60 cm where radiation workers can be located. From a conservative point of view, It is possible to avoid needless exposure to radiation for the purpose of education. However, in case that an unintended exposure to radiation happens within a radiation controlled area, it is still necessary to educate radiation safety. But according to the current Medical Service Act, in medical institutions, even if they are not installed, the equipment such as interlock are obliged by the Nuclear Safety Law, considering that the spatial dose rate of the educational dental panoramic radiography room is low. It seems to be excessive regulation

  10. Evaluation of Invisalign treatment effectiveness and efficiency compared with conventional fixed appliances using the Peer Assessment Rating index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiafeng; Tang, Jack Shengyu; Skulski, Brennan; Fields, Henry W; Beck, F Michael; Firestone, Allen R; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Deguchi, Toru

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to compare the treatment effectiveness and efficiency of the Invisalign system with conventional fixed appliances in treating orthodontic patients with mild to moderate malocclusion in a graduate orthodontic clinic. Using the peer assessment rating (PAR) index, we evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment records of 48 Invisalign patients and 48 fixed appliances patients. The 2 groups of patients were controlled for general characteristics and initial severity of malocclusion. We analyzed treatment outcome, duration, and improvement between the Invisalign and fixed appliances groups. The average pretreatment PAR scores (United Kingdom weighting) were 20.81 for Invisalign and 22.79 for fixed appliances (P = 1.0000). Posttreatment weighted PAR scores between Invisalign and fixed appliances were not statistically different (P = 0.7420). On average, the Invisalign patients finished 5.7 months faster than did those with fixed appliances (P = 0.0040). The weighted PAR score reduction with treatment was not statistically different between the Invisalign and fixed appliances groups (P = 0.4573). All patients in both groups had more than a 30% reduction in the PAR scores. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the odds of achieving "great improvement" in the Invisalign group were 0.329 times the odds of achieving "great improvement" in the fixed appliances group after controlling for age (P = 0.0150). Our data showed that both Invisalign and fixed appliances were able to improve the malocclusion. Invisalign patients finished treatment faster than did those with fixed appliances. However, it appears that Invisalign may not be as effective as fixed appliances in achieving "great improvement" in a malocclusion. This study might help clinicians to determine appropriate patients for Invisalign treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The system for automatic dose rate measurements by mobile groups in field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Filgas, R.; Cespirova, I.; Ejemova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of characteristics between a pressurized ionization chamber, plastic scintillator and proportional counter is given. Based on requirements and comparison of properties of various probes, the system for automatic dose rate measurement and integration of geographic co-ordinates in field was designed and tested.The system consists of proportional counter. This is so-called intelligent probe can be easily connected to a personal computer. The probe measures in the energy range 30 keV - 1.3 MeV with reasonable energy and angular response, it can measure the dose rate in the range 50 nSv/h - 1 Sv/h with the typical efficiency 9.5 imp/s/μSv/h. The probe is fixed in the holder placed on the front mask of a car. For the simultaneous determination of geographical co-ordinates the personal GPS navigator Garmin 95 is used. Both devices are controlled by a notebook via two serial ports. The second serial port that is not quite common in notebook can be easily realised by a PCMCIA card. The notebook is used in the field by a mobile group can be transmitted to the assessment centre by the cellular GSM phone. The system Nokia 2110 connected to notebook by PCMCIA card is used. The whole system is powered up from the car battery. The system is controlled by specially developed software. The software was developed in the FoxPro 2.5 environment and works under MS-DOS 6.22. It has no problems to work in Windows 95 DOS window. The results of dose rate measurements obtained during route monitoring are stored in files. They can be displayed on a graphic screen, presenting the geographical distribution of the dose rate values colour coded on a map and the time sequence of the measured data. (authors)

  12. Efficacy and tolerability between an olmesartan/amlodipine fixed-dose combination and an amlodipine double dose in mild to moderate hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Lin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs are one of the options for improving blood pressure (BP goal attainment. We enrolled 141 patients and evaluated the efficacy and safety between a fixed dose of olmesartan/amlodipine (OA and a double dose of amlodipine (DA for treating mild to moderate hypertension after amlodipine monotherapy failure. After at least 2 weeks of monotherapy failure, the patients were randomized to receive either OA or DA for 8 weeks. We compared the systolic blood pressure (SBP-lowering efficacy of the OA and DA using both an office BP and an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM device. The intent-to-treat analysis found that the early (2nd week and final visit (8th week SBP reductions were significantly greater in those patients receiving OA (n = 70 than DA (n = 71 (17.57 ± 15.49 vs. 10.46 ± 13.36 and 24.89 ± 14.09 vs. 17.03 ± 13.27 mmHg, p = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively. Among those using ABPM, the patients with 8-week OA had a greater SBP-lowering effect in comparison with those on DA (14.08 ± 10.74 vs. 6.32 ± 10.21, p = 0.018. Both treatment strategies were well tolerated. This study showed that an OA FDC is more effective than DA in reducing SBP for mild to moderate hypertension after the failure of amlodipine monotherapy.

  13. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  14. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  15. Dose and dose-rate effects of ionizing radiation: a discussion in the light of radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehm, Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), Hiroshima City (Japan); Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Grosche, Bernd [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Niwa, Ohtsura [Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Kagoshima City (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Ban, Nobuhiko [Tokyo Healthcare University, Faculty of Nursing, Tokyo (Japan); Kai, Michiaki [Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, Oita (Japan); Clement, Christopher H.; Hamada, Nobuyuki [International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), PO Box 1046, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bouffler, Simon [Public Health England (PHE), Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Toma, Hideki [JAPAN NUS Co., Ltd. (JANUS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The biological effects on humans of low-dose and low-dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation have always been of major interest. The most recent concept as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is to extrapolate existing epidemiological data at high doses and dose rates down to low doses and low dose rates relevant to radiological protection, using the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The present paper summarizes what was presented and discussed by experts from ICRP and Japan at a dedicated workshop on this topic held in May 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. This paper describes the historical development of the DDREF concept in light of emerging scientific evidence on dose and dose-rate effects, summarizes the conclusions recently drawn by a number of international organizations (e.g., BEIR VII, ICRP, SSK, UNSCEAR, and WHO), mentions current scientific efforts to obtain more data on low-dose and low-dose-rate effects at molecular, cellular, animal and human levels, and discusses future options that could be useful to improve and optimize the DDREF concept for the purpose of radiological protection. (orig.)

  16. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  17. Fixed target combined with spectral mapping: approaching 100% hit rates for serial crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghbaey, Saeed; Sarracini, Antoine; Ginn, Helen M; Pare-Labrosse, Olivier; Kuo, Anling; Marx, Alexander; Epp, Sascha W; Sherrell, Darren A; Eger, Bryan T; Zhong, Yinpeng; Loch, Rolf; Mariani, Valerio; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nelson, Silke; Lemke, Henrik T; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Stuart, David I; Ernst, Oliver P; Mueller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-01

    The advent of ultrafast highly brilliant coherent X-ray free-electron laser sources has driven the development of novel structure-determination approaches for proteins, and promises visualization of protein dynamics on sub-picosecond timescales with full atomic resolution. Significant efforts are being applied to the development of sample-delivery systems that allow these unique sources to be most efficiently exploited for high-throughput serial femtosecond crystallography. Here, the next iteration of a fixed-target crystallography chip designed for rapid and reliable delivery of up to 11 259 protein crystals with high spatial precision is presented. An experimental scheme for predetermining the positions of crystals in the chip by means of in situ spectroscopy using a fiducial system for rapid, precise alignment and registration of the crystal positions is presented. This delivers unprecedented performance in serial crystallography experiments at room temperature under atmospheric pressure, giving a raw hit rate approaching 100% with an effective indexing rate of approximately 50%, increasing the efficiency of beam usage and allowing the method to be applied to systems where the number of crystals is limited.

  18. The macroeconomic effects of oil shocks under fixed and flexible exchange rates - a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore further, from a primarily theoretical perspective, the macroeconomic implications arising for an oil-producing economy operating with either a fixed or flexible exchange rate system - to explore, in particular, which of these two extreme systems best offers insulatory properties, in the sense of reducing the volatility of adjustment of key macroeconomic variables arising primarily from oil-related shocks. The issue is explored by analyzing a theoretical framework, which emphasizes the long-run nature of the adjustment process. Such an emphasis is particularly pertinent in models which assume that economic agents possess rational expectations, where long-run equilibrium will have a major bearing upon the short-run adjustment process itself. However, due to the complexity of the model developed here, it is not possible to derive analytical unambiguous results, hence emphasis is placed upon deriving results through numerical simulation. The results derived enable an identification to be made of the importance, for policy purposes, of implementing an appropriate exchange rate system for oil producing and exporting economics with the characteristics emphasised in this paper. (3 figures). (Author)

  19. Strategies for nevirapine initiation in HIV-infected children taking pediatric fixed-dose combination "baby pills" in Zambia: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulenga, V.; Cook, A.; Walker, A.S.; Kabamba, D.; Chijoka, C.; Ferrier, A.; Kalengo, C.; Kityo, C.; Kankasa, C.; Burger, D.M.; Thomason, M.; Chintu, C.; Gibb, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fixed-dose combination scored dispersible stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine minitablets (Triomune Baby and Junior; Cipla Ltd) are simpler and cheaper than liquid formulations and have correct dose ratios for human immunodeficiency virus-infected children. However, they cannot be used

  20. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  1. Modelling second malignancy risks from low dose rate and high dose rate brachytherapy as monotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise; Mason, Joshua; Henry, Ann M; Hoskin, Peter; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Venselaar, Jack; Bownes, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To estimate the risks of radiation-induced rectal and bladder cancers following low dose rate (LDR) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localised prostate cancer and compare to external beam radiotherapy techniques. LDR and HDR brachytherapy monotherapy plans were generated for three prostate CT datasets. Second cancer risks were assessed using Schneider's concept of organ equivalent dose. LDR risks were assessed according to a mechanistic model and a bell-shaped model. HDR risks were assessed according to a bell-shaped model. Relative risks and excess absolute risks were estimated and compared to external beam techniques. Excess absolute risks of second rectal or bladder cancer were low for both LDR (irrespective of the model used for calculation) and HDR techniques. Average excess absolute risks of rectal cancer for LDR brachytherapy according to the mechanistic model were 0.71 per 10,000 person-years (PY) and 0.84 per 10,000 PY respectively, and according to the bell-shaped model, were 0.47 and 0.78 per 10,000 PY respectively. For HDR, the average excess absolute risks for second rectal and bladder cancers were 0.74 and 1.62 per 10,000 PY respectively. The absolute differences between techniques were very low and clinically irrelevant. Compared to external beam prostate radiotherapy techniques, LDR and HDR brachytherapy resulted in the lowest risks of second rectal and bladder cancer. This study shows both LDR and HDR brachytherapy monotherapy result in low estimated risks of radiation-induced rectal and bladder cancer. LDR resulted in lower bladder cancer risks than HDR, and lower or similar risks of rectal cancer. In absolute terms these differences between techniques were very small. Compared to external beam techniques, second rectal and bladder cancer risks were lowest for brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenxing; Huang, Shengyun; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies. Only randomized controlled trials (RCT) and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III) were of interest. Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR) met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01), overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66) and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42). This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  3. Thermoeffector Responses at a Fixed Rate of Heat Production in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmain, Bryce N; Jay, Ollie; Morris, Norman R; Shiino, Kenji; Stewart, Glenn M; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Chan, Jonathan; Sabapathy, Surendran

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients seem to exhibit altered thermoregulatory responses during exercise in the heat. However, the extent to which these responses are altered due to physiological impairments independently of biophysical factors associated with differences in metabolic heat production (Hprod), evaporative heat balance requirements (Ereq), and/or body size is presently unclear. Therefore, we examined thermoregulatory responses in 10 HF patients and 10 age-matched controls (CON) similar in body size during exercise at a fixed rate of Hprod and therefore Ereq in a 30°C environment. Rectal temperature, local sweat rate, and cutaneous vascular conductance were measured throughout 60 min of cycle ergometry. Whole-body sweat rate was estimated from pre-post nude body weight corrected for fluid intake. Despite exercising at the same rate of Hprod (HF, 338 ± 43 W; CON, 323 ± 31 W; P = 0.25), the rise in rectal temperature was greater (P < 0.01) in HF (0.81°C ± 0.16°C) than in CON (0.49°C ± 0.27°C). In keeping with a similar Ereq (HF, 285 ± 40 W; CON, 274 ± 28 W; P = 0.35), no differences in whole-body sweat rate (HF, 0.45 ± 0.11 L·h; CON, 0.41 ± 0.07 L·h; P = 0.38) or local sweat rate (HF, 0.96 ± 0.17 mg·cm·min; CON, 0.79 ± 0.15 mg·cm·min; P = 0.50) were observed between groups. However, the rise in cutaneous vascular conductance was lower in HF than in CON (HF, 0.83 ± 0.42 au·mm Hg; CON, 2.10 ± 0.79 au·mm Hg; P < 0.01). In addition, the cumulative body heat storage estimated from partitional calorimetry was similar between groups (HF, 154 ± 106 kJ; CON, 196 ± 174 kJ; P = 0.44). Collectively, these findings demonstrate that HF patients exhibit a blunted skin blood flow response, but no differences in sweating. Given that HF patients had similar body heat storage to that of CON at the same Hprod, their greater rise in core temperature can be attributed to a less uniform internal distribution of heat between the body core and periphery.

  4. Prediction of antidepressant response in both 2.25xthreshold RUL and fixed high dose RUL ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, James N; Rosenquist, Peter B; Dunn, Aaron; McCall, Vaughn

    2009-01-01

    Some forms of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can result in generalized seizures that lack efficacy, therefore physiological markers of treatment adequacy would be helpful. EEG measures of seizure quality, such as EEG regularity and post-ictal suppression, have largely supplanted seizure duration as a marker for seizure adequacy, yet no predictive algorithm has gained wide clinical acceptance. Electrographic seizure durations of less than 25 s still prompt re-stimulation in many settings. We re-examined the utility of EEG seizure duration and other measures of EEG seizure as predictors of antidepressant response to right unilateral (RUL) ECT. Seventy-two adult patients with major depression were randomized to either titrated RUL ECT at 2.25 times initial seizure threshold or RUL ECT at a fixed dose of 403 mC. Intent-to-treat responder status (defined by 60% reduction in HRSD scores and final score of 12 or less after the last RUL ECT session) was identified as the dependent variable in a nominal logistic regression model including EEG seizure quality candidate variables, controlled for age and gender. A model including EEG seizure duration, EEG regularity, post-ictal suppression, age and gender and randomization status was significantly predictive of intent-to-treat responder status at treatment 2 (R2=.21 pmodel remained significant at these time points even when randomization status (titrated moderately suprathreshold vs. high fixed dosage) was removed (Treatment 2: R2=.18 p<.007; Treatment 4: R2=.23 p<.0007). EEG markers of seizure adequacy, including EEG seizure duration, are modestly predictive of antidepressant response for both titrated moderately suprathreshold and high fixed dosage RUL ECT.

  5. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X

    2009-01-01

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc(TM) deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to ≤± 5 deg. This restriction requires the treatment arc to be broken into multiple sectors such that the local MU fluctuation within each sector is reduced, thereby lowering the angular deviation of the segments during redistribution. The converted CDR plans were delivered with a single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was

  6. Escitalopram in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized, placebo-controlled, paroxetine-referenced, fixed-dose, 24-week study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Dan J; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Tonnoir, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized, placebo controlled fixed-dose trial was undertaken to determine the efficacy and tolerability of escitalopram in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), using paroxetine as the active reference. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 466 adults with OCD from specialized...... clinical centres, psychiatric hospital departments, psychiatric practices, or general practice were randomized to one of four treatment groups: escitalopram 10 mg/day (n = 116), escitalopram 20 mg/day (n = 116), paroxetine 40 mg/day (n = 119), or placebo (n = 115) for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy...... of adverse events, and on changes in vital signs (blood pressure and pulse). Main outcome measures; RESULTS: Escitalopram 20 mg/day was superior to placebo on the primary and all secondary outcome endpoints, including remission. Escitalopram 10 mg/day and paroxetine 40 mg/day were also effective...

  7. Safety handling manual for high dose rate remote afterloading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This manual is mainly for safety handling of 192 Ir-RALS (remote afterloading system) of high dose rate and followings were presented: Procedure and document format for the RALS therapy and for handling of its radiation source with the purpose of prevention of human errors and unexpected accidents, Procedure for preventing errors occurring in the treatment schedule and operation, and Procedure and format necessary for newly introducing the system into a facility. Consistency was intended in the description with the quality assurance guideline for therapy with small sealed radiation sources made by JASTRO (Japan Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology). Use of the old type 60 Co-RALS was pointed out to be a serious problem remained and its safety handling procedure was also presented. (K.H.)

  8. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  9. Atomoxetine treatment for nicotine withdrawal: a pilot double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study in adult smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverstone Peter H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many effective treatments for nicotine addiction inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Three recent studies have suggested that another noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine, may reduce smoking behaviors. Methods The present double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study was carried out over 21 days during which administration of 40 mg atomoxetine was compared to placebo in 17 individuals. Of these, nine were randomized to atomoxetine and eight to placebo. Baseline and weekly measurements were made using the Cigarette Dependence Scale (CDS, Cigarette Withdrawal Scale (CWS, Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU, reported number of cigarettes smoked, and salivary cotinine levels. Results The study results showed that all those on placebo completed the study. In marked contrast, of the nine individuals who started on atomoxetine, five dropped out due to side effects. In a completer analysis there were statistically significant differences at 14 and 21 days in several measures between the atomoxetine and placebo groups, including CDS, CWS, QSU, number of cigarettes smoked (decreasing to less than two per day in the treatment group who completed the study, and a trend towards lower mean salivary cotinine levels. However, these differences were not seen in a last observation carried forward (LOCF analysis. Conclusions In summary, this is the first study to examine the use of atomoxetine in non-psychiatric adult smokers for a period of more than 7 days, and the findings suggest that atomoxetine might be a useful treatment for nicotine addiction. However, the dose used in the current study was too high to be tolerated by many adults, and a dose-finding study is required to determine the most appropriate dose for future studies of this potential treatment for smoking cessation.

  10. Fixed dynamometry is more sensitive than vital capacity or ALS rating scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Patricia L; Allred, Margaret Peggy; Stephens, Helen E; Proffitt Bunnell, Mary; Siener, Catherine; Macklin, Eric A; Haines, Travis; English, Robert A; Fetterman, Katherine A; Kasarskis, Edward J; Florence, Julaine; Simmons, Zachary; Cudkowicz, Merit E

    2017-10-01

    Improved outcome measures are essential to efficiently screen the growing number of potential amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) therapies. This longitudinal study of 100 (70 male) participants with ALS compared Accurate Test of Limb Isometric Strength (ATLIS), using a fixed, wireless load cell, with ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) and vital capacity (VC). Participants enrolled at 5 U.S. sites. Data were analyzed from 66 participants with complete ATLIS, ALSFRS-R, and VC data over at least 3 visits. Change in ATLIS was less variable both within- and among-person than change in ALSFRS-R or VC. Additionally, participants who had normal ALSFRS-R arm and leg function averaged 12 to 32% below expected strength values measured by ATLIS. ATLIS was more sensitive to change than ALSFRS-R or VC and could decrease sample size requirements by approximately one-third. The ability of ATLIS to detect prefunctional change has potential value in early trials. Muscle Nerve 56: 710-715, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High dose rate brachytherapy for superficial cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, Philippe; D'Hombres, Anne; Truc, Gilles; Barillot, Isabelle; Michiels, Christophe; Bedenne, Laurent; Horiot, Jean Claude

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with external radiotherapy, combined modality treatment, or HDR brachytherapy alone to limited esophageal cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1996, 25 patients with limited superficial esophagus carcinomas were treated by high dose rate brachytherapy. The mean age was 63 years (43-86 years). Five patients showed superficial local recurrence after external radiotherapy. Eleven patients without invasion of the basal membrane were staged as Tis. Fourteen patients with tumors involving the submucosa without spreading to the muscle were staged as T1. Treatment consisted of HDR brachytherapy alone in 13 patients, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy in 8 cases, and concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy in 4 cases. External beam radiation was administered to a total dose of 50 Gy using 2 Gy daily fractions in 5 weeks. In cases of HDR brachytherapy alone (13 patients), 6 applications were performed once a week. Results: The mean follow-up is 31 months (range 24-96 months). Twelve patients received 2 applications and 13 patients received 6 applications. Twelve patients experienced a failure (48%), 11/12 located in the esophagus, all of them in the treated volume. One patient presented an isolated distant metastasis. In the patients treated for superficial recurrence, 4/5 were locally controlled (80%) by brachytherapy alone. After brachytherapy alone, 8/13 patients were controlled (61%). The mean disease-free survival is 14 months (1-36 months). Overall survival is 76% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years, and 14% at 3 years. Overall survival for Tis patients is 24% vs. 20% for T1 (p 0.83). Overall survival for patients treated by HDR brachytherapy alone is 43%. One patient presented with a fistula with local failure after external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Four stenosis were registered, two were diagnosed on barium swallowing without symptoms, and two required dilatations. Conclusion: High dose rate brachytherapy permits the treating

  12. Proposal of a high dose rate brachytherapy model for in vitro radiobiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Jony M.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Andrade, Lidia M.; Trindade, Cassia; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop an easy and reproducible approach for experimental HDR brachytherapy allowing in vitro irradiation studies based on clinical parameters. An acrylic platform was designed to attach T25 tissue culture flasks and multi-well tissue culture plates as well as kept the catheters in a fixed position during irradiation. CT images were taken and the irradiation was planned for 550cGy dose applied on adherent tumor cells. Dosimetric measurements were done and all relevant uncertainties were taken into account in order to figure out the correct dose range received by the cells. Tumor cells were irradiated two times over an interval of 24h between irradiations. Proof of concepts of this approach was carried out by biological effects analysis using a radioresistant human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cell line. Cellular proliferation and cell cycle phase were assessed by Trypan blue exclusion assay and DNA content analysis by flow cytometry, respectively. This approach allowed uniform dose distribution around the arrangement in all types of tissue culture plastics evaluated. Corrections due to uncertainties were managed. Regarding in vitro assays there was a significant (p<0.05) decreasing of cellular proliferation rate in irradiated cells. Moreover, increased percentage of cells arrested in G2/M phase (32.3 ± 1.5%) were observed for treated group compared with untreated cells. (author)

  13. Pharmacokinetics of a telmisartan/rosuvastatin fixed-dose combination: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period crossover study in healthy Korean subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Dong Woo; Son, Mijeong; Kim, Yukyung; Son, Hankil; Jang, Seong Bok; Seo, Jeong Min; Nam, Su Youn; Park, Kyungsoo

    2015-10-01

    As hypertension and dyslipidemia are frequent comorbidities, antihypertensive drugs and lipid-lowering agents are often prescribed together for their treatment. Telmisartan and rosuvastatin are widely used together to treat hypertension and dyslipidemia. A combination formulation of these two drugs would improve patient compliance due to ease of dosing. The purpose of this study was to assess bioequivalence of single-dose administration of a newly-developed fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablet containing telmisartan/rosuvastatin 80/20 mg (test treatment) and coadministration of a telmisartan 80-mg tablet and a rosuvastatin 20-mg tablet (reference treatment) in healthy Korean male volunteers. This was a single-dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period crossover study enrolling healthy males aged 20 - 50 years with BMI between 18.5 and 25 kg/m2. Each subject received a single dose of the reference and test treatments with a 14-day washout period. Blood sampling was performed at prespecified intervals for up to 72 hours after dosing. Primary pharmacokinetic parameters were Cmax, AUClast, and AUC0-∞ of telmisartan, rosuvastatin, and N-desmethyl rosuvastatin. Bioequivalence was assessed by determining whether the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the geometric mean ratios (test treatment/reference treatment) of these parameters were within the standard range of 80% to 125%. Adverse events were monitored via regular interviews with the subjects and by physical examinations. 60 subjects were enrolled and 55 completed the study. The 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of Cmax, AUClast, and AUC00-∞ were 0.9262-1.1498, 0.9294-1.0313, and 0.9312-1.0320 for telmisartan, 0.9041-1.0428, 0.9262-1.0085, and 0.9307-1.0094 for rosuvastatin, and 0.8718-1.0022, 0.8901-0.9904, and 0.8872-0.9767 for N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, respectively. There was no statistical difference in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) (all of which were mild or moderate) between the reference and test

  14. S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Augmentation in Patients with Stage II Treatment-Resistant Major Depressive Disorder: An Open Label, Fixed Dose, Single-Blind Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the efficacy of S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe augmentation in patients with treatment-resistant depressive disorder (TRD. Thirty-three outpatients with major depressive episode who failed to respond to at least 8 weeks of treatment with two adequate and stable doses of antidepressants were treated openly with fixed dose of SAMe (800 mg for 8 weeks, added to existing medication. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline in total score on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The Clinical Global Impression of Improvement (CGI-I was rated at the endpoint. Patients with a reduction of 50% or more on HAM-D total score and a CGI-I score of 1 or 2 at endpoint were considered responders; remission was defined as a HAM-D score ≤7. Secondary outcome measures included the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS. At 8 weeks, a significant decrease in HAM-D score was observed with response achieved by 60% of the patients and remission by 36%. Also a statistically significant reduction in SHAPS and SDS was observed. Our findings indicate that SAMe augmentation may be effective and well tolerated in stage II TRD. However, limitations of the present study must be considered and further placebo-controlled trials are needed.

  15. Strategies for nevirapine initiation in HIV-infected children taking pediatric fixed-dose combination "baby pills" in Zambia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, V; Cook, A; Walker, A S; Kabamba, D; Chijoka, C; Ferrier, A; Kalengo, C; Kityo, C; Kankasa, C; Burger, D; Thomason, M; Chintu, C; Gibb, D M

    2010-11-01

    Fixed-dose combination scored dispersible stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine minitablets (Triomune Baby and Junior; Cipla Ltd) are simpler and cheaper than liquid formulations and have correct dose ratios for human immunodeficiency virus-infected children. However, they cannot be used for dose escalation (DE) of nevirapine. Children were randomized to initiate antiretroviral therapy with full-dose (FD) nevirapine (Triomune Baby or Junior in the morning and evening) versus DE (half-dose nevirapine for 14 days [Triomune in the morning and stavudine-lamivudine {Lamivir-S} in the evening], then FD), in accordance with World Health Organization weight-band dosing tables. The primary end point was nevirapine-related clinical or laboratory grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs). In total, 211 children (median [interquartile range {IQR}] age, 5 [ 2-9 ] years; median [IQR] CD4 cell percentage, 13% [8%-18%]) were enrolled and followed up for a median (IQR) of 92 (68-116) weeks. There were 31 grade 3 or 4 AEs that were definitely/probably or uncertainly related to nevirapine in the FD group (18.0 per 100 child-years), compared with 29 in the DE group (16.5 per 100 child-years) (incidence rate ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.63–1.87; P = .74). All were asymptomatic; 11 versus 3 were single grade 3 or 4 elevations in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) or aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, all of which resolved without a change in nevirapine dose or interruption. Thirteen (12%) FD versus 2 (2%) DE children had grade 1 (2 in FD) or grade 2 (11 in FD and 2 in DE) rashes. Three (2 in FD and 1 in DE) substituted efavirenz, 3 (FD) continued FD nevirapine, and 9 (8 in FD and 1 in DE) temporarily interrupted nevirapine, followed by successful DE. Predictors of nevirapine rash were older age (P = .003) and higher CD4 cell count for age (P = .03). Twenty-two children died (12 in FD and 10 in DE), 1 FD and 5 DE children at dose Triomune or efavirenz substitution. Current

  16. Gamma spectrum, count rate, and dose rate measurements of the Columbia riverbank from Vernita to Sacajawea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grande, L.A.

    1966-01-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological conditions that exist on the riverbank of the Columbia River. Included was a comparative study of the suitability of three instruments to measure the dose rates. These instruments were a NaI (T1) scintillation counter normally used for aerial monitoring, a bioplastic scintillation counter normally used as a road monitor, and a portable 40 liter ionization chamber normally used to measure very low gamma dose rates. The selection of representative sites for the comparative study was based on an initial GM survey of the general areas in question. Seven sites were studied--from Vernita Ferry Landing above the Hanford project to Sacajawea Park below Pasco.

  17. Dose levels and neutron reaction rates for HPRR and SHEBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Westfall, R.M.; Knight, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis shows good agreement between calculated and experimental values of the neutron doses at 6 meters, while the gamma-ray doses vary by 25%. For distances greater than 6 meters, there are larger differences between the calculated and experimental doses, which may be due to experimental uncertainties. The Henderson and ANSI-STD neutron and gamma-ray doses for the BARE-SHEBA, LS-HPRR and BARE-HPRR configurations are also displayed. At distances of 6 meters and greater, the neutron doses of the LS-HPRR are similar to those of BARE-SHEBA. For the BARE-HPRR, the neutron doses are up to a factor of 8 greater. The gamma-ray doses of the LS-HPRR are smaller by as much as 75% of the BARE-SHEBA values. The gamma-ray doses of the BARE-HPRR and LS-HPRR show less variation

  18. External dose rates in coastal urban environments in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, E.M.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Conti, C.C.

    2015-01-01

    A long term activity aiming on assessing the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation is being developed at IRD/CNEN. Several research groups within IRD work in this activity, although mostly as a parallel work associated to main research lines followed by researches of the institution. One main activity is related to the raise of external gamma dose rates throughout the country. The objective of this work is to present results from recent surveys performed as part of the emergency preparedness for radiological emergencies during major public events in Brazil, such as the the World Youth Day, held in Rio de Janeiro in 2013, and the Confederations Cup and the FIFA World Cup soccer games, in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In this work, only the recent (2014) coastal urban environments measurements were included. Average kerma rates for Fortaleza is 80 ± 23 nGy/h, for Vitoria is 96 ± 33 nGy/h and for Angra dos Reis is 147 ± 16 nGy/h. These results are then compared to previous results on other coastal urban towns (Rio de Janeiro, Niterói and Salvador), and with the high background coastal area of Guarapari town. (authors)

  19. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in uterine cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Firuza D.; Rai, Bhavana; Mallick, Indranil; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is in wide use for curative treatment of cervical cancer. The American Brachytherapy Society has recommended that the individual fraction size be <7.5 Gy and the range of fractions should be four to eight; however, many fractionation schedules, varying from institution to institution, are in use. We use 9 Gy/fraction of HDR in two to five fractions in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We found that our results and toxicity were comparable to those reported in the literature and hereby present our experience with this fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients with Stage I-III carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1996 and 2000. The total number of patients analyzed was 113. The median patient age was 53 years, and the histopathologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 93% of patients. The patients were subdivided into Groups 1 and 2. In Group 1, 18 patients with Stage Ib-IIb disease, tumor size <4 cm, and preserved cervical anatomy underwent simultaneous external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks with central shielding and HDR brachytherapy of 9 Gy/fraction, given weekly, and interdigitated with external beam radiotherapy. The 95 patients in Group 2, who had Stage IIb-IIIb disease underwent external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions within 4.5 weeks followed by two sessions of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of 9 Gy each given 1 week apart. The follow-up range was 3-7 years (median, 36.4 months). Late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rate was 74.5% and 62.0%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 100% for Stage I, 80% for Stage II, and 67.2% for Stage III patients. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 88.8% for

  20. Growing body of evidence on survival rates of implant-supported fixed prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Elliot

    2008-01-01

    Medline and manual searches were made of the bibliographies of all full-text articles and related reviews selected from the electronic search and the following journals: American Journal of Dentistry, Australian Dental Journal, British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Deutsche Zahnärztliche Zeitschrift, European Journal of Oral Sciences, International Dental Journal, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, International Journal of Prosthodontics, Journal de Parodontologie, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Oral Implantology, Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Quintessence International, Swedish Dental Journal and Schweizerische Monatsschrift Zahnmedizin. Prospective or retrospective cohort studies were included if they had a mean follow-up of 5 years or more; were reported in the dental literature in the English or German language; patients had been examined clinically at the follow-up visit; and details of the characteristics of the suprastructures were reported. Publications that combined findings for both implant-supported fixed partial dentures and single-tooth crowns were selected if they allowed for extraction of the data for the single-tooth crowns group. Publications based on patient records only or on questionnaires or interviews were excluded. Failure and complication rates are calculated by dividing the number of events (failures or complications; the numerator) by the total exposure time [single crown (SC) time and/ or implant time; the denominator]. Event rates for SC and/ or implants were calculated by dividing the total number of events by the total SC or implant exposure time in years. The total number of events was considered to be Poisson distributed. To assess heterogeneity of

  1. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of HCP1004 (a fixed-dose combination of naproxen and esomeprazole strontium) and VIMOVO® (a marketed fixed-dose combination of naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, YoonJung; Han, HyeKyung; Shin, Dongseong; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    HCP1004 is a newly developed fixed-dose combination of naproxen (500 mg) and esomeprazole strontium (20 mg) that is used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases and can reduce the risk of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-associated ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of HCP1004 compared to VIMOVO(®) (a marketed fixed-dose combination of naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium). An open-label, randomized, two-treatment, two-sequence crossover, single-dose clinical study was conducted in 70 healthy volunteers. In each period, a reference (VIMOVO(®)) or test (HCP1004) drug was administered orally, and serial blood samples for PK analysis were collected up to 72 hours after dosing. To evaluate the PK profiles, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to the last measurable time (AUC0-t) were estimated using a noncompartmental method. Safety profiles were evaluated throughout the study. Sixty-six of the 70 subjects completed the study. The Cmax (mean ± standard deviation) and AUC0-t (mean ± standard deviation) for naproxen in HCP1004 were 61.67 ± 15.16 µg/mL and 1,206.52 ± 166.46 h · µg/mL, respectively; in VIMOVO(®); these values were 61.85 ± 14.54 µg/mL and 1,211.44 ± 170.01 h · µg/mL, respectively. The Cmax and AUC0-t for esomeprazole in HCP1004 were 658.21 ± 510.91 ng/mL and 1,109.11 ± 1,111.59 h · ng/mL, respectively; for VIMOVO(®), these values were 595.09 ± 364.23 ng/mL and 1,015.12 ± 952.98 h · ng/mL, respectively. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) (HCP1004 to VIMOVO(®)) of the Cmax and AUC0-t of naproxen were 0.99 (0.94-1.06) and 1.00 (0.98-1.01), respectively. For esomeprazole, the geometric mean ratios (90% CI) for the Cmax and AUC0-t were 0.99 (0.82-1.18) and 1.04 (0.91-1.18), respectively. The overall results of the safety assessment showed no clinically significant issues for either treatment. The PK of HCP

  2. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combinations of empagliflozin/metformin compared with individual tablets in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Christina; Link, Jasmin; Meinicke, Thomas; Macha, Sreeraj

    2016-04-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablets of empagliflozin/metformin with individual tablets taken together. In 3 randomized, open-label studies, healthy subjects received a single FDC tablet of empagliflozin/metformin in 1 of 6 dose combinations (empagliflozin 12.5 mg or 5 mg; metformin 500 mg, 850 mg, or 1,000 mg) in 1 period and the individual tablets taken together under fed conditions in another period. Empagliflozin 12.5 mg/metformin 1,000 mg FDC and individual tablets were also given under fasted conditions. Adjusted geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of empagliflozin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) for the FDCs vs. individual tablets ranged from 97.92 to 106.00%, and 90% CIs ranged from 93.53 to 109.39%. Adjusted GMRs of empagliflozin maximum plasma concentrations (C(max)) for the FDCs vs. individual tablets ranged from 100.97 to 106.52%, and 90% CIs ranged from 95.86 to 118.35%. Adjusted GMRs of metformin AUC(0-∞) for the FDCs vs. individual tablets ranged from 96.25 to 101.61%, and 90% CIs ranged from 88.54 to 106.62%. Adjusted GMRs of metformin C(max) for the FDCs vs. individual tablets ranged from 93.83 to 102.95%, and 90% CIs ranged from 88.01 to 109.08%. Bioequivalence was also established under fasted conditions for empagliflozin 12.5 mg/metformin 1,000 mg FDC vs. individual tablets taken together. All treatments were well tolerated. Empagliflozin/metformin FDC tablets were found to be bioequivalent to individual tablets taken together at all tested dose strengths.

  4. The Clinical Efficacy and Cardiotoxicity of Fixed-Dose Monthly Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: A Single Institutional Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ying Wu

    Full Text Available Trastuzumab-containing treatment regimens have been shown to improve survival outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer (BC. It is much easier to infuse a fixed one-vial dose to every patient on a regular schedule in the general clinical setting. The aims of this study were evaluating the efficacy of a 440 mg fixed-dose of trastuzumab administered on a monthly infusion schedule, and the risk factors for cardiac events.We retrospectively reviewed data from 300 HER2-positive BC patients in our institute: 208 were early-stage BC patients undergoing adjuvant trastuzumab treatment, and 92 were metastatic BC patients treated with trastuzumab infusions until disease progression. There were 181 patients receiving regular trastuzumab infusions every 3 weeks (Q3W; 8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 3 weeks, and the other 119 patients were treated monthly with a fixed 440 mg dose (QM; fixed 440 mg every 4 weeks.The medians of progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS in the adjuvant setting were not reached in both treatment groups. In the metastatic setting, there was no significant difference between groups in PFS or OS. The median time to significant cardiovascular (CV dysfunction was 4.54 months. The incidence of congestive heart failure requiring medication in our cohort was 3.4%.In our study, we found that fixed-dose monthly trastuzumab was feasible and effective. In addition, the CV risk was not higher with the fixed-dose protocol. This treatment modality could lower the cost and was easier to implement in clinical practice. Larger prospective randomized studies with longer-term follow up are needed to confirm our results.

  5. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Monchaux, G.; Fritsch, P.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Chameaud, J.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 10 6 J.m -3 (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author)

  6. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlier, J.P.; Morin, M.; Monchaux, G.; Fritsch, P.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection Technique; Pineau, J.F. [ALGADE, Bessines (France); Chameaud, J. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 87 - Razes (France)

    1994-12-31

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 10{sup 6} J.m{sup -3} (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author).

  7. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balgobind, Brian V.; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Pieters, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in

  8. Stress effect on conception rate in Nellore cows submmited to fixed time artificial insemination. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Luis Nogueira Natal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In beef cattle, fixed time artificial insemination (FTAI provides a method to inseminate large numbers of females in a specific time, which result in economical gains due, among others, to a more uniform calf crop. However, FTAI requires frequent manipulation of animals in order to inject hormones and for clinical examination. Consequently, animals seemed stressed in less or higher extent at the time of insemination. This can be a problem because it has been demonstrated that application of an acute stress treatment (electric shock, confinement, restraint and rotation twice a day during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle prevents the pre-ovulatory LH surge. This study aimed to evaluate if FTAI efficiency of Nellore cows is affected by the degree of stress observed at time of AI. Nellore cows (n=92 were treated (Day 0 with a progesterone intravaginal devise (Primer®, Tecnopec, São Paulo, Brazil containing 1 g of progesterone and injected with estradiol benzoate (2mg EB, Estrogin, AUSA, Brazil. Primer was removed on Day 8 (08:00 AM and administered one injection of cloprostenol (125 mcg, Prolise®, Tecnopec, São Paulo, Brazil. Twenty-four hours later, cows received 2 mg EB and insemination (semen from one sire was done on the afternoon (14:00 to 16:00 PM of day 10. At time of FTAI, the stress condition was classified as 1 (low, 2 (moderate or 3 (high according the reactivity of cows to enter in the squeeze chute and apparent nervous behavior. Pregnancy status was evaluated by transrectal ultrasound on day 40 after FTAI. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test. Cows with moderate or high degree of stress had lower conception rate than low stressed cows (P<0.01. These results suggest that cow temperament must be considered in the planning of FTAI programs. Studies are in progress in order to measure hormonal parameters (cortisol and Alpha amylase that better reflects the “fight-or-flight” response to immediate stressors in order to

  9. Pulsed-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy : Comparison of sparing effects in cells of a radiosensitive and a radioresistant cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, J; Woudstra, EC; Kampinga, HH

    Pulsed-dose-rate regimens are an attractive alternative to continuous low-dose-rate brachytherapy. However, apart from data obtained from modeling, only a few irt vitro results are available for comparing the biological effectiveness of both modalities. Cells of two human cell lines with survival

  10. A comparative pharmacokinetic study of a fixed dose combination for essential hypertensive patients: a randomized crossover study in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorain, B; Choudhury, H; Halder, D; Sarkar, A K; Sarkar, P; Biswas, E; Ghosh, B; Pal, T K

    2013-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the relative bioavailability of fixed-dose-combination (FDC) product of amlodipine, telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide with individual marketed products in healthy male volunteers. Control of blood pressure with fixed dose combination of the above drugs acting through different mechanism have a benefit of convenient dosing in terms of compliance, lower the dose and subsequently reduce the side effects. The authors investigated the relative bioavailability under a fasting state of the 3 drugs in a randomized, open-label, 2-treatment, 2-period, 2-sequence, crossover bioequivalence study with a washout period of 21 days. Plasma concentration of the analytes were assayed in timed samples with a simple, highly sensitive and rapid validated method using HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry that had a lower limit of quantification of 1 ng/mL for all the 3 components. Test and reference formulations gave a mean Cmax of 5.234±0.914 ng/mL and 4.991±0.563 ng/mL, 108.839±13.601 ng/mL and 114.783±12.315 ng/mL and 97.814±10.779 ng/mL and 93.731±10.018 ng/mL for amlodipine, telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide respectively. The AUC0-t of amlodipine, telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide was 161.484 ng.h/mL, 1 917.644 ng.h/mL and 822.847 ng.h/mL for test formulation and 162.108 ng.h/mL, 2 014.764 ng.h/mL and 829.323 ng.h/mL for reference in the fasting state. The 90% confidence intervals for the test/reference ratio of the pharmacokinetic parameters in fasting state (mean Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-∞) were within the acceptable range of 80.00-125.00. Thus, these findings clearly indicate that the FDC product is bioequivalent with the individual marketed products in terms of rate and extent of drug absorption and is well tolerated with no significant adverse reactions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Gamma irradiation: Effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burditt, Arthur K.; Hungate, Frank P.; Toba, H. Harold

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to γ-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortility. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min.

  12. Gamma irradiation: effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Toba, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to γ-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortality. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min. (author)

  13. Gamma irradiation: effect of dose and dose rate on development of mature codling moth larvae and adult eclosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Toba, H.H. (Department of Agriculture, Yakima, WA (USA). Agricultural Research Lab.); Hungate, F.P. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), larvae infest apples, pears and many other fruits and nuts. Mature, nondiapausing, cocooned larvae in fiberboard strips were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation at applied doses ranging from 0 to 98 Gy and dose rates from 0.77 to 204.4 Gy/min and subsequently held to permit further development, pupation and adult emergence. At or above an applied dose of 58 Gy, many of the adults that emerged were physically deformed and most were males. As the applied dose increased from 44 to 98 Gy, the percentage of normal adults decreased, the primary effect shifting from a higher percentage of abnormal adults, pupal mortality, to larval mortality. The effects were more pronounced at higher than at lower dose rates. Insect development apparently was not affected when larvae were irradiated at applied doses up to 31.7 Gy. Significantly more adults emerged when larvae were treated at low dose rates (1.0 Gy/min) than at higher dose rates (204 Gy/min). A rate of 52.2 Gy/min was more effective at preventing adult emergence than rates of 1, 4.4 or 201.5 Gy/min. (author).

  14. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  15. [Technical complications rates and plaque control of fixed dental prostheses in patients treated for periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yesi; Meng, Huanxin; Han, Jie; Pan, Shaoxia; Zhang, Li; Shi, Dong

    2016-02-01

    To compare the incidence of technical complications of implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in Chinese patients with a history of moderate or severe periodontitis and periodontally healthy patients(PHP) and analyze the effects of interproximal papillae patterns on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control. A total of 103 partially edentulous patients treated with implant-supported fixed dental prostheses between December 2009 and December 2012 for a minimum 1-year follow-up period were recruited from Department of Periodontology, Peking University, School and Hospital of Stomatology. Based on the initial periodontal examination, the participants were divided into three groups: 30 PHP, 36 moderate periodontally compromised patients(mPCP) and 37 severe periodontally compromised patients(sPCP). Implant survival/loss, technical complications, plaque index, papilla index, food impaction and degree of proximal contact tightness of each patient were assessed around the implants at follow-up. According to the implant papilla index, the implants were divided into two groups: the "filling" group with the mesial and distal aspects with papilla index=3 and the "no filling" group with at least one aspect with papilla indeximplant survival, technical complications were analyzed. Comparisons of the incidence of technical complications were performed between the patients with different periodontal conditions with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The influences of the interproximal papillae loss on food impaction and efficacy of plaque control were estimated with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. The total implant survival rate was 100%(162/162) for all three groups. Technical complications were as following: veneer fractures(1.9%, 3/162), abutment screw loosening(1.9%, 3/162), prosthetic screw loosening(3.1%, 5/162) and decementation(3.1%, 5/162) in all subjects. No implant/screw fracture was noted. The incidence of technical complications in sPCP, mPCP and PHP did

  16. [Fixed-dose combination fluticasone propionate/formoterol for the treatment of asthma: a review of its pharmacology, efficacy and tolerability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintano Jiménez, J A; Ginel Mendoza, L; Entrenas Costa, L M; Polo García, J

    2016-02-01

    The fixed-dose combination fluticasone propionate/formoterol (FPF) is a novel combination of a widely known and used inhaled glucocorticoid (IGC) and a long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist (LABA), available for the first time in a single device. This fixed-dose combination of FPF has a demonstrated efficacy and safety profile in clinical trials compared with its individual components and other fixed-dose combinations of IGC/LABA and is indicated for the treatment of persistent asthma in adults and adolescents. FPF is available in a wide range of doses that can adequately cover the therapeutic steps recommended by treatment guidelines, constituting a fixed-dose combination of GCI/LABA that is effective, rapid, well tolerated and with a reasonable acquisition cost. Various assessment agencies of the Spanish Autonomous Communities consider this combination to be an appropriate alternative therapy for asthma in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  17. Open-Label Comparative Clinical Study of Chlorproguanil−Dapsone Fixed Dose Combination (Lapdap™) Alone or with Three Different Doses of Artesunate for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Daniel G.; Opara, Hyginus; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Kanjala, Maxwell K.; Duparc, Stephan; Kirby, Paula L.; Woessner, Mary; Neate, Colin; Nyirenda, Maggie; Blencowe, Hannah; Dube-Mbeye, Queen; Kanyok, Thomas; Ward, Stephen; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunyo, Sam; Winstanley, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the appropriate dose of artesunate for use in a fixed dose combination therapy with chlorproguanil−dapsone (CPG−DDS) for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods Open-label clinical trial comparing CPG−DDS alone or with artesunate 4, 2, or 1 mg/kg at medical centers in Blantyre, Malawi and Farafenni, The Gambia. The trial was conducted between June 2002 and February 2005, including 116 adults (median age 27 years) and 107 children (median age 38 months) with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Subjects were randomized into 4 groups to receive CPG–DDS alone or plus 4, 2 or 1 mg/kg of artesunate once daily for 3 days. Assessments took place on Days 0−3 in hospital and follow-up on Days 7 and 14 as out-patients. Efficacy was evaluated in the Day 3 per-protocol (PP) population using mean time to reduce baseline parasitemia by 90% (PC90). A number of secondary outcomes were also included. Appropriate artesunate dose was determined using a pre-defined decision matrix based on primary and secondary outcomes. Treatment emergent adverse events were recorded from clinical assessments and blood parameters. Safety was evaluated in the intent to treat (ITT) population. Results In the Day 3 PP population for the adult group (N = 85), mean time to PC90 was 19.1 h in the CPG−DDS group, significantly longer than for the +artesunate 1 mg/kg (12.5 h; treatment difference −6.6 h [95%CI −11.8, −1.5]), 2 mg/kg (10.7 h; −8.4 h [95%CI −13.6, −3.2]) and 4 mg/kg (10.3 h; −8.7 h [95%CI −14.1, −3.2]) groups. For children in the Day 3 PP population (N = 92), mean time to PC90 was 21.1 h in the CPG−DDS group, similar to the +artesunate 1 mg/kg group (17.7 h; −3.3 h [95%CI −8.6, 2.0]), though the +artesunate 2 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg groups had significantly shorter mean times to PC90 versus CPG−DDS; 14.4 h (treatment difference −6.4 h [95%CI −11.7, −1.0]) and 12.8 h (−7

  18. Open-label comparative clinical study of chlorproguanil-dapsone fixed dose combination (Lapdap alone or with three different doses of artesunate for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Wootton

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the appropriate dose of artesunate for use in a fixed dose combination therapy with chlorproguanil-dapsone (CPG-DDS for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.Open-label clinical trial comparing CPG-DDS alone or with artesunate 4, 2, or 1 mg/kg at medical centers in Blantyre, Malawi and Farafenni, The Gambia. The trial was conducted between June 2002 and February 2005, including 116 adults (median age 27 years and 107 children (median age 38 months with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Subjects were randomized into 4 groups to receive CPG-DDS alone or plus 4, 2 or 1 mg/kg of artesunate once daily for 3 days. Assessments took place on Days 0-3 in hospital and follow-up on Days 7 and 14 as out-patients. Efficacy was evaluated in the Day 3 per-protocol (PP population using mean time to reduce baseline parasitemia by 90% (PC90. A number of secondary outcomes were also included. Appropriate artesunate dose was determined using a pre-defined decision matrix based on primary and secondary outcomes. Treatment emergent adverse events were recorded from clinical assessments and blood parameters. Safety was evaluated in the intent to treat (ITT population.In the Day 3 PP population for the adult group (N = 85, mean time to PC90 was 19.1 h in the CPG-DDS group, significantly longer than for the +artesunate 1 mg/kg (12.5 h; treatment difference -6.6 h [95%CI -11.8, -1.5], 2 mg/kg (10.7 h; -8.4 h [95%CI -13.6, -3.2] and 4 mg/kg (10.3 h; -8.7 h [95%CI -14.1, -3.2] groups. For children in the Day 3 PP population (N = 92, mean time to PC90 was 21.1 h in the CPG-DDS group, similar to the +artesunate 1 mg/kg group (17.7 h; -3.3 h [95%CI -8.6, 2.0], though the +artesunate 2 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg groups had significantly shorter mean times to PC90 versus CPG-DDS; 14.4 h (treatment difference -6.4 h [95%CI -11.7, -1.0] and 12.8 h (-7.4 h [95%CI -12.9, -1.8], respectively. An analysis of mean time

  19. COMPARATIVE BIOAVAILABILITY OF A FIXED-DOSE COMBINATION TABLET OF OLMESARTAN MEDOXOMIL/HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE IN HEALTHY KOREAN VOLUNTEERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renhua; Hwang, Ho Min; Kim, Bo-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with diuretics and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist is frequently recommended for the control of blood pressure in hypertensive patients. This study was targeted to compare pharmacokinetic profiles of a new generic fixed-dose combination (FDC) tablet of olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide 20/12.5 mg and a reference formulation of Olmetec Plus 20/12.5 mg tablets in healthy volunteers. The study design was a randomized sequence and two-way crossover study in healthy subjects. They were to be randomly assigned to either one of the two sequence groups; each subject sequentially received a single oral dose of reference and test tablet with 7-day washout period. Blood sample was collected at pre-dose and at 0.33, 0.67, 1, 1.33, 1.67, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h post-dose. The blood concentrations were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Both of the 90% CI for the treatment ratios (test/reference) of C(max) and AUC(last) were to be in the range of 0.800-1.250 with regards to olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide; the geometric mean ratios (test/reference) for olmesartan C(max) and AUC(last) were 0.979 (90% CI, 0.934-1.027) and 0.992 (0.946-1.041), respectively, and those for hydrochlorothiazide C(max) and AUC(last) were 0.966 (0.975-1.110) and 0.999 (0.963-1.038), respectively. No serious adverse events were reported during the study. The generic formulation of olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide 20/12.5 mg tablet was bioequivalent with the reference formulation of Olmetec Plus 20/12.5 mg tablet in regards to the pharmacokinetic parameters of olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide. Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) Registration Number: KCT0001025. (https://cris.nih.go.kr/ Mar 18, 2014)

  20. Effect of radiation doses rate on SOS response induction in irradiated Escherichia coli Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuetara Lugo, Elizabeth B.; Fuentes Lorenzo, Jorge L.; Almeida Varela, Eliseo; Prieto Miranda, Enrique F.; Sanchez Lamar, Angel; Llagostera Casal, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to study the effect of radiation dose rate on the induction of SOS response in Escherichia coli cells. We measured the induction of sul A reporter gene in PQ-37 (SOS Chromotest) cells. Lead devises were built with different diameter and these were used for diminishing the dose rate of PX- -30M irradiator. Our results show that radiation doses rate significantly modifies the induction of SOS response. Induction factor increases proportionally to doses rate in Escherichia coli cells defective to nucleotide excision repair (uvrA), but not in wild type cells. We conclude that the dose rate affects the level of induction of SOS response

  1. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  2. Survival and complication rates of combined tooth-implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Schäfer, Corinna; Spiekermann, Hubertus

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study has been to review the incidence of biological and technical complications in case of tooth-implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) treatments on the basis of survival data regarding clinical cases. Based on the treatment documentations of a Bundeswehr dental clinic (Cologne-Wahn German Air Force Garrison), the medical charts of 83 patients with tooth-implant-supported FPDs were completely recorded. The median follow-up time was 4.73 (time range: 2.2-8.3) years. In the process, survival curves according to Kaplan and Meier were applied in addition to frequency counts. A total of 84 tooth-implant (83 patients) connected prostheses were followed (132 abutment teeth, 142 implant abutments (Branemark, Straumann). FPDs: the time-dependent illustration reveals that after 5 years, as many as 10% of the tooth-implant-supported FPDs already had to be subjected to a technical modification (renewal (n=2), reintegration (n=4), veneer fracture (n=5), fracture of frame (n=2)). In contrast to non-rigid connection of teeth and implants, technical modification measures were rarely required in case of tooth-implant-supported FPDs with a rigid connection. There was no statistical difference between technical complications and the used implant system. Abutment teeth and implants: during the observation period, none of the functionally loaded implants (n=142) had to be removed. Three of the overall 132 abutment teeth were lost because of periodontal inflammation. The time-dependent illustration reveals, that after 5 years as many as 8% of the abutment teeth already required corresponding therapeutic measures (periodontal treatment (5%), filling therapy (2.5%), endodontic treatment (0.5%)). After as few as 3 years, the connection related complications of implant abutments (abutment or occlusal screw loosening, loss of cementation) already had to be corrected in approximately 8% of the cases. In the utilization period there was no screw or abutment

  3. Dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3) for frequently used radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szermerski, Bastian; Bruchmann, Iris; Geworski, Lilli [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. for Radiation Protection and Medical Physics; Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    According to recent studies, the human eye lens is more sensitive to ionising radiation than previously assumed. Therefore, the dose limit for personnel occupationally exposed to ionising radiation will be lowered from currently 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Currently, no data base for a reliable estimation of the dose to the lens of the eye is available for nuclear medicine. Furthermore, the dose is usually not monitored. The aim of this work was to determine dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3), which is supposed to estimate the dose to the lens of the eye. For this, H{sub p}(3)-dosemeters were fixed to an Alderson Phantom at different positions. The dosemeters were exposed to radiation from nuclides typically used in nuclear medicine in their geometries analog to their application in nuclear medicine, e.g. syringe or vial. The results show that the handling of high-energy beta (i.e. electron or positron) emitters may lead to a relevant dose to the lens of the eye. For low-energy beta emitters and gamma emitters, an exceeding of the lowered dose limit seems to be unlikely.

  4. Relative Bioavailability of Fixed-Dose Combinations of Tamsulosin and Dutasteride: Results From 2 Randomized Trials in Healthy Male Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Olivia; Zhu, John; Manyak, Michael J; Ravindranath, Ramiya; Koosha, Fariba; Haque, Nazneen; Chung, Sally

    2018-05-01

    The relative bioavailabilities of dutasteride/tamsulosin hydrochloride 0.5 mg/0.2 mg fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsules compared with coadministered reference products (1 dutasteride 0.5-mg capsule [Avodart ® ] + 1 tamsulosin hydrochloride 0.2-mg orally disintegrating tablet [Harnal D ® ]) were investigated in 2 clinical trials under fasted and fed conditions (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02184585 and NCT02509104). Both trials were open-label, randomized, single-dose, crossover studies in healthy male adults aged 18-65 years. Trial 1 evaluated 2 formulations (FDC1 and FDC2), and trial 2 evaluated a third formulation (FDC3). The primary end points were dutasteride area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to t (AUC (0-t) ) and peak plasma concentration (C max ) and tamsulosin AUC (0-∞) , AUC (0-t) , and C max . The formulations were considered to be bioequivalent if the 90%CIs for the geometric mean ratios for each end point were within the range of 0.80-1.25. For FDC1 in trial 1, bioequivalence criteria were not met for dutasteride C max or AUC in the fasted state or for tamsulosin C max in the fasted or fed states. For FDC2 in trial 1, all bioequivalence criteria were met except for tamsulosin C max in the fasted state. For FDC3 in trial 2, bioequivalence criteria were met for all dutasteride and tamsulosin end points in both the fed and fasted states. Safety profiles were similar for all FDC formulations and combination treatments. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Use of antibacterial fixed-dose combinations in the private sector in eight Latin American Countries between 1999 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Veronika J; Mol, Peter G M; Verdijk, Jonneke; Vander Stichele, Robert H; Taxis, Katja

    2013-04-01

    To assesses the safety and rationale of antibacterial fixed-dose combinations in the private sector in Latin America and determine the extent of their use. Analysis of FDCs was based on retail sales data for eight Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela) between 1999 and 2009. FDCs were classified according to the pre-defined criteria. Use was expressed as daily defined doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DDD/TID). A total of 175 antibacterial FDCs contained a mean of 1.3 antibacterial substances and 3.2 other active substances. Thirty-seven (21%) FDCs were classified as unsafe, 124 (70%) as lacking sufficient evidence for efficacy and only 14 (9%) of all FDCs were considered rational, for example amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. Consumption of unsafe FDCs decreased by 0.011 DDD/TID (95% CI: -0.012 to -0.009) annually, from 0.173 DDD/TID in 1999 to 0.070 DDD/TID in 2009 (overall decrease, 59.7%). Consumption of FDCs lacking sufficient evidence decreased by 30.3% (-0.018 DDD/TID [95% CI: -0.028 to -0.008] annually), while use of rational FDCs increased by 17.1% (from 1.283 DDD/TID to 1.497 DDD/TID annually). The majority of antibacterial FDCs in the private sector lack therapeutic benefit. Despite the decrease in the consumption of unsafe antibacterials and those lacking sufficient evidence, their use remains high and their marketing does not fit into strategies of prudent use of antibiotics to contain antibacterial resistance. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Three in one: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of triple fixed-dose combination medicine in the management of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor AA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Addison A Taylor, Shawn RagbirDepartment of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Hypertensive patients whose blood pressures are more than 20 mmHg above their goal will often require three or more medications. Careful selection of medications whose actions are complementary or have an improved adverse effect profile when combined can affect not only the blood pressure but also patient acceptance, thus improving persistence in taking the medications as prescribed. This review will highlight the three single-pill three-drug combinations currently available in the US and will address their efficacy, safety, and tolerability. All three include the dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, amlodipine, and the thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. They each contain a different renin–angiotensin system blocker. One includes the angiotensin-receptor blocker, olmesartan, while another contains valsartan. The third combination includes the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren. All three fixed-dose combinations (FDC at maximum doses of each component lowers the blood pressure of patients with stage II hypertension by 37 to 40 mmHg systolic and 21 to 25 mmHg diastolic, which is superior to any two of the components that comprise the three-drug FDC. These drugs are effective in males and females, the elderly, diabetics, minority populations, and patients with metabolic syndrome. Triple-drug FDCs are well tolerated with a low incidence of adverse effects, the most common being peripheral edema related to amlodipine. Extrapolation of data from two-drug FDC suggests that medication compliance (adherence and persistence should be better with these FDCs than with the individual components taken as separate medications, although additional studies are necessary to confirm this.Keywords: calcium-channel blockers, hypertension, patient tolerability, renin–angiotensin system antagonists, safety, triple-drug combinations

  7. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  8. SSDL quality assurance for environmental dose/dose rate monitoring of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Member states of IAEA have recently approved an expanded Nuclear Safety Programme and two International Conventions have been signed. One concerns early notification of a nuclear accident, and the other concerns assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In the course of the implementation of these conventions an international system will be established by the Agency for the reception and dissemination of data following a nuclear accident. Such data should include the results of radiation measurements obtained by radiation monitoring. These data must be reliable, and comparable. This assures that numerical values of measured quantities obtained at different times, sites and countries, and with different instruments, can be compared in order that the competent authorities may draw conclusions. Such measurements may also have legal consequences. This implies that the instruments used for the measurement should comply with the relevant international specifications, and that the readings of these instruments be traceable to the international measurement system. At a meeting of an expert working group on International Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection held in November 1986, a proposal to produce a technical document on ''The role of SSDLs in the quality assurance programme relating to the use of dose and dose rate meters for personal and environmental measurements'' received high priority, and at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Governors the proposal was approved. Prior to these proposals the SSDL Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in May 1986 also advised the IAEA to promote measures to ensure world wide reliability and traceability of dose measurements in the field of radiation protection. On 26-30 January 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting on ''The role of SSDLs in the dosimetry of unintentional radiation exposures'' was organized by the IAEA. This Advisory Group assisted the Agency in the formulation of a

  9. Total dose and dose rate radiation characterization of EPI-CMOS radiation hardened memory and microprocessor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, B.L.; Hermsen, J.M.; Lee, J.C.; Schroeder, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The process, circuit discription, and total dose radiation characteristics are presented for two second generation hardened 4K EPI-CMOS RAMs and a first generation 80C85 microprocessor. Total dose radiation performance is presented to 10M rad-Si and effects of biasing and operating conditions are discussed. The dose rate sensitivity of the 4K RAMs is also presented along with single event upset (SEU) test data

  10. Effect of food on the oral bioavailability of amlodipine/valsartan and amlodipine/valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide fixed dose combination tablets in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Jiang, Xuemin; Reynolds, Christine; Serra, Denise; Zhang, Yiming; Ligueros-Saylan, Monica; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Winter, Serge; Jarugula, Venkateswar

    2014-11-01

    A double fixed dose combination of amlodipine/valsartan and triple fixed dose combination of amlodipine/valsartan/HCTZ tablets have been developed to treat patients with moderate-to-severe hypertension. Here, we present the effect of food on the oral bioavailability of these two fixed dose combination tablets from two separate clinical studies in healthy subjects. Single oral doses of amlodipine/valsartan (10/160 mg) and amlodipine/valsartan/HCTZ (10/320/25 mg were administered under fasted or fed conditions. Blood samples were collected in both studies to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of amlodipine, valsartan, and/or HCTZ using non-compartmental analysis. Following amlodipine/valsartan administration, the geometric mean ratios (GMRs, 90% CI) of AUC0-∞ and Cmax were 1.09 (1.05-1.13) and 1.03 (0.97-1.09) for amlodipine, and 0.94 (0.81-1.10) and 0.86 (0.73-1.02) for valsartan, respectively. Following amlodipine/valsartan/HCTZ administration, the GMRs (90%CI) of AUC0-∞ and Cmax were 1.09 (1.04-1.15) and 1.11 (1.05-1.08) for amlodipine, 1.14 (0.99-1.31) and 1.12 (0.98-1.29) for valsartan, and 1.09 (1.02-1.16) and 0.86 (0.79-0.93) for HCTZ, respectively. Considering the sample size and pharmacokinetic variability associated with analytes, these study results indicate that food effect is minimal or none when fixed dose combination tablets are administered with food. In conclusion, both fixed dose combination tablets can be administered without regards to meals. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Factors affecting pregnancy rate to estrous synchronization and fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of AI in extensive beef cattle production is limited by the necessity to monitor estrus and handle animals twice daily for several weeks. Protocols that effectively synchronize ovarian follicular development and ovulation to enable fixed-time AI (TAI) would facilitate the use of AI. Obje...

  12. Posttreatment visual acuity in patients treated with episcleral plaque therapy for choroidal melanomas: dose and dose rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Robert; Gore, Elizabeth; Mieler, William; Murray, Kevin; Gillin, Michael; Albano, Katherine; Erickson, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the long-term visual function and the dose and dose rates delivered to critical ocular structures in patients with choroidal melanoma treated with 125 I episcleral plaque radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 1994, 63 patients underwent 125 I episcleral plaque (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study [COMS] design) application for the treatment of choroidal melanoma. The mean tumor height was 4.5 mm (range 1.7-8.3). Doses and dose rates at the tumor apex, macula, and optic disc were calculated. Forty-three records were scored to assess whether a decrease in visual acuity of >2 lines on a standard Snellen eye chart had occurred. Patient age and the presence of hypertension or diabetes were noted. Statistical analysis was performed to assess both the rate at which visual decline had occurred and the presence of significant factors that had contributed to this decline. Results: With a median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year actuarial survival rate was 93.6%. The 3-year actuarial local control rate was 86.9%. The median time to visual loss after therapy was 18.7 months. The 3-year actuarial rate of visual preservation was 40.5%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated higher macula dose rates (p=0.003) to forecast visual decline. Macula dose rates of 111±11.1 cGy/h were associated with a 50% risk of significant visual loss. Conclusion: Patients in our series treated with 125 I plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma experienced favorable tumor control, but with a measurable incidence of visual decline. Higher dose rates to the macula correlated strongly with poorer posttreatment visual outcome. This information may be valuable in selecting the optimal dose rates to treat choroidal melanomas and to predict the risk of visual decline

  13. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  14. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  15. Radiation induced oxidative degradation of polymers—IV. Dose rate effects on chemical and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, T.; Arakawa, K.; Hayakawa, N.; Machi, S.

    The dose rate effects on the radiation induced oxidative degradation of crosslinked polyethylene and ethylene-propylene copolymer was investigated by the tensile property, gel fraction, and dielectric loss tangent. The polymer films crosslinked by chemical agent were irradiated with various dose rates from 5×10 5 to 5×10 3{rad}/{hr} in oxygen under pressure from 5 to 0.2 atm at room temperature. It was found that the degradation at a given dose depends on the dose rate; {Deg}/{r} = k·I {-1}/{3}, where Deg is degradation, r dose, I dose rate, and k constant. For the polymers containing antioxidant the dose rate effects was not observed, then the degradation was only dependent on the total dose.

  16. Effectiveness and tolerability of fixed-dose combination enalapril plus nitrendipine in hypertensive patients: results of the 3-month observational, post-marketing, multicentre, prospective CENIT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Alejandro de la; Roca-Cusachs, Alejandro; Redón, Josep; Marín, Rafael; Luque, Manuel; Figuera, Mariano de la; Garcia-Garcia, Margarida; Falkon, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    dyslipidaemia (42.3%), obesity (29.2%) and diabetes (23.9%). After 3 months of treatment, SBP and DBP showed mean (+/- SD) decreases of 26.5 (+/- 14.4) mmHg and 14.9 (+/- 9.0) mmHg, respectively, and 73.0% of patients responded to treatment while 40.9% achieved BP control (70.8%/36.1% in 2658 patients aged >65 years; 61.7%/46.8% in 1521 patients with diabetes; 55.3%/44.2% in 731 patients with ISH; 72.0%/36.4% in 1762 obese patients). Adverse events were reported in 10.8% of patients (n = 689). During the follow-up period, ten patients died and seven patients had serious adverse events; in no case was a causal relationship attributed to the study product. The rate of SBP/DBP control achieved demonstrates the effectiveness of the fixed-dose enalapril/nitrendipine 10 mg/20 mg combination administered as a single daily dose in patients with essential hypertension not adequately controlled with monotherapy or with any combination other than enalapril + nitrendipine. The proportion and type of adverse events reported were as expected and have already been described for both components of the enalapril/nitrendipine 10 mg/20 mg combination. These results confirm the effectiveness of a strategy based on a fixed-dose enalapril/nitrendipine 10 mg/20 mg combination in reducing BP and achieving BP control goals.

  17. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R.; Siwarungsun, N.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for γ-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  18. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  19. Zero crossing and ratio spectra derivative spectrophotometry for the dissolution tests of amlodipine and perindopril in their fixed dose formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maczka Paulina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution tests of amlodipine and perindopril from their fixed dose formulations were performed in 900 mL of phosphate buffer of pH 5.5 at 37°C using the paddle apparatus. Then, two simple and rapid derivative spectrophotometric methods were used for the quantitative measurements of amlodipine and perindopril. The first method was zero crossing first derivative spectrophotometry in which measuring of amplitudes at 253 nm for amlodipine and 229 nm for perindopril were used. The second method was ratio derivative spectrophotometry in which spectra of amlodipine over the linearity range were divided by one selected standard spectrum of perindopril and then amplitudes at 242 nm were measured. Similarly, spectra of perindopril were divided by one selected standard spectrum of amlodipine and then amplitudes at 298 nm were measured. Both of the methods were validated to meet official requirements and were demonstrated to be selective, precise and accurate. Since there is no official monograph for these drugs in binary formulations, the dissolution tests and quantification procedure presented here can be used as a quality control test for amlodipine and perindopril in respective dosage forms.

  20. Fixed ratio dosing of pramlintide with regular insulin before a standard meal in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, M C; Yuen, K C J; de Bruin, T W; Herrmann, K; Xu, J; Öhman, P; Kolterman, O G

    2015-09-01

    Amylin is co-secreted with insulin and is therefore lacking in patients with type 1 diabetes. Replacement with fixed ratio co-administration of insulin and the amylin analogue pramlintide may be superior to separate dosing. This concept was evaluated in a ratio-finding study. Patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled in a randomized, single-masked, standard breakfast crossover study using regular human insulin injected simultaneously with pramlintide 6, 9 or 12 mcg/unit insulin or placebo. Insulin dosage was reduced by 30% from patients' usual estimates. Plasma glucose, glucagon and pramlintide and adverse events were assessed. All ratios reduced 0-3-h glucose and glucagon increments by >50%. No hypoglycaemia occurred. Adverse events were infrequent and generally mild. All pramlintide/insulin ratios markedly and safely reduced glycaemic excursions and suppressed glucagon secretion in the immediate postprandial state. Further study using one of these ratios to explore the efficacy and safety of longer-term meal-time and basal hormone replacement is warranted. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Calendering as a direct shaping tool for the continuous production of fixed-dose combination products via co-extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynckier, A-K; Lin, H; Zeitler, J A; Willart, J-F; Bongaers, E; Voorspoels, J; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-10-01

    In this study calendering is used as a downstream technique to shape monolithic co-extruded fixed-dose combination products in a continuous way. Co-extrudates with a metoprolol tartrate-loaded sustained-release core and a hydrochlorothiazide-loaded immediate-release coat were produced and immediately shaped into a monolithic drug delivery system via calendering, using chilled rolls with tablet-shaped cavities. In vitro metoprolol tartrate release from the ethylcellulose core of the calendered tablets was prolonged in comparison with the sustained release of a multiparticulate dosage form, prepared manually by cutting co-extrudates into mini-matrices. Analysis of the dosage forms using X-ray micro-computed tomography only detected small differences between the pore structure of the core of the calendered tablet and the mini-matrices. Diffusion path length was shown to be the main mechanism behind the release kinetics. Terahertz pulsed imaging visualized that adhesion between the core and coat of the calendered tablet was not complete and a gradient in coat thickness (varying from 200 to 600μm) was observed. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction indicated that the solid-state properties of both drugs were not affected by the calendering procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enteric protection of naproxen in a fixed-dose combination product produced by hot-melt co-extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynckier, A-K; De Beer, M; Monteyne, T; Voorspoels, J; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study hot-melt co-extrusion is used as processing technique to manufacture a fixed-dose combination product providing enteric protection to naproxen incorporated in the core and immediate release to esomeprazole magnesium embedded in the coat. The plasticizing effect of naproxen and triethyl citrate (TEC) was tested on the enteric polymers investigated (Eudragit(®) L100-55, HPMC-AS-LF and HPMCP-HP-50). Core matrix formulations containing HPMC-AS-LF, TEC and a naproxen load of 15, 30 and 50% were processed and characterized. The in vitro naproxen release in 0.1N HCl was prevented for 2h for all formulations. The physicochemical state of the drug in the extrudates was determined and a stability study was performed. Intermolecular interactions between naproxen and polymer were identified using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. When esomeprazole magnesium was formulated in a polyethylene oxide 100K:polyethylene glycol 4K (1:1) matrix, separated from the naproxen-containing layer, the formulation could be easily processed and complete in vitro drug release was observed after 45 min. When co-extruding the core/coat dosage form it was observed that a third layer of polymer, separating the naproxen loaded enteric formulation in the core from the coat, is required to prevent degradation of the acid-labile esomeprazole magnesium at the core/coat interface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori; Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Yoshida, Mineo

    2002-01-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients) for OAR were lower

  4. Animal Studies of Residual Hematopoietic and Immune System Injury from Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Radiation and Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    fission products were released, workers involved in reactor or weapons construction, and perhaps astronauts/cosmonauts exposed to space irradiation. It is...dose rates [5,6]. long-term animal experiments. Such data could be extrap - The long-term consequences of low dose irradiation may olated to human

  5. Effects of gemcitabine on cell survival and chromosome aberrations after pulsed low dose-rate irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro Kreder, Natasja; van Bree, Chris; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Haveman, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    The radiosensitizing potential of gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine) was studied in combination with pulsed low dose-rate irradiation. The experiments were carried out with a human lung carcinoma cell line SW 1573. These were irradiated at pulsed low dose rate (p-LDR); the average dose

  6. Post-treatment visual acuity in patients treated with episcleral plaque therapy for choroidal melanoma: Dose and dose rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Robert; Gore, Elizabeth; Mieler, William; Gillin, Michael; Albano, Katherine; Erickson, Beth

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the long-term visual function and the dose and dose rates delivered to critical ocular structures in patients with choroidal melanoma treated with 125 I episcleral plaque radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 1993, 63 patients underwent 125 I episcleral plaque application for the treatment of choroidal melanoma. Mean tumor height was 4.6 mm (range 1.7-8.3 mm). Plaques utilized were of COMS design. Doses and dose rates at the tumor apex, macula, and optic disc were obtained. Visual acuity data prior to and after plaque application was available for 52 patients. 9 patients were excluded from analysis secondary to co-morbidities or disease progression. 43 records were scored to assess if a decrease in visual acuity of ≥ 2 lines on a standard Snellen eye chart had occurred. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square tests of significance. Results: Of the 63 total patients, 59 (93.7%) were alive at a median follow-up of 36 months. Local progression occurred in (7(63)) (11.1%). Median dose and dose rate to the tumor apex were 90 Gy and 97.2 cGy/hr, respectively. Of the 43 patients with post-treatment visual acuity analysis, 28 (65.1%) experienced visual loss of ≥ 2 lines on a standard eye chart. Median time to altered visual acuity was 20 months. Median dose and dose rates to the macula in patients with a significant visual loss were 123.3 Gy and 122.5 cGy/hr, respectively, compared with 38 Gy and 51.9 cGy/hr in those without notable visual change. These differences reached statistical significance at a dose and dose rate to the macula of 82.0 Gy (p 125 I plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma experienced favorable tumor control, but with a measurable incidence of decreased visual acuity. Both total dose and dose rates to the macula and optic disc correlated strongly with post-treatment visual outcome. This information may be valuable in decisions about the dose and dose rates used to treat

  7. Post-treatment visual acuity in patients treated with episcleral plaque therapy for choroidal melanoma: dose and dose rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Robert; Gore, Elizabeth; Mieler, William; Murray, Kevin; Gillin, Michael; Albano, Katherine; Erickson, Beth

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the long-term visual function and the dose and dose rates delivered to critical ocular structures in patients with choroidal melanoma treated with 125 I episcleral plaque radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1987 to 1994, 63 patients underwent 125 I episcleral plaque application for the treatment of choroidal melanoma. Mean tumor height was 4.6 mm (range 1.7-8.3 mm). Plaques utilized were of COMS design. Doses and dose rates at the tumor apex, macula, and optic disc were obtained. Visual acuity data prior to and after plaque application was available for 52 patients. Nine patients were excluded from analysis secondary to co-morbidities or disease progression. Forty-three records were scored to assess if a decrease in visual acuity of ≥ 2 lines on a standard Snellen eye chart had occurred. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square tests of significance. Results: Of the 63 total patients, 59 (93.7%) were alive at a median follow-up of 36 months. Local progression occurred in 7/63 (11.1%). Median dose and dose rate to the tumor apex were 90 Gy and 97.2 cGy/hr, respectively. Of the 43 patients with post-treatment visual acuity analysis, 28 (65.1%) experienced visual loss of ≥ 2 lines on a standard eye chart. Median time to altered visual acuity was 20 months. Median dose and dose rates to the macula in patients with a significant visual loss were 123.3 Gy and 122.5 cGy/hr, respectively, compared with 38 Gy and 51.9 cGy/hr in those without notable visual change. These differences reached statistical significance at a dose and dose rate to the macula of 82.0 Gy (p 125 I plaque brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma experienced favorable tumor control, but with a measurable incidence of decreased visual acuity. Both total dose and dose rates to the macula and optic disc correlated strongly with post-treatment visual outcome. This information may be valuable in decisions about the dose and dose rates used to

  8. Background internal dose rates of earthworm and arthropod species in the forests of Aomori, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihito Ohtsuka; Yuichi Takaku; Shun'ichi Hisamatsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we measured the concentrations of several natural radionuclides in samples of one earthworm species and 11 arthropod species collected from four coniferous forests in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, Japan, and we assessed the background internal radiation dose rate for each species. Dose rates were calculated by using the radionuclide concentrations in the samples and dose conversion coefficients obtained from the literature. The mean internal dose rate in the earthworm species was 0.28 μGy h -1 , and the mean internal dose rates in the arthropod species ranged between 0.036 and 0.69 μGy h -1 . (author)

  9. Reference air kerma rate calibration system for high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy sources in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei-Han; Yuan, Ming-Chen; Lee, Jeng-Hung; Lin, Yi-Chun

    2017-11-01

    Ir-192 sources are widely used in brachytherapy and the number of treatments is around seven thousand for the use of the high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy source per year in Taiwan. Due to its physical half-life of 73.8 days, the source should be replaced four times per year to maintain the HDR treatment mode (DDEP, 2005; Coursey et al., 1992). When doing this work, it must perform the source dose trace to assure the dose accuracy. To establish the primary measurement standard of reference air kerma rate(RAKR) for the HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy sources in Taiwan, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) fabricated a dual spherical graphite-walled cavity ionization chambers system to directly measure the RAKR of the Ir-192 brachytherapy source. In this system, the ion-charge was accumulated by the two ionization chambers and after correction for the ion recombination, temperature, atmosphere pressure, room scattering, graphite-wall attenuation, air attenuation, source decay, stem effect, and so on. The RAKR of the Ir-192 source was obtained in the ambient conditions of 22 °C and one atmosphere. The measurement uncertainty of the system was around 0.92% in 96% confidence level (k=2.0). To verify the accuracy of the result, the source calibration comparison has been made at the National Radiation Standard Laboratory (NRSL) of INER and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) in 2015. The ratio of the measurement results between INER and PTB, INER/PTB, was 0.998±0.027 (k=2) which showed good consistency and the performance of the system was verified.

  10. Possible use of EPDM in radioactive waste disposal: Long term low dose rate and short term high dose rate irradiation in aquatic and atmospheric environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacıoğlu, Fırat; Özdemir, Tonguç; Çavdar, Seda; Usanmaz, Ali

    2013-02-01

    In this study, changes in the properties of ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) irradiated with different dose rates in ambient atmosphere and aqueous environment were investigated. Irradiations were carried out both with low dose and high dose rate irradiation sources. EPDM samples which were differentiated from each other by peroxide type and 5-ethylidene 2-norbornene (ENB) contents were used. Long term low dose rate irradiations were carried out for the duration of up to 2.5 years (total dose of 1178 kGy) in two different irradiation environments. Dose rates (both high and low), irradiation environments (in aquatic and open to atmosphere), and peroxide types (aliphatic or aromatic) were the parameters studied. Characterization of irradiated EPDM samples were performed by hardness, compression, tensile, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), TGA-FTIR, ATR-FTIR, XRD and SEM tests. It was observed that the irradiation in water environment led to a lower degree of degradation when compared to that of irradiation open to atmosphere for the same irradiation dose. In addition, irradiation environment, peroxide type and dose rate had effects on the extent of change in the properties of EPDM. It was observed that EPDM is relatively radiation resistant and a candidate polymer for usage in radioactive waste management.

  11. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192 Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D w,m ). The relation between D m,m and D w,m for 192 Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D w,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D m,m, D w,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D w,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D w,m (SCT) and D w,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D m,m and D w,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  12. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  13. A review of the efficacy of fixed-dose combinations olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine besylate/benazepril in factorial design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Allen; Chavanu, Kathleen; Merkel, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In order to adequately control hypertension, the majority of patients will require treatment with more than one antihypertensive agent. Fixed-dose combination therapy offers several advantages, including improved efficacy, tolerability, and treatment compliance. Certain combinations have benefits in specific patient populations, such as the elderly or those with comorbidities. In this review, we evaluate the BP-lowering efficacy of olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and amlodipine besylate/benazepril in similarly designed, randomized, placebo-controlled studies in similar patient populations. This indirect comparison showed that both combinations significantly improve both systolic and diastolic BP compared with monotherapy with the individual agents or placebo; it also demonstrated that the combinations were well tolerated. Both combination therapies significantly improved response rates, but olmesartan medoxomil/HCTZ achieved the highest control rates compared with the individual agents. On the basis of an indirect comparison of published factorial design studies, olmesartan medoxomil/HCTZ appears to be at least as effective as amlodipine besylate/benazepril and may provide quantitatively greater reductions in diastolic BP at commonly used dosages. A randomized clinical trial comparing the two combinations is needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Dose-rate effects on the bulk etch-rate of CR-39 track detector exposed to low-LET radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Oda, K; Ikeda, T; Honda, Y; Tagawa, S

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gamma-rays and pulsed electrons has been investigated on the bulk etch rate of CR-39 detector at doses up to 100 kGy under various dose-rate between 0.0044 and 35.0 Gy/s. The bulk etch rate increased exponentially with the dose at every examined dose-rates. It was reveled to be strongly depend on the dose-rate: the bulk etch rate was decreased with increasing dose-rate at the same total dose. A primitive model was proposed to explain the dose-rate effect in which oxygen dissolved was assumed to dominate the damage formation process.

  15. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  16. Expected dose rates from component activation in the APT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fikani, M.M.; Pitcher, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    At the heart of the APT is the concept of using accelerator-based technology to reliably produce tritium in sufficient quantity for maintaining the US strategic arsenal. The proposed accelerator for this project will provide a proton beam with an energy of 1700 MeV/particle, a current of 100 mA, and an on-target rectangular cross section of 19 x 190 cm. The spallation neutron source in the target chamber (configured in 13 ladders) produces a prodigious amount of neutrons and is enclosed on five sides by a number of regions (decouplers, production modules, and reflectors) that capture a portion of this flux for producing tritium. As with any large-scale accelerator, its complexity dictates a thorough understanding of the radiation environment it will produce. For an operational production level accelerator such as is needed for the APT, performance, reliability, and safety are of paramount importance. In order to meet production goals, downtime must be minimized. Inspection, maintenance, and/or replacement of accelerator components must be done in a timely fashion and on schedule. This requirement does not supersede safety considerations, however. In the design of the APT accelerator, several mechanisms for producing an ambient radiation field in the accelerator tunnel have been looked at. Analyses of these mechanisms and the radiation environments they produce then give us guidance in the design and may bound certain aspects in the operation of the accelerator. The authors discuss one such mechanism, that is, component activation from a continuous beam spill. Since this will be present at some level during all hours of normal beam operation, it is likely to be the dominant contributor to the dose rate that personnel working in the tunnel will receive. A continuous beam spill will activate all nearby accelerator components, as well as the concrete tunnel structure itself. Thus, in order for personnel to enter the accelerator tunnel as soon as possible after beam

  17. Comparison of the two different standard flux-to-dose rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metghalchi, M.; Ashrafi, R.

    1983-01-01

    A very useful and simple way of obtaining the dose rate associated with neutron or photon fluxes is to multiply these fluxes by the appropriate flux-to-dose rate conversion factors. Two basic standard flux-to-dose rate conversion factors. are being used in all over the world, those recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the American National Standars (ANS). The purpose of this paper is to compare these two standard with each other. The comparison proved that the dose rate associated with a specific neutron flux, obtained by the ANS flux-to-dose rate conversion factors is usually higher than those calculated by the ICRP's conversion factors. Whereas in the case of the photon, in all energies, the difference between the dose rates obtained by these two standard flux-to-dose rate conversion factors are noticeable, and the ANS results are higher than the ICRP ones. So, it should be noted that for a specific neutron or photon flux the dose rate obtained by the ANS flux-to-dose rate conversion factors are more conservative than those obtained by the ICRP's. Therefore, in order to establish a more reasonable new standard flux-to-dose rate conversion factors, more work should be done. (author)

  18. Evaluating the role of atazanavir/cobicistat and darunavir/cobicistat fixed-dose combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crutchley RD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rustin D Crutchley,1 Rakesh C Guduru,2 Amy M Cheng1 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, 2CompanionDX, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Atazanavir/cobicistat (ATV/c and darunavir/cobicistat (DRV/c are newly approved once daily fixed-dose protease inhibitor combinations for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Studies in healthy volunteers have established bioequivalence between cobicistat and ritonavir as pharmacoenhancers of both atazanavir (ATV and darunavir (DRV. In addition, two randomized clinical trials (one Phase II and one Phase III noninferiority trial with a 144-week follow-up period demonstrated that cobicistat had sustainable and comparable efficacy and safety to ritonavir as a pharmacoenhancer of ATV through 144 weeks of treatment in HIV-1-infected patients. Furthermore, one Phase III, open-label, single-arm, clinical trial reflected virologic and immunologic responses and safety outcomes consistent with prior published data for DRV/ritonavir 800/100 mg once daily, supporting the use of DRV/c 800/150 mg once daily for future treatment of treatment-naïve and -experienced HIV-1-infected patients with no DRV resistance-associated mutations. Low rates of virologic failure secondary to resistance to antiretroviral regimens were present in these clinical studies. Most notable adverse events in the ATV studies were hyperbilirubinemia and in the DRV study rash. Small increases in serum creatinine and minimally reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate Cockcroft–Gault calculation (eGFRCG were observed in ATV/c and DRV/c clinical studies consistent with other studies evaluating elvitegravir/cobicistat/tenofovir/emtricitabine for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. These renal parameter changes occurred acutely in the first few weeks and plateaued off for the remaining study periods and are not necessarily clinically relevant. Cobicistat has numerous advantages compared to

  19. Comparative effect of fixed dose combination of Amlodipine + Bisoprolol versus Amlodipine and Bisoprolol alone on blood pressure in stage-2 essential hypertensive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirure PA,Tadvi NA, Bajait CS, Baig MS, Gade PR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Employment of low dose combinations of two antihypertensives, with different mode of action has gained acceptance worldwide for the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension. However, most studies in hypertensive disease have focused on monotherapy. The combination therapy in the treatment of hypertension is largely extrapolated from these monotherapy studies. Objectives: To study and compare the effect of amlodipine, bisoprolol and fixed dose combination of amlodipine + bisoprolol on blood pressure in stage-2 essential hypertensive patients. Methods: The present study was carried out in Department of Pharmacology in collaboration with Department of Medicine at Government Medical College and Hospital, Aurangabad. Results and Conclusion : Amlodipine + bisoprolol in fixed dose combination have showed significant blood pressure control in patients of stage-2 essential hypertension and the antihypertensive effect was greater than individual monotherapy study groups.

  20. Bioequivalence evaluation of two amlodipine salts, besylate and orotate, each in a fixed-dose combination with olmesartan in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Yun Lee,1 Jung-Ryul Kim,2,3 Jin Ah Jung,4 Wooseong Huh,2,5 Mi Young Bahng,6 Jae-Wook Ko1,2 1Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Clinical Research Design and Evaluation, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Republic of Korea; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 6Dong-A ST Co., Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: A fixed-dose combination of amlodipine and olmesartan is used to treat high blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is not sufficiently controlled with either drug alone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of two fixed-dose combinations, ie, amlodipine orotate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg and amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg, in healthy subjects. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-sequence, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 30 healthy adult volunteers. Blood samples were collected for up to 72 hours post-dose in each period. Safety data included the results of physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, vital signs, an electrocardiogram, and adverse events. For both amlodipine and olmesartan, the 90% confidence intervals for the geometric mean ratios of AUClast and time to peak plasma concentration fell within the bioequivalence acceptance criteria. The two fixed-dose combinations showed similar safety profiles. Amlodipine orotate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg was bioequivalent to amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg. Keywords: amlodipine orotate, amlodipine besylate, olmesartan medoxomil, fixed-dose combination, bioequivalence

  1. Profile of a fixed-dose combination of tiotropium/olodaterol and its potential in the treatment of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muruganandan S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanjeevan Muruganandan,1 Lata Jayaram2,3 1Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, 2Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Western Health, 3University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive, debilitating disorder that results in frequent exacerbations and impacts quality of life. It represents a growing burden of health care cost, both from societal and economic perspectives. Short- and long-acting bronchodilators remain the mainstay of therapy in COPD patients. New fixed-dose combination inhalers with novel pharmacological combinations of long-acting β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists and delivered once-daily through a variety of devices are currently being developed and licensed for the treatment of COPD. There is mounting research suggesting that combining a fixed dose of a β2-agonist and a muscarinic antagonist achieves better bronchodilation and clinical outcomes compared with either agent alone. These once-daily dosing inhalers are anticipated to impact favorably on patient preference and compliance. This review examines the fixed-dose combination of tiotropium bromide and olodaterol delivered by a Respimat® Soft Mist™ inhaler at doses of 2.5/5 µg and 5/5 µg in moderate-to-very-severe COPD, and its potential role in COPD compared with other long-acting β2-agonist with long-acting muscarinic antagonist combinations and delivery devices. Keywords: fixed-dose combination inhalers, olodaterol, tiotropium bromide, COPD treatment, long-acting β2-agonists, long-acting muscarinic antagonist

  2. Lack of asthma and rhinitis control in general practitioner-managed patients prescribed fixed-dose combination therapy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Kritikos, Vicky; Carter, Victoria; Yan, Kwok Yin; Armour, Carol; Ryan, Dermot; Price, David

    2017-09-08

    The first aim of the study (i) assess the current asthma status of general-practitioner-managed patients receiving regular fixed-dose combination inhaled corticosteroid and long-acting beta 2 agonist (FDC ICS/LABA) therapy and (ii) explore patients' perceptions of asthma control and attitudes/behaviors regarding preventer inhaler use. A cross-sectional observational study of Australian adults with a current physician diagnosis of asthma receiving ≥2 prescriptions of FDC ICS/LABA therapy in the previous year, who were recruited through general practice to receive a structured in-depth asthma review between May 2012 and January 2014. Descriptive statistics and Chi-Square tests for independence were used for associations across asthma control levels. Only 11.5% of the patients had controlled asthma based on guideline-defined criteria. Contrarily, 66.5% of the patients considered their asthma to be well controlled. Incidence of acute asthma exacerbations in the previous year was 26.5% and 45.6% of the patients were without a diagnosis of rhinitis. Asthma medication use and inhaler technique were sub-optimal; only 41.0% of the preventer users reported everyday use. The side effects of medication were common and more frequently reported among uncontrolled and partially controlled patients. The study revealed the extent to which asthma management needs to be improved in this patient cohort and the numerous unmet needs regarding the current state of asthma care. Not only there is a need for continuous education of patients, but also education of health care practitioners to better understand the way in which patient's perceptions impact on asthma management practices, incorporating these findings into clinical decision making.

  3. Fluctuation factors of ambient dose rates in the vicinity of Hamaoka nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hideyuki; Ibuki, Yuko; Goto, Rensuke; Aika, Masahiro; Iki, Akio

    2004-01-01

    It is important to clearly distinguish between variations in natural ambient dose rates and those by small accidents at nuclear facilities from the viewpoint of radiation control. Therefore, we must have exact data of ambient dose rates during daily life. Ambient dose rates are influenced by meteorological conditions as well as geographical and geological features. We investigated the factors which cause fluctuations in ambient dose rates on fine and rainy days around Hamaoka nuclear power plant in Shizuoka Prefecture. Fluctuations in ambient dose rates depended on the concentration of radon daughters on fine days, whereas on rainy days they depended on gamma-rays from the uranium-series. Contributions of gamma-rays from the thorium-series and potassium-40 to fluctuations in ambient dose rates were not observed. (author)

  4. Calculated neutron dose rates and flux densities from implantable californium-252 point and line sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A; Schwartz, B; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-01-01

    The results of neutron-transport flux-density and dose rate calculations for implantable Californium-252 point and line sources in essentially infinite tissue-equivalent material are presented. The point-source flux densities were obtained from a discrete ordinates calculation, and the point dose rates were established by multiplying the flux densities by their appropriate kerma factors. Line-source dose rates were evaluated by integrating the point dose rates over the length of the line source. Dose-rate data are given within a 20 X 20-cm region from the source center for source lengths of 1.5, 2, and 3 cm. The dose rates established by these calculations showed good agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation. Detailed point-source flux-density data as a function of energy and position are also given.

  5. Transport calculations of gamma ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    Gamma flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line source dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  6. Dosimetric accuracy at low monitor unit setting in electron beams at different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravikumar, M.; Ravichandran, R.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Sharma, Anil K.

    1999-01-01

    As electron beam with low monitor unit (LMU) settings are used in some dosimetric studies, better understanding of accuracy in dose delivery at LMU setting is necessary. The dose measurements were carried out with 0.6 cm 3 farmer type ion chamber at d max in a polystyrene phantom. Measurements at different MUs show that the dose linearity ratio (DLR) increases as the MU setting decreases below 20 MU and DLRs are found to increase when the incident electron beams have higher energies. The increase in DLR is minimum for low dose rate setting for all five electron beam energies (6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV). As the variation in dose delivery is machine-specific, a detailed study should be conducted before the low MU setting is implemented. Since errors in dose delivery are high at higher dose rates, low dose rate may be better at low MU unit setting. (author)

  7. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  8. Distribution of dose rates due to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Susumu

    2011-01-01

    A number of dose rate data taken after the Fukushima Daiichi reactor accident occurred have been collected through official websites of prefectural governments. Subtracting natural background dose rates from these data, contributions due to fallout alone were evaluated. A train-borne survey was carried out to verify the accuracy of the contour map. The dose rate variation pattern obtained by the survey coincided fairly well with that of the map. (author)

  9. REVEALING THE VOLUME CONVERSION AND USAGE OF FIXED ASSETS IN THE COMMERCIAL RATE OF RETURN AND OF RESOURCES CONSUMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin CĂRUNTU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article concerns the presentation of the analysis methodology of the volume conversion and the usage of fixed assets in the commercial rate of return and in the return rate on resources consumed. By realising this article we sought to highlight a number of methodological issues concerning the influencing factors of the two rates of return taking into account the factors that make the turnover and total liabilities. The conversion of the volume and use of assets is intended to guide the company's financial and economic activity to achieve a profit as higher as possible. This has however a number of sides to be analyzed based on two basic elements that put their stamp on the commercial rate of return and on resources consumed, turnover and total expenditure afferent to turnover. The correlation between the volume and the use of fixed assets with the commercial rate of return and the return rate on resources consumed is a crucial objective of economic efficiency in the performances of economic efficiency of the company.

  10. Leuco-crystal-violet micelle gel dosimeters: Component effects on dose-rate dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J. C.; Katz, E. A. B.; Alexander, K. M.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2017-05-01

    Designed experiments were performed to produce empirical models for the dose sensitivity, initial absorbance, and dose-rate dependence respectively for leucocrystal violet (LCV) micelle gel dosimeters containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE). Previous gels of this type showed dose-rate dependent behaviour, producing an ∼18% increase in dose sensitivity between dose rates of 100 and 600 cGy min-1. Our models predict that the dose rate dependence can be reduced by increasing the concentration of TCE, CTAB and LCV. Increasing concentrations of LCV and CTAB produces a significant increase in dose sensitivity with a corresponding increase in initial absorbance. An optimization procedure was used to determine a nearly dose-rate independent gel which maintained high sensitivity and low initial absorbance. This gel which contains 33 mM CTAB, 1.25 mM LCV, and 96 mM TCE in 25 mM trichloroacetic acid and 4 wt% gelatin showed an increase in dose sensitivity of only 4% between dose rates of 100 and 600 cGy min-1, and provides an 80% greater dose sensitivity compared to Jordan’s standard gels with similar initial absorbance.

  11. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  12. Estimation of outdoor and indoor effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from Gamma dose rates in Gonabad, Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafaria, R.; Zarghania, H.; Mohammadia, A., E-mail: rvzreza@gmail.com [Paramedical faculty, Birjand University of Medical Sciences, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Background gamma irradiation in the indoor and outdoor environments is a major concern in the world. The study area was Gonabad city. Three stations and buildings for background radiation measurement of outdoor and indoor were randomly selected and the Geiger-Muller detector (X5C plus) was used. All dose rates on display of survey meter were recorded and mean of all data in each station and buildings was computed and taken as measured dose rate of that particular station. The average dose rates of background radiation were 84.2 nSv/h for outdoor and 108.6 nSv/h for indoor, maximum and minimum dose rates were 88.9 nSv/h and 77.7 nSv/h for outdoor measurements and 125.4 nSv/h and 94.1 nSv/h for indoor measurements, respectively. Results show that the annual effective dose is 0.64 mSv, which compare to global level of the annual effective dose 0.48 mSv is high. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risk was 2.24×10{sup -3} , indicated that it is large compared to the world average value of 0.25×10{sup -3}. (author)

  13. Spent Fuel Pool Dose Rate Calculations Using Point Kernel and Hybrid Deterministic-Stochastic Shielding Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, M.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents comparison of the Krsko Power Plant simplified Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) dose rates using different computational shielding methodologies. The analysis was performed to estimate limiting gamma dose rates on wall mounted level instrumentation in case of significant loss of cooling water. The SFP was represented with simple homogenized cylinders (point kernel and Monte Carlo (MC)) or cuboids (MC) using uranium, iron, water, and dry-air as bulk region materials. The pool is divided on the old and new section where the old one has three additional subsections representing fuel assemblies (FAs) with different burnup/cooling time (60 days, 1 year and 5 years). The new section represents the FAs with the cooling time of 10 years. The time dependent fuel assembly isotopic composition was calculated using ORIGEN2 code applied to the depletion of one of the fuel assemblies present in the pool (AC-29). The source used in Microshield calculation is based on imported isotopic activities. The time dependent photon spectra with total source intensity from Microshield multigroup point kernel calculations was then prepared for two hybrid deterministic-stochastic sequences. One is based on SCALE/MAVRIC (Monaco and Denovo) methodology and another uses Monte Carlo code MCNP6.1.1b and ADVANTG3.0.1. code. Even though this model is a fairly simple one, the layers of shielding materials are thick enough to pose a significant shielding problem for MC method without the use of effective variance reduction (VR) technique. For that purpose the ADVANTG code was used to generate VR parameters (SB cards in SDEF and WWINP file) for MCNP fixed-source calculation using continuous energy transport. ADVATNG employs a deterministic forward-adjoint transport solver Denovo which implements CADIS/FW-CADIS methodology. Denovo implements a structured, Cartesian-grid SN solver based on the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe parallel transport sweep algorithm across x-y domain blocks. This was first

  14. The influence of dose fractionation and dose rate on normal tissue responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of responses of a variety of normal tissues in animals to fractionated irradiations has been made with the aim of developing a formalism for the prediction of tolerance doses as a function of the dose per fraction and the overall treatment time. An important feature of the formalism is that it is directly based on radiological insights and therefore provides a logical concept to account for the diversity of tissue responses. (Auth.)

  15. Determination and Analysis of Ar-41 Dose Rate Characteristic at Thermal Column of Kartini Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widarto; Sardjono, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Determination and Analysis of Ar-41 activity dose rate at the thermal column after shutdown of Kartini reactor has been done. Based on evaluation and analysis concluded that external dose rate is D = 1.606x10 -6 Sv/second and internal dose rate is 3.429x10 -1 1 Sv/second. It means that if employee work at the column thermal area for 15 minutes a day, 5 days a week, in a year will be 0.376 Sv still under dose rate limit i.e. 0.5 Sv, so that the column thermal facility is safely area. (author)

  16. Effect of Dose Rate on Radiation Pre vulcanized Natural Rubber Latex Tensile Strength and Physical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofian Ibrahim; Mohd Noorwadi Mat Lazim; Syuhada Ramli

    2015-01-01

    Comparison on effect of irradiation dose rate on physical and mechanical properties of RVNRL was carried out in RAYMINTEX and Sinagama plant with dose rate at 0.23 kGy/ hour and 2.00 kGy/ hour respectively. The samples were irradiated at 12, 15 and 17 kGy. Results from the study showed irradiation dose rate does not significantly affect on physical properties of RVNRL but affects its tensile strength approximately at 10-15 %. Therefore it can be concluded that high irradiation dose rates will produced RVNRL with better tensile strength. (author)

  17. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, Anita [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)]. E-mail: krokosz@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Koziczak, Renata [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Gonciarz, Marta [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2006-01-15

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min{sup -1} in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  18. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect

  19. Effects of low dose rate irradiation on induction of myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the induction of myeloid leukemia and other kinds of neoplasias in C3H male mice irradiated at several dose rate levels. We compared the incidence of neoplasias among these groups, obtained dose and dose rate effectiveness factors (DDREF) for myeloid leukemia. C3H/He male mice were exposed to whole body gamma-ray irradiation at 8 weeks of age. All mice were maintained for their entire life span and teh pathologically examined after their death. Radiation at a high dose-rate of 882 mGy/min (group H), a medium dose-rate of 95.6 mGy/min (group M), and low dose-rates of 0.298 mGy/min (group L-A), 0.067 mGy/min (group L-B) or 0.016 mGy/min (group L-C) were delivered from 137 Cs sources. The mice in group L were irradiated continuously for 22 hours daily up to total doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 Gy over a period of 3 days to 200 days. As for the induction of neoplasias, myeloid leukemia developed significantly more frequently in irradiated groups than in unirradiated groups. The time distribution of mice dying from myeloid leukemia did not show a difference between groups H and L. The incidence of myeloid leukemia showed a greater increase in the high dose-rate groups than in the low and medium dose-rate groups in the dose range over 2 Gy, it also showed significant increases in the groups irradiated with 1 Gy of various dose rate, but the difference between these groups was not clear. These dose effect curves had their highest values on each curve at about 3 Gy. We obtained DDREF values of 2-3 by linear fittings for their dose response curves of dose ranges in which leukemia incidences were increasing. (author)

  20. Optimum design for the primary cooling system in BWRs to control shutdown radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Saito, Tatsuya; Uchida, Shunsuke; Izumiya, Masakiyo.

    1982-01-01

    The reduction of radiation dose rate at the time of shutdown is an important task for smoothly performing the regular inspection and maintenance works in nuclear power plants as the number of those plants in operation has increased. Hitachi Ltd. has investigated the industrially applicable measures to reduce dose rate to suppress the exposure dose per year in 1100 MWe class BWR nuclear power plants below 200 Man-Rem. The exposure dose in normal checking works during a regular inspection is regarded to be macroscopically dependent on the dose rate of piping in recirculation system. Thus, it was found that the above target can be achieved by suppressing the dose rate on piping surface to 30 mR/h. For further reduction if iron crud and 60 Co ions contributing to the increase of dose rate, in addition to the oxygen injection into the feed water system and the duplicated condensate purification system, the use of corrosion-resistant steel and low cobalt material has been attempted. However, high temperature water to be filtrated can not be passed through the purification system because it employs ion exchange resin. Therefore, the optimum capacity is selected for the purification system in view of the reduction of dose rate and plant thermal efficiency. Hitachi Ltd. recommends the application of this system, considering the evaluation of contribution by the code predicting dose rate increase and estimating economy. The above measures will achieve the exposure dose target of 200 Man-Rem/year. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. A comparative study of fixed dose of Tamsulosin with finasteride vs Tamsulosin with dutasteride in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Mohanty

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety and tolerability of Dutasteride vs Finasteride in a fixed dose combination, with a uro-selective a-blocker Tamsulosin, in the management of symptomatic BPH associated with LUTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 105 males between 40-80 years, clinically diagnosed as Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH having a baseline evaluation of their IPSS, UFR, PSA, LFT, KFT, sex health, ultrasound of prostate and PVUV, were randomized to receive a fixed dose combination therapy of Tamsulosin (0.4 mg with Finasteride (5 mg, vs Tamsulosin (0.4 mg with Dutasteride (0.5 mg, daily for six consecutive months. Follow- up at the end of the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th and 24th week was done with IPSS, UFR, PSA, ultrasound of Prostate, PVUV and sex health. RESULTS: There were five dropouts, three from the Finasteride arm and two from Dutasteride arm, leaving a total of 100 patients for the final evaluation. Patients in both the groups showed improvement in their symptoms score and urine flow rate from the baseline, but those with the Dutasteride combination not only showed much better improvement in their symptoms score and urine flow, but were also relieved of their obstructive symptoms earlier (10-14 days than seen in the Finasteride group (24-35 days. None of the patients had acute retention of urine (AUR during the trial. The post void urine volume was decreased more in the Dutasteride group, than in patients with Finasteride. Sexual dysfunction incidence was same in both the groups. Approximately 50% reduction in the PSA level was seen in both the groups, while LFT did not show significant difference from the baseline, in either group. Both the drugs were well tolerated, with the patient′s good compliance and with no drop-out due to adverse effects. CONCLUSION : A combination of a-adrenergic blocker and 5-ARI is the best therapeutic option for medical management of BPH as it is safe, effective and well tolerated

  2. Experimental analysis of the influence of air-flow rate on wheat straw combustion in a fixed bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čepić Zoran M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass in the form of crop residues represents a significant energy source in regions whose development is based on agricultural production. Among many possibilities of utilizing biomass for energy generation, combustion is the most common. With the aim of improving and optimizing the combustion process of crop residues, an experimental rig for straw combustion in a fixed bed was constructed. This paper gives a brief review of working characteristics of the experimental rig, as well as the results for three different measuring regimes, with the purpose to investigate the effect of air-flow rate on the wheat straw combustion in a fixed bed. For all three regimes analysed in this paper bulk density of the bed was the same, 60 kg/m3, combustion air was without preheating and air-flow rates were: 1152, 1872, and 2124 kg/m2h. The effect of air-flow rate on the ignition rate, burning rate, temperature profile of the bed and flue gas composition were analysed. It was concluded that in the regime with the lowest air-flow rate progress of combustion had two clearly conspicuous stages: the ignition propagation stage and the char and unburned material oxidation stage. At the highest air-flow rate the entire combustion occurred mostly in a single stage, due to increased air supply oxidized the char, remaining above the ignition front, simultaneously with the reactions of volatiles. Despite that, the optimal combustion process, the highest value of ignition rate, burning rate, and bed temperature was achieved with air-flow rate of 1872 kg/m2h.

  3. Low-dose-rate total lymphoid irradiation: a new method of rapid immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.E.; de Silva, S.M.; Rachman, D.B.; Order, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) has been successful in inducing immunosuppression in experimental and clinical applications. However, both the experimental and clinical utility of TLI are hampered by the prolonged treatment courses required (23 days in rats and 30-60 days in humans). Low-dose-rate TLI has the potential of reducing overall treatment time while achieving comparable immunosuppression. This study examines the immunosuppressive activity and treatment toxicity of conventional-dose-rate (23 days) vs low-dose-rate (2-7 days) TLI. Seven groups of Lewis rats were given TLI with 60Co. One group was treated at conventional-dose-rates (80-110 cGy/min) and received 3400 cGy in 17 fractions over 23 days. Six groups were treated at low-dose-rate (7 cGy/min) and received total doses of 800, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, and 3400 cGy over 2-7 days. Rats treated at conventional-dose-rates over 23 days and at low-dose-rate over 2-7 days tolerated radiation with minimal toxicity. The level of immunosuppression was tested using allogeneic (Brown-Norway) skin graft survival. Control animals retained allogeneic skin grafts for a mean of 14 days (range 8-21 days). Conventional-dose-rate treated animals (3400 cGy in 23 days) kept their grafts 60 days (range 50-66 days) (p less than .001). Low-dose-rate treated rats (800 to 3400 cGy total dose over 2-7 days) also had prolongation of allogeneic graft survival times following TLI with a dose-response curve established. The graft survival time for the 3400 cGy low-dose-rate group (66 days, range 52-78 days) was not significantly different from the 3400 cGy conventional-dose-rate group (p less than 0.10). When the total dose given was equivalent, low-dose-rate TLI demonstrated an advantage of reduced overall treatment time compared to conventional-dose-rate TLI (7 days vs. 23 days) with no increase in toxicity

  4. Use of reduced dose rate when treating moving tumors using dynamic IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Laurence; Wagar, Matthew; Bogdanov, Madeleine; Ionascu, Dan; Schofield, Deborah; Allen, Aaron; Berbeco, Ross; Lingos, Tania

    2010-09-20

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of dose rate on discrepancies between expected and delivered dose caused by the interplay effect. Fifteen separate dynamic IMRT plans and five hybrid IMRT plans were created for five patients (three IMRT plans and one hybrid IMRT plan per patient). The impact of motion on the delivered dose was evaluated experimentally for each treatment field for different dose rates (200 and 400 MU/min), and for a range of target amplitudes and periods. The maximum dose discrepancy for dynamic IMRT fields was 18.5% and 10.3% for dose rates of 400 and 200 MU/min, respectively. The maximum dose discrepancy was larger than this for hybrid plans, but the results were similar when weighted by the contribution of the IMRT fields. The percentage of fields for which 98% of the target never experienced a 5% or 10% dose discrepancy increased when the dose rate was reduced from 400 MU/min to 200 MU/min. For amplitudes up to 2 cm, reducing the dose rate to 200 MU/min is effective in keeping daily dose discrepancies for each field within 10%.

  5. Vitamin D production depends on ultraviolet-B dose but not on dose rate: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, Morten K B; Schmedes, Anne V; Philipsen, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    exposed. Skin pigmentation and 25(OH)D were measured before and after the irradiations. The increase in 25(OH)D after UV-B exposure (adjusted for baseline 25(OH)D) was positively correlated with the UV-B dose (P=0.001; R(2) =0.176) but not to dose rate (1-20 min). 25(OH)D increased in response to four UV...

  6. Simple approximation for estimating centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overcamp, T.J.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple approximation for estimating the centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume was developed. To simplify the integration of the dose integral, this approach makes use of the Gaussian cloud concentration distribution. The solution is expressed in terms of the I1 and I2 integrals which were developed for estimating long-term dose due to a sector-averaged Gaussian plume. Estimates of tissue absorbed dose rates for the new approach and for the uniform cloud model were compared to numerical integration of the dose integral over a Gaussian plume distribution

  7. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  8. Effect of gamma-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Pradeep K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Department of Management Science, U.P. Technical University, Lucknow 226021 (India); Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Ch. C.S. University, Meerut 200005 (India); Gupta, B.L. [CH3/56 Kendriya Vihar, Kharghar, Sector-11, Navi Mumbai-410 210 (India); Guha, Sujoy K., E-mail: guha_sk@yahoo.co [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of gamma-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min gamma-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy gamma-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  9. Effect of γ-dose rate and total dose interrelation on the polymeric hydrogel: A novel injectable male contraceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pradeep K.; Jha, Rakhi; Gupta, B. L.; Guha, Sujoy K.

    2010-05-01

    Functional necessity to use a particular range of dose rate and total dose of γ-initiated polymerization to manufacture a novel polymeric hydrogel RISUG ® (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance) made of styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), for its broad biomedical application explores new dimension of research. The present work involves 16 irradiated samples. They were tested by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, etc. to see the interrelation effect of gamma dose rates (8.25, 17.29, 20.01 and 25.00 Gy/min) and four sets of doses (1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 kGy) on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution and porosity analysis of the biopolymeric drug RISUG ®. The results of randomized experiment indicated that a range of 18-24 Gy/min γ-dose rate and 2.0-2.4 kGy γ-total doses is suitable for the desirable in vivo performance of the contraceptive copolymer.

  10. The Influence of Used Construction Material and Its Thickness on the Neutron Dose Rate Around the Linear Accelerator - Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krpan, I; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Zivkovic, A.; Faj, D.; Ivkovic, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since linear accelerators for medical radiotherapy do not have active radioactive sources it makes them adequate from the radioprotection point of view. However, when operating at the energy higher than 10 MeV, they can become a source of unwanted neutron radiation in the giant dipole resonance reaction between the photon beam and the accelerator head material. Neutrons created in this reaction are almost isotropic in direction with an energy range between 700 keV and 1 MeV. During the accelerator installation and different phases of the construction work around the accelerator, a neutron dose rate at several important locations was investigated. Both passive (solid state nuclear track etched detectors - CR 39 and/or LR-115 with the 10B foil) and active detectors (Thermo Biorem FHT 752) were used. A higher photon dose rate was measured around the accelerator facility. An effective photon dose reduction was achieved using steel plates. However, this was the secondary source of neutrons in the reaction between the photons and steel plates, since higher values were measured. Neutron reduction was done by additional layers of barite concrete. A very conservative assessment of the effective dose was done for the medical personnel inside the control room. At the accelerator extreme operating regime (fixed accelerator direction - gantry angle, highest energy possible used), the neutron dose rate in the control room of 12 μSv/h was measured. Knowing the number of working days and number of patients per technician (per day), an exposure to the neutron dose of 1,1 mSv per year was calculated.(author)

  11. Conventional High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With Concomitant Complementary IMRT Boost: A Novel Approach for Improving Cervical Tumor Dose Coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Jun; Kim, Robert Y.; Elassal, Shaaban; Lin Huiyi; Shen Sui

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of combining conventional high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with a concomitant complementary intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost for improved target coverage in cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Six patients with cervical cancer underwent conventional HDR (C-HDR) treatment. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired with a CT/MRI-compatible applicator in place. The clinical target volumes (CTVs), defined as the gross target volume with a 3-mm margin and the uterus, were delineated on the CT scans, along with the organs at risk (OARs). The IMRT plans were optimized to generate dose distributions complementing those of C-HDR to cover the CTV while maintaining low doses to the OARs (IMRT-HDR). For comparison, dwell-weight optimized HDR (O-HDR) plans were also generated to cover the CTV and spare the OARs. The three treatment techniques (C-HDR, O-HDR, and IMRT-HDR) were compared. The percentage of volume receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V 95 ) was used to evaluate dose coverage to the CTV, and the minimal doses in the 2.0-cm 3 volume receiving the greatest dose were calculated to compare the doses to the OARs. Results: The C-HDR technique provided very poor CTV coverage in 5 cases (V 95 95 ≥96.9%), it resulted in unacceptably high doses to the OARs in all 6 cases and unsatisfactory coverage to the whole CTV in 3 cases. IMRT-HDR not only yielded substantially improved CTV coverage (average V 95 = 95.3%), but also kept the doses to the bladder and rectum reasonably low. Conclusion: Compared with C-HDR and O-HDR, concomitant IMRT boost complementary to C-HDR not only provided excellent CTV coverage, but also maintained reasonably low doses to the OARs

  12. Use of virtual reality to estimate radiation dose rates in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Couto, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    Operators in nuclear plants receive radiation doses during several different operation procedures. A training program capable of simulating these operation scenarios will be useful in several ways, helping the planning of operational procedures so as to reduce the doses received by workers, and to minimize operations' times. It can provide safe virtual operation training, visualization of radiation dose rates, and estimation of doses received by workers. Thus, a virtual reality application, a free game engine, has been adapted to achieve the goals of this project. Simulation results for Argonauta research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear are shown in this paper. A database of dose rate measurements, previously performed by the radiological protection service, has been used to display the dose rate distribution in the region of interest. The application enables the user to walk in the virtual scenario, displaying at all times the dose accumulated by the avatar. (author)

  13. The effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and species on tissue and blood levels of benzene metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.F.; Sabourin, P.J.; Bechtold, W.E.; Griffith, W.C.; Medinsky, M.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Lucier, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were completed in F344/N rats and B6C3F 1 mice to determine the effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and rodent species on formation of total and individual benzene metabolites. Oral doses of 50 mg/kg or higher saturated the capacity for benzene metabolism in both rats and mice, resulting in an increased proportion of the administered dose being exhaled as benzene. The saturating air concentration for benzene metabolism during 6-hr exposures was between 130 and 900 ppm. At the highest exposure concentration, rats exhaled approximately half of the internal dose retained at the end of the 6-hr exposure as benzene; mice exhaled only 15% as benzene. Mice were able to convert more of the inhaled benzene to metabolites than were rats. In addition, mice metabolized more of the benzene by pathways leading to the putative toxic metabolites, benzoquinone and muconaldehyde, than did rats. In both rats and mice, the effect of increasing dose, administered orally or by inhalation, was to increase the proportion of the total metabolites that were the products of detoxification pathways relative to the products of pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. This indicates low-affinity, high-capacity pathways for detoxification and high-affinity, low-capacity pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. If the results of rodent studied performed at high doses were used to assess the health risk at low-dose exposures to benzene, the toxicity of benzene would be underestimated

  14. High dose-per-pulse electron beam dosimetry: Usability and dose-rate independence of EBT3 Gafchromic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Maud; Petersson, Kristoffer; Buchillier, Thierry; Germond, Jean-François; Durán, Maria Teresa; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François O; Bailat, Claude

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of Gafchromic EBT3 films for reference dose measurements in the beam of a prototype high dose-per-pulse linear accelerator (linac), capable of delivering electron beams with a mean dose-rate (Ḋ m ) ranging from 0.07 to 3000 Gy/s and a dose-rate in pulse (Ḋ p ) of up to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. To do this, we evaluated the overall uncertainties in EBT3 film dosimetry as well as the energy and dose-rate dependence of their response. Our dosimetric system was composed of EBT3 Gafchromic films in combination with a flatbed scanner and was calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to primary standard. All sources of uncertainties in EBT3 dosimetry were carefully analyzed using irradiations at a clinical radiotherapy linac. Energy dependence was investigated with the same machine by acquiring and comparing calibration curves for three different beam energies (4, 8 and 12 MeV), for doses between 0.25 and 30 Gy. Ḋ m dependence was studied at the clinical linac by changing the pulse repetition frequency (f) of the beam in order to vary Ḋ m between 0.55 and 4.40 Gy/min, while Ḋ p dependence was probed at the prototype machine for Ḋ p ranging from 7 × 10 3 to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. Ḋ p dependence was first determined by studying the correlation between the dose measured by films and the charge of electrons measured at the exit of the machine by an induction torus. Furthermore, we compared doses from the films to independently calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) that have been reported as being dose-rate independent up to such high dose-rates. We report that uncertainty below 4% (k = 2) can be achieved in the dose range between 3 and 17 Gy. Results also demonstrated that EBT3 films did not display any detectable energy dependence for electron beam energies between 4 and 12 MeV. No Ḋ m dependence was found either. In addition, we obtained excellent consistency between films and TLDs over the entire Ḋ p

  15. Transperineal high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy in the management of gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, Jun; Hara, Ryuseke; Kozuka, Takuyou; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakajima, Kaori; Shibata, Kouji; Abe, Yoshihisa; Fuse, Masashi; Ito, Masashi [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology

    2003-11-01

    Background: High-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a newly introduced modality, and its role in the management of gynecologic malignancies remains to be studied. Clinical experience in high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy was retrospectively investigated. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with primary and nine with recurrent gynecologic malignancies underwent high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy with/without external-beam irradiation. Fractional dose of the high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy ranged between 4 and 6 Gy with total doses of 15-54 Gy. Interstitial irradiation was performed twice daily with an interval of > 6 h. Results: 2-year local control rate was 75% for primary treatment and 47% for treatment of recurrence (p = 0.46). Maximum tumor size had a statistically significant impact on local control (p < 0.002). Grade 2 and 4 late complications were seen in five patients, and the incidence was significantly higher in patients with a larger volume enclosed by the prescribed fractional dose of high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 2 and 4 complications at 18 months was 78% and 0% with a volume > 100 cm{sup 3} and {<=} 100 cm{sup 3}, respectively (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Although high-dose-rate interstitial radiation therapy is a promising modality, it must be applied cautiously to patients with bulky tumors because of the high incidence of serious complications. (orig.)

  16. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) of Kelantan State, Malaysia. Relationship between the geological formation and soil type to radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garba, N.N.; Gabdo, H.T.; Federal College of Education, Yola

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates (TGRD) of Kelantan State were measured in situ using a portable [NaI(TI)] micro roentgen (μR) survey meter. The TGRD rates ranged between 44 and 500 nGy h -1 with a mean value of 209 ± 8 nGy h -1 . The distribution of these measurements in various districts of the state shows the statistically the influence of geology and soil types on the dose rate values. The data obtained could be used in formulating safety standard and radiological guidelines. (author)

  17. Cardiovascular disorders associated with naloxone monotherapy and in fixed-dose combination with opioids: Data from international safety surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amneet; Kao, David; Mehler, Philip S; Haigney, Mark C P; Krantz, Mori J

    2016-06-01

    The widespread use of opioids has resulted in sharp rise of associated complications, particularly opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Opioid receptor antagonists have been proposed to treat OIC, but could precipitate rapid opioid withdrawal. As cardiovascular safety data are lacking, we assessed disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiac events associated with naloxone across large, international pharmacovigilance systems. Post-marketing data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and FDA Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) were evaluated for naloxone and the synthetic opioids oxycodone and tilidine. The proportional reporting ratio (PRR), a measure of reporting frequency analogous to an odds ratio, was assessed. The primary outcome was reporting frequency of the MedDRA System Organ Class (SOC) 'Cardiac Disorders' for naloxone alone and in fixed-dose combination with opioids. Opioid mono-preparations served as quasi-experimental controls. A PRR greater than 2.0 was considered significant. In total, 14,827,374 million adverse drug event reports were reviewed. In WHO, there were 1757 reports of SOC cardiac disorders among 10,866 total reports for oxycodone (PRR 2.38 [95% CI 2.28-2.49, χ(2)=1504]). For oxycodone-naloxone, there were 43/453 reports of SOC cardiac disorders (PRR 1.45 [95% CI 1.09-1.92, χ(2)=6.4]). For the synthetic opioid tilidine there were 13/179 reports (PRR 1.13 [95% CI 0.67-1.91, χ(2)=0.2]) and for tilidine-naloxone, 30/505 reports (PRR 0.92 [95% CI 0.65-1.31, χ(2)=0.2]). In FAERS, the PRR for SOC cardiac disorders was 0.95 [95% CI 0.89-1.01, χ(2)=2.1] for naloxone (all administration routes) and 1.16 [95% CI 0.93-1.45, χ(2)=1.3] for naloxone (oral only). In comparison, the PRR was 1.66 [95% CI 1.63-1.69, χ(2)=4278] for oxycodone and 1.52 [CI 1.28-1.80, χ(2)=1500] for oxycodone-naloxone. Available pharmacovigilance data do not suggest disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiovascular events for opioid antagonists used to treat

  18. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. (paper)

  19. Dose rate range extension of the calibration of dosemeters at LNMRI, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, T.S.; Carlos, M.T.; Ramos, M.M.O.

    2009-01-01

    The present work has an objective the implantation of a experimental arrange for application of essays of instrument calibration for measurement of low dose rate, which measure rate less than 10 μSv/h

  20. Analysis of dosimetric leaf gap variation on dose rate variation for dynamic IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Sic; Park, Ju Kyeong; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Yang Su; Lee, Sun Young; Cha, Seok Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the position accuracy of the MLC. This study analyzed the variations of the dosimetric leaf gap(DLG) and MLC transmission factor to reflect the location of the MLC leaves according to the dose rate variation for dynamic IMRT. We used the 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray beams from linear accelerator with a Millennium 120 MLC system. We measured the variation of DLG and MLC transmission factor at depth of 10 cm for the water phantom by varying the dose rate to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min using the CC13 and FC-65G chambers. For 6 MV X-ray beam, a result of measuring based on a dose rate 400 MU/min by varying the dose rate to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min of the difference rate was respectively -2.59, -1.89, 0.00, -0.58, -2.89%. For 10 MV X-ray beam, the difference rate was respectively 2.52, -1.69, 0.00, +1.28, -1.98%. The difference rate of MLC transmission factor was in the range of about 1% of the measured values at the two types of energy and all of the dose rates. This study evaluated the variation of DLG and MLC transmission factor for the dose rate variation for dynamic IMRT. The difference of the MLC transmission factor according to the dose rate variation is negligible, but, the difference of the DLG was found to be large. Therefore, when randomly changing the dose rate dynamic IMRT, it may significantly affect the dose delivered to the tumor. Unless you change the dose rate during dynamic IMRT, it is thought that is to be the more accurate radiation therapy.

  1. Verification of radiation dose to a and b position at cervix during low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy in bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Begur, M.

    2001-01-01

    A manual low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy consists two sets viz. 440 mCi (tandem 120,40,40, 40, 40 and ovoids 40, 40 mCi each) and 360 mCi ( tandem 120, 40, 40 mCi and ovoids 40, 40 Mci each) having the dose rates at A were 155.2 cGy/hr and 140.8 cGy/hr. respectively on June 1996) was supplied by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India and are being used in the Delta Medical Centre Limited, Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh for gynecological insertion. BARC also supplied the operation manual quoting the dose at point A and B of cervix of the patient only for straight uterine tubes and separation between vaginal ovoids of 2, 3 and 4 cm. BARC also mentioned that the dose at A and B are within 1-2 % of the mean dose. Manual calculation was done to compare the dose at point A and B for ten intracavitary insertions in the hospital to compare those with the value supplied by the BARC. It was found that the dose varied at point A from +0.46% to +9.11% for eight patients and -3.4% and -5.96% for two patients with the quoted value. Dose at B varied from +0.59% to 9.8% for nine patients and -10.94% for one patient with the quoted value supplied by the supplier. This is not unusual because the tandem used for treatment were with different angles such as, 15 degree, 30 degree etc. as per anatomy of the patient. Moreover, the tolerance dose of the fornix region is much more higher (about 140 Gy) than that of the other critical organs. Overall prognosis of the patients, treated so far, using this manual brachytherapy and performing manual calculation were found to satisfactory. So, the result shows a good result with the manual treatment planning

  2. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  3. A fixed-dose 24-hour regimen of artesunate plus sulfamethoxypyrazine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Ishag; Magzoub, Mamoun; Osman, Maha E

    2006-01-01

    -sulfamethoxypyrazine-pyrimethamine (AS+SMP f) administered at time intervals of 12 hours for a 24-hour therapy was compared with the efficacy of the same drug given as a loose combination (AS+SMP l) with a dose interval of 24 hours for 3 days for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan. RESULTS...... of the patients. CONCLUSION: both regimens of AS+SMP were effective and safe for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan. Due to its simplicity, the fixed dose one-day treatment regimen may improve compliance and therefore may be the preferred choice....

  4. Independent verification of the delivered dose in High-Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portillo, P.; Feld, D.; Kessler, J.

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of a Quality Assurance program in Clinical Dosimetry is an independent verification of the dosimetric calculation done by the Treatment Planning System for each radiation treatment. The present paper is aimed at creating a spreadsheet for the verification of the dose recorded at a point of an implant with radioactive sources and HDR in gynecological injuries. An 192 Ir source automatic differed loading equipment, GammaMedplus model, Varian Medical System with HDR installed at the Angel H. Roffo Oncology Institute has been used. The planning system implemented for getting the dose distribution is the BraquiVision. The sources coordinates as well as those of the calculation point (Rectum) are entered into the Excel-devised verification program by assuming the existence of a point source in each one of the applicators' positions. Such calculation point has been selected as the rectum is an organ at risk, therefore determining the treatment planning. The dose verification is performed at points standing at a sources distance having at least twice the active length of such sources, so they may be regarded as point sources. Most of the sources used in HDR brachytherapy with 192 Ir have a 5 mm active length for all equipment brands. Consequently, the dose verification distance must be at least of 10 mm. (author)

  5. On the problem of non-zero word error rates for fixed-rate error correction codes in continuous variable quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Sarah J; Ong, Lawrence; Shirvanimoghaddam, Mahyar; Lance, Andrew M; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, T C

    2017-01-01

    The maximum operational range of continuous variable quantum key distribution protocols has shown to be improved by employing high-efficiency forward error correction codes. Typically, the secret key rate model for such protocols is modified to account for the non-zero word error rate of such codes. In this paper, we demonstrate that this model is incorrect: firstly, we show by example that fixed-rate error correction codes, as currently defined, can exhibit efficiencies greater than unity. Secondly, we show that using this secret key model combined with greater than unity efficiency codes, implies that it is possible to achieve a positive secret key over an entanglement breaking channel—an impossible scenario. We then consider the secret key model from a post-selection perspective, and examine the implications for key rate if we constrain the forward error correction codes to operate at low word error rates. (paper)

  6. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  7. Establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni Uranium Project, Singida. ... Tanzania Journal of Science ... The absorbed dose rate in air in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni uranium mining project located in Singida region, Tanzania, was determined so as to establish the ...

  8. Application of MCNP{trademark} to storage facility dose rate assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, W.T.; Roberts, R.R.; Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    The MCNP code is widely used in the determination of neutral particle dose rate analyses. In this paper we examine the application of MCNP to several storage facilities containing special nuclear material, SNM, wherein the neutron dose rate is the primary quantity of interest. In particular, we describe the special geometry, modeling assumptions, and physics considerations encountered in each of three applications.

  9. High turnover rates indicated by changes in the fixed N forms and their stable isotopes in Antarctic landfast sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fripiat, François; Sigman, Daniel M.; Massé, Guillaume; Tison, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    We report concentration and nitrogen and oxygen isotopic measurements of nitrate, total dissolved nitrogen, and particulate nitrogen from Antarctic landfast sea ice, covering almost the complete seasonal cycle of sea ice growth and decay (from April to November). When sea ice forms in autumn, ice algae growth depletes nitrate and accumulates organic N within the ice. Subsequent low biological activity in winter imposes minor variations in the partitioning of fixed N. In early spring, the coupling between nitrate assimilation and brine convection at the sea ice bottom traps a large amount of fixed N within sea ice, up to 20 times higher than in the underlying seawater. At this time, remineralization and nitrification also accelerate, yielding nitrate concentrations up to 5 times higher than in seawater. Nitrate δ15N and δ18O are both elevated, indicating a near-balance between nitrification and nitrate assimilation. These findings require high microbially mediated turnover rates for the large fixed N pools, including nitrate. When sea ice warms in the spring, ice algae grow through the full thickness of the ice. The warming stratifies the brine network, which limits the exchange with seawater, causing the once-elevated nitrate pool to be nearly completely depleted. The nitrate isotope data point to light limitation at the base of landfast ice as a central characteristic of the environment, affecting its N cycling (e.g., allowing for nitrification) and impacting algal physiology (e.g., as reflected in the N and O isotope effects of nitrate assimilation).

  10. Solifenacin/tamsulosin fixed-dose combination therapy to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitropoulos K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Konstantinos Dimitropoulos, Stavros Gravas Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece Abstract: Treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS has traditionally focused on the management of benign prostatic obstruction, but the contribution of bladder dysfunction has been recently recognized. Therefore, it is well understood that LUTS have multifactorial etiology and often occur in clusters and not in isolation. Voiding LUTS are highly prevalent in men, but storage LUTS have been proved to be more bothersome. α1-Blockers are the most widely used pharmacologic agents for the treatment of symptoms relating to benign prostatic enlargement due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, while antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of the two drug classes would be a reasonable approach to treat men with both storage and voiding symptoms, and several short-term studies have proved the efficacy and safety of different combinations with an α1-blocker and an antimuscarinic. Following previous studies on the separate administration of solifenacin and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination tablet of tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (OCAS 0.4 mg and solifenacin succinate 6 mg has been recently introduced, and the current review evaluates the available data on the use of this fixed-dose combination in the treatment of LUTS in men with BPH. Keywords: benign prostatic obstruction, lower urinary tract symptoms, overactive bladder, fixed-dose combination, benign prostatic hyperplasia, tamsulosin, solifenacin

  11. Evaluation of the dose uniformity for double-plane high dose rate interstitial breast implants with the use of dose reference points and dose non-uniformity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAjor, T.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Nemeth, G.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dwell time optimizations on dose uniformity characterized by dose values in dose points and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) and analyzed which implant parameters have influence on the DNR. Double-plane breast implants with catheters arranged in triangular pattern were used for the calculations. At a typical breast implant, dose values in dose reference points inside the target volume and volumes enclosed by given isodose surfaces were calculated and compared for non-optimized and optimized implants. The same 6-cm treatment length was used for the comparisons. Using different optimizations plots of dose non-uniformity ratio as a function of catheter separation, source step size, number of catheters, length of active sections were drawn and the minimum DNR values were determined. Optimization resulted in less variation in dose values over dose points through the whole volume and in the central plane only compared to the non-optimized case. At implant configurations consisting of seven catheters with 15-mm separation, 5-mm source step size and various active lengths adapted according to the type of optimization, the no optimization, geometrical (volume mode) and dose point (on dose points and geometry) optimization resulted in similar treatment volumes, but an increased high dose volume was observed due to the optimization. The dose non-uniformity ratio always had the minimum at average dose over dose normalization points, defined in the midpoints between the catheters through the implant volume. The minimum value of DNR depended on catheter separation, source step size, active length and number of catheters. The optimization had only a small influence on DNR. In addition to the reference points in the central plane only, dose points positioned in the whole implant volume can be used for evaluating the dose uniformity of interstitial implants. The dose optimization increases not only the dose uniformity within the implant but

  12. Comparison of Radiation Dose Rates with the Flux to Dose Conversion Factors Recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Kil, A Reum; Lee, Jo Eun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation shielding has been performed for the design and maintenance of various facilities using radioactive sources such as nuclear fuel, accelerator, and radionuclide. The conversion of flux to dose mainly used in nuclear and radiation fields has been generally made with the dose coefficients presented in ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP- 74), which are produced based on ICRP Publication 60. On the other hand, ICRP Publication 116 (ICRP-116), which adopts the protection system of ICRP Publication 103, has recently been published and provides the dose conversion coefficients calculated with a variety of Monte Carlo codes. The coefficients have more than an update of those in ICRP-74, including new particle types and a greatly expanded energy range. In this study, a shielding evaluation of a specific container for neutron and gamma sources was performed with the MCNP6 code. The dose rates from neutron and gamma-ray sources were calculated using the MCNP6 codes, and these results were based on the flux to dose conversion factors recommended in ICRP-74 and ICRP-116. As a result, the dose rates evaluated with ICRP-74 were generally shown higher than those with ICRP-116. For neutrons, the difference is mainly occurred by the decrease of radiation weighting factors in a part of energy ranges in the ICRP-116 recommendations. For gamma-rays, the ICRP-74 recommendation applied with the kerma approximation leads to overestimated results than the other assessment

  13. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  14. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  15. Enhancing the Frequency Adaptability of Periodic Current Controllers with a Fixed Sampling Rate for Grid-Connected Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    for the periodic signal controllers (e.g., PR and RC) with a fixed sampling rate. In this paper, the impacts of frequency deviations induced by the PLL and/or the grid disturbances on the selected current controllers are investigated by analyzing the frequency adaptability of these current controllers....... Subsequently, strategies to enhance the frequency adaptability of the current controllers are proposed for the power converters to produce high quality feed-in currents even in the presence of grid frequency deviations. Specifically, by feeding back the PLL estimated frequency to update the center frequencies......, which have verified the discussions and the effectiveness of the frequency adaptive current controllers....

  16. Effect of Air Staging Ratios on the Burning Rate and Emissions in an Underfeed Fixed-Bed Biomass Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Regueiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work studies a small-scale biomass combustor (5–12 kW with an underfed fixed bed using low air staging ratios (15%–30%. This document focuses on the influence of the operative parameters on the combustion process, so gaseous emissions and the distribution and concentration of particulate matter have also been recorded. The facility shows good stability and test repeatability. For the studied airflow ranges, the results show that increasing the total airflow rate does not increase the overall air excess ratio because the burning rate is proportionally enhanced (with some slight differences that depend on the air staging ratio. Consequently, the heterogeneous reactions at the bed remain in the so-called oxygen-limited region, and thus the entire bed operates under sub-stoichiometric conditions with regards of the char content of the biomass. In addition, tests using only primary air (no staging may increase the fuel consumption, but in a highly incomplete way, approaching a gasification regime. Some measured burning rates are almost 40% higher than previous results obtained in batch combustors due to the fixed position of the ignition front. The recorded concentration of particulate matter varies between 15 and 75 mg/Nm3, with a main characteristic diameter between 50 and 100 nm.

  17. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  18. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10 11 Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410 9 Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510 9 Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  19. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO 2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different 137 Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662 keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. - Highlights: • A gamma irradiation facility for chronic exposures of cells was set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità. • The dose rate uniformity and the percentage of primary 662 keV photons on the sample are greater than 92% and 80%, respectively. • The GEANT4 code was used to design the facility. • Good agreement between simulation and experimental dose rate measurements has been obtained. • The facility will allow to safely investigate different issues about low dose rate effects on cultured cells.

  20. Treatment Compliance with Fixed-Dose Combination of Vildagliptin/Metformin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled with Metformin Monotherapy: A 24-Week Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Rombopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the differences in treatment compliance with vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose versus free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Greece. Design. Adult patients with T2DM, inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy, (850 mg bid, participated in this 24-week, multicenter, observational study. Patients were enrolled in two cohorts: vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose combination (group A and vildagliptin metformin free-dose combination (group B. Results. 659 patients were enrolled, 360 were male, with mean BMI 30.1, mean T2DM duration 59.6 months, and mean HbA1c at baseline 8%; 366 patients were assigned to group A and 293 to group B; data for 3 patients was missing. In group A, 98.9% of patients were compliant with their treatment compared to 84.6% of group B. The odds ratio for compliance in group A versus B was (OR 18.9 (95% CI: 6.2, 57.7; P<0.001. In group A mean HbA1c decreased from 8.1% at baseline to 6.9% (P<0.001 at the study end and from 7.9% to 6.8% (P<0.001 in group B. Conclusions. Patients in group A were more compliant than patients in group B. These results are in accordance with international literature suggesting that fixed-dose combination therapies lead to increased compliance to treatment.

  1. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Heliana de; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Custodio, Wilson [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: wilsonc@cnen.gov.br; Kodama, Yasko [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ykodama@ipen.br; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences], e-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br, e-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 {+-} 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from {sup 60}Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h{sup -1} - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h{sup -1} - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h{sup -1} - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h{sup -}'1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h{sup -1} - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h{sup -1} - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  2. In vitro biotransformation rates in fish liver S9: effect of dosing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Shan; Lee, Danny H Y; Delafoulhouze, Maximilien; Otton, S Victoria; Moore, Margo M; Kennedy, Chris J; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2014-08-01

    In vitro biotransformation assays are currently being explored to improve estimates of bioconcentration factors of potentially bioaccumulative organic chemicals in fish. The present study compares thin-film and solvent-delivery dosing techniques as well as single versus multiple chemical dosing for measuring biotransformation rates of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9. The findings show that biotransformation rates of very hydrophobic substances can be accurately measured in thin-film sorbent-dosing assays from concentration-time profiles in the incubation medium but not from those in the sorbent phase because of low chemical film-to-incubation-medium mass-transfer rates at the incubation temperature of 13.5 °C required for trout liver assays. Biotransformation rates determined by thin-film dosing were greater than those determined by solvent-delivery dosing for chrysene (octanol-water partition coefficient [KOW ] =10(5.60) ) and benzo[a]pyrene (KOW  =10(6.04) ), whereas there were no statistical differences in pyrene (KOW  =10(5.18) ) biotransformation rates between the 2 methods. In sorbent delivery-based assays, simultaneous multiple-chemical dosing produced biotransformation rates that were not statistically different from those measured in single-chemical dosing experiments for pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene but not for chrysene. In solvent-delivery experiments, multiple-chemical dosing produced biotransformation rates that were much smaller than those in single-chemical dosing experiments for all test chemicals. While thin-film sorbent-phase and solvent delivery-based dosing methods are both suitable methods for measuring biotransformation rates of substances of intermediate hydrophobicity, thin-film sorbent-phase dosing may be more suitable for superhydrophobic chemicals. © 2014 SETAC.

  3. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  4. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  5. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D.; Jones, J.; Gonda, S.; Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G.; Kirchin, V.; Rachael, C.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  6. Treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using Ralstron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, C.O.; Kim, G.E.; Loh, J.J.K.

    1988-01-01

    From May 1979 through December 1981, a total of 530 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Of the 530 patients, 365 were treated with a high-dose-rate remote-controlled afterloading system (RALS) using a cobalt source, and 165 patients received a low dose rate using a radium source. External pelvic irradiation with a total of 40-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by intracavitary radiation (ICR) with a total dose of 30-39 Gy in ten to 13 fractions to point A was the treatment protocol. ICR was given three times a week with a dose of 3 Gy per fraction. Five-year actuarial survival rate with high-dose-rate ICR by stage was as follows: stage I:82.7% (N = 19) stage II:69.6% (N = 184), and stage III:52.2% (N = 156). The above results were comparable with those with conventional low-dose-rate ICR treatment, and late complications were far less. The application of high-dose-rate ICR was technically simple and easily performed on an outpatient basis without anesthesia, and the patients tolerated it very well. Radiation exposure to personnel was virtually none as compared with that of low-dose-rate ICR. Within a given period of time, more patients can be treated with high-dose-rate ICR because of the short treatment time. The authors therefore conclude that high-dose-rate ICR is suitable for a cancer center where a large number of patients are to be treated

  7. Survey of environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga prefectures, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamia, Kazuyuki; Shimo, Michikuni; Oka, Mitsuaki; Ejiri, Kazutaka; Sugino, Masato; Minato, Susumu; Hosoda, Masahiro; Yamada, Junya; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    We have measured environmental radiation dose rates in several Prefectures, such as Ai chi Prefecture, Gifu Prefecture, and Mie Prefecture, in central Japan. Recently, we measured the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures that are also located in central Japan with a car-borne survey system. At the time of measurement, Kyoto Prefecture (area: 4,613 km 2 ) had a total of 36 districts, and Shiga Prefecture (area: 3,387 km 2 ) a total of 26. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates and secondary cosmic ray dose rates were measured by a 2 inches ψ x 2 inches NaI(Tl) scintillation counter and a handy-type altimeter (GPS eTrex Legend by Gamin), respectively. The following factors were taken into consideration the shielding effect of the car body, the effect of the road pavement, radon progeny borne by precipitation, and increases in tunnels and near the walls. Terrestrial gamma ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were estimated to be 51.7 ± 6.0 n Gy/h (district average: 52.4 ± 4.7 n Gy/h), 52.2 ± 10.5 n Gy/h (district average: 51.9 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. Secondary cosmic ray dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 30.0 ± 0.6 n Gy/h (district average: 29.9 ±0.3 n Gy/h), 30.1 ± 0.3 n Gy/h (district average: 30.0 ± 0.2 n Gy/h), respectively. The environmental radiation dose rates due to the sum dose rates of terrestrial gamma ray and secondary cosmic ray in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures were 81.7 ± 6.2 n Gy/h (district average: 82.3 ± 4.8 n Gy/h), 82.3 ± 10.6 n Gy/h (district average: 82.0 ± 8.1 n Gy/h), respectively. We confirmed that the environmental radiation dose rates in Kyoto and Shiga Prefectures mainly depended on the change of the terrestrial gamma ray dose rates, since the secondary cosmic ray dose rates had little change. Therefore, radiation dose-rate maps of the terrestrial gamma rays as well as maps of the environmental radiation dose-rate were drawn. (author)

  8. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  9. The content of African diets is adequate to achieve optimal efficacy with fixed-dose artemether-lumefantrine: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Zulfiqarali G; Abdulla, Salim; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ndong, Alice; Falade, Catherine O; Sagara, Issaka; Mulure, Nathan; Nwaiwu, Obiyo; Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2008-11-25

    A fixed-dose combination of artemether-lumefantrine (AL, Coartem(R)) has shown high efficacy, good tolerability and cost-effectiveness in adults and children with uncomplicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Lumefantrine bioavailability is enhanced by food, particularly fat.As the fat content of sub-Saharan African meals is approximately a third that of Western countries, it raises the question of whether fat consumption by African patients is sufficient for good efficacy. Data from healthy volunteers have indicated that drinking 36 mL soya milk (containing only 1.2 g of fat) results in 90% of the lumefantrine absorption obtained with 500 mL milk (16 g fat). African diets are typically based on a carbohydrate staple (starchy root vegetables, fruit [plantain] or cereals) supplemented by soups, relishes and sauces derived from vegetables, pulses, nuts or fish. The most important sources of dietary fat in African countries are oil crops (e.g. peanuts, soya beans) and cooking oils as red palm, peanut, coconut and sesame oils. Total fat intake in the majority of subSaharan countries is estimated to be in the range 30-60 g/person/day across the whole population (average 43 g/person/day). Breast-feeding of infants up to two years of age is standard, with one study estimating a fat intake of 15-30 g fat/day from breast milk up to the age of 18 months. Weaning foods typically contain low levels of fat, and the transition from breast milk to complete weaning is associated with a marked reduction in dietary fat. Nevertheless, fat intake >10 g/day has been reported in young children post-weaning. A randomized trial in Uganda reported no difference in the efficacy of AL between patients receiving supervised meals with a fixed fat content (~23 g fat) or taking AL unsupervised, suggesting that fat intake at home was sufficient for optimal efficacy. Moreover, randomized trials in African children aged 5-59 months have shown similar high cure rates to those observed in

  10. The content of African diets is adequate to achieve optimal efficacy with fixed-dose artemether-lumefantrine: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagara Issaka

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fixed-dose combination of artemether-lumefantrine (AL, Coartem® has shown high efficacy, good tolerability and cost-effectiveness in adults and children with uncomplicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Lumefantrine bioavailability is enhanced by food, particularly fat. As the fat content of sub-Saharan African meals is approximately a third that of Western countries, it raises the question of whether fat consumption by African patients is sufficient for good efficacy. Data from healthy volunteers have indicated that drinking 36 mL soya milk (containing only 1.2 g of fat results in 90% of the lumefantrine absorption obtained with 500 mL milk (16 g fat. African diets are typically based on a carbohydrate staple (starchy root vegetables, fruit [plantain] or cereals supplemented by soups, relishes and sauces derived from vegetables, pulses, nuts or fish. The most important sources of dietary fat in African countries are oil crops (e.g. peanuts, soya beans and cooking oils as red palm, peanut, coconut and sesame oils. Total fat intake in the majority of subSaharan countries is estimated to be in the range 30–60 g/person/day across the whole population (average 43 g/person/day. Breast-feeding of infants up to two years of age is standard, with one study estimating a fat intake of 15–30 g fat/day from breast milk up to the age of 18 months. Weaning foods typically contain low levels of fat, and the transition from breast milk to complete weaning is associated with a marked reduction in dietary fat. Nevertheless, fat intake >10 g/day has been reported in young children post-weaning. A randomized trial in Uganda reported no difference in the efficacy of AL between patients receiving supervised meals with a fixed fat content (~23 g fat or taking AL unsupervised, suggesting that fat intake at home was sufficient for optimal efficacy. Moreover, randomized trials in African children aged 5–59 months have shown similar high cure

  11. Testing of an automatic outdoor gamma ambient dose-rate surveillance system in Tokyo and its calibration using measured deposition after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Korpach, Ed; Berg, Rodney; Ungar, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    An in-situ fixed point radioactivity surveillance network has been developed at the Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada. The network consists of a number of spectrometric NaI(Tl) detectors measuring, in real-time, ambient gamma dose-rate. The present paper describes the gamma dose-rate monitoring by one detector installed at the Canadian embassy in Tokyo during the Fukushima nuclear accident. Soil samples were collected for the measurement of fallout fission products inventories at each location where the NaI(Tl) detector was installed. The gamma-ray attenuation by the soil matrix was estimated by the information on the depth distribution of 137 Cs activities. The study demonstrated that the gamma dose-rates measured by the field NaI(Tl) spectrometric method agreed well with the laboratory results estimated by the inventories of fallout fission products deposited in the soil and the vertical distribution of 137 Cs in the soil. -- Highlights: ► An automatic outdoor gamma ambient dose-rate surveillance system in Tokyo. ► Monitoring of increased ambient gamma dose-rate during the Fukushima accident. ► Laboratory soil sample fallout fission product inventory analysis. ► NaI(Tl) dose-rate calibration coefficient testing by contaminated soil inventories

  12. Oral L-menthol reduces thermal sensation, increases work-rate and extends time to exhaustion, in the heat at a fixed rating of perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, T R; Waldron, M; Jeffries, O

    2017-07-01

    The study investigated the effect of a non-thermal cooling agent, L-menthol, on exercise at a fixed subjective rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in a hot environment. Eight male participants completed two trials at an exercise intensity between 'hard' and 'very hard', equating to 16 on the RPE scale at ~35 °C. Participants were instructed to continually adjust their power output to maintain an RPE of 16 throughout the exercise trial, stopping once power output had fallen by 30%. In a randomized crossover design, either L-menthol or placebo mouthwash was administered prior to exercise and at 10 min intervals. Power output, [Formula: see text]O 2 , heart rate, core and skin temperature was monitored, alongside thermal sensation and thermal comfort. Isokinetic peak power sprints were conducted prior to and immediately after the fixed RPE trial. Exercise time was greater (23:23 ± 3:36 vs. 21:44 ± 2:32 min; P = 0.049) and average power output increased (173 ± 24 vs. 167 ± 24 W; P = 0.044) in the L-menthol condition. Peak isokinetic sprint power declined from pre-post trial in the L-menthol l (9.0%; P = 0.015) but not in the placebo condition (3.4%; P = 0.275). Thermal sensation was lower in the L-menthol condition (P = 0.036), despite no changes in skin or core temperature (P > 0.05). These results indicate that a non-thermal cooling mouth rinse lowered thermal sensation, resulting in an elevated work rate, which extended exercise time in the heat at a fixed RPE.

  13. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S.; Ivanova, Kremena; Tsenova, Martina; Ristova, Mimoza; Ajka, Sorsa; Bossew, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m 3 for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. (orig.)

  14. INFLUENCE OF DOSE RATE ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE TO LOW- AND HIGH-LET RADIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eWozny

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treatment failure is mostly explained by loco-regional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy which modify the dose-rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional radiotherapy or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2 or 10Gy/min.For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure, this variation of radiosensitivity was associated to the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks. By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA double-strand breaks after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the Relative Biological Efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased.In conclusion, in the radiotherapy treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes towards altered-fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation

  15. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Boev, Blazo [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Natural and Technical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Zunic, Zora S. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' ' Vinca' ' , Belgrade (Serbia); Ivanova, Kremena; Tsenova, Martina [National Center of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Ristova, Mimoza [University in Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematic, Institute of Physics, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ajka, Sorsa [Croatian Geological Survey, Zagreb (Croatia); Bossew, Peter [German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m{sup 3} for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. (orig.)

  16. INFLUENCE OF RADON PROGENY ON DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS STUDIED AT PTB'S RADON REFERENCE CHAMBER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P; Camp, A; Dombrowski, H; Neumaier, S; Röttger, A; Vargas, A

    2017-12-01

    The responses of electronic dose rate meters were investigated in a large volume radon chamber at PTB in a wide range of radon activity concentrations. The measurements were conducted under controlled laboratory conditions and measured dose rate data are compared with Monte-Carlo simulations. Consequences concerning environmental monitoring are described. A further result is that the direct measurement of the dose rates produced by radon progeny in air is hardly possible in radon atmospheres with high activity concentrations, because the major contribution of measured dose rates is produced by radon progeny on the housing of the dose rate instruments. The latter effect largely depends on the ability of surfaces to absorb radon progeny. The Monte-Carlo simulations revealed quantitative results on the height of the single contributions to the total dose rate measured in the radon chamber. When environmental dose rate measurements are performed, the plate-out on detectors can be neglected. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Do Generous Unemployment Benefit Programs Reduce Suicide Rates? A State Fixed-Effect Analysis Covering 1968–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylus, Jonathan; Glymour, M. Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The recent economic recession has led to increases in suicide, but whether US state unemployment insurance programs ameliorate this association has not been examined. Exploiting US state variations in the generosity of benefit programs between 1968 and 2008, we tested the hypothesis that more generous unemployment benefit programs reduce the impact of economic downturns on suicide. Using state linear fixed-effect models, we found a negative additive interaction between unemployment rates and benefits among the US working-age (20–64 years) population (β = −0.57, 95% confidence interval: −0.86, −0.27; P unemployment rates on suicide is offset by the presence of generous state unemployment benefit programs, though estimated effects are small in magnitude. PMID:24939978

  18. Do generous unemployment benefit programs reduce suicide rates? A state fixed-effect analysis covering 1968-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylus, Jonathan; Glymour, M Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    The recent economic recession has led to increases in suicide, but whether US state unemployment insurance programs ameliorate this association has not been examined. Exploiting US state variations in the generosity of benefit programs between 1968 and 2008, we tested the hypothesis that more generous unemployment benefit programs reduce the impact of economic downturns on suicide. Using state linear fixed-effect models, we found a negative additive interaction between unemployment rates and benefits among the US working-age (20-64 years) population (β = -0.57, 95% confidence interval: -0.86, -0.27; P unemployment rates on suicide is offset by the presence of generous state unemployment benefit programs, though estimated effects are small in magnitude. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation dose-rate on sterile male Aedesaegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawan, Beni; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Sugoro, Irawan; Sasmita, Hadian Iman

    2017-06-01

    Aedesaegypti is the most important vector for dengue, yellow fever and Zika viruses. Considering its medical importance, vector population control program utilizing radiation-based sterile insect technique (SIT) is one of the potential methods for preventing and limiting the dispersal of these viruses. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the dose-rates effects of γ-sterilization on quality parameters of sterile males. Males Ae.aegypti at the pupal stage were sterilized by applying 70 Gyγ-rays in varies dose-rates, i.e. 0 (control), 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500Gy/h utilizing panoramic irradiator. Adult males that emerged from the pupal stage were assessed for their quality parameters, which are the percentage of emergence, longevity, sterility and mating competitiveness. The results herein indicate that there was no major effect of dose-rate on the percentage of emergence, the data showedthat there were no differences between irradiated males compared with control. Generally, the longevity of irradiated males was lower compared to control. The data also demonstrated that longevity was significantly increased at the dose-rate from 300 to 900Gy/h, then decreased at the dose-rate 900 to 1500 Gy/h. Sterility of irradiated maleswas significantly different compared to control, while there was no significantly different at dose rate 300 to 1500 Gy/h. Mating competitiveness of irradiated males was increased at the dose rate from 300 to 1200 Gy/h, then the value was decreased significantly at the dose rate 1500 Gy/h. The dose-rate effects of γ-sterilization were discussed in the context genetic vector control, in particular, the SIT. The results give information and contribute to better understanding towards γ-sterilization optimization and quality parameters of sterile male Ae. aegypti on SIT methods.

  20. Optimal multitone bit allocation for fixed-rate video transmission over ADSL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Marc; Moureaux, Jean-Marie; Lecuire, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel approach for the bit allocation performed in an ADSL modulator. This new method is based on the observation that the transmission speed using ADSL strongly depends on the distance between the central office and the subscriber's side and does not permit real-time transmission for high bitrate video on long distances. The algorithm we develop takes into account the characteristics of a video sequence and distributes the channel error according to visual sensitivity. This method involves variable transmission Bit Error Rate.

  1. Consequences of the exposure at low dose rates-contribution of animal experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    1990-01-01

    The exposure of laboratory animals to the various types of radiations will induce cancers in relation with the tissue absorbed doses. The shape of the dose-effet relationship is most variable. It is important to distinguish which tumours are comparable to human tumours. Those showing more analogies answer but seldom to the classical lineo-quadratic relationship; however, a strong attenuation of induction is demonstrated at low dose rates. Quasi-threshold relationships are seen after the exposure of some tissues to high-LET radiations. These observations question the validity of generalizing the radiobiologists' dual action theory, setting the origin of the dose-effect relationship in the induction of events within the DNA molecule. There is an alternative in the cellular collaboration events; it assumes that the effectiveness per dose unit decreases constantly as an inverse function of the dose rate [fr

  2. Radiation chemistry of water at low dose rates with emphasis on the energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in absorbed dose water calorimetry. In order to accurately relate the temperature change to the absorbed dose, the energy balance of the overall chemistry of the system must be known. The radiolytic products and their yields are affected by dose rate, dose and added solutes. The yields of the radiolytic products have been calculated using a computer program developed at Atomic Energy of Canada. The chemical energy balance was determined as a function of dose for various dose rates and initial concentrations of hydrogen (H 2 ), oxygen (O 2 ), and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In solutions containing H 2 O 2 or O 2 and H 2 the chemical reactions were exothermic; in other cases they were endothermic. Approach to equilibrium and equilbrium conditions are discussed

  3. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  4. Development of a program for calculation of second dose and securities in brachytherapy high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve Sanchez, S.; Martinez Albaladejo, M.; Garcia Fuentes, J. D.; Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Capuz Suarez, B.; Moris de Pablos, R.; Colmenares Fernandez, R.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the reliability of the program with 80 patients in the usual points of prescription of each pathology. The average error of the calculation points is less than 0.3% in 95% of cases, finding the major differences in the axes of the applicators (maximum error -0.798%). The program has proved effective previously testing him with erroneous dosimetry. Thanks to the implementation of this program is achieved by the calculation of the dose and part of the process of quality assurance program in a few minutes, highlighting the case of HDR prostate due to having a limited time. Having separate data sheet allows each institution to its protocols modify parameters. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity in Discrete Bipolar Junction Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Ladbury Raymond; LaBel, Kenneth; Topper, Alyson; Ladbury, Raymond; Triggs, Brian; Kazmakites, Tony

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the low dose rate sensitivity in several families of discrete bipolar transistors across device parameter, quality assurance level, and irradiation bias configuration. The 2N2222 showed the most significant low dose rate sensitivity, with low dose rate enhancement factor of 3.91 after 100 krad(Si). The 2N2907 also showed critical degradation levels. The devices irradiated at 10 mrad(Si)/s exceeded specifications after 40 and 50 krad(Si) for the 2N2222 and 2N2907 devices, respectively.

  6. Responses of cultured mammalian cells to prolonged low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Rongen, E. van; Welleweerd, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to verify the finding of others that prolonged irradiation caused sudden death of cells. Continuous irradiation (dose rate 0.09 Gy/h) was applied to the R-1, RUC-2, V79 and T-1g cells for up to 140 days. End points were: Population growth rate, plating efficiency and radiosensitivity. The population doubling times were increased and plating efficiencies decreased; cell survival after single doses at acute dose rate were lower than that of control cells. Part of the cell parameters returned to control values within three weeks after prolonged irradiation had been terminated. Sudden death after prolonged exposure was not observed. (orig.) [de

  7. Dose rate evaluation of workers on the operation floor in Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kaoru; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Shirai, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Ippei; Mukaida, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    At Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, installation of a fuel handling machine is planned to support the removal of spent fuel. The dose rates at the workplace were calculated based on the source distribution measured using a collimator in order to confirm that the dose rates on the operation floor were within a manageable range. It was confirmed that the accuracy of the source distribution was C/M = 1.0-2.4. These dose rates were then used to plan the work on the operation floor.

  8. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, K.B.; Müller, T.O.; Astrup, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often...... of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64...

  9. The fitting parameters extraction of conversion model of the low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakerenkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS) in bipolar devices consists of in base current degradation of NPN and PNP transistors increase as the dose rate is decreased. As a result of almost 20-year studying, the some physical models of effect are developed, being described in detail. Accelerated test methods, based on these models use in standards. The conversion model of the effect, that allows to describe the inverse S-shaped excess base current dependence versus dose rate, was proposed. This paper presents the problem of conversion model fitting parameters extraction.

  10. Dose rate measurement of a cobalt source 'Issledovatel' by means of Fricke dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Peimel-Stuglik, Z

    2001-01-01

    The results of measurements leading to the elaboration of a reliable and accurate dose rate determination for a cobalt irradiator 'Issledovatel' were presented. The dose measurements were done by means of classic Fricke dosimeter. The conclusions from measurements can be useful also for the dosimetry of other kinds of cobalt irradiators. The measurements were performed by a newly employed Laboratory for Measurements of Technological Doses staff and were a practical test of their proficiency in gamma ray dosimetry.

  11. Space dependence of neutron dose rates from the external neutron converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasic, N.; Pesic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of neutron and gamma doses from the external converter (ENC) is necessary for variety studies in dosimetry, radiation protection and irradiation of samples in determined neutron fields. Considering that the dose measurements in these fields are complicated, their previous calculation, by using any of the referent computer codes, simplifies the job. In this paper, space dependence of dose rates behind the ENC was calculated using MCNP code based on Monte Carlo techniques in radiation transport modelling. (author)

  12. Image-Guided High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Cervix Carcinoma Using Balloon Catheter and Belt Immobilization System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiyong; Yeung, Anamaria R; Amdur, Robert; Helmig, Richard; Park, Justin; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2017-06-01

    The efficacy of image-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer is limited by the ineffective rectal sparing devices available commercially and the potential applicator movement. We developed a novel device using a balloon catheter and a belt immobilization system, serving for rectal dose reduction and applicator immobilization purposes, respectively. The balloon catheter is constructed by gluing a short inflatable tube to a long regular open-end catheter. Contrast agent (10) cm 3 is injected into the inflatable end, which is affixed to the tandem and ring applicator, to displace the posterior vaginal wall. The belt immobilization system consists of a specially designed bracket that can hold and fix itself to the applicator, a diaper-like Velcro fastener package used for connecting the patient's pelvis to the bracket, and a buckle that holds the fasteners to stabilize the whole system. The treatment data for 21 patients with cervical cancer using both balloon catheter and belt immobilization system were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, acquired about 30 minutes apart, were registered to evaluate the effectiveness of the immobilization system. In comparison with a virtual rectal blade, the balloon decreased the rectal point dose by 34% ± 4.2% (from 276 ± 57 to 182 ± 38 cGy), corresponding to an extra sparing distance of 7.9 ± 1.1 mm. The maximum sparing distance variation per patient is 1.4 ± 0.6 mm, indicating the high interfractional reproducibility for rectum sparing. With the immobilization system, the mean translational and rotational displacements of the applicator set are <3 mm and <1.5°, respectively, in all directions. The rectal balloon provides significant dose reduction to the rectum and it may potentially minimize patient discomfort. The immobilization system permits almost no movement of the applicator during treatment. This work has the potential to be promoted as a standardized solution

  13. Relative effect of radiation dose rate on hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic lethality of total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; McNeill, J.; Karolis, C.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Travis, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine the influence of dose rate on the toxicity of total-body irrdiation (TBI) with and without syngeneic bone-marrow rescue in mice. The results showed a much greater dose-rate dependence for death from nonhemopoietic toxicity than from bone-marrow ablation, with the ratio of LD 50 's increasing from 1.73 at 25 cGy/min to 2.80 at 1 cGy/min. At the higher dose rates, dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity resulted from late organ injury, affecting the lungs, kidneys, and liver. At 1 cGy/min the major dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity was acute gastrointestinal injury. The implications of these results in the context of TBI in preparation for bone-marrow transplantation are discussed. 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  15. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O'Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h -1 (1 rad d -1 ). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h -1 to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h -1 will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted

  16. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  17. Success rate of short dental implants supporting single crowns and fixed bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Hans; Gupta, Bhumija; Ghanem, Alexis; Cacciato, Rita; Ren, Yanfang; Romanos, Georgios E

    2016-09-01

    Bone grafts (sinus lift and/or ridge augmentation) may become an obstacle for some patients who desire implant treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the success of six- and eight-millimeters rough surface design short dental implants, for up to 2 years in function, when compared to conventional length (11 mm) implants. A total of 25.6-, 20.8- and 35.11-mm length implants were placed and restored in 30 subjects (11 males, 19 females) between the age of 22 and 80, following a standard protocol. Implant mobility, crestal bone loss as well as periodontal parameters were evaluated immediately after restoration placement, at 6, 12 and 24 months. There was one failure of one 6-mm implant during the healing phase and one restorative failure. The median crestal bone loss at 24 months was 0.45 mm for the 6-mm implants, 0.55 mm for the 8 mm implants and 0.65 mm for the 11-mm implants. The success rate for 6-mm implants was 97% and for 8-mm and 11-mm implants 100%. Based on this preliminary data, we conclude that rough surface design short dental implants (6 and 8 mm in length) have similar success rate when compared to 11-mm implants. Long-term data with larger number of implants and subjects are needed to confirm these results. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The biological effect of 125I seed continuous low dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Hong-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of 125I seed continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on colonic cell line CL187 in vitro. Methods The CL187 cell line was exposed to radiation of 60Coγ ray at high dose rate of 2 Gy/min and 125I seed at low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Radiation responses to different doses and dose rates were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Under 125I seed low dose rate irradiation, a total of 12 culture dishes were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group, and 2, 5, and 10 Gy irradiation groups. At 48 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by Annexin and Propidium iodide (PI staining. Cell cycle arrests were detected by PI staining. In order to investigate the influence of low dose rate irradiation on the MAPK signal transduction, the expression changes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Raf under continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDR and/or EGFR monoclonal antibodies were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Results The relative biological effect (RBE for 125I seeds compared with 60Co γ ray was 1.41. Apoptosis rates of CL187 cancer cells were 13.74% ± 1.63%, 32.58% ± 3.61%, and 46.27% ± 3.82% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 1.67% ± 0.19%. G2/M cell cycle arrests of CL187 cancer cells were 42.59% ± 3.21%, 59.84% ± 4.96%, and 34.61% ± 2.79% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 26.44% ± 2.53%. P 2/M cell cycle arrest. After low dose rate irradiation, EGFR and Raf expression increased, but when EGFR was blocked by a monoclonal antibody, EGFR and Raf expression did not change. Conclusion 125I seeds resulted in more effective inhibition than 60Co γ ray high dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells. Apoptosis following G2/M cell cycle arrest was the main mechanism of cell-killing effects under low dose rate irradiation. CLDR could

  19. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  20. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive o