WorldWideScience

Sample records for fixed core flow

  1. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  2. Core flow control system for field applications; Sistema de controle de core-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granzotto, Desiree G.; Adachi, Vanessa Y.; Bannwart, Antonio C.; Moura, Luiz F.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Sassim, Natache S.D.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudo do Petroleo (CEPETRO); Carvalho, Carlos H.M. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The significant heavy oil reserves worldwide and the presently high crude oil prices make it essential the development of technologies for heavy oil production and transportation. Heavy oils, with their inherent features of high viscosity (100- 10,000 cP) and density (below 20 deg API) require specific techniques to make it viable their flow in pipes at high flow rates. One of the simplest methods, which do not require use of heat or diluents, is provided by oil-water annular flow (core-flow). Among the still unsolved issues regarding core-flow is the two-phase flow control in order to avoid abrupt increases in the pressure drop due to the possible occurrence of bad water-lubricated points, and thus obtain a safe operation of the line at the lowest possible water-oil ratio. This work presents results of core flow tests which allow designing a control system for the inlet pressure of the line, by actuating on the water flow rate at a fixed oil flow rate. With the circuit model and the specified controller, simulations can be done to assess its performance. The experiments were run at core-flow circuit of LABPETRO-UNICAMP. (author)

  3. HANARO core channel flow-rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heon Il; Chae, Hee Tae; Im, Don Soon; Kim, Seon Duk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    HANARO core consists of 23 hexagonal flow tubes and 16 cylindrical flow tubes. To get the core flow distribution, we used 6 flow-rate measuring dummy fuel assemblies (instrumented dummy fuel assemblies). The differential pressures were measured and converted to flow-rates using the predetermined relationship between AP and flow-rate for each instrumented dummy fuel assemblies. The flow-rate for the cylindrical flow channels shows +-7% relative errors and that for the hexagonal flow channels shows +-3.5% relative errors. Generally the flow-rates of outer core channels show smaller values compared to those of inner core. The channels near to the core inlet pipe and outlet pipes also show somewhat lower flow-rates. For the lower flow channels, the thermal margin was checked by considering complete linear power histories. From the experimental results, the gap flow-rate was estimated to be 49.4 kg/s (cf. design flow of 50 kg/s). 15 tabs., 9 figs., 10 refs. (Author) .new.

  4. Rapidly changing flows in the Earth's core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.

    2008-01-01

    A large part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the molten outer core(1). As a result of continuous satellite measurements since 1999, the core magnetic field and its recent variations can now be described with a high resolution in space and time(2). These data have...... field occurring over only a few months, indicative of fluid flow at the top of the core, can in fact be resolved. Using nine years of magnetic field data obtained by satellites as well as Earth-based observatories, we determine the temporal changes in the core magnetic field and flow in the core. We...

  5. Wall shear stress fixed points in blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2017-11-01

    Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics produces large datasets, and wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most important parameters due to its close connection with the biological processes at the wall. While some studies have investigated WSS vectorial features, the WSS fixed points have not received much attention. In this talk, we will discuss the importance of WSS fixed points from three viewpoints. First, we will review how WSS fixed points relate to the flow physics away from the wall. Second, we will discuss how certain types of WSS fixed points lead to high biochemical surface concentration in cardiovascular mass transport problems. Finally, we will introduce a new measure to track the exposure of endothelial cells to WSS fixed points.

  6. Titrated flow versus fixed flow Bubble Nasal CPAP for respiratory distress in preterm neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas eMurki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical effects of a pre-fixed flow of air-oxygen versus a flow titrated according to visible bubbling are not well understood.Objective: To compare the effects of a fixed flow (5 L/min and titrated flow ( flow just enough to ensure bubbling at different set pressures on delivered intra-prong pressure, gas exchange and clinical parameters in preterm infants on bubble CPAP for respiratory distress.Methods: Preterm infants less than 35 weeks gestation on bubble CPAP and less than 96 h of age, were enrolled in this cross over study. They were subjected to 30 minute periods of titrated flow and fixed flow. At the end of both epochs, gas flow rate, set pressure, FiO2, SpO2, Silverman retraction score, respiratory rate , abdominal girth, and blood gases were recorded. The delivered intra-prong pressure was measured by an electronic manometer. Results: Sixty nine recordings were made in 54 infants. For each of the set CPAP pressures (4, 5 and 6 cm H2O, the mean delivered pressure with a fixed flow of 5 L/min was higher than that delivered by the titrated flow. During the fixed flow epoch, the delivered pressure was closer to and higher than the set pressure resulting in higher PaO2 and lower PaCO2 as compared to titrated flow epoch. In the titrated flow period, the delivered pressure was consistently lower than the set pressure. Conclusion: In preterm infants on bubble CPAP with set pressures of 4 to 6 cm H2O, a fixed flow of 5 L/min is more effective than a flow titrated to ensure adequate visible bubbling. It achieves higher delivered pressures, better oxygenation and ventilation.

  7. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  8. Core-control assembly with a fixed fuel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challberg, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    A core-control assembly is described comprising: a control rod having a plurality of blades; a control-rod guide tube for guiding vertical motion of said control rod; a fuel support for supporting fuel bundles separated by said blades, said fuel support having an aperture conforming to a cross section of said control rod through said blades for preventing rotational movement of said control rod to a decoupling orientation when said control rod is between a maximum power position and a minimum power position, said minimum power position being above said maximum power position, said fuel support being supported by said control-rod guide tube; control-rod drive means for controlling vertical motion of said control rod, said control-rod drive means providing for vertical motion between said maximum power position and said minimum power position, said control-rod drive means providing for vertical movement to a decoupling position, said decoupling position being no lower than said minimum power position, said decoupling position being at a level sufficient to permit said control rod to rotate to a decoupling orientation relative to said fuel support; and coupling means for coupling said control rod to said control rod drive means, said coupling means being releasable by rotational movement of said control rod to said decoupling orientation relative to said control-rod drive means

  9. General spectral flow formula for fixed maximal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm; Zhu, Chaofeng

    2005-01-01

    and symplectic analysis and give a full (and surprisingly short) proof of our General Spectral Flow Formula for the case of fixed maximal domain. As a side result, we establish local stability of weak inner unique continuation property (UCP) and explain its role for parameter dependent spectral theory....... of the resulting continuous family of (unbounded) self-adjoint Fredholm operators in terms of the Maslov index of two related curves of Lagrangian spaces. One curve is given by the varying domains, the other by the Cauchy data spaces. We provide rigorous definitions of the underlying concepts of spectral theory...

  10. Exchange between the stagnant and flowing zone in gas-flowing solids-fixed bed contactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR P. DUDUKOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In countercurrent gas – flowing solids – fixed bed contactors, a fraction of the flowing solids is in motion (dynamic holdup, while the other fraction is resting on the fixed bed elements. In this study it was experimentally proved that the stagnant zone should not be considered as a dead part of the column, but that there is a dynamic exchange between these two portions of flowing solids particles. Combining a mathematical model with tracer experiments, the rate of exchange was determined and it was shown that only a small part (ca. 20 % of the stagnant region should be considered as a dead one.

  11. General spectral flow formula for fixed maximal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm; Zhu, Chaofeng

    2005-01-01

    of the resulting continuous family of (unbounded) self-adjoint Fredholm operators in terms of the Maslov index of two related curves of Lagrangian spaces. One curve is given by the varying domains, the other by the Cauchy data spaces. We provide rigorous definitions of the underlying concepts of spectral theory......We consider a continuous curve of linear elliptic formally self-adjoint differential operators of first order with smooth coefficients over a compact Riemannian manifold with boundary together with a continuous curve of global elliptic boundary value problems. We express the spectral flow...... and symplectic analysis and give a full (and surprisingly short) proof of our General Spectral Flow Formula for the case of fixed maximal domain. As a side result, we establish local stability of weak inner unique continuation property (UCP) and explain its role for parameter dependent spectral theory....

  12. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    OpenAIRE

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the test-pattern generation and fault coverage determination in the core based design. The basic core-test strategy that one has to apply in the core-based design is stated in this work. A Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed resulting in accurate fault coverage of embedded cores. The CAT now is applied to a few cores within the Philips Core Test Pilot IC project

  13. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe : Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  14. Effects of Core Cavity on a Flow Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Kim, Kihwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The axial pressure drop is removed in the free core condition, But the actual core has lots of fuel bundles and mixing vanes to the flow direction. The axial pressure drop induces flow uniformity. In a uniform flow having no shear stress, the cross flow or cross flow mixing decreases. The mixing factor is important in the reactor safety during a Steam Line Break (SLB) or Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) transients. And the effect of core cavity is needed to evaluate the realistic core mixing factor quantification. The multi-dimensional flow mixing phenomena in a core cavity has been studied using a CFD code. The 1/5-scale model was applied for the reactor flow analysis. A single phase water flow conditions were considered for the 4-cold leg and DVI flows. To quantify the mixing intensity, a boron scalar was introduced to the ECC injection water at cold legs and DVI nozzles. The present CFD pre-study was performed to quantify the effects of core structure on the mixing phenomena. The quantified boron mixing scalar in the core simulator model represented the effect of core cavity on the core mixing phenomena. This simulation results also give the information for sensor resolution to measure the boron concentration in the experiments and response time to detect mixing phenomena at the core and reactor vessel.

  15. Experimentation of a fixed in-core-based system for core limiting conditions of operation (LCO) monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piguet, F.; Carrasco, M.; Mourlevat, J.L.; Rio, G.; Verneret, C.

    2006-01-01

    FRAMATOME-ANP has developed a new core monitoring system which is based on measurements coming from fixed in-core sensors and on a true 3D power distribution reconstruction. This new system is called P.I.M.S. or 'Process In-core Monitoring System'. After selecting the rhodium self powered neutron detectors as fixed in-core sensors, the first step of this development consisted in testing this kind of sensors in the French Golfech Unit 2 reactor (4L, 1300 MWe). The second step which is in progress presently consists in installing and testing a prototype of P.I.M.S. in the French Cattenom Unit 1 reactor (4L-1300 MWe). The present paper is dealing with the Cattenom experimentation. The paper has the following structure: Introduction; Design Principles Of P.I.M.S.; General Presentation; Mechanical design; Instrumentation and Control Architecture; Functional design; The Cattenom 1 Experimentation; General presentation; Results; Conclusion. In conclusion one underlines that the improvement in the core operating limits monitoring function allows a significant gain in margins to be achieved. These operating margin gains can be used in a practical way by the Utilities according to their own needs by increasing the power level or increasing the fuel cycle length by implementing a more demanding loading pattern or improving the operation flexibility. For Utilities, the main objective is to take an economic profit of the core margin gain provided by a new core surveillance system like P.I.M.S. that means this new system must be licensed. The P.I.M.S. design features such as the redundancy of two, the ICDA/adapter mechanical design, the electronic components used in the protection system of the French N4 units, the 3D nuclear model directly derived from the design code, the rhodium detectors largely qualified in the USA and in the French testing campaigns, will make the licensing of P.I.M.S. very easy. The presence of rhodium detectors used as fixed-in-core sensors reinforces the

  16. Flow distribution in ET-RR-1 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    In nuclear reactors the flow may be arranged through individual bundles by orifices to achieve better thermal performance. A model based on constant pressure drop across different core regions is developed to determine the flow distribution in reactor core. The friction and grids in the bundles as well as the orifices diameters have an influence on modifying the flow distribution. The application of the proposed model on ET-RR-1 gives reasonable prediction of flow distribution

  17. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the efficient test-pattern generation in a core-based design. A consistent Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed based on the required core-test strategy. It generates a test-pattern set for the embedded cores with high fault coverage and low DfT area overhead. The CAT

  18. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the test-pattern generation and fault coverage determination in the core based design. The basic core-test strategy that one has to apply in the core-based design is stated in this work. A Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed resulting in accurate fault coverage of

  19. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  20. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its......The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...

  1. A fixed incore based system for an on line core margin monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourlevat, J. L.; Carrasco, M.

    2002-01-01

    FRAMATOME-ANP has developed a new core monitoring system which is based on measurements coming from fixed incore sensors and on a 3D power distribution on line reconstruction. After selecting the rhodium self powered neutron detectors as fixed incore sensors, a first step of this development consisted in testing this kind of sensors in the French Golfech Unit 2 reactor (4L, 1300 MWe). (Author)

  2. Development of three methods for control rod position monitoring based on fixed in-core neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Xingjie; Li, Qing; Wang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Three methods are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. • Fixed in-core neutron detector measurements are simulated by neutronics code SMART. • Numerical results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately. • Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals. - Abstract: Nuclear reactor core power distribution on-line monitoring system is very important in core surveillance, and this system should have the ability to indicate some abnormal conditions, such as the unacceptable control rod misalignment. In this study, the methodologies of radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), group method of data handling (GMDH) and Levenberg–Marquardt (LM) algorithm are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. For using these methods, a large number of in-core detector signals corresponding to various known rod positions are needed. These data can be generated by an advanced core calculation code. In this study, the neutronics code SMART was used. The simulation results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately, and the performance comparison shows that the regularized RBFNN performs best. Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals and improve the rod position monitoring accuracy when there are mismatches between actual physical factors and modeled physical factors

  3. Effect of a Central Graphite Column on a Pebble Flow in a Pebble Bed Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    A pebble bed reactor(PBR) uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. The pebble bed core is configured as cylindrical or annular depending on the reactor power. It is well known that an annular core can increase a cores' thermal power. The annular inner core zone is typically filled with movable graphite balls or a fixed graphite column. The first problem with this conventional annular core is that it is difficult to maintain a boundary between the central graphite ball zone and the outer fuel zone. The second problem is that it is expensive to replace the central fixed graphite column after several tens of years of reactor operation. In order to resolve these problems, a PBR with a central graphite column in a low core is invented. This paper presents the effect of the central graphite column on a pebble flow by using the computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10

  4. A Fixed Flow is More Effective than Titrated Flow during Bubble Nasal CPAP for Respiratory Distress in Preterm Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Das, Ratan Kumar; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effects of a pre-fixed flow of air-oxygen versus a flow titrated according to visible bubbling are not well understood. To compare the effects of a fixed flow (5 L/min) and titrated flow (flow just enough to ensure bubbling) at different set pressures on delivered intra-prong pressure, gas exchange and clinical parameters in preterm infants on bubble CPAP for respiratory distress. Preterm infants rate, set pressure, FiO2, SpO2, Silverman retraction score, respiratory rate, abdominal girth, and blood gases were recorded. The delivered intra-prong pressure was measured by an electronic manometer. 69 recordings were made in 54 infants. For each of the set CPAP pressures (4, 5, and 6 cm H2O), the mean delivered pressure with a fixed flow of 5 L/min was higher than that delivered by the titrated flow. During the fixed flow epoch, the delivered pressure was closer to and higher than the set pressure resulting in higher PaO2 and lower PaCO2 as compared to titrated flow epoch. In the titrated flow period, the delivered pressure was consistently lower than the set pressure. In preterm infants on bubble CPAP with set pressures of 4-6 cm H2O, a fixed flow of 5 L/min is more effective than a flow titrated to ensure adequate visible bubbling. It achieves higher delivered pressures, better oxygenation and ventilation.

  5. Active AirCore Sampling: Constraining Point Sources of Methane and Other Gases with Fixed Wing Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, J. D.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Wolter, S.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate estimates of point source gas emissions are essential for reconciling top-down and bottom-up greenhouse gas measurements, but sampling such sources is challenging. Remote sensing methods are limited by resolution and cloud cover; aircraft methods are limited by air traffic control clearances, and the need to properly determine boundary layer height. A new sampling approach leverages the ability of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to measure all the way to the surface near the source of emissions, improving sample resolution, and reducing the need to characterize a wide downstream swath, or measure to the full height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The "Active-AirCore" sampler, currently under development, will fly on a fixed wing UAS in Class G airspace, spiraling from the surface to 1200 ft AGL around point sources such as leaking oil wells to measure methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The sampler collects a 100-meter long sample "core" of air in an 1/8" passivated stainless steel tube. This "core" is run on a high-precision instrument shortly after the UAS is recovered. Sample values are mapped to a specific geographic location by cross-referencing GPS and flow/pressure metadata, and fluxes are quantified by applying Gauss's theorem to the data, mapped onto the spatial "cylinder" circumscribed by the UAS. The AirCore-Active builds off the sampling ability and analytical approach of the related AirCore sampler, which profiles the atmosphere passively using a balloon launch platform, but will add an active pumping capability needed for near-surface horizontal sampling applications. Here, we show design elements, laboratory and field test results for methane, describe the overall goals of the mission, and discuss how the platform can be adapted, with minimal effort, to measure other gas species.

  6. In-core flow rate distribution measurement test of the JOYO irradiation core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshihiro; Isozaki, Kazunori; Suzuki, Soju

    1996-01-01

    A flow rate distribution measurement test was carried out for the JOYO irradiation core (the MK-II core) after the 29th duty cycle operation. The main object of the test is to confirm the proper flow rate distribution at the final phase of the MK-II core. The each flow rate at the outlet of subassemblies was measured by the permanent magnetic flowmeter inserted avail of fuel exchange hole in the rotating plug. This is third test in the MK-II core, after 10 years absence from the final test (1985). Total of 550 subassemblies were exchanged and accumulated reactor operation time reached up to 38,000 hours from the previous test. As a conclusion, it confirmed that the flow rate distribution has been kept suitable in the final phase of the MK-II core. (author)

  7. Pick'n'Fix: Capturing Control Flow in Modular Compilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Laurence E.; Bahr, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    structures, in particular cyclic ones, we employ Oliveira and Cook's purely functional representation of graphs. Moreover, to separate control flow features semantically from other language features, we represent source languages using Johann and Ghani's encoding of generalised algebraic datatypes...

  8. The influence of core bypass flow during SBLOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maselj, A.; Jurkovic, M.

    1996-01-01

    Many parameters affect the behaviour of a NPP during a Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The bypass flow between the core side and the downcomer is one of them. Different PWRs have different values of core bypass flow. In spite of the complexity of the real situation in the primary system during SBLOCA, some fundamental details of the phenomena can be explained with simplified mathematical models, which relate on basic parameters of the primary coolant. These models define the conditions for loop seal clearance and final results are confirmed with measured values. The analysis presented in the paper refers to Bethsy Test 9.1.b SB LOCA scenario, with variation of core bypass flow. Basic RELAP5 input model calculation results show very good agreement with the experimental data. The core liquid level depression before loop seal clearance is lower in case of smaller core bypass flow. This affects the fuel clad temperature because of different heat transfer mechanisms. Time of loop seal clearance is delayed with larger core bypass flow and consequently lower differential pressure between downcomer and core. (author)

  9. The flow field investigations of no load conditions in axial flow fixed-blade turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhou, X. Z.; Xu, H. X.

    2014-03-01

    During the start-up process, the strong instabilities happened at no load operation in a low head axial flow fixed-blade turbine, with strong pressure pulsation and vibration. The rated speed can not reach until guide vane opening to some extent, and stable operation could not be maintained under the rated speed at some head, which had a negative impact on the grid-connected operation of the unit. In order to find the reason of this phenomenon, the unsteady flow field of the whole flow passage at no load conditions was carried out to analyze the detailed fluid field characteristics including the pressure pulsation and force imposed on the runner under three typical heads. The main hydraulic cause of no load conditions instability was described. It is recommended that the power station should try to reduce the no-load running time and go into the high load operation as soon as possible when connected to grid at the rated head. Following the recommendations, the plant operation practice proved the unstable degree of the unit was reduced greatly during start up and connect to the power grid.

  10. Optimization on fixed low latency implementation of the GBT core in FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Wu, W.; Xu, H.; Yao, L.

    2017-07-01

    In the upgrade of ATLAS experiment [1], the front-end electronics components are subjected to a large radiation background. Meanwhile high speed optical links are required for the data transmission between the on-detector and off-detector electronics. The GBT architecture and the Versatile Link (VL) project are designed by CERN to support the 4.8 Gbps line rate bidirectional high-speed data transmission which is called GBT link [2]. In the ATLAS upgrade, besides the link with on-detector, the GBT link is also used between different off-detector systems. The GBTX ASIC is designed for the on-detector front-end, correspondingly for the off-detector electronics, the GBT architecture is implemented in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). CERN launches the GBT-FPGA project to provide examples in different types of FPGA [3]. In the ATLAS upgrade framework, the Front-End LInk eXchange (FELIX) system [4, 5] is used to interface the front-end electronics of several ATLAS subsystems. The GBT link is used between them, to transfer the detector data and the timing, trigger, control and monitoring information. The trigger signal distributed in the down-link from FELIX to the front-end requires a fixed and low latency. In this paper, several optimizations on the GBT-FPGA IP core are introduced, to achieve a lower fixed latency. For FELIX, a common firmware will be used to interface different front-ends with support of both GBT modes: the forward error correction mode and the wide mode. The modified GBT-FPGA core has the ability to switch between the GBT modes without FPGA reprogramming. The system clock distribution of the multi-channel FELIX firmware is also discussed in this paper.

  11. Optimization on fixed low latency implementation of the GBT core in FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, H.; Wu, W.; Xu, H.; Yao, L.

    2017-01-01

    In the upgrade of ATLAS experiment [1], the front-end electronics components are subjected to a large radiation background. Meanwhile high speed optical links are required for the data transmission between the on-detector and off-detector electronics. The GBT architecture and the Versatile Link (VL) project are designed by CERN to support the 4.8 Gbps line rate bidirectional high-speed data transmission which is called GBT link [2]. In the ATLAS upgrade, besides the link with on-detector, the GBT link is also used between different off-detector systems. The GBTX ASIC is designed for the on-detector front-end, correspondingly for the off-detector electronics, the GBT architecture is implemented in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). CERN launches the GBT-FPGA project to provide examples in different types of FPGA [3]. In the ATLAS upgrade framework, the Front-End LInk eXchange (FELIX) system [4, 5] is used to interface the front-end electronics of several ATLAS subsystems. The GBT link is used between them, to transfer the detector data and the timing, trigger, control and monitoring information. The trigger signal distributed in the down-link from FELIX to the front-end requires a fixed and low latency. In this paper, several optimizations on the GBT-FPGA IP core are introduced, to achieve a lower fixed latency. For FELIX, a common firmware will be used to interface different front-ends with support of both GBT modes: the forward error correction mode and the wide mode. The modified GBT-FPGA core has the ability to switch between the GBT modes without FPGA reprogramming. The system clock distribution of the multi-channel FELIX firmware is also discussed in this paper.

  12. Chemical-looping combustion in a reverse-flow fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Lu; Bollas, George M.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse-flow fixed bed reactor concept for CLC (chemical-looping combustion) is explored. The limitations of conventional fixed bed reactors, as applied to CLC, are overcome by reversing the gas flow direction periodically to enhance the mixing characteristics of the bed, thus improving oxygen carrier utilization and energy efficiency with respect to power generation. The reverse-flow reactor is simulated by a dusty-gas model and compared with an equivalent fixed bed reactor without flow reversal. Dynamic optimization is used to calculate conditions at which each reactor operates at maximum energy efficiency. Several cases studies illustrate the benefits of reverse-flow operation for the CLC with CuO and NiO oxygen carriers and methane and syngas fuels. The results show that periodic reversal of the flow during reduction improves the contact between the fuel and unconverted oxygen carrier, enabling the system to suppress unwanted catalytic reactions and axial temperature and conversion gradients. The operational scheme presented reduces the fluctuations of temperature during oxidation and increases the high-temperature heat produced by the process. CLC in a reverse-flow reactor has the potential to achieve higher energy efficiency than conventional fixed bed CLC reactors, when integrated with a downstream gas turbine of a combined cycle power plant. - Highlights: • Reverse-flow fixed bed CLC reactors for combined cycle power systems. • Dynamic optimization tunes operation of batch and transient CLC systems. • The reverse-flow CLC system provides stable turbine-ready gas stream. • Reverse-flow CLC fixed bed reactor has superior CO 2 capture and thermal efficiency.

  13. Fluid flow with heat transfer in a fix-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests with two different fluids, water and air, flowing in a bed with irregular particles of silica were done. The bed was confined inside a tube, which was heated by an external jacket. The bed is characterized by permeability and porosity. The tests showed a wall effect face to the relation between the tube diameter and the medium dimension of the particles. The results are presented as a relation between Nusselt number / Peclet number. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  15. Inequalities for trace anomalies, length of the RG flow, distance between the fixed points and irreversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2004-01-01

    I discuss several issues about the irreversibility of the RG flow and the trace anomalies c, a and a'. First I argue that in quantum field theory: (i) the scheme-invariant area Δ a' of the graph of the effective beta function between the fixed points defines the length of the RG flow; (ii) the minimum of Δ a' in the space of flows connecting the same UV and IR fixed points defines the (oriented) distance between the fixed points and (iii) in even dimensions, the distance between the fixed points is equal to Δ a = a UV - a IR . In even dimensions, these statements imply the inequalities 0 ≤ Δ a ≤ Δ a' and therefore the irreversibility of the RG flow. Another consequence is the inequality a ≤ c for free scalars and fermions (but not vectors), which can be checked explicitly. Secondly, I elaborate a more general axiomatic set-up where irreversibility is defined as the statement that there exist no pairs of non-trivial flows connecting interchanged UV and IR fixed points. The axioms, based on the notions of length of the flow, oriented distance between the fixed points and certain 'oriented-triangle inequalities', imply the irreversibility of the RG flow without a global a function. I conjecture that the RG flow is also irreversible in odd dimensions (without a global a function). In support of this, I check the axioms of irreversibility in a class of d = 3 theories where the RG flow is integrable at each order of the large N expansion

  16. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavislan James M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS, 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and

  17. Confocal Microscopy of Unfixed Breast Needle Core Biopsies: A Comparison to Fixed and Stained Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Needle core biopsy, often in conjunction with ultrasonic or stereotactic guided techniques, is frequently used to diagnose breast carcinoma in women. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a technology that provides real-time digital images of tissues with cellular resolution. This paper reports the progress in developing techniques to rapidly screen needle core breast biopsy and surgical specimens at the point of care. CSLM requires minimal tissue processing and has the potential to reduce the time from excision to diagnosis. Following imaging, specimens can still be submitted for standard histopathological preparation. Methods Needle core breast specimens from 49 patients were imaged at the time of biopsy. These lesions had been characterized under the Breast Imaging Reporting And Data System (BI-RADS) as category 3, 4 or 5. The core biopsies were imaged with the CSLM before fixation. Samples were treated with 5% citric acid and glycerin USP to enhance nuclear visibility in the reflectance confocal images. Immediately following imaging, the specimens were fixed in buffered formalin and submitted for histological processing and pathological diagnosis. CSLM images were then compared to the standard histology. Results The pathologic diagnoses by standard histology were 7 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinomas, 3 ductal carcinomas in-situ (CIS), 21 fibrocystic changes/proliferative conditions, 9 fibroadenomas, and 5 other/benign; two were excluded due to imaging difficulties. Morphologic and cellular features of benign and cancerous lesions were identified in the confocal images and were comparable to standard histologic sections of the same tissue. Conclusion CSLM is a technique with the potential to screen needle core biopsy specimens in real-time. The confocal images contained sufficient information to identify stromal reactions such as fibrosis and cellular proliferations such as intra-ductal and infiltrating carcinoma, and

  18. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report

  19. Forces on zonal flows in tokamak core turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallatschek, K.; Itoh, K.

    2005-01-01

    The saturation of stationary zonal flows (ZF) in the core of a tokamak has been analyzed in numerical fluid turbulence computer studies. The model was chosen to properly represent the kinetic global plasma flows, i.e., undamped stationary toroidal or poloidal flows and Landau damped geodesic acoustic modes. Reasonable agreement with kinetic simulations in terms of magnitude of transport and occurrence of the Dimits shift was verified. Contrary to common perception, in the final saturated state of turbulence and ZFs, the customary perpendicular Reynolds stress continues to drive the ZFs. The force balance is established by the essentially quasilinear parallel Reynolds stress acting on the parallel return flows required by incompressibility. (author)

  20. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  1. Neutronics of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Hansen, G.E.

    1977-11-01

    The study was made to investigate the neutronic feasibility of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor. Three reactor concepts were studied: four- and seven-cell radial reactors and a seven-cell scallop reactor. The reactors were fueled with UF 6 (either U-233 or U-235) and various parameters were varied. A four-cell reactor is not practical nor is the U-235 fueled seven-cell radial reactor; however, the 7-cell U-233 radial and scallop reactors can satisfy all design criteria. The mixed flow gas core reactor is a very attractive reactor concept and warrants further investigation

  2. CFD Analysis for Predicting Flow Resistance of the Cross Flow Gap in Prismatic VHTR Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Yoon, Su Jong; Park, Goon Cherl; Park, Jong Woon

    2011-01-01

    The core of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) consists of assemblies of hexagonal graphite blocks and its height and across-flats width are 800 mm and 360 mm respectively. They are equipped with 108 coolant holes 16 mm in diameter. Up to ten fuel blocks arranged in vertical order form a fuel element column and the neutron flux varies over the cross section of the core. It makes different axial shrinkage of fuel element and this leads to make wedge-shaped gaps between the base and top surfaces of stacked blocks. The cross flow is defined as the core flow that passes through this cross gaps. The cross flow complicates the flow distribution of reactor core. Moreover, the cross flow could lead to uneven coolant distribution and consequently to superheating of individual fuel element zones with increased fission product release. Since the core cross flow has a negative impact on safety and efficiency of VHTR, core cross flow phenomena have to be investigated to improve the core thermal margin of VHTR. In particular, to predict amount of flow at the cross flow gap obtaining accurate flow loss coefficient is important. Nevertheless, there has not been much effort in domestic. The experiment of cross flow was carried out by H. G. Groehn in 1981 Germany. For the study of cross flow the applicability of CFD code should be validated. In this paper a commercial CFD code CFX-12 validation will be carried out with this cross flow experiment. Validated data can be used for validation of other thermal-hydraulic analysis codes

  3. Core flow inversion tested with numerical dynamo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Steffen; Christensen, Ulrich; Jackson, Andrew; Wicht, Johannes

    2000-05-01

    We test inversion methods of geomagnetic secular variation data for the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the core with synthetic data. These are taken from self-consistent 3-D models of convection-driven magnetohydrodynamic dynamos in rotating spherical shells, which generate dipole-dominated magnetic fields with an Earth-like morphology. We find that the frozen-flux approximation, which is fundamental to all inversion schemes, is satisfied to a fair degree in the models. In order to alleviate the non-uniqueness of the inversion, usually a priori conditions are imposed on the flow; for example, it is required to be purely toroidal or geostrophic. Either condition is nearly satisfied by our model flows near the outer surface. However, most of the surface velocity field lies in the nullspace of the inversion problem. Nonetheless, the a priori constraints reduce the nullspace, and by inverting the magnetic data with either one of them we recover a significant part of the flow. With the geostrophic condition the correlation coefficient between the inverted and the true velocity field can reach values of up to 0.65, depending on the choice of the damping parameter. The correlation is significant at the 95 per cent level for most spherical harmonic degrees up to l=26. However, it degrades substantially, even at long wavelengths, when we truncate the magnetic data sets to l currents, similar to those seen in core-flow models derived from geomagnetic data, occur in the equatorial region. However, the true flow does not contain this flow component. The results suggest that some meaningful information on the core-flow pattern can be retrieved from secular variation data, but also that the limited resolution of the magnetic core field could produce serious artefacts.

  4. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  5. Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with a Fixed Flow of Investment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We consider a mean-variance portfolio selection problem for a fixed flow of investment in a continuous time framework. We consider a market structure that is characterized by a cash account, an indexed bond and a stock. We obtain the expected optimal terminal wealth for the investor. We also obtain a closed-form ...

  6. Fixed-bed adsorption separation of xylene isomers over sio2/silicallite-1 core-shell adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Easir A.

    2013-12-29

    SiO2/Silicalite-1 core-shell material has been demonstrated as potential shape selective adsorbent in gas phase separation of p-xylene from a mixture of p/o-xylene isomers. The core-shell composite comprised of large silica core and thin polycrystalline silicalite-1 shell which was synthesized via a self-assembly of silicalite-1 nanocrystals on core silica surface followed by a secondary seeded growth method. The core materials, SiO2 used in this study has mesoporosity with an average pore diameter of 60Å and hence offers no shape selectivity for xylene isomers. However, the shell, silicalite-1 contains rigid pore structures and preferentially adsorbs p-xylene from their isomers mixtures. A series of adsorption fixed bed breakthrough adsorption/desorption experiment was performed to obtain the equilibrium isotherms and adsorption isotherm parameters of xylene isomers. The equilibrium isotherms of xylene isomers follow the Langmuir\\'s model. A chromatographic adsorption model has been used to describe the fixed-bed breakthrough profiles of xylene isomers. The model has successfully predicted the responses of the binary mixtures of p/o-xylene isomers. The SiO2/silicalite-1 core-shell adsorbents have shown para-selectivity as high as 15. © Bangladesh Uni. of Engg. & Tech.

  7. Numerical simulation on coolant flow and heat transfer in core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhaohui; Wang Xuefang; Shen Mengyu

    1997-01-01

    To simulate the coolant flow and the heat transfer characteristics of a core, a computer code, THAPMA (Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Porous Medium Analysis) has been developed. In THAPMA code, conservation equations are based on a porous-medium formulation, which uses four parameters, i.e, volume porosity, directional surface porosity, distributed resistance, and distributed heat source (sink), to model the effects of fuel rods and other internal solid structures on flow and heat transfer. Because the scheme and the solution are very important in accuracy and speed of calculation, a new difference scheme (WSUC) has been used in the energy equation, and a modified PISO solution method have been employed to simulate the steady/transient states. The code has been proved reliable and can effectively solve the transient state problem by several numerical tests. According to the design of Qinshan NPP-II, the flow and heat transfer phenomena in reactor core have been numerically simulated. The distributions of the velocity and the temperature can provide a theoretical basis for core design and safety analysis

  8. Influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics of core shooting process based on experiment and multiphase simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-jiang Ni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics was investigated synchronously with various core sands, transparent core-box and high-speed camera. To confirm whether the core shooting process has significant turbulence, the flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head and core box was reproduced with colored core sands. By incorporating the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF, kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation and turbulence model, a two-fluid model (TFM was established to study the flow dynamics of the core shooting process. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations were then performed and a areasonable agreement was achieved between the simulation and experimental results. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the effects of turbulence, sand density, sand diameter and binder ratio were analyzed in terms of filling process, sand volume fraction (αs and sand velocity (Vs.

  9. Study on core flow distribution of the reference core design Mark-III of experimental multi-purpose VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Sadao; Arai, Taketoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Hirano, Mitsumasa

    1977-01-01

    Concerning the coolant flow distribution between fuel channels and other flow paths in the core, designated as Reference Core Mark-III of the Multi-purpose Experimental Very High Temperature Reactor, thermal analysis has been made of the control rods and other steel structures around the core to find the coolant flow rates (bypass flow) necessary to cool them to their safe operating temperatures. Calculations showed that adequate cooling could be achieved in the Mark-III Core by the bypass flow of 8% of the total reactor coolant flow, 4% each for the control-rod channels and for other structures. The thermal and coolant flow design bases, including the assumption of a 10% bypass flow, were thus confirmed to first approximation. (auth.)

  10. Characterization of interfacial waves in horizontal core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Singh, Ramesh; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we characterize interfacial waves in horizontal core annular flow (CAF) of fuel-oil and water. Experimental studies on CAF were performed in an acrylic pipe of 15.5mm internal diameter, and the time evolution of the oil-water interface shape was recorded with a high speed camera for a range of different flow-rates of oil (Qo) and water (Qw). The power spectrum of the interface shape shows a range of notable features. First, there is negligible energy in wavenumbers larger than 2 π / a , where a is the thickness of the annulus. Second, for high Qo /Qw , there is no single dominant wavelength, as the flow in the confined annulus does not allow formation of a preferred mode. Third, for lower Qo /Qw , a dominant mode arises at a wavenumber of 2 π / a . We also observe that the power spectrum of the interface shape depends weakly on Qw, and strongly on Qo, perhaps because the net shear rate in the annulus appears to depend weakly on Qw as well. We also attempt to build a general empirical model for CAF by relating the interfacial stress (calculated via the mean pressure gradient) to the flow rate in the annulus, the annular thickness and the core velocity. Authors are thankful to Orica Mining Services (Australia) for the financial support.

  11. Effect of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment on Salivary Flow, pH and Microbial Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Arab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in saliva properties and oral microbial flora in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.Materials and Methods: Two important saliva properties namely the salivary flow rate and pH as well as oral microbial flora were assessed in 30 orthodontic patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment and after six, 12 and 18 weeks of treatment. Selective media, Sabouraud dextrose agar, Mitis salivarius agar and Rogosa agar were used for isolation of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Dunn’s tests. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After six, 12 and 18 weeks of commencing fixed orthodontic treatment, the total colony counts of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase. The saliva pH decreased during the orthodontic treatment (P< 0.05 while the salivary flow did not change significantly. Conclusions: Fixed orthodontic treatment causes major changes in the saliva properties. The changes in oral microflora and saliva properties show the importance of caries preventive measures during orthodontic treatment.

  12. K-FIX: a computer program for transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Torrey, M.D.

    1976-11-01

    The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds using the K-FIX program. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange. The equations are solved using an Eulerian finite difference technique that implicitly couples the rates of phase transitions, momentum, and energy exchange to determination of the pressure, density, and velocity fields. The implicit solution is accomplished iteratively without linearizing the equations, thus eliminating the need for numerous derivative terms. K-FIX is written in a highly modular form to be easily adaptable to a variety of problems. It is applied to growth of an isolated steam bubble in a superheated water pool

  13. Nuclear reactor with a fixed system of neutron poison, which can be burnt up, introduced into the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.; Roegler, H.J.; Wickert, M.

    1985-01-01

    The fixed system consists of neutron poison which can be burnt up, in an uneven distribution, and with adjustable absorber rods for output control, which are driven into the reactor core from the side along the fuel elements. There is an excess of neutron poison which can be burnt up, overall, on the side of the reactor core away from the absorber rods. The reactor core is free of neutron poison which can be burnt up on the side where the absorber rods are driven in, so that the ratio of maximum to mean power density with reference to a possible absorber rod positions is less than for homogeneous distribution of the neutron poison which can be burnt up. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Device for measuring flow rate in a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamano, Jiro.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To always calculate core flow rate automatically and accurately in BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: Jet pumps are provided to the recycling pump and to the inside of the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor. The jet pumps comprise a plurality of calibrated jet pumps for forcively convecting the coolants and a plurality of not calibrated jet pumps in order to cool the heat generated in the reactor core. The difference in the pressures between the upper and the lower portions in both of the jet pumps is measured by difference pressure transducers. Further, a thermo-sensitive element is provided to measure the temperature of recycling water at the inlet of the recycling pump. The output signal from the difference pressure transducer is inputted to a process computer, calculated periodically based on predetermined calculation equations, compensated for the temperature by a recycling water temperature signal and outputted as a core flow rate signal to a recoder. The signal is also used for the power distribution calculation in the process computer and the minimum limit power ratio as the thermal limit value for the fuels is outputted. (Furukawa, Y.)

  15. Cores, Joins and the Fano-Flow Conjectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ligang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Fan-Raspaud Conjecture states that every bridgeless cubic graph has three 1-factors with empty intersection. A weaker one than this conjecture is that every bridgeless cubic graph has two 1-factors and one join with empty intersection. Both of these two conjectures can be related to conjectures on Fano-flows. In this paper, we show that these two conjectures are equivalent to some statements on cores and weak cores of a bridgeless cubic graph. In particular, we prove that the Fan-Raspaud Conjecture is equivalent to a conjecture proposed in [E. Steffen, 1-factor and cycle covers of cubic graphs, J. Graph Theory 78 (2015 195–206]. Furthermore, we disprove a conjecture proposed in [G. Mazzuoccolo, New conjectures on perfect matchings in cubic graphs, Electron. Notes Discrete Math. 40 (2013 235–238] and we propose a new version of it under a stronger connectivity assumption. The weak oddness of a cubic graph G is the minimum number of odd components (i.e., with an odd number of vertices in the complement of a join of G. We obtain an upper bound of weak oddness in terms of weak cores, and thus an upper bound of oddness in terms of cores as a by-product.

  16. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1980-01-01

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored 1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 0 C and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. Problems encountered when comparing the leaching rates of different waste forms are discussed

  17. Flow cytometric method for measuring chromatin fragmentation in fixed sperm from yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J A; Draugelis-Dale, R O; Pinkney, A E; Iwanowicz, L R; Blazer, V S

    2015-03-15

    Declining harvests of yellow perch, Perca flavescens, in urbanized watersheds of Chesapeake Bay have prompted investigations of their reproductive fitness. The purpose of this study was to establish a flow cytometric technique for DNA analysis of fixed samples sent from the field to provide reliable gamete quality measurements. Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay, measures were made on the susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation, but used fixed rather than live or thawed cells. Nuclei were best exposed to the acid treatment for 1 minute at 37 °C followed by the addition of cold (4 °C) propidium iodide staining solution before flow cytometry. The rationale for protocol development is presented graphically through cytograms. Field results collected in 2008 and 2009 revealed DNA fragmentation up to 14.5%. In 2008, DNA fragmentation from the more urbanized watersheds was significantly greater than from reference sites (P = 0.026) and in 2009, higher percentages of haploid testicular cells were noted from the less urbanized watersheds (P = 0.032) indicating better reproductive condition at sites with less urbanization. For both years, total and progressive live sperm motilities by computer-assisted sperm motion analysis ranged from 19.1% to 76.5%, being significantly higher at the less urbanized sites (P < 0.05). This flow cytometric method takes advantage of the propensity of fragmented DNA to be denatured under standard conditions, or 1 minute at 37 °C with 10% buffered formalin-fixed cells. The study of fixed sperm makes possible the restrospective investigation of germplasm fragmentation, spermatogenic ploidy patterns, and chromatin compaction levels from samples translocated over distance and time. The protocol provides an approach that can be modified for other species across taxa. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Evaluation of the influence of bypass flow gap distribution on the core hot spot in a prismatic VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hwan; Lim, Hong-Sik

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A procedure to evaluate the local gap size variation between graphite blocks was developed and applied to a prismatic core VHTR. → The analysis for the core bypass flow and hot spot was carried out based on the calculated gap distributions. → The predicted gap size is large enough to affect the flow distribution in the core. → The bypass gap and flow distributions are closely related to the local hot spot temperature and its location. → The core restraint mechanism preventing outward movement of graphite block reduces the bypass gap size and hot spot temperature. - Abstract: Core bypass flow in VHTR is one of the key issues for core thermal margins and efficiency. The bypass flow in the prismatic core varies during core cycles due to the irradiation shrinkage/swelling and thermal expansion of the graphite blocks. A procedure to evaluate the local gap size variation between graphite blocks was developed and applied to a prismatic core VHTR. The influence of the core restraint mechanism on the bypass flow gap was evaluated. The predicted gap size is as much as 8 mm when the graphite block is exposed to its allowable limit of fast neutron fluence. The analysis for the core bypass flow and hot spot was carried out based on the calculated gap distributions. The results indicate that the bypass gap and flow distributions are closely related to the local hot spot and its location and the core restraint mechanism preventing outward movement of the graphite block by a fastening device reduces the bypass gap size, which results in the decrease of maximum fuel temperature not less than 100 deg. C, when compared to the case without it.

  19. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    In a prematurely aborted attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of using a gas core nuclear reactor as a rocket engine, NASA initiated a number of studies on the relevant fluid mechanics problems. These studies were carried out at NASA laboratories, universities and industrial research laboratories. Because of the relatively sudden termination of most of this work, a unified overview was never presented which demonstrated the accomplishments of the program and pointed out the areas where additional work was required for a full understanding of the cavity flow. This review attempts to fulfill a part of this need in two important areas

  20. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L., E-mail: dlk15@cornell.edu [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, 120 Olin Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853-5201 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  1. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit; Koch, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  2. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit

    2015-11-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  3. Reactor vessel and core two-phase flow ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia. Separate effects tests and two-phase flow tests have been conducted to characterize the detector. Tests show the detector can perform in a 343 0 C pressurized water reactor environment and measure the average density of the media surrounding the sensor

  4. Does core mobility of lumbar total disc arthroplasty influence sagittal and frontal intervertebral displacement? Radiologic comparison with fixed-core prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delécrin, Joël; Allain, Jérôme; Beaurain, Jacques; Steib, Jean-Paul; Chataigner, Hervé; Aubourg, Lucie; Huppert, Jean; Ameil, Marc; Nguyen, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Background An artificial disc prosthesis is thought to restore segmental motion in the lumbar spine. However, it is reported that disc prosthesis can increase the intervertebral translation (VT). The concept of the mobile-core prosthesis is to mimic the kinematic effects of the migration of the natural nucleus and therefore core mobility should minimize the VT. This study explored the hypothesis that core translation should influence VT and that a mobile core prosthesis may facilitate physiological motion. Methods Vertebral translation (measured with a new method presented here), core translation, range of motion (ROM), and distribution of flexion-extension were measured on flexion-extension, neutral standing, and lateral bending films in 89 patients (63 mobile-core [M]; 33 fixed-core [F]). Results At L4-5 levels the VT with M was lower than with F and similar to the VT of untreated levels. At L5-S1 levels the VT with M was lower than with F but was significantly different compared to untreated levels. At M levels a strong correlation was found between VT and core translation; the VT decreases as the core translation increases. At F levels the VT increases as the ROM increases. No significant difference was found between the ROM of untreated levels and levels implanted with either M or F. Regarding the mobility distribution with M and F we observed a deficit in extension at L5-S1 levels and a similar distribution at L4-5 levels compared to untreated levels. Conclusion The intervertebral mobility was different between M and F. The M at L4-5 levels succeeded to replicate mobility similar to L4-5 untreated levels. The M at L5-S1 succeeded in ROM, but failed regarding VT and mobility distribution. Nevertheless M minimized VT at L5-S1 levels. The F increased VT at both L4-5 and L5-S1. Clinical Relevance This study validates the concept that the core translation of an artificial lumbar disc prosthesis minimizes the VT. PMID:25802632

  5. Effect of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment on Salivary Flow, pH and Microbial Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Sepideh; Nouhzadeh Malekshah, Sepideh; Abouei Mehrizi, Ehsan; Ebrahimi Khanghah, Anita; Naseh, Roya; Imani, Mohammad Moslem

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in saliva properties and oral microbial flora in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Two important saliva properties namely the salivary flow rate and pH as well as oral microbial flora were assessed in 30 orthodontic patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment and after six, 12 and 18 weeks of treatment. Selective media, Sabouraud dextrose agar, Mitis salivarius agar and Rogosa agar were used for isolation of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Dunn's tests. Porthodontic treatment, the total colony counts of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase. The saliva pH decreased during the orthodontic treatment (Porthodontic treatment causes major changes in the saliva properties. The changes in oral microflora and saliva properties show the importance of caries preventive measures during orthodontic treatment.

  6. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won

    2016-01-01

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  7. Evaluation of core modeling effect on transients for multi-flow zone design of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Andong; Choi, Yong Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SFR core is composed of different types of assemblies including fuel driver, reflector, blanket, control, safety drivers and other drivers. Modeling of different types of assemblies is inevitable in general. But modeling of core flow zones of with different channels needs a lot of effort and could be a challenge for system code modeling due to its limitation on the number of modeling components. In this study, core modeling effect on SFR transient was investigated with flow-zone model and averaged inner core channel model to improve modeling efficiency and validation of simplified core model for EBR-II loss of flow transient case with the modified TRACE code for SFRs. Core modeling effect on the loss flow transient was analyzed with flow-zoned channel model, single averaged inner core model and highest flow channel with averaged inner core channel model for EBR-II SHRT-17 test core. Case study showed that estimations of transient pump and channel flow as well as channel outlet temperatures were similar for all cases macroscopically. Comparing the result of the base case (flow-zone channel inner core model) and the case 2 (highest flow channel considered averaged inner core channel model), flow and channel outlet temperature response were closer than the case1 (single averaged inner core model)

  8. Preferential flow through intact soil cores: Effects of matrix head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, H.W.; Gaber, H.M.; Wraith, J.M.; Huwe, B.; Inskeep, W.P.

    1999-12-01

    Continuous soil pores may act as pathways for preferential flow depending on their size and water status (filled or drained), the latter being largely controlled by the soil matrix head (h). The literature contains a wide range of proposed minimal pore sizes that may contribute to preferential flow. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between h (and corresponding pore sizes) and preferential solute transport in a naturally structured soil. Tracer ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O and pentafluorobenzoic acid, [PFBA]) miscible displacement experiments were performed at several h values in intact soil cores (15-cm diameter, 30-cm length) using an apparatus especially suited to maintain constant h while collecting large effluent volumes. To test for the occurrence of preferential flow, observed breakthrough curves (BTCs) were evaluated for physical nonequilibrium (PNE) using a comparison between fitted local equilibrium (PNE) and PNE models. Fitting results of the observed BTCs indicated absence of PNE in all solute transport experiments at h {le} {minus}10 cm. Experiments at h {ge} {minus}5 cm consistently exhibited PNE conditions, indicating the presence of preferential flow. These results suggest that soil pores with effective radii of 150 {micro}m and smaller (water-filled at h = {minus}10 cm) do not contribute to preferential flow. Observed pore water velocities were not indicative of the presence or absence of preferential flow conditions. Continuous measurements of soil water content ({theta}) using time domain reflectometry (TDR) revealed that at h = {minus}10 cm, <2% of the soil volume had drained.

  9. A study on bypass flow gap distribution in a prismatic VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. H.; Jo, C. K.; Lim, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Core bypass flow in VHTR is one of the key issues for core thermal margins and efficiency. The bypass flow in the prismatic core varies during core cycles due to the irradiation shrinkage and thermal expansion of the graphite blocks. A procedure to evaluate the local gap size variation between graphite blocks was developed and applied to a prismatic core VHTR. The influence of the core restraint mechanism on the bypass flow gap was evaluated. The predicted gap size is as much as 8 mm when the graphite block is exposed to its allowable limit of irradiation fluence. The analysis for the core bypass flow and hot spot was carried out based on the calculated gap distributions. The results indicate that the bypass flow and the location of core hot spots are closely related and a measure to reduce the bypass flow is necessary. (authors)

  10. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1982-01-01

    Both crushed (150- to 300- μm) and cored (1,8- mm-diam) samples of SYNROC have been leached with single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of cesium-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 0 and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC-C were ranked cesium > strontium greater than or equal to calcium > barium > zirconium. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads, cesium leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both sodium and neptunium leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than sodium and neptunium leached from glass. They also vary for each element, while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both sodium and neptunium

  11. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, D.G.; Bazan, F.

    1981-01-01

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored (1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 and 75 0 C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO 3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads Cs leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both Na and Np leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than Na and Np leached from glass. They also vary for each element while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both Na and Np

  12. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  13. A multiscale fixed stress split iterative scheme for coupled flow and poromechanics in deep subsurface reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Saumik; Ganis, Benjamin; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2018-01-01

    In coupled flow and poromechanics phenomena representing hydrocarbon production or CO2 sequestration in deep subsurface reservoirs, the spatial domain in which fluid flow occurs is usually much smaller than the spatial domain over which significant deformation occurs. The typical approach is to either impose an overburden pressure directly on the reservoir thus treating it as a coupled problem domain or to model flow on a huge domain with zero permeability cells to mimic the no flow boundary condition on the interface of the reservoir and the surrounding rock. The former approach precludes a study of land subsidence or uplift and further does not mimic the true effect of the overburden on stress sensitive reservoirs whereas the latter approach has huge computational costs. In order to address these challenges, we augment the fixed-stress split iterative scheme with upscaling and downscaling operators to enable modeling flow and mechanics on overlapping nonmatching hexahedral grids. Flow is solved on a finer mesh using a multipoint flux mixed finite element method and mechanics is solved on a coarse mesh using a conforming Galerkin method. The multiscale operators are constructed using a procedure that involves singular value decompositions, a surface intersections algorithm and Delaunay triangulations. We numerically demonstrate the convergence of the augmented scheme using the classical Mandel's problem solution.

  14. Centering and fixing device of a control rod guide flange on a nuclear reactor core plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.

    1990-01-01

    The device comprises at least two pins diametrally opposite entering into holes in the core plate and self locking pads sliding into bores in the flange. These pads have a command mechanism blocking the lateral displacement of the pads on the plate [fr

  15. Preliminary Estimation of Local Bypass Flow Gap Sizes for a Prismatic VHTR Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Jo, Chang Keun; Lee, Won Jae

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected for the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) project. In the VHTR design, core bypass flow has been one of key issues for core thermal margins and target temperature of the core outlet. The core bypass flow in the prismatic VHTR varies with the core life due to the irradiation shrinkage/ swelling and thermal expansion of the graphite blocks, which could be a significant proportion of the total core flow. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is of major importance in assuring the core thermal margin. To predict the bypass flow, first of all, local gap sizes between graphite blocks in the core should be determined. The objectives of this work are to develop a methodology for determining the gap sizes and to perform a preliminary evaluation for a reference reactor

  16. Bypass Flow and Hot Spot Analysis for PMR200 Block-Core Design with Core Restraint Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hong Sik; Kim, Min Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The accurate prediction of local hot spot during normal operation is important to ensure core thermal margin in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor because of production of its high temperature output. The active cooling of the reactor core determining local hot spot is strongly affected by core bypass flows through the inter-column gaps between graphite blocks and the cross gaps between two stacked fuel blocks. The bypass gap sizes vary during core life cycle by the thermal expansion at the elevated temperature and the shrinkage/swelling by fast neutron irradiation. This study is to investigate the impacts of the variation of bypass gaps during core life cycle as well as core restraint mechanism on the amount of bypass flow and thus maximum fuel temperature. The core thermo fluid analysis is performed using the GAMMA+ code for the PMR200 block-core design. For the analysis not only are some modeling features, developed for solid conduction and bypass flow, are implemented into the GAMMA+ code but also non-uniform bypass gap distribution taken from a tool calculating the thermal expansion and the shrinkage/swell of graphite during core life cycle under the design options with and without core restraint mechanism is used

  17. Traffic flow model at fixed control signals with discrete service time distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky I. Igbinosun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the models of road traffic flow at fixed-cycle controlled intersection assume stationary distributions and provide steady state results. The assumption that a constant number of vehicles can leave the system during the green phase is unrealistic in real life situations. A discrete time queuing model was developed to describe the operation of traffic flow at a road intersection with fixed-cycle signalized control and to account for the randomness in the number of vehicles that can leave the system. The results show the expected queue size in the system when the traffic is light and for a busy period, respectively. For the light period, when the traffic intensity is less than one, it takes a shorter green cycle time for vehicles to clear up than during high traffic intensity (the road junction is saturated. Increasing the number of cars that can leave the junction at the turn of the green phase reduces the number of cycle times before the queue is cleared.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic study of fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR), in FCC, BCC and pseudo-random configurations of the core through CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Chavez, I.; Cajas, D.; Santos, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study of thermal-hydraulic performance of a fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) core and the effect of the porosity was studied by the CFD method with 'SolidWorks' software. The representative sections of three different packed beds arrangements were analyzed: face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and a pseudo-random, with values of porosity of 0.28, 0.33 and 0.53 respectively. The minimum coolant flow required to avoid the phase change for each one of the configurations was determined. The results show that the heat transfer rate increases when the porosity value decreases, and consequently the minimum coolant flow in each configuration. The results of minimum coolant flow were: 728.51 kg/s for the FCC structure, 372.72 kg/s for the BCC, and 304.96 kg/s for the pseudo-random. Meanwhile, the heat transfer coefficients in each packed bed were 6480 W/m 2 *K, 3718 W/m 2 *K and 3042 W/m 2 *K respectively. Finally the pressure drop was calculated, and the results were 0.588 MPa for FCC configuration, 0.033 MPa for BCC and 0.017 MPa for the pseudo-random one. This means that with a higher porosity, the fluid can circulate easier because there are fewer obstacles to cross, so there are fewer energy losses. (authors)

  19. CFD Analysis on a Core Outlet Flow through the Fuel Alignment Plant of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. I.; Bae, Y. M.; Kim, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations were performed to confirm the core flow distribution for SMART, which acquired standard design approval in 2012. In this paper, CFD simulation is also used to calculate the pressure distribution of a core outlet, a Fuel Alignment Plate (FAP), for SMART. In SMART, the fluid discharged from the Steam Generator comes into a Flow Mixing Header Assembly (FMHA), and is rearranged and split into a very fine size. The FMHA is greatly important for enhancing the flow distribution of a downcomer during a normal operation, transient, and even accidents. Then, the fluid discharged from the FMHA flows into the core upstream through flow skirt holes. The Low Core Support Plate (LCSP) reallocates the flow introducing into the inlet core from the core upstream. The deviation of flow distribution becomes smaller or almost disappears by LCSP holes having relatively large loss coefficient compared to the downstream flow deviation. In an open core, the flow deviation at the core inlet region is diminished by cross flow as it goes upward. Near the core outlet, the flow distribution can be distorted by the influence of a Fuel Alignment Plate (FAP) installed above the fuels. In this paper, the effect of the core outlet flow structure such as the FAP holes of SMART is investigated. Before the calculation, the influences of mesh size and turbulence models are inspected. CFD simulations were performed to investigate the effect of FAP flow holes on the core outlet flow of SMART. As a preliminary study, the dependency of the mesh size and turbulence models was tested; a fine grid was applied, the effect of which is negligible, and the core outlet flow is not sensitive to the turbulence models. In brief, the flow resistance of FAP is less than 15% of that of the fuel assemblies. The flow resistance deviation between two flow path patterns is less than 1% of that of active core. Even two flow path patterns located at the downstream location of the

  20. Effect of the design change of the LSSBP on core flow distribution of APR+ Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kihwan; Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Hae-Seob; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2014-01-01

    The uniform core inlet flow distribution of an Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR+) is required to prevent the failure rate of the HIPER fuel assembly and improve the core thermal margin. KEPCO-E and C and KAERI proposed a design change of the Lower Support Structure Bottom Plate (LSSBP), since the core flow rates were intense near the outer region of the intact LSSBP in a previous study. In this study, an experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of the design change of the LSSBP on the core flow distribution using the APR+ Core Flow and Pressure (ACOP) test facility. The results showed great improvement on the core flow distribution under a 4-pump balanced flow condition. Under the 4-pump balanced flow condition, fifteen tests were repeated using the ACOP test facility to verify the effect of the 50% blocked flow area at the outer region of the LSSBP on the core inlet flow distribution. The profiles of the core inlet mass flow rates were analyzed using ensemble averaged values, and compared with that of the intact LSSBP. The results showed great improvement for the overall core region. The change in design of the LSSBP is expected to improve the hydraulic performance of an APR+ reactor

  1. CFD analysis of flow distribution at the core inlet of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Youngmin, E-mail: ybae@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young In; Park, Cheon Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Core inlet flow distribution of system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART) is numerically investigated. ► Effects of mesh resolution, turbulence model, Reynolds number, and inflow condition are examined. ► Numerical results show that lower core support plate effectively distributes the flow at the core inlet of SMART. -- Abstract: This study numerically investigates the flow distribution at the core inlet region of the system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART). The single-phase turbulent flow is computed by the commercial CFD code, Fluent 12.0 on the computational domain consisting of three main parts: fuel assemblies, a lower core support plate, and a flow skirt. Simulations are carried out with different mesh resolutions, turbulence models, and upstream boundary conditions. The CFD results show that the flow distribution at the core inlet is almost identical for the two Reynolds numbers and turbulence models tested here, and the effect of mesh refinement on the flow distribution at the core inlet is negligible. It is also found that under a uniform upstream boundary condition, the maximum difference in mass flow rate between the fuel assemblies is less than 2%, while it slightly increases to 2.3% under a non-uniform condition. These results consequently indicate that the present design of the lower core support plate effectively distributes the flow at the core inlet of SMART, even when the flow discharged from the upstream has a certain degree of non-uniformity.

  2. FIX-II/2032, BWR Pump Trip Experiment 2032, Simulation Mass Flow and Power Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: In the FIX-II pump trip experiments, mass flow and power transients were simulated subsequent to a total loss of power to the recirculation pumps in an internal pump boiling water reactor. The aim was to determine the initial power limit to give dryout in the fuel bundle for the specified transient. In addition, the peak cladding temperature was measured and the rewetting was studied. 2 - Description of test: Pump trip experiment 2032 was a part of test group 2, i.e. the mass flow transient was to simulate the pump coast down with a pump inertia of 11.3 kg.m -2 . The initial power in the 36-rod bundle was 4.44 MW which gave dryout after 1.4 s from the start of the flow transient. A maximum rod cladding temperature of 457 degrees C was measured. Rewetting was obtained after 7.6 s. 3 - Experimental limitations or shortcomings: No ECCS injection systems

  3. Effects of lower plenum flow structure on core inlet flow of ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shun; Abe, Yutaka; Kaneko, Akiko; Watanabe, Fumitoshi; Tezuka, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of coolant flow structure at a lower plenum of an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) in which there are many structures is very important in order to improve generating power. Although the simulation results by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes can predict such complicated flow in the lower plenum, it is required to establish the database of flow structure in lower plenum of ABWR experimentally for the benchmark of the CFD codes. In the model of the lower plenum, we measured velocity profiles with LDV and PIV. And differential pressure of constructed model is measured with differential pressure instrument. It was identified that the velocity and differential pressure profiles also showed the tendency to be flat in the core inlet. Moreover, vortexes were observed around side entry orifice by PIV measurement. (author)

  4. Release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliance: an in vitro study in continuous flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Wołowiec, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances. A new system for in vitro testing of dental materials was constructed and consisted of a thermostatic glass reactor that enabled immersion of the studied material. Experimental conditions reflected the human oral cavity, with a temperature of 37°C and a saliva flow rate of 0.5mL/min. The simulated fixed orthodontic appliance made of stainless steel was evaluated. Sampling was performed at several time points during the 28-day study, and the metal ion concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The total mass of released metal ions from the appliance during 4 weeks of the experiment was as follows nickel 18.7 μg, chromium 5.47 μg, copper 31.3 μg. The estimated doses of nickel, chromium, and copper determined by extrapolation of experimental data released during the treatment period were far below the toxic dose to humans. This shows that orthodontic treatment might not be a significant source of exposure to these metal ions.

  5. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-08-15

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane.

  6. Effects of non-uniform core flow on peak cladding temperature: MOXY/SCORE sensitivity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    The MOXY/SCORE computer program is used to evaluate the potential effect on peak cladding temperature of selective cooling that may result from a nonuniform mass flux at the core boundaries during the blowdown phase of the LOFT L2-4 test. The results of this study indicate that the effect of the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries will be neutralized by a strong radial flow redistribution in the neighborhood of core boundaries. The implication is that the flow nonuniformity at the core boundaries has no significant effect on the thermal-hydraulic behavior and cladding temperature at the hot plane

  7. Experiments on graphite block gaps connected with leak flow in bottom-core structure of experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1984-01-01

    In order to minimize the leak flow rate of an experimental VHTR (a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor), the graphite blocks are tightened to reduce the gap distance between blocks by core restrainers surrounded outside of the fixed reflectors of the bottom-core structure and seal elements are placed in the gaps. By using a 1/2.75-scale model of the bottom-core structure, the experiments on the following items have been carried out: a relationship between core restraint force and block gap, a relationship between core restraint force and inclined angle of the model, leak flow characteristics of seal elements etc. The conclusions derived from the experiments are as follows: (1) Core restraint force is significantly effective for decreasing the gap distance between hot plenum blocks, but ineffective for the gap between hot plenum block and fixed reflector. (2) Graphite seal element reduces the leak flow rate from the top surface of hot plenum block into plenum region to one-third. (author)

  8. Numerical solution of heat transfer process in a prismatic VHTR core accompanying bypass and cross flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three-dimensional CFD analysis is conducted for the thermal analysis in the reactor core. • Hot spot temperature, coolant channel outlet temperature distribution are affected by bypass flow. • Bypass gap size has significant influence on temperature and flow distribution in the core. • Cross flow has some effect on the temperature distribution of the coolant in the core due to flow mixing in the cross gaps. - Abstract: Bypass flow and cross flow gaps both exist in the core of a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), which is inevitable owing to tolerances in manufacturing, thermal expansion and irradiation shrinkage. The coolant mass flow rate distribution, temperature distribution, and hot spot temperature are significantly affected by bypass and cross flows. In the present study, three-dimensional CFD analysis is conducted for thermal analysis of the reactor core. A validation study for the turbulence model is performed by comparing the friction coefficient with published correlations. A sensitivity study of the near wall mesh is conducted to ensure mesh quality. Parametric studies are performed by changing the size of the bypass and cross gaps using a one-twelfth sector of a fuel block. Simulation results show the influence of the bypass gap size on temperature distribution and coolant mass flow rate distribution in the prismatic core. It is shown that the maximum fuel and coolant channel outlet temperatures increase with an increase in the gap size, which may lead to a structural risk to the fuel block. The cross flow is divided into two types: the cross flow from the bypass gap to the coolant channels and the cross flow from the high-pressure coolant channels to low-pressure coolant channels. These two types of flow have an opposing influence on the temperature gradient. It is found that the presence of the cross flow gaps may have a significant effect on the distribution of the coolant in the core due to flow mixing in the

  9. Evaluation of Core Bypass Flow in the Prismatic VHTR with a Multi-block Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Yoon, Su Jong; Park, Goon Cherl; Kim, Min Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The core of Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) consists of assemblies of hexagonal graphite fuel and reflector elements. The core bypass flow of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is defined as the core flow that does not pass through the coolant channels but passes through the bypass gap between fuel elements. The increase in bypass flow makes the decrease in effective coolant flow. Since the core bypass flow has a negative impact on safety and efficiency of VHTR, core bypass phenomena have to be investigated to improve the core thermal margin of VHTR. For this purpose, the international project, I-NERI project, has been carried out since 2008. I-NERI project is collaborative project that KAERI and SNU of Korea side and INL, ANL and TAMU of U.S side are involved. In order to evaluate the core bypass flow, the multicolumn and multi-layer experimental facility is designed by SNU. In this experiment, the effect of cross-flow and local variation of bypass gap on the bypass flow distribution is investigated. Furthermore, the experimental data will be used for validation of CFD code or thermal hydraulic analysis codes such as GAMMA or GAS-NET

  10. Predictions of the Bypass Flows in the HTR-PM Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jun; Chen Zhipeng; Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Li Fu

    2014-01-01

    In the HTR-PM reactor core, the basic structure materials are large amount of graphite reflectors and carbon bricks. Small gaps among those graphite and carbon bricks are widespread in the reactor core so that the cold helium flow may be bypassed and not completely heated. The bypass flows in relative lower temperature would change the flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core, therefore, the accurate prediction of bypass flows need to be carried out carefully to evaluate the influence to the reactor safety. Based on the characteristics of the bypass flow problem, hybrid method of the flow network and the CFD tools was employed to represent the connections and calculate flow distributions of all the main flow and bypass flow paths. In this paper, the hybrid method was described and applied to specific bypass flow problem in the HTR-PM. Various bypass flow paths in the HTR-PM were reviewed, figured out, and modeled by the flow network and the CFD methods, including the axial vertical gaps in the side reflectors, control rod channels, absorber sphere channels and radial gap flow through keys around the hot helium plenum. The bypass flow distributions and its flow rate ratio to the total flow rate in the primary loop were also calculated, discussed and evaluated. (author)

  11. A numerical study of flow about fixed and flexibly mounted circular cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meling, Trond Stokka

    1998-12-31

    Motivated by the needs of the offshore oil industry, this thesis studies flow around a circular cylinder that is either fixed or flexibly mounted. The latter configuration is susceptible to vortex-induced vibrations. To predict the results numerically, a two-dimensional procedure was developed to handle the fluid domain, the structural problem and the non-linear interaction between the two media. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach was employed in order to handle moving boundaries. The fluid forces and the cylinder kinematics are solved in a staggered fashion. A velocity-correction method is employed to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations where the Galerkin finite element method is used for the spatial discretization of the fluid domain. The second-order equation of motion of the cylinder is solved by a 4th order Rung-Kutta scheme. Various numerical schemes for solving the convection-diffusion equation involved are tested. All the schemes, except the rational Runge-Kutta, were found to smear the vortex street. To predict the flow field at high Reynolds number several turbulence models were tested. The modified 2-layer K-epsilon model with all elements in the boundary layer was found to predict results in remarkably good agreement with experimental results. Self-excited vibration tests of circular cylinders are also performed showing that the presented model is able to capture the lock-in phenomenon with reasonable accuracy, both in the laminar- and in the subcritical Reynolds number regime. 136 refs., 67 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, J. W.; Park, G. C.

    2012-01-01

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  13. On the fixed-stress split scheme as smoother in multigrid methods for coupling flow and geomechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Gaspar Lorenz (Franscisco); C. Rodrigo (Carmen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe fixed-stress split method has been widely used as solution method in the coupling of flow and geomechanics. In this work, we analyze the behavior of an inexact version of this algorithm as smoother within a geometric multigrid method, in order to obtain an efficient monolithic solver

  14. Experimental Investigation on Cross Flow of Wedge-shaped Gap in the core of Prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Goon Cherl; Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Yoon, Su Jong

    2014-01-01

    The core of the PMR type reactor consists of assemblies of hexagonal graphite blocks. The graphite blocks have lots of advantages for neutron economy and high temperature structural integrity. The height and flat-to-flat width of fuel bock are 793 mm and 360 mm, respectively. Each block has 108 coolant channels of which the diameter is 16 mm. And there are gaps between blocks not only vertically but also horizontally for reloading of the fuel elements. The vertical gap induces the bypass flow and through the horizontal gap the cross flow is formed. Since the complicated flow distribution occurs by the bypass flow and cross flow, flow characteristics in the core of the PMR reactor cannot be treated as a simple pipe flow. The fuel zone of the PMR core consists of multiple layers of fuel blocks. The shape change of the fuel blocks could be caused by the thermal expansion and fast-neutron induced shrinkage. It could make different axial shrinkage of fuel block and this leads to wedge-shaped gaps between two stacked fuel blocks. The cross flow is often considered as a leakage flow through the horizontal gap between stacked fuel blocks and it complicates the flow distribution in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel and the bypass gap. Moreover, the cross flow could lead to uneven coolant distribution and consequently cause superheating of individual fuel element zones with increased fission product release. Since the core cross flow has a negative impact on safety and efficiency of VHTR, core cross flow phenomena have to be investigated to improve the core thermal margin of VHTR. To develop the cross flow loss coefficient model for determination of the flow distribution for PMR core analysis codes, study on cross flow for PMR200 core is essential. In particular, to predict the amount of flow through the cross flow gap, obtaining accurate flow loss coefficient is important. In this study, the full-scale cross flow experimental facility was constructed to

  15. Study and analysis for the flow-induced vibration of the core barrel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan

    1989-01-01

    The resemblance criteria are derived and a test model is designed by applying the flow-soild coupling theory. After having completed the model analysis of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core barrel in an 1:10 model, the dynamic characteristics are obtained. In an 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the hydraulic vibration tests of the core barrel are performed, and the relations between the flow rate and the flow-induced pulse pressure on core barrel, acceleration and strain signals have been measured. The corresponding responses and a group of computational equations for hydraulic vibration are derived from these two experiments. The computational hydraulic vibration responses for core barrel in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are in good agreement with the test results, and it shows that the core barrel is safe within its lifetime of 30 years

  16. Structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow is explored. • The quiescent core region is the uniform momentum zone located at the center of the channel. • The boundary of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. • The prograde and retrograde vortices form a counter-rotating vortex pair at the boundary of the core region. - Abstract: The structural organization of the quiescent core region in a turbulent channel flow was explored using direct numerical simulation data at Re_τ = 930. The quiescent core region is the uniform momentum zone located at the center of the channel, and contains the highest momentum with a low level of turbulence. The boundary of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. The streamwise velocity changes abruptly near the boundary of the core region. The abrupt jump leads the increase of the velocity gradient, which is similar to the vorticity thickness of the laminar superlayer at the turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The strong shear induced from the abrupt change is originated from the vortical structure lying on the boundary of the core region. The spanwise population densities of the prograde and retrograde vortices have a local maximum near the boundary of the core region. The prograde vortex dominantly contributes to the total mean shear near the core boundary and the contribution to the total mean shear rapidly decreases within the core region. The prograde and retrograde vortices form a counter-rotating vortex pair at the boundary of the core region associated with the nibbling mechanism. The boundary of the core region contains large-scale concave and convex features. The concave (convex) core interface is organized by the negative-u (positive-u) regions which induce the ejections (sweeps) around the core boundary.

  17. CFD Validation with a Multi-Block Experiment to Evaluate the Core Bypass Flow in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Su Jong; Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Goon Cherl; Kim, Min Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Core bypass flow of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is defined as the ineffective coolant which passes through the bypass gaps between the block columns and the crossflow gaps between the stacked blocks. This flows lead to the variation of the flow distribution in the core and affect the core thermal margin and the safety of VHTR. Therefore, bypass flow should be investigated and quantified. However, it is not a simple question, because the flow path of VHTR core is very complex. In particular, since dimensions of the bypass gap and the crossflow gap are of the order of few millimeters, it is very difficult to measure and to analyze the flow field at those gaps. Seoul National University (SNU) multi-block experiment was carried out to evaluate the bypass flow distribution and the flow characteristics. The coolant flow rate through outlet of each block column was measured, but the local flow field was measured restrictively in the experiment. Instead, CFD analysis was carried out to investigate the local phenomena of the experiment. A commercial CFD code CFX-12 was validated by comparing the simulation results and the experimental data

  18. Characterization of the core poloidal flow at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebschy, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    An essential result from neoclassical (NC) theory is that the fluid poloidal rotation (upol) of the main ions is strongly damped by magnetic pumping and, therefore, expected to be small (theory has been found at both DIII-D and TCV. This is qualitatively consistent with the edge results from both Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). At AUG thanks to an upgrade of the core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics, the core upol can be evaluated through the inboard-outboard asymmetry of the toroidal rotation with an accuracy of 0.5 - 1 km / s . This measurement also provides the missing ingredient to evaluate the core (E-> × B->) velocity (uE-> × B->) via the radial force balance equation. At AUG the core upol (0.35 × B-> determined from CXRS and the perpendicular velocity measured from turbulence propagation. The difference between these two quantities is the turbulent phase velocity. The gathered dataset indicates that the transition in the turbulence regime occurs after the saturation of the energy confinement time. The author thankfully acknowledges the financial support from the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers through the Helmholtz Young Investigators Group program.

  19. Hydrodynamic characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid flow upward through a fixed bed of spherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VELIZAR D. STANKOVIC

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of an electrochemically generated gas phase on the hydrodynamic characteristics of a three-phase system has been examined. The two-phase fluid, (gas-liquid, in which the liquid phase is the continuous one, flows through a packed bed with glass spheres. The influence of the liquid velocity was examined, as well as the gas velocity and particle diameter on the pressure drop through the fixed bed. It was found that with increasing liquid velocity (wl = 0.0162–0.03 m/s, the relative pressure drop decreases through the fixed bed. With increasing current density, the pressure drop increases, since greater gas quantities stay behind in the fixed bed. Besides, it was found that with decreasing diameter of the glass particles, the relative pressure drop also decreases. The relationship betweeen the experimentally obtained friction factor and the Reynolds number was established.

  20. Calculation of local flow conditions in the lower core of a PWR with code-Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In order to better understand the stresses to which fuel rods are subjected, we need to improve our knowledge of the fluid flow inside the core. A code specialized for calculations in tube bundles is used to calculate the flow inside the whole of the core, with a resolution at the assembly level. Still, it is necessary to obtain realistic entry conditions, and these depend on the flow in the downcomer and lower plenum. Also, the flow in the first stages of the core features 4 incoming jets per assembly, and requires a resolution much finer than that used for the whole core calculation. A series of calculations are thus run with our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, Code-Saturne, using a classical Ranse turbulence model. The first calculations involve a detailed geometry, including part of the cold legs, downcomer, lower plenum, and lower core of a pressurized water reactor. The level of detail includes most obstacles below the core. The lower core plate, being pierced with close to 800 holes, cannot be realistically represented within a practical mesh size, so that a head loss model is used. The lower core itself requiring even more detail is also represented with head losses. We make full use of Code-Saturne's non conforming mesh possibilities to represent a complex geometry, being careful to retain a good mesh quality. Starting just under the lower core, the mesh is aligned with fuel rod assemblies, so that different types of assemblies can be represented through different head loss coefficients. These calculations yield steady-state or near steady-state results, which are compared to experimental data, and should be sufficient to yield realistic entry conditions for full core calculations at assembly width resolution, and beyond those mechanical strain calculations. We are also interested in more detailed flow conditions and fluctuations in the lower core area, so as to better quantify vibrational input. This requires a much higher resolution, which we limit

  1. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a computer code for the analysis of the detailed flow of helium in prismatic fuel reactors is reported. The code, called BYPASS, solves, a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the Modular High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The discretization of the flow in a core region typically considers the main coolant flow paths, the bypass gap flow paths, and the crossflow connections between them. 16 refs., 5 figs

  2. ConSpeciFix: Classifying prokaryotic species based on gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobay, Louis-Marie; Ellis, Brian Shin-Hua; Ochman, Howard

    2018-05-16

    Classification of prokaryotic species is usually based on sequence similarity thresholds, which are easy to apply but lack a biologically-relevant foundation. Here, we present ConSpeciFix, a program that classifies prokaryotes into species using criteria set forth by the Biological Species Concept, thereby unifying species definition in all domains of life. ConSpeciFix's webserver is freely available at www.conspecifix.com. The local version of the program can be freely downloaded from https://github.com/Bobay-Ochman/ConSpeciFix. ConSpeciFix is written in Python 2.7 and requires the following dependencies: Usearch, MCL, MAFFT and RAxML. ljbobay@uncg.edu.

  3. Fixed-bed adsorption separation of xylene isomers over sio2/silicallite-1 core-shell adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Easir A.; Rajendran, Arvind; Lai, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    SiO2/Silicalite-1 core-shell material has been demonstrated as potential shape selective adsorbent in gas phase separation of p-xylene from a mixture of p/o-xylene isomers. The core-shell composite comprised of large silica core and thin

  4. ASCOT-1, Thermohydraulics of Axisymmetric PWR Core with Homogeneous Flow During LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: ASCOT-1 is used to analyze the thermo-hydraulic behaviour in a PWR core during a loss-of-coolant accident. 2 - Method of solution: The core is assumed to be axisymmetric two-dimensional and the conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics. For the temperature response of fuel in the annular regions into which the core is divided, the heat conduction equations are solved by an explicit method with averaged flow conditions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Axisymmetric two-dimensional homogeneous flows

  5. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  6. Feasibility analysis of As(III) removal in a continuous flow fixed bed system by modified calcined bauxite (MCB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhakat, P.B.; Gupta, A.K.; Ayoob, S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examine the feasibility of As(III) removal from aqueous environment by an adsorbent, modified calcined bauxite (MCB) in a continuous flow fixed bed system. MCB exhibited excellent adsorption capacity of 520.2 mg/L (0.39 mg/g) with an adsorption rate constant 0.7658 L/mg h for an influent As(III) concentration of 1 mg/L. In a 2 cm diameter continuous flow fixed MCB bed, a depth of only 1.765 cm was found necessary to produce effluent As(III) concentration of 0.01 mg/L, from an influent of 1 mg/L at a flow rate of 8 mL/min. Also, bed heights of 10, 20, and 30 cm could treat 427.85, 473.88 and 489.17 bed volumes of water, respectively, to breakthrough. A reduction in adsorption capacity of MCB was observed with increase in flow rates. The theoretical service times evaluated from bed depth service time (BDST) approach for different flow rates and influent As(III) concentrations had shown good correlation with the corresponding experimental values. The theoretical breakthrough curve developed from constantly mixed batch reactor (CMBR) isotherm data also correlated well with experimental breakthrough curve

  7. Study and analysis on the flow induced vibration of the core barrel of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Weida; Shi Guolin; Jiang Nanyan; Peng YongYong; Zhang Huijun; Wang Yufen; Xie Yongcheng; Guo Chunhua; Shen Qinping

    1989-01-01

    The deduction of the resemblance criterion and the design of the test model by applying flow-solid coupling theory are described. The model analysis of a core barrel both in the air and stationary water were performed in a 1:10 model, thus obtaining the dynamic characteristic. In a 1:5 reactor model with a hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic closed loop, the inner structure and support were modeled for performing hydraulic vibration test of the core barrel. The flow induced pulse pressure of the core barrel and corresponding response were obtained by using miniature pressure capsule, strain gauge and accelerometer. Power spectrum, correlation functions, transfer function and amplitudes under different flow velocities were calculated. The hydraulic vibration test shows that the core barrel will be in safety during its 30-year life time

  8. Deconvolution-based resolution enhancement of chemical ice core records obtained by continuous flow analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Andersen, Katrine K.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann

    2005-01-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) has become a popular measuring technique for obtaining high-resolution chemical ice core records due to an attractive combination of measuring speed and resolution. However, when analyzing the deeper sections of ice cores or cores from low-accumulation areas...... of the data for high-resolution studies such as annual layer counting. The presented method uses deconvolution techniques and is robust to the presence of noise in the measurements. If integrated into the data processing, it requires no additional data collection. The method is applied to selected ice core...

  9. Gauge fixing, BRS invariance and Ward identities for randomly stirred flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berera, Arjun; Hochberg, David

    2009-01-01

    The Galilean invariance of the Navier-Stokes equation is shown to be akin to a global gauge symmetry familiar from quantum field theory. This symmetry leads to a multiple counting of infinitely many inertial reference frames in the path integral approach to randomly stirred fluids. This problem is solved by fixing the gauge, i.e., singling out one reference frame. The gauge fixed theory has an underlying Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) symmetry which leads to the Ward identity relating the exact inverse response and vertex functions. This identification of Galilean invariance as a gauge symmetry is explored in detail, for different gauge choices and by performing a rigorous examination of a discretized version of the theory. The Navier-Stokes equation is also invariant under arbitrary rectilinear frame accelerations, known as extended Galilean invariance (EGI). We gauge fix this extended symmetry and derive the generalized Ward identity that follows from the BRS invariance of the gauge-fixed theory. This new Ward identity reduces to the standard one in the limit of zero acceleration. This gauge-fixing approach unambiguously shows that Galilean invariance and EGI constrain only the zero mode of the vertex but none of the higher wavenumber modes.

  10. Gauge fixing, BRS invariance and Ward identities for randomly stirred flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berera, Arjun [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk; Hochberg, David [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir Km. 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: hochbergd@inta.es

    2009-06-21

    The Galilean invariance of the Navier-Stokes equation is shown to be akin to a global gauge symmetry familiar from quantum field theory. This symmetry leads to a multiple counting of infinitely many inertial reference frames in the path integral approach to randomly stirred fluids. This problem is solved by fixing the gauge, i.e., singling out one reference frame. The gauge fixed theory has an underlying Becchi-Rouet-Stora (BRS) symmetry which leads to the Ward identity relating the exact inverse response and vertex functions. This identification of Galilean invariance as a gauge symmetry is explored in detail, for different gauge choices and by performing a rigorous examination of a discretized version of the theory. The Navier-Stokes equation is also invariant under arbitrary rectilinear frame accelerations, known as extended Galilean invariance (EGI). We gauge fix this extended symmetry and derive the generalized Ward identity that follows from the BRS invariance of the gauge-fixed theory. This new Ward identity reduces to the standard one in the limit of zero acceleration. This gauge-fixing approach unambiguously shows that Galilean invariance and EGI constrain only the zero mode of the vertex but none of the higher wavenumber modes.

  11. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, O.J.

    1984-01-01

    The flow redistribution through fuel assemblies of LMFBRs: for the correct calculation of mass flow rates and pressure drop, are studied. Using a quasi-static formulation of conservation equations of mass and energy, a computer program was developed to simulate any arbitrary number of flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore f flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore, it was possible to perform thermal transient calculations for the Clinch River reactor core. The results of the calculations agree with the data found in the literature and supply accurate information about flow redistribution, average temperature, and pressure drop in the core, when the reactor is operated at conditions from the designed flow conditions, as is always the case in a load changing operation, or during transients. (Autor) [pt

  12. Calculation of the flow distribution for the new core of the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.C.; Delmastro, Dario F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the pressure drop, the flow distribution, effective cooling flow rate and the velocity in the subchannels that cool fuel plates for the new core of RA-6 research reactor were calculated. These calculations were performed for a flow of 340 m 3 /hr and water temperatures of 12 C degrees, of 35 C degrees and 42 C degrees. The flow distribution was calculated without considering either safety factors or geometric changes. All the calculations were performed considering the flow as isothermal. (author) [es

  13. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of core bypass flow phenomena in a prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Johnson, Richard; Schultz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The core bypass flow in a prismatic very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is an important design consideration and can have considerable impact on the condition of reactor core internals including fuels. The interstitial gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The occurrence of hot spots in the core and lower plenum and hot streaking in the lower plenum (regions of very hot gas flow) are affected by bypass flow. In the present study, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic VHTR are conducted to better understand bypass flow phenomena and establish an evaluation method for the reactor core using the commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing several factors in a one-twelfth sector of a fuel column are performed. The simulations show the impact of each factor on bypass flow and the resulting flow and temperature distributions in the prismatic core. Factors include inter-column gap-width, turbulence model, axial heat generation profile and geometry change from irradiation-induced shrinkage in the graphite block region. It is shown that bypass flow provides a significant cooling effect on the prismatic block and that the maximum fuel and coolant channel outlet temperatures increase with an increase in gap-width, especially when a peak radial factor is applied to the total heat generation rate. Also, the presence of bypass flow causes a large lateral temperature gradient in the block and also dramatically increases the variation in coolant channel outlet temperatures for a given block that may have repercussions on the structural integrity of the graphite, the neutronics and the potential for hot streaking and hot spots occurring in the lower plenum.

  14. Numerical and experimental investigation on labyrinth seal mechanism for bypass flow reduction in prismatic VHTR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong, E-mail: paper80@snu.ac.r [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Daehak-Dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Hun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Daehak-Dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Moon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-Dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Tak, Nam-il; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150-1 Deokjin-Dong, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-Dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Daehak-Dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Bypass flow reduction method was developed by applying labyrinth seal mechanism. • Grooves on side walls of replaceable reflector block were made. • Design of the grooved wall of the reflector block was optimized by the RSA method. • The flow resistance of the bypass gap rose from 18.04 to 26.24 by the optimization. • The bypass ratios at the inlet and outlet were reduced by 36.19% and 14.66%, respectively. -- Abstract: Core bypass flow in block type very high temperature reactor (VHTR) occurs due to the inevitable gaps between the hexagonal core blocks for the block installation and refueling. Since the core bypass flow affects the reactor safety and efficiency, it should be minimized to enhance the core thermal margin. In this regard, the core bypass flow reduction method applying the labyrinth seal mechanism was developed and optimized by using the single-objective shape optimization method. Response surface approximation (RSA) method was adopted as the optimization method. Side wall of the replaceable reflector block was redesigned and response surface approximate model was adopted to optimize the shape of the reflector wall. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out not only to assess the limitation of existing method of bypass flow reduction, but also to optimize the design of a newly developed reduction method. The experiment with Seoul National University (SNU) multi-block experimental facility was performed to demonstrate the performance of the reduction method. It was found that the effect of the existing bypass flow reduction method by sealing the bypass gap exit was restricted nearby the lower region of the core. However, the flow resistance factor of the bypass gap increased from 18.04 to 26.24 by the optimized reduction method. The results of the performance test showed that the bypass flow distribution was reduced throughout the entire core regions. The bypass flow ratios at the inlet and the outlet were

  15. A three-dimensional fixed grid model for shallow-water flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvelds, M.D.J.P.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the implementation and testing of a numerical model that is based on a Cartesian fixed grid in vertical direction is described. The model uses the shallow-water equations and accounts for effects of stratification. In stratified environments, the terrain-following 0-transformation,

  16. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF STEADY STATE DISPERSION FLOW MODEL FOR LACTOSE-LACTASE HYDROLYSIS WITH DIFFERENT KINETICS IN FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLAOSEBIKAN ABIDOYE OLAFADEHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed computational procedure for evaluating lactose hydrolysis with immobilized enzyme in a packed bed tubular reactor under dispersion flow conditions is presented. The dispersion flow model for lactose hydrolysis using different kinetics, taking cognizance of external mass transfer resistances, was solved by the method of orthogonal collocation. The reliability of model simulations was tested using experimental data from a laboratory packed bed column, where the -galactosidase of Kluyveromyces fragilis was immobilized on spherical chitosan beads. Comparison of the simulated results with experimental exit conversion shows that the dispersion flow model and using Michaelis-Menten kinetics with competitive product (galactose inhibition are appropriate to interpret the experimental results and simulate the process of lactose hydrolysis in a fixed bed.

  17. Renormalization group flows and fixed points for a scalar field in curved space with nonminimal F (ϕ )R coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlikin, Boris S.; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Wipf, Andreas; Zanusso, Omar

    2017-12-01

    Using covariant methods, we construct and explore the Wetterich equation for a nonminimal coupling F (ϕ )R of a quantized scalar field to the Ricci scalar of a prescribed curved space. This includes the often considered nonminimal coupling ξ ϕ2R as a special case. We consider the truncations without and with scale- and field-dependent wave-function renormalization in dimensions between four and two. Thereby the main emphasis is on analytic and numerical solutions of the fixed point equations and the behavior in the vicinity of the corresponding fixed points. We determine the nonminimal coupling in the symmetric and spontaneously broken phases with vanishing and nonvanishing average fields, respectively. Using functional perturbative renormalization group methods, we discuss the leading universal contributions to the RG flow below the upper critical dimension d =4 .

  18. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    . On the annual to decadal timescale, the SV is generated primarily by advection in the fluid outer core. We demonstrate the utility of the revised monthly means by calculating models of the core surface advective flow between 1997 and 2013 directly from the SV data. One set of models assumes flow......Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them...... less favourable for studying the field generated by dynamo action in the core. We remove external field predictions, including a new way of characterising the magnetospheric ring current, from the data and then calculate revised monthly means using robust methods. The geomagnetic secular variation (SV...

  19. CFD analysis of the effect of rolling motion on the flow distribution at the core inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.H.; Zhang, G.; Gu, H.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The flow distribution at the core inlet in rolling motion is investigated. ► In rolling motion, the variation of flow distribution factor is not regular. ► The minimum flow distribution factor could be decreased by rolling motion. ► The effect of rolling motion diminishes with Reynolds number increasing. ► Effect of rolling motion in single loop operation is more significant. - Abstract: The flow distribution at the core inlet in rolling motion is investigated with software CFX12.0. The calculation results were in agreement with experimental data in steady state. As the increasing of rolling amplitude and the decreasing of rolling period, the effect of rolling motion on the flow distribution factor and the flowing behavior increases. In rolling motion, the variation of flow distribution factor is not regular. The rolling motion could decrease the minimum flow distribution factor. The effect of rolling motion on the coolant field and flow distribution diminishes with the Reynolds number increasing. The effect of rolling motion on the flow distribution in the case of single loop operation is more significant than that in the case of double loops operation.

  20. Newly-fixed carbon preferentially flows through starch in the unicellular alga Rhodella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroen, W.K.; Ramus, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Cells of the unicellular red alga Rhodella reticulata produce copious amounts of anionic extracellular polysaccharides. Previous experiments, comparing growing and non-growing cells, showed little difference in the pattern of initial 14 C partitioning, with a high percentage of label in starch. Short labelling periods, followed by chasing in unlabelled medium, showed rapid movement of carbon through the starch pool within the first 6 hrs, with an accompanying increase in both the protein and mucilage fractions. The overall pattern of carbon metabolism appears fixed throughout growth of the cells, with total carbon input changing with changing growth phase. As starch is extrachloroplastic in the red algae, input of fixed carbon directly into the starch pool may serve as a routing mechanism to direct subsequent carbon metabolism within the cell

  1. CoreFlow: A computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2014-01-01

    between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion......A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which...... provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts...

  2. Gradient flow and IR fixed point in SU(2) with Nf=8 flavors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leino, Viljami; Karavirta, Tuomas; Rantaharju, Jarno

    2015-01-01

    We study the running of the coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with 8 massless fundamental representation fermion flavours, using the gradient flow method with the Schr\\"odinger functional boundary conditions. Gradient flow allows us to measure robust continuum limit for the step scaling function...

  3. Operating Cash Flow, Earning Response Coefficient, and Fixed Asset Revaluation: Study on Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andison Andison

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study to determine the effect of operating cash flow to the abnormal return and the effect of operating cash flow to the abnormal return of companies that conduct the revaluation is higher than that of non revaluation which adopted SFAS No. 16 (2012. The analysis used in this study are multiple regression, for the period 2012-2015. The results showed that operating cash flow has no effect on non-sampled companies revaluation, while the sample of firms that perform revaluation proves that operating cash flow has a positive and significant impact on the abnormal return. Moreover, the effect of revaluation policy can strengthen the influence between operating cash flow to the firm abnormal return than non revaluation.DOI: 10.15408/etk.v16i1.4820

  4. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the core of LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.; Morgado, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    It is studied the flow redistribution through of fuel elements to the pressure drop calculation in the core of sodium cooled reactors. Using the quasi-static formulation of equations of the conservation of mass, energy and momentum, it was developed a computer program to flow redistribution calculations and pressure drop for different power levels and total flow simulating an arbitrary number of channels for sodium flowing . An optimization of the number of sufficient channels for calculations of this nature is done. The method is applied in studies of transients in the same reactor. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Flow with boiling in four-cusp channels simulating damaged core in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The study of subcooled nucleate flow boiling in non-circular channels is of great importance to engineering applications in particular to Nuclear Engineering. In the present work, an experimental apparatus, consisting basically of a refrigeration system, running on refrigerant-12, has been developed. Preliminary tests were made with a circular tube. The main objective has been to analyse subcooled flow boiling in four-cusp channels simulating the flow conditions in a PWR core degraded by accident. Correlations were developed for the forced convection film coefficient for both single-phase and subcooled flow boiling. The incipience of boiling in such geometry has also been studied. (author) [pt

  6. Ice-sheet flow conditions deduced from mechanical tests of ice core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Narita, Hideki; Hondoh, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were performed on samples of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) deep ice core, both in the field and later in a cold-room laboratory, in order to understand the ice-flow behavior of large ice sheets. Experiments were conducted under conditions of constant strain rate....... It was revealed that cloudy bands affect ice-deformation processes, but the details remain unclear. Udgivelsesdato: June......Uniaxial compression tests were performed on samples of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) deep ice core, both in the field and later in a cold-room laboratory, in order to understand the ice-flow behavior of large ice sheets. Experiments were conducted under conditions of constant strain rate......-core samples with basal planes parallel to the horizontal plane of the ice sheet. The ice-flow enhancement factors show a gradual increase with depth down to approximately 2000 m. These results can be interpreted in terms of an increase in the fourth-order Schmid factor. Below 2000 m depth, the flow...

  7. Accidents and transients analyses of a super fast reactor with single flow pass core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto,; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Safety analysis of a Super FR with single flow pass core is conducted. • Loss of feed water flow leads to a direct effect on the loss of fuel channel flow. • The core pressure is sensitive to LOCA accidents due to the direct effect. • Small LOCA introduces a critical break. • The safety criteria for all selected events are satisfied. - Abstract: The supercritical water cooled fast reactor with single flow pass core has been designed to simplify refueling and the structures of upper and lower mixing plenums. To evaluate the safety performance, safety analysis has been conducted with regard to LOCA and non-LOCA accidents including transient events. Safety analysis results show that the safety criteria are satisfied for all selected events. The total loss of feed water flow is the most important accident which the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is high due to a direct effect of the accident on the total loss of flow in all fuel assemblies. However, actuation of the ADS can mitigate the accident. Small LOCA also introduces a critical break at 7.8% break which results high MCST at BOC because the scram and ADS are not actuated. Early ADS actuation is effective to mitigate the accident. In large LOCA, 100% break LOCA results a high MCST of flooding phase at BOC due to high power peaking at the bottom part. Use of high injection flow rate by 2 LPCI units is effective to decrease the MCST

  8. Characterisation of the core poloidal flow at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebschy, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); McDermott, Rachael M.; Geiger, Benedikt; Cavedon, Marco; Dunne, Michael G.; Dux, Ralph; Fischer, Rainer; Kappatou, Athina; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Viezzer, Eleonora [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Plasma rotation has a strong influence on the transport of heat, particles, and momentum in fusion plasmas via a variety of mechanisms, for example, by the stabilization of modes and the suppression of plasma turbulence. In tokamaks, the toroidal rotation (u{sub tor}) is essentially a free parameter that is usually dominated by the external momentum input from neutral beams used to heat the plasma. The poloidal rotation (u{sub pol}), on the other hand, is strongly damped and is predicted to remain at Neoclassical (NC) levels of a few km/s. Measuring the inboard-outboard asymmetry of u{sub tor} with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy enables an indirect measurement of u{sub pol} and, hence, the measurement of the complete plasma flow on a flux surface. In order to characterise the nature of u{sub pol} at ASDEX Upgrade a poloidal rotation database has been built that contains a large variation in the parameters that, according to NC theory, drive u{sub pol}; namely, the main ion temperature and density gradients and collisionality. Initial results from this database and a detailed comparison of u{sub pol} to NC theory in interesting plasma scenarios, are presented in this poster.

  9. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Masahiro [City College of New York, NY (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Artoun, Narbeh [City College of New York, NY (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy [City College of New York, NY (United States); Sohal, Manohar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  10. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaji, Masahiro; Valentin, Francisco I.; Artoun, Narbeh; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Sohal, Manohar; Schultz, Richard; McEligot, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  11. Influence of core flows on the decade variations of the polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulot, G.; Le Huy, M.; Le Mouël, J.-L.

    We address the possibility for the core flows that generate the geomagnetic field to contribute significantly to the decade variations of the mean pole position (generally called the Markowitz wobble). This assumption is made plausible by the observation that the flow at the surface of the core-estimated from the geomagnetic secular variation models-experiences important changes on this time scale. We discard the viscous and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and consider only the pressure torque pf resulting from the fluid flow overpressure acting on the non-spherical core-mantle boundary (CMB) at the bottom of the mantle, and the gravity torque gf due to the density heterogeneity driving the core flow. We show that forces within the core balance each other on the time scale considered and, using global integrals over the core, the mantle and the whole Earth, we write Euler's equation for the mantle in terms of two more useful torques Pgeo and . The "geostrophic torque", γ Pgeo incorporates γpf and part of γgf, while γ is another fraction of γgf. We recall how the geostrophic pressure pgeo, and thus γPgeo for a given topography, can be derived from the flow at the CMB and compute the motion of the mean pole from 1900 to 1990, assuming in a first approach that the unknown γ can be neglected. The amplitude of the computed pole motion is three to ten times less than the observed one and out of the phase with it. In order to estimate the possible contribution of γ we then use a second approach and consider the case in which the reference state for the Earth is assumed to be the classical axisymmetric ellipsoidal figure with an almost constant ellipticity within the core. We show that (γPgeo + γ) is then equal to a pseudo-electromagnetic torque γL3, the torque exerted on the core by the component of the Lorentz force along the axis of rotation (this torque exists even though the mantle is assumed insulating). This proves that, at least in this case and

  12. Measurement of unsteady flow forces in inline and staggered tube bundles with fixed and vibrating tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.; Heinecke, E.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1986-01-01

    Unsteady flow forces arising in heat exchangers with cross-flow may lead to serious vibrations of the tubes. These vibrations can destroy the tubes in the end supports or in the baffles, which would require expensive repairs. The flow forces reach unexpectedly by high values if the vibration of the tube intensifies these forces. To clear up this coupling mechanism the flow forces and the vibration amplitude were measured simultaneously in a staggered and in an inline tube bundle. Considering the tube as a one-mass oscillator excited by the flow force, the main parameters can be derived, i.e. dynamic pressure, reduced mass, eigenfrequency and damping. These parameters form a dimensionless model number describing the coherence of the vibration amplitude and the force coefficient. The validity of this number has been confirmed by varying the test conditions. With the aid of this model number, the expected force coefficient can be calculated and then using a finite-element program information can be obtained about mechanical tensions and the lifetime of the heat exchanger tubes. With this model number the results of other authors, who measured the vibration amplitude only, could be confirmed in good agreement. The experiments were carried out in air with Reynolds numbers 10 4 5 . (orig.) [de

  13. Development of a detailed core flow analysis code for prismatic fuel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the core flow distribution in prismatic fuel reactors is of interest for modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) design and safety analyses. Such analyses involve the steady-state flow of helium through highly cross-connected flow paths in and around the prismatic fuel elements. Several computer codes have been developed for this purpose. However, since they are proprietary codes, they are not generally available for independent MHTGR design confirmation. The previously developed codes do not consider the exchange or diversion of flow between individual bypass gaps with much detail. Such a capability could be important in the analysis of potential fuel block motion, such as occurred in the Fort St. Vrain reactor, or for the analysis of the conditions around a flow blockage or misloaded fuel block. This work develops a computer code with fairly general-purpose capabilities for modeling the flow in regions of prismatic fuel cores. The code, called BYPASS solves a finite difference control volume formulation of the compressible, steady-state fluid flow in highly cross-connected flow paths typical of the MHTGR

  14. Study of core flow distribution for small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhao, Pengcheng; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Hongli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A core flow distribution calculation code for natural circulation LFRs was developed. • The comparison study between the channel method and the CFD method was conducted. • The core flow distribution analysis and optimization design for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was conducted. - Abstract: Small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactor (LFR) is a potential candidate for LFR development. It has many attractive advantages such as reduced capital costs and inherent safety. The core flow distribution calculation is an important issue for nuclear reactor design, which will provide important input parameters to thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. The core flow distribution calculation of a natural circulation LFR is different from that of a forced circulation reactor. In a forced circulation reactor, the core flow distribution can be controlled and adjusted by the pump power and the flow distributor, while in a natural circulation reactor, the core flow distribution is automatically adjusted according to the relationship between the local power and the local resistance feature. In this paper, a non-uniform heated parallel channel flow distribution calculation code was developed and the comparison study between the channel method and the CFD method was carried out to assess the exactness of the developed code. The core flow distribution analysis and optimization design for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was conducted using the developed code. A core flow distribution optimization design scheme for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was proposed according to the optimization analysis results

  15. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  16. CoreFlow: Enriching Bro security events using network traffic monitoring data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, R.; Buraglio, N.; de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    Attacks against network infrastructures can be detected by Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS). Still reaction to these events are often limited by the lack of larger contextual information in which they occurred. In this paper we present CoreFlow, a framework for the correlation and enrichment of IDS

  17. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified

  18. Burnout and distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltenko, E. A.; Shpakovskii, A. A.

    2010-03-01

    Previous works on studying distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels are briefly reviewed. Interrelation between mass transfer processes and burnout is shown. A procedure for calculating burnout on convex and concave heat-transfer surfaces in narrow slot channels is presented.

  19. Core dynamics analysis for reactivity insertion and loss of coolant flow tests using the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    2007-01-01

    The High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is a graphite-moderated and a gas-cooled reactor with a thermal power of 30 MW and a reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC (SAITO, 1994). Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR are in progress to verify its inherent safety features and improve the safety technology and design methodology for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) (TACHIBANA 2002) (NAKAGAWA 2004). The reactivity insertion test is one of the safety demonstration tests for the HTTR. This test simulates the rapid increase in the reactor power by withdrawing the control rod without operating the reactor power control system. In addition, the loss of coolant flow tests has been conducted to simulate the rapid decrease in the reactor power by tripping one, two or all out of three gas circulators. The experimental results have revealed the inherent safety features of HTGRs, such as the negative reactivity feedback effect. The numerical analysis code, which was named ACCORD (TAKAMATSU 2006), was developed to analyze the reactor dynamics including the flow behavior in the HTTR core. We used a conventional method, namely, a one-dimensional flow channel model and reactor kinetics model with a single temperature coefficient, taking into account the temperature changes in the core. However, a slight difference between the analytical and experimental results was observed. Therefore, we have modified this code to use a model with four parallel channels and twenty temperature coefficients in the core. Furthermore, we added another analytical model of the core for calculating the heat conduction between the fuel channels and the core in the case of the loss of coolant flow tests. This paper describes the validation results for the newly developed code using the experimental results of the reactivity insertion test as well as the loss of coolant flow tests by tripping one or two out of three gas circulators. Finally, the pre-analytical result of

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageway and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another

  1. Measurement of two-phase flow at the core upper plenum interface under simulated reflood conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.G.; Combs, S.K.; Bagwell, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Objectives of the Instrument Development Loop program were to simulate flows at the core/upper plenum interface during the reflood phase of a LOCA and to develop instruments for measuring mass-flows at this interface. A tie plate drag body was developed and tested successfully, and the data obtained were shown to be equivalent to pressure drops. The tie-plate drag body gave useful measurements in pure downflow, and the drag/turbine combination correlates with mass flow for high upflow

  2. Flowing and freezing of molten core materials during unprotected loss of flow accidents in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Royl, P.

    1988-09-01

    Flowing and freezing of mobile core materials change the fissile material distribution and core-inventory under hypothetical accident conditions and determine the path to permanent shutdown of the neutronic events and the energetic potentials. The report classifies the bondary conditions for such flowing and freezing processes by going through the different situations under which these processes can occur in the scenario of the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident. The classification is based on ULOF-accident simulations for a homogeneous reactor core concept of a 300 MWe LMFBR (e. g. SNR-300), but many boundary conditions are also characteristic for other core designs. A review of the relevant experiments is then made to correlate the available experimental information with these classified boundary conditions and to look at the resulting flowing and freezing processes. Boundary conditions that have been experimentally shown to be important are assigned high priorities. The data are specifically valued in relation to these boundary conditions of high priorities. The review includes the major experimental programs with published results. The discussion shows that the results from most clean condition tests for melt relocations are valuable for a better understanding of basic phenomena and analytical model development, but are not directly applicable to real accident conditions. The database for relevant boundary conditions from the ULOF scenario is limited and largely included in integral sequence tests from which quantitative information for modelling is difficult to obtain. Needs for additional investigations are identified. The suggestions are mainly restricted to investigations of the early phase of fuel removal. They are given with reference to candidate facilities and include relocations in the subassemblies and in the inter-subassembly gaps. Particular emphasis is put on the leading edge properties and possible driving forces to which more attention

  3. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  4. Direct numerical simulations of reacting flows with detailed chemistry using many-core/GPU acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Herná ndez Pé rez, Francisco E.; Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan; Xu, Xiao; Sow, Aliou; Lee, Bok Jik; Sankaran, Ramanan; Im, Hong G.

    2018-01-01

    A new direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for multi-component gaseous reacting flows has been developed at KAUST, with the state-of-the-art programming model for next generation high performance computing platforms. The code, named KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flows Solver (KARFS), employs the MPI+X programming, and relies on Kokkos for “X” for performance portability to multi-core, many-core and GPUs, providing innovative software development while maintaining backward compatibility with established parallel models and legacy code. The capability and potential of KARFS to perform DNS of reacting flows with large, detailed reaction mechanisms is demonstrated with various model problems involving ignition and turbulent flame propagations with varying degrees of chemical complexities.

  5. Fundamental study on flow characteristics of disrupted core pool at a low energy level (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Liu, Ping; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Fukuda, Kenji; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Yamano, Hidemasa; Sato, Ikken

    2009-09-01

    Dynamic behaviors of solid-particle dominant multiphase flows were investigated to model the mobility of core materials in a low-energy disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor. Two series of experiments were performed, those were dam-break experiments and bubble visualization experiments. Verification of fluid-dynamics models used in the fast reactor safety analysis code SIMMER-III was also conducted based on the numerical simulations of these experiments. The experimental analyses show that SIMMER-III can represent effects of solid particle interaction on multiphase flow behaviors by adjusting model parameters of the particle jamming model if the particles are immersed in liquid phase. Further improvement of SIMMER-III with more generalized models is necessary to appropriately simulate interactions between solid particles in a wider range of flow conditions. (author)

  6. Flow velocity calculation to avoid instability in a typical research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Flow velocity through a research reactor core composed by MTR-type fuel elements is investigated. Core cooling capacity must be available at the same time that fuel-plate collapse must be avoided. Fuel plates do not rupture during plate collapse, but their lateral deflections can close flow channels and lead to plate over-heating. The critical flow velocity is a speed at which the plates collapse by static instability type failure. In this paper, critical velocity and coolant velocity are evaluated for a typical MTR-type flat plate fuel element. Miller's method is used for prediction of critical velocity. The coolant velocity is limited to 2/3 of the critical velocity, that is a currently used criterion. Fuel plate characteristics are based on the open pool Australian light water reactor. (author)

  7. Direct numerical simulations of reacting flows with detailed chemistry using many-core/GPU acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Hernández Pérez, Francisco E.

    2018-03-29

    A new direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for multi-component gaseous reacting flows has been developed at KAUST, with the state-of-the-art programming model for next generation high performance computing platforms. The code, named KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flows Solver (KARFS), employs the MPI+X programming, and relies on Kokkos for “X” for performance portability to multi-core, many-core and GPUs, providing innovative software development while maintaining backward compatibility with established parallel models and legacy code. The capability and potential of KARFS to perform DNS of reacting flows with large, detailed reaction mechanisms is demonstrated with various model problems involving ignition and turbulent flame propagations with varying degrees of chemical complexities.

  8. Use of flow cytometry for high-throughput cell population estimates in fixed brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The numbers and types of cells in an area of cortex define its function. Therefore it is essential to characterize the numbers and distributions of total cells in areas of the cortex, as well as to identify numbers of subclasses of neurons and glial cells. To date, the large size of the primate brain and the lack of innovation in cell counting methods have been a roadblock to obtaining high-resolution maps of cell and neuron density across the cortex in humans and non-human primates. Stereological counting methods and the isotropic fractionator are valuable tools for estimating cell numbers, but are better suited to smaller, well-defined brain structures or to cortex as a whole. In the present study, we have extended our flow-cytometry based counting method, the flow fractionator (Collins et al., 2010a, to include high-throughput total cell population estimates in homogenized cortical samples. We demonstrate that our method produces consistent, accurate and repeatable cell estimates quickly. The estimates we report are in excellent agreement with estimates for the same samples obtained using a Neubauer chamber and a fluorescence microscope. We show that our flow cytometry-based method for total cell estimation in homogenized brain tissue is more efficient and more precise than manual counting methods. The addition of automated nuclei counting to our flow fractionator method allows for a fully automated, rapid characterization of total cells and neuronal and non-neuronal populations in human and non-human primate brains, providing valuable data to further our understanding of the functional organization of normal, aging and diseased brains.

  9. Flow of power-law fluids in fixed beds of cylinders or spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, John P.

    2012-10-29

    An ensemble average of the equations of motion for a Newtonian fluid over particle configurations in a dilute fixed bed of spheres or cylinders yields Brinkman\\'s equations of motion, where the disturbance velocity produced by a test particle is influenced by the Newtonian fluid stress and a body force representing the linear drag on the surrounding particles. We consider a similar analysis for a power-law fluid where the stress τ is related to the rate of strain e by τ = 2m en-1e, where m and n are constants. In this case, the ensemble-averaged momentum equation includes a body force resulting from the nonlinear drag exerted on the surrounding particles, a power-law stress associated with the disturbance velocity of the test particle, and a stress term that is linear with respect to the test particle\\'s disturbance velocity. The latter term results from the interaction of the test particle\\'s velocity disturbance with the random straining motions produced by the neighbouring particles and is important only in shear-thickening fluids where the velocity disturbances of the particles are long-ranged. The solutions to these equations using scaling analyses for dilute beds and numerical simulations using the finite element method are presented. We show that the drag force acting on a particle in a fixed bed can be written as a function of a particle-concentration-dependent length scale at which the fluid velocity disturbance produced by a particle is modified by hydrodynamic interactions with its neighbours. This is also true of the drag on a particle in a periodic array where the length scale is the lattice spacing. The effects of particle interactions on the drag in dilute arrays (periodic or random) of cylinders and spheres in shear-thickening fluids is dramatic, where it arrests the algebraic growth of the disturbance velocity with radial position when n≥ 1 for cylinders and n≥ 2 for spheres. For concentrated random arrays of particles, we adopt an

  10. Analytical study on coolant temperature of several leak flows in the experimental VHTr core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoh; Arai, Taketoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1982-08-01

    This report describes heat transfer analysis of several leak flows which bypass main coolant flow path in the experimental VHTR core. The analysis contains the leak flow at permanent reflectors, replaceable reflectors and gaps between fuel columns. The summary of the results are as follows: (1) the temperature of the leak flow gas increases up to the surface temperature of permanent reflectors, (2) the gas temperature at replaceable reflectors increases at least 40 0 C in case of the worst analytical condition, (3) the gas temperature increases remarkably with decreasing equivalent diameter which is changed by the angle of bevel edge of the reflector, (4) while the gas temperature is low at the upper part of the fuel element, the temperature increases rapidly when it flow down along the gap of the fuel columns. (author)

  11. Reactor core flow measurements during plant start-up using non-intrusive flow meter CROSSFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, V.; Sharp, B.; Gurevich, A., E-mail: vkanda@amag-inc.com, E-mail: bsharp@amag-inc.com, E-mail: agurevich@amag-inc.com [Advanced Measurement & Analysis Group Inc., Ontario (Canada); Gurevich, Y., E-mail: yuri.gurevich@daystartech.ca [Daystar Technologies Inc., Ontario (Canada); Selvaratnarajah, S.; Lopez, A., E-mail: sselvaratnarajah@amag-inc.com, E-mail: alopez@amag-inc.com [Advanced Measurement & Analysis Group Inc., Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    For the first time, direct measurements of the total reactor coolant flow and the flow distribution between the inner reactor zone and the outer zone were conducted using the non-intrusive clamp on ultrasonic cross-correlation flow meter, CROSSFLOW, developed and manufactured by Advanced Measurement & Analysis Group Inc. (AMAG). The measurements were performed at Bruce Power A Unit 1 on the Pump Discharge piping of the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system during start-up. This paper describes installation processes, hydraulic testing, uncertainty analysis and traceability of the measurements to certified standards. (author)

  12. Evolution of - and Core-Dominated Lava Flows Using Scaling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, A.; Rust, A.; Sparks, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the front evolution of simple lava flows on a slope using scaling arguments. For the retarding force acting against gravity, we analyzed three different cases: a flow controlled by a Newtonian viscosity, a flow controlled by the yield strength of a diffusively growing crust and a flow controlled by its core yield strength. These models were tested using previously published data of front evolution and volume discharge of 10 lava flow eruptions from 6 different volcanoes. Our analysis suggests that for basaltic eruptions with high effusion rate and low crystal content, (Hawaiian eruptions), the best fit of the data is with a Newtonian viscosity. For basaltic eruptions with lower effusion rates (Etna eruptions) or long duration andesitic eruptions (Lonquimay eruption, Chile) the flow is controlled by the yield strength of a growing crust. Finally, for very high crystalline lavas (Colima, Santiaguito) the flow is controlled by its core yield strength. The order of magnitude of the viscosities from our analysis is in the same range as previous studies using field measurements on the same lavas. The yield strength values for the growing crust and core of the flow are similar and with an order of magnitude of 10^5 Pa. This number is similar to yield strength values found in lava domes by different authors. The consistency of yield strength ~10^5 Pa is because larger stresses cause fracturing of very crystalline magma, which drastically reduces its effective strength. Furthermore, we used a 2-D analysis of a Bingham fluid flow on a slope to conclude that, for lower yield strength values, the flow is controlled mainly by its plastic viscosity and the lava can be effectively modelled as Newtonian. Our analysis provides a simple tool to evaluate the main controlling forces in the evolution of a lava flow, as well as the magnitude of its rheological properties, for eruptions of different compositions and conditions and may be useful to predict the evolution of

  13. Activity of corrosion products in pool type reactors with ascending flow in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade e Silva, Graciete S. de; Queiroz Bogado Leite, Sergio de

    1995-01-01

    A model for the activity of corrosion products in the water of a pool type reactor with ascending flow is presented. The problem is described by a set of coupled differential equations relating the radioisotope concentrations in the core and pool circuits and taking into account two types of radioactive sources: i) those from radioactive species formed in the fuel cladding, control elements, reflector, etc, and afterwards released to the primary stream by corrosion (named reactor sources) and ii) those formed from non radioactive isotopes entering the primary stream by corrosion of the circuit components and being activated when passing through the core (named circuit sources). (author). 6 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic...... meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...

  15. A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Foley, R. J.; Ruel, J.; Sullivan, P.; Veilleux, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster s lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L(sub 2-10 keV) = 8.2 10(exp 45) erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (M(sub cool) = 3820 +/- 530 Stellar Mass/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Stellar Mass/ yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form via accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than the current picture of central galaxies assembling entirely via mergers.

  16. Investigation of two-phase flow instability under SMART-P core conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Chung Chan

    2005-01-01

    An integral-type advanced light water reactor, named SMART-P, is being continuously studied at KAERI. The reactor core consists of hundreds of closed-channel type fuel assemblies with vertical upward flows. The upper and lower parts of the fuel assembly channels are connected to the common heads. The constant pressure drop imposed on the channel is responsible for the occurrence of density wave oscillations under local boiling and/or natural circulation conditions. The fuel assembly channel with oscillatory flow is highly susceptible to experience the CHF which may cause the fuel failure due to a sudden increase of the cladding temperature. Thus, prevention of the flow instability is an important criterion for the SMART-P core design. Experimental and analytical studies have been conducted in order to investigate the onset of flow instability (OFI) under SMART core conditions. The parallel channel oscillations were observed in a high pressure water-loop test facility. A linear stability analysis model in the frequency-domain was developed for the prediction of the marginal stability boundary (MSB) in the parallel boiling channels

  17. CoreFlow: a computational platform for integration, analysis and modeling of complex biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Schoof, Erwin M; Creixell, Pau; Zheng, Yong; Olhovsky, Marina; Tian, Ruijun; So, Jonathan; Vanderlaan, Rachel D; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune; Colwill, Karen

    2014-04-04

    A major challenge in mass spectrometry and other large-scale applications is how to handle, integrate, and model the data that is produced. Given the speed at which technology advances and the need to keep pace with biological experiments, we designed a computational platform, CoreFlow, which provides programmers with a framework to manage data in real-time. It allows users to upload data into a relational database (MySQL), and to create custom scripts in high-level languages such as R, Python, or Perl for processing, correcting and modeling this data. CoreFlow organizes these scripts into project-specific pipelines, tracks interdependencies between related tasks, and enables the generation of summary reports as well as publication-quality images. As a result, the gap between experimental and computational components of a typical large-scale biology project is reduced, decreasing the time between data generation, analysis and manuscript writing. CoreFlow is being released to the scientific community as an open-sourced software package complete with proteomics-specific examples, which include corrections for incomplete isotopic labeling of peptides (SILAC) or arginine-to-proline conversion, and modeling of multiple/selected reaction monitoring (MRM/SRM) results. CoreFlow was purposely designed as an environment for programmers to rapidly perform data analysis. These analyses are assembled into project-specific workflows that are readily shared with biologists to guide the next stages of experimentation. Its simple yet powerful interface provides a structure where scripts can be written and tested virtually simultaneously to shorten the life cycle of code development for a particular task. The scripts are exposed at every step so that a user can quickly see the relationships between the data, the assumptions that have been made, and the manipulations that have been performed. Since the scripts use commonly available programming languages, they can easily be

  18. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect...... signals of abrupt climate change in deep polar ice cores. To test its performance, we used the system to analyze different climate intervals in ice drilled at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, Greenland. The quality of our continuous measurement of stable water isotopes has been......In recent decades, the development of continuous flow analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analysis has enabled greater sample throughput and greater depth resolution compared with the classic discrete sampling technique. We developed the first Japanese CFA system at the National Institute...

  19. Fundamental study on flow characteristics of disrupted core pool at a low energy level (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Liu, Ping; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Fukuda, Kenji; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Sato, Ikken

    2007-03-01

    Dynamic behaviors of solid particle beds in a liquid pool against pressure transients were investigated to model the mobility of core materials in a low-energy disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor. A series of experiments was performed with a particle bed of different heights, comprising different monotype solid particles, where variable initial pressures of the originally pressurized nitrogen gas were adopted as the pressure source. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using SIMMER-III, a fast reactor safety analysis code. Experimental analyses using the SIMMER-III code show that physical models and method used in the code can reasonably represent the transient behaviors of multiphase flows with rich solid phase as observed in the experiments. The validation of several key models of SIMMER-III was also discussed for treating transient behaviors of the solid-particle phase in multiphase flows. (author)

  20. Toward Understanding Tip Leakage Flows in Small Compressor Cores Including Stator Leakage Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work was to provide additional data to supplement the work reported in NASA/CR-2015-218868 (Berdanier and Key, 2015b). The aim of that project was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearances were studied with nominal tip clearance gaps of 1.5 percent, 3.0 percent, and 4.0 percent based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was previously investigated at four corrected speedlines (100 percent, 90 percent, 80 percent, and 68 percent) for each of the three tip clearance configurations. This study extends the previously published results to include detailed steady and time-resolved pressure data at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100 percent corrected speedline for the intermediate clearance level (3.0 percent). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row are supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data were combined with existing three-component velocity measurements to identify a novel technique for calculating blockage in a multistage compressor. Time-resolved static pressure measurements have been collected over the rotor tips for all rotors with each of the three tip clearance configurations for up to five loading conditions along the 100 percent corrected speedline using fast-response piezoresistive pressure sensors. These time-resolved static pressure measurements reveal new knowledge about the

  1. Features and validation of discrete element method for simulating pebble flow in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yong; Li Yanjie

    2005-01-01

    The core of a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is composed of big number of fuel pebbles, their kinetic behaviors are of great importance in estimating the path and residence time of individual pebble, the evolution of the mixing zone for the assessment of the efficiency of a reactor. Numerical method is highlighted in modern reactor design. In view of granular flow, the Discrete Element Model based on contact mechanics of spheres was briefly described. Two typical examples were presented to show the capability of the DEM method. The former is piling with glass/steel spheres, which provides validated evidences that the simulated angles of repose are in good coincidence with the experimental results. The later is particle discharge in a flat- bottomed silo, which shows the effects of material modulus and demonstrates several features. The two examples show the DEM method enables to predict the behaviors, such as the evolution of pebble profiles, streamlines etc., and provides sufficient information for pebble flow analysis and core design. In order to predict the cyclic pebble flow in a HTGR core precisely and efficiently, both model and code improvement are needed, together with rational specification of physical properties with proper measuring techniques. Strategic and methodological considerations were also discussed. (authors)

  2. K-FIX, Transient 2 Phase Flow Hydrodynamic in 2-D Planar or Cylindrical Geometry, Eulerian Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W. C.; Torrey, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The transient dynamics of two- dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange. 2 - Method of solution: The equations are solved using an Eulerian finite difference technique that implicitly couples the rates of phase transitions, momentum, and energy exchange to determination of the pressure, density, and velocity fields. The implicit solution is accomplished iteratively using a point relaxation technique without linearizing the equations, thus eliminating the need for numerous derivative terms. Solutions can be obtained in one and two space dimensions in plane geometry and in cylindrical geometry with axial symmetry and zero azimuthal velocity. Solutions in spherical geometry can also be obtained in one space dimension. The geometric region of interest is divided into many finite-sized, space-fixed zones called cells which form the computing mesh. In plane geometry the cells are rectangular cylinders, in cylindrical geometry they are toroids with rectangular cross section, and in spherical geometry they are spherical shells

  3. Spatial connectivity in a highly heterogeneous aquifer: From cores to preferential flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M.; Zheng, C.; Wilson, C.; Tick, G.R.; Liu, Gaisheng; Gorelick, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates connectivity in a small portion of the extremely heterogeneous aquifer at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi. A total of 19 fully penetrating soil cores were collected from a rectangular grid of 4 m by 4 m. Detailed grain size analysis was performed on 5 cm segments of each core, yielding 1740 hydraulic conductivity (K) estimates. Three different geostatistical simulation methods were used to generate 3-D conditional realizations of the K field for the sampled block. Particle tracking calculations showed that the fastest particles, as represented by the first 5% to arrive, converge along preferential flow paths and exit the model domain within preferred areas. These 5% fastest flow paths accounted for about 40% of the flow. The distribution of preferential flow paths and particle exit locations is clearly influenced by the occurrence of clusters formed by interconnected cells with K equal to or greater than the 0.9 decile of the data distribution (10% of the volume). The fraction of particle paths within the high-K clusters ranges from 43% to 69%. In variogram-based K fields, some of the fastest paths are through media with lower K values, suggesting that transport connectivity may not require fully connected zones of relatively homogenous K. The high degree of flow and transport connectivity was confirmed by the values of two groups of connectivity indicators. In particular, the ratio between effective and geometric mean K (on average, about 2) and the ratio between the average arrival time and the arrival time of the fastest particles (on average, about 9) are consistent with flow and advective transport behavior characterized by channeling along preferential flow paths. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Gene expression patterns in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded core biopsies predict docetaxel chemosensitivity in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenny C; Makris, Andreas; Gutierrez, M Carolina; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Hackett, James R; Jeong, Jennie; Liu, Mei-Lan; Baker, Joffre; Clark-Langone, Kim; Baehner, Frederick L; Sexton, Krsytal; Mohsin, Syed; Gray, Tara; Alvarez, Laura; Chamness, Gary C; Osborne, C Kent; Shak, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we had identified gene expression patterns that predicted response to neoadjuvant docetaxel. Other studies have validated that a high Recurrence Score (RS) by the 21-gene RT-PCR assay is predictive of worse prognosis but better response to chemotherapy. We investigated whether tumor expression of these 21 genes and other candidate genes can predict response to docetaxel. Core biopsies from 97 patients were obtained before treatment with neoadjuvant docetaxel (4 cycles, 100 mg/m2 q3 weeks). Three 10-microm FFPE sections were submitted for quantitative RT-PCR assays of 192 genes that were selected from our previous work and the literature. Of the 97 patients, 81 (84%) had sufficient invasive cancer, 80 (82%) had sufficient RNA for QRTPCR assay, and 72 (74%) had clinical response data. Mean age was 48.5 years, and the median tumor size was 6 cm. Clinical complete responses (CR) were observed in 12 (17%), partial responses in 41 (57%), stable disease in 17 (24%), and progressive disease in 2 patients (3%). A significant relationship (P<0.05) between gene expression and CR was observed for 14 genes, including CYBA. CR was associated with lower expression of the ER gene group and higher expression of the proliferation gene group from the 21 gene assay. Of note, CR was more likely with a high RS (P=0.008). We have established molecular profiles of sensitivity to docetaxel. RT-PCR technology provides a potential platform for a predictive test of docetaxel chemosensitivity using small amounts of routinely processed material.

  5. TiO2-photocatalyzed As(III) oxidation in a fixed-bed, flow-through reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Megan A; Hering, Janet G

    2006-07-01

    Compliance with the U.S. drinking water standard for arsenic (As) of 10 microg L(-1) is required in January 2006. This will necessitate implementation of treatment technologies for As removal by thousands of water suppliers. Although a variety of such technologies is available, most require preoxidation of As(III) to As(V) for efficient performance. Previous batch studies with illuminated TiO2 slurries have demonstrated that TiO2-photocatalyzed AS(III) oxidation occurs rapidly. This study examined reaction efficiency in a flow-through, fixed-bed reactor that provides a better model for treatment in practice. Glass beads were coated with mixed P25/sol gel TiO2 and employed in an upflow reactor irradiated from above. The reactor residence time, influent As(III) concentration, number of TiO2 coatings on the beads, solution matrix, and light source were varied to characterize this reaction and determine its feasibility for water treatment. Repeated usage of the same beads in multiple experiments or extended use was found to affect effluent As(V) concentrations but not the steady-state effluent As(III) concentration, which suggests that As(III) oxidation at the TiO2 surface undergoes dynamic sorption equilibration. Catalyst poisoning was not observed either from As(V) or from competitively adsorbing anions, although the higher steady-state effluent As(III) concentrations in synthetic groundwater compared to 5 mM NaNO3 indicated that competitive sorbates in the matrix partially hinder the reaction. A reactive transport model with rate constants proportional to incident light at each bead layer fit the experimental data well despite simplifying assumptions. TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of As(III) was also effective under natural sunlight. Limitations to the efficiency of As(III) oxidation in the fixed-bed reactor were attributable to constraints of the reactor geometry, which could be overcome by improved design. The fixed-bed TiO2 reactor offers an environmentally

  6. Heat flow at the proposed Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) Site: Tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costain, John K.; Decker, Edward R.

    The heat flow in northwestern South Carolina at the Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) site area is approximately 55 mW/m². This data supplements other data to the east in the Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain provinces where heat flows > 55 mW/m² are characteristic of post- and late-synmetamorphic granitoids. Piedmont heat flow and heat generation data for granites, metagranites, and one Slate Belt site, in a zone approximately parallel to major structural Appalachian trends, define a linear relation. Tectonic truncation of heat-producing crust at a depth of about 8 km (a depth equal to the slope of the heat flow-heat production line) is proposed to explain the linear relation. Using the value of reduced heat flow estimated from this empirical relation, and assuming thicknesses of heat-producing crust defined by new ADCOH seismic data, the heat flow and heat production at the ADCOH site are consistent with a depth to the base of the Inner Piedmont crystalline allochthon of about 5.5 km. Seismic data at the ADCOH site confirm that the Inner Piedmont is tectonically truncated at about 5.5 km by the Blue Ridge master decollement. Temperatures at 10 km at the ADCOH site are predicted to be less than 200 °C.

  7. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  8. Development of the test facilities for the measurement of core flow and pressure distribution of SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Y.J.; Euh, D.J.; Youn, Y.J.; Chu, I.C.; Kwon, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    A design of SMART reactor has been developed, of which the primary system is composed of four internal circulation pumps, a core of 57 fuel assemblies, eight cassettes of steam generators, flow mixing head assemblies, and other internal structures. Since primary design features are very different from conventional reactors, the characteristics of flow and pressure distribution are expected to be different accordingly. In order to analyze the thermal margin and hydraulic design characteristics of SMART reactor, design quantification tests for flow and pressure distribution with a preservation of flow geometry are necessary. In the present study, the design feature of the test facility in order to investigate flow and pressure distribution, named “SCOP” is described. In order to preserve the flow distribution characteristics, the SCOP is linearly reduced with a scaling ratio of 1/5. The core flow rate of each fuel assembly is measured by a venturi meter attached in the lower part of the core simulator having a similarity of pressure drop for nominally scaled flow conditions. All the 57 core simulators and 8 S/G simulators are precisely calibrated in advance of assembling in test facilities. The major parameters in tests are pressures, differential pressures, and core flow distribution. (author)

  9. Measurement of the complete core plasma flow across the LOC-SOC transition at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Angioni, C.; Geiger, B.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G.; Kappatou, A.; Pütterich, T.; Stroth, U.; Viezzer, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2018-02-01

    A newly installed core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) enables the evaluation of the core poloidal rotation (upol ) through the inboard-outboard asymmetry of the toroidal rotation with an accuracy of 0.5 to 1 km s-1 . Using this technique, the total plasma flow has been measured in Ohmic L-mode plasmas across the transition from the linear to saturated ohmic confinement (LOC-SOC) regimes. The core poloidal rotation of the plasma around mid-radius is found to be always in the ion diamagnetic direction, in disagreement with neoclassical (NC) predictions. The edge rotation is found to be electron-directed and consistent with NC codes. This measurement provides as well the missing ingredient to evaluate the core E×B velocity (uE×B ) from data only, which can then be compared to measurements of the perpendicular velocity of the turbulent fluctuations (u\\perp ) to gain information on the turbulent phase velocity (vph ). The non neoclassical upol from CXRS leads to good agreement between uE×B and u\\perp indicating that vph is small and at similar values as found with gyrokinetic simulations. Moreover, the data shows a shift of vph in the ion-diamagnetic direction at the edge after the transition from LOC to SOC consistent with a change in the dominant turbulence regime. The upgrade of the core CXRS system provides as well a deeper insight into the intrinsic rotation. This paper shows that the reversal of the core toroidal rotation occurs clearly after the LOC-SOC transition and concomitant with the peaking of the electron density.

  10. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art in network coding for wireless, meshed networks typically considers two problems separately. First, the problem of providing reliability for a single session. Second, the problem of opportunistic combination of flows by using minimalistic coding, i.e., by XORing packets from diff...

  11. Analysis of liquid metal MHD flow in multiple adjacent ducts using an iterative method to solve the core flow equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally fast and efficient method for analyzing MHD flow at high Hartmann number and interaction parameter is presented and used to analyze a multiple duct geometry. This type of geometry is of practical interest in fusion applications. Because the Hartmann number and interaction parameter are generally large in fusion applications, the inertial and viscous terms in the Navier-Stokes equation can often be neglected in the core flow region, making this equation linear. In addition, because the magnetic fields in a fusion reactor vary slowly and the magnetic Reynolds number is small, the induced magnetic field can be neglected. The resulting equations representing core flow have certain characteristics which make it possible to reduce them to two dimensional without losing the three dimensional characteristics. The method which has been developed is an 'iterative' method. A velocity profile is assumed, then Ohm's law and the current conservation equation are combined and used to solve for the potential distribution in a plane in the fluid, and in a surface in the duct wall. The potential variation along magnetic field lines is checked, and if necessary, the velocities are adjusted. This procedure is repeated until the potentials along field lines vary to within a specified error. The analysis of the multiple duct geometry shows the importance of global effects. The results of two basic cases are presented. In the first, the average velocity in each duct is the same, but the wall conductance ratios of the walls perpendicular to the magnetic field vary from duct to duct. The total pressure drop in the electrically connected ducts was greater than or equal to the total pressure drop in the same ducts electrically isolated. In addition, the velocity profile in the ducts can be significantly affected by the presence of neighboring ducts. (orig./AH)

  12. VALIDATION OF NUMERICAL METHODS TO CALCULATE BYPASS FLOW IN A PRISMATIC GAS-COOLED REACTOR CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAM-IL TAK

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For thermo-fluid and safety analyses of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR, intensive efforts are in progress in the developments of the GAMMA+ code of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI and the AGREE code of the University of Michigan (U of M. One of the important requirements for GAMMA+ and AGREE is an accurate modeling capability of a bypass flow in a prismatic core. Recently, a series of air experiments were performed at Seoul National University (SNU in order to understand bypass flow behavior and generate an experimental database for the validation of computer codes. The main objective of the present work is to validate the GAMMA+ and AGREE codes using the experimental data published by SNU. The numerical results of the two codes were compared with the measured data. A good agreement was found between the calculations and the measurement. It was concluded that GAMMA+ and AGREE can reliably simulate the bypass flow behavior in a prismatic core.

  13. Ring waves as a mass transport mechanism in air-driven core-annular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Forest, M Gregory; Lee, Long; Ogrosky, H Reed; Olander, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Air-driven core-annular fluid flows occur in many situations, from lung airways to engineering applications. Here we study, experimentally and theoretically, flows where a viscous liquid film lining the inside of a tube is forced upwards against gravity by turbulent airflow up the center of the tube. We present results on the thickness and mean speed of the film and properties of the interfacial waves that develop from an instability of the air-liquid interface. We derive a long-wave asymptotic model and compare properties of its solutions with those of the experiments. Traveling wave solutions of this long-wave model exhibit evidence of different mass transport regimes: Past a certain threshold, sufficiently large-amplitude waves begin to trap cores of fluid which propagate upward at wave speeds. This theoretical result is then confirmed by a second set of experiments that show evidence of ring waves of annular fluid propagating over the underlying creeping flow. By tuning the parameters of the experiments, the strength of this phenomenon can be adjusted in a way that is predicted qualitatively by the model.

  14. Experimental investigation of the vibration response of a flexible tube due to simulated reactor core, cross and annular exit flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, K.H.; Martin, M.L.; Higgins, W.H.; Rossano, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Instrumentation tubes in pressurized nuclear reactors have experienced wear due to excessive flow-induced vibrations. Experiments to identify the predominant flow excitation mechanism at a particular plant, and to develop a sleeve design to remedy the wear problem are reported. An instrumented flow visualization model enabled simulation of a wide range of individual or combined reactor core flow, cross flow and thimble flow conditions. The instrumentation scheme adopted for these experiments used proximity displacement transducers and a force transducer to measure respectively tube motion and contact/impact forces at the wear region. Extensive testing of the original, in-plant configuration identified the normal core flow as the primary source of excitation. Shielding the In-Core-Instrumentation thimble tube from the normal core flow curtailed vibration amplitudes; however, thimble flow excitation then became more pronounced. Various outlet nozzle configurations were investigated. An internal cavity combined with radial outlet slots became the optimum solution for the problem. The paper presents typical test data in the form of orbital tube motion, spectrum analysis and time history collages. The effectiveness of shielding the instrumentation tube from the flow is demonstrated. (author)

  15. Anaerobic digestion of corn ethanol thin stillage in batch and by high-rate down-flow fixed film reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A; Kennedy, K J

    2012-01-01

    Thin stillage (CTS) from a dry-grind corn ethanol plant was evaluated as a carbon source for anaerobic digestion (AD) by batch and high rate semi-continuous down-flow stationary fixed film (DSFF) reactors. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays were carried out with CTS concentrations ranging from approximately 2,460-27,172 mg total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) per litre, achieved by diluting CTS with clean water or a combination of clean water and treated effluent. High TCOD, SCOD and volatile solids (VS) removal efficiencies of 85 ± 2, 94 ± 0 and 82 ± 1% were achieved for CTS diluted with only clean water at an organic concentration of 21,177 mg TCOD per litre, with a methane yield of 0.30 L methane per gram TCOD(removed) at standard temperature and pressure (STP, 0 °C and 1 atmosphere). Batch studies investigating the use of treated effluent for dilution showed promising results. Continuous studies employed two mesophilic DSFF anaerobic digesters treating thin stillage, operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 20, 14.3, 8.7, 6.3, 5 and 4.2 d. Successful digestion was achieved up to an organic loading rate (OLR) of approximately 7.4 g TCOD L(-1)d(-1) at a 5 d HRT with a yield of 2.05 LCH(4) L(-1)d(-1) (at STP) and TCOD and VS removal efficiencies of 89 ± 3 and 85 ± 3%, respectively.

  16. Analysis of resonance oscillation of the neutron flow in a BWR-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.

    1987-09-01

    This is a thesis which has been made within the institution of automatic control in Lund. Two programs, 'Blackie' and 'Test' have been written in Fortran. These two programs are to be used for the evaluation of ASEA-ATOMs resonance test in different nuclear reactors. In these tests the condition of the reactor becomes more and more unstable because the coolant flow decreases at the same time as the power gradually increases. This leads to resonance in the neutron flow. This flow is measured by detectors placed in different parts of the reactor core. 'Blackie' receives and stores the values sampled by the detectors. The same program also carries out a Fourier analysis. Amplitudes and phase angles from the different oscillations are calculated. These results are then used as inputs for 'Test'. 'Test' is a plotting program. It draws the reactor and plots arrows where the detectors are situated. The size and direction of the arrows are measurements of the amplitudes and phase angles of the neutron flow oscillations. From these arrow diagrams you can come to conclusions about the oscillations in the neutron flow and how the affect the reactor. (author)

  17. The effect of carbon nanotube chirality on the spiral flow of copper atoms in their cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, M.C.G.; Zhong, Z.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) chirality on the flow of copper atoms along its core has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The investigation is conducted using CNTs of different chirality, and different flow conditions such as temperatures, bias voltages and the initial positions of the copper atoms. The results show that the atoms flow in a spiral fashion along the CNT channels. The effect is most evident in the CNT channel with zigzag CNTs. The movement of the copper atoms is more erratic when the temperature is increased at a low biased voltage, regardless of the types of channel used. The initial positions of the copper atoms affect the way they converge as they move downstream along the channel. A bias voltage of 4 V favours the initiation of a spiral flow, especially when the position of the copper atoms is far from the central axis of the channel. -- Highlights: ► We model the transportation of copper atoms in armchair and zigzag CNT channels. ► The spiral flow of copper atoms occurs in a semiconductor–semiconductor CNT. ► The compact copper mass is predicted to occur at 673 K with a 4 V bias voltage.

  18. Structural characterisation of pretreated solids from flow-through liquid hot water treatment of sugarcane bagasse in a fixed-bed reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Untreated sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane bagasse pretreated with flow-through liquid hot water (LHW) treatment (170-207°C and 204-250 ml/min) in a fixed-bed reactor have been structurally characterised. Field emission gun scanning electron...

  19. Absorption of CO2 and H2S in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions using a Fixed-Bed Reactor with Cocurrent Downflow Operation in the Pulsing Flow Regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1988-01-01

    Absorption rates of H2S and CO2 in several aqueous alkanolamines in a cocurrent downflow fixed-bed reactor operated in the pulse flow regime have been measured in order to obtain information on the potential selectivity and on the mass transfer parameters. From these experiments it can be concluded

  20. A new model for turbidity current behavior based on integration of flow monitoring and precision coring in a submarine canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, William O.; Sumner, Esther J.; Paull, Charles K.; Cartigny, Matthieu J.B.; Xu, Jingping; Maier, Katherine L.; Lorenson, Thomas; Talling, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Submarine turbidity currents create some of the largest sediment accumulations on Earth, yet there are few direct measurements of these flows. Instead, most of our understanding of turbidity currents results from analyzing their deposits in the sedimentary record. However, the lack of direct flow measurements means that there is considerable debate regarding how to interpret flow properties from ancient deposits. This novel study combines detailed flow monitoring with unusually precisely located cores at different heights, and multiple locations, within the Monterey submarine canyon, offshore California, USA. Dating demonstrates that the cores include the time interval that flows were monitored in the canyon, albeit individual layers cannot be tied to specific flows. There is good correlation between grain sizes collected by traps within the flow and grain sizes measured in cores from similar heights on the canyon walls. Synthesis of flow and deposit data suggests that turbidity currents sourced from the upper reaches of Monterey Canyon comprise three flow phases. Initially, a thin (38–50 m) powerful flow in the upper canyon can transport, tilt, and break the most proximal moorings and deposit chaotic sands and gravel on the canyon floor. The initially thin flow front then thickens and deposits interbedded sands and silty muds on the canyon walls as much as 62 m above the canyon floor. Finally, the flow thickens along its length, thus lofting silty mud and depositing it at greater altitudes than the previous deposits and in excess of 70 m altitude.

  1. Flow Boiling on a Downward-Facing Inclined Plane Wall of Core Catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tak; Bang, Kwang Hyun; Suh, Jung Soo

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate boiling behavior on downward-facing inclined heated wall prior to the CHF condition, an experiment was carried out with 1.2 m long rectangular channel, inclined by 10 .deg. from the horizontal plane. High speed video images showed that the bubbles were sliding along the heated wall, continuing to grow and combining with the bubbles growing at their nucleation sites in the downstream. These large bubbles continued to slide along the heated wall and formed elongated slug bubbles. Under this slug bubble thin liquid film layer on the heated wall was observed and this liquid film prevents the wall from dryout. The length, velocity and frequency of slug bubbles sliding on the heated wall were measured as a function of wall heat flux and these parameters were used to develop wall boiling model for inclined, downward-facing heated wall. One approach to achieve coolable state of molten core in a PWR-like reactor cavity during a severe accident is to retain the core melt on a so-called core catcher residing on the reactor cavity floor after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel. The core melt retained in the core catcher is cooled by water coolant flowing in an inclined cooling channel underneath as well as the water pool overlaid on the melt layer. Two-phase flow boiling with downward-facing heated wall such as this core catcher cooling channel has drawn a special attention because this orientation of heated wall may reach boiling crisis at lower heat flux than that of a vertical or upward-facing heated wall. Nishikawa and Fujita, Howard and Mudawar, Qiu and Dhir have conducted experiments to study the effect of heater orientation on boiling heat transfer and CHF. SULTAN experiment was conducted to study inclined large-scale structure coolability by water in boiling natural convection. In this paper, high-speed visualization of boiling behavior on downward-facing heated wall inclined by 10 .deg. is presented and wall boiling model for the

  2. Characterization of interfacial waves and pressure drop in horizontal oil-water core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F.; Singh, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2017-08-01

    We study the transportation of highly viscous furnace-oil in a horizontal pipe as core-annular flow (CAF) using experiments. Pressure drop and high-speed images of the fully developed CAF are recorded for a wide range of flow rate combinations. The height profiles (with respect to the centerline of the pipe) of the upper and lower interfaces of the core are obtained using a high-speed camera and image analysis. Time series of the interface height are used to calculate the average holdup of the oil phase, speed of the interface, and the power spectra of the interface profile. We find that the ratio of the effective velocity of the annular fluid to the core velocity, α , shows a large scatter. Using the average value of this ratio (α =0.74 ) yields a good estimate of the measured holdup for the whole range of flow rate ratios, mainly due to the low sensitivity of the holdup ratio to the velocity ratio. Dimensional analysis implies that, if the thickness of the annular fluid is much smaller than the pipe radius, then, for the given range of parameters in our experiments, the non-dimensional interface shape, as well as the non-dimensional wall shear stress, can depend only on the shear Reynolds number and the velocity ratio. Our experimental data show that, for both lower and upper interfaces, the normalized power spectrum of the interface height has a strong dependence on the shear Reynolds number. Specifically, for low shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with large wavelengths dominate, while, for large shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with small wavelengths dominate. Normalized variance of the interface height is higher at lower shear Reynolds numbers and tends to a constant with increasing shear Reynolds number. Surprisingly, our experimental data also show that the effective wall shear stress is, to a large extent, proportional to the square of the core velocity. Using the implied scalings for the holdup ratio and wall shear stress, we can derive

  3. Accuracy of small diameter sheathed thermocouples for the core flow test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.L.; Kollie, T.G.

    1979-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development on 0.5-mm-diameter, compacted, metal sheathed thermocouples. The objectives of this research effort have been: to identify and analyze the sources of temperature measurement errors in the use of 0.5-mm-diameter sheathed thermocouples to measure the surface temperature of the cladding of fuel-rod simulators in the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) at ORNL; to devise methods for reducing or correcting for these temperature measurement errors; to estimate the overall temperature measurement uncertainties; and to recommend modifications in the manufacture, installation, or materials used to minimize temperature measurement uncertainties in the CFTL experiments

  4. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  5. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Meignin, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.)

  6. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of PWR core including intermediate flow mixers with the THYC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mur, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France); Meignin, J.C. [Electricite de France (EDF), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-07-01

    Departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) is one of the major limiting factors of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Safety requires that occurrence of DNB should be precluded under normal or incidental operating conditions. The thermal-hydraulic THYC code developed by EDF is described. The code is devoted to heat and mass transfer in nuclear components. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is predicted from local thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, mass flow rate, and quality. A three stage methodology to evaluate thermal margins in order to perform standard core design is described. (K.A.) 8 refs.

  7. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented.

  8. NASA Glenn Research Center, Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Plan to Measure Engine Core Flow Water Vapor Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will be made at the 92nd AIAA Turbine Engine Testing Working Group (TETWoG), a semi-annual technical meeting of turbine engine testing professionals. The objective is to describe an effort by NASA to measure the water vapor content on the core airflow in a full scale turbine engine ice crystal icing test and to open a discussion with colleagues how to accurately conduct the measurement based on any previous collective experience with the procedure, instruments and nature of engine icing testing within the group. The presentation lays out the schematics of the location in the flow path from which the sample will be drawn, the plumbing to get it from the engine flow path to the sensor and several different water vapor measurement technologies that will be used: Tunable diode laser and infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented

  10. A flow test for calibrating 177 core tubes of 1/5-scale reactor flow model for Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Jang, Ho Cheol; Cheong, Jong Sik; Kuh, Jung Eui

    1990-01-01

    A flow test was performed to find out the hydraulic characteristics of every one of 177 core tubes, representing a fuel assembly respectively, as a preparatory step of 1/5 scale reactor flow model test for Yonggwang Nuclear Units (hereafter YGN) 3 and 4. The axial hydraulic resistance of the fuel assembly was simulated in the square core tube with six orifice plates positioned along the tube length; core support structure below each fuel assembly was done in the core upstream geometry section of the test loop. For each core tube the pressure differentials across the inlet, exit orifice plate and overall tube length were measured, along with the flow rates and temperatures of the test fluid. The measured pressure drops were converted to pressure loss or flow metering coefficients. The metering coefficient of the inlet orifice plate was sensitive to the configuration and location of the upstream geometry. The hydraulic resistance of the core tubes were reasonably coincided with a target value and consistent. The polynomial curve fits of the calibrated coefficients for the 177 core tubes were obtained with reasonable data scatters

  11. Operation manual for the core flow test loop zone power-supply controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The core flow test loop, which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at ORNL, is a high-pressure, high-temperature, out-of-reactor helium circulation system that is being constructed to permit study of the performance at steady-state and transient conditions of simulated segments of core assemblies for a GCFR demonstration plant. The simulated core segments, which are divided into zones, contain electrical heating elements to simulate the heat generated by fission. To control the power which is applied to a zone, a novel multitapped transformer and zone power control system have been designed and built which satisfy stringent design criteria. The controller can match power output to demand to within better than +-1% over a 900:1 dynamic range and perform full-power transients within 1 s. The power is applied in such a way as to minimize the electromagnetic interference at the bandwidth of the loop instrumentation, and the controller incorporates several error detection techniques, making it inherently fail-safe. The operation manual describes the specifications, operating instructions, error detection capabilities, error recovery, troubleshooting, calibration and QA procedures, and maintenance requirements. Also included are sections on the theory of operation, circuitry description, and a complete set of schematics.

  12. Evaluation of advanced two-phase flow instrumentation in SCTF Core-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Sudo, Yukio; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1984-03-01

    In the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-I, advanced two-phase flow instruments have been provided by the USNRC to measure the thermohydraulic behavior in the primary system including pressure vessel during the end of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor. The advanced instruments are turbine meters, drag disks, γ-densitometers, spool pieces, liquid level detectors (LLD), fluid distribution grids (FDG), impedance probes (flag, prong and string probes), film probes, and video optical probes. This report presents evaluated results of the data from these instruments. Some instruments are quantitatively evaluated by comparing with the data from the conventional instruments or the other advanced instruments. Main conclusions are as follows: (1) The spool pieces and the γ-densitometers work well and provide satisfactory results; (2) Some of the turbine meters, the impedance probes and the film probes give partially reasonable results, but still more improvements are required; (3) Most of the LLDs, the FDGs, the impedance probes, and the film probes do not work well due to a hard cable corrosion, and (4) The video optical probes give clear image of the flow pattern. (author)

  13. Applying CFD in the Analysis of Heavy-Oil Transportation in Curved Pipes Using Core-Flow Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Conceição

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiphase flow of oil, gas and water occurs in the petroleum industry from the reservoir to the processing units. The occurrence of heavy oils in the world is increasing significantly and points to the need for greater investment in the reservoirs exploitation and, consequently, to the development of new technologies for the production and transport of this oil. Therefore, it is interesting improve techniques to ensure an increase in energy efficiency in the transport of this oil. The core-flow technique is one of the most advantageous methods of lifting and transporting of oil. The core-flow technique does not alter the oil viscosity, but change the flow pattern and thus, reducing friction during heavy oil transportation. This flow pattern is characterized by a fine water pellicle that is formed close to the inner wall of the pipe, aging as lubricant of the oil flowing in the core of the pipe. In this sense, the objective of this paper is to study the isothermal flow of heavy oil in curved pipelines, employing the core-flow technique. A three-dimensional, transient and isothermal mathematical model that considers the mixture and k-e  turbulence models to address the gas-water-heavy oil three-phase flow in the pipe was applied for analysis. Simulations with different flow patterns of the involved phases (oil-gas-water have been done, in order to optimize the transport of heavy oils. Results of pressure and volumetric fraction distribution of the involved phases are presented and analyzed. It was verified that the oil core lubricated by a fine water layer flowing in the pipe considerably decreases pressure drop.

  14. Integrative analysis of copy number and gene expression in breast cancer using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded core biopsy tissue: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iddawela, Mahesh; Rueda, Oscar; Eremin, Jenny; Eremin, Oleg; Cowley, Jed; Earl, Helena M; Caldas, Carlos

    2017-07-11

    An absence of reliable molecular markers has hampered individualised breast cancer treatments, and a major limitation for translational research is the lack of fresh tissue. There are, however, abundant banks of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study evaluated two platforms available for the analysis of DNA copy number and gene expression using FFPE samples. The cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay (DASL™) has been developed for gene expression analysis and the Molecular Inversion Probes assay (Oncoscan™), were used for copy number analysis using FFPE tissues. Gene expression and copy number were evaluated in core-biopsy samples from patients with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Forty-three core-biopsies were evaluated and characteristic copy number changes in breast cancers, gains in 1q, 8q, 11q, 17q and 20q and losses in 6q, 8p, 13q and 16q, were confirmed. Regions that frequently exhibited gains in tumours showing a pathological complete response (pCR) to NAC were 1q (55%), 8q (40%) and 17q (40%), whereas 11q11 (37%) gain was the most frequent change in non-pCR tumours. Gains associated with poor survival were 11q13 (62%), 8q24 (54%) and 20q (47%). Gene expression assessed by DASL correlated with immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis for oestrogen receptor (ER) [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.95], progesterone receptor (PR)(AUC = 0.90) and human epidermal growth factor type-2 receptor (HER-2) (AUC = 0.96). Differential expression analysis between ER+ and ER- cancers identified over-expression of TTF1, LAF-4 and C-MYB (p ≤ 0.05), and between pCR vs non-pCRs, over-expression of CXCL9, AREG, B-MYB and under-expression of ABCG2. This study was an integrative analysis of copy number and gene expression using FFPE core biopsies and showed that molecular marker data from FFPE tissues were consistent with those in previous studies using fresh-frozen samples. FFPE tissue can provide

  15. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy

  16. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. ► Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. ► A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. ► Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. ► Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of

  17. Evaluation of effective coolant flow rate in advanced design of the small scale VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Murakami, Tomoyuki.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the evaluation of effective coolant flow rate in the advanced design of the small scale VHTR core. The analytical design study was carried out after the 2nd stage of detailed design in order to reduce the cost of construction. The summary of the analytical results are as follows: (1) Crossflow loss coefficient of flange type fuel block having 0.1 mm of sealing gap is about 100 times higher than that of dowel type block adopted in the 2nd stage of detailed design. (2) In case that coolant channel outer diameter is 52 mm and hydraulic diameter is 6 mm, the effective coolant flow rates using flange and dowel type fuel blocks are 80 % and 70 % respectively. Because the crossflow loss coefficients of dowel type are lower than that of flange type. (3) The effective coolant flow rate, when crossflow loss coefficients are distributed along with the axial direction, agrees well with that using mean value of crossflow loss coefficient i.e. 5 x 10 11 m -4 . (author)

  18. Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: net recovery and transport intensity indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Vivanco, David; Puig Ventosa, Ignasi; Gabarrell Durany, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Huang Jinhua; Peng Lilin; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    A global model analysis of the compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma has been performed. The relationships between the surface temperature of lithium curtain and mean effective plasma charges, fuel dilution and produced fusion power have been obtained. Results show that under normal circumstances, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not affect Z eff seriously, but affects fuel dilution and fusion power sensitively. The authors have investigated the relationships between the flow velocity of liquid lithium and its surface temperature rise based on the conditions of the option II of the fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) design with reversed shear configuration and fairly high power density. The authors concluded that the effects of evaporation from liquid lithium curtain for FEB-E on plasma are negligible even if the flow velocity of liquid lithium is as low as 0.5 m·s -1 . Finally, the sputtering yield of liquid lithium saturated by hydrogen isotopes is briefly discussed

  20. Numerical investigation of flow and heat transfer in a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Hao, Li; Zhang, Luhong; Sun, Yongli; Xiao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    In the present contribution, a numerical study of fluid flow and heat transfer performance in a pilot-scale multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein oxidation reaction is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. Firstly, a two-dimensional CFD model is developed to simulate flow behaviors, catalytic oxidation reaction, heat and mass transfer adopting porous medium model on tube side to achieve the temperature distribution and investigate the effect of operation parameters on hot spot temperature. Secondly, based on the conclusions of tube-side, a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed-bed reactor comprising 790 tubes design with disk-and-doughnut baffles is proposed by comparing with segmental baffles reactor and their performance of fluid flow and heat transfer is analyzed to ensure the uniformity condition using molten salt as heat carrier medium on shell-side by three-dimensional CFD method. The results reveal that comprehensive performance of the reactor with disk-and-doughnut baffles is better than that of with segmental baffles. Finally, the effects of operating conditions to control the hot spots are investigated. The results show that the flow velocity range about 0.65 m/s is applicable and the co-current cooling system flow direction is better than counter-current flow to control the hottest temperature.

  1. Application of the extended Kalman filtering for the estimation of core coolant flow rate in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    In-core neutron detector and core-exit temperature signals in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) satisfy the condition of observability of the core dynamic system, and can be used to estimate nonmeasurable state variables and model parameters. The extension of the Kalman filtering technique is very useful for direct parameter estimation. This approach is applied to the determination of core coolant mass flow rate in PWRs and is evaluated using in-core measurements at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor. The influence of model uncertainties on the estimation accuracy was studied using the ambiguity function analysis. A sequential discretization method was developed to achieve faster convergence to the true value, avoiding model discretization at each sample point. The performance of the extended Kalman filter and the computational innovations were evaluated using a reduced order core dynamic model of the LOFT reactor and random data simulation. The technique was then applied to the determination of LOFT core coolant flow rate from operational data at 100% and 65% flow conditions

  2. Replication of Annual Cycles in Mn in Hudson River Cores: Mn Peaks During High Water Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D. H.; Hutson, D.; Marrero, A. M.; Block, K. A.; Chang, C.; Cai, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Using the results from an ITRAX, XRF scanner, we previously reported apparent annual cycles in Mn in a single, high sedimentation rate Hudson River core, LWB1-8, taken off Yonkers, NY (Carlson et al., 2016). We replicated these results in three more high sedimentation rate cores and found stratigraphic markers that verify our inferences about the annual nature of the Mn cycles. The three new cores are LWB4-5 taken off Peekskill, NY, and LWB3-44 and LWB3-25, both taken in Haverstraw Bay. The cores are from water depths of 7-9 meters and all have high magnetic susceptibilities (typically > 30 cgs units) in their upper 1 to 2 meters. The high susceptibilities are primarily produced by magnetite from modern industrial combustion. One core, LWB1-8, has reconnaissance Cs dates that verify the annual nature of the cycles. More Cs dates are expected before the meeting. We developed several new methods of verifying the annual nature of our layer counts. The first is looking at the grain size distribution and age of layers with unusually high Mn peaks. Peaks in Si, Ni and Ti and peaks in percentage of coarse material typically accompany the peaks in Mn. Some are visible as yellow sandy layers. The five highest peaks in Mn in LWB1-8 have layer counted ages that correspond (within 1 year in the top meter and within 2 years in the bottom meter) to 1996, 1948, 1913, 1857 and 1790. The latter three events are the three largest historical spring freshets on the Hudson. 1996 is a year of unusually high flow rate during the spring freshet. Based on our work and previous work on Mn cycling in rivers, we infer that the peaks in Mn are produced by extreme erosional events that erode sediment and release pore water Mn into the water column. The other methods of testing our chronology involve marine storms that increase Ca and Sr and a search for fragments of the Peekskill meteorite that fell in October 1992. More information on the latter will be available by the meeting.

  3. One Core Phase Shifting Transformer for Control of the Power Flow Distribution in Electric Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golub I.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the variant of phase shifting transformer that is made, unlike from traditional technology, on the basis of only one magnetic core. The paper describes the methodology related to the analysis of operation modes of device and its components. Additionally it presents a mathematical model of device with determines the relationship between input and output electric quantities as well as own longitudinal and transverse parameters of an equivalent circuit of phase shifting transformer (PST. Proposed configuration of PST is interesting from an economic and operational consideration; enable continuous control of power flow distribution in electric networks as a result of regulation a phase shift angle between input and output voltages of device.

  4. Evaluation of Baffle Fixes Film up Flow Sludge Blanket Filtration (BFUSBF) System in Treatment of Wastewaters from Phenol and 2,4-Dinitrophenol Using Daphnia Magna Bioassay

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Javad Ghannadzadeh; Ahmad Jonidi Jafari; Abbas Rezaee; Fatemeh Eftekharian; Ali Koolivand

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phenol and nitrophenol are common compounds found in different types of industrial wastewater known as serious threats to human health and natural environment. In this study, Daphnia magna was used to evaluate the effectiveness of "baffle fixes film up flow sludge blanket filtration" (BFUSBF) system in elimination of phenolic compounds from water. Methods: D. magna cultures were used as toxicity index of phenol and 2,4-DNP mixtures after treatment by a pilot BFUSBF system which...

  5. Development of Sodium Two Phase Flow Model for Kalimer Core Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.P.; Hahn, Dohee

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm for sodium boiling is developed in order to extend the applicability of SSC-K, which is a main system analysis code for the KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid Metal Reactor) conceptual design. As the capability of the current SSC-K version is limited to simulation of only a single-phase sodium flow, its applicable range should not be enough to assess the fuel integrity under some of HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) initiating events where sodium boiling is anticipated. The two-phase flow model similar to that used for the light water system is known to be no more effective directly to liquid metal reactors, because the phenomena observed between two reactor coolant systems are definitely different. The developing algorithm is based on a multiple-bubble slug ejection model, which allows a finite number of bubbles in a channel at any time. The present work is a continuous effort following the former study to confirm a qualitative acceptance on the model. Since the model has been applied only to the active fuel region in the former study, a part of its qualification seems to have already been demonstrated. For its application to the whole KALIMER core channel, however, the model needs to be examined the applicability to the fuel regions other than the active fuel. The present study primarily focuses on that point. In a result, although the model may be improved in a sense through the present study over the previous modeling, a clear limitation is also confirmed with the validity of the model. The further development, therefore, is required for this model to achieve its goal by resolving such limitations. (authors)

  6. Experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the SNR-upper-core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the upper-core (UCS) during a HCDA of a LMFBR. The experiments were designed to verify some of the thermal-hydraulic models in SIMMER-II. Four different liquids were used to simulate the flashing U0 2 ; and numerous parameter variations were made regarding initial pressure, temperature, and configurations of the test apparatus. The experiments showed the large effect of the heat transfer in the UCS and the relatively small effect of friction. The reduction in final kinetic energy by the presence of the UCS is shown as a function of the initial pressure and the temperature difference between core and UCS. Calculations with SIMMER-II for the wide range of experiments produced results for the kinetic energy within a factor of 2 of the experimental results without changing the crucial input parameters. The minimum droplet size during the flashing process and the structure-side heat transfer coefficient were determined to be the crucial and most sensitive parameters. This reflects deficiencies in modeling of both the flashing process and the transient heat conduction in the structure. (orig./HP) [de

  7. In-core fuel element temperature and flow measurment of HFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong; Jiang Pei

    1988-02-01

    The HFETR in-core fuel element temperature-flow measurement facility and its measurement system are expounded. The applications of the instrumented fuel element to stationary and transient states measurements during the lift of power, the operation test of all lifetime at first load, and the deepening burn-up test at second load are described. The method of determination of the hot point temperature under the fin is discussed. The error analysis is made. The fuel element out-of-pile water deprivation test is described. The development of this measurement facility and succesful application have made important contribution to high power and deep burn-up safe operation at two load, in-core fuel element irradiation, and varied investigation of HFETR. After operation at two loads, the integrated power of this instrumented fuel element arrives at 90.88 MWd, its maximum point burn-up is about 64.9%, so that the economy of fuel use of HFETR is raised very much

  8. Experimental demonstration of an OpenFlow based software-defined optical network employing packet, fixed and flexible DWDM grid technologies on an international multi-domain testbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channegowda, M; Nejabati, R; Rashidi Fard, M; Peng, S; Amaya, N; Zervas, G; Simeonidou, D; Vilalta, R; Casellas, R; Martínez, R; Muñoz, R; Liu, L; Tsuritani, T; Morita, I; Autenrieth, A; Elbers, J P; Kostecki, P; Kaczmarek, P

    2013-03-11

    Software defined networking (SDN) and flexible grid optical transport technology are two key technologies that allow network operators to customize their infrastructure based on application requirements and therefore minimizing the extra capital and operational costs required for hosting new applications. In this paper, for the first time we report on design, implementation & demonstration of a novel OpenFlow based SDN unified control plane allowing seamless operation across heterogeneous state-of-the-art optical and packet transport domains. We verify and experimentally evaluate OpenFlow protocol extensions for flexible DWDM grid transport technology along with its integration with fixed DWDM grid and layer-2 packet switching.

  9. MHD accelerated motion on a body placed symmetrical to the flow in the presence of transverse magnetic field fixed relative to the body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Mamta; Bansal, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The growth of the boundary layer in an accelerated flow of an electricity conducting fluid past a symmetrical placed body in the presence of uniform transverse magnetic field fixed relative to the body has been studied. The boundary layer equation has been solved by using a method previously developed by Pozzi, based on expressing the unknown velocity in term of an error function and on using differential and integral relations obtained from the balance equation. As examples, the impulsive flow past a circular cylinder and uniformly accelerated flow over a flat plate are considered. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field is to decelerate the fluid motion which results in an earlier boundary layer separation in the impulsive flow past a circular cylinder. The results show a good agreement with the numerical data available in the literature. (author). 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Fuel assembly outlet temperature profile influence on core by-pass flow and power distribution determination in WWER -440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petenyi, V.; Klucarova, K.; Remis, J.

    2003-01-01

    The in core instrumentation of the WWER-440 reactors consists of the thermocouple system and the system of self powered detectors (SPD). The thermocouple systems are positioned about 50 cm above the fuel bundle upper flow-mixing grid. The usual assumption is that, the coolant is well mixed in the Tc location, i.e. the temperature is constant through the flow cross-section area. The present evaluations by using the FLUENT 5.5.14 code reveal that, this assumption is not fulfilled. There exists a temperature profile that depends on fuel assembly geometry and on inner power profile of the fuel assembly. The paper presents the estimation of this effect and its influence on the core power distribution and the core by-pass flow determination. Comparison with measurements in Mochovce NPP will also be a part of this presentation (Authors)

  11. Evaluation method for core thermohydraulics during natural circulation in fast reactors numerical predictions of inter-wrapper flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Kimura, N.; Miyakoshi, H.; Nagasawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    Decay heat removal using natural circulation is one of the important functions for the safety of fast reactors. As a decay heat removal system, direct reactor auxiliary cooling system has been selected in current designs of fast reactors. In this design, dumped heat exchanger provides cold sodium and it covers the reactor core outlet. The cold sodium can penetrate into the gap region between the subassemblies. This gap flow is referred as inter-wrapper flow (IWF). A numerical estimation method for such natural circulation phenomena in a reactor core has been developed, which models each subassembly as a rectangular duct with gap region between the subassemblies and also the upper plenum in a reactor vessel. This numerical simulation method was verified based on experimental data of a sodium test using 7- subassembly core model and also a water test which simulates IWF using the 1/12 sector model of a reactor core. We applied the estimation method to the natural circulation in a 600 MW class fast reactor. The temperature in the core strongly depended on IWF, flow redistribution in the core, and inter-subassembly heat transfer. It is desired for prediction methods on the natural circulation to simulate these phenomena. (author)

  12. Contribution to the physical validation of computer programs for reactor cores flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    A κ-ε turbulence model was implemented in the FLICA computer code which is devoted to thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor cores flows. Foreseen applications concern single-phase flows in rod bundles. First-moment closure principles are reminded. Low Reynolds wall effects are accounted for by a two-layer approach. A computational method for the distance from the wall must have been developed to do so. Two two-layer κ-ε models are proposed and studied: the classical isotropic version, based on the Boussinesq's hypothesis, and an original anisotropic version which supposes a non-linear relation between Reynolds stresses and mean deformation rate. The second one permits the treatment of anisotropy, which is encountered in non-circular ducts in general, and in rod bundles in particular. Turbulent solver is linearized implicit, based on a finite volume method - VF9 scheme for the viscous part, upwind scheme for passive scalar for the convective part, centered scheme for the source terms. Several numerical simulations on 2D and 3D configurations were conducted (validation standard test, industrial application). (author) [fr

  13. Identification of Columbia River basalt flows from deep cores in the Pasco Basin based on trace element abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchter, J.S.; Rancitelli, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of basalt from three deep core holes drilled in the Pasco Basin, Washington (DDH-3, DH-4, DH-5) were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation (INAA) for up to fifteen trace and major elements. These analyses were used to assign each basalt flow to one of a series of previously defined chemical types of the Columbia River Basalt Group. All of the flows except the two flows at the bottom of well DDH-3 were clearly assignable to one of the defined chemical types. These two flows apparently represent new, as yet undefined chemical types. Average values and standard deviations for compositions of each of the chemical types found in the three wells are presented along with two-element variation diagrams for the geochemically important pair La-Cr, La-Fe, La-Th and La-Sc. The assignment of the flows to known chemical types accomplished in this study was very helpful in relating the basalts in the core holes to stratigraphically defined basalt flows in surface sections. A correlation diagram relating the flows in the core holes to one another on the basis of chemical type is presented

  14. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  15. Analysis of two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer in inclined channel of core-catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Abe, N.; Kurita, T.; Hamazaki, R.; Kojima, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Passive Corium Cooling System (CCS) provides a function of ex-vessel debris cooling and molten core stabilization during a severe accident. CCS features inclined cooling channels arranged axi-symmetrically below the core-catcher basin. In order to estimate the coolability of the inclined cooling channel, it is indispensable to identify the flow pattern of the two-phase flow in the cooling channel. Several former studies for the two-phase flow pattern in the inclined channel are referred. Taitel and Dukler (1976) developed a prediction method of the flow pattern transition in horizontal and near horizontal tubes. Barnea et al. (1980) showed the flow pattern map of upward flow with 10 degrees inclination. Sakaguti et al. (1996) observed the two-phase flow patterns in the horizontal pipe connected with slightly upward pipe, in which the flow pattern in the pipe with a bending part was expressed by the combination of a basic flow pattern and some auxiliary flow patterns. Then we investigated these studies In order to identify the flow patterns observed in the inclined cooling channel of CCS. Furthermore we experimentally observed the flow patterns in the inclined cooling channel with various inlet conditions. As a result of the investigation and observation, typical flow patterns in the inclined cooling channel were identified. Two typical flow patterns were observed depending on the steam flow rate, one of which is 'elongated bubble 'flow, and the other is 'churn with collapsing backward and upward slug 'flow The flow and heat transfer in the inclined channel of CCS is analyzed by using a two-phase analysis code employing two-fluid model in which the constitutive equations for the two-phase flow in inclined channels are incorporated. That is, drift flux parameter for each of the elongated bubble flow, and the churn with collapsing backward and upward slug flow are incorporated to the two-phase analysis code, which are based on the rising velocity of the long bubble in

  16. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  17. Role of wall-attached structures in the interface of the quiescent core region in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmin; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The effects of low- and high-speed structures on the interface of the quiescent core region are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent pipe flow. The quiescent core region is a uniform momentum zone located at the center of the pipe flow, which contains the highest streamwise momentum with a low level of turbulence. The interface of the quiescent core region can be identified from the probability density function of the streamwise modal velocity. In the vicinity of the interface of the quiescent core region, the streamwise velocity changes abruptly. The abrupt jump in velocity causes an increase of the velocity gradient. The interface of the quiescent core region is similar to the laminar superlayer in turbulent/non-turbulent interface. The interface of the quiescent core region contains the low- and high-speed structures. They can be classified into wall-attached and detached structures depending on the distance between the structures and the wall. The influence of the detached structures accounted for most of the number of detected structures is negligible due to its small volume. Conversely, the wall-attached structures adjacent to the interface have a huge influence on the statistical amount of the interface, such as entrainment characteristics. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  18. Core fracture analysis applied to ground water flow systems: Chickamauga Group, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, E.; Dreier, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate hydrologic properties with detailed geologic fabrics and to investigate the influence of a complex geologic setting on ground water systems. The Chickamauga Group (CH) located in Bethel Valley on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation is comprised of limestones and interbedded shales. Five core holes (CH 1-5), oriented across strike, provide a cross section of the CH and were mapped for fracture density, orientation and cross-cutting relationships as well as lithologic variations. Correlation of structural and lithologic features with downhole geophysical logs and hydraulic conductivity values shows a relationship between lithology, fracture density and increased permeability in an otherwise low-permeability environment. Structures identified as influential in enhancing hydraulic conductivity include contractional bedding plane and tectonic stylolites and extensional fractures. Three sets of extensional fractures are indicated by cross-cutting relationships and various degrees of veining. Hydraulic conductivity values (K) for the five wells indicate two ground water flow systems in the valley. A shallow system (up to 150 feet deep) shows a range in K from 10E-4 centimeters per second to 10E-6 centimeters per second. Shallow horizons show more open fractures than are observed at depth, and these fractures appear to control the enhanced K in the shallow system. A subhorizontal interface that is not defined by pre-existing structures or a stratigraphic horizon separates the two flow systems. The deeper system ranges in K values from 10E-9 centimeters per second to 10E-5 centimeters per second. The higher K values at depth correspond to increased fracture density at lithologic contacts, zones of tectonic stylolitization and partially veined extension fractures. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  19. CFD analysis of flow distribution of reactor core and temperature rise of coolant in fuel assembly for VVER reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Daiquan; Zeng Xiaokang; Xiong Wanyu; Yang Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Flow field of VVER-1000 reactor core was investigated by using computational fluid dynamics code CFX, and the temperature rise of coolant in hot assembly was calculated. The results show that the maximum value of flow distribution factor is 1.12 and the minimum value is 0.92. The average value of flow distribution factor in hot assembly is 0.97. The temperature rise in hot assembly is higher than current warning limit value ΔT t under the deviated operation condition. The results can provide reference for setting ΔT t during the operation of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  20. Why is Facebook so successful? Psychophysiological measures describe a core flow state while using Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Maurizio; Cipresso, Pietro; Balgera, Anna; Villamira, Marco; Riva, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    People are more and more using social networking sites (SNSs) like Facebook and MySpace to engage with others. The use of SNSs can have both positive and negative effect on the individual; however, the increasing use of SNSs might reveal that people look for SNSs because they have a positive experience when they use them. Few studies have tried to identify which particular aspects of the social networking experience make SNSs so successful. In this study we focus on the affective experience evoked by SNSs. In particular, we explore whether the use of SNSs elicits a specific psychophysiological pattern. Specifically, we recorded skin conductance, blood volume pulse, electroencephalogram, electromyography, respiratory activity, and pupil dilation in 30 healthy subjects during a 3-minute exposure to (a) a slide show of natural panoramas (relaxation condition), (b) the subject's personal Facebook account, and (c) a Stroop and mathematical task (stress condition). Statistical analysis of the psychophysiological data and pupil dilation indicates that the Facebook experience was significantly different from stress and relaxation on many linear and spectral indices of somatic activity. Moreover, the biological signals revealed that Facebook use can evoke a psychophysiological state characterized by high positive valence and high arousal (Core Flow State). These findings support the hypothesis that the successful spread of SNSs might be associated with a specific positive affective state experienced by users when they use their SNSs account.

  1. Towards an integrated petrophysical tool for multiphase flow properties of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of an Integrated Petrophysical Tool (IPT) on reservoir rock samples. The IPT simultaneously measures the following petrophysical properties: (1) Complete capillary pressure cycle: primary drainage, spontaneous and forced imbibitions, secondary drainage (the cycle leads to the wettability of the core by using the USBM index); End-points and parts of the relative permeability curves; Formation factor and resistivity index. The IPT is based on the steady-state injection of one fluid through the sample placed in a Hassler cell. The experiment leading to the whole Pc cycle on two reservoir sandstones consists of about 30 steps at various oil or water flow rates. It takes about four weeks and is operated at room conditions. Relative permeabilities are in line with standard steady-state measurements. Capillary pressures are in accordance with standard centrifuge measurements. There is no comparison for the resistivity index, but the results are in agreement with literature data. However, the accurate determination of saturation remains the main difficulty and some improvements are proposed. In conclusion, the Integrated Petrophysical Tool is as accurate as standard methods and has the advantage of providing the various parameters on the same sample and during a single experiment. The FIT is easy to use and can be automated. In addition, it can be operated in reservoir conditions.

  2. Interactions of solitary waves and compression/expansion waves in core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Michelle; Anderson, Dalton; El, Gennady; Franco, Nevil; Hoefer, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear hydrodynamics of an initial step leads to the formation of rarefaction waves and dispersive shock waves in dispersive media. Another hallmark of these media is the soliton, a localized traveling wave whose speed is amplitude dependent. Although compression/expansion waves and solitons have been well-studied individually, there has been no mathematical description of their interaction. In this talk, the interaction of solitons and shock/rarefaction waves for interfacial waves in viscous, miscible core-annular flows are modeled mathematically and explored experimentally. If the interior fluid is continuously injected, a deformable conduit forms whose interfacial dynamics are well-described by a scalar, dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation. The main focus is on interactions of solitons with dispersive shock waves and rarefaction waves. Theory predicts that a soliton can either be transmitted through or trapped by the extended hydrodynamic state. The notion of reciprocity is introduced whereby a soliton interacts with a shock wave in a reciprocal or dual fashion as with the rarefaction. Soliton reciprocity, trapping, and transmission are observed experimentally and are found to agree with the modulation theory and numerical simulations. This work was partially supported by NSF CAREER DMS-1255422 (M.A.H.) and NSF GRFP (M.D.M.).

  3. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  4. Measurement of two-phase flow variables in a BWR by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the state of the art of the measurement of two-phase flow variables in a boiling water reactor (BWR) by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals is given. It is concluded that the neutronic processes involved in neutron noise are quite well understood, but that little is known about the density fluctuations in two-phase flow which are the main cause of the neutron noise. For this reason, the neutron noise measurements, like the well known two-detector velocity measurements, are still difficult to interpret. By analyzing neutron noise measurements in a natural circulation cooled BWR, it is illustrated that, once a theory on the density fluctuations is developed, two-phase flow can be monitored with a single in-core detector. (author). 70 refs, 4 figs

  5. Prediction, analysis and solution of flow inversion phenomenon in a typical MTR reactor with upward core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Morshedy, Salah El-Din

    2010-01-01

    Research reactors of power greater than 20 MW are usually designed to be cooled with upward coolant flow direction inside the reactor core. This is mainly to prevent flow inversion problems following a pump coast down. However, in some designs and under certain operating conditions, flow inversion phenomenon is predicted. In the present work, the best-estimate Material Testing Reactors Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis program (MTRTHA) is used to simulate a typical MTR reactor behavior with upward cooling under a hypothetical case of loss of off-site power. The flow inversion phenomenon is predicted under certain decay heat and/or pool temperature values below the design values. The reactor simulation under loss of off-site power is performed for two cases namely; two-flap valves open and one flap-valve fails to open. The model results for the flow inversion phenomenon prediction is analyzed and a solution of the problem is suggested. (orig.)

  6. Numerical simulations of flows through fixed networks of monodispersed and bi-dispersed spheres, for moderate Reynolds numbers; Simulations numeriques d'ecoulements a travers des reseaux fixes de spheres monodisperses et bidisperses, pour des nombres de Reynolds moderes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massol, A.

    2004-02-15

    The application of statistically averaged two-fluid models for the simulation of complex indus- trial two-phase flows requires the development of adequate models for the drag force exerted on the inclusions and the interfacial heat exchange. This task becomes problematic at high volume fractions of the dispersed phase. The quality of the simulation strongly depends upon the inter- facial exchange terms, starting with the steady drag force. For example, an accurate modelling of the drag force is therefore a crucial point to simulate the expansion of dense fluidized beds. Most models used to study the exchange terms between particles and fluids are based on the interaction between an isolated particle and a surrounding gas. Those models are clearly not adequate in cases where the volume fraction of particles increases and particle-particle interactions become important. Studying such cases is a complex task because of the multiple possible configurations. While the interaction between an isolated sphere and a gas depends only on the particle size and the slip velocity between gas and particles, the interaction between a cloud of particles and a gas depends on many more parameters: size and velocity distribution of particles, relative position of particles. Even if the particles keep relative fixed positions, there is an infinite number of combinations to construct such an array. The objective of the present work is to perform steady and unsteady simulations of the flow in regular arrays of fixed particles in order to analyze the influence of the size and distributions of spheres on drag force and heat transfer (the array of spheres can be either monodispersed, either bi-dispersed). Several authors have studied the drag exerted on the spheres, but only for low Reynolds numbers and/or solid volume fractions close to the packed limit. Moreover some discrepancies are observed between the different studies. On top of that, all existing studies are limited to steady flows

  7. Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer during core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1987-01-01

    The low and high power core uncovery patterns were observed in the high-pressure quasi-steady core uncovery experiments in a 25-rod bundle. The boundary between the two patterns was obtained in the experiments. The difference of two patterns was considered to be due to the slug-annular transition below the dryout points. The Osakabe's slug-annular transition model was the good boundary between the two patterns. The small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) experiments were conducted by using the integral experimental facility with the 1,168-rod core. The transient core uncovery pattern was expected as the low power core uncovery pattern based on the quasisteady experiments mentioned above. The transient core uncovery patterns were classified into the boiloff and hydraulic core uncovery. In the boiloff core uncovery, the dryout points were controlled with the mixture level like the quasi-steady state. In the hydraulic core uncovery, the dryout points were not controlled with the mixture level alone, and the multi-dimensional dryout process in the core and the relatively high heat transfer above the dryout points were observed. It was considered that a part of water was remained above the dryout points due to the rapid depression of core liquid level. (author)

  8. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Morrill, Mike [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, JoAnn S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silcox, Geoffrey D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  9. Short-term variations in core surface flow resolved from an improved method of calculating observatory monthly means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2014-05-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements taken by ground observatories are a useful data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field and the underlying core flow. However, the usual way of calculating monthly means as the arithmetic mean of all days (geomagnetic quiet as well as disturbed) and all local times (day and night) may result in contributions from external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin in the (ordinary, omm) monthly means. Such contamination makes monthly means less favourable for core studies. We calculated revised monthly means (rmm), and their uncertainties, from observatory hourly means using robust means and after removal of external field predictions, using an improved method for characterising the magnetospheric ring current. The utility of the new method for calculating observatory monthly means is demonstrated by inverting their first differences for core surface advective flows. The flow is assumed steady over three consecutive months to ensure uniqueness; the effects of more rapid changes should be attenuated by the weakly conducting mantle. Observatory data are inverted directly for a regularised core flow, rather than deriving it from a secular variation spherical harmonic model. The main field is specified by the CHAOS-4 model. Data from up to 128 observatories between 1997 and 2013 were used to calculate 185 flow models from the omm and rmm, for each possible set of three consecutive months. The full 3x3 (non-diagonal) data covariance matrix was used, and two-norm (least squares) minimisation performed. We are able to fit the data to the target (weighted) misfit of 1, for both omm and rmm inversions, provided we incorporate the full data covariance matrix, and produce consistent, plausible flows. Fits are better for rmm flows. The flows exhibit noticeable changes over timescales of a few months. However, they follow rapid excursions in the omm that we suspect result from external field contamination

  10. Correction for Delay and Dispersion Results in More Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow Ischemic Core Measurement in Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Kleinig, Timothy; Spratt, Neil J; Levi, Christopher R; Yang, Qing; Parsons, Mark W

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to assess how the ischemic core measured by perfusion computed tomography (CTP) was affected by the delay and dispersion effect. Ischemic stroke patients having CTP performed within 6 hours of onset were included. The CTP data were processed twice, generating standard cerebral blood flow (sCBF) and delay- and dispersion-corrected CBF (ddCBF), respectively. Ischemic core measured by the sCBF and ddCBF was then compared at the relative threshold core were used: acute diffusion-weighted imaging or 24-hour diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with complete recanalization. Difference of core volume between CTP and diffusion-weighted imaging was estimated by Mann-Whitney U test and limits of agreement. Patients were also classified into favorable and unfavorable CTP patterns. The imaging pattern classification by sCBF and ddCBF was compared by the χ 2 test; their respective ability to predict good clinical outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale score) was tested in logistic regression. Fifty-five patients were included in this study. Median sCBF ischemic core volume was 38.5 mL (12.4-61.9 mL), much larger than the median core volume of 17.2 mL measured by ddCBF (interquartile range, 5.5-38.8; P core much closer to diffusion-weighted imaging core references, with the mean volume difference of -0.1 mL (95% limits of agreement, -25.4 to 25.2; P =0.97) and 16.7 mL (95% limits of agreement, -21.7 to 55.2; P core measurement on CTP. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Modelling the transition between fixed and mobile bed conditions in two-phase free-surface flows: The Composite Riemann Problem and its numerical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In a two-phase free-surface flow, the transition from a mobile-bed condition to a fixed-bed one (and vice versa) occurs at a sharp interface across which the relevant system of partial differential equations changes abruptly. This leads to the possibility of conceiving a new type of Riemann Problem (RP), which we have called Composite Riemann Problem (CRP), where not only the initial constant values of the variables but also the system of equations change from left to right of a discontinuity. In this paper, we present a strategy for solving a CRP by reducing it to a standard RP of a single, composite system of equations. This can be obtained by combining the two original systems by means of a suitable weighting function, namely the erodibility variable, and the introduction of an appropriate differential equation for this quantity. In this way, the CRP problem can be analyzed theoretically with standard methods, and the features of the solutions can be clearly identified. In particular, a stationary contact wave is able to correctly describe the sharp transition between mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. A finite volume scheme based on the Multiple Averages Generalized Roe approach (Rosatti and Begnudelli (2013) [22]) was used to numerically solve the fixed-mobile CRP. Several test cases demonstrate the effectiveness, exact well balanceness and high accuracy of the scheme when applied to problems that fall within the physical range of applicability of the relevant mathematical model.

  12. Computational and Experimental Investigations of the Coolant Flow in the Cassette Fissile Core of a KLT-40S Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Varentsov, A. V.; Dobrov, A. A.; Doronkov, D. V.; Pronin, A. N.; Sorokin, V. D.; Khrobostov, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the local hydrodynamic and mass-exchange characteristics of a coolant flowing through the cells in the characteristic zones of a fuel assembly of a KLT-40S reactor plant downstream of a plate-type spacer grid by the method of diffusion of a gas tracer in the coolant flow with measurement of its velocity by a five-channel pneumometric probe are presented. An analysis of the concentration distribution of the tracer in the coolant flow downstream of a plate-type spacer grid in the fuel assembly of the KLT-40S reactor plant and its velocity field made it possible to obtain a detailed pattern of this flow and to determine its main mechanisms and features. Results of measurement of the hydraulic-resistance coefficient of a plate-type spacer grid depending on the Reynolds number are presented. On the basis of the experimental data obtained, recommendations for improvement of the method of calculating the flow rate of a coolant in the cells of the fissile core of a KLT-40S reactor were developed. The results of investigations of the local hydrodynamic and mass-exchange characteristics of the coolant flow in the fuel assembly of the KLT-40S reactor plant were accepted for estimating the thermal and technical reliability of the fissile cores of KLT-40S reactors and were included in the database for verification of computational hydrodynamics programs (CFD codes).

  13. Contribution to the modelling of flows and heat transfers during the reflooding phase of a PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, D.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis contributes to modelise thermohydraulic phenomena occuring in a pressurized water nuclear reactor core during the reflood phase of a LOCA. The reference accident and phenomena occuring during reflooding are described as well as flow regime and heat transfer proposed models. With these models, we developed a code to compute fluid conditions and fuel rods temperatures in a reactor core chanel. In order to test this code, results of computation are compared with experiments (FLECHT Skewed Tests) and a conclusion is drawn [fr

  14. Flow distribution experimental study on the emergency core cooling system of the IEA-R1m - IPEN-CNEN/SP - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of Emergency Core Cooling System designed by the IEA-R1m Reactor and the experimental results of flow distribution over the core. Several parameters were evaluated, such as: relative position of spray header to the reactor core; type and quantity of spray nozzles; spray nozzles position on spray header; and total spray flow. The main conclusions are presented. (author)

  15. Experimental study of core thermohydraulics in fast reactors during transition from forced to natural circulation. Influence of inter-wrapper flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Hayashi, K.; Momoi, K.

    1997-01-01

    The evaluation of core thermohydraulics under natural circulation conditions is important to utilize inherent safety features of Fast Reactors. When heat exchangers of a decay heat removal system are operated in an upper plenum of reactor vessel, cold sodium is provided by the heat exchangers. Core-plenum interactions will occur during a natural circulation condition due to this cold sodium in the upper plenum, e.g., it can penetrate into gap regions between fuel subassemblies (inter-wrapper flow, IWF) and the flow may reverse in low power core channels. These interactions will significantly modify the flow and temperature distributions in the core. Sodium experiments were carried out to study these phenomena. In a test section, seven subassemblies are housed and connected to an upper plenum. The influences of core-plenum interactions on the core thermohydraulics were investigated under steady state conditions and also in transitions from forced to natural circulation. Cooling effects of IWF on the fuel subassemblies were found in spite of natural circulation flow reduction in the primary loop due to temperature decreases in the upper non-heated section in the core. The inter-wrapper flow can effectively cool the core under extreme conditions of low flow rates through the core. (author)

  16. French experimental facilities for measurements of transverse flows and assessment of the corresponding risk of vibrations in heterogeneous cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Borgne, E.; Mattei, A.; Oceraies, Y.; Fardeau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Due to insertion of a limited number of new assemblies at each cycle, the cores in Pressurized Water Reactors are not homogeneous. Referring only to the impact on coolant flow, these differences can range from variable hydraulic resistances in the assembly, which depend on the geometric changes occurring during preceding cycles, to coexistence of assemblies with new design structures. Deviations in resistance between neighboring fuel assemblies causes the flow rates to be distributed differently between the assembly rods. This results in development of transverse flows from the main axial flow, and changes in the axial velocity gradients. These particularities of coolant flow have an effect on both vibration levels and cooling of the fuel rods, and also on the axial forces exerted on the assemblies in the core cavity. Since 1985, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has gradually acquired experimental and measuring facilities that have allowed it to engage in research and development programs in these areas, in cooperation with industry partners in the nuclear field. Two complementary test loops have been constructed, called ARIANE and HERMES T. Use of these experimental facilities allows to obtain complete and detailed information on the hydraulic and vibratory phenomena specific to heterogeneous cores. In particular it is possible to establish a direct assessment of the actual compatibility between two different assemblies. By making a few specific changes, these facilities can also be used as a unique tool for assembly behaviour studies under seismic conditions with simulation of the flow effects. Also, a source of information in thus made available for qualification of computation codes for vibratory mechanics and multidimensional fluid mechanics under development at CEA and also used in the field of nuclear fuel. (authors). 6 figs., 1 ref

  17. Experimental study of core bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR based on a two-layer block model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu; Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis, E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Bypass flow in a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) plays an important role in determining the coolant distribution in the core region. Efficient removal of heat from the core relies on the majority of coolant passing through the coolant channels instead of the bypass gaps. Consequently, the bypass flow fraction and its flow characteristic are important in the design process of the prismatic VHTR. The objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the flow behavior including the turbulence characteristics inside the bypass gaps using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), bypass fraction and pressure drops in the system. The experiment facility constructed at Texas A&M University is a scaled model consisting of two layers of fuel blocks. The distributions of the mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulence kinetic energy within the bypass gap at two different elevations under different Reynolds number were investigated. Uncertainties in the bypass flow fraction estimation were evaluated. The velocity and turbulence study in this work is considered to be unique, and may serve as a benchmark for the related numerical calculations.

  18. Flow and heat transfer thermohydraulic modelisation during the reflooding phase of a P.W.R.'s core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Patrick

    1978-04-01

    Some generalities about L.O.C.A. are first recalled. The French experimental studies about Emergency Core Cooling System are briefly described. The different heat transfer mechanisms to take into account, according to the flow pattern in the dry zone, and the correlations or methods to calculate them, are defined. Then the Thermohydraulic code computer: FLIRA, which describe the reflooding phase, and a modelisation taking into account the different flow patterns are setted. A first interpretation of ERSEC experiments with a tubular test section shows that it is possible, with this modelisation and some classical heat transfer correlations, to describe the reflooding phase. [fr

  19. Short-term variations in core surface flow resolved from an improved method of calculating observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Whaler, K. A.; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements taken by ground observatories are a useful data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field and the underlying core flow. However, the usual way of calculating monthly means as the arithmetic mean of all days (geomagnetic quiet...... as well as disturbed) and all local times (day and night) may result in contributions from external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin in the (ordinary, omm) monthly means. Such contamination makes monthly means less favourable for core studies. We calculated revised monthly means (rmm......), and their uncertainties, from observatory hourly means using robust means and after removal of external field predictions, using an improved method for characterising the magnetospheric ring current. The utility of the new method for calculating observatory monthly means is demonstrated by inverting their first...

  20. Core2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  1. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J; Juncosa, R; Delgado, J; Montenegro, L [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  2. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  3. A parallel solution-adaptive scheme for predicting multi-phase core flows in solid propellant rocket motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, J.S.; Groth, C.P.T.; Gottlieb, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme is described for solving the governing equations for multi-phase (gas-particle) core flows in solid propellant rocket motors (SRM). An Eulerian formulation is used to described the coupled motion between the gas and particle phases. A cell-centred upwind finite-volume discretization and the use of limited solution reconstruction, Riemann solver based flux functions for the gas and particle phases, and explicit multi-stage time-stepping allows for high solution accuracy and computational robustness. A Riemann problem is formulated for prescribing boundary data at the burning surface. Efficient and scalable parallel implementations are achieved with domain decomposition on distributed memory multiprocessor architectures. Numerical results are described to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach for predicting SRM core flows. (author)

  4. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis and flow channel blockage accident analysis of JRR-3 silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-03-01

    JRR-3 is a light water moderated and cooled, beryllium and heavy water reflected pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuels. Its thermal power is 20 MW. The core conversion program from uranium-aluminum (UAl x -Al) dispersion type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum (U 3 Si 2 -Al) dispersion type fuel (silicide fuel) is currently conducted at the JRR-3. This report describes about the steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results and the flow channel blockage accident analysis result. In JRR-3, there are two operation mode. One is high power operation mode up to 20 MW, under forced convection cooling using the primary and the secondary cooling systems. The other is low power operation mode up to 200 kW, under natural circulation cooling between the reactor core and the reactor pool without the primary and the secondary cooling systems. For the analysis of the flow channel blockage accident, COOLOD code was used. On the other hand, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis for both of the high power operation mode under forced convection cooling and low power operation under natural convection cooling, COOLOD-N2 code was used. From steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results of both forced and natural convection cooling, fuel temperature, minimum DNBR etc. meet the design criteria and JRR-3 LEU silicide core has enough safety margin under normal operation conditions. Furthermore, flow channel blockage accident analysis results show that one channel flow blockage accident meet the safety criteria for accident conditions which have been established for JRR-3 LEU silicide core. (author)

  5. Fixed Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Fixed Points - From Russia with Love - A Primer of Fixed Point Theory. A K Vijaykumar. Book Review Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 101-102. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. A comparison of multicopter and fixed-wing unmanned aerial systems (UAS) applied to mapping debris flows in small alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotier, Bernadette; Lechner, Veronika

    2016-04-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for documenting natural hazard events (e.g. debris flows) is becoming increasingly popular, as UAS allow on-demand, flexible and cost-efficient data acquisition. In this paper, we present the results of a comparison of multicopter and fixed-wing UAS. They were employed in the summer of 2015 to map two small alpine catchments located in Western Austria, where debris flows had occurred recently: The first event took place in the Seigesbach (Tyrol), the second occurred in the Plojergraben (Salzburg). For the Seigesbach mission, a fixed-wing UAS (Multiplex Mentor), equipped with a Sony NEX5 (50 mm prime lens, 14 MP sensor resolution) was employed to acquire approximately 4,000 images. In the Plojergraben an AustroDrones X18 octocopter was used, carrying a Sony ILCE-7R (35 mm prime lens, 36 MP sensor resolution) to record 1,700 images. Both sites had a size of approximately 2km². 20 ground control points (GCP) were distributed within both catchments, and their location was measured (Trimble GeoXT, expected accuracy 0.15 m). Using standard structure-from-motion photogrammetry software (AgiSoft PhotoScan Pro, v. 1.1.6), orthophotos (5 cm ground sampling distance - GSD) and digital surface models (DSM) (20 cm GSD) were calculated. Volume differences caused by the debris flow (i.e. deposition heights and erosion depths) computed by subtracting post-event from pre-event DSMs. Even though the terrain conditions in the two catchments were comparable, the challenges during the field campaign and the evaluation of the aerial images were very different. The main difference between the two campaigns was the number of flights required to cover the catchment: only four were needed by the fixed-wing UAS, while the multicopter required eleven in the Plojergraben. The fixed-wing UAS is specially designed for missions in hardly accessible regions, requiring only two people to carry the whole equipment, while in this case a car was needed for the

  7. Process for heating a part of an equipment to bring a fluid flowing in this part at a fixed temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, Claude; Vanderchmitt, Andre.

    1978-01-01

    Processs for heating a valve, pump and connections of a circuit so as to bring or maintain the fluid flowing through them at a temperature such that its change of state or a modification of its physical characteristics is avoided, by means of a heating unit built in a high thermal conductivity material, made integral with the heated component and including electric heating facilities [fr

  8. Development of an optimization technique of CETOP-D inlet flow factor for reactor core thermal margin improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sung Duk; Im, Jong Sun; Yoo, Yun Jong; Kwon, Jung Taek; Park, Jong Ryool

    1995-01-01

    The recent ABB/CE(Asea Brown Boveri Combustion Engineering) type pressurized water reactors have the on-line monitoring system, i.e., the COLSS(core operating limit supervisory system), to prevent the specified acceptable fuel design limits from being violated during normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences. One of the main functions of COLSS is the on-line monitoring of the DNB(departure from nucleate boiling) overpower margin by calculating the MDNBR(minimum DNB ratio) for the measured operating condition at every second. The CETOP-D model, used in the MDNBR calculation of COLSS, is benchmarked conservatively against the TORC model using an inlet flow factor of hot assembly in CETOP-D as an adjustment factor for TORC. In this study, a technique to optimize the CETOP-D inlet flow factor has been developed by eliminating the excessive conservatism in the ABB/CE's. A correlation is introduced to account for the actual variation of the CETOP-D inlet flow factor within the core operating limits. This technique was applied to the core operating range of the Yonggwang Units 3 and 4 Cycle 1, which results in the increase of 2% in the DNB overpower margin at the normal operating condition, compared with that from the ABB/CE method. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs. (Author)

  9. Fabrication of a polyvinylidene difluoride fiber with a metal core and its application as directional air flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Hui, Shen

    2016-09-01

    We fabricated a sensitive air flow detector that mimic the sensing mechanism found at the tail of some insects. [see Y. Yang, A. Klein, H. Bleckmann and C. Liu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(2) (2011); J. J. Heys, T. Gedeon, B. C. Knott and Y. Kim, J. Biomech. 41(5), 977 (2008); J. Tao and X. Yu, Smart Mat. Struct. 21(11) (2012)]. Our bionic airflow sensor uses a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) microfiber with a molybdenum core which we produced with the hot extrusion tensile method. The surface of the fiber is partially coated with conductive silver adhesive that serve as surface electrodes. A third electrode, the metal core is used to polarize polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) under the surface electrodes. The cantilever beam structure of the prepared symmetric electrodes of metal core piezoelectric fiber (SMPF) is used as the artificial hair airflow sensor. The surface electrodes are used to measure output voltage. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the SMPF responds fast to air flow changes, the output charge has an exponential correlation with airflow velocity and a cosine relation with the direction of airflow. Our bionic airflow sensor with directional sensing ability can also measure air flow amplitude. [see H. Droogendijk, R. G. P. Sanders and G. J. M. Krijnen, New J. Phys. 15 (2013)]. By using two surface electrodes, our sensing circuit further improves sensitivity.

  10. Robust Detection and Visualization of Jet-Stream Core Lines in Atmospheric Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Michael; Hewson, Tim; Sadlo, Filip; Westermann, Rudiger; Rautenhaus, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Jet-streams, their core lines and their role in atmospheric dynamics have been subject to considerable meteorological research since the first half of the twentieth century. Yet, until today no consistent automated feature detection approach has been proposed to identify jet-stream core lines from 3D wind fields. Such 3D core lines can facilitate meteorological analyses previously not possible. Although jet-stream cores can be manually analyzed by meteorologists in 2D as height ridges in the wind speed field, to the best of our knowledge no automated ridge detection approach has been applied to jet-stream core detection. In this work, we -a team of visualization scientists and meteorologists-propose a method that exploits directional information in the wind field to extract core lines in a robust and numerically less involved manner than traditional 3D ridge detection. For the first time, we apply the extracted 3D core lines to meteorological analysis, considering real-world case studies and demonstrating our method's benefits for weather forecasting and meteorological research.

  11. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, S/N, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia (Spain); Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping, E-mail: juarez@ice.cat [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-07-20

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s{sup −1}, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  12. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M.; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping

    2017-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s −1 , converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  13. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  14. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  15. Fix 40!

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Ansambel Fix peab 13. detsembril Tallinnas Saku Suurhallis oma 40. sünnipäeva. Kontserdi erikülaline on ansambel Apelsin, kaastegevad Jassi Zahharov ja HaleBopp Singers. Õhtut juhib Tarmo Leinatamm

  16. Large-Scale Flows and Magnetic Fields Produced by Rotating Convection in a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Convection is the main heat transport process in the liquid cores of planets. The convective flows are thought to be turbulent and constrained by rotation (corresponding to high Reynolds numbers Re and low Rossby numbers Ro). Under these conditions, and in the absence of magnetic fields, the convective flows can produce coherent Reynolds stresses that drive persistent large-scale zonal flows. The formation of large-scale flows has crucial implications for the thermal evolution of planets and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. In this work, we explore this problem with numerical simulations using a quasi-geostrophic approximation to model convective and zonal flows at Re 104 and Ro 10-4 for Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (Pr 0.1). The formation of intense multiple zonal jets strongly affects the convective heat transport, leading to the formation of a mean temperature staircase. We also study the generation of magnetic fields by the quasi-geostrophic flows at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

  17. Breccia-cored columnar rosettes in a rubbly pahoehoe lava flow, Elephanta Island, Deccan Traps, and a model for their origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetu Sheth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubbly pahoehoe lava flows are abundant in many continental flood basalts including the Deccan Traps. However, structures with radial joint columns surrounding cores of flow-top breccia (FTB, reported from some Deccan rubbly pahoehoe flows, are yet unknown from other basaltic provinces. A previous study of these Deccan “breccia-cored columnar rosettes” ruled out explanations such as volcanic vents and lava tubes, and showed that the radial joint columns had grown outwards from cold FTB inclusions incorporated into the hot molten interiors. How the highly vesicular (thus low-density FTB blocks might have sunk into the flow interiors has remained a puzzle. Here we describe a new example of a Deccan rubbly pahoehoe flow with FTB-cored rosettes, from Elephanta Island in the Mumbai harbor. Noting that (1 thick rubbly pahoehoe flows probably form by rapid inflation (involving many lava injections into a largely molten advancing flow, and (2 such flows are transitional to ‘a’ā flows (which continuously shed their top clinker in front of them as they advance, we propose a model for the FTB-cored rosettes. We suggest that the Deccan flows under study were shedding some of their FTB in front of them as they advanced and, with high-eruption rate lava injection and inflation, frontal breakouts would incorporate this FTB rubble, with thickening of the flow carrying the rubble into the flow interior. This implies that, far from sinking into the molten interior, the FTB blocks may have been rising, until lava supply and inflation stopped, the flow began solidifying, and joint columns developed outward from each cold FTB inclusion as already inferred, forming the FTB-cored rosettes. Those rubbly pahoehoe flows which began recycling most of their FTB became the ‘a’ā flows of the Deccan.

  18. A method and programme (BREACH) for predicting the flow distribution in water cooled reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randles, J.; Roberts, H.A.

    1961-03-01

    The method presented here of evaluating the flow rate in individual reactor channels may be applied to any type of water cooled reactor in which boiling occurs The flow distribution is calculated with the aid of a MERCURY autocode programme, BREACH, which is described in detail. This programme computes the steady state longitudinal void distribution and pressure drop in a single channel on the basis of the homogeneous model of two phase flow. (author)

  19. A method and programme (BREACH) for predicting the flow distribution in water cooled reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randles, J; Roberts, H A [Technical Assessments and Services Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1961-03-15

    The method presented here of evaluating the flow rate in individual reactor channels may be applied to any type of water cooled reactor in which boiling occurs The flow distribution is calculated with the aid of a MERCURY autocode programme, BREACH, which is described in detail. This programme computes the steady state longitudinal void distribution and pressure drop in a single channel on the basis of the homogeneous model of two phase flow. (author)

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    High pressure/high temperature forced and natural convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. VHTRs are designed with the capability to withstand accidents by preventing nuclear fuel meltdown, using passive safety mechanisms; a product of advanced reactor designs including the implementation of inert gases like helium as coolants. The present experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced and natural circulation experiments. This work examines fundamental aspects of high temperature gas heat transfer applied to VHTR operational and accident scenarios. Two different types of experiments, forced convection and natural circulation, were conducted under high pressure and high temperature conditions using three different gases: air, nitrogen and helium. The experimental data were analyzed to obtain heat transfer coefficient data in the form of Nusselt numbers as a function of Reynolds, Grashof and Prandtl numbers. This work also examines the flow laminarization phenomenon (turbulent flows displaying much lower heat transfer parameters than expected due to intense heating conditions) in detail for a full range of Reynolds numbers including: laminar, transition and turbulent flows under forced convection and its impact on heat transfer. This phenomenon could give rise to deterioration in convection heat transfer and occurrence of hot spots in the reactor core. Forced and mixed convection data analyzed indicated the occurrence of flow laminarization phenomenon due to the buoyancy and acceleration effects induced by strong heating. Turbulence parameters were also measured using a hot wire anemometer in forced convection experiments to confirm the existence of the flow laminarization phenomenon. In particular, these results demonstrated the influence of pressure on delayed transition between laminar and turbulent flow. The heat

  1. Turbulent-flow split model and supporting experiments for wire-wrapped core assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.; Rohsenow, W.

    1978-04-01

    A flow split model for the turbulent flow in a wire-wrapped nuclear fuel rod assembly is developed taking the form drag and sweeping flow between subchannels into consideration. This model is applicable to the flow distribution between two types of subchannels, i.e., interior and edge subchannels. The constants in this model for each type of subchannel were determined using all experimental data in the literature and the results of two tests performed as part of this study to fill a gap in the available literature. These experiments to measure flow split were performed on two wire-wrapped 61 pin bundles of pin pitch to pin diameter ratio, P/D, equal to 1.063 and wire lead to pin diameter ratios, H/D, of 4 and 8. The predictions of this model match all experimental data in the literature within +- 5%

  2. SNR 2 core dynamics and shut-down signals in a protected loss-of-flow incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a 1300 MWe Core during a loss-of-flow incident has been analyzed by use of the SAS3D code for a given pump coast down characteristic and constant core inlet temperature. Emphasis was placed on the questions: How fast and via which monitored parameters can the incident be recognized by the reactor protection system. What is the tolerable time span for the shut-down action without exceeding safety limits. Key prameters and limit values as well as conceivable reactivity feed-back effects are discussed. The result is, that three out of four choosen monitored parameters are capable of initiating a shut-down action in time. In addition, the amount of shut-down reactivity required for a successful scram was briefly investigated

  3. Optimization of fermentative hydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket fixed film bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology with a central composite design was applied to optimize fermentative hydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent (POME in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket fixed film reactor. In this study, the concurrent effects of up-flow velocity (Vup and feed flow rate (QF as independent operating variables on biological hydrogen production were investigated. A broad range of organic loading rate between 10 and 60 g COD L−1 d−1 was used as the operating variables. The dependent parameters as multiple responses were evaluated. Experimental results showed the highest value of yield at 0.31 L H2 g−1 COD was obtained at Vup and QF of 0.5 m h−1 and 1.7 L d−1, respectively. The optimum conditions for the fermentative hydrogen production using pre-settled POME were QF = 2.0–3.7 L d−1 and Vup = 1.5–2.3 m h−1. The experimental results agreed very well with the model prediction.

  4. Experimental study on heat transfer enhancement of laminar ferrofluid flow in horizontal tube partially filled porous media under fixed parallel magnet bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza, E-mail: hoseinir@aut.ac.ir; Saffar Avval, Majid

    2017-02-15

    In this study, steady state laminar ferroconvection through circular horizontal tube partially filled with porous media under constant heat flux is experimentally investigated. Transverse magnetic fields were applied on ferrofluid flow by two fixed parallel magnet bar positioned on a certain distance from beginning of the test section. The results show promising notable enhancement in heat transfer as a consequence of partially filled porous media and magnetic field, up to 2.2 and 1.4 fold enhancement were observed in heat transfer coefficient respectively. It was found that presence of both porous media and magnetic field simultaneously can highly improve heat transfer up to 2.4 fold. Porous media of course plays a major role in this configuration. Virtually, application of Magnetic field and porous media also insert higher pressure loss along the pipe which again porous media contribution is higher that magnetic field. - Highlights: • Porous media can improve the coefficient of heat transfer up to 2.2 fold. • Both porous media and Nano particles have undesired pressure drop effect. • Application of both porous media and magnetic field in ferrofluid flow will result in significant enhancement in heat transfer up to 2.4 fold. • Magnet bar effect is mainly restricted to approximately one fourth of the test section. • Diluted Ferrofluids 2%, results in over 1.4 fold enhancement in heat transfer coefficient.

  5. Achieve efficient nitrogen removal from real sewage in a plug-flow integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor via partial nitritation/anammox pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yandong; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2017-09-01

    This study tested the feasibility of plug-flow integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor in applying sewage partial nitritation/anammox (PN/A) process. The IFAS reactor was fed with real pre-treated sewage (C/N ratio=1.3) and operated for 200days. High nitrogen removal efficiency of 82% was achieved with nitrogen removal rates of 0.097±0.019kgN/(m 3 ·d). Therefore, plug-flow IFAS reactor could be an alternative to applying sewage PN/A process. Besides, it was found that the stability of sewage PN/A process was significantly affected by residual ammonium. Nitrate accumulated in effluent and PN/A performance deteriorated when residual ammonium was below 1mg/L. On the contrary, long-term stable PN/A operation was achieved when residual ammonium was over 3mg/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effect of the Holes Size Change of Lower-Support-Structure-Bottom Plate on the Reactor Core-Inlet Flow-Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Cheong, Ae Ju

    2015-01-01

    Complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena exist inside PWR because reactor interiors include a fuel assembly, control rod assembly, ICI (In-Core Instrumentation), and other internal structures. Because changes to reactor design may influence interior, thermal-hydraulic characteristics, licensing applicants commonly conduct a flow-distribution test and use test results (e.g., core-inlet flow-rate distribution) as the input data for a core thermal-margin analysis program. Because the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus) had more fuel assemblies (241EA → 257EA) and the design of some internal structures was changed (from those of APR1400), the core-inlet flow-rate distribution for a 1/5 scaled-down reactor model was measured and high flow-rates were found especially near the outer region of the reactor core. In this study, to examine the effect of the holes size change (i.e. smaller diameter) in the outer region of the LSSBP, not a 50% blockage of the flow holes, on the reactor core-inlet flow-distribution, simulations were conducted with the commercial CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software, ANSYS CFX R.14. The predicted results were compared with those of the original LSSBP. In this study, to examine the effect of the holes size change (smaller diameter) in the outer region of the LSSBP on the reactor core-inlet flow-distribution, simulations were conducted with the commercial CFD software, ANSYS CFX R.14. The predicted results were compared with those of the original LSSBP. Through these comparisons it was concluded that a more uniform distribution of the mass-flow rate at the core-inlet plane could be obtained by reducing the holes size in the outer region of the LSSBP

  7. The questions of liquid metal two-phase flow modelling in the FBR core channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martsiniouk, D.Ye.; Sorokin, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The two-fluid model representation for calculations of two-phase flow characteristics in the FBR fuel pin bundles with liquid metal cooling is presented and analysed. Two conservation equations systems of the mass, momentum and energy have been written for each phase. Components accounted the mass-, momentum- and heat transfer throughout the interface occur in the macro-field equations after the averaging procedure realisation. The pattern map and correlations for two-fluid model in vertical liquid metal flows are presented. The description of processes interphase mass- and heat exchange and interphase friction is determined by the two-phase flow regime. The opportunity of the liquid metal two-phase flow regime definition is analysed. (author)

  8. Experimental study on two-phase flow natural circulation in a core catcher cooling channel for EU-APR1400 using air-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Won [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Thanh Hung [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jinho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow regimes and transition behavior were observed in the coolant channel. • Test were conducted for natural circulation with air-water. • Data were obtained on flow regime, void fraction, flow rates and re-wetting time. • The data were related to a cooling capability of core catcher system. - Abstract: Ex-vessel core catcher cooling system driven by natural circulation is designed using a full scaled air-water system. A transparent half symmetric section of a core catcher coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor was designed with instrumentations for local void fraction measurement and flow visualization. Two designs of air-water top separator water tanks are studied including one with modified ‘super-step’ design which prevents gas entrainment into down-comer. In the experiment air flow rates are set corresponding to steam generation rate for given corium decay power. Measurements of natural circulation flow rate, spatial local void fraction distribution and re-wetting time near the top wall are carried out for various air flow rates which simulate boiling-induced vapor generation. Since heat transfer and critical heat flux are strongly dependent on the water mass flow rate and development of two-phase flow on the heated wall, knowledge of two-phase flow characteristics in the coolant channel is essential. Results on flow visualization showing two phase flow structure specifically near the high void accumulation regions, local void profiles, rewetting time, and natural circulation flow rate are presented for various air flow rates that simulate corium power levels. The data are useful in assessing the cooling capability of and safety of the core catcher system.

  9. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1-7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8-11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. There was a significant difference (Pdesigns, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS(®) (1,806±165 N) and e.max(®) ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM(®) 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass-ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use both anteriorly and posteriorly. Analysis of the fracture pattern shows

  10. Refined model for the coolability of core debris with flow entry from the bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Mueller, U.

    1986-01-01

    Within the context of a hypothetical severe accident in light water reactors also heat generating debris beds of a coarse particle size are discussed. A refined model for two-phase flow in particle beds is presented. Compared to previous models this model takes into account the effect of interfacial drag forces between liquid and vapor. These effects are important in coarse debris beds. The model is based on the momentum equations for separated flow, which are closed by empirical relations for the wall shear stress and the interfacial drag. When the refined model is applied to LWR severe accident scenarios an increased dryout heat flux is predicted for debris beds with flow entry from the bottom driven by a moderate downcomer head

  11. Two-phase flow experiments in emergency core cooling feed through the hot leg for developing numerical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, T.; Meyer, L.; Schulenberg, T.; Laurien, E.

    2006-01-01

    When a leakage, a 'loss-of-coolant accident', occurs in a light water reactor, the emergency cooling system is able to supply large amounts of coolant to ensure residual heat removal. This supply can be routed through a special emergency cooling pipe, the 'scoop', into the horizontal section of the main coolant pipe, the 'hot leg'. At the same time, hot steam from the superheated, partly voided core flows against the coolant. This gives rise to a two-phase flow in the opposite direction. A factor of primary interest in this situation is whether the coolant supplied by the emergency cooling system will reach the reactor core. The research project is being conducted in order to compute the rate of water supply by numerical methods. The WENKA test facility has been designed and built at the Karlsruhe Research Center to verify numerical calculations. It can be used to study the fluid dynamics phenomena expected to arise in emergency coolant feeding into the hot leg; the necessary local data can be determined experimentally. An extensive database for validating the numerical calculations is then available to complete the experimental work. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution continuous flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) continuous flow measurements. It is the first continuous flow laser spectroscopy system that is using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research - LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze sample from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to: (1) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time (2) enable measurements on several water standards, and (3) to reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The modified setup provides a shorter response time (~54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the modified setup has a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the modified WVISS and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the 2013 modified setup the precision after integration times of 103 s are 0.060 and 0.070‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. For the WVISS setup the corresponding σAllan values are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the modified setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The σAllan values for δ18O of 0.30 and 0.18‰ for the modified (2013) and WVISS setup, respectively after averaging times of 104 s (2.78 h). The Isotopic Water Analyzer (IWA)-modified WVISS setup used during the

  13. Compositional variation within thick (>10 m) flow units of Mauna Kea Volcano cored by the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shichun; Vollinger, Michael J.; Frey, Frederick A.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    Geochemical analyses of stratigraphic sequences of lava flows are necessary to understand how a volcano works. Typically one sample from each lava flow is collected and studied with the assumption that this sample is representative of the flow composition. This assumption may not be valid. The thickness of flows ranges from 100 m. Geochemical heterogeneity in thin flows may be created by interaction with the surficial environment whereas magmatic processes occurring during emplacement may create geochemical heterogeneities in thick flows. The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) cored ∼3.3 km of basalt erupted at Mauna Kea Volcano. In order to determine geochemical heterogeneities in a flow, multiple samples from four thick (9.3-98.4 m) HSDP flow units were analyzed for major and trace elements. We found that major element abundances in three submarine flow units are controlled by the varying proportion of olivine, the primary phenocryst phase in these samples. Post-magmatic alteration of a subaerial flow led to loss of SiO2, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5, and as a consequence, contents of immobile elements, such as Fe2O3 and Al2O3, increase. The mobility of SiO2 is important because Mauma Kea shield lavas divide into two groups that differ in SiO2 content. Post-magmatic mobility of SiO2 adds complexity to determining if these groups reflect differences in source or process. The most mobile elements during post-magmatic subaerial and submarine alteration are K and Rb, and Ba, Sr and U were also mobile, but their abundances are not highly correlated with K and Rb. The Ba/Th ratio has been used to document an important role for a plagioclase-rich source component for basalt from the Galapagos, Iceland and Hawaii. Although Ba/Th is anomalously high in Hawaiian basalt, variation in Ba abundance within a single flow shows that it is not a reliable indicator of a deep source component. In contrast, ratios involving elements that are typically immobile, such as La/Nb, La

  14. Cavity temperature and flow characteristics in a gas-core test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A test reactor concept for conducting basic studies on a fissioning uranium plasma and for testing various gas-core reactor concepts is analyzed. The test reactor consists of a conventional fuel-element region surrounding a 61-cm-(2-ft-) diameter cavity region which contains the plasma experiment. The fuel elements provide the neutron flux for the cavity region. The design operating conditions include 60-MW reactor power, 2.7-MW cavity power, 200-atm cavity pressure, and an average uranium plasma temperature of 15,000 K. The analytical results are given for cavity radiant heat transfer, hydrogen transpiration cooling, and uranium wire or powder injection.

  15. Core microstructure, morphology and chain arrangement of block copolymer self-assemblies as investigated by thermal field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muza, U L; Greyling, G; Pasch, H

    2018-05-28

    The self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs), as a result of solvent selectivity for one block, has recently received significant attention due to novel applications of BCPs in pharmaceuticals, biomedicine, cosmetics, electronics and nanotechnology. The correlation of BCP microstructure and the structure of the resulting self-assemblies requires advanced analytical methods. However, traditional bulk characterization techniques are limited in the quest of providing detailed information regarding molar mass (M w ), hydrodynamic size (D h ), chemical composition, and morphology for these self-assemblies. In the present study, thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) is utilised to investigate the impact of core microstructure on the resultant solution properties of vesicles prepared from polystyrene-polybutadiene block copolymers (PS-b-PBd) with 1.2- and 1.4-polybutadiene blocks, respectively. As compared to investigations on the impact of the corona microstructure, the impact of core microstructure on micellar properties has largely been neglected in previous work. In N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) these BCPs form vesicles having PS shells and PBd cores. D h , M w , aggregation number, and critical micelle concentration of these micelles are shown to be sensitive to the core microstructure, therefore, demonstrating the potential of microstructural differences to be used for providing tuneable pathways to specific self-assemblies. It is shown that micelles prepared from BCPs of similar PS and PBd block sizes are successfully separated by ThFFF. It is further demonstrated in this study that PS-b-PBd vesicles and PS homopolymers of identical surface chemistry (PS) and comparable D h in DMAc, can be separated by ThFFF. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The development of NRTM-turbine flow meter and measurement of the coolant flow rate in-core of 5 MW heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Meisheng; Wang Xiuqin; Ni Mengchen

    1995-01-01

    In order to measure the coolant flow rate in-core of 5 MW Heating Reactor the special turbine flowmeter of the type of NRTM has been developed. It consists of a body, a turbine with long screw blade and six pieces of Alnico magnets, and a coil mounted on the body. The advantage of this turbine flowmeter is of low resistance and long working-life. Another advantage is that when the turbine is working or not working its factor of resistance is about the same. It is very important for a natural circulation heating reactor. Because the cable, which is welded to the coil assembly, is long enough to extend out of the reactor vessel to the control room, the signal of flow rate is easy to be disturbed by noise in the case. The traditional method of counting the frequency of the A-C voltage which is induced in the coil has a poor ability for resisting noise. The method of the frequency-spectrum analysis of the frequency of the A-C voltage is used to make sure the accuracy of the measurement of the turbine flow meter. Compared with the method of the count it has a good ability for resisting noise. After three years operation a lot of valuable data were obtained

  17. Autotrophic denitrification of synthetic nitrate-contaminated groundwater in up-flow fixed-bed bioreactor by pumice as porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Tourang1

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background: Increasing nitrate concentrations in groundwater resources is considered a common environmental and public health problem worldwide. In this research, an autotrophic up-flow bioreactor with pumice as media was used to study the effects of the sulfur-to-nitrogen (S/N ratio and empty bed contact time (EBCT on nitrate removal efficiency and byproducts. Methods: Experiments were carried out in a 3.47 L up-flow, fixed-bed reactor with 3 sampling ports. To evaluate the overall impact of S/N ratio and EBCT on the performance of the bioreactor, several phases with different S/N ratios and EBCTs were applied. Results: At a constant S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g, as EBCT decreased from 24 hours to 2 hours, the nitrate removal efficiency decreased from 98% to 64%. On the other hand, at the desired EBCT of 4 hr, as S/N ratio decreased from 3.85 to 1.51 g/g, nitrate removal efficiency was reduced from 85% to 32%. Changing the EBCT and S/N ratio also affected the effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations as byproducts. At the S/N ratio of 3.85 g/g and EBCT of 24 hours, effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations were 0.1 mg NO2--N/L and 463 mg SO4 2-/L, respectively. Decreasing the S/N ratio to 1.51 g/g and the EBCT to 4 hours caused drastic changes in effluent nitrite and sulfate concentrations. Conclusion: The results indicated that the autotrophic denitrification with thiosulfate as electron donor and pumice as media was feasible and applicable for nitrate contaminated groundwater.

  18. Structure, Mechanics and Flow Properties of Fractured Shale: Core-Scale Experimentation and In-situ Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalek, B. F.; Karpyn, Z.; Liu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last several years, hydrocarbon exploitation and development in North America has been heavily centered on shale gas plays. However, the physical attributes of shales and their manifestation on transport properties and storage capacity remain poorly understood. Therefore, more experimentally based data are needed to fill the gaps in understanding both transport and storage of fluids in shale. The proposed work includes installation and testing of an experimental system which is capable of monitoring the dynamic evolution of shale core permeability under variable loading conditions and in coordination with X-ray microCT imaging. The goal of this study is to better understand and quantify fluid flow patterns and associated transport dynamics of fractured shale samples. The independent variables considered in this study are: mechanical loading and pore pressure. The mechanical response of shale core is captured for different loading paths. To best replicate the in-situ production scenario, the pore pressure is progressively depleted to mimic pressure decline. During the course of experimentation, permeability is estimated using the pulse-decay method under tri-axial stress boundary conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray microCT imaging is used with a tracer gas that is allowed to flow through the sample as an illuminating agent. In the presence of an illuminating agent, either Xenon or Krypton, the X-ray CT scanner can image fractures, global pathways and diffusional fronts in the matrix, as well as sorption sites that reflect heterogeneities in the sample and localized deformation. Anticipated results from these experiments will help quantify permeability evolution as a function of different loading conditions and pore pressure depletion. Also, the X-ray images will help visualize the change of flow patterns and the intensity of sorption as a function of mechanical loading and pore pressure.

  19. Evaluation of Baffle Fixes Film up Flow Sludge Blanket Filtration (BFUSBF System in Treatment of Wastewaters from Phenol and 2,4-Dinitrophenol Using Daphnia Magna Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Ghannadzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phenol and nitrophenol are common compounds found in different types of industrial wastewater known as serious threats to human health and natural environment. In this study, Daphnia magna was used to evaluate the effectiveness of "baffle fixes film up flow sludge blanket filtration" (BFUSBF system in elimination of phenolic compounds from water. Methods: D. magna cultures were used as toxicity index of phenol and 2,4-DNP mixtures after treatment by a pilot BFUSBF system which consisted of baffle in anoxic section and biofilm in aerobic sections. Initial concentrations were 312 mg/L phenol and 288 mg/L 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP. Results: Bioassay tests showed that D. magna was influenced by the toxicity of phenol and 2,4 DNP mixtures. The comparison between the toxicity of initial phenol and 2,4-DNP mixtures and the output toxic unit (TU derived from BFUSBF treatment system showed that the TU of the effluent from BFUSBF reactor was much lower than that of the solution that entered the reactor. Conclusion: Based on the acute toxicity test, BFUSBF process could reduce phenol and 2,4-DNP in aqueous solutions. Therefore, it is possible to use BFUSBF process as an appropriate treatment option for wastewaters containing phenolic compounds.

  20. In situ magnetic resonance measurement of conversion, hydrodynamics and mass transfer during single- and two-phase flow in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, L F; Alexander, P; Britton, M M; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Yuen, E H L

    2003-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in applying magnetic resonance (MR) techniques in areas of engineering and chemical technology. The science that underpins many of these applications is the physics and chemistry of transport and reaction processes in porous materials. Key to the exploitation of MR methods will be our ability to demonstrate that MR yields information that cannot be obtained using conventional measurement techniques in engineering research. This article describes two case studies that highlight the power of MR to give new insights to chemical engineers. First, we demonstrate the application of MR techniques to explore both mass transfer and chemical conversion in situ within a fixed bed of catalyst, and we then use these data to identify the rate-controlling step of the chemical conversion. Second, we implement a rapid imaging technique to study the stability of the gas-liquid distribution in the low- and high-interaction two-phase flow regimes in a trickle-bed reactor.

  1. Nuclear reactor core support incorporating also a cooling fluid flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a core bearing plate with several modular intake units having cooling fluid intake openings on their lower extensions, and on their upper ends located above the bearing plate, at least one fuel assembly which is thus in communication with the area under the bearing plate through the modular intake unit. The means for introducing the cooling fluid into the reactor vessel area are located under the bearing plate. The lower ends of the modular intake have ribs arranged essentially on a plane and join together with openings provided between the seals, in such a manner that the ribs form a barrier. The cooling fluid intake openings are located above this barrier, so that the cooling fluid is compelled to cross it before penetrating into the modular intake units [fr

  2. High-resolution continuous-flow analysis setup for water isotopic measurement from ice cores using laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, B. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Keller, E. D.; Gkinis, V.

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an experimental setup for water stable isotope (δ18O and δD) continuous-flow measurements and provide metrics defining the performance of the setup during a major ice core measurement campaign (Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution; RICE). We also use the metrics to compare alternate systems. Our setup is the first continuous-flow laser spectroscopy system that is using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS; analyzer manufactured by Los Gatos Research, LGR) in combination with an evaporation unit to continuously analyze water samples from an ice core. A Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source (WVISS) calibration unit, manufactured by LGR, was modified to (1) enable measurements on several water standards, (2) increase the temporal resolution by reducing the response time and (3) reduce the influence from memory effects. While this setup was designed for the continuous-flow analysis (CFA) of ice cores, it can also continuously analyze other liquid or vapor sources. The custom setups provide a shorter response time (~ 54 and 18 s for 2013 and 2014 setup, respectively) compared to the original WVISS unit (~ 62 s), which is an improvement in measurement resolution. Another improvement compared to the original WVISS is that the custom setups have a reduced memory effect. Stability tests comparing the custom and WVISS setups were performed and Allan deviations (σAllan) were calculated to determine precision at different averaging times. For the custom 2013 setup the precision after integration times of 103 s is 0.060 and 0.070 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. The corresponding σAllan values for the custom 2014 setup are 0.030, 0.060 and 0.043 ‰ for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. For the WVISS setup the precision is 0.035, 0.070 and 0.042 ‰ after 103 s for δ18O, δD and δ17O, respectively. Both the custom setups and WVISS setup are influenced by instrumental drift with δ18O being more drift sensitive than δD. The

  3. Mathematical modelling of powder material motion and transportation in high-temperature flow core during plasma coatings application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, V. I.; Giorbelidze, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    A problem of mathematical modelling of powder material motion and transportation in gas thermal flow core has been addressed. Undertaken studies indicate significant impact on dynamics of motion of sprayed particles of phenomenological law for drag coefficient and accounting momentum loss of a plasma jet upon acceleration of these particles and their diameter. It is determined that at great dispersion of spraying particles, they reach detail surface at different velocity and significant particles separation takes place at spraying spot. According to the results of mathematical modelling, requirements for admissible dispersion of diameters of particles used for spraying have been formulated. Research has also allowed reducing separation of particles at the spraying spot due to the selection of the method of powder feed to the anode channel of the plasma torch.

  4. Special power supply and control system for the gas-cooled fast reactor-core flow test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.L.

    1981-09-01

    The test bundle in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop (GCFR-CFTL) requires a source of electrical power that can be controlled accurately and reliably over a wide range of steady-state and transient power levels and skewed power distributions to simulate GCFR operating conditions. Both ac and dc power systems were studied, and only those employing silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) could meet the requirements. This report summarizes the studies, tests, evaluations, and development work leading to the selection. it also presents the design, procurement, testing, and evaluation of the first 500-kVa LMPL supply. The results show that the LMPL can control 60-Hz sine wave power from 200 W to 500 kVA

  5. Breakdown voltage at the electric terminals of GCFR-core flow test loop fuel rod simulators in helium and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, W.R.; Conley, T.B.

    1979-12-01

    Tests were performed to determine the ac and dc breakdown voltage at the terminal ends of a fuel rod simulator (FRS) in helium and air atmospheres. The tests were performed at low pressures (1 to 2 atm) and at temperatures from 20 to 350 0 C (68 to 660 0 F). The area of concern was the 0.64-mm (0.025-in.) gap between the coaxial conductor of the FRS and the sheaths of the four internal thermocouples as they exit the FRS. The tests were prformed to ensure a sufficient safety margin during Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) operations that require potentials up to 350 V ac at the FRS terminals. The primary conclusion from the test results is that the CFTL cannot be operated safely if the terminal ends of the FRSs are surrounded by a helium atmosphere but can be operated safely in air

  6. Assessment of Two-Phase Flow Heat Transfer Correlations for Molten Core-Concrete Interaction Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.; Varo, O.

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of heat transfer between corium pool and concrete basemat is of particular significance in the framework of the study of PWR's severe accident. Heat transfer directly governs the ablation velocity of concrete in case of molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) and, consequently, the time delay when the reactor cavity may fail. From a restricted hydrodynamic point of view, this issue is related to heat transfer between a heated bubbling pool and a porous wall with gas injection. Several experimental studies have been performed with simulant materials and many correlations have been provided to address this issue. The main purpose of this paper is to assess these correlations from comparisons against the available experimental data. After a review of these data, the different correlations are presented. Attention focuses here on the correlations generally used in MCCI study: Kutateladze-Malenkov, Konsetov and BALI correlations. The Deckwer's correlation is also included in this review. The comparisons between the results of these correlations and the experimental data are then discussed. (authors)

  7. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood DJH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deyar Jallal Hadi Mahmood, Ewa H Linderoth, Ann Wennerberg, Per Vult Von Steyern Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Aim: To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP fixed dental prostheses (FDPs with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods: A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion: The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed

  8. K-FIX: a computer program for transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid flow. THREED: an extension of the K-FIX code for three-dimensional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Torrey, M.D.

    1978-10-01

    The transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid code K-FIX has been extended to perform three-dimensional calculations. This capability is achieved by adding five modification sets of FORTRAN statements to the basic two-dimensional code. The modifications are listed and described, and a complete listing of the three-dimensional code is provided. Results of an example problem are provided for verification

  9. A Hybrid Mineral Battery: Energy Storage and Dissolution Behavior of CuFeS2 in a Fixed Bed Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Kashif Mairaj; Asselin, Edouard

    2018-05-09

    The development of a hybrid system capable of storing energy and the additional benefit of Cu extraction is discussed in this work. A fixed bed flow cell (FBFC) was used in which a composite negative electrode containing CuFeS 2 (80 wt %) and carbon black (20 wt %) in graphite felt was separated from a positive (graphite felt) electrode by a proton-exchange membrane. The anolyte (0.2 m H 2 SO 4 ) and catholyte (0.5 m Fe 2+ in 0.2 m H 2 SO 4 with or without 0.1 m Cu 2+ ) were circulated in the cell. The electrochemical activity of the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ redox couple over graphite felt significantly improved after the addition of Cu 2+ in the catholyte. Ultimately, in the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ /Cu 2+ (CFeCu) FBFC system, the specific capacity increased continuously to 26.4 mAh g -1 in 500 galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycles, compared to the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ (CFe) system (13.9 mAh g -1 ). Interestingly, the specific discharge energy gradually increased to 3.6 Wh kg -1 in 500 GCD cycles for the CFeCu system compared to 3.29 Wh kg -1 for the CFe system in 150 cycles. In addition to energy storage, 10.75 % Cu was also extracted from the mineral, which is an important feature of the CFeCu system as it would allow Cu extraction and recovery through hydrometallurgical methods. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. INVESTIGATION ON THERMAL-FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF HTGR CORE USING THERMIX-KONVEK MODULE AND VSOP'94 CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmono Sudarmono

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The failure of heat removal system of water-cooled reactor such as PWR in Three Mile Islands and Fukushima Daiichi BWR makes nuclear society starting to consider the use of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR. Reactor Physics and Technology Division – Center for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology  (PTRKN has tasks to perform research and development on the conceptual design of cogeneration gas cooled reactor with medium power level of 200 MWt. HTGR is one of nuclear energy generation system, which has high energy efficiency, and has high and clean inherent safety level. The geometry and structure of the HTGR200 core are designed to produce the output of helium gas coolant temperature as high as 950 °C to be used for hydrogen production and other industrial processes in co-generative way. The output of very high temperature helium gas will cause thermal stress on the fuel pebble that threats the integrity of fission product confinement. Therefore, it is necessary to perform thermal-flow evaluation to determine the temperature distribution in the graphite and fuel pebble in the HTGR core. The evaluation was carried out by Thermix-Konvek module code that has been already integrated into VSOP'94 code. The HTGR core geometry was done using BIRGIT module code for 2-D model (RZ model with 5 channels of pebble flow in active core in the radial direction. The evaluation results showed that the highest and lowest temperatures in the reactor core are 999.3 °C and 886.5 °C, while the highest temperature of TRISO UO2 is 1510.20 °C in the position (z= 335.51 cm; r=0 cm. The analysis done based on reactor condition of 120 kg/s of coolant mass flow rate, 7 MPa of pressure and 200 MWth of power. Compared to the temperature distribution resulted between VSOP’94 code and fuel temperature limitation as high as 1600 oC, there is enough safety margin from melting or disintegrating. Keywords: Thermal-Flow, VSOP’94, Thermix-Konvek, HTGR, temperature

  11. Improving the Prediction of Prostate Cancer Overall Survival by Supplementing Readily Available Clinical Data with Gene Expression Levels of IGFBP3 and F3 in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded Core Needle Biopsy Material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuochun Peng

    Full Text Available A previously reported expression signature of three genes (IGFBP3, F3 and VGLL3 was shown to have potential prognostic value in estimating overall and cancer-specific survivals at diagnosis of prostate cancer in a pilot cohort study using freshly frozen Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA samples.We carried out a new cohort study with 241 prostate cancer patients diagnosed from 2004-2007 with a follow-up exceeding 6 years in order to verify the prognostic value of gene expression signature in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE prostate core needle biopsy tissue samples. The cohort consisted of four patient groups with different survival times and death causes. A four multiplex one-step RT-qPCR test kit, designed and optimized for measuring the expression signature in FFPE core needle biopsy samples, was used. In archive FFPE biopsy samples the expression differences of two genes (IGFBP3 and F3 were measured. The survival time predictions using the current clinical parameters only, such as age at diagnosis, Gleason score, PSA value and tumor stage, and clinical parameters supplemented with the expression levels of IGFBP3 and F3, were compared.When combined with currently used clinical parameters, the gene expression levels of IGFBP3 and F3 are improving the prediction of survival time as compared to using clinical parameters alone.The assessment of IGFBP3 and F3 gene expression levels in FFPE prostate cancer tissue would provide an improved survival prediction for prostate cancer patients at the time of diagnosis.

  12. Multicenter core laboratory comparison of the instantaneous wave-free ratio and resting Pd/Pa with fractional flow reserve: The RESOLVE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeremias, Allen; Maehara, Akiko; Généreux, Philippe; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Berry, Colin; Bruyne, de B. (Bernard); Davies, Justin E.; Escaned, Javier; Fearon, W.F. (William); Gould, K. Lance; Johnson, Nils P.; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Koo, Bon Kwon; Marques, Koen M.; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Oldroyd, K.G. (Keith); Petraco, Ricardo; Piek, Jan J.; Pijls, Nico H.; Redwood, Simon; Siebes, M.; Spaan, J.A.E.; van 't Veer, Marcel; Mintz, Gary S.; Stone, Gregg W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) and resting distal coronary artery pressure/aortic pressure (Pd/Pa) with respect to hyperemic fractional flow reserve (FFR) in a core laboratory-based multicenter collaborative study.

  13. Multicenter core laboratory comparison of the instantaneous wave-free ratio and resting Pd/Pa with fractional flow reserve: the RESOLVE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeremias, Allen; Maehara, Akiko; Généreux, Philippe; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Berry, Colin; de Bruyne, Bernard; Davies, Justin E.; Escaned, Javier; Fearon, William F.; Gould, K. Lance; Johnson, Nils P.; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Marques, Koen M.; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Petraco, Ricardo; Piek, Jan J.; Pijls, Nico H.; Redwood, Simon; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos A. E.; van 't Veer, Marcel; Mintz, Gary S.; Stone, Gregg W.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) and resting distal coronary artery pressure/aortic pressure (Pd/Pa) with respect to hyperemic fractional flow reserve (FFR) in a core laboratory-based multicenter collaborative study. FFR is an index of

  14. Two-Dimensional Cutting (TDC Vitrectome: In Vitro Flow Assessment and Prospective Clinical Study Evaluating Core Vitrectomy Efficiency versus Standard Vitrectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrofanis Pavlidis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate comparative aspiration flow performance and also vitrectomy operating time efficiency using a double-cutting open port vitreous cutting system incorporated in a two-dimensional cutting (TDC, DORC International vitrectome design versus standard vitreous cutter. Methods. In vitro investigations compared aspiration flow rates in artificial vitreous humor at varying cutter speeds and vacuum levels using a TDC vitrectome and a standard vitrectome across different aspiration pump systems. A prospective single-centre clinical study evaluated duration of core vitrectomy in 80 patients with macular pucker undergoing 25-gauge or 27-gauge vitrectomy using either a TDC vitrectome at 16,000 cuts per minute (cpm or standard single-cut vitrectome, combined with a Valve Timing intelligence (VTi pump system (EVA, DORC International. Results. Aspiration flow rates remained constant independent of TDC vitrectome cut rate, while flow rates decreased linearly at higher cutter speeds using a classic single-blade vitrectome. Mean duration of core vitrectomy surgeries using a TDC vitreous cutter system was significantly (p<0.001 shorter than the mean duration of core vitrectomy procedures using a single-cut vitrectome of the same diameter (reduction range, 34%–50%. Conclusion. Vitrectomy surgery performed using a TDC vitrectome was faster than core vitrectomy utilizing a standard single-action vitrectome at similar cut speeds.

  15. Transient core characteristics of small molten salt reactor coupling problem between heat transfer/flow and nuclear fission reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takahisa; Mitachi, Koshi

    2004-01-01

    This paper performed the transient core analysis of a small Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The emphasis is that the numerical model employed in this paper takes into account the interaction among fuel salt flow, nuclear reaction and heat transfer. The model consists of two group diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluexs, balance equations for six-group delayed neutron precursors and energy conservation equations for fuel salt and graphite moderator. The results of transient analysis are that (1) fission reaction (heat generation) rate significantly increases soon after step reactivity insertion, e.g., the peak of fission reaction rate achieves about 2.7 times larger than the rated power 350 MW when the reactivity of 0.15% Δk/k 0 is inserted to the rated state, and (2) the self-control performance of the small MSR effectively works under the step reactivity insertion of 0.56% Δk/k 0 , putting the fission reaction rate back on the rated state. (author)

  16. A unified monolithic approach for multi-fluid flows and fluid-structure interaction using the Particle Finite Element Method with fixed mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a strategy to solve multi-fluid and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems using Lagrangian particles combined with a fixed finite element (FE) mesh. Our approach is an extension of the fluid-only PFEM-2 (Idelsohn et al., Eng Comput 30(2):2-2, 2013; Idelsohn et al., J Numer Methods Fluids, 2014) which uses explicit integration over the streamlines to improve accuracy. As a result, the convective term does not appear in the set of equations solved on the fixed mesh. Enrichments in the pressure field are used to improve the description of the interface between phases.

  17. Coupled 3D-neutronics / thermal-hydraulics analysis of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident for a 3600 MWth SFR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, K.; Chenu, A.; Mikityuk, K.; Krepel, J.; Chawla, R.

    2012-01-01

    The core behaviour of a large (3600 MWth) sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is investigated in this paper with the use of a coupled TRACE/PARCS model. The SFR neutron spectrum is characterized by several performance advantages, but also leads to one dominating neutronics drawback - a positive sodium void reactivity. This implies a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. In order to evaluate such feedback in terms of the dynamics, a representative unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) transient, i.e. flow run-down without SCRAM in which sodium boiling occurs, is analyzed. Although analysis of a single transient cannot allow general conclusions to be drawn, it does allow better understanding of the underlying physics and can lead to proposals for improving the core response during such an accident. The starting point of this study is the reference core design considered in the framework of the Collaborative Project on the European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR). To reduce the void effect, the core has been modified by introducing an upper sodium plenum (along with a boron layer) and by reducing the core height-to-diameter ratio. For the ULOF considered, a sharp increase in core power results in melting of the fuel in the case of the reference core. In the modified core, a large dryout leads to melting of the clad. It seems that, for the hypothetical event considered, fuel failure cannot be avoided with just improvement of the neutronics design; therefore, thermal-hydraulics optimization has been considered. An innovative assembly design is proposed to prevent sodium vapour blocking the fuel channel. This results in preventing a downward propagation of the sodium boiling to the core center, thus limiting it to the upper region. Such a void map introduces a negative coolant density reactivity feedback, which dominates the total reactivity change. As a result, the power level and the fuel temperature are effectively reduced, and a large dryout

  18. Coupled 3D-neutronics / thermal-hydraulics analysis of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident for a 3600 MWth SFR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chenu, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Mikityuk, K.; Krepel, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The core behaviour of a large (3600 MWth) sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is investigated in this paper with the use of a coupled TRACE/PARCS model. The SFR neutron spectrum is characterized by several performance advantages, but also leads to one dominating neutronics drawback - a positive sodium void reactivity. This implies a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. In order to evaluate such feedback in terms of the dynamics, a representative unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) transient, i.e. flow run-down without SCRAM in which sodium boiling occurs, is analyzed. Although analysis of a single transient cannot allow general conclusions to be drawn, it does allow better understanding of the underlying physics and can lead to proposals for improving the core response during such an accident. The starting point of this study is the reference core design considered in the framework of the Collaborative Project on the European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR). To reduce the void effect, the core has been modified by introducing an upper sodium plenum (along with a boron layer) and by reducing the core height-to-diameter ratio. For the ULOF considered, a sharp increase in core power results in melting of the fuel in the case of the reference core. In the modified core, a large dryout leads to melting of the clad. It seems that, for the hypothetical event considered, fuel failure cannot be avoided with just improvement of the neutronics design; therefore, thermal-hydraulics optimization has been considered. An innovative assembly design is proposed to prevent sodium vapour blocking the fuel channel. This results in preventing a downward propagation of the sodium boiling to the core center, thus limiting it to the upper region. Such a void map introduces a negative coolant density reactivity feedback, which dominates the total reactivity change. As a result, the power level and the fuel temperature are effectively reduced, and a large dryout

  19. Identification of the two-phase flow in the upper part of a boiling water reactor core using reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miteff, L.

    1983-08-01

    The starting point of this work were neutron flux correlation measurements in the core of the Muehleberg boiling water reactor. During these measurements a new effect was observed i.e. that the cross power spectral density (CPSD) phases could be approximated by two straight lines of different slopes. The two linear domains of the CPSD-phases are separated along the frequency axis by a transition interval. It was supposed that such CPSD-phases could account for the propagation in the axial direction of two different thermohydraulic perturbations in the upper part of the Muehleberg BWR-core. It was also assumed that the second linear domain of these CPSD-phases could be related to a characteristic property of an annular flow regime of the steam-water two-phase flows in the bundles around the neutron detectors. The author attempts to give an explanation for the existence of a second transport phenomenon. This was achieved by in-core and out-core correlation measurements as well as by theoretical work. The out-core measurements were performed on an water-air simulation loop by use of laser beams. (Auth.)

  20. Vortex flow during early and late left ventricular filling in normal subjects: quantitative characterization using retrospectively-gated 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance and three-dimensional vortex core analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Calkoen, Emmeline E; Westenberg, Jos J M; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Roest, Arno A W; van der Geest, Rob J

    2014-09-27

    LV diastolic vortex formation has been suggested to critically contribute to efficient blood pumping function, while altered vortex formation has been associated with LV pathologies. Therefore, quantitative characterization of vortex flow might provide a novel objective tool for evaluating LV function. The objectives of this study were 1) assess feasibility of vortex flow analysis during both early and late diastolic filling in vivo in normal subjects using 4D Flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with retrospective cardiac gating and 3D vortex core analysis 2) establish normal quantitative parameters characterizing 3D LV vortex flow during both early and late ventricular filling in normal subjects. With full ethical approval, twenty-four healthy volunteers (mean age: 20±10 years) underwent whole-heart 4D Flow CMR. The Lambda2-method was used to extract 3D LV vortex ring cores from the blood flow velocity field during early (E) and late (A) diastolic filling. The 3D location of the center of vortex ring core was characterized using cylindrical cardiac coordinates (Circumferential, Longitudinal (L), Radial (R)). Comparison between E and A filling was done with a paired T-test. The orientation of the vortex ring core was measured and the ring shape was quantified by the circularity index (CI). Finally, the Spearman's correlation between the shapes of mitral inflow pattern and formed vortex ring cores was tested. Distinct E- and A-vortex ring cores were observed with centers of A-vortex rings significantly closer to the mitral valve annulus (E-vortex L=0.19±0.04 versus A-vortex L=0.15±0.05; p=0.0001), closer to the ventricle's long-axis (E-vortex: R=0.27±0.07, A-vortex: R=0.20±0.09, p=0.048) and more elliptical in shape (E-vortex: CI=0.79±0.09, A-vortex: CI=0.57±0.06; vortex. The circumferential location and orientation relative to LV long-axis for both E- and A-vortex ring cores were similar. Good to strong correlation was found between vortex shape and

  1. Hydrocarbon Degradation in Caspian Sea Sediment Cores Subjected to Simulated Petroleum Seepage in a Newly Designed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Treude

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbial community response to petroleum seepage was investigated in a whole round sediment core (16 cm length collected nearby natural hydrocarbon seepage structures in the Caspian Sea, using a newly developed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through (SOFT system. Distinct redox zones established and migrated vertically in the core during the 190 days-long simulated petroleum seepage. Methanogenic petroleum degradation was indicated by an increase in methane concentration from 8 μM in an untreated core compared to 2300 μM in the lower sulfate-free zone of the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective decrease in the δ13C signal of methane from -33.7 to -49.5‰. The involvement of methanogens in petroleum degradation was further confirmed by methane production in enrichment cultures from SOFT sediment after the addition of hexadecane, methylnapthalene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. Petroleum degradation coupled to sulfate reduction was indicated by the increase of integrated sulfate reduction rates from 2.8 SO42-m-2 day-1 in untreated cores to 5.7 mmol SO42-m-2 day-1 in the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective accumulation of sulfide from 30 to 447 μM. Volatile hydrocarbons (C2–C6 n-alkanes passed through the methanogenic zone mostly unchanged and were depleted within the sulfate-reducing zone. The amount of heavier n-alkanes (C10–C38 decreased step-wise toward the top of the sediment core and a preferential degradation of shorter (C30 was seen during the seepage. This study illustrates, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time the development of methanogenic petroleum degradation and the succession of benthic microbial processes during petroleum passage in a whole round sediment core.

  2. Hydrocarbon Degradation in Caspian Sea Sediment Cores Subjected to Simulated Petroleum Seepage in a Newly Designed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sonakshi; Wefers, Peggy; Schmidt, Mark; Knittel, Katrin; Krüger, Martin; Stagars, Marion H; Treude, Tina

    2017-01-01

    The microbial community response to petroleum seepage was investigated in a whole round sediment core (16 cm length) collected nearby natural hydrocarbon seepage structures in the Caspian Sea, using a newly developed Sediment-Oil-Flow-Through (SOFT) system. Distinct redox zones established and migrated vertically in the core during the 190 days-long simulated petroleum seepage. Methanogenic petroleum degradation was indicated by an increase in methane concentration from 8 μM in an untreated core compared to 2300 μM in the lower sulfate-free zone of the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective decrease in the δ 13 C signal of methane from -33.7 to -49.5‰. The involvement of methanogens in petroleum degradation was further confirmed by methane production in enrichment cultures from SOFT sediment after the addition of hexadecane, methylnapthalene, toluene, and ethylbenzene. Petroleum degradation coupled to sulfate reduction was indicated by the increase of integrated sulfate reduction rates from 2.8 SO 4 2- m -2 day -1 in untreated cores to 5.7 mmol SO 4 2- m -2 day -1 in the SOFT core at the end of the experiment, accompanied by a respective accumulation of sulfide from 30 to 447 μM. Volatile hydrocarbons (C2-C6 n -alkanes) passed through the methanogenic zone mostly unchanged and were depleted within the sulfate-reducing zone. The amount of heavier n -alkanes (C10-C38) decreased step-wise toward the top of the sediment core and a preferential degradation of shorter (C30) was seen during the seepage. This study illustrates, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time the development of methanogenic petroleum degradation and the succession of benthic microbial processes during petroleum passage in a whole round sediment core.

  3. Application of Direct Current Atmospheric Pressure Glow Microdischarge Generated in Contact with a Flowing Liquid Solution for Synthesis of Au-Ag Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzimitrowicz, Anna; Jamroz, Piotr; Nyk, Marcin; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-04-06

    A direct current atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (dc-μAPGD) generated between an Ar nozzle microjet and a flowing liquid was applied to produce Au-Ag core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AgCSNPs) in a continuous flow system. Firstly, operating dc-μAPGD with the flowing solution of the Au(III) ions as the cathode, the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) core was produced. Next, to produce the core-shell nanostructures, the collected AuNPs solution was immediately mixed with an AgNO₃ solution and passed through the system with the reversed polarity to fabricate the Ag nanoshell on the AuNPs core. The formation of Au@AgCSNPs was confirmed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Three localized surface plasmon resonance absorption bands with wavelengths centered at 372, 546, and 675 nm were observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of Au@AgCSNPs, confirming the reduction of both the Au(III) and Ag(I) ions. The right configuration of metals in Au@AgCSNPs was evidenced by TEM. The Au core diameter was 10.2 ± 2.0 nm, while the thickness of the Ag nanoshell was 5.8 ± 1.8 nm. The elemental composition of the bimetallic nanoparticles was also confirmed by EDS. It is possible to obtain 90 mL of a solution containing Au@AgCSNPs per hour using the applied microdischarge system.

  4. Thermal response of core and central-cavity components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the absence of forced convection coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, R.L.; Sanders, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    A means of determining the thermal responses of the core and the components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor after loss of forced coolant flow is discussed. A computer program, using a finite-difference technique, is presented together with a solution of the confined natural convection. The results obtained are reasonable and demonstrate that the computer program adequately represents the confined natural convection

  5. Simulation of single-phase rod bundle flow. Comparison between CFD-code ESTET, PWR core code THYC and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mur, J.; Larrauri, D.

    1998-07-01

    Computer simulation of flow in configurations close to pressurized water reactor (PWR) geometry is of great interest for Electricite de France (EDF). Although simulation of the flow through a whole PWR core with an all purpose CFD-code is not yet achievable, such a tool cna be quite useful to perform numerical experiments in order to try and improve the modeling introduced in computer codes devoted to reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis. Further to simulation in small bare rod bundle configurations, the present study is focused on the simulation, with CFD-code ESTET and PWR core code THYC, of the flow in the experimental configuration VATICAN-1. ESTET simulation results are compared on the one hand to local velocity and concentration measurements, on the other hand with subchannel averaged values calculated by THYC. As far as the comparison with measurements is concerned, ESTET results are quite satisfactory relatively to available experimental data and their uncertainties. The effect of spacer grids and the prediction of the evolution of an unbalanced velocity profile seem to be correctly treated. As far as the comparison with THYC subchannel averaged values is concerned, the difficulty of a direct comparison between subchannel averaged and local values is pointed out. ESTET calculated local values are close to experimental local values. ESTET subchannel averaged values are also close to THYC calculation results. Thus, THYC results are satisfactory whereas their direct comparison to local measurements could show some disagreement. (author)

  6. Effects of the proposed California WaterFix North Delta Diversion on flow reversals and entrainment of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) into Georgiana Slough and the Delta Cross Channel, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Russell W.; Romine, Jason G.; Pope, Adam C.; Evans, Scott D.

    2018-02-27

    The California Department of Water Resources and Bureau of Reclamation propose new water intake facilities on the Sacramento River in northern California that would convey some of the water for export to areas south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (hereinafter referred to as the Delta) through tunnels rather than through the Delta. The collection of water intakes, tunnels, pumping facilities, associated structures, and proposed operations are collectively referred to as California WaterFix. The water intake facilities, hereinafter referred to as the North Delta Diversion (NDD), are proposed to be located on the Sacramento River downstream of the city of Sacramento and upstream of the first major river junction where Sutter Slough branches from the Sacramento River. The NDD can divert a maximum discharge of 9,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) from the Sacramento River, which reduces the amount of Sacramento River inflow into the Delta.In this report, we conducted three analyses to investigate the effect of the NDD and its proposed operation on entrainment of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) into Georgiana Slough and the Delta Cross Channel (DCC). Fish that enter the interior Delta (the network of channels to the south of the Sacramento River) through Georgiana Slough and the DCC survive at lower rates than fish that use other migration routes (Sacramento River, Sutter Slough, and Steamboat Slough). Therefore, fisheries managers were concerned about the extent to which operation of the NDD would increase the proportion of the population entering the interior Delta, which, all else being equal, would lower overall survival through the Delta by increasing the fraction of the population subject to lower survival rates. Operation of the NDD would reduce flow in the Sacramento River, which has the potential to increase the magnitude and duration of reverse flows of the Sacramento River downstream of Georgiana Slough.In the first analysis, we

  7. A relative permeability model to derive fractional-flow functions of water-alternating-gas and surfactant-alternating-gas foam core-floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mossawy, Mohammed Idrees; Demiral, Birol; Raja, D M Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Foam is used in enhanced oil recovery to improve the sweep efficiency by controlling the gas mobility. The surfactant-alternating-gas (SAG) foam process is used as an alternative to the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection. In the WAG technique, the high mobility and the low density of the gas lead the gas to flow in channels through the high permeability zones of the reservoir and to rise to the top of the reservoir by gravity segregation. As a result, the sweep efficiency decreases and there will be more residual oil in the reservoir. The foam can trap the gas in liquid films and reduces the gas mobility. The fractional-flow method describes the physics of immiscible displacements in porous media. Finding the water fractional flow theoretically or experimentally as a function of the water saturation represents the heart of this method. The relative permeability function is the conventional way to derive the fractional-flow function. This study presents an improved relative permeability model to derive the fractional-flow functions for WAG and SAG foam core-floods. The SAG flow regimes are characterized into weak foam, strong foam without a shock front and strong foam with a shock front. (paper)

  8. Magnetic Fixed Points and Emergent Supersymmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antipin, Oleg; Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    We establish in perturbation theory the existence of fixed points along the renormalization group flow for QCD with an adjoint Weyl fermion and scalar matter reminiscent of magnetic duals of QCD [1-3]. We classify the fixed points by analyzing their basin of attraction. We discover that among...

  9. Metallic and antiferromagnetic fixed points from gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Chandrima

    2018-06-01

    We consider SU(2) × U(1) gauge theory coupled to matter field in adjoints and study RG group flow. We constructed Callan-Symanzik equation and subsequent β functions and study the fixed points. We find there are two fixed points, showing metallic and antiferromagnetic behavior. We have shown that metallic phase develops an instability if certain parametric conditions are satisfied.

  10. Electricity generation by nuclear fission reactor and closed cycle gas turbines, with core automatically shut down by coolant flow failure and dropped out of plant for sealing if temperature is excessive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reactor system is described in which if there is a failure of coolant flow the core automatically drops down to its control rods, so that criticality is reduced, but if the temperature of the core still stays dangerously high the core is allowed to drop down a deep shaft. Concrete blocks automatically come together after the ejected reactor core has moved past them to prevent the escape of radiation or radioactive material, until such time that the core temperature has dropped to a level that it can, with safety, be returned to its normal position in the plant. (U.K.)

  11. Detection of T and B cells specific complement-fixing alloantibodies using flow cytometry: A diagnostic approach for a resource limited laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra Jain

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We postulate that this method incorporates most of the features of all the available modalities (i.e., National Institute of Health-complement dependent lymphocytotoxicity, FCXM, cytotoxic FCXM and C4d-flowPRA yet cost-effective and best suited for resource-limited laboratory/ies which is a common scenario in developing countries.

  12. Numerical investigation of the 3-dimensional steady-state temperature- and flow distribution in the core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a computer model determining the steady-state temperature- and flow field in 3 dimensions in the core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor. The numerical sprinkler method, basind on the Thermix-model, allows to describe the thermo-hydraulics of a non-rotational-symmetric core-geometry. The AVR-reactor in Juelich, in operation since 1967, represents a suitable investigation-object for the computer model of Thermix-3D. It is in a 3D-mesh-structure to reproduce very precisely the so called ''graphite noses'', in which the shut-down rods are conducted as well as the filling cones in the inner and outer area. The results of the final calculation of the normal operation condition for the AVR-reactor unambiguously show, that within the core reproduced in 3 dimensions there are evident deviations in the flow profile and in the temperatures of the cooling gas in contrast to a 2D-handling. (orig.) [de

  13. Synthesis of Aqueous CdTe/CdS/ZnS Core/shell/shell Quantum Dots by a Chemical Aerosol Flow Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work described a continuous method to synthesize CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots. In an integrated system by flawlessly combining the chemical aerosol flow system working at high temperature (200–300°C to generate CdTe/CdS intermediate products and an additional heat-up setup at relatively low temperature to overcoat the ZnS shells, the CdTe/CdS/ZnS multishell structures were realized. The as-synthesized CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots are characterized by photoluminescence spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. Fluorescence and XRD results confirm that the obtained quantum dots have a core/shell/shell structure. It shows the highest quantum yield above 45% when compared to the rhodamine 6G. The core/shell/shell QDs were more stable via the oxidation experiment by H2O2.

  14. Analysis on temperature field and flow field of reactor core barrel openings for China experiment fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yabo; Yang Hongyi

    2008-01-01

    The paper gives analysis of the temperature and flow field around openings by software CFX, and figures out the flow direction around openings under CEFR normal condition. The calculation result is consistent with the test result of CAPX (the test-bed of decay heat removal system) and ground for the safety analysis later. (authors)

  15. Application of TEMPPC code to the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor core hydrothermal calculations operating at 2 MW for determining the minimal coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajndlich, R.; Sousa, J.A. de.

    1985-01-01

    A thermohydraulic study of the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor core on steady-state operating condition and forced convection, is presented. The objective of this calculation is to obtain the minimal flow rate of coolant necessary at the reactor core, limited by the temperature associated to the beginning of nucleate boiling over the fuel plates at a normal operating power (2MW) for a certain inlet coolant temperature. The coolant system safety level is also calculated in this paper, which is divided in three steps: thermohydraulic calculation, without using the uncertainty factors and, after that, considering these factor by two methods: the statistical and the conventional ones. Whichever the method accepted, the results obtained by the program TEMPPC show a great safety margin with respect to the termohydraulic parameters from the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  16. Two-phase flow visualization under reservoir conditions for highly heterogeneous conglomerate rock: A core-scale study for geologic carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kue-Young; Oh, Junho; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Kwon Gyu; Shinn, Young Jae; Park, Eungyu

    2018-03-20

    Geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere; however, understanding the flow mechanisms in various geological formations is essential for safe storage using this technique. This study presents, for the first time, a two-phase (CO 2 and brine) flow visualization under reservoir conditions (10 MPa, 50 °C) for a highly heterogeneous conglomerate core obtained from a real CO 2 storage site. Rock heterogeneity and the porosity variation characteristics were evaluated using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Multiphase flow tests with an in-situ imaging technology revealed three distinct CO 2 saturation distributions (from homogeneous to non-uniform) dependent on compositional complexity. Dense discontinuity networks within clasts provided well-connected pathways for CO 2 flow, potentially helping to reduce overpressure. Two flow tests, one under capillary-dominated conditions and the other in a transition regime between the capillary and viscous limits, indicated that greater injection rates (potential causes of reservoir overpressure) could be significantly reduced without substantially altering the total stored CO 2 mass. Finally, the capillary storage capacity of the reservoir was calculated. Capacity ranged between 0.5 and 4.5%, depending on the initial CO 2 saturation.

  17. Evaluation of final vapor pressures in the loss of flow accident in an irradiation device of a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The reliability feature, are described for a device containing samples, at a temperatures of 300 grade centigrades, in a reactor core for a long time. After an examination of the maximum accident event, the maximum vapour pressure originated by the inlet of reactor cooling water into the experimental device, is evaluated

  18. Observations of the vertical structure of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers above fixed roughness beds using a prototype wideband coherent Doppler profiler: 1. The oscillatory component of the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alex E.; Zedel, Len; Cheel, Richard; Dillon, Jeremy

    2012-03-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of rough turbulent oscillatory boundary layers using a prototype wideband bistatic coherent Doppler profiler. The profiler operates in the 1.2 MHz to 2.3 MHz frequency band and uses software-defined radio technologies for digital control of the frequency content and shape of the transmit pulse and for digital complex demodulation of the received signals. Velocity profiles are obtained at sub-millimeter range resolution and 100 Hz profiling rates (each profile being an ensemble average of 10 pulse pairs). The measurements were carried out above beds of fixed sand or gravel particles, with median grain diameters of 0.37 mm and 3.9 mm, respectively, oscillating sinusoidally at a 10 s period through excursions of 0.75 m to 1.5 m. The resulting vertical profiles of horizontal velocity magnitude and phase, with the vertical axis scaled by ℓ = κu∗m/ω, are comparable to similarly scaled profiles obtained using laser Doppler anemometry by Sleath (1987) and Jensen (1988). A key objective of the comparisons between the previous experiments and those reported here was to establish how close to the bed reliable velocity measurements can be made with the sonar. This minimum distance above the bed is estimated to be 5 ± 1 mm, a value approaching the 3 to 4 mm limit set by the path of least time.

  19. Applying CFD in the analysis of heavy oil - water two-phase flow in joints by using core annular flow technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Andrade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the oil industry the multiphase flow occur throughout the production chain, from reservoir rock until separation units through the production column, risers and pipelines. During the whole process the fluid flows through the horizontal pipes, curves, connections and T joints. Today, technological and economic challenges facing the oil industry is related to heavy oil transportation due to its unfavourable characteristics such as high viscosity and high density that provokes high pressure drop along the flow. The coreflow technique consists in the injection of small amounts of water into the pipe to form a ring of water between the oil and the wall of the pipe which provides the reduction of friction pressure drop along the flow. This paper aim to model and simulate the transient two-phase flow (water-heavy oil in a horizontal pipe and T joint by numerical simulation using the software ANSYS CFX® Release 12.0. Results of pressure and volumetric fraction distribution inside the horizontal pipe and T joint are presented and analysed.

  20. The fixed bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Sefidvash, F.

    2007-01-01

    The core of a water moderated Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR), possessing, for instance, an electrical power of 40 MW, consists of 1.35 million fuel pellets (9.5 t) with a diameter of 1.5 cm each. The low enriched uranium fuel is made of TRISO type microspheres used in the HTGR, embedded in a graphite matrix and cladded by a shell of 1 mm SiC. Under any thinkable operational condition the fuel temperature will be below 400 C whereas its stability limit is at about 1600 C. The first characteristic of the FBNR is, therefore, its robust fuel under relatively 'cold' operating conditions and - due to the outer SiC - shell layer - the freedom from any hydrogen production. To operate the reactor the fuel pellets are pumped by a flow of water from below into the core regions where they form a stable fixed bed of about 4 cubic meter and become critical for energy production heating the outlet water to about 330 C (at 160 bar) which feeds a steam generator. The new safety feature is now the following: In case of any abnormity (e.g. external power failure, overheating etc.) the circulating pump stops and - due to gravity - the fuel pellets fall automatically out of the core region into a helical 'fuel chamber' underneath the core where their decay heat is transferred passively by natural circulation to a water tank housing the fuel chamber. The safety principle, applied here, is: The loss of an active component (circulating pump) induces a self-controlled, passively working shut-down manoeuvre accompanied by a foolproof decay heat removal without any emergency power system or any human interaction. The fuel chamber is sealed and is transported as the only reactor component to and from the reactor site. There is no possibility to irradiate fertile fuel, too. For a long-life core (larger than a 10 years cycle time) the fuel can either be poisoned by gadolinium-oxide or by a piston type core limiter adjusting the height and controlling thereby the number of the fuel pellets in

  1. Detailed evaluation of two phase natural circulation flow in the cooling channel of the ex-vessel core catcher for EU-APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon, E-mail: rjpark@kaeri.re.kr; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Rhee, Bo-Wook; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Ex-vessel core catcher of PECS is installed in EU-APR1400. • CE-PECS has been conducted to test a cooling capability of the PECS. • Two phase flow in CE-PECS and PECS was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. • RELAP5 results are very similar to the CE-PECS data. • The super-step design is suitable for steam injection into the downcomer in PECS. - Abstract: The ex-vessel core catcher of the PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System) is installed to retain and cool down the corium in the reactor cavity of the EU (European Union)-APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400. A verification experiment on the cooling capability of the PECS has been conducted in the CE (Cooling Experiment)-PECS. Simulations of a two-phase natural circulation flow using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code in the CE-PECS and PECS have been conducted to predict the two-phase flow characteristics, to determine the natural circulation mass flow rate in the cooling channel, and to evaluate the scaling in the experimental design of the CE-PECS. Particularly from a comparative study of the prototype PECS and the scaled test facility of the CE-PECS, the orifice loss coefficient in the CE-PECS was found to be 6 to maintain the coolant circulation mass flux, which is approximately 273.1 kg/m{sup 2} s. The RELAP5 results on the coolant circulation mass flow rate are very similar to the CE-PECS experimental results. An increase in the coolant injection temperature and the heat flux lead to an increase in the coolant circulation mass flow rate. In the base case simulation, a lot of vapor was injected into the downcomer, which leads to an instability of the two-phase natural circulation flow. A super-step design at a downcomer inlet is suitable to prevent vapor injection into the downcomer piping.

  2. Detailed evaluation of two phase natural circulation flow in the cooling channel of the ex-vessel core catcher for EU-APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Rhee, Bo-Wook; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ex-vessel core catcher of PECS is installed in EU-APR1400. • CE-PECS has been conducted to test a cooling capability of the PECS. • Two phase flow in CE-PECS and PECS was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. • RELAP5 results are very similar to the CE-PECS data. • The super-step design is suitable for steam injection into the downcomer in PECS. - Abstract: The ex-vessel core catcher of the PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System) is installed to retain and cool down the corium in the reactor cavity of the EU (European Union)-APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400. A verification experiment on the cooling capability of the PECS has been conducted in the CE (Cooling Experiment)-PECS. Simulations of a two-phase natural circulation flow using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code in the CE-PECS and PECS have been conducted to predict the two-phase flow characteristics, to determine the natural circulation mass flow rate in the cooling channel, and to evaluate the scaling in the experimental design of the CE-PECS. Particularly from a comparative study of the prototype PECS and the scaled test facility of the CE-PECS, the orifice loss coefficient in the CE-PECS was found to be 6 to maintain the coolant circulation mass flux, which is approximately 273.1 kg/m"2 s. The RELAP5 results on the coolant circulation mass flow rate are very similar to the CE-PECS experimental results. An increase in the coolant injection temperature and the heat flux lead to an increase in the coolant circulation mass flow rate. In the base case simulation, a lot of vapor was injected into the downcomer, which leads to an instability of the two-phase natural circulation flow. A super-step design at a downcomer inlet is suitable to prevent vapor injection into the downcomer piping.

  3. Behaviour of steel pipe exposed to fouling by heavy oil during core-annular flow; Comportamento de tubo de aco exposto a sujeira de oleo pesado durante escoamento nucleo-anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Adriana; Bannwart, Antonio C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The use of water-assisted technologies such as core-annular flow to the pipelines of viscous oils has been proposed as an attractive alternative for production and transportation of heavy crudes in both onshore and offshore scenarios. Usually, core-annular flow can be created by injecting a relatively small water flow rate laterally in the pipe, so as to form a thin water annulus surrounding the viscous oil, which is pumped through the center. The reduction in friction losses obtained thanks to lubrication by water is significant, since the pressure drop in a steady state core flow becomes comparable to water flow only. For a complete assessment of core flow technology, however, unwanted effects associated with possible oil adhesion onto the pipe wall should be investigated, since these may cause severe fouling of the wall and pressure drop increase. It has been observed that oil adhesion on metallic surfaces may occur for certain types of crude and oilphilic pipe materials. In this work we present results of pressure drop monitoring during 35 hour-operation of a heavy oil-water core annular flow in a 26.08 mm. i.d. horizontal steel pipe. The oil used is described in terms of its main components and the results of static wet ability tests are also presented for comparison (author)

  4. RAMONA-3B calculations of core-wide and regional power/flow oscillations - comparison with Oskarshamn 3 natural circulation test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Stepniewski, M.

    1991-01-01

    The 3-D BWR Dynamics Code RAMONA-3D is used for a study of power and flow fluctuations at conditions close to observed limit-cycle out-of-phase oscillations during the start-up stability test at the Oskarshamn 3 internal pump BWR. The purpose of the work, which is sponsored by the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate, SKI, is to see if the observed first order azimuthal oscillations can be reproduced in a simulation using no a-priori information on the oscillation pattern when setting up the model. The experimental data contain dynamic information on the local neutron flux at 32 LPRM detector locations and the inlet flow to 8 fuel channels. The oscillation patterns, i.e. amplitudes and phases at the resonance frequency for local power and flow, are evaluated by direct Fourier transformation of small time slices of the data. A large RAMONA-3B model, using 350 and 268 channels in the neutronic and hydraulic models respectively, each divided into 25 axial nodes, was used for the analyses. The agreement between measured and calculated local flux and flow oscillation frequency and patterns at the limit-cycle threshold is excellent, taking into account the limitations of the half-core model used

  5. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  6. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-10-07

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  7. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest

  8. The role of zonal flows and predator-prey oscillations in triggering the formation of edge and core transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.; Austin, M. E.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct evidence of low frequency, radially sheared, turbulence-driven flows (zonal flows (ZFs)) triggering edge transport barrier formation preceding the L- to H-mode transition via periodic turbulence suppression in limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs), consistent with predator-prey dynamics. The final transition to edge-localized mode-free H-mode occurs after the equilibrium E × B flow shear increases due to ion pressure profile evolution. ZFs are also observed to initiate formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) at the q = 2 rational surface via local suppression of electron-scale turbulence. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering (DBS) has revealed the radial structure of the ZF-induced shear layer and the E × B shearing rate, ωE×B, in both barrier types. During edge barrier formation, the shearing rate lags the turbulence envelope during the LCO by 90°, transitioning to anti-correlation (180°) when the equilibrium shear dominates the turbulence-driven flow shear due to the increasing edge pressure gradient. The time-dependent flow shear and the turbulence envelope are anti-correlated (180° out of phase) in the electron ITB. LCOs with time-reversed evolution dynamics (transitioning from an equilibrium-flow dominated to a ZF-dominated state) have also been observed during the H-L back-transition and are potentially of interest for controlled ramp-down of the plasma stored energy and pressure (normalized to the poloidal magnetic field) \\beta_{\\theta} =2\\mu_{0} n{( {T_{e} +T_{i}})}/{B_{\\theta}^{2}} in ITER.

  9. Anomalous flow below 2700 m in the EPICA Dome C ice core detected using δ18O of atmospheric oxygen measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Leuenberger

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available While there are no indications of mixing back to 800 000 years in the EPICA Dome C ice core record, comparison with marine sediment records shows significant differences in the timing and duration of events prior to stage 11 (~430 ka, thousands of years before 1950. A relationship between the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen (δ18O of O2, noted δ18Oatm and daily northern hemisphere summer insolation has been observed for the youngest four climate cycles. Here we use this relationship with new δ18O of O2 measurements to show that anomalous flow in the bottom 500 m of the core distorts the duration of events by up to a factor of 2. By tuning δ18Oatm to orbital precession we derive a corrected thinning function and present a revised age scale for the interval corresponding to Marine Isotope Stages 11–20 in the EPICA Dome C ice core. Uncertainty in the phasing of δ18Oatm with respect to insolation variations in the precession band limits the accuracy of this new agescale to ±6 kyr (thousand of years. The previously reported ~30 kyr duration of interglacial stage 11 is unchanged. In contrast, the duration of stage 15.1 is reduced by a factor of 2, from 31 to 16 kyr.

  10. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the advanced neutron source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effect of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  11. Comparative analysis of unprotected loss-of-flow accidents for the 1.0 m EFR-LVC core using different computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.; Frizonnet, J.M.; Moran, J.

    1993-02-01

    A comparative analysis of the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident has been performed for the LVC core (Lower Void Core) of the European Fast Reactor EFR with the FRAX5B and FRAX5C codes from the AEA-T, the PHYSURAC code from CEA and the SAS4A REF92 code system developed jointly between KfK, CEA and PNC. The accident is triggered by the run down of the coolant pumps with failure to trip the reactor by the primary and/or secondary shutdown system. Only a limited amount of mitigating reactivity from the third shutdown line was considered so that the accident can progress into boiling and core disruption. This code outlines the important modelling differences and compares the different simulations. The discussion of the rather wide spectrum of calculated accident progressions identifies the generic differences, relates them to the applied models, and summarizes the key points that are responsible for the different progressions. A comparison of the consequence spectrum from all simulations indicates zero work energies for the majority of the calculations. All simulations show up the need for a continued accident analysis into the early and late transition phase

  12. Unique rod lens/video system designed to observe flow conditions in emergency core coolant loops of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques and equipment are described which are used for video recordings of the single- and two-phase fluid flow tests conducted with the PKL Spool Piece Measurement System designed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and EG and G Inc. The instrumented spool piece provides valuable information on what would happen in pressurized water reactor emergency coolant loops should an accident or rupture result in loss of fluid. The complete closed-circuit television video system, including rod lens, light supply, and associated spool mounting fixtures, is discussed in detail. Photographic examples of test flows taken during actual spool piece system operation are shown

  13. Modelling of a rod bundle under viscous and uncompressible flow by porous media. Applied to nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, Guillaume; Collard, Bruno; Bellizzi, Sergio; Cochelin, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study is about the safety of nuclear reactor core submitted to seismic loading. In order to reduce the incertitude margin of the present day codes we propose to develop a numerical code including the non linear behavior of the fluid/structure coupling. The challenge of this work is to find out a tractable model taking the structure complexity into account. In this paper we model the nuclear reactor core mechanical behavior including the dynamics of both fuel assemblies of fluid. Each rod bundle is considered as a deformable porous media, so the velocity field of the fluid and the displacement field of the structure are defined in the whole domain space. Fluid part and structure part are in a first time considered separately, and in second time, the two parts are coupled. The motion equations of the structure are obtained by a Lagrangian formulation, and to allow the fluid structure coupling, the motion equations of the fluid are obtained by an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation. The finite elements method is applied to spatially discretize the equations. Simulations have been performed to analyze the influence of the fluid and structure characteristics, phenomena observed by the experience have been reproduced qualitatively. (author)

  14. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction

  15. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.Q.; Casadei, A.L.; Doshi, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  16. Chemical and physical changes during seawater flow through intact dunite cores: An experimental study at 150-200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Andrew J.; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Bagley, Brian C.; Mildner, David F. R.; Scheuermann, Peter P.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Seyfried, William E.

    2017-10-01

    Two flow-through experiments were conducted to assess serpentinization of intact dunite cores. Permeability and fluid chemistry indicate significantly more reaction during the second experiment at 200 °C than the first experiment at 150 °C. Permeability decreased by a factor of 2.4 and 25 during the experiments at 150 and 200 °C, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen and methane concentrations exceeded 600 μmol/kg and 300 μmol/kg during the 200 °C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150 °C experiment. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure analyses of alteration minerals demonstrated Fe oxidation that occurred during the 200 °C experiment. Vibrating sample magnetometer measurements on post-experimental cores indicated little to no magnetite production, suggesting that the hydrogen was largely generated by the oxidation of iron as olivine was converted to ferric iron (Fe(III)) serpentine and/or saponite. Scanning electron microscopy images suggested secondary mineralization on the post-experimental core from the 200 °C experiment, portraying the formation of a secondary phase with a honeycomb-like texture as well as calcite and wollastonite. Scanning electron microscopy images also illustrated dissolution along linear bands through the interiors of olivine crystals, possibly along pathways with abundant fluid inclusions. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy identified Cl uptake in serpentine, while Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy suggested the formation of serpentine, saponite, and talc. However, no change was observed when comparing pre- and post-experimental X-ray computed tomography scans of the cores. Furthermore, (ultra) small angle neutron scattering datasets were collected to assess changes in porosity, surface area, and fractal characteristics of the samples over the ≈ 1 nm- to 10 μm-scale range. The results from the 200 °C post-experimental core generally fell within the range of

  17. Continuous-Flow Synthesis of Deuterium-Labeled Antidiabetic Chalcones: Studies towards the Selective Deuteration of the Alkynone Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor B. Ötvös

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow chemistry-based syntheses of deuterium-labeled analogs of important antidiabetic chalcones were achieved via highly controlled partial C≡C bond deuteration of the corresponding 1,3-diphenylalkynones. The benefits of a scalable continuous process in combination with on-demand electrolytic D2 gas generation were exploited to suppress undesired over-reactions and to maximize reaction rates simultaneously. The novel deuterium-containing chalcone derivatives may have interesting biological effects and improved metabolic properties as compared with the parent compounds.

  18. Experimental demonstration of OpenFlow-enabled media ecosystem architecture for high-end applications over metro and core networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntofon, Okung-Dike; Channegowda, Mayur P; Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Rashidi Fard, Mehdi; Nejabati, Reza; Hunter, David K; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2013-02-25

    In this paper, a novel Software-Defined Networking (SDN) architecture is proposed for high-end Ultra High Definition (UHD) media applications. UHD media applications require huge amounts of bandwidth that can only be met with high-capacity optical networks. In addition, there are requirements for control frameworks capable of delivering effective application performance with efficient network utilization. A novel SDN-based Controller that tightly integrates application-awareness with network control and management is proposed for such applications. An OpenFlow-enabled test-bed demonstrator is reported with performance evaluations of advanced online and offline media- and network-aware schedulers.

  19. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation

  20. Thermodynamic parameters and transport coefficients of the U-C-F gas mixture in the steady flow gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.S. van den.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters and transport coefficients have been calculated for a multicomponent reacting U-C-F gas mixture in the steady flow gaseous core fission reactor. Element abundances are consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas mixture and a cooled solid graphite wall at 2500 K. Results are presented for various pressures, a fluorine potential of 5.6 and temperatures between 2500 and 7000 K. As a result of dissociation processes of uranium and carbon fluoride compounds, ''effective'' values of thermodynamic parameters and transport coefficients show anomalous behaviour with respect to so-called ''frozen'' values. The chemical reaction energy of the U-C-F gas mixture has been calculated as the driving-force behind the process of fuel redistribution to attain criticality conditions inside a functioning reactor. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae: finding a neutrino-powered explosion aided by non-axisymmetric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2016-09-01

    We report results from a series of three-dimensional (3D) rotational core-collapse simulations for 11.2 and 27 M⊙ stars employing neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. By changing the initial strength of rotation systematically, we find a rotation-assisted explosion for the 27 M⊙ progenitor , which fails in the absence of rotation. The unique feature was not captured in previous two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent rotating models because the growing non-axisymmetric instabilities play a key role. In the rapidly rotating case, strong spiral flows generated by the so-called low T/|W| instability enhance the energy transport from the proto-neutron star (PNS) to the gain region, which makes the shock expansion more energetic. The explosion occurs more strongly in the direction perpendicular to the rotational axis, which is different from previous 2D predictions.

  2. Optimisation of the core shroud bypass flow in the nuclear power plant Unterweser. Part 2: hardware implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, M.; Weissmueller, W.; Strobel, R.

    2001-01-01

    As result of the thermohydraulic analysis a modification of the upper core shroud former plate was identified. The goal was to machine 36 holes with a diameter of 56 mm into the plate. Among different methods of machining the EDM technique was selected. EDM means ''electric discharge machining''. This method contained some advantages. First, most of the equipment was available and the erodiation tools had to be optimised only. Secondly, EDM does not produce any metal chips which could probably reach the primary circuit. Tests were made using two types of erodiation electrodes. One type like a tube machined a circular groove into the 30 mm thick plate leaving two ligaments of solid material at the bottom of the groove. These were cut out in a second step. The EDM tool for cutting out is shown. The structure of the groove making tool looks quite similar. It differs in the kind of electrode only. Handling the EDM tools in the test facility is ALSO shown. (author)

  3. Fuel rod fixing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    This is a reusable system for fixing a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support. An interlock cap is fixed to the fuel rod and an interlock strip is fixed to the support. The interlock cap has two opposed fingers, which are shaped so that a base is formed with a body part. The interlock strip has an extension, which is shaped so that this is rigidly fixed to the body part of the base. The fingers of the interlock cap are elastic in bending. To fix it, the interlock cap is pushed longitudinally on to the interlock strip, which causes the extension to bend the fingers open in order to engage with the body part of the base. To remove it, the procedure is reversed. (orig.) [de

  4. Prediction of flow instability during natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi, Kazem

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of flow excursion instability during passive heat removal for Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has been analyzed at low-pressure and low-mass rate of flow conditions without boiling taking place. Pressure drop-flow rate characteristics in the general case are determined upon a developed code for this purpose. The code takes into account variations of different pressure drop components caused by different powers as well as different core inlet temperatures. The analysis revealed the fact that the instability can actually occur in the natural convection mode for a range of powers per fuel plates at a predetermined inlet temperature with fixed geometry of the core. Low mass rate of flow and high sub-cooling are the two important conditions for the occurrence of static instability in the TRR. The calculated results are compared with the existing data in the literature. (author)

  5. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity and fixed wavelength fluorescence detection of PAHs metabolites in bile in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) exposed to a dispersed topped crude oil in a continuous flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, L.; Aas, E.; Borseth, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long term effects of sublethal concentrations of oil on the marine environment have become of general concern. Cytochrome P4501A activity (EROD) in liver and fixed wavelength fluorescence detection of PAHs metabolites (FF) have in this study been used as biomarkers for dispersed oil exposure on a long term period of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.). A Continuous Flow System was used to carry out the study. The fish were continuously exposed to 0.125, 0.5 or 2.0 mg litre -1 dispersed topped crude oil for 6, 15, 24h 4 and 21 days followed by a 9 day recovery period in clean seawater. No induction of the cytochrome P4501A was measured. A maximum level in bile metabolites (4- to 5-fold) was recorded after 24h of exposure revealing thereby a detoxification process, but a decline occurred from day 4 to day 21. This study demonstrated that FF detection of PAHs metabolites in bile could be a more sensitive biomarker than EROD activity in a long term exposure to sublethal concentration of oil. (author)

  6. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  7. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  8. Fixed mobile convergence handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2010-01-01

    From basic concepts to future directions, this handbook provides technical information on all aspects of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC). The book examines such topics as integrated management architecture, business trends and strategic implications for service providers, personal area networks, mobile controlled handover methods, SIP-based session mobility, and supervisory and notification aggregator service. Case studies are used to illustrate technical and systematic implementation of unified and rationalized internet access by fixed-mobile network convergence. The text examines the technolo

  9. Automated online measurement of N2, N2O, NO, CO2, and CH4 emissions based on a gas-flow-soil-core technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tingting; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Xunhua; Sun, Yang; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Chen, Nuo

    2013-11-01

    The gas-flow-soil-core (GFSC) technique allows to directly measure emission rates of denitrification gases of incubated soil cores. However, the technique was still suffering some drawbacks such as inadequate accuracy due to asynchronous detection of dinitrogen (N2) and other gases and low measurement frequency. Furthermore, its application was limited due to intensive manual operation. To overcome these drawbacks, we updated the GFSC system as described by Wang et al. (2011) by (a) using both a chemiluminescent detector and a gas chromatograph detector to measure nitric oxide (NO), (b) synchronizing the measurements of N2, NO, nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and (c) fully automating the sampling/analysis of all the gases. These technical modifications significantly reduced labor demands by at least a factor of two, increased the measurement frequency from 3 to 6 times per day and resulted in remarkable improvements in measurement accuracy (with detection limits of 0.5, 0.01, 0.05, 2.3 and 0.2μgN or Ch(-1)kg(-1)ds, or 17, 0.3, 1.8, 82, and 6μgN or Cm(-2)h(-1), for N2, N2O, NO, CO2, and CH4, respectively). In some circumstances, the modified system measured significantly more N2 and CO2 and less N2O and NO because of the enhanced measurement frequency. The modified system distinguished the differences in emissions of the denitrification gases and CO2 due to a 20% change in initial carbon supplies. It also remarkably recovered approximately 90% of consumed nitrate during incubation. These performances validate the technical improvement, and indicate that the improved GFSC system may provide a powerful research tool for obtaining deeper insights into the processes of soil carbon and nitrogen transformation during denitrification. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of a 1400MW PWR for designing a scale-down test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Bo. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of 1400MWe PWR is described. The scaling criteria for reproducing the same thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as the prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility is derived and the resulting natural circulation flow characteristics of the prototype and scale-down facility analyzed and compared. The purpose of this study is to apply the similarity law to the prototype EU-APR1400 core catcher cooling system and the model test facility of this prototype system and derive a relationship between the heating channel characteristics and the down-comer piping characteristics so as to determine the down-comer pipe size and the orifice size of the model test facility. As the geometry and the heating wall heat flux of the heating channel of the model test facility will be the same as those of the prototype core catcher cooling system except the width of the heating channel is reduced, the axial distribution of the coolant quality (or void fraction) is expected to resemble each other between the prototype and model facility. Thus using this fact, the down-comer piping design characteristics of the model facility can be determined from the relationship derived from the similarity law

  11. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm2 in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm 2 of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  12. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm{sup 2} in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm{sup 2} of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  13. Flow-injection amperometric determination of glucose using a biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase onto Au seeds decorated on core Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samphao, Anchalee; Butmee, Preeyanut; Jitcharoen, Juthamas; Švorc, Ľubomír; Raber, Georg; Kalcher, Kurt

    2015-09-01

    An amperometric biosensor based on chemisorption of glucose oxidase (GOx) on Au seeds decorated on magnetic core Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Au) and their immobilization on screen-printed carbon electrode bulk-modified with manganese oxide (SPCE{MnO2}) was designed for the determination of glucose. The Fe3O4@Au/GOx modified SPCE{MnO2} was used in a flow-injection analysis (FIA) arrangement. The experimental conditions were investigated in amperometric mode with the following optimized parameters: flow rate 1.7 mL min(-1), applied potential +0.38 V, phosphate buffer solution (PBS; 0.1 mol L(-1), pH 7.0) as carrier and 3.89 unit mm(-2) enzyme glucose oxidase loading on the active surface of the SPCE. The designed biosensor in FIA arrangement yielded a linear dynamic range for glucose from 0.2 to 9.0 mmol L(-1) with a sensitivity of 2.52 µA mM(-1) cm(-2), a detection limit of 0.1 mmol L(-1) and a quantification limit of 0.3 mmol L(-1). Moreover, a good repeatability of 2.8% (number of measurements n=10) and a sufficient reproducibility of 4.0% (number of sensors n=3) were achieved. It was found that the studied system Fe3O4@Au facilitated not only a simpler enzyme immobilization but also provided wider linear range. The practical application of the proposed biosensor for FIA quantification of glucose was tested in glucose sirup samples, honeys and energy drinks with the results in good accordance with those obtained by an optical glucose meter and with the contents declared by the producers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  15. Lateral flow immunodipstick for visual detection of aflatoxin B1 in food using immuno-nanoparticles composed of a silver core and a gold shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, J.-Y.; Li, H.

    2010-01-01

    An immunodipstick assay with a lateral flow strip was developed for fast screening of food for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) using the respective monoclonal antibody immobilized on nanoparticles with a silver core and a gold shell (AgAu) as detection reagent. The membrane-based immunodipstick consisted of a test line containing AFB1 conjugated to bovine serum albumin, and a control line with goat anti-mouse IgG. One to two colored lines are formed on the membrane by using the red AgAu nanoparticles coated with anti-AFB1 as signaling reagents. Under optimal conditions, the dipstick exhibits a lower visual detection limit of 0. 1 ng mL -1 of AFB1. Compared to the use of pure gold nanoparticles, the AgAu nanoparticles strongly enhance the sensitivity of the assay, and the reproducibility and stability are comparable. The assay was evaluated with naturally contaminated samples including rice, wheat, sunflower, cotton, chillies, and almonds, and a good correlation was found with data obtained with a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The simple and non-instrumental dipstick method may further be extended to the screening of other mycotoxins in food. (author)

  16. PBDOWN: A computer code for simulation of core material discharge and expansion in the upper coolant plenum in a hypothetical unprotected loss of flow accident in a LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1985-01-01

    The report gives a description of the code PBDOWN (Pool Blow Down), its equations, input specifications and subroutines and it lists the input and output for some samples. Besides that some analysis results for the SNR-300 are discussed, that were obtained with this code. PBDOWN is an integral blow-down and expansion code, which simulates core material discharge and expansion into a sodium filled upper coolant plenum after build-up of vapour pressures in an unprotected loss of flow accident. The model includes the effect of sodium entrainment into an expending bubble of fuel or steel vapour with various assumptions for the heat transfer and vaporization of the entrained sodium droplets. The expanding vapour bubble is connected to the discharging pool via an orifice of a given size through which a time dependent ejection is simulated using quasi-stationary blow down correlations. The model allows bounding analysis of the possible influence of sodium vapour as a secondary working fluid, that is activated outside the pool on the overall expansion energy and discharge

  17. Preparation of Fe(3)O(4)@C@CNC multifunctional magnetic core/shell nanoparticles and their application in a signal-type flow-injection photoluminescence immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chengchao; Li, Meng; Li, Long; Ge, Shenguang; Ge, Lei; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2013-11-01

    We describe here the preparation of carbon-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles that were further fabricated into multifunctional core/shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@C@CNCs) through a layer-by-layer self-assembly process of carbon nanocrystals (CNCs). The nanoparticles were applied in a photoluminescence (PL) immunosensor to detect the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and CEA primary antibody was immobilized onto the surface of the nanoparticles. In addition, CEA secondary antibody and glucose oxidase were covalently bonded to silica nanoparticles. After stepwise immunoreactions, the immunoreagent was injected into the PL cell using a flow-injection PL system. When glucose was injected, hydrogen peroxide was obtained because of glucose oxidase catalysis and quenched the PL of the Fe3O4@C@CNC nanoparticles. The here proposed PL immunosensor allowed us to determine CEA concentrations in the 0.005–50 ng·mL-1 concentration range, with a detection limit of 1.8 pg·mL-1.

  18. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography

  19. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  20. Fort St. Vrain core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, D.W.; Brown, J.R.; Heller, R.A.; Franek, W.J.

    1977-07-01

    The Fort St. Vrain High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor core performance has been evaluated during the startup testing phase of the reactor operation. The reactor is graphite moderated, helium cooled, and uses coated particle fuel and on-line flow control to each of the 37 refueling regions. Principal objectives of startup testing were to determine: core and control system reactivity, radial power distribution, flow control capability, and initial fission product release. Information from the core demonstrates that Technical Specifications are being met, performance of the core and fuel is as expected, flow and reactivity control are predictable and simple for the operator to carry out

  1. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  2. Least fixed points revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. de Bakker (Jaco)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractParameter mechanisms for recursive procedures are investigated. Contrary to the view of Manna et al., it is argued that both call-by-value and call-by-name mechanisms yield the least fixed points of the functionals determined by the bodies of the procedures concerned. These functionals

  3. Characterizing fixed points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo Zlobec

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A set of sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a point x⋆ such that f(x⋆ = x⋆ is called a "fixed point theorem". Many such theorems are named after well-known mathematicians and economists. Fixed point theorems are among most useful ones in applied mathematics, especially in economics and game theory. Particularly important theorem in these areas is Kakutani's fixed point theorem which ensures existence of fixed point for point-to-set mappings, e.g., [2, 3, 4]. John Nash developed and applied Kakutani's ideas to prove the existence of (what became known as "Nash equilibrium" for finite games with mixed strategies for any number of players. This work earned him a Nobel Prize in Economics that he shared with two mathematicians. Nash's life was dramatized in the movie "Beautiful Mind" in 2001. In this paper, we approach the system f(x = x differently. Instead of studying existence of its solutions our objective is to determine conditions which are both necessary and sufficient that an arbitrary point x⋆ is a fixed point, i.e., that it satisfies f(x⋆ = x⋆. The existence of solutions for continuous function f of the single variable is easy to establish using the Intermediate Value Theorem of Calculus. However, characterizing fixed points x⋆, i.e., providing answers to the question of finding both necessary and sufficient conditions for an arbitrary given x⋆ to satisfy f(x⋆ = x⋆, is not simple even for functions of the single variable. It is possible that constructive answers do not exist. Our objective is to find them. Our work may require some less familiar tools. One of these might be the "quadratic envelope characterization of zero-derivative point" recalled in the next section. The results are taken from the author's current research project "Studying the Essence of Fixed Points". They are believed to be original. The author has received several feedbacks on the preliminary report and on parts of the project

  4. Infrared fixed points and fixed lines in the top-bottom-tau sector in supersymmetric grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.

    1994-10-01

    The two loop 'top-down' renormalization group flow for the top, bottom and tau Yukawa couplings, from μ=M GUT ≅O(10 16 GeV) to μ≅m t , is explored in the framework of supersymmetric grand unification; reproduction of the physical bottom and tau masses is required. Instead of following the recent trend of implementing exact Yukawa coupling unification i) a search for infrared (IR) fixed lines and fixed points in the m t pole -tan β plane is performed and ii) the extent to which these imply approximate Yukawa unification is determined. In the m t pole -tan β plane two IR fixed lines, intersecting in an IR fixed point, are located. The more attractive fixed line has a branch of almost constant top mass, m t pole ≅168≅180 GeV (close to the experimental value), for the large interval 2.5 GUT approximately. The less attractive fixed line as well as the fixed point at m t pole ≅170 GeV, tan β≅55 implement approximate top-bottom Yukawa unification at all scales μ. The renormalization group flow is attracted towards the IR fixed point by way of the more attractive IR fixed line. The fixed point and lines are distinct from the much quoted effective IR fixed point m t pole ≅O(200 GeV) sin β. (orig.)

  5. Vilified and Fixed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Westberg, Lysa

    , and imbalances of power between scholars and journalists on one side, and fans on the other are not rare occurrences. An analysis of a number of recent news articles, scholarly works, and websites, shows how the attempt of fixing fandom still prevails. Like Said's view on how the Orient is treated, fandom...... and tween website", 'Teen' managed to outrage fans. It took days and hundreds of comments, tweets, and mails to the publishers, before the article was taken down. Vilification in scholarly works and the media may have significantly lessened in recent years. Still, misunderstandings, applied exoticism...... is similarly exotisised, incorporated, and fixed. Scholars explain how to become better fans, attempting authority over fandom by applying rules to a culture, which already has their own. This, the notion of the 'better fan', devalues the existing discourses, rules, and traditions within fandom. The expert...

  6. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  7. Fixed target beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V; Cettour-Cave, S; Cornelis, K; Fraser, M A; Gatignon, L; Goddard, B; Velotti, F

    2017-01-01

    The CERN SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) serves asLHC injector and provides beam for the North Area fixedtarget experiments. At low energy, the vertical acceptancebecomes critical with high intensity large emittance fixed tar-get beams. Optimizing the vertical available aperture is a keyingredient to optimize transmission and reduce activationaround the ring. During the 2016 run a tool was developed toprovide an automated local aperture scan around the entirering.The flux of particles slow extracted with the1/3inte-ger resonance from the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERNshould ideally be constant over the length of the extractionplateau, for optimum use of the beam by the fixed target ex-periments in the North Area. The extracted intensity is con-trolled in feed-forward correction of the horizontal tune viathe main SPS quadrupoles. The Mains power supply noiseat 50 Hz and harmonics is also corrected in feed-forwardby small amplitude tune modulation at the respective fre-quencies with a dedicated additional quad...

  8. CopperCore 2.2.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Changes in this version: great number of bug fixes with regard to notifcation handling, allowed empty items in order to be more compatible with Reload, added QTI content type for CopperCore Service Integration, improved error handling, improved Clicc and fixed a bug regarding the else operation in a

  9. Flow regimes and heat transfer modes identification in ANGRA 2 core, during small break in the primary loop with area of 100 cm2, simulated with RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the flow regimes and the heat transfer modes is important for the analysis of accidents such as the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used in the RELAP5/MOD3.2.gama code in ANGRA 2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 100cm 2 -rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of ANGRA 2 (FSAR - A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of ANGRA 2 during the postulated accident. (author)

  10. Flow regimes and heat transfer modes identification in ANGRA 2 core, during small break in the primary loop with area of 100 cm{sup 2}, simulated with RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdgian@ipen.br, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the flow regimes and the heat transfer modes is important for the analysis of accidents such as the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used in the RELAP5/MOD3.2.gama code in ANGRA 2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 100cm{sup 2}-rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of ANGRA 2 (FSAR - A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of ANGRA 2 during the postulated accident. (author)

  11. Wall shear stress fixed points in cardiovascular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2018-05-17

    Complex blood flow in large arteries creates rich wall shear stress (WSS) vectorial features. WSS acts as a link between blood flow dynamics and the biology of various cardiovascular diseases. WSS has been of great interest in a wide range of studies and has been the most popular measure to correlate blood flow to cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have emphasized different vectorial features of WSS. However, fixed points in the WSS vector field have not received much attention. A WSS fixed point is a point on the vessel wall where the WSS vector vanishes. In this article, WSS fixed points are classified and the aspects by which they could influence cardiovascular disease are reviewed. First, the connection between WSS fixed points and the flow topology away from the vessel wall is discussed. Second, the potential role of time-averaged WSS fixed points in biochemical mass transport is demonstrated using the recent concept of Lagrangian WSS structures. Finally, simple measures are proposed to quantify the exposure of the endothelial cells to WSS fixed points. Examples from various arterial flow applications are demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  13. Fixed term employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, B.W.; Schonberner, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    A series of brief notes were included with this presentation which highlighted certain aspects of contract management. Several petroleum companies have realized the benefits of taking advantage of contract personnel to control fixed G and A, manage the impacts on their organization, contain costs, to manage termination costs, and to fill gaps in lean personnel rosters. An independent contractor was described as being someone who is self employed, often with a variety of work experiences. The tax benefits and flexibility of contractor personnel were also described. Some liability aspects of hiring an independent contractor were also reviewed. The courts have developed the following 4 tests to help determine whether an individual is an employee or an independent contractor: (1) the control test, (2) the business integration test, (3) specific result test, and (4) the economic reality test

  14. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  15. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm 2 , 1000 0 C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm 2 , 1200 0 C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370 0 C

  16. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  17. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  18. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  19. Flow measurements in the core of the FRJ-2 research reactor after the installation of flow regulators in the locating bushes in the grid and investigation of the consequences for the safety of reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, J.P.

    1975-04-01

    Early in June, 1974, radial flow regulators were installed in the locating bushes in the grid of the FRJ-2 reactor in order to reduce the flow irregularities in certain positions and thus to mobilize additional safety reserves. The success of these measures was tested by flow measurements in all 25 fuel element positions. The results are presented in this paper, their consequences for safety engineering are analyzed, and a flexible inlet temperature is proposed. (orig./AK) [de

  20. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seon Oh; Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Joong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  1. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Oh Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  2. THE MAIN QUESTION OF FIXED ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogan A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the methods of selecting the best type of fixed assets (real investment. Explore the current situation where the investor has to compare the different-parametrical alternatives (DPA. The DPA are the fixed assets which have similar functions, but different in price, durability and periodic effects. In the general case the DPA are the investment projects which have different amounts of investment, accounting periods and net cash flow. Net present value (NPV and internal rate of return (IRR are criticized. The author describes his indicator «speed index of unit value increase» (IS. The author proves on numerical examples that the economy, the subjects of which use IS instead of NPV and IRR, has accelerated the pace of development.

  3. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  4. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  5. Working Capital and Fixed Investment: New Evidence on Financing Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Steven M. Fazzari; Bruce C. Petersen

    1993-01-01

    This article presents new tests for finance constraints on investment by emphasizing the often-neglected role of working capital as both a use and a source of funds. The coefficient of endogenous working capital investment is negative in a fixed-investment regression, as expected if working capital competes with fixed investment for a limited pool of finance. This finding addresses a criticism of previous research on finance constraints, that cash flows may simply proxy shifts in investment d...

  6. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  7. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  8. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  9. Fixed points of quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Litim, D F

    2003-01-01

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalisation group methods. Analytical results for a non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameter in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  10. Wire core reactor for NTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the wire core system for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) that took place from 1963 to 1965 is discussed. A wire core consists of a fuel wire with spacer wires. It's an annular flow core having a central control rod. There are actually four of these, with beryllium solid reflectors on both ends and all the way around. Much of the information on the concept is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs are presented on design details of the wire core, the engine design, engine weight vs. thrust, a technique used to fabricate the wire fuel element, and axial temperature distribution

  11. Core barrel inner tube lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffers, J P

    1968-07-16

    A core drill with means for selectively lifting a core barrel inner tube consists of a lifting means connected to the core barrel inner tube assembly. It has a closable passage to permit drilling fluid normally to pass through it. The lifting means has a normally downward facing surface and a means to direct drilling fluid pressure against that surface so that on closure of the passage to fluid flow, the pressure of the drilling fluid is caused to act selectively on it. This causes the lifting means to rise and lift the core barrel. (7 claims)

  12. Device for removal of oriented core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhmalov, A.M.

    1981-05-04

    A device for removal of an oriented core, which contains an external core barrel, connected with a gear, a rock-crushing bit, nonrotary core-receiving pipe, and a core marker, placed in the core-receiving pipe and connected kinematically with the external core barrel and gear, is distinguished by the fact that in order to increase the accuracy of determination of the spatial orientation of the core the gear of the core barrel and the marker come in the form of an electric drill, and a magnetic compass witha remote-fix indicator is attached to its housing. The device is also distinguished by the fact that it is equipped with an auxillary marker positioned symmetrically with respect to the first one.

  13. Fixed kernel regression for voltammogram feature extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Rodriguez, F J; López-Sastre, R J; Gil-Jiménez, P; Maldonado Bascón, S; Ruiz-Reyes, N

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an electroanalytical technique for obtaining information about substances under analysis without the need for complex flow systems. However, classifying the information in voltammograms obtained using this technique is difficult. In this paper, we propose the use of fixed kernel regression as a method for extracting features from these voltammograms, reducing the information to a few coefficients. The proposed approach has been applied to a wine classification problem with accuracy rates of over 98%. Although the method is described here for extracting voltammogram information, it can be used for other types of signals

  14. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  15. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  16. CERN: Fixed target targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-03-15

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become visible for the first

  17. Effects of mixing methods on phase distribution in vertical bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monji, Hideaki; Matsui, Goichi; Sugiyama, Takayuki.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of the phase distribution formation in a bubble flow is one of the most important problems in the control of two-phase flow systems. The effect of mixing methods on the phase distribution was experimentally investigated by using upward nitrogen gas-water bubble flow under the condition of fixed flow rates. The experimental results show that the diameter of the gas injection hole influences the phase distribution through the bubble size. The location of the injection hole and the direction of injection do not influence the phase distribution of fully developed bubble flow. The transitive equivalent bubble size from the coring bubble flow to the sliding bubble flow corresponds to the bubble shape transition. The analytical results show that the phase distribution may be predictable if the phase profile is judged from the bubble size. (author)

  18. Vortex flow during early and late left ventricular filling in normal subjects : Quantitative characterization using retrospectively-gated 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance and three-dimensional vortex core analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbaz, M.S.M.; Calkoen, E.E.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Roest, A.A.W.; Van der Geest, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background LV diastolic vortex formation has been suggested to critically contribute to efficient blood pumping function, while altered vortex formation has been associated with LV pathologies. Therefore, quantitative characterization of vortex flow might provide a novel objective tool for

  19. Comparative analysis of a hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in an irradiated LMFBR core using different computer models for a common benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wider, H.U.; Devos, J.; Nguyen, H.; Goethem, G. Van.; Miles, K.J.; Tentner, A.M.; Pizzica, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an international exercise to compare whole-core accident calculations of the initiation phase of an unprotected LOF accident in a large irradiated LMFBR. The results for the accident phase before pin failure are in rather good agreement except for the fuel pin mechanics predictions. There are also some differences in the sodium boiling calculations but the voiding rates which are of key importance are very similar. The post - failure fuel motion and sodium voiding predictions show significant differences. However, the majority of these calculations agree that temporary fuel accumulations occur which increase the power beyond that caused by sodium voiding alone

  20. In-core flow measurement and calibration of gags using on-load instrumented stringers in a C.A.G.R. at Hinkley Point 'B'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.E.; Carrick, I.H.

    1982-06-01

    The initial fuel loading of the first CAGR at Hinkley Point included 5 specially instrumented stringers (OLIS) each containing a flow-measuring venturi and additional thermocouples. Venturi absolute and differential pressures were measured by transducers mounted on the pile-cap. Transducers and thermocouples were routed to a computer/logger and processed into stringer performance data. The venturi was engineered to comply closely with appropriate British Standards but compromises were made to minimise interaction with other functions of the OLIS plug unit, justifying rig calibration of venturis to check for deviation in behaviour. High accuracy and reliability of the flow measuring system were established by thorough commissioning procedures. The transducers were selected for low sensitivity to their operational environment. Nevertheless calibration of all transducers was carried out both in laboratory and in-situ. Errors introduced by signal processing were identified and zero drift monitored. Pipe-runs were scrupulously leak-tested and leak sensitivity was evaluated. After one year re-calibration and recommissioning gave confidence of long term stability. Measurements of stringer behaviour were collected in a series of tests spanning the full range of both the setting of the channel flow control gags and the reactor power. Throughout these tests comprehensive monitoring, with intercalibration between the OLIS and comparison with installed reactor instrumentation has quantified residual error. These measurements were used to check the theoretical model used by the station for channel flow assessment. The excellent agreement obtained justified proceeding to the derivation of a universal gag resistance calibration applying to all power levels. In performance tests aimed at evaluation of overall generating efficiency, the theoretical model was used to make accurate estimates of reactor power and flow which agreed well with estimates based directly on further OLIS

  1. A Comparative Experimental Study of Fixed Temperature and Fixed Heat Flux Boundary Conditions in Turbulent Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Wang, Fei; Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the influences of thermal boundary condition in turbulent thermal convection. Two configurations were examined: one was fixed heat flux at the bottom boundary and fixed temperature at the top (HC cells); the other was fixed temperature at both boundaries (CC cells). It is found that the flow strength in the CC cells is on average 9% larger than that in the HC ones, which could be understood as change in plume emission ability under different boundary conditions. It is further found, rather surprisingly, that flow reversals of the large-scale circulation occur more frequently in the CC cell, despite a stronger large-scale flow and more uniform temperature distribution over the boundaries. These findings provide new insights into turbulent thermal convection and should stimulate further studies, especially experimental ones. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK 403712.

  2. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  3. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. CERN: Fixed target targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become

  5. Paleomagnetic correlation of surface and subsurface basaltic lava flows and flow groups in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, with paleomagnetic data tables for drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Davis, Linda C.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2011-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies have been conducted on thousands of subcore samples from 51 coreholes located at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. These studies are used to paleomagnetically characterize and correlate successive stratigraphic intervals in each corehole to similar depth intervals in adjacent coreholes. Paleomagnetic results from 83 surface paleomagnetic sites, within and near the INL, are used to correlate these buried lava flow groups to basaltic shield volcanoes still exposed on the surface of the eastern Snake River Plain. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons between coreholes located only kilometers apart show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens of meters of depth. At greater distance between coreholes, comparable correlation of mean inclination values is less consistent because flow groups may be missing or additional flow groups may be present and found at different depth intervals. Two shallow intersecting cross-sections, A-A- and B-B- (oriented southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, respectively), drawn through southwest Idaho National Laboratory coreholes show the corehole to corehole or surface to corehole correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results included the (1) Quaking Aspen Butte flow group, which erupted from Quaking Aspen Butte southwest of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed northeast, and has been found in the subsurface in corehole USGS 132; (2) Vent 5206 flow group, which erupted near the southwestern border of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed north and east, and has been found in the subsurface in coreholes USGS 132, USGS 129, USGS 131, USGS 127, USGS 130, USGS 128, and STF-AQ-01; and (3) Mid Butte flow group, which erupted north of U.S. Highway 20, flowed northwest, and has been

  6. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahide.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable a stable operation of an emergency core cooling system by preventing the system from the automatic stopping at an abnormally high level of the reactor water during its operation. Constitution: A pump flow rate signal and a reactor water level signal are used and, when the reactor water level is increased to a predetermined level, the pump flow rate is controlled by the reactor water level signal instead of the flow rate signal. Specifically, when the reactor water level is gradually increased by the water injection from the pump and exceeds a setting signal for the water level, the water level deviation signal acts as a demand signal for the decrease in the flow rate of the pump and the output signal from the water level controller is also decreased depending on the control constant. At a certain point, the output signal from the water level controller becomes smaller than the output signal from the flow rate controller. Thus, the output signal from the water level controller is outputted as the output signal for the lower level preference device. In this way, the reactor water level and the pump flow rate can be controlled within a range not exceeding the predetermined pump flow rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. National Radiological Fixed Lab Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Radiological Fixed Laboratory Data Asset includes data produced in support of various clients such as other EPA offices, EPA Regional programs, DOE,...

  8. Can mushrooms fix atmospheric nitrogen?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Introduction. Rhizobium is a genus of symbiotic N2-fixing soil bacteria that induce ... To produce biofilm cultures, a 2 × 2 cm yeast manitol agar. (YMA) slab was .... determination of antibiotic susceptibilities of bacterial biofilms;. J. Clin. Microbiol.

  9. Elevated Fixed Platform Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Elevated Fixed Platform (EFP) is a helicopter recovery test facility located at Lakehurst, NJ. It consists of a 60 by 85 foot steel and concrete deck built atop...

  10. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  11. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitiwat, Prapaporn; Salimee, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (paligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  12. Accuracy Constraint Determination in Fixed-Point System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serizel R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of digital signal processing applications are specified and designed with floatingpoint arithmetic but are finally implemented using fixed-point architectures. Thus, the design flow requires a floating-point to fixed-point conversion stage which optimizes the implementation cost under execution time and accuracy constraints. This accuracy constraint is linked to the application performances and the determination of this constraint is one of the key issues of the conversion process. In this paper, a method is proposed to determine the accuracy constraint from the application performance. The fixed-point system is modeled with an infinite precision version of the system and a single noise source located at the system output. Then, an iterative approach for optimizing the fixed-point specification under the application performance constraint is defined and detailed. Finally the efficiency of our approach is demonstrated by experiments on an MP3 encoder.

  13. Fixed Point Learning Based Intelligent Traffic Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongyao, Wang; Cong, Sui; Cheng, Shao

    2017-10-01

    Fixed point learning has become an important tool to analyse large scale distributed system such as urban traffic network. This paper presents a fixed point learning based intelligence traffic network control system. The system applies convergence property of fixed point theorem to optimize the traffic flow density. The intelligence traffic control system achieves maximum road resources usage by averaging traffic flow density among the traffic network. The intelligence traffic network control system is built based on decentralized structure and intelligence cooperation. No central control is needed to manage the system. The proposed system is simple, effective and feasible for practical use. The performance of the system is tested via theoretical proof and simulations. The results demonstrate that the system can effectively solve the traffic congestion problem and increase the vehicles average speed. It also proves that the system is flexible, reliable and feasible for practical use.

  14. Nuclear reactor core servicing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved core servicing apparatus for a nuclear reactor of the type having a reactor vessel, a vessel head having a head penetration therethrough, a removable plug adapted to fit in the head penetration, and a core of the type having an array of elongated assemblies. The improved core servicing apparatus comprises a plurality of support columns suspended from the removable plug and extending downward toward the nuclear core, rigid support means carried by each of the support columns, and a plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns for servicing a plurality of assemblies. Each of the plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns is fixedly supported in a fixed array from the rigid support means. Means are provided for rotating the rigid support means and servicing means between condensed and expanded positions. When in the condensed position, the rigid support means and servicing means lie completely within the coextensive boundaries of the plug, and when in the expanded position, some of the rigid support means and servicing means lie without the coextensive boundaries of the plug

  15. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Binlin; Song Yongchen; Liu Yingguang; Feng Cong

    2010-01-01

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO 2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO 2 gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO 2 level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO 2 capture at 550 deg. C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900 deg. C by pure N 2 flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO 2 were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  16. Fixed points of quantum operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, A.; Gheondea, A.; Gudder, S.

    2002-01-01

    Quantum operations frequently occur in quantum measurement theory, quantum probability, quantum computation, and quantum information theory. If an operator A is invariant under a quantum operation φ, we call A a φ-fixed point. Physically, the φ-fixed points are the operators that are not disturbed by the action of φ. Our main purpose is to answer the following question. If A is a φ-fixed point, is A compatible with the operation elements of φ? We shall show in general that the answer is no and we shall give some sufficient conditions under which the answer is yes. Our results will follow from some general theorems concerning completely positive maps and injectivity of operator systems and von Neumann algebras

  17. A pressure tuned stop-flow atomic layer deposition process for MoS2 on high porous nanostructure and fabrication of TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin; Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Wang, Zhiwei; Kei Tan, Chiew; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2017-11-01

    MoS2 thin films are obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature range of 120-150 °C using Mo(CO)6 and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) as precursors. A pressure tuned stop-flow ALD process facilitates the precursor adsorption and enables the deposition of MoS2 on high porous three dimensional (3D) nanostructures. As a demonstration, a TiO2/MoS2 core/shell inverse opal (TiO2/MoS2-IO) structure has been fabricated through ALD of TiO2 and MoS2 on a self-assembled multilayer polystyrene (PS) structure template. Due to the self-limiting surface reaction mechanism of ALD and the utilization of pressure tuned stop-flow ALD processes, the as fabricated TiO2/MoS2-IO structure has a high uniformity, reflected by FESEM and FIB-SEM characterization. A crystallized TiO2/MoS2-IO structure can be obtained through a post annealing process. As a 3D photonic crystal, the TiO2/MoS2-IO exhibits obvious stopband reflecting peaks, which can be adjusted through changing the opal diameters as well as the thickness of MoS2 layer.

  18. Fixed-point signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Padgett, Wayne T

    2009-01-01

    This book is intended to fill the gap between the ""ideal precision"" digital signal processing (DSP) that is widely taught, and the limited precision implementation skills that are commonly required in fixed-point processors and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These skills are often neglected at the university level, particularly for undergraduates. We have attempted to create a resource both for a DSP elective course and for the practicing engineer with a need to understand fixed-point implementation. Although we assume a background in DSP, Chapter 2 contains a review of basic theory

  19. Apparatus for fixing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.D.; Pirro, J. Jr.; Lawrence, M.; Wisla, S.F.

    1975-01-01

    Fixing radioactive waste is disclosed in which the waste is collected as a slurry in aqueous media in a metering tank located within the nuclear facilities. Collection of waste is continued from time to time until a sufficient quantity of material to make up a full shipment to a burial ground has been collected. The slurry is then cast in shipping containers for shipment to a burial ground or the like by metering through a mixer into which fixing materials are simultaneously metered at a rate to yield the desired proportions of materials. (U.S.)

  20. Single- and two-phase flow simulation based on equivalent pore network extracted from micro-CT images of sandstone core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Liu, Jianjun; Cui, Mengmeng

    2016-01-01

    Due to the intricate structure of porous rocks, relationships between porosity or saturation and petrophysical transport properties classically used for reservoir evaluation and recovery strategies are either very complex or nonexistent. Thus, the pore network model extracted from the natural porous media is emphasized as a breakthrough to predict the fluid transport properties in the complex micro pore structure. This paper presents a modified method of extracting the equivalent pore network model from the three-dimensional micro computed tomography images based on the maximum ball algorithm. The partition of pore and throat are improved to avoid tremendous memory usage when extracting the equivalent pore network model. The porosity calculated by the extracted pore network model agrees well with the original sandstone sample. Instead of the Poiseuille's law used in the original work, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the single- and two- phase flow in the extracted pore network. Good agreements are acquired on relative permeability saturation curves of the simulation against the experiment results.

  1. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  2. Study of the spatial dependence of neutronic flow oscillations caused by fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance of the core of a reactor PWR; Estudio de la dependencia espacial de las oscilaciones de flujo neutronico causadas por flucturaciones termohidraulicas a la entrada del nucleo de un reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermejo, J. A.; Lopez, A.; Ortego, A.

    2014-07-01

    It presents a theoretical study on spatial dependence of flow oscillations neutronic caused by thermal hydraulics fluctuations at the entrance of the core of a PWR reactor. To simulate, with SIMULATE code - 3K different fluctuations thermohydraulics at the entrance to the core and the spatial dependence of the oscillations and is analyzed neutronic flow obtained at locations of neutron detectors. the work It is part of the r and d program initiated in CNAT to investigate the phenomenon of the noise neutronic. (Author)

  3. Core Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Greg; Ross, J. D.; Mulder, David

    2011-01-01

    The website--it is where people go to find out anything and everything about a school, college, or university. In the relatively short life of the Internet, institutional websites have moved from the periphery to center stage and become strategically integral communications and marketing tools. As the flow of information accelerates and new…

  4. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  5. Flat Coalgebraic Fixed Point Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Lutz; Venema, Yde

    Fixed point logics are widely used in computer science, in particular in artificial intelligence and concurrency. The most expressive logics of this type are the μ-calculus and its relatives. However, popular fixed point logics tend to trade expressivity for simplicity and readability, and in fact often live within the single variable fragment of the μ-calculus. The family of such flat fixed point logics includes, e.g., CTL, the *-nesting-free fragment of PDL, and the logic of common knowledge. Here, we extend this notion to the generic semantic framework of coalgebraic logic, thus covering a wide range of logics beyond the standard μ-calculus including, e.g., flat fragments of the graded μ-calculus and the alternating-time μ-calculus (such as ATL), as well as probabilistic and monotone fixed point logics. Our main results are completeness of the Kozen-Park axiomatization and a timed-out tableaux method that matches ExpTime upper bounds inherited from the coalgebraic μ-calculus but avoids using automata.

  6. Enumerating matroids of fixed rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendavingh, R.; van der Pol, J.

    2017-01-01

    It has been conjectured that asymptotically almost all matroids are sparse paving, i.e. that~s(n)∼m(n)s(n)∼m(n), where m(n)m(n) denotes the number of matroids on a fixed groundset of size nn, and s(n)s(n) the number of sparse paving matroids. In an earlier paper, we showed that

  7. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  8. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  9. Safety characteristics of mid-sized MOX fueled liquid metal reactor core of high converter type in the initiating phase of unprotected loss of flow accident. Effect of low specific fuel power density on ULOF behavior brought by employment of large diameter fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masayoshi; Kawada, Kenichi; Niwa, Hajime

    2003-07-01

    Safety characteristics in core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of mid-sized MOX fueled liquid metal reactor core of high converter type have been examined by using the CDA initiating phase analysis code SAS4A. The design concept of high converter type reactor core has been studied as one of options in the category of sodium-cooled reactor in Phase II of Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System. An unprotected loss-of-flow accident (ULOF) has been selected as a representative CDA initiator for this study. A core concept of high converter type, which employed a large diameter fuel pin of 11.1 mm with 1.2 m core height to get a large fuel volume fraction in the core to achieve high internal conversion ratio was proposed in JFY2001. Each fuel subassembly of the core (abbreviated here as UPL120)was provided with an upper sodium plenum directly above the core to reduce the sodium void reactivity worth. Because of the large fuel pin diameter, average specific fuel power density (31 kW/kg-MOX) of UPL120 is about one half of those of conventional large MOX cores. The reactivity worth of sodium voiding is 6$ in the whole core, and -1$ in the all upper plenums. Initiating phase of ULOF accident in UPL120 under the conditions of nominal design and best estimate analysis resulted in a slightly super-prompt critical power burst. The causes of the super-prompt criticality have been identified twofold: (a) the low specific fuel power density of core reduced the effectiveness of prompt negative reactivity feedback of Doppler and axial fuel expansion effects upon increase in reactor power, and (b) the longer core height compared with conventional 1m cores brought, together with the lower specific power density, a remarkable delay in insertion of negative fuel dispersion reactivity after the onset of fuel disruption in sodium voided subassembly due to the lower linear heat rating in the top portion of the core. During the delay, burst-type fuel failures in sodium un

  10. Renormalization group fixed points of foliated gravity-matter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemans, Jorn [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP),Radboud University Nijmegen,Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Platania, Alessia [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP),Radboud University Nijmegen,Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania,Via S. Sofia 63, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, Catania section,Via S. Sofia 64, 95123, Catania (Italy); INAF, Catania Astrophysical Observatory,Via S. Sofia 78, 95123, Catania (Italy); Saueressig, Frank [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP),Radboud University Nijmegen,Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-05-17

    We employ the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism to study the renormalization group flow of gravity minimally coupled to an arbitrary number of scalar, vector, and Dirac fields. The decomposition of the gravitational degrees of freedom into a lapse function, shift vector, and spatial metric equips spacetime with a preferred (Euclidean) “time”-direction. In this work, we provide a detailed derivation of the renormalization group flow of Newton’s constant and the cosmological constant on a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. Adding matter fields, it is shown that their contribution to the flow is the same as in the covariant formulation and can be captured by two parameters d{sub g}, d{sub λ}. We classify the resulting fixed point structure as a function of these parameters finding that the existence of non-Gaussian renormalization group fixed points is rather generic. In particular the matter content of the standard model and its most common extensions gives rise to one non-Gaussian fixed point with real critical exponents suitable for Asymptotic Safety. Moreover, we find non-Gaussian fixed points for any number of scalar matter fields, making the scenario attractive for cosmological model building.

  11. In-core Instrument Subcritical Verification (INCISV) - Core Design Verification Method - 358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prible, M.C.; Heibel, M.D.; Conner, S.L.; Sebastiani, P.J.; Kistler, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    According to the standard on reload startup physics testing, ANSI/ANS 19.6.1, a plant must verify that the constructed core behaves sufficiently close to the designed core to confirm that the various safety analyses bound the actual behavior of the plant. A large portion of this verification must occur before the reactor operates at power. The INCISV Core Design Verification Method uses the unique characteristics of a Westinghouse Electric Company fixed in-core self powered detector design to perform core design verification after a core reload before power operation. A Vanadium self powered detector that spans the length of the active fuel region is capable of confirming the required core characteristics prior to power ascension; reactivity balance, shutdown margin, temperature coefficient and power distribution. Using a detector element that spans the length of the active fuel region inside the core provides a signal of total integrated flux. Measuring the integrated flux distributions and changes at various rodded conditions and plant temperatures, and comparing them to predicted flux levels, validates all core necessary core design characteristics. INCISV eliminates the dependence on various corrections and assumptions between the ex-core detectors and the core for traditional physics testing programs. This program also eliminates the need for special rod maneuvers which are infrequently performed by plant operators during typical core design verification testing and allows for safer startup activities. (authors)

  12. CopperCore 2.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Harrie; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Changes in this release: repackaged the source code classes, split coppercore archive packages in smaller packages, added a coppercore.ear archive for easy deployment of CopperCore on the application server, updated the build scripts for accommodating these changes, fixed some bugs.

  13. CopperCore 3.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Harrie; Vogten, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Available under the GNU GPL license. CopperCore version 3.2 release notes (2008-11-14) ================================================= 2008-05-09 FIXED: changed all references to PropertyLookUp to PropertyLookup in the SQL statements. Caused problems with MySQL in Linux 2008-03-19 CHNGD: added the

  14. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  15. A reduced-cost iterated local search heuristic for the fixed-charge transportation problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buson, Erika; Roberti, Roberto; Toth, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The fixed-charge transportation problem (FCTP) is a generalization of the transportation problem where an additional fixed cost is paid for sending a flow from an origin to a destination. We propose an iterated local search heuristic based on the utilization of reduced costs for guiding the restart

  16. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  17. Net profit flow per country from 1980 to 2009: The long-term effects of foreign direct investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the paper The paper aims at describing and explaining net profit flows per country for the period 1980–2009. Net profit flows result from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) stock and profit repatriation: inward stock creating a profit outflow and outward FDI stock a profit inflow. Profit flows, especially ‘normal’ ones are not commonly researched. Theoretical background According to world-system theory, countries are part of a system characterised by a core, semi-periphery and periphery, as shown by network analyses of trade relations. Network analyses based on ownership relations of TransNational Corporations (TNCs) show that the top 50 firms that control about 40% of the world economy are almost exclusively located in core countries. So, we may expect a hierarchy in net profit flows with core countries on top and the periphery at the bottom. FDI outflows from the core countries especially rose in the 1990s, so we may expect that the difference has grown in time. Data and results A dataset on 'net profit flow' per country is developed. There are diverging developments in net profit flows since the 1980s, as expected: ever more positive for core countries, negative and ever lower for semi-peripheral and peripheral countries, in particular from the 1990s onwards. A fixed effects quantile regression using publicly available data confirms the prediction that peripheral countries share a unique characteristic: their outward investments do not have a positive influence on net profit flow as is the case with semi-peripheral and core countries. The most probable explanation is that peripheral outward investments are indirectly owned by firms located in core and semi-peripheral countries, so all peripheral profit inflows end up in those countries. PMID:28654644

  18. Net profit flow per country from 1980 to 2009: The long-term effects of foreign direct investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, Dirk H M

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims at describing and explaining net profit flows per country for the period 1980-2009. Net profit flows result from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) stock and profit repatriation: inward stock creating a profit outflow and outward FDI stock a profit inflow. Profit flows, especially 'normal' ones are not commonly researched. According to world-system theory, countries are part of a system characterised by a core, semi-periphery and periphery, as shown by network analyses of trade relations. Network analyses based on ownership relations of TransNational Corporations (TNCs) show that the top 50 firms that control about 40% of the world economy are almost exclusively located in core countries. So, we may expect a hierarchy in net profit flows with core countries on top and the periphery at the bottom. FDI outflows from the core countries especially rose in the 1990s, so we may expect that the difference has grown in time. A dataset on 'net profit flow' per country is developed. There are diverging developments in net profit flows since the 1980s, as expected: ever more positive for core countries, negative and ever lower for semi-peripheral and peripheral countries, in particular from the 1990s onwards. A fixed effects quantile regression using publicly available data confirms the prediction that peripheral countries share a unique characteristic: their outward investments do not have a positive influence on net profit flow as is the case with semi-peripheral and core countries. The most probable explanation is that peripheral outward investments are indirectly owned by firms located in core and semi-peripheral countries, so all peripheral profit inflows end up in those countries.

  19. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only

  20. A fixed-point farrago

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Joel H

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to some of the best-known fixed-point theorems, with an emphasis on their interactions with topics in analysis. The level of exposition increases gradually throughout the book, building from a basic requirement of undergraduate proficiency to graduate-level sophistication. Appendices provide an introduction to (or refresher on) some of the prerequisite material and exercises are integrated into the text, contributing to the volume’s ability to be used as a self-contained text. Readers will find the presentation especially useful for independent study or as a supplement to a graduate course in fixed-point theory. The material is split into four parts: the first introduces the Banach Contraction-Mapping Principle and the Brouwer Fixed-Point Theorem, along with a selection of interesting applications; the second focuses on Brouwer’s theorem and its application to John Nash’s work; the third applies Brouwer’s theorem to spaces of infinite dimension; and the fourth rests ...

  1. Flow analysis of HANARO flow simulated test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Wu, Jong-Sub; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2002-01-01

    The HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor of 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under normal operation since its initial critical in February, 1995. Many experiments should be safely performed to activate the utilization of the NANARO. A flow simulated test facility is being developed for the endurance test of reactivity control units for extended life times and the verification of structural integrity of those experimental facilities prior to loading in the HANARO. This test facility is composed of three major parts; a half-core structure assembly, flow circulation system and support system. The half-core structure assembly is composed of plenum, grid plate, core channel with flow tubes, chimney and dummy pool. The flow channels are to be filled with flow orifices to simulate core channels. This test facility must simulate similar flow characteristics to the HANARO. This paper, therefore, describes an analytical analysis to study the flow behavior of the test facility. The computational flow analysis has been performed for the verification of flow structure and similarity of this test facility assuming that flow rates and pressure differences of the core channel are constant. The shapes of flow orifices were determined by the trial and error method based on the design requirements of core channel. The computer analysis program with standard k - ε turbulence model was applied to three-dimensional analysis. The results of flow simulation showed a similar flow characteristic with that of the HANARO and satisfied the design requirements of this test facility. The shape of flow orifices used in this numerical simulation can be adapted for manufacturing requirements. The flow rate and the pressure difference through core channel proved by this simulation can be used as the design requirements of the flow system. The analysis results will be verified with the results of the flow test after construction of the flow system. (author)

  2. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  3. Functional requirements for core surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Operating experience at Ringhals-2 has demonstrated the feasibility of a mixed core surveillance system comprised of fixed in-core detectors combined with the original movable detector system. A small number of fixed in-core detectors provide continuous measurement of the thermal margins while the movable detectors are used mainly at start-up to verify the expected power distribution. Reactor noise diagnostics and neural networks can further improve the monitoring system. The reliability of the movable detector system can be improved by mechanical simplification. Wear and maintenance costs are lowered if the required flux-mapping frequency is reduced. Improved computer codes make the measurement uncertainties less dependent on the number of instrumented positions. A mixed system requires new types of technical specifications. (author)

  4. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  5. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  6. A new 6d fixed point from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apruzzi, Fabio [Department of Physics, University of North Carolina,Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); CUNY Graduate Center, Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences,New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University,New York, NY 10027 (United States); Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Tizzano, Luigi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala university,Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-22

    We propose a stringy construction giving rise to a class of interacting and non-supersymmetric CFT’s in six dimensions. Such theories may be obtained as an IR conformal fixed point of an RG flow ending up in a (1,0) theory in the UV. We provide the due holographic evidence in the context of massive type IIA on AdS{sub 7}×M{sub 3}, where M{sub 3} is topologically an S{sup 3}. In particular, in this paper we present a 10d flow solution which may be interpreted as a non-BPS bound state of NS5, D6 and (D6)-bar branes. Moreover, by adopting its 7d effective description, we are able to holographically compute the free energy and the operator spectrum in the novel IR conformal fixed point.

  7. BRST gauge fixing and regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damgaard, P.H.; Jonghe, F. de; Sollacher, R.

    1995-05-01

    In the presence of consistent regulators, the standard procedure of BRST gauge fixing (or moving from one gauge to another) can require non-trivial modifications. These modifications occur at the quantum level, and gauges exist which are only well-defined when quantum mechanical modifications are correctly taken into account. We illustrate how this phenomenon manifests itself in the solvable case of two-dimensional bosonization in the path-integral formalism. As a by-product, we show how to derive smooth bosonization in Batalin-Vilkovisky Lagrangian BRST quantization. (orig.)

  8. GOLD and the fixed ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vestbo J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jørgen VestboUniversity of Manchester, Manchester, UKI read with interest the paper entitled "Diagnosis of airway obstruction in the elderly: contribution of the SARA study" by Sorino et al in a recent issue of this journal.1 Being involved in the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Diseases (GOLD, it is nice to see the interest sparked by the GOLD strategy document. However, in the paper by Sorino et al, there are a few misunderstandings around GOLD and the fixed ratio (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced volume vital capacity < 0.70 that need clarification.View original paper by Sorino and colleagues.

  9. Determinants of private fixed investment in emerging country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goitsemodimo Abel Molocwa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The neoclassical and Keynesian theories regard private investment not only as a source of economic growth but also as a determinant of the potential extent of the national income. The aim of this research was to examine the determinants of private fixed investment in South Africa by employing the Johansen cointegration technique and the vector error correction model (VECM analysis. Based on the literature survey it appears that the previous studies mainly focused on private investment in manufacturing and infrastructure sectors therefore this is envisaged to add knowledge to a body of economics literature in this area by focusing more on private fixed investment and its determinants in South Africa. The study concludes that for the period under investigation GDP has the positive sign as expected. This suggests that in the long run it impact positively on private fixed investment. The findings of the study also confirmed that tax rate is a complementary to private fixed investment. Similarly, the real exchange rate coefficient was negative as expected which suggests that the depreciation of the currency stimulates the growth of South Africa private fixed investment. It is obvious that even the best economic model cannot achieve the expected outcomes immediately but these results encourage the study to believe that the South African monetary policy on exchange rate complements private fixed investment. Therefore, the study proposes that both even though both growth and general tax rate are difficult to accomplish simultaneously, they should be used to promote the flow of private fixed investment in South Africa.

  10. A Retrospective on Modulated Wavy Vortex Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, Michael; Swinney, Harry

    2009-01-01

    A fluid dynamics video of the Modulated Wavy Vortex Flow state of Taylor-Couette flow with the outer cylinder fixed is presented. This state precedes the transition to turbulence, which is more gradual than that for other fluid systems.

  11. Design and management of networks with fixed transportation costs

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Jean-Charles

    2010-01-01

    Reusable packages are logistic items used for the shipments of goods from a producer to its customers and which, once the goods have been consumed by the customers, are to be returned to the producer. This doctoral thesis addresses the strategic design and the operational management of large independent reverse networks for their return flows when fixed transportation costs apply. At the strategic level, we identify the economic logic by which the allocation of the customers should be made...

  12. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  13. Fixed Target Collisions at STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, Kathryn C.

    2016-12-15

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Previous results have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies of 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb potential analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions are presented and are found to be consistent with results from previous experiments. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared to published results from the AGS.

  14. Utilization of nitrogen fixing trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewbaker, J.L.; Beldt, R. van den; MacDicken, K.; Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O.; Escalante, G.; Herrera, R.; Aranguren, J.; Arkcoll, D.B.; Doebereinger, J. (cord.)

    1983-01-01

    Six papers from the symposium are noted. Brewbaker, J.L., Beldt, R. van den, MacDicken, K. Fuelwood uses and properties of nitrogen-fixing trees, pp 193-204, (Refs. 15). Includes a list of 35 nitrogen-fixing trees of high fuelwood value. Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O. Leguminous trees for shade, pp 205-222, (Refs. 68). Escalante, G., Herrera, R., Aranguren, J.; Nitrogen fixation in shade trees (Erythrina poeppigiana) in cocoa plantations in northern Venezuela, pp 223-230, (Refs. 13). Arkcoll, D.B.; Some leguminous trees providing useful fruits in the North of Brazil, pp 235-239, (Refs. 13). This paper deals with Parkia platycephala, Pentaclethra macroloba, Swartzia sp., Cassia leiandra, Hymenaea courbaril, dipteryz odorata, Inga edulis, I. macrophylla, and I. cinnamonea. Baggio, A.J.; Possibilities of the use of Gliricidia sepium in agroforestry systems in Brazil, pp 241-243; (Refs. 15). Seiffert, N.F.; Biological nitrogen and protein production of Leucaena cultivars grown to supplement the nutrition of ruminants, pp 245-249, (Refs. 14). Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru, L. campina grande (L. leucocephala), and L. cunningham (L. leucocephalae) were promising for use as browse by beef cattle in central Brazil.

  15. Fixed-Target Electron Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, William K.

    2001-01-01

    A tremendous amount of scientific insight has been garnered over the past half-century by using particle accelerators to study physical systems of sub-atomic dimensions. These giant instruments begin with particles at rest, then greatly increase their energy of motion, forming a narrow trajectory or beam of particles. In fixed-target accelerators, the particle beam impacts upon a stationary sample or target which contains or produces the sub-atomic system being studied. This is in distinction to colliders, where two beams are produced and are steered into each other so that their constituent particles can collide. The acceleration process always relies on the particle being accelerated having an electric charge; however, both the details of producing the beam and the classes of scientific investigations possible vary widely with the specific type of particle being accelerated. This article discusses fixed-target accelerators which produce beams of electrons, the lightest charged particle. As detailed in the report, the beam energy has a close connection with the size of the physical system studied. Here a useful unit of energy is a GeV, i.e., a giga electron-volt. (ne GeV, the energy an electron would have if accelerated through a billion volts, is equal to 1.6 x 10 -10 joules.) To study systems on a distance scale much smaller than an atomic nucleus requires beam energies ranging from a few GeV up to hundreds of GeV and more

  16. The Preliminary GAMMA Code Thermal hydraulic Analysis for the Steady State of HTR-10 Initial Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Lim, Hong Sik; Lee, Won Jae

    2006-07-15

    This report describes the preliminary thermalhydraulic analysis of HTR-10 steady state full power initial core to provide a benchmark calculation of VHTGR(Very High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) safety analysis code of GAMMA(GAs Multicomponent Mixture Analysis). The input data of GAMMA code are produced for the models of fluid block, wall block, radiation heat transfer and each component material properties in HTR-10 reactor. The temperature and flow distributions of HTR-10 steady state 10 MW{sub th} full power initial core are calculated by GAMMA code with boundary conditions of total reactor inlet flow rate of 4.32 kg/s, inlet temperature of 250 .deg. C, inlet pressure of 3 MPa, outlet pressure of 2.992 MPa and the fixed temperature at RCCS water cooling tube of 50 .deg C. The calculation results are compared with the measured solid material temperatures at 22 fixed instrumentation positions in HTR-10. The wall temperature distribution in pebble bed core shows that the minimum temperature of 358 .deg. C is located at upper core, a higher temperature zone than 829 .deg. C is located at the inner region of 0.45 m radius at the bottom of core centre, and the maximum wall temperature is 897 .deg. C. The wall temperatures linearly decreases at radially and axially farther side from the bottom of core centre. The maximum temperature of RPV is 230 .deg. C, and the maximum values of fuel average temperature and TRISO centreline temperature are 907 .deg. C and 929 .deg. C, respectively and they are much lower than the fuel temperature limitation of 1230 .deg. C. The comparsion between the GAMMA code predictions and the measured temperature data shows that the calculation results are very close to the measured values in top and side reflector region, but a great difference is appeared in bottom reflector region. Some measured data are abnormally high in bottom reflector region, and so the confirmation of data is necessary in future. Fifteen of twenty two data have a

  17. Core baffle for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, O.J.; Berringer, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns the design of the core of a LWR with a large number of fuel assemblies formed by fuel rods and kept in position by spacer grids. According to the invention, at the level of the spacer grids match plates are mounted with openings so the flow of coolant directed upwards will not be obstructed and a parallel bypass will be obtained in the space between the core barrel and the baffle plates. In case of an accident, this configuration reduces or avoids damage from overpressure reactions. (HP) [de

  18. Boiling flow through diverging microchannel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    such systems, for small pressure drop penalty and with good flow stability. .... ied the effect of divergence angle on mean and transient pressure/temperature distribution and .... supplying a fixed voltage and current using a power source meter.

  19. Improved Landau gauge fixing and discretisation errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, F.D.R.; Bowman, P.O.; Leinweber, D.B.; Richards, D.G.; Williams, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    Lattice discretisation errors in the Landau gauge condition are examined. An improved gauge fixing algorithm in which O(a 2 ) errors are removed is presented. O(a 2 ) improvement of the gauge fixing condition displays the secondary benefit of reducing the size of higher-order errors. These results emphasise the importance of implementing an improved gauge fixing condition

  20. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  1. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  2. Libration-driven flows in ellipsoidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasquerier, D.; Grannan, A. M.; Vidal, J.; Cébron, D.; Favier, B.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Planets and satellites can undergo physical librations, which consist of forced periodic variations in their rotation rate induced by gravitational interactions with nearby bodies. This mechanical forcing may drive turbulence in interior fluid layers such as subsurface oceans and metallic liquid cores through a libration-driven elliptical instability (LDEI) that refers to the resonance of two inertial modes with the libration-induced base flow. LDEI has been studied in the case of a full ellipsoid. Here we address for the first time the question of the persistence of LDEI in the more geophysically relevant ellipsoidal shell geometries. In the experimental setup, an ellipsoidal container with spherical inner cores of different sizes is filled with water. Direct side view flow visualizations are made in the librating frame using Kalliroscope particles. A Fourier analysis of the light intensity fluctuations extracted from recorded movies shows that the presence of an inner core leads to spatial heterogeneities but does not prevent LDEI. Particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulations are performed on selected cases to confirm our results. Additionally, our survey at a fixed forcing frequency and variable rotation period (i.e., variable Ekman number, E) shows that the libration amplitude at the instability threshold varies as ˜E0.65. This scaling is explained by a competition between surface and bulk dissipation. When extrapolating to planetary interior conditions, this leads to the E1/2 scaling commonly considered. We argue that Enceladus' subsurface ocean and the core of the exoplanet 55 CnC e should both be unstable to LDEI.

  3. Challenges Regarding IP Core Functional Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, intellectual property (IP) cores have been incorporated into field programmable gate array (FPGA) and application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design flows. However, the usage of large complex IP cores were limited within products that required a high level of reliability. This is no longer the case. IP core insertion has become mainstream including their use in highly reliable products. Due to limited visibility and control, challenges exist when using IP cores and subsequently compromise product reliability. We discuss challenges and suggest potential solutions to critical application IP insertion.

  4. Emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi; Okataku, Yasukuni.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the fuel soundness upon loss of primary coolant accidents in a pressure tube type nuclear reactor by injecting cooling heavy water at an early stage, to suppress the temperature of fuel cans at a lower level. Constitution: When a thermometer detects the temperature rise and a pressure gauge detects that the pressure for the primary coolants is reduced slightly from that in the normal operation upon loss of coolant accidents in the vicinity of the primary coolant circuit, heavy water is caused to flow in the heavy water feed pipeway by a controller. This enables to inject the heavy water into the reactor core in a short time upon loss of the primary coolant accidents to suppress the temperature rise in the fuel can thereby maintain the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling

  6. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  7. Post-LOCA core flushing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyajian, J.D.; Weinberger, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    A system is disclosed for flushing the core of a nuclear reactor after a loss-of-coolant accident. A pump causes flow of liquid-phase fluid from the containment-vessel sump. This flow is used to provide the motivating force for an eductor that causes suction at the hot log of the reactor. The eductor suction can draw gas-phase coolant out of the hot leg. As a result, it can reduce pressure which may be preventing the flow of liquid-phase coolant out of the hot leg. By causing liquid-phase flow through the reactor, the system ensures that particles and boric acid are flushed out of the core. The system thereby eliminates the build-up of particles and the concentrations of boric acid in the core that could result if the coolant were to leave the pressure vessel exclusively in the gas phase. 9 claims

  8. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  9. Perturbed solutions of fixed boundary MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portone, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the fixed boundary plasma MHD equilibrium problem is solved by the finite element method; then, by perturbing the flux at the plasma boundary nodes, linear formulae are derived linking the variation of several plasma parameters of interest to the variation of the currents flowing in the external circuits. On the basis of these formulae it is shown how it is possible to efficiently solve two central problems in plasma engineering, namely (1) the optimization of the currents in a given set of coils necessary to maintain a specified equilibrium configuration and (2) the derivation of a linear dynamic model describing the plasma axisymmetric displacement (n = 0 mode) about a given magnetic configuration. A case study-based on the ITER reference equilibrium magnetic configuration at burn-is analysed both in terms of equilibrium currents optimality as well as axisymmetric stability features. The results obtained by these formulae are also compared with the predictions of a non-linear free boundary code and of a linear, dynamic model. As shown, the formulae derived here are in good agreement with such predictions, confirming the validity of the present approach. (author)

  10. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  11. Use of fixed income products within a company's portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile DEDU

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Financial instruments have been developed over time from bonds, with a simple structure of cash flows, to yielding instruments that have a complex structure, attracting a much broader range of investors and permitting issuers of bonds to allow reduce the costs of fund raising. To construct investment strategies to control interest rate risk and grow revenues, investors must understand the forcesthat controls the bond market but also the tendencies.The main objective of this paper is to show how they apply to an investment strategy and asset allocation tools available. Fixed income products occupy a large share in total assets, so we want to highlight how to use fixed income products in order to optimize the portfolio of companies. Working hypothesis we chose looks at how the value of financial assets is influenced by macroeconomic factors and market price developments. Investment banks, in particular, put great emphasis on fixed income products and their use by customers. Thus traditional banking and financial products together with fixed income products enables companies to finance current needs, to finance development and to diversify the asset allocation tools.

  12. Fixed telephony evolution at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The heart of CERN’s telephony infrastructure consists of the Alcatel IP-PBX that links CERN’s fixed line phones, Lync softphones and CERN’s GSM subscribers to low-cost local and international telephony services. The PABX infrastructure also supports the emergency “red telephones” in the LHC tunnel and provides vital services for the Fire and Rescue Service and the CERN Control Centre. Although still reliable, the Alcatel hardware is increasingly costly to maintain and looking increasingly outmoded in a market where open source solutions are increasingly dominant. After presenting an overview of the Alcatel PABX and the services it provides, including innovative solutions such as the Closed User Group for our mobile telephony services, we present a possible architecture for a software based system designed to meet tomorrow’s communication needs and describe how the introduction of open-source call routers based on the SIP protocol and Session Border Controllers (SBC) could foster the introduction...

  13. Fixed type incore measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka; Ito, Hitoshi; Maeda, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a measuring device using gamma thermometers to be used in a BWR type reactor. An input switch is inserted to the vicinity of a detection signal input portion of a signal cable connecting GT with the detection signal input portion of a fixed type incore measuring device, and a loop resistance measuring means is disposed to the input switch on the side of the GT by way of a measurement switch. Upon measuring loop resistance, the GT measuring circuit is switched from the detection signal input portion to the loop resistance measuring means by a switching operation of the input switch and the measurement switch thereby enabling to confirm the value of the loop resistance. In addition, the lowering of the voltage in the loop resistance is compensated to confirm the accurate measurement values to be used thereby enabling to measure GT detection signals accurately. A diagnosing means for diagnosing the state of GT based on the results of the measurement for the loop resistance is disposed, and the results are reported to an operator. (N.H.)

  14. Device for supporting a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The core of a light-water reactor which is enclosed in a prestressed concrete pressure vessel and held within a diffuser basket is supported by a device consisting of a cylindrical shell which surrounds the basket and is rigidly fixed to a plurality of frusto-conical skirts having concurrent axes and located substantially at right angles to the axis of the reactor core. The small base of each skirt is rigidly fixed to the shell and the large base is anchored in openings formed in the reactor vessel for the penetration of coolant inlet and outlet pipes. The top portion of the shell is secured to the top portion of the diffuser basket, a flat surface being formed on the shell at the point of connection with each frusto-conical skirt so as to ensure rigid suspension while permitting thermal expansion

  15. Constructive and thermal design of a core fast discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, H.

    1979-08-01

    The present study is concerned with the development and thermal design of a fast discharge system for balls for the PR 3000 MWsub(th) process heat reactor. The term 'fast discharge system for balls' denotes a very short-time discharge procedure of the entire core contents, i.e. the flowing out of the fuel elements due to gravity into a receiver tank underneath the prestressed-concrete vessel. From a safety-engineering point of view, the fast discharge system for balls constitutes an additional possibility of active decay heat removal, besides the multiply redundant and diversitary reactor protection system, serving to further reduce the remaining residual risk. A fast discharge system for balls, however, is to be used only in the event of all the other possibilities of active decay heat removal having failed and when the maximum permissible temperatures for particularly exposed primary circuit components have been reached. However, the application range of such a system is restricted exclusively to high-temperature reactors with spherical fuel elements; the procedure cannot be applied to other reactor systems because of the rigidly fixed position of the fuel elements inside the core and for reasons of fuel element geometry. Besides the purpose of application, the influence of in-core temperature development on the possible actuation of the fast discharge system is being described in particular detail. This is followed by a description of the structural and thermal design of three specific major components, i.e. the piping system, shut-off devices and fuel element receiver tank, which will have to be installed additionally for the implementation of a fast discharge system for balls as compared to previous plant concepts. (orig.) [de

  16. Common fixed points for weakly compatible maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    In 1976, Jungck [4] proved a common fixed point theorem for commuting maps generalizing the Banach's fixed point theorem, which states that, 'let (X, d) be a complete metric space. If T satisfies d(Tx,Ty) ≤ kd(x,y) for each x,y ∈ X where 0 ≤ k < 1, then T has a unique fixed point in X'. This theorem has many applications, ...

  17. Infra-red fixed points in supersymmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ¾c /font>, and c stands for the color quadratic Casimir of the field. Fixed points arise when R* ¼ or when R*. /nobr>. ´S-½. µ ´r ·b¿µ. The stability of the solutions may be tested by linearizing the system about the fixed points. For the non-trivial fixed points we need to consider the eigenvalues of the stability matrix whose ...

  18. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapaporn PANITIWAT

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC, MultiCore Flow (MCF, and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ, and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC. Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10. Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers’ instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. Results One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05, but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (p<0.05. In terms of the flexural modulus, the ranking from the highest values of the materials was aligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Conclusion Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  19. Study of Pressure Drop in Fixed Bed Reactor Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Ahmadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drops of water and critical steam flowing in the fixed bed of mono-sized spheres are studied using SolidWorks 2017 Flow Simulation CFD code. The effects of the type of bed formation, flow velocity, density, and pebble size are evaluated. A new equation is concluded from the data, which is able to estimate pressure drop of a packed bed for high particle Reynolds number, from 15,000 to 1,000,000.

  20. Proportionate Flow Shop Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Mosquera, M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a proportionate flow shop problem several jobs have to be processed through a fixed sequence of machines and the processing time of each job is equal on all machines.By identifying jobs with agents, whose costs linearly depend on the completion time of their jobs, and assuming an initial

  1. Fixed point theorems in spaces and -trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk WA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that if is a bounded open set in a complete space , and if is nonexpansive, then always has a fixed point if there exists such that for all . It is also shown that if is a geodesically bounded closed convex subset of a complete -tree with , and if is a continuous mapping for which for some and all , then has a fixed point. It is also noted that a geodesically bounded complete -tree has the fixed point property for continuous mappings. These latter results are used to obtain variants of the classical fixed edge theorem in graph theory.

  2. Factors influencing bonding fixed restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Crown displacement often occurs because the features of tooth preparations do not counteract the forces directed against restorations. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preparation designs on retention and resistance of fixed restorations. METHOD The study was performed on 64 differently sized stainless steel dies. Also, caps which were used for evaluated retention were made of stainless steel for each die. After cementing the caps on experimental dies, measuring of necessary tensile forces to separate cemented caps from dies was done. Caps, which were made of a silver-palladium alloy with a slope of 60° to the longitudinal axis formed on the occlusal surface, were used for evaluating resistance. A sudden drop in load pressure recorded by the test machine indicated failure for that cap. RESULTS A significant difference was found between the tensile force required to remove the caps from the dies with different length (p<0.05 and different taper (p<0.01. The greatest retentive strengths (2579.2 N and 2989.8 N were noticed in experimental dies with the greatest length and smallest taper. No statistically significant (p>0.05 differences were found between tensile loads for caps cemented on dies with different diameter. Although there was an apparent slight increase in resistance values for caps on dies with smaller tapers, the increase in resistance for those preparation designs was not statistically significant. There was a significant difference among the resistance values for caps on dies with different length (p<0.01 and diameter (p<0.05. CONCLUSION In the light of the results obtained, it could be reasonably concluded that retention and resistance of the restoration is in inverse proportion to convergence angle of the prepared teeth. But, at a constant convergence angle, retention and resistance increase with rising length and diameter.

  3. STUDY OF HYDRODYNAMICS IN FIXED BED OF COMPOSITE GRANULAR MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Petrescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at the experimental determination of pressure drop and friction factor at gas flow through fixed beds of granular silica gel, alumina and activated carbon, and establishment of an equation containing a modified friction factor Fm to calculate pressure drop. In order to calculate the modified friction factor, an equation was suggested.The experimental values for pressure drop and friction factor were determined using spherical grains of silica gel, cylindrical grains of alumina and silica gel, alumina and activated carbon impregnated with calcium chloride. By means of the suggested equation, the values of pressure drop in fixed bed were calculated and compared with the experimental values. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental data is noticed.

  4. Bed retained products in swept fixed bed (SFB) coal hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Perez-Surio, M.J. [CSIC, Zaragosa (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

    1997-12-31

    The hydropyrolysis of a low rank coal in a swept fixed bed (SFB) reactor is carried out by fixing the hydrogen pressure (40 kg/cm{sup 2}), the hydrogen flow (2 l/min) and the residence time (10 min) at increasing temperatures (400 C, 500 C and 600 C) and coal bed heights (h, 1.5h, 2h, 2.5h and 3h). It is shown that the percentages of tars and char directly depend on the coal bed height and that there is not only a quantitative dependence, but also the height of the coal bed is very important and plays a relevant role on the nature of the conversion products. (orig.)

  5. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature......Straw is being used as main renewable energy source in grate boilers in Denmark. For optimizing operating conditions and design parameters, a one-dimensional unsteady heterogeneous mathematical model has been developed and experiments have been carried out for straw combustion in a fixed bed...... are in good agreement with measurements at different operating conditions such as primary air-flow rate, pre-heating of the primary air, oxygen concentration, moisture content in straw, and bulk density of the straw in the fixed bed. A parametric study indicates that the effective heat conductivity, straw...

  6. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  7. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  8. Computer-Aided Design System Development of Fixed Water Distribution of Pipe Irrigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou , Mingyao; Wang , Susheng; Zhang , Zhen; Chen , Lidong

    2010-01-01

    International audience; It is necessary to research a cheap and simple fixed water distribution device according to the current situation of the technology of low-pressure pipe irrigation. This article proposed a fixed water distribution device with round table based on the analysis of the hydraulic characteristics of low-pressure pipe irrigation systems. The simulation of FLUENT and GAMBIT software conducted that the flow of this structure was steady with a low head loss comparing to other t...

  9. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  10. The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem: Applications and solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Simon; Klose, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem (SSFCTP) consists in finding a minimum cost flow from a number of supplier nodes to a single demand node. Shipping costs comprise costs proportional to the amount shipped as well as a fixed-charge. Although the SSFCTP is an important special case...... of the well-known fixed-charge transportation problem, just a few methods for solving this problem have been proposed in the literature. After summarising some applications of this problem arising in manufacturing and transportation, we give an overview on approximation algorithms and worst-case results...

  11. Fixed Wireless may be a temporary answer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Possible to enhance throughput by 4 with respect to Mobile Wireless. And get 8 to 10 bps / Hz / cell; Examples: BB corDECT: today provides 256/512kbps to each connection in fixed environment. Ideal for small town / rural Broadband. Fixed 802.16d/e does the same in but at much higher price-points.

  12. Gaining Insight into an Organization's Fixed Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues related to school district implementation of June 2001 Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34 designed to change how schools report fixed assets. Includes planning for GASB implementation, conducting fixed-asset inventories, and making time for GASB reporting. (PKP)

  13. 78 FR 20705 - Fixed Income Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69275; File No. 4-660] Fixed Income Roundtable... of fixed income markets. The roundtable will focus on the municipal securities, corporate bonds, and asset-backed securities markets. The roundtable discussion will be held in the multi-purpose room of the...

  14. Gauge fixing problem in the conformal QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    The gauge fixing problem in the conformal (spinor and scalar) QED is examined. For the analysis, we generalize Dirac's manifestly conformal-covariant formalism. It is shown that the (vector and matter) fields must obey a certain mixed (conformal and gauge) type of transformation law in order to fix the local gauge symmetry preserving the conformal invariance in the Lagrangian. (orig.)

  15. Fixed export cost heterogeneity, trade and welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp J.H.

    2008-01-01

    -country intra-industry trade model where firms are of two different marginal costs types and where fixed export costs are heterogeneous across firms. This model traces many of the stylized facts of international trade. However, we find that with heterogeneous fixed export costs there exists a positive bilateral...

  16. Impact of fixed-mobile convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pachnicke, Stephan; Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Autenrieth, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Fixed-Mobile Convergence (FMC) is a very trendy concept as it promises integration of the previously separated fixed access network and the mobile network. From this novel approach telecommunication operators expect significant cost savings and performance improvements. FMC can be separated...

  17. Global gauge fixing in lattice gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fachin, S.; Parrinello, C. (Physics Department, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, New York (USA))

    1991-10-15

    We propose a covariant, nonperturbative gauge-fixing procedure for lattice gauge theories that avoids the problem of Gribov copies. This is closely related to a recent proposal for a gauge fixing in the continuum that we review. The lattice gauge-fixed model allows both analytical and numerical investigations: on the analytical side, explicit nonperturbative calculations of gauge-dependent quantities can be easily performed in the framework of a generalized strong-coupling expansion, while on the numerical side a stochastic gauge-fixing algorithm is very naturally associated with the scheme. In both applications one can study the gauge dependence of the results, since the model actually provides a smooth'' family of gauge-fixing conditions.

  18. Algorithms for solving common fixed point problems

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2018-01-01

    This book details approximate solutions to common fixed point problems and convex feasibility problems in the presence of perturbations. Convex feasibility problems search for a common point of a finite collection of subsets in a Hilbert space; common fixed point problems pursue a common fixed point of a finite collection of self-mappings in a Hilbert space. A variety of algorithms are considered in this book for solving both types of problems, the study of which has fueled a rapidly growing area of research. This monograph is timely and highlights the numerous applications to engineering, computed tomography, and radiation therapy planning. Totaling eight chapters, this book begins with an introduction to foundational material and moves on to examine iterative methods in metric spaces. The dynamic string-averaging methods for common fixed point problems in normed space are analyzed in Chapter 3. Dynamic string methods, for common fixed point problems in a metric space are introduced and discussed in Chapter ...

  19. The price of fixed income market volatility

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fixed income volatility and equity volatility evolve heterogeneously over time, co-moving disproportionately during periods of global imbalances and each reacting to events of different nature. While the methodology for options-based "model-free" pricing of equity volatility has been known for some time, little is known about analogous methodologies for pricing various fixed income volatilities. This book fills this gap and provides a unified evaluation framework of fixed income volatility while dealing with disparate markets such as interest-rate swaps, government bonds, time-deposits and credit. It develops model-free, forward looking indexes of fixed-income volatility that match different quoting conventions across various markets, and uncovers subtle yet important pitfalls arising from naïve superimpositions of the standard equity volatility methodology when pricing various fixed income volatilities. The ultimate goal of the authors´ efforts is to make interest rate volatility standardization a valuable...

  20. Dynamic transition between fixed- and mobile-bed: mathematical and numerical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Daniel; Pasqualini, Matteo; Rosatti, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Free-surface flows with high sediment transport (as debris flow or hyper-concentrated flow) are composed by a mixture of fluid and solid phase, usually water and sediment. When these flows propagate over loose beds, particles constituting the mixture of water and sediments strongly interact with the ones forming the bed, leading to erosion or deposition. However, there are lots of other situations when the mixture flows over rigid bedrocks or over artificially paved transects, so there is no mass exchange between bed and mixture. The two situations are usually referred to as, respectively, mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. From a mathematical point of view, the systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe these flows derive from mass and momentum balance of both phases, but, the two resulting PDEs systems are different. The main difference concerns the concentration: in the mobile-bed condition, the concentration is linked to the local flow conditions by means of a suitable rheological relation, while in the fixed-bed case, the concentration is an unknown of the problem. It is quite common that a free surface flow with high sediment transport, in its path, encounters both conditions. In the recent work of Rosatti & Zugliani 2015, the mathematical and numerical description of the transition between fixed- and mobile-bed was successfully resolved, for the case of low sediment transport phenomena, by the introduction of a suitable erodibility variable and satisfactory results were obtained. The main disadvantage of the approach is related to the erodibility variable, that changes in space, based on bed characteristics, but remains constant in time. However, the nature of the bed can change dynamically as result of deposition over fixed bed or high erosion over mobile bed. With this work, we extend the applicability of the mentioned approach to the more complex PDEs describing the hyper-concentrated flow. Moreover, we introduce a strategy that allows