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Sample records for five-dimensional neuroimaging localization

  1. Matrix models from localization of five-dimensional supersymmetric noncommutative U(1) gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Yang, Hyun Seok

    2016-01-01

    We study localization of five-dimensional supersymmetric $U(1)$ gauge theory on $\\mathbb{S}^3 \\times \\mathbb{R}_{\\theta}^{2}$ where $\\mathbb{R}_{\\theta}^{2}$ is a noncommutative (NC) plane. The theory can be isomorphically mapped to three-dimensional supersymmetric $U(N \\to \\infty)$ gauge theory on $\\mathbb{S}^3$ using the matrix representation on a separable Hilbert space on which NC fields linearly act. Therefore the NC space $\\mathbb{R}_{\\theta}^{2}$ allows for a flexible path to derive matrix models via localization from a higher-dimensional supersymmetric NC $U(1)$ gauge theory. The result shows a rich duality between NC $U(1)$ gauge theories and large $N$ matrix models in various dimensions.

  2. The return of the four- and five-dimensional preons

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Sabra, Wafic

    2007-01-01

    We prove the existence of 3/4-BPS preons in four- and five-dimensional gauged supergravities by explicitly constructing them as smooth quotients of the AdS_4 and AdS_5 maximally supersymmetric backgrounds, respectively. This result illustrates how the spacetime topology resurrects a fraction of supersymmetry previously ruled out by the local analysis of the Killing spinor equations.

  3. Bonnor solution in five-dimensional gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerril, R.; Matos, T. (Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, Distrito Federal, Mexico (MX))

    1990-03-15

    From Bonnor's solution of Einstein-Maxwell theory, a new solution to five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein equations which refers to a massive source carrying a magnetic and an electric dipole is constructed.

  4. Source Localization of Brain States Associated with Canonical Neuroimaging Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Michael; Thibault, Robert T; Roth, Raquel R; Raz, Amir

    2017-02-14

    Cognitive neuroscientists rarely consider the influence that body position exerts on brain activity; yet, postural variation holds important implications for the acquisition and interpretation of neuroimaging data. Whereas participants in most behavioral and EEG experiments sit upright, many prominent brain imaging techniques (e.g., fMRI) require participants to lie supine. Here we demonstrate that physical comportment profoundly alters baseline brain activity as measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG)-an imaging modality that permits multipostural acquisition. We collected resting-state MEG data from 12 healthy participants in three postures (lying supine, reclining at 45°, and sitting upright). Source-modeling analysis revealed a broadly distributed influence of posture on resting brain function. Sitting upright versus lying supine was associated with greater high-frequency (i.e., beta and gamma) activity in widespread parieto-occipital cortex. Moreover, sitting upright and reclined postures correlated with dampened activity in prefrontal regions across a range of bandwidths (i.e., from alpha to low gamma). The observed effects were large, with a mean Cohen's d of 0.95 (SD = 0.23). In addition to neural activity, physiological parameters such as muscle tension and eye blinks may have contributed to these posture-dependent changes in brain signal. Regardless of the underlying mechanisms, however, the present results have important implications for the acquisition and interpretation of multimodal imaging data (e.g., studies combining fMRI or PET with EEG or MEG). More broadly, our findings indicate that generalizing results-from supine neuroimaging measurements to erect positions typical of ecological human behavior-would call for considering the influence that posture wields on brain dynamics.

  5. The return of the four- and five-dimensional preons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa-O' Farrill, Jose [Maxwell Institute and School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Gutowski, Jan [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sabra, Wafic [CAMS and Physics Department, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

    2007-09-07

    We prove the existence of 3/4-BPS preons in four- and five-dimensional gauged supergravities by explicitly constructing them as smooth quotients of the AdS{sub 4} and AdS{sub 5} maximally supersymmetric backgrounds, respectively. This result illustrates how the spacetime topology resurrects a fraction of supersymmetry previously ruled out by the local analysis of the Killing spinor equations.

  6. Teleparallel Gravity in Five Dimensional Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tseng, Huan-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    We study teleparallel gravity in five-dimensional space-time with particular discussions on Kaluza-Klein (KK) and braneworld theories. We directly perform the dimensional reduction by differential forms. In the braneworld theory, the teleparallel gravity formalism in the Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker cosmology is equivalent to GR due to the same Friedmann equation, whereas in the KK case the reduction of our formulation does not recover the effect as GR of 4-dimensional spacetime.

  7. Five Dimensional f(R) Braneworld Models

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, J M Hoff

    2011-01-01

    After incorporating the f(R) gravity into the general braneworld sum rules scope, it is shown that some particular class of warped five dimensional nonlinear braneworld models, which may be interesting for the hierarchy problem solution, still require a negative tension brane. For other classes of warp factors (suitable and not suitable for approaching the hierarchy problem) it is not necessary any negative brane tension in the compactification scheme. In this vein, it is argued that in the bulk f(R) gravity context, some types of warp factors may be useful for approaching the hierarchy problem and for evading the necessity of a negative brane tension in the compactification scheme.

  8. Prognostic Role of Functional Neuroimaging after Multilobar Resection in Patients with Localization-Related Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Bin Cho

    Full Text Available To investigate the usage of functional neuroimaging as a prognostic tool for seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes in patients with multilobar resection, we recruited 90 patients who received multilobar resections between 1995 and 2013 with at least 1-year follow-up (mean 8.0 years. All patients were monitored using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG after pre-surgical evaluation. Clinical data (demographics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical outcomes were evaluated at 1, 2, 5 years after surgery, and at the end of the study. After 1 year, 56 patients (62.2% became Engel class I and at the last follow-up, 47 patients (52.2% remained seizure-free. Furthermore, non-localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET, identifying hypometabolic areas not concordant with ictal onset zones, significantly correlated with seizure recurrence after 1 year. Non-lesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and left-sided resection correlated with poor outcomes. In the last follow-up, non-localized PET and left-sided resection significantly correlated with seizure recurrence. Both localized PET and ictal-interictal SPECT subtraction co-registered to MR (SISCOM predicted good surgical outcomes in the last follow-up (69.2%, Engel I. This study suggests that PET and SISCOM may predict postoperative outcomes for patients after multilobar epilepsy and shows comparable long-term surgical outcomes after multilobar resection.

  9. Interior properties of five-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Soon-Tae

    2014-01-01

    We investigate inner structure of Schwarzschild black hole on a five-dimensional spacetime S^3xR^2. To do this, we exploit a f\\"unfbein scheme. In particular, we construct an equation of state of hydrostatic equilibrium for the five-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole, which is a five-dimensional version of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation on four-dimensional manifold. We also investigate uniform density interior configuration of the five-dimensional black hole which consists of incompressible fluid of density, to find a general relativistic expression for pressure.

  10. Holographic Duals for Five-Dimensional Superconformal Quantum Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hoker, Eric; Gutperle, Michael; Uhlemann, Christoph F.

    2017-03-01

    We construct global solutions to type IIB supergravity with 16 residual supersymmetries whose space-time is AdS6×S2 warped over a Riemann surface. Families of solutions are labeled by an arbitrary number L ≥3 of asymptotic regions, in each of which the supergravity fields match those of a (p ,q ) five-brane, and may therefore be viewed as near-horizon limits of fully localized intersections of five-branes in type IIB string theory. These solutions provide compelling candidates for holographic duals to a large class of five-dimensional superconformal quantum field theories which arise as nontrivial UV fixed points of perturbatively nonrenormalizable Yang-Mills theories, thereby making them more directly accessible to quantitative analysis.

  11. Holographic Duals for Five-Dimensional Superconformal Quantum Field Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hoker, Eric; Gutperle, Michael; Uhlemann, Christoph F

    2017-03-10

    We construct global solutions to type IIB supergravity with 16 residual supersymmetries whose space-time is AdS_{6}×S^{2} warped over a Riemann surface. Families of solutions are labeled by an arbitrary number L≥3 of asymptotic regions, in each of which the supergravity fields match those of a (p,q) five-brane, and may therefore be viewed as near-horizon limits of fully localized intersections of five-branes in type IIB string theory. These solutions provide compelling candidates for holographic duals to a large class of five-dimensional superconformal quantum field theories which arise as nontrivial UV fixed points of perturbatively nonrenormalizable Yang-Mills theories, thereby making them more directly accessible to quantitative analysis.

  12. Holographic duals for five-dimensional superconformal quantum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hoker, Eric; Uhlemann, Christoph F

    2016-01-01

    We construct global solutions to Type IIB supergravity with 16 residual supersymmetries whose space-time is $AdS_6 \\times S^2$ warped over a Riemann surface. Families of solutions are labeled by an arbitrary number $L\\geq 3$ of asymptotic regions, in each of which the supergravity fields match those of a $(p,q)$ five-brane, and may therefore be viewed as near-horizon limits of fully localized intersections of five-branes in Type IIB string theory. These solutions provide compelling candidates for holographic duals to a large class of five-dimensional superconformal quantum field theories which arise as non-trivial UV fixed points of perturbatively non-renormalizable Yang-Mills theories, thereby making them more directly accessible to quantitative analysis.

  13. Five-Dimensional Cosmological Model with Variable G and Λ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Baysal; (I). Yilmaz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Einstein's field equations with G and Λ both varying with time are considered in the presence of a perfect fluid for five-dimensional cosmological model in a way which conserves the energy momentum tensor of the matter content. Several sets of explicit solutions in the five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein type cosmological models with variable G and Λ are obtained. The diminishment of extra dimension with the evolution of the universe for the five-dimensional model is exhibited. The physical properties of the models are examined.

  14. Fresh inflation from five-dimensional vacuum state

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, M

    2003-01-01

    I study fresh inflation from a five-dimensional vacuum state, where the fifth dimension is constant. In this framework, the universe can be seen as inflating in a four-dimensional FRW metric embedding in a five-dimensional metric. Finally, the experimental data $n_s=1$ are consistent with $(p+\\rho_t)/\\rho_t \\simeq1/3$ in the fresh inflationary scenario.

  15. Hidden symmetries of black holes in five-dimensional supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, David D K

    2016-01-01

    We consider a general charged, rotating black hole in five-dimensional STU supergravity, and show that its six-dimensional Kaluza-Klein lift admits a Killing-Yano 3-form with torsion. This underlies its known Killing tensors in five dimensions. In the generalization to gauged supergravity, we present a five-dimensional Killing-Yano 3-form with torsion when two of the gauge fields are equal, and a Killing-Stackel tensor in the general 3-charge Wu solution.

  16. Five-Dimensional Warped Geometry with a Bulk Scalar Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, M

    2001-01-01

    We explore the diversity of warped metric function in five-dimensional gravity including a scalar field and a 3-brane. We point out that the form of the function is determined by a parameter introduced here. For a particular value of the parameter, the warped metric function is smooth without having a singularity, and we show that the bulk cosmological constant have a upper bound and must be positive and that the lower bound of five-dimensional fundamental scale is controlled by both the brane tension and four-dimensional effective Planck scale. The general warp factor obtained here may relate to models inspired by SUGRA or M-theory.

  17. Relationship Between Solitonic Solutions of Five-Dimensional Einstein Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, S; Mishima, T; Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2006-01-01

    We give the relation between the solutions generated by the inverse scattering method and the B\\"acklund transformation applied to the vacuum five-dimensional Einstein equations. In particular, we show that the two-solitonic solutions generated from an arbitrary diagonal seed by the B\\"acklund transformation are contained those generated from the same seed by the inverse scattering method.

  18. String Cosmological Models in Five-Dimensional Spacetimes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjay Oli

    2009-01-01

    We present some classes of solutions for dust matter coupled to the string cloud in five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein spacetimes. The solutions have one or two distinct singularities depending upon the sign of the constant of integration. Some of the classes of models exhibit inflation in the initial stage. The behaviour of associated parameters has been discussed in detail.

  19. Localization of function in anterior cingulate cortex: from psychosurgery to functional neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Early localizationists linked anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: Brodmann's area 24 and adjacent regions) with emotional behavior, paving the way for bilateral cingulotomy psychosurgery in severe, treatment resistant, cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder, chronic pain, depression, and substance abuse. Neuropsychological follow-up of such cases demonstrated executive function impairment. Abnormal neuroimaged activity in ACC has been found in many psychiatric conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, chronic pain, substance abuse, and schizophrenia. With healthy participants, increased neuroimaged activity in ACC has been linked with challenging executive function tasks, homeostatically incongruous physical states, and the encoding of the pleasant/averseness of stimuli. There is disagreement on the cortical substrate subsumed by the term ACC, the existence of functionally distinct ACC subregions (e.g., dorsal: cognitive vs. ventral: emotion), and the interpretation of functional neuroimaging studies. Synthesis of neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies suggests ACC contributes to behavior by modifying responses especially in reaction to challenging cognitive and physical states that require additional effortful cognitive control. This is accomplished by monitoring the emotional salience of stimuli, exerting control over the autonomic nervous system, and modulating cognitive activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Localization of Long-Distance Dependency Components: Integrating the Focal-lesion and Neuroimaging Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñango, Maria M; Finn, Emily; Lacadie, Cheryl; Constable, R Todd

    2016-01-01

    In the sentence "The captain who the sailor greeted is tall," the connection between the relative pronoun and the object position of greeted represents a long-distance dependency (LDD), necessary for the interpretation of "the captain" as the individual being greeted. Whereas the lesion-based record shows preferential involvement of only the left inferior frontal (LIF) cortex, associated with Broca's aphasia, during real-time comprehension of LDDs, the neuroimaging record shows additional involvement of the left posterior superior temporal (LPST) and lower parietal cortices, which are associated with Wernicke's aphasia. We test the hypothesis that this localization incongruence emerges from an interaction of memory and linguistic constraints involved in the real-time implementation of these dependencies and which had not been previously isolated. Capitalizing on a long-standing psycholinguistic understanding of LDDs as the workings of an active filler, we distinguish two linguistically defined mechanisms: GAP-search, triggered by the retrieval of the relative pronoun, and GAP-completion, triggered by the retrieval of the embedded verb. Each mechanism is hypothesized to have distinct memory demands and given their distinct linguistic import, potentially distinct brain correlates. Using fMRI, we isolate the two mechanisms by analyzing their relevant sentential segments as separate events. We manipulate LDD-presence/absence and GAP-search type (direct/indirect) reflecting the absence/presence of intervening islands. Results show a direct GAP-search-LIF cortex correlation that crucially excludes the LPST cortex. Notably, indirect GAP-search recruitment is confined to supplementary-motor and lower-parietal cortex indicating that GAP presence alone is not enough to engage predictive functions in the LIF cortex. Finally, GAP-completion shows recruitment implicating the dorsal pathway including: the supplementary motor cortex, left supramarginal cortex, precuneus, and

  1. Systematic solution-generation of five-dimensional black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Solitonic solution-generating methods are powerful tools to construct nontrivial black hole solutions of the higher-dimensional Einstein equations systematically. In five dimensions particularly, the solitonic methods can be successfully applied to the construction of asymptotically Minkowski spacetimes with multiple horizons. We review the solitonic methods applicable to higher-dimensional vacuum spacetimes and present some five-dimensional examples derived from the methods.

  2. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University,119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-28

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  3. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is...

  4. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  5. Local and global volume changes of subcortical brain structures from longitudinally varying neuroimaging data for dementia identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unay, Devrim

    2012-09-01

    Quantification of structural changes in the human brain is important to elicit resemblances and differences between pathological and normal aging. Identification of dementia, associated with loss of cognitive ability beyond normal aging, and especially converters--the subgroup of individuals at risk for developing dementia--has recently gained importance. For this purpose atrophy markers have been explored and their effectiveness has been evaluated both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. However, more research is needed to understand the dynamics of atrophy markers at different disease stages, which requires temporal analysis of local along with global changes. Unfortunately, most of the longitudinal neuroimaging data available in the clinical settings is acquired at largely varying time intervals. In the light of the above, this study presents a novel methodology to process longitudinal neuroimaging data acquired incompletely and at different time intervals, and explores complementary nature of local and global brain volume changes in identifying dementia. Results on the OASIS database demonstrate discriminative power of global atrophy in hippocampus (as early as two years after the first visit) for identifying demented cases, and local volume shrinkage of thalamus proper (as early as three years after the first visit) for differentiating converters.

  6. Special properties of five-dimensional BPS rotating black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdeiro, C.A.R. E-mail: car26@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2000-08-28

    Supersymmetric, rotating, asymptotically flat black holes with a regular horizon are rare configurations in string theory. One example is known in five spacetime dimensions, within the toroidal compactification of type IIB string theory. The existence of such special solution is allowed by the existence of a Chern-Simons coupling in the supergravity theory and by the possibility of imposing a self duality condition on the 'rotation 2-form'. We further exemplify the use of such duality condition by finding a new Brinkmann wave solution in D=6 simple gravity, possessing Killing spinors. We then explore three peculiar features of the aforementioned black holes: (1) Oxidising to D=10 the five-dimensional configuration may be interpreted as a system of D1-D5 branes with a Brinkmann wave propagating along their worldvolume. Unlike its five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein compactification, the universal covering space of this manifold has no causality violations. In other words, causal anomalies can be solved in higher dimensions. From the dual SCFT viewpoint, the causality bound for the compactified spacetime arises as the unitarity bound; (2) The vanishing of the scattering cross section for uncharged scalars and sufficiently high angular momentum of the background is shown still to hold at the level of charged interactions. The same is verified when a non-minimal coupling to the geometry is used. Therefore, the 'repulson' behaviour previously found is universal for non accelerated observers; (3) The solutions are shown to have a non-standard gyromagnetic ratio of g=3. In contrast, the superpartners of a static, BPS, five-dimensional black hole have g=1. At the semi-classical level, we find that a Dirac fermion propagating in the rotating hole background has g=2{+-}1, depending on the spinor direction of the fermion being parallel to Killing or 'anti-Killing' spinors.

  7. Moduli inflation in five-dimensional supergravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We propose a simple but effective mechanism to realize an inflationary early universe consistent with the observed WMAP, Planck and/or BICEP2 data, which would be incorporated in various supersymmetric models of elementary particles constructed in the (effective) five-dimensional spacetime. In our scenario, the inflaton field is identified with one of the moduli appearing when the fifth direction is compactified, and a successful cosmological inflation without the so-called eta problem can be achieved by a very simple moduli stabilization potential. We also discuss the related particle cosmology during and (just) after the inflation, such as the (no) cosmological moduli problem.

  8. Moduli inflation in five-dimensional supergravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Hajime, E-mail: abe@waseda.jp, E-mail: hajime.13.gologo@akane.waseda.jp [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    We propose a simple but effective mechanism to realize an inflationary early universe consistent with the observed WMAP, Planck and/or BICEP2 data, which would be incorporated in various supersymmetric models of elementary particles constructed in the (effective) five-dimensional spacetime. In our scenario, the inflaton field is identified with one of the moduli appearing when the fifth direction is compactified, and a successful cosmological inflation without the so-called η problem can be achieved by a very simple moduli stabilization potential. We also discuss the related particle cosmology during and (just) after the inflation, such as the (no) cosmological moduli problem.

  9. Hawking radiation from a five-dimensional Lovelock black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mahamat; Crepin, Kofane Timoleon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Hawking radiation from a five-dimensional Lovelock black hole using the Hamilton-Jacobi method. The behavior of the rate of radiation is plotted for various values of the ultraviolet correction parameter and the cosmological constant. The results show that, owing to the ultraviolet correction and the presence of dark energy represented by the cosmological constant, the black hole radiates at a slower rate in comparison to the case without ultraviolet correction or cosmological constant. Moreover, the presence of the cosmological constant makes the effect of the ultraviolet correction on the black hole radiation negligible.

  10. Solitonic generation of five-dimensional black ring solution

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, H; Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Using the solitonic solution-generating technique we rederived the one-rotational five-dimensional black ring solution found by Emparan and Reall. The seed solution is not the Minkowski metric, which is the seed of $S^2$-rotating black ring. The obtained solution has more parameters than the Emparan and Reall's $S^1$-rotating black ring. We found the conditions of parameters to reduce the solution to the $S^1$-rotating black ring. In addition we examined the relation between the expressions of the metric in the prolate-spheroidal coordinates and in the canonical coordinates.

  11. Five-dimensional Nernst branes from special geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, P.; Errington, D.; Gutowski, J.; Mohaupt, T.

    2016-11-01

    We construct Nernst brane solutions, that is black branes with zero entropy density in the extremal limit, of FI-gauged minimal five-dimensional supergravity coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets. While the scalars take specific constant values and dynamically determine the value of the cosmological constant in terms of the FI-parameters, the metric takes the form of a boosted AdS Schwarzschild black brane. This metric can be brought to the Carter-Novotný-Horský form that has previously been observed to occur in certain limits of boosted D3-branes. By dimensional reduction to four dimensions we recover the four-dimensional Nernst branes of arXiv:1501.07863 and show how the five-dimensional lift resolves all their UV singularities. The dynamics of the compactification circle, which expands both in the UV and in the IR, plays a crucial role. At asymptotic infinity, the curvature singularity of the four-dimensional metric and the run-away behaviour of the four-dimensional scalar combine in such a way that the lifted solution becomes asymptotic to AdS5. Moreover, the existence of a finite chemical potential in four dimensions is related to fact that the compactification circle has a finite minimal value. While it is not clear immediately how to embed our solutions into string theory, we argue that the same type of dictionary as proposed for boosted D3-branes should apply, although with a lower amount of supersymmetry.

  12. Five-dimensional Nernst branes from special geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dempster, P; Gutowski, J; Mohaupt, T

    2016-01-01

    We construct Nernst brane solutions, that is black branes with zero entropy density in the extremal limit, of FI-gauged minimal five-dimensional supergravity coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets. While the scalars take specific constant values and dynamically determine the value of the cosmological constant in terms of the FI-parameters, the metric takes the form of a boosted AdS Schwarzschild black brane. This metric can be brought to the Carter-Novotny-Horsky form that has previously been observed to occur in certain limits of boosted D3-branes. By dimensional reduction to four dimensions we recover the four-dimensional Nernst branes of arXiv:1501.07863 and show how the five-dimensional lift resolves all their UV singularities. The dynamics of the compactification circle, which expands both in the UV and in the IR, plays a crucial role. At asymptotic infinity, the curvature singularity of the four-dimensional metric and the run-away behaviour of the four-dimensional scalar combine in such a w...

  13. Quantum Statistical Entropy of Five-Dimensional Black Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ren; WU Yue-Qin; ZHANG Sheng-Li

    2006-01-01

    The generalized uncertainty relation is introduced to calculate quantum statistic entropy of a black hole.By using the new equation of state density motivated by the generalized uncertainty relation, we discuss entropies of Bose field and Fermi field on the background of the five-dimensional spacetime. In our calculation, we need not introduce cutoff. There is not the divergent logarithmic term as in the original brick-wall method. And it is obtained that the quantum statistic entropy corresponding to black hole horizon is proportional to the area of the horizon. Further it is shown that the entropy of black hole is the entropy of quantum state on the surface of horizon. The black hole's entropy is the intrinsic property of the black hole. The entropy is a quantum effect. It makes people further understand the quantum statistic entropy.

  14. The Status of Modern Five-Dimensional Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Wesson, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Recent criticism of higher-dimensional extensions of Einstein's theory is considered. This may have some justification as regards string theory, but is misguided as applied to five-dimensional theories with a large extra dimension. Such theories smoothly embed general relativity, ensuring recovery of the latter's observational support. When the embedding of spacetime is carried out in accordance with Campbell's theorem, the resulting 5D theory naturally explains the origin of classical matter and vacuum energy. Also, constraints on the equations of motion near a high-energy surface or membrane in the 5D manifold lead to quantization and quantum uncertainty. These are major returns on the modest investment of one extra dimension. Instead of fruitless bickering about whether it is possible to "see" the fifth dimension, it is suggested that it be treated on par with other concepts of physics, such as time. The main criterion for the acceptance of a fifth dimension (or not) should be its usefulness.

  15. What neuroimaging and brain localization can do, cannot do and should not do for social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Daniel T; Dunn, Elizabeth W

    2003-10-01

    Interest in bridging social psychology and neuroscience has seen a significant upsurge. Much of this interest has centered on brain localization--the attempt to relate psychological events to locations of brain events. Although many articles have sought to localize brain activity that supports social behavior, scant attention has been paid to the specific methods to be used in integrating brain localization data into psychological theory. The authors describe 4 strategies psychologists can use to integrate brain localization data and psychological theory, and they consider whether social psychology presents special considerations in the use of these strategies. They conclude that brain localization offers a useful tool for some but not all problems in social psychology, and they discuss the types of problems for which it may and may not prove useful.

  16. Five-dimensional Horava-like braneworld models

    CERN Document Server

    Bemfica, F S; Gomes, M; da Silva, J M Hoff

    2012-01-01

    In this work we study a Horava-like five-dimensional model in the context of braneworld theory. To begin with, the equations of motion of such model are obtained and, within the realm of warped geometry, we show that the model is consistent if and only if $\\lambda$ takes its relativistic value 1. Furthermore, since the first derivative of the warp factor is discontinuous over the branes, we show that the elimination of problematic terms involving the square of the warp factor second order derivatives are eliminated by imposing detailed balance condition in the bulk. Afterwards, the Israel's junction conditions are computed, allowing the attainment of an effective Lagrangian in the visible brane. In particular, for a (4+1)-dimensional Horava-like model defined in the bulk without cosmological constant, we show that the resultant effective Lagrangian in the brane corresponds to a (3+1)-dimensional Horava-like model with an emergent positive cosmological constant but without detailed balance condition. Now, rest...

  17. Vacuum thin shell solutions in five-dimensional Lovelock gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, C; Gravanis, E; Willison, S

    2010-01-01

    Junction conditions for vacuum solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity are studied. We focus on those cases where two spherically symmetric regions of space-time are joined in such a way that the induced stress tensor on the junction surface vanishes. So a spherical vacuum shell, containing no matter, arises as a boundary between two regions of the space-time. Such solutions are a generalized kind of spherically symmetric empty space solutions, described by metric functions of the class $C^0$. New global structures arise with surprising features. In particular, we show that vacuum spherically symmetric wormholes do exist in this theory. These can be regarded as gravitational solitons, which connect two asymptotically (Anti) de-Sitter spaces with different masses and/or different effective cosmological constants. We prove the existence of both static and dynamical solutions and discuss their (in)stability under perturbations that preserve the symmetry. This leads us to discuss a new type of...

  18. Protein energy landscapes determined by five-dimensional crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marius; Srajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Purwar, Namrta; Tenboer, Jason; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2013-12-01

    Free-energy landscapes decisively determine the progress of enzymatically catalyzed reactions [Cornish-Bowden (2012), Fundamentals of Enzyme Kinetics, 4th ed.]. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies transient-state kinetics with structure determination [Moffat (2001), Chem. Rev. 101, 1569-1581; Schmidt et al. (2005), Methods Mol. Biol. 305, 115-154; Schmidt (2008), Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Medicine and Biology] because both can be determined from the same set of X-ray data. Here, it is demonstrated how barriers of activation can be determined solely from five-dimensional crystallography, where in addition to space and time, temperature is a variable as well [Schmidt et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. A66, 198-206]. Directly linking molecular structures with barriers of activation between them allows insight into the structural nature of the barrier to be gained. Comprehensive time series of crystallographic data at 14 different temperature settings were analyzed and the entropy and enthalpy contributions to the barriers of activation were determined. One hundred years after the discovery of X-ray scattering, these results advance X-ray structure determination to a new frontier: the determination of energy landscapes.

  19. Vacuum solutions of five dimensional Einstein equations generated by inverse scattering method

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, S; Yasui, Y; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomizawa, Shinya; Yasui, Yukinori

    2006-01-01

    We study stationary and axially symmetric two solitonic solutions of five dimensional vacuum Einstein equations by using the inverse scattering method developed by Belinski and Zakharov. In this generation of the solutions, we use five dimensional Minkowski spacetime as a seed. It is shown that if we restrict ourselves to the case of one angular momentum component, the generated solution coincides with a black ring solution with a rotating two sphere which was found by Mishima and Iguchi recently.

  20. Hawking radiation of five-dimensional charged black holes with scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Xu, Zhen-Ming

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation cascade from the five-dimensional charged black hole with a scalar field coupled to higher-order Euler densities in a conformally invariant manner. We give the semi-analytic calculation of greybody factors for the Hawking radiation. Our analysis shows that the Hawking radiation cascade from this five-dimensional black hole is extremely sparse. The charge enhances the sparsity of the Hawking radiation, while the conformally coupled scalar field reduces this sparsity.

  1. Five-dimensional theory of scalar-tensor gravitation and electromagnetism in the dyad form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    The dyad method is applied to five-dimensional generalizations of general relativity. The dyad splitting of the five-dimensional Riemann manifold would make it possible to write the field equations in a dynamic form and to determine the fifth coordinate and the physical-geometrical objects 'generated' by it. This in turn would make it possible to compare the obtained system of field equations to analogous gravitational field equations as well as to electromagnetic and scalar field equations for curved space, written using kinemetric gauge transformation of the monad method.

  2. Dynamics of test particles in the five-dimensional, charged, rotating EMCS spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Reimers, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We derive the complete set of geodesic equations for massive and massless test particles of a five-dimensional, charged, rotating black hole solution of the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons field equations in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity and present their analytical solutions in terms of Weierstra{\\ss}' elliptic functions. We study the polar and radial motion, depending on the black hole and test particle parameters, and characterize the test particle motion qualitatively by the means of effective potentials. We use the analytical solutions in order to visualize the test particle motion by two- and three-dimensional plots.

  3. Fermionic greybody factors of two and five-dimensional dilatonic black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becar, Ramon [Universidad Catolica de Temuco, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas y Fisicas, Temuco (Chile); Gonzalez, P.A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2014-08-15

    We study fermionic perturbations in the background of a two and five-dimensional dilatonic black holes. Then, we compute the reflection and transmission coefficients and the absorption cross section for fermionic fields, and we show numerically that the absorption cross section vanishes in the low and high frequency limit. Also we find that beyond a certain value of the horizon radius r{sub 0} the absorption cross section for five-dimensional dilatonic black hole is constant. Besides, we have find that the absorption cross section decreases for higher angular momentum, and it decreases when the mass of the fermionic field increases. (orig.)

  4. From estimating activation locality to predicting disorder: A review of pattern recognition for neuroimaging-based psychiatric diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfers, Thomas; Buitelaar, Jan K; Beckmann, Christian F; Franke, Barbara; Marquand, Andre F

    2015-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are increasingly being recognised as having a biological basis, but their diagnosis is made exclusively behaviourally. A promising approach for 'biomarker' discovery has been based on pattern recognition methods applied to neuroimaging data, which could yield clinical utility in future. In this review we survey the literature on pattern recognition for making diagnostic predictions in psychiatric disorders, and evaluate progress made in translating such findings towards clinical application. We evaluate studies on many criteria, including data modalities used, the types of features extracted and algorithm applied. We identify problems common to many studies, such as a relatively small sample size and a primary focus on estimating generalisability within a single study. Furthermore, we highlight challenges that are not widely acknowledged in the field including the importance of accommodating disease prevalence, the necessity of more extensive validation using large carefully acquired samples, the need for methodological innovations to improve accuracy and to discriminate between multiple disorders simultaneously. Finally, we identify specific clinical contexts in which pattern recognition can add value in the short to medium term.

  5. Collapsing perfect fluid in self-similar five dimensional space-time and cosmic censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, S G; Saraykar, R V

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence and nature of naked singularities in the gravitational collapse of a self-similar adiabatic perfect fluid in a five dimensional space-time. The naked singularities are found to be gravitationally strong in the sense of Tipler and thus violate the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  6. Stationary solutions in five-dimensional gravity with a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerril, R. (Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Area de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Avenida San Pablo 180, Mexico 02200 Distrito Federal, Mexico ( )); Matos, T. (Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, Mexico 07000, Distrito Federal, Mexico ( ))

    1992-08-15

    Using the potential formalism, six new stationary axisymmetric solutions of the five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein field equations are constructed. It is supposed that each potential depends only on one parameter which satisfies the Laplace equation. All the solutions have a scalar potential and some of them possess magnetic fields which represent a magnetic monopole, dipole, and quadrupole.

  7. Gravity in a stabilized brane world model in five-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, A S; Smolyakov, M N; Volobuev, I P

    2008-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for gravitational and scalar fields are found and solved in a stabilized brane world model in five-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory. The physical degrees of freedom are isolated, the mass spectrum of Kaluza-Klein excitations is found and the coupling constants of these excitations to matter on the negative tension brane are calculated.

  8. A functional neuroimaging study of sound localization: visual cortex activity predicts performance in early-blind individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Gougoux

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Blind individuals often demonstrate enhanced nonvisual perceptual abilities. However, the neural substrate that underlies this improved performance remains to be fully understood. An earlier behavioral study demonstrated that some early-blind people localize sounds more accurately than sighted controls using monaural cues. In order to investigate the neural basis of these behavioral differences in humans, we carried out functional imaging studies using positron emission tomography and a speaker array that permitted pseudo-free-field presentations within the scanner. During binaural sound localization, a sighted control group showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the occipital lobe, which was not seen in early-blind individuals. During monaural sound localization (one ear plugged, the subgroup of early-blind subjects who were behaviorally superior at sound localization displayed two activation foci in the occipital cortex. This effect was not seen in blind persons who did not have superior monaural sound localization abilities, nor in sighted individuals. The degree of activation of one of these foci was strongly correlated with sound localization accuracy across the entire group of blind subjects. The results show that those blind persons who perform better than sighted persons recruit occipital areas to carry out auditory localization under monaural conditions. We therefore conclude that computations carried out in the occipital cortex specifically underlie the enhanced capacity to use monaural cues. Our findings shed light not only on intermodal compensatory mechanisms, but also on individual differences in these mechanisms and on inhibitory patterns that differ between sighted individuals and those deprived of vision early in life.

  9. Solitonic generation of vacuum solutions in five-dimensional General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Iguchi, H; Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We describe a solitonic solution-generating technique for the five-dimensional General Relativity. Reducing the five-dimensional problem to the four-dimensional one, we can systematically obtain single-rotational axially symmetric vacuum solutions. Applying the technique for a simple seed solution, we have previously obtained the series of stationary solutions which includes $S^2$-rotating black ring. We analyze the qualitative features of these solutions, e.g., conical singularities, closed timelike curves, and spacetime curvatures. We investigate the rod structures of seed and solitonic solutions. We examine the relation between the expressions of the metric in the prolate-spheroidal coordinates and in the C-metric coordinates.

  10. Discrete Cocompact Subgroups of the Five-Dimensional Connected and Simply Connected Nilpotent Lie Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Ghorbel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The discrete cocompact subgroups of the five-dimensional connected, simply connected nilpotent Lie groups are determined up to isomorphism. Moreover, we prove if G = N × A is a connected, simply connected, nilpotent Lie group with an Abelian factor A, then every uniform subgroup of G is the direct product of a uniform subgroup of N and Z^r where r = dim A.

  11. Five dimensional minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Anitha, S.; Umadevi, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate five dimensional space-time filled with minimally interacting dark matter and holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained using (i) special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields constant value of deceleration parameter and (ii) a relation between metric potentials. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model are also discussed.

  12. New Axisymmetric Stationary Solutions of Five-dimensional Vacuum Einstein Equations with Asymptotic Flatness

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, T; Mishima, Takashi; Iguchi, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    New axisymmetric stationary solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations in five-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes are given by solitonic solution-generating techniques. We show the equivalence between these solutions and the four-dimensional multi-solitonic ones derived from particular class of four-dimensional Weyl solutions. The solutions constructed here include different black rings from the ones obtained by Emparan and Reall.

  13. Various Types of Five Dimensional Warp Factor and Effective Planck Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, M

    2002-01-01

    Based on the assumption that the warp factor of four dimensional spacetime and the one of fifth dimension are tied through a parameter $\\alpha$, we consider five dimensional gravity with a 3-brane coupled to a bulk scalar field. For arbitrary value of $\\alpha$, the form of the warp factor is implicitly determined by hypergeometric function. Concretely, we show that the warp factor becomes explicit form for appropriate value of $\\alpha$, and study the relation between four dimensional effective Planck scale and the brane tension. This setup allows the possibility of extending the diversity of brane world.

  14. From hidden symmetry to extra dimensions: a five dimensional formulation of the Degenerate BESS model

    CERN Document Server

    Coradeschi, Francesco; Dominici, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    We consider the continuum limit of a moose model corresponding to a generalization to N sites of the Degenerate BESS model. The five dimensional formulation emerging in this limit is a realization of a RS1 type model with SU(2)_L x SU(2)_R in the bulk, broken by boundary conditions and a vacuum expectation value on the infrared brane. A low energy effective Lagrangian is derived by means of the holographic technique and corresponding bounds on the model parameters are obtained.

  15. Five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian with the Gogny force: An ongoing saga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libert, J.; Delaroche, J.P.; Girod, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2016-07-15

    We provide a sample of analyses for nuclear spectroscopic properties based on the five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) implemented with the Gogny force. The very first illustration is dating back to the late 70's. It is next followed by others, focusing on shape coexistence, shape isomerism, superdeformation, and systematics over the periodic table. Finally, the inclusion of Thouless-Valatin dynamical contributions to vibrational mass parameters is briefly discussed as a mean of strengthening the basis of the 5DCH theory. (orig.)

  16. Big Bounce Singularity of a Simple Five-Dimensional Cosmological Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐立昕; 刘宏亚; 王贝利

    2003-01-01

    The big bounce singularity of a simple five-dimensional cosmological model is studied. Contrary to the standard big bang space-time singularity, this big bounce singularity is found to be an event horizon at which the scale factor and the mass density of the universe are finite, while the pressure undergoes a sudden transition from negative infinity to positive infinity. By using coordinate transformation it is also shown that before the bounce the universe contracts deflationary. According to the proper-time, the universe may have existed for an infinitely long time.

  17. Five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian with the Gogny force: An ongoing saga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, J.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Girod, M.

    2016-07-01

    We provide a sample of analyses for nuclear spectroscopic properties based on the five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) implemented with the Gogny force. The very first illustration is dating back to the late 70's. It is next followed by others, focusing on shape coexistence, shape isomerism, superdeformation, and systematics over the periodic table. Finally, the inclusion of Thouless-Valatin dynamical contributions to vibrational mass parameters is briefly discussed as a mean of strengthening the basis of the 5DCH theory.

  18. Kaluza--Klein Cosmology from five-dimensional Lovelock--Cartan Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; del Pino, Simón; Ramírez, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    We study the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction of the Lovelock-Cartan theory in five-dimensional spacetime, with a compact dimension of $S^1$ topology. We find cosmological solutions of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker class in the reduced spacetime. The torsion and the fields arising from the dimensional reduction induce a nonvanishing energy-momentum tensor in four dimensions. We find solutions describing expanding, contracting and bouncing universes. The model shows a dynamical compactification of the extra dimension in some regions of the parameter space.

  19. A four-dimensional description of five-dimensional N-brane models

    CERN Document Server

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for obtaining the four-dimensional effective gravitational theory for five-dimensional braneworld models with arbitrary numbers of branes in a low energy regime, based on a two-lengthscale expansion. The method is straightforward and computationally efficient, and is applicable to both compactified and uncompactified models. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of the radion modes of the model, while the massive effective fields are automatically truncated. Generally, the radion modes are found to form a (N-1)-dimensional nonlinear sigma model. We illustrate the method for a N-brane model in an uncompactified extra dimension.

  20. String cosmological models in the Brans-Dicke theory for five-dimensional space-time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koijam Manihar Singh; Kangujam Priyokumar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Five-dimensional space-time string cosmological models generated by a cloud of strings with particles attached to them are studied in the Brans-Dicke theory.We obtain two types of interesting models by taking up the cases of geometric strings (or Nambu strings) and p-strings (Takabayasi strings),and study their different physical and dynamical properties.The roles of the scalar field in getting different phases,such as the inflationary phase and the string-dominated phase,are discussed.An interesting feature obtained here is that in one of the models there is a "bounce" at a particular instant of its evolution.

  1. Lines of Constant Physics in a Five-Dimensional Gauge-Higgs Unification Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Maurizio; Knechtli, Francesco; Moir, Graham

    2016-01-01

    We report on the progress in the study of a five-dimensional SU(2) Gauge-Higgs Unification model. In this non-perturbative study, the Higgs mechanism is triggered by the spontaneous breaking of a global symmetry. In the same region of the phase diagram, we observe both dimensional reduction and the ratio of Higgs and Z boson masses to take the value known from experiment. We present the first results on the construction of a line of constant physics in this region, including the prediction for the mass scale of the first excited states of the Higgs and gauge bosons.

  2. Quantum statistical entropy corresponding to cosmic horizon in five-dimensional spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The generalized uncertainty relation is introduced to calculate the quantum statis-tical entropy corresponding to cosmic horizon. By using the new equation of state density motivated by the generalized uncertainty relation, we discuss entropies of Bose field and Fermi field on the background of five-dimensional spacetime. In our calculation, we need not introduce cutoff. There is no divergent logarithmic term in the original brick-wall method. And it is obtained that the quantum statistical en-tropy corresponding to cosmic horizon is proportional to the area of the horizon. Further it is shown that the entropy corresponding to cosmic horizon is the entropy of quantum state on the surface of horizon. The black hole’s entropy is the intrinsic property of the black hole. The entropy is a quantum effect. In our calculation, by using the quantum statistical method, we obtain the partition function of Bose field and Fermi field on the background of five-dimensional spacetime. We provide a way to study the quantum statistical entropy corresponding to cosmic horizon in the higher-dimensional spacetime.

  3. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult.

  4. Some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we examine, from the purely theoretical point of view and in a model-independent way, the case, when matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension, and the Standard Model fields and their interactions are supposed to be reproduced by the corresponding zero Kaluza-Klein modes. An unexpected result is that in order to avoid possible pathological behavior in the fermion sector, it is necessary to impose constraints on the fermion field Lagrangian. In the case when the fermion zero modes are supposed to be localized at one of the branes, these constraints imply an additional relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric. Moreover, this relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric results in the exact reproduction of the gauge boson and fermion sectors of the Standard Model by the corresponding zero mode four-dimensional effective theory in all the physically relevant cases, allowed by the absence of pathologies. Meanwhile, deviations from these conditions can lead either back to pathological behavior in the fermion sector or to a variance between the resulting zero mode four-dimensional effective theory and the Standard Model, which, depending on the model at hand, may, in principle, result in constraints putting the theory out of the reach of the present day experiments.

  5. Electroweak Unification into a Five-Dimensional SU(3) at a TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, Savas K; Weiner, N; Dimopoulos, Savas; Kaplan, David E.; Weiner, Neal

    2002-01-01

    We apply a recently proposed mechanism for predicting the weak mixing angle to theories with TeV-size dimensions. "Reconstruction" of the associated moose (or quiver) leads to theories which unify the electroweak forces into a five dimensional SU(3) symmetry. Quarks live at an orbifold fixed point where SU(3) breaks to the electroweak group. A variety of theories -- all sharing the same successful prediction of the weak mixing angle -- emerges; they differ primarily by the spatial location of the leptons and the absence or presence of supersymmetry. A particularly interesting theory puts leptons in a Konopinski-Mahmoud triplet and suppresses proton decay by placing quarks and leptons on opposite fixed points.

  6. Particle physics and cosmology with high-scale SUSY breaking in five-dimensional supergravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Otsuka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a high-scale SUSY breaking scenario with the wino dark matter in the five-dimensional supergravity model on $S^1/Z_2$. The extra U(1) symmetries broken by the orbifold projection control the flavor structure of soft SUSY-breaking parameters as well as the Yukawa couplings, and a scalar component of the one of moduli multiplets, which arise from extra-dimensional components of the U(1) vector multiplets, induces the slow-roll inflation. Because of the supersymmetric moduli stabilization as well as the moduli inflation, it is found that the correct dark matter relic abundance is non-thermally generated by the gravitino decaying into the wino.

  7. Black objects and hoop conjecture in five-dimensional space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yuta; Shinkai, Hisa-aki, E-mail: m1m08a26@info.oit.ac.j, E-mail: shinkai@is.oit.ac.j [Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Osaka Institute of Technology, 1-79-1 Kitayama, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0196 (Japan)

    2010-02-21

    We numerically investigated the sequences of initial data of a thin spindle and a thin ring in five-dimensional space-time in the context of the cosmic censorship conjecture. We modeled the matter in non-rotating homogeneous spheroidal or toroidal configurations under the momentarily static assumption, solved the Hamiltonian constraint equation and searched the apparent horizons. We discussed when S{sup 3} (black-hole) or S{sup 1} x S{sup 2} (black-ring) horizons ('black objects') are formed. By monitoring the location of the maximum Kretchmann invariant, an appearance of 'naked singularity' or 'naked ring' under special situations is suggested. We also discuss the validity of the hyper-hoop conjecture using a minimum area around the object, and show that the appearance of the ring horizon does not match with this hoop.

  8. Painleve-gullstrand-type Coordinates for the Five-dimensional Myers-Perry Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Tehani Kahi

    2013-01-01

    The Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates provide a convenient framework for presenting the Schwarzschild geometry because of their flat constant-time hypersurfaces, and the fact that they are free of coordinate singularities outside r=0. Generalizations of Painlev´e-Gullstrand coordinates suitable for the Kerr geometry have been presented by Doran and Nat´ario. These coordinate systems feature a time coordinate identical to the proper time of zero-angular-momentum observers that are dropped from infinity. Here, the methods of Doran and Nat´ario are extended to the five-dimensional rotating black hole found by Myers and Perry. The result is a new formulation of the Myers-Perry metric. The properties and physical significance of these new coordinates are discussed.

  9. Tidal wave in $^{102}$Pd: An extended five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian description

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y Y; Chen, Q B; Zhang, S Q; Song, C Y

    2016-01-01

    The five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian based on the covariant density functional theory is applied to investigate the observed tidal wave mode in the yrast band of $^{102}$Pd. The energy spectra, the relations between the spin and the rotational frequency, and the ratios of $B(E2)/\\mathcal{J}(I)$ in the yrast band are well reproduced by introducing the empirical $ab$ formula for the moments of inertia. This $ab$ formula is related to the fourth order effect of collective momentum in the collective Hamiltonian. It is also shown that the shape evolution in the tidal wave is determined microscopically by the competition between the rotational kinetic energy and the collective potential in the framework of the collective Hamiltonian.

  10. Black Objects and Hoop Conjecture in Five-dimensional Space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Yuta

    2009-01-01

    We numerically investigated the sequences of initial data of thin spindle and thin ring in five-dimensional space-time in the context of the cosmic censorship conjecture. We modeled the matter in non-rotating homogeneous spheroidal or toroidal configurations under the momentarily static assumption, solved the Hamiltonian constraint equation, and searched the apparent horizon. We found both $S^3$ (black hole) and $S^2\\times S^1$ (black ring) horizons ("black objects"), only when the matter configuration is not sharp. By monitoring the location of the maximum Kretchmann invariant, an appearance of `naked singularity' or `naked ring' under the special situations is suggested. We also discuss the validity of the {\\it hyper-hoop} conjecture using minimum {\\it area} around the object, and show that the appearance of the ring horizon does not match with this hoop.

  11. Five-dimensional scenario with a fluctuating three-brane an stochastic approach to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Quirós, I

    2001-01-01

    A five-dimensional scenario with a non compact extra dimension of infinite extent is studied, in which a single three-brane is affected by small Gaussian fluctuations in the extra dimension. The average magnitude of the fluctuations is of order of the electro-weak length scale ($\\sigma\\sim m_{EW}^{-1}$). The model provides an stochastic approach to gravity that accounts for an alternative resolution of the mass hierarchy problem. The cosmological constant problem can be suitably treated as well. Surprisingly the Mach's principle finds a place in the model. It is argued that the Mach's principle, the mass hierarchy and the cosmological constant problem, are different aspects of a same property of gravity in this model: its stochastic character. Thin-brane scenarios are recovered in the "no-fluctuations" limit ($\\sigma\\to 0$).

  12. Space-Time--Time Five-dimensional Kaluza--Weyl Space

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, H G

    2001-01-01

    Space-time--time couples Kaluza's five-dimensional geometry with Weyl's conformal space-time geometry to produce an extension that goes beyond what either of those theories can achieve by itself. Kaluza's ``cylinder condition'' is replaced by an ``exponential expansion constraint'' that causes translations along the secondary time dimension to induce both the electromagnetic gauge transformations found in the Kaluza and the Weyl theories and the metrical gauge transformations unique to the Weyl theory, related as Weyl had postulated. A space-time--time geodesic describes a test particle whose rest mass, space-time momentum, and electric charge q, all defined kinematically, evolve in accord with definite dynamical laws. Its motion is governed by four apparent forces: the Einstein gravitational force, the Lorentz electromagnetic force, a force proportional to the electromagnetic potential, and a force proportional to a scalar field's gradient d(ln phi). The test particles exhibit quantum behavior: (1) they appe...

  13. Coadjoint Orbits and Wilson Loops in Five Dimensional Topological Gauge Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Noma, Yui

    2009-01-01

    We give path integral expressions of Wilson loops. This work is an extension of the relation between characters of Lie groups and quantum mechanics whose phase spaces are coadjoint orbits. The path-ordering operators in Wilson loops are considered as the time-ordering operators of the quantum mechanics. Then, by using this expression the formal discussion are simplified. As an application of this expression, we considered one-point functions of BPS Wilson loops in a five dimensional topological gauge theory defined on M_4\\times S^1. We found that the Wilson loop gives interaction terms between charged particles and certain gauge fields on the instanton moduli space, and makes the non-charged particle charged under the gauge fields.

  14. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  15. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A realistic pattern of fermion masses from a five-dimensional SO(10) model

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Vicino, Denise

    2015-01-01

    We provide a unified description of fermion masses and mixing angles in the framework of a supersymmetric grand unified SO(10) model with anarchic Yukawa couplings of order unity. The space-time is five dimensional and the extra flat spatial dimension is compactified on the orbifold $S^1/(Z_2 \\times Z_2')$, leading to Pati-Salam gauge symmetry on the boundary where Yukawa interactions are localised. The gauge symmetry breaking is completed by means of a rather economic scalar sector, avoiding the doublet-triplet splitting problem. The matter fields live in the bulk and their massless modes get exponential profiles, which naturally explain the mass hierarchy of the different fermion generations. Quarks and leptons properties are naturally reproduced by a mechanism, first proposed by Kitano and Li, that lifts the SO(10) degeneracy of bulk masses in terms of a single parameter. The model provides a realistic pattern of fermion masses and mixing angles for large values of $\\tan\\beta$. It favours normally ordered ...

  17. Self-force on a charge outside a five-dimensional black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Beach, Matthew J S; Nickel, Bernhard G

    2014-01-01

    We compute the electromagnetic self-force acting on a charged particle held in place at a fixed position r outside a five-dimensional black hole described by the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metric. Using a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential and a regularization prescription based on the Hadamard Green's function, we express the self-force as a convergent mode sum. The self-force is first evaluated numerically, and next presented as an analytical expansion in powers of R/r, with R denoting the event-horizon radius. The power series is then summed to yield a closed-form expression. Our results for the self-force are unique up to an ambiguity parameter inherited from the regularization prescription. The self-force is repulsive at large distances, and its behavior is related to a model according to which the force results from a gravitational interaction between the black hole and the distribution of electrostatic field energy attached to the particle. The model, however, is shown to be...

  18. Gravitational solitons and $C^0$ vacuum metrics in five-dimensional Lovelock gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, C; Gravanis, E; Willison, S

    2007-01-01

    Junction conditions for vacuum solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity are studied. We focus on those cases where two spherically symmetric regions of space-time are joined in such a way that the induced stress tensor on the junction surface vanishes. So a spherical vacuum shell, containing no matter, arises as a boundary between two regions of the space-time. A general analysis is given of solutions that can be constructed by this method of geometric surgery. Such solutions are a generalized kind of spherically symmetric empty space solutions, described by metric functions of the class $C^0$. New global structures arise with surprising features. In particular, we show that vacuum spherically symmetric wormholes do exist in this theory. These can be regarded as gravitational solitons, which connect two asymptotically (Anti) de-Sitter spaces with different masses and/or different effective cosmological constants. We prove the existence of both static and dynamical solutions and discuss thei...

  19. Scalar gravitational perturbations and quasinormal modes in the five dimensional Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, V; Yoshida, S; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose' P.S.; Yoshida, Shijun

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the quasinormal modes (QNMs) for gravitational perturbations of the Schwarzschild black hole in the five dimensional (5D) spacetime with a continued fraction method. As shown by Kodama and Ishibashi, the gravitational perturbations of higher-dimensional (higher-D) Schwarzschild black holes can be divided into three decoupled classes, namely scalar-gravitational, vector-gravitational, and tensor-gravitational perturbations. In order to examine the QNMs, we make use of Schr\\"odinger-type wave equations for determining the dynamics of the gravitational perturbations. We apply the continued fraction method and expand the eigenfunctions around the black hole horizon in terms of Fr\\"obenius series. It is found that the resulting recurrence relations become an eight-term relation for the scalar-gravitational perturbations and four-term relations for the vector-gravitational and tensor-gravitational perturbations. For all the types of perturbations, the QNMs associated with $l=2$, $l=3$, and $l=4$ are ca...

  20. Five-dimensional teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity, the axially symmetric solution,energy and spatial momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gamal G.L. Nashed

    2011-01-01

    A theory of (4+1)-dimensional gravity is developed on the basis of the teleparallel theory equivalent to general relativity.The fundamental gravitational field variables are the five-dimensional vector fields (pentad),defined globally on a manifold M,and gravity is attributed to the torsion.The Lagrangian density is quadratic in the torsion tensor.We then give the exact five-dimensional solution.The solution is a generalization of the familiar Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions of the four-dimensional teleparallel equivalent of general relativity.We also use the definition of the gravitational energy to calculate the energy and the spatial momentum.

  1. Hydrogen adsorbed in a metal organic framework-5: coupled translation-rotation eigenstates from quantum five-dimensional calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanović, Ivana; Belof, Jonathan L; Space, Brian; Sillar, Kaido; Sauer, Joachim; Eckert, Juergen; Bačić, Zlatko

    2012-07-07

    We report rigorous quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations of the coupled translation-rotation (T-R) eigenstates of a H(2) molecule adsorbed in metal organic framework-5 (MOF-5), a prototypical nanoporous material, which was treated as rigid. The anisotropic interactions between H(2) and MOF-5 were represented by the analytical 5D intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) used previously in the simulations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption in this system [Belof et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 113, 9316 (2009)]. The global and local minima on this 5D PES correspond to all of the known binding sites of H(2) in MOF-5, three of which, α-, β-, and γ-sites are located on the inorganic cluster node of the framework, while two of them, the δ- and ε-sites, are on the phenylene link. In addition, 2D rotational PESs were calculated ab initio for each of these binding sites, keeping the center of mass of H(2) fixed at the respective equilibrium geometries; purely rotational energy levels of H(2) on these 2D PESs were computed by means of quantum 2D calculations. On the 5D PES, the three adjacent γ-sites lie just 1.1 meV above the minimum-energy α-site, and are separated from it by a very low barrier. These features allow extensive wave function delocalization of even the lowest translationally excited T-R eigenstates over the α- and γ-sites, presenting significant challenges for both the quantum bound-state calculations and the analysis of the results. Detailed comparison is made with the available experimental data.

  2. On some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss some problems which arise, when the matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension and their zero Kaluza-Klein modes are supposed to exactly reproduce the Standard Model fields and their interactions.

  3. Neuroimaging in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahina Bano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease worldwide and is second only to stroke in causing neurological morbidity. Neuroimaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. This review article highlights the specific role of various imaging modalities in patients with epilepsy, and their practical applications in the management of epileptic patients.

  4. Neuroimaging in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhof, Frederik [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (NL). Dept. of Radiology and Image Analysis Center (IAC); Fox, Nick C. [UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Dementia Research Centre; VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bastos-Leite, Antonio J. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Scheltens, Philip [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Alzheimer Center

    2011-07-01

    Against a background of an ever-increasing number of patients, new management options, and novel imaging modalities, neuroimaging is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of dementia. This up-to-date, superbly illustrated book aims to provide a practical guide to the effective use of neuroimaging in the patient with cognitive decline. It sets out the key clinical and imaging features of the wide range of causes of dementia and directs the reader from clinical presentation to neuroimaging and on to an accurate diagnosis whenever possible. After an introductory chapter on the clinical background, the available ''toolbox'' of structural and functional neuroimaging techniques is reviewed in detail, including CT, MRI and advanced MR techniques, SPECT and PET, and image analysis methods. The imaging findings in normal ageing are then discussed, followed by a series of chapters that carefully present and analyze the key imaging findings in patients with dementias. A structured path of analysis follows the main presenting feature: disorders associated with primary gray matter loss, with white matter changes, with brain swelling, etc. Throughout, a practical approach is adopted, geared specifically to the needs of clinicians (neurologists, radiologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians) working in the field of dementia, for whom this book should prove an invaluable resource. (orig.)

  5. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Erik H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the field of neuroimaging has undergone dramatic development. Specifically, of importance for clinicians and researchers managing patients with epilepsies, new methods of brain imaging in search of the seizure-producing abnormalities have been implemented, and older methods have undergone additional refinement. Methodology to predict seizure freedom and cognitive outcome has also rapidly progressed. In general, the image data processing methods are very different and more complicated than even a decade ago. In this review, we identify the recent developments in neuroimaging that are aimed at improved management of epilepsy patients. Advances in structural imaging, diffusion imaging, fMRI, structural and functional connectivity, hybrid imaging methods, quantitative neuroimaging, and machine-learning are discussed. We also briefly summarize the potential new developments that may shape the field of neuroimaging in the near future and may advance not only our understanding of epileptic networks as the source of treatment-resistant seizures but also better define the areas that need to be treated in order to provide the patients with better long-term outcomes.

  6. Charged fermions tunneling radiation from the charged Gdel black hole in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we extend fermions tunneling radiation to the case of five-dimensional charged black holes by introducing a set of appropriate matrices γμ for general covariant Dirac equation of 1/2 spin charged Dirac particles in the electromagnetic field.It is expected that our result can strengthen the validity and power of the tunneling method.We take the charged Gdel black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity for example in order to present a reasonable extension of the tunneling method.As a result,we get fermions tunneling probability of the black hole and the Hawking temperature near the event horizon.

  7. Hierarchy problem and the cosmological constant in a five-dimensional Brans-Dicke brane world model

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a new solution, admitting the existence of dS_{4} branes, in five-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory. It is shown that, due to a special form of a bulk scalar field potential, for certain values of the model parameters the effective cosmological constant can be made small on the brane, where the hierarchy problem of gravitational interaction is solved. We also discuss new stabilization mechanism which is based on the use of auxiliary fields.

  8. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kirsten; Bandelow, Borwin; Gruber, Oliver; Wedekind, Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have gained increasing importance in validating neurobiological network hypotheses for anxiety disorders. Functional imaging procedures and radioligand binding studies in healthy subjects and in patients with anxiety disorders provide growing evidence of the existence of a complex anxiety network, including limbic, brainstem, temporal, and prefrontal cortical regions. Obviously, "normal anxiety" does not equal "pathological anxiety" although many phenomena are evident in healthy subjects, however to a lower extent. Differential effects of distinct brain regions and lateralization phenomena in different anxiety disorders are mentioned. An overview of neuroimaging investigations in anxiety disorders is given after a brief summary of results from healthy volunteers. Concluding implications for future research are made by the authors.

  9. Neuroimaging and sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-06-01

    In sleep medicine, patients with sleep disorders are evaluated and treated. The primary assessment tool of the field has traditionally been polysomnography. While polysomnography has been helpful in the evaluation of some sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder, it has been less helpful in others, such as the insomnias, or sleep disorders secondary to mental disorders. These disorders are presumed to stem from some alteration in brain function that disrupts sleep. The development of functional neuroimaging methods provides a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders in a manner not accessible to polysomnography. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings during healthy sleep, then, reviews available studies in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: (1) clarification of pathophysiology; (2) aid in differential diagnosis; (3) assessment of treatment response; (4) guiding new drug development; and (5) monitoring treatment response.

  10. Neuroimaging in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-LoberaBehavioral Sciences Institute and Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Neuroimaging techniques have been useful tools for accurate investigation of brain structure and function in eating disorders. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry have been the most relevant technologies in this regard. The purpose of this review is to update the existing data on neuroimaging in eating disorders. The main brain changes seem to be reversible to some extent after adequate weight restoration. Brain changes in bulimia nervosa seem to be less pronounced than in anorexia nervosa and are mainly due to chronic dietary restrictions. Different subtypes of eating disorders might be correlated with specific brain functional changes. Moreover, anorectic patients who binge/purge may have different functional brain changes compared with those who do not binge/purge. Functional changes in the brain might have prognostic value, and different changes with respect to the binding potential of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and D2/D3 receptors may be persistent after recovering from an eating disorder.Keywords: neuroimaging, brain changes, brain receptors, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders

  11. Neuroimaging of consciousness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuropsychiatry; UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Sobell Dept. of Motor, Neuroscience and Movement Disorders; Nani, Andrea [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Research Group BSMHFT; Blumenfeld, Hal [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States). Depts. of Neurology, Neurobiology and Neurosurgery; Laureys, Steven (ed.) [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Cyclotron Research Centre

    2013-07-01

    An important reference work on a multidisciplinary and rapidly expanding area. Particular focus on the relevance of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and treatment of common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness. Written by world-class experts in the field. Relevant for clinicians, researchers, and scholars across different specialties. Within the field of neuroscience, the past few decades have witnessed an exponential growth of research into the brain mechanisms underlying both normal and pathological states of consciousness in humans. The development of sophisticated imaging techniques (above all fMRI and PET) to visualize and map brain activity in vivo has opened new avenues in our understanding of the pathological processes involved in common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness, such as epilepsy, coma, vegetative states, dissociative disorders, and dementia. This book presents the state of the art in neuroimaging exploration of the brain correlates of the alterations in consciousness across these conditions, with a particular focus on the potential applications for diagnosis and management. Although the book has a practical approach and is primarily targeted at neurologists, neuroradiologists, and psychiatrists, a wide range of researchers and health care professionals will find it an essential reference that explains the significance of neuroimaging of consciousness for clinical practice. Within the field of neuroscience, the past few decades have witnessed an exponential growth of research into the brain mechanisms underlying both normal and pathological states of consciousness in humans. The development of sophisticated imaging techniques (above all fMRI and PET) to visualize and map brain activity in vivo has opened new avenues in our understanding of the pathological processes involved in common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness, such as epilepsy, coma, vegetative states, dissociative disorders, and dementia. This

  12. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial EEG (icEEG monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  13. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Weifang; Chen, Hui; Xia, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Shanshan; Liu, Qingzhu; Li, Yunlin

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  14. Neuroimaging Findings and Repeat Neuroimaging Value in Pediatric Chronic Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Chodirker, Bernard N; Bunge, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Chronic ataxia, greater than two months in duration, is encountered relatively commonly in clinical pediatric neurology practise and presents with diagnostic challenges. It is caused by multiple and diverse disorders. Our aims were to describe the neuroimaging features and the value of repeat neuroimaging in pediatric chronic ataxia to ascertain their contribution to the diagnosis and management. A retrospective charts and neuroimaging reports review was undertaken in 177 children with chronic ataxia. Neuroimaging in 130 of 177 patients was also reviewed. Nineteen patients had head computed tomography only, 103 brain magnetic resonance imaging only, and 55 had both. Abnormalities in the cerebellum or other brain regions were associated with ataxia. Neuroimaging was helpful in 73 patients with 30 disorders: It was diagnostic in 9 disorders, narrowed down the diagnostic possibilities in 14 disorders, and revealed important but non-diagnostic abnormalities, e.g. cerebellar atrophy in 7 disorders. Having a normal magnetic resonance imaging scan was mostly seen in genetic diseases or in the early course of ataxia telangiectasia. Repeat neuroimaging, performed in 108 patients, was generally helpful in monitoring disease evolution and in making a diagnosis. Neuroimaging was not directly helpful in 36 patients with 10 disorders or by definition the 55 patients with unknown disease etiology. Normal or abnormal neuroimaging findings and repeat neuroimaging are very valuable in the diagnosis and management of disorders associated with pediatric chronic ataxia.

  15. Five Dimensional Bianchi Type-V Space-Time in f (R,T Theory of Gravityw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Ladke,

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the spatially homogeneous anisotropic Bianchi type-V universe in f(R,T theory of gravity, where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We assume the variation law of mean Hubble parameter and constant deceleration parameter to find two different five dimensional exact solutions of the modified field equations. The first solution yields a singular model for n  0 while the second gives a nonsingular model for n  0. The physical quantities are discussed for both models in future evolution of the universe.

  16. Non-radial strong curvature naked singularities in five dimensional perfect fluid self-similar space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Sarwe, S B; Sarwe, Sanjay B.

    2004-01-01

    We study five dimensional(5D) spherically symmetric self-similar perfect fluid space-time with adiabatic equation of state, considering all the families of future directed non-spacelike geodesics. The space-time admits globally strong curvature naked singularities in the sense of Tipler and thus violates the cosmic censorship conjecture provided a certain algebraic equation has real positive roots. We further show that it is the weak energy condition (WEC) that is necessary for visibility of singularities for a finite period of time and for singularities to be gravitationally strong. We, also, match the solution to 5D Schwarzschild solution using the junction conditions.

  17. Extended General Relativity: large-scale antigravity and short-scale gravity with \\omega=-1 from five dimensional vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, Jose Edgar Madriz

    2009-01-01

    Considering a five-dimensional (5D) Riemannian spacetime with a particular stationary Ricci-flat metric, we obtain in the framework of the induced matter theory an effective 4D static and spherically symmetric metric which give us ordinary gravitatory solutions on small (planetary and astrophysical) scales, but repulsive (antigravity) forces on very large (cosmological) scales with \\omega = -1. Our approach is an unified manner to describe dark energy, dark matter and ordinary matter. We illustrate the theory with two examples, the solar system and the great attractor.

  18. On spinless null propagation in five dimensional space-times with approximate space-like Killing symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Breban, Romulus

    2015-01-01

    Five-dimensional (5D) space-time symmetry greatly facilitates how a 4D observer perceives the propagation of a single spinless particle in a 5D space-time. In particular, if the 5D geometry is independent of the fifth coordinate then the 5D physics may be interpreted as 4D quantum mechanics. In this work we address the case where the symmetry is approximate, focusing on the case where the 5D geometry depends weakly on the fifth coordinate. We show that concepts developed for the case of exact...

  19. Meeting Curation Challenges in a Neuroimaging Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Whyte

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The SCARP project is a series of short studies with two aims; firstly to discover more about disciplinary approaches and attitudes to digital curation through ‘immersion’ in selected cases; secondly to apply known good practice, and where possible, identify new lessons from practice in the selected discipline areas. The study summarised here is of the Neuroimaging Group in the University of Edinburgh’s Division of Psychiatry, which plays a leading role in eScience collaborations to improve the infrastructure for neuroimaging data integration and reuse. The Group also aims to address growing data storage and curation needs, given the capabilities afforded by new infrastructure. The study briefly reviews the policy context and current challenges to data integration and sharing in the neuroimaging field. It then describes how curation and preservation risks and opportunities for change were identified throughout the curation lifecycle; and their context appreciated through field study in the research site. The results are consistent with studies of neuroimaging eInfrastructure that emphasise the role of local data sharing and reuse practices. These sustain mutual awareness of datasets and experimental protocols through sharing peer to peer, and among senior researchers and students, enabling continuity in research and flexibility in project work. This “human infrastructure” is taken into account in considering next steps for curation and preservation of the Group’s datasets and a phased approach to supporting data documentation.

  20. Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods provide a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: 1) clarification of pathophysiology; 2) aid in differential diagnosis; 3) assessment of treatment response; 4) guiding new drug development; and 5) monitoring treatment response.

  1. Functional neuroimaging of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep and sleep disorders have traditionally been viewed from a polysomnographic perspective. Although these methods provide information on the timing of various stages of sleep and wakefulness, they do not provide information regarding function in brain structures that have been implicated in the generation of sleep and that may be abnormal in different sleep disorders. Functional neuroimaging methods provide information regarding changes in brain function across the sleep-wake cycle that provides information for models of sleep dysregulation in a variety of sleep disorders. Early studies show reliable increases in function in limbic and anterior paralimbic cortex in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decreases in function in higher-order cortical regions in known thalamocortical networks during non-REM sleep. Although most of the early work in this area has been devoted to the study of normal sleep mechanisms, a collection of studies in diverse sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, depression, insomnia, dyssomnias, narcolepsy, and sleep apnea suggest that functional neuroimaging methods have the potential to clarify the pathophysiology of sleep disorders and to guide treatment strategies.

  2. Neuroimaging in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2014-06-28

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG sequence in huntingtin gene (HTT) on chromosome 4. HD manifests with chorea, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Although advances in genetics allow identification of individuals carrying the HD gene, much is still unknown about the mechanisms underlying the development of overt clinical symptoms and the transitional period between premanifestation and manifestation of the disease. HD has no cure and patients rely only in symptomatic treatment. There is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that are able to monitor disease progression and assess the development and efficacy of novel disease modifying drugs. Over the past years, neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have provided important advances in our understanding of HD. MRI provides information about structural and functional organization of the brain, while PET can detect molecular changes in the brain. MRI and PET are able to detect changes in the brains of HD gene carriers years ahead of the manifestation of the disease and have also proved to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique has been validated as an optimal biomarker. An integrative multimodal imaging approach, which combines different MRI and PET techniques, could be recommended for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive therapies in HD. In this article we review the current neuroimaging literature in HD.

  3. Physical Identifications for the Algebraic Quantities of Five-Dimensional Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Wesson, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    When four-dimensional general relativity is embedded in an unconstrained man-ner in a fifth dimension, the physical quantities of spacetime can be interpreted as geometrical properties related to the extra dimension. It has become widespread to view the ten Einstein equations and the source terms of the energy-momentum tensor in this way. We now assign physical meanings to the other five equations involved. The scalar field acts like gravity, but concerns inertial as opposed to gravitational mass. The other four equations are conservation laws for 4D dynamics, but where the mass of a test particle is related to a local value of the cosmological 'constant'. Ways of testing these identifications are suggested.

  4. Interactive Information Visualization in Neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform......We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform...

  5. Interactive Information Visualization in Neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform......We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform...

  6. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste ePoline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging.

  7. Translational Perspectives for Computational Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Klaas E; Iglesias, Sandra; Heinzle, Jakob; Diaconescu, Andreea O

    2015-08-19

    Functional neuroimaging has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of brain function. It remains challenging, however, to translate these advances into diagnostic tools for psychiatry. Promising new avenues for translation are provided by computational modeling of neuroimaging data. This article reviews contemporary frameworks for computational neuroimaging, with a focus on forward models linking unobservable brain states to measurements. These approaches-biophysical network models, generative models, and model-based fMRI analyses of neuromodulation-strive to move beyond statistical characterizations and toward mechanistic explanations of neuroimaging data. Focusing on schizophrenia as a paradigmatic spectrum disease, we review applications of these models to psychiatric questions, identify methodological challenges, and highlight trends of convergence among computational neuroimaging approaches. We conclude by outlining a translational neuromodeling strategy, highlighting the importance of openly available datasets from prospective patient studies for evaluating the clinical utility of computational models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuroimaging of autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoeven, Judith S.; Cock, Paul de; Lagae, Lieven [University Hospitals of the Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Pediatrics, Leuven (Belgium); Sunaert, Stefan [University Hospitals of the Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-01-15

    Neuroimaging studies done by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have provided important insights into the neurobiological basis for autism. The aim of this article is to review the current state of knowledge regarding brain abnormalities in autism. Results of structural MRI studies dealing with total brain volume, the volume of the cerebellum, caudate nucleus, thalamus, amygdala and the area of the corpus callosum are summarised. In the past 5 years also new MRI applications as functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging brought considerable new insights in the pathophysiological mechanisms of autism. Dysfunctional activation in key areas of verbal and non-verbal communication, social interaction, and executive functions are revised. Finally, we also discuss white matter alterations in important communication pathways in the brain of autistic patients. (orig.)

  9. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Brandon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomarkers provide clinicians with a predictable model for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of medical ailments. Psychiatry has lagged behind other areas of medicine in the identification of biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we investigated the current state of neuroimaging as it pertains to biomarkers for psychosis. Methods We reviewed systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the structural (sMRI), functional (fMRI), diffusion-tensor (DTI), Positron emission tomography (PET) and spectroscopy (MRS) studies of subjects at-risk or those with an established schizophrenic illness. Only articles reporting effect-sizes and confidence intervals were included in an assessment of robustness. Results Out of the identified meta-analyses and systematic reviews, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment. There were 13 sMRI, 4 PET, 3 MRS, and 1 DTI studies. The search terms included in the current review encompassed familial high risk (FHR), clinical high risk (CHR), First episode (FES), Chronic (CSZ), schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), and healthy controls (HC). Conclusions Currently, few neuroimaging biomarkers can be considered ready for diagnostic use in patients with psychosis. At least in part, this may be related to the challenges inherent in the current symptom-based approach to classifying these disorders. While available studies suggest a possible value of imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, more systematic research is needed. To date, the best value of imaging data in psychoses has been to shed light on questions of disease pathophysiology, especially through the characterization of endophenotypes. PMID:25883891

  10. Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) facilitates finding and comparing neuroimaging resources for functional and structural...

  11. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces:nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Möller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  12. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer - definitions, state of the art and further directions - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennernaes, Bo (Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Hospital and Academy, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)), e-mail: bo.lennernas@telia.com; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour (Dept. of Oncology/Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC

  13. Extended general relativity: Large-scale antigravity and short-scale gravity with ω=-1 from five-dimensional vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2009-08-01

    Considering a five-dimensional (5D) Riemannian spacetime with a particular stationary Ricci-flat metric, we obtain in the framework of the induced matter theory an effective 4D static and spherically symmetric metric which give us ordinary gravitational solutions on small (planetary and astrophysical) scales, but repulsive (anti gravitational) forces on very large (cosmological) scales with ω=-1. Our approach is an unified manner to describe dark energy, dark matter and ordinary matter. We illustrate the theory with two examples, the solar system and the great attractor. From the geometrical point of view, these results follow from the assumption that exists a confining force that make possible that test particles move on a given 4D hypersurface.

  14. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces: Nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Randrup, Jorgen

    2011-01-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there exists no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  15. On spinless null propagation in five-dimensional space-times with approximate space-like Killing symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breban, Romulus [Institut Pasteur, Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2016-09-15

    Five-dimensional (5D) space-time symmetry greatly facilitates how a 4D observer perceives the propagation of a single spinless particle in a 5D space-time. In particular, if the 5D geometry is independent of the fifth coordinate then the 5D physics may be interpreted as 4D quantum mechanics. In this work we address the case where the symmetry is approximate, focusing on the case where the 5D geometry depends weakly on the fifth coordinate. We show that concepts developed for the case of exact symmetry approximately hold when other concepts such as decaying quantum states, resonant quantum scattering, and Stokes drag are adopted, as well. We briefly comment on the optical model of the nuclear interactions and Millikan's oil drop experiment. (orig.)

  16. On spinless null propagation in five-dimensional space-times with approximate space-like Killing symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breban, Romulus

    2016-09-01

    Five-dimensional (5D) space-time symmetry greatly facilitates how a 4D observer perceives the propagation of a single spinless particle in a 5D space-time. In particular, if the 5D geometry is independent of the fifth coordinate then the 5D physics may be interpreted as 4D quantum mechanics. In this work we address the case where the symmetry is approximate, focusing on the case where the 5D geometry depends weakly on the fifth coordinate. We show that concepts developed for the case of exact symmetry approximately hold when other concepts such as decaying quantum states, resonant quantum scattering, and Stokes drag are adopted, as well. We briefly comment on the optical model of the nuclear interactions and Millikan's oil drop experiment.

  17. Neuroimaging of central breathlessness mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattinson, Kyle T S; Johnson, Miriam J

    2014-09-01

    Breathlessness debilitates millions of people with cardiorespiratory conditions and cancer. Symptoms correlate poorly with the objective measures of disease (e.g. spirometry). Altered brain processing of respiratory sensations may contribute to this disparity. This article summarizes how functional neuroimaging works, focussing on functional MRI (FMRI) and magnetoencephalography, how neuroimaging has shed light on the central mechanisms of breathlessness and thus how it may help target new therapies. Current understanding of central neural activity in breathlessness comes mainly from a small number of studies in healthy volunteers using models of induced acute breathlessness. Parallels with neuroimaging findings in pain and fear or anxiety have been used to interpret the neuroimaging studies of breathlessness to form hypotheses. Despite the lack of recent neuroimaging studies in breathlessness, there have been methodological advances in overcoming confounders with respiratory FMRI. In addition, developing interest in the distinction of emotional from the sensory aspects of breathlessness and the use of opioids for breathlessness has driven mechanistic understandings. Neuroimaging of breathlessness remains in its infancy. However, advances in the understanding of central perception, combined with novel neuroimaging techniques, means that we are poised to increase our understanding of the brain processes of breathlessness and their modulation.

  18. Neuroimaging bei Schlaganfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasel Ch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Während zunächst die Differenzialdiagnosen des Schlaganfalls erfasst werden sollten, wurde sehr bald das Neuroimaging in den Dienst der Behandlung der akuten Ischämie gestellt. Hier kommt der neuroradiologischen Bildgebung eine besondere Rolle zu, da zunehmend die Auswahl von Patienten für eine bestimmte Therapie von der Bildgebung abhängt. Der Verlauf von zerebralen Ischämien ist, bedingt durch stark variierende Faktoren wie Kollateralisation, frühe Rekanalisation etc., sehr unterschiedlich. Die multimodale MR- und CTBildgebung, welche eine Kombination aus konventioneller Bildgebung des Gehirns, angiographischen Verfahren und funktionellen Messungen, wie z. B. Perfusionsmessungen, darstellt, kann jede Ischämie sehr genau charakterisieren. Wichtig ist dabei ein klares Interpretationskonzept. Bei Patienten, deren Symptombeginn eindeutig innerhalb der letzten 3–4,5 h liegt, kann die Nativ- CT, am besten in Kombination mit der CTA, als ausreichend zur Durchführung der anerkannten systemischen i.v.-Lyse sowie zur Feststellung eines Gefäßverschlusses, der einer weiteren Behandlung bedarf, angesehen werden. Im Zeitfenster 4,5 h, bei unklarem Zeitfenster oder nach frustraner i.v.-Lyse, ist, insbesondere bei einem im Weiteren geplanten endovaskulären Eingriff, die multimodale MRI mit Anwendung des „Mismatch-match“-Konzepts zwischen diffusionsgewichtetem MRI und Perfusions-MRI jedenfalls die Methode der ersten Wahl. Steht diese nicht zur Verfügung, kann alternativ das multimodale CT eingesetzt werden.

  19. [Mixed states and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Cermolacce, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the growing number of neuroimaging studies in bipolar disorder over the past years, the brain regions involved in mood dysregulation in this disease are still poorly understood. If some neurofunctional abnormalities seem to be independent of mood state, others were preferentially associated with mania or depression, involving the amygdala and other limbic regions as well as ventral frontal regions, with a likely hemispheric lateralization of these abnormalities according to the thymic state that was examined. Very few imaging studies became interested in bipolar patients in a mixed state, making it harder to connect brain malfunction to a given mood state. However, data obtained so far support the hypothesis of a lateralization of brain abnormalities in relation to bipolar symptomatology, suggesting that neurofonctional abnormalities preferentially located in the right ventral frontal and limbic areas may underlie the depressive component, associated with abnormalities of the left similar regions for the manic component. Identification of brain dysfunctions that may explain the emergence of mixed symptoms will likely provide useful information to better understand the respective roles of each hemisphere in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacognosia. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroimaging in Traumatic Brain Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bruce; Newberg, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common and potentially devastating clinical problem. Because prompt proper management of TBI sequelae can significantly alter the clinical course especially within 48 h of the injury, neuroimaging techniques have become an important part of the diagnostic work up of such patients. In the acute setting, these imaging studies can determine the presence and extent of injury and guide surgical planning and minimally invasive interventions. Neuroimaging a...

  1. [Modern neuroimaging of brain plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, G; Seidel, S

    2010-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging methods offer new insights into the plasticity of the human brain. As the techniques of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly being applied in a clinical setting, the examiner is now frequently confronted with the interpretation of imaging findings related to regenerative processes in response to lesions of the central and also of the peripheral nervous system. In this article individual results of modern neuroimaging studies are discussed in the context of structural and functional plasticity of the CNS.

  2. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Leiter, Jeff; Hall, Thomas; McDonald, Patrick J; Sawyer, Scott; Silver, Norm; Bunge, Martin; Essig, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The goal in this review was to summarize the results of clinical neuroimaging studies performed in patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) who were referred to a multidisciplinar ypediatric concussion program. The authors conducted a retrospective review of medical records and neuroimaging findings for all patients referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program between September 2013 and July 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) age ≤ 19 years; and 2) physician-diagnosed SRC. All patients underwent evaluation and follow-up by the same neurosurgeon. The 2 outcomes examined in this review were the frequency of neuroimaging studies performed in this population (including CT and MRI) and the findings of those studies. Clinical indications for neuroimaging and the impact of neuroimaging findings on clinical decision making were summarized where available. This investigation was approved by the local institutional ethics review board. A total of 151 patients (mean age 14 years, 59% female) were included this study. Overall, 36 patients (24%) underwent neuroimaging studies, the results of which were normal in 78% of cases. Sixteen percent of patients underwent CT imaging; results were normal in 79% of cases. Abnormal CT findings included the following: arachnoid cyst (1 patient), skull fracture (2 patients), suspected intracranial hemorrhage (1 patient), and suspected hemorrhage into an arachnoid cyst (1 patient). Eleven percent of patients underwent MRI; results were normal in 75% of cases. Abnormal MRI findings included the following: intraparenchymal hemorrhage and sylvian fissure arachnoid cyst (1 patient); nonhemorrhagic contusion (1 patient); demyelinating disease (1 patient); and posterior fossa arachnoid cyst, cerebellar volume loss, and nonspecific white matter changes (1 patient). Results of clinical neuroimaging studies are normal in the majority of pediatric patients with SRC. However, in selected cases neuroimaging can provide

  3. Geodesic Motions in the vicinity of a black hole in Five-dimensional Reissner- Nordstrom Anti-de Sitter spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Sarbari; Bhattacharya, Pinaki

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the timelike and null geodesics in the vicinity of a non-rotating, charged black hole in a five-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom Anti-de Sitter spacetime. Here the solutions are uniquely characterized by their mass, charge and the cosmological constant. The line element and the horizon function has been defined and it is found that only one horizon is physically admissible. The spherical symmetry of the geometry helps us to reduce the problem to a study of three geodesic equations. In our analysis, we have used both the method of effective Newtonian orbit calculations and the dynamical systems method to analyze the particle trajectories. The equation of motion of a particle of unit mass is found. The effective potential under which any test particle moves with a given angular momentum at a given distance from the black hole, depends only on the mass and charge of the black hole and the cosmological constant. This equation is used to study radial motion and the corresponding stabil...

  4. Dirac and Faddeev–Jackiw quantization of a five-dimensional Stüeckelberg theory with a compact dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalante, Alberto, E-mail: aescalan@ifuap.buap.mx; Zarate, Moises, E-mail: mzarate@ifuap.buap.mx

    2015-02-15

    A detailed Hamiltonian analysis for a five-dimensional Stüeckelberg theory with a compact dimension is performed. First, we develop a pure Dirac’s analysis of the theory; we show that after performing the compactification, the theory is reduced to four-dimensional Stüeckelberg theory plus a tower of Kaluza–Klein modes. We develop a complete analysis of the constraints, we fix the gauge and we show that there are present pseudo-Goldstone bosons. Then we quantize the theory by constructing the Dirac brackets. As complementary work, we perform the Faddeev–Jackiw quantization for the theory under study, and we calculate the generalized Faddeev–Jackiw brackets, we show that both the Faddeev–Jackiw and Dirac’s brackets are the same. Finally we discuss some remarks and prospects. - Highlights: • Dirac’s method for 5D Stueckelberg theory with a compact dimension is performed. • By fixing the gauge in the effective theory we find present pseudo-Goldstone bosons. • Dirac’s brackets are constructed for the zero-modes and the kk-excitations. • The Faddeev–Jackiw quantization is performed. • The equivalence between generalized Faddeev–Jackiw and Dirac’s brackets is shown.

  5. The status of modern five-dimensional gravity (A short review: Why physics needs the fifth dimension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Paul S.

    2015-11-01

    Recent criticism of higher-dimensional extensions of Einstein's theory is considered. This may have some justification in regard to string theory, but is misguided as applied to five-dimensional (5D) theories with a large extra dimension. Such theories smoothly embed general relativity, ensuring recovery of the latter's observational support. When the embedding of spacetime is carried out in accordance with Campbell's theorem, the resulting 5D theory naturally explains the origin of classical matter and vacuum energy. Also, constraints on the equations of motion near a high-energy surface or membrane in the 5D manifold lead to quantization and quantum uncertainty. These are major returns on the modest investment of one extra dimension. Instead of fruitless bickering about whether it is possible to "see" the fifth dimension, it is suggested that it be treated on par with other concepts of physics, such as time. The main criterion for the acceptance of a fifth dimension (or not) should be its usefulness.

  6. Five-dimensional theoretical physics. Statements on the nature of the gravitation and the electromagnetism; Fuenfdimensionale Theoretische Physik. Thesen zur Natur der Gravitation und des Elektromagnetismus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Norbert

    2011-07-01

    This book contains a generalization of Newton' s gravitation theory to wave mechanics, as well as a five-dimensionalunification of these wave mechanics with Maxwell's electrodynamics and the derivation of a five-dimensional relativity theory. At the end of the essay stands a five-dimensional generally covariant variational principle, from which all above mentioned theories can be derived. In the framework of the generalization to this variational principle the foundations of the classical theories and the general relativity theory are discussed.

  7. Neuroimaging findings in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, J N; Berman Rosa, M; Gouin, J-P; Dang-Vu, T T

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study and understanding of sleep in humans. Neuroimaging studies in primary insomnia remain relatively few, considering the important prevalence of this disorder in the general population. This review examines the contribution of functional and structural neuroimaging to our current understanding of primary insomnia. Functional studies during sleep provided support for the hyperarousal theory of insomnia. Functional neuroimaging also revealed abnormalities in cognitive and emotional processing in primary insomnia. Results from structural studies suggest neuroanatomical alterations in primary insomnia, mostly in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. However, these results are not well replicated across studies. A few magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies revealed abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and bioenergetics in primary insomnia. The inconsistencies among neuroimaging findings on insomnia are likely due to clinical heterogeneity, differences in imaging and overall diversity of techniques and designs employed. Larger samples, replication, as well as innovative methodologies are necessary for the progression of this perplexing, yet promising area of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuroimaging in Iran: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ali Hossein-Zadeh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNeuroimaging allows noninvasive evaluation of the anatomy, physiology, and function of the brain. It is widely used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment evaluation of neurological disorders as well as understanding functions of the brain in health and disease. Neuroimaging modalities include X-ray computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, positron emission tomography (PET, electroencephalography (EEG, and magnetoencephalography (MEG. This paper presents an overview of the neuroimaging research in Iran in recent years, partitioned into three categories: anatomical imaging; anatomical image analysis; and functional imaging and analysis. Published papers reflect considerable progress in development of neuroimaging infrastructure, hardware installation and software development. However, group work and research collaborations among engineers, scientists, and clinicians need significant enhancement to optimize utility of the resources and maximize productivity. This is a challenge that cannot be solved without specific plans, policies, and funding.

  9. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  10. A new implementation of high-throughput five-dimensional clone pooling strategy for BAC library screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deal Karin R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A five-dimensional (5-D clone pooling strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones with molecular markers utilizing highly-parallel Illumina GoldenGate assays and PCR facilitates high-throughput BAC clone and BAC contig anchoring on a genetic map. However, this strategy occasionally needs manual PCR to deconvolute pools and identify truly positive clones. Results A new implementation is reported here for our previously reported clone pooling strategy. Row and column pools of BAC clones are divided into sub-pools with 1~2× genome coverage. All BAC pools are screened with Illumina's GoldenGate assay and the BAC pools are deconvoluted to identify individual positive clones. Putative positive BAC clones are then further analyzed to find positive clones on the basis of them being neighbours in a contig. An exhaustive search or brute force algorithm was designed for this deconvolution and integrated into a newly developed software tool, FPCBrowser, for analyzing clone pooling data. This algorithm was used with empirical data for 55 Illumina GoldenGate SNP assays detecting SNP markers mapped on Aegilops tauschii chromosome 2D and Ae. tauschii contig maps. Clones in single contigs were successfully assigned to 48 (87% specific SNP markers on the map with 91% precision. Conclusion A new implementation of 5-D BAC clone pooling strategy employing both GoldenGate assay screening and assembled BAC contigs is shown here to be a high-throughput, low cost, rapid, and feasible approach to screening BAC libraries and anchoring BAC clones and contigs on genetic maps. The software FPCBrowser with the integrated clone deconvolution algorithm has been developed and is downloadable at http://avena.pw.usda.gov/wheatD/fpcbrowser.shtml.

  11. A vacuum-like configuration in General Relativity as a manifestation of a Lorentz-invariant mode of five-dimensional gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gladush, V D

    2005-01-01

    A Lorentz-invariant cosmological model is constructed within the framework of five-dimensional gravity. The five-dimensional theorem which is analogical to the generalized Birkhoff theorem is proved, that corresponds to the Kaluza's ``cylinder condition''. The five-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations have an integral of motion corresponding to this symmetry, the integral of motion is similar to the mass function in general relativity (GR). Space closure with respect to the extra dimensionality follows from the requirement of the absence of a conical singularity. Thus, the Kaluza-Klein (KK) model is realized dynamically as a Lorentz-invariant mode of five-dimensional general relativity. After the dimensional reduction and conformal mapping the model is reduced to the GR configuration. It contains a scalar field with a vanishing conformally invariant energy-momentum tensor on the flat space-time background. This zero mode can be interpreted as a vacuum configuration in GR. As a result the vacuum-like configur...

  12. Neuroimaging. Recent issues and future progresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the technology of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques, include X-ray CT, magnetic resonance imaging, positron CT, etc. The trend of neuroimaging is from the diagnosis of the brain structural change to the functional localization of the brain function with accurate topographical data. Brain activation studies disclosed the responsible regions in the brain for various kinds of paradigms, including motor, sensory, cognitive functions. Another aspect of brain imaging shows the pathophysiological changes of the neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease by abnormal CBF or metabolism changes. It is very important to note that the neurotransmitter receptor imaging is now available for various kinds of transmitters. We recently developed a new tracer for nicotinic type acetylcholine receptor, which might be involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and its treatment. In the near future, we will be able to visualize the proteins in the brain such as amyloid protein, which will make us to diagnose Alzheimer's patients accurately, and with respect to neuroscience research, not only neuronal functional localizations but also relationship between them will become important to disclose the functional aspects of the brain. (author)

  13. Nipype: A flexible, lightweight and extensible neuroimaging data processing framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof eGorgolewski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Current neuroimaging software offer users an incredible opportunity to analyze their data in different ways, with different underlying assumptions. Several sophisticated software packages (e.g., AFNI, BrainVoyager, FSL, FreeSurfer, Nipy, R, SPM are used to process and analyze large and often diverse (highly multi-dimensional data. However, this heterogeneous collection of specialized applications creates several issues that hinder replicable, efficient and optimal use of neuroimaging analysis approaches: 1 No uniform access to neuroimaging analysis software and usage information; 2 No framework for comparative algorithm development and dissemination; 3 Personnel turnover in laboratories often limits methodological continuity and training new personnel takes time; 4 Neuroimaging software packages do not address computational efficiency; and 5 Methods sections in journal articles are inadequate for reproducing results. To address these issues, we present Nipype (Neuroimaging in Python: Pipelines and Interfaces; http://nipy.org/nipype, an open-source, community-developed, software package and scriptable library. Nipype solves the issues by providing Interfaces to existing neuroimaging software with uniform usage semantics and by facilitating interaction between these packages using Workflows. Nipype provides an environment that encourages interactive exploration of algorithms, eases the design of Workflows within and between packages, allows rapid comparative development of algorithms and reduces the learning curve necessary to use different packages. Nipype supports both local and remote execution on multi-core machines and clusters, without additional scripting. Nipype is BSD licensed, allowing anyone unrestricted usage. An open, community-driven development philosophy allows the software to quickly adapt and address the varied needs of the evolving neuroimaging community, especially in the context of increasing demand for reproducible research.

  14. Sinp 2012: aggiornamenti in neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D'Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Molti gli aggiornamenti in neurofisiologia e neuroimaging dal congresso annuale della Società Italiana di Neuropsicologia (Sinp tenutosi a Roma a Novembre. Interessanti in modo particolare alcuni studi sui modelli anatomici funzionali nell'anosognosia per l'emiplegia e sulle funzioni della corteccia premotoria ventrale e della giunzione temporo-parietale nella regolazione del senso di "agency".

  15. Finding related functional neuroimaging volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a content-based image retrieval technique for finding related functional neuroimaging experiments by voxelization of sets of stereotactic coordinates in Talairach space, comparing the volumes and reporting related volumes in a sorted list. Voxelization is accomplished by convolving each...

  16. [Schizophrenia, cognition and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Fakra, E; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2011-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex illness whose mechanisms are still largely unknown. Functional brain imaging, by making the link between psyche and brain, has recently become an indispensable tool to study in vivo the neural bases underlying cognitive dysfunction in this disease. But despite the proliferation of data coming from this approach, the exact impact of functional imaging on our understanding of the disease remains blurry. In general, studies of the brain functioning of patients with schizophrenia found activation abnormalities which vary in nature and localization depending of the cognitive paradigm used. However, it appears that neurofunctional abnormalities observed in patients cannot be reduced to a simple well-localized deficit. It would be rather an alteration of the dynamics of the interactions between different brain regions that underlie the cognitive disturbances encountered in the disease. Functional brain imaging now offers new perspectives to clarify the dynamics of the brain networks, and particularly those involved in high-level cognitive functions, such as cognitive control or social cognition which seem to play a crucial role in the disease. The characterization of these features is an important issue not only to develop new hypotheses on the pathophysiology of the disorder, but also more pragmatically to identify potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Motamedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the problem of seizures requires knowledge of the clinical details and features of the seizures, the functional abnormality in the brain as shown on the EEG, and the structural assessment of the brain with an MRI study optimized for epilepsy. Usually MRI or computed tomographic (CT scan should be performed in evaluating the cause of a newly diagnosed seizure disorder. MRI is preferred over CT because of its greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying small lesions."nBecause there is an option of surgical excision of the "seizure focus," which may cure the patient, the detection of a focal abnormality of the brain is important for the formulation of the reason for the seizures and the options available for treatment. Knowledge of the brain abnormalities early in the course of treating the patient greatly helps the management of each individual. The challenge to epileptologists is that the problem of epilepsy is a special one, which requires optimized protocols dedicated to it."nMRI interpretation is different when used in a screening way and when viewed in the context of other investigations. This is particularly important when the patient has partial seizures and may be considered for surgical treatment."nMost centers that deal with epilepsy spend a great deal of time in ensuring the quality of their EEG and EEG interpretation. However, unless there is a radiologist with an interest in epilepsy or an epileptologist who spends time with radiologist colleagues, it can be difficult to establish good epilepsy-focused MRI with appropriate sequences, radiography, and interpretation. MRI acquisition and interpretation need to be focused on the problem of epilepsy."nIndication"nThe American academy of neurology has published practice parameters for neuroimaging (NI studies (MRI, CT of patients having a first seizure. Emergent NI (scan immediately should be performed when a health care provider suspects a serious

  18. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P; Strauman, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research.

  19. [Correlation between EEG and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms underlying nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities is reviewed to clarify the correlation between EEG and neuroimaging. Focal and widespread slow waves, background abnormalities, and bursts of rhythmic slow activity are discussed. EEG phenomena were correlated with lesion size, location, type (white matter vs. gray matter, high density vs. low density), and mass effect. Clinical and experimental accumulated over the past five decades suggest that polymorphic slow activity is generated in cerebral cortex by layers of pyramidal cells and is probably due to partial deafferentation from subcortical areas. Unilateral background activity changes are probably thalamic dysfunction, and bilateral paroxysmal slow activity is due to abnormal thalamocortical circuits combined with cortical pathology. Paroxysmal discharges indicate the presence of epilepsy with possible brain lesion(s). The EEG is a functional test and provides us complementary information to neuroimaging studies.

  20. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  1. Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Baker; Alisa Zeliger-Kandasamy; Laura U. DeWyngaert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in t...

  2. Can neuroimaging disentangle bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozer, Franz; Houenou, Josselin

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar disorder heterogeneity is large, leading to difficulties in identifying neuropathophysiological and etiological mechanisms and hindering the formation of clinically homogeneous patient groups in clinical trials. Identifying markers of clinically more homogeneous groups would help disentangle BD heterogeneity. Neuroimaging may aid in identifying such groups by highlighting specific biomarkers of BD subtypes or clinical dimensions. We performed a systematic literature search of the neuroimaging literature assessing biomarkers of relevant BD phenotypes (type-I vs. II, presence vs. absence of psychotic features, suicidal behavior and impulsivity, rapid cycling, good vs. poor medication response, age at onset, cognitive performance and circadian abnormalities). Consistent biomarkers were associated with suicidal behavior, i.e. frontal/anterior alterations (prefrontal and cingulate grey matter, prefrontal white matter) in patients with a history of suicide attempts; and with cognitive performance, i.e. involvement of frontal and temporal regions, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right thalamic radiation, and corpus callosum in executive dysfunctions. For the other dimensions and sub-types studied, no consistent biomarkers were identified. Studies were heterogeneous both in methodology and outcome. Though theoretically promising, neuroimaging has not yet proven capable of disentangling subtypes and dimensions of bipolar disorder, due to high between-study heterogeneity. We issue recommendations for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Autismo: neuroimagem Autism: neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Zilbovicius

    2006-05-01

    and stereotyped and repetitive behaviors. Thanks to recent brain imaging studies, scientists are getting a better idea of the neural circuits involved in autism spectrum disorders. Indeed, functional brain imaging, such as positron emission tomography, single foton emission tomographyand functional MRI have opened a new perspective to study normal and pathological brain functioning. Three independent studies have found anatomical and rest functional temporal lobe abnormalities in autistic patients. These alterations are localized in the superior temporal sulcus bilaterally, an area which is critical for perception of key social stimuli. In addition, functional studies have shown hypoactivation of most areas implicated in social perception (face and voice perception and social cognition (theory of mind. These data suggest an abnormal functioning of the social brain network in autism. The understanding of the functional alterations of this important mechanism may drive the elaboration of new and more adequate social re-educative strategies for autistic patients.

  4. Consensus paper: combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Bergmann, Til O; Bestmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-neuroimaging studies have greatly stimulated research in the field of TMS and neuroimaging. Here, we review how TMS can be combined with various neuroimaging techniques to investigate human brain function. When applied during...... neuroimaging (online approach), TMS can be used to test how focal cortex stimulation acutely modifies the activity and connectivity in the stimulated neuronal circuits. TMS and neuroimaging can also be separated in time (offline approach). A conditioning session of repetitive TMS (rTMS) may be used to induce...... information obtained by neuroimaging can be used to define the optimal site and time point of stimulation in a subsequent experiment in which TMS is used to probe the functional contribution of the stimulated area to a specific task. In this review, we first address some general methodologic issues that need...

  5. Neuroimaging in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, Federica; Chiaro, Giacomo

    2015-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies are of crucial relevance in defining the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). MRI studies showed no structural brain lesions and confirmed a central iron deficiency. Structural and functional studies showed an involvement of the thalamus, sensorimotor cortical areas, and cerebellum in RLS and assessed neurotransmission abnormalities in the dopaminergic and opiate systems. Finally, glutamatergic hyperactivity has been proposed as a cause of disrupted and shortened sleep in RLS. Differences among the results of the studies make it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions, thus, suggesting the need for future research.

  6. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium.

  7. Neuroimaging in Selected Nigerian Epileptic Patients: A Decade of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuroimaging in Selected Nigerian Epileptic Patients: A Decade of Experience. ... The study sets out to highlight the relevance of neuroimaging in the management of ... The neuroimaging was done in various centres in Nigeria and abroad.

  8. Neuroimaging studies of the hippocampus in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckers, S

    2001-01-01

    Three neuroimaging techniques, morphometric neuroimaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and functional neuroimaging, have provided evidence for abnormal hippocampal structure and function in schizophrenia. Hippocampal volume reduction is now one of the most consistent structural abnormalities found in schizophrenia: it is present at the onset of the illness and, to a lesser degree, in first-degree relatives of schizophrenic probands. Decreased levels of N-acetyl-aspartate point towards a cellular basis of such volume changes. Functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated abnormal levels of hippocampal activity at rest, during the experience of auditory hallucinations, and during the performance of memory retrieval tasks. These results of neuroimaging studies complement evidence from post-mortem and behavioral studies, which have found regionally specific abnormalities of the hippocampus and of memory function in schizophrenia.

  9. Structural and functional neuroimaging in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchure Swati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical management remains unsatisfactory in about a third of patients with epilepsy and some of them are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the identification of the precise cortical region responsible for seizures and is very crucial for a good surgical outcome. Furthermore, identification of eloquent cortical areas near the region to be resected is essential to avoid postoperative neurologic deficit. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI protocol for epilepsy can be individually tailored depending on the seizure semiology and possibly electroencephalography. New MRI techniques demonstrate the structure of the brain in fine detail, help in understanding the underlying pathology, and demonstrate functional activity of the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Metabolic imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission tomography (SPECT visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. In MR-negative epilepsy patients, these techniques may have localizing value. The proper use and interpretation of the findings provided by these new technologies is crucial. In this review article, we discuss various conventional and advanced MRI techniques, interpretation of various findings, and the role of functional imaging modalities, such as functional MRI, PET, and SPECT in the localization of epileptogenic substrate as well as for understanding the pathophysiology, propagation, and neurochemical correlates of epilepsy.

  10. Neuroimaging of classic neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieba-Samal, Doris; Jengojan, Suren; Kasprian, Gregor; Wöber, Christian; Bodner, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) often imposes diagnostic problems. Recently, MRI and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) have proven useful in diagnosing peripheral nerve disorders. We performed a chart and imaging review of patients who were examined using neuroimaging and who were referred because of clinically diagnosed NA between March 1, 2014 and May 1, 2015. Six patients were included. All underwent HRUS, and 5 underwent MRI. Time from onset to evaluation ranged from 2 weeks to 6 months. HRUS showed segmental swelling of all clinically affected nerves/trunks. Atrophy of muscles was detected in those assessed >1 month after onset. MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensity in all clinically affected nerves, except for the long thoracic nerve, and denervation edema of muscles. HRUS and MRI are valuable diagnostic tools in NA. This could change the diagnostic approach from one now focused on excluding other disorders to confirming NA through imaging markers. Muscle Nerve 54: 1079-1085, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neuroimaging craving: urge intensity matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen J; Sayette, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    Functional neuroimaging has become an increasingly common tool for studying drug craving. Furthermore, functional neuroimaging studies, which have addressed an incredibly diverse array of questions regarding the nature and treatment of craving, have had a substantial impact on theoretical models of addiction. Here, we offer three points related to this sizeable and influential body of research. First, we assert that the craving most investigators seek to study represents not just a desire but a strong desire to use drugs, consistent with prominent theoretical and clinical descriptions of craving. Secondly, we highlight that, despite the clear conceptual and clinical emphasis on craving as an intense desire, brain imaging studies often have been designed explicitly in a way that reduces the ability to generate powerful cravings. We illustrate this point by reviewing the peak urge levels endorsed by participants in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of cigarette craving in nicotine-deprived versus non-deprived smokers. Thirdly, we suggest that brain responses measured during mild states of desire (such as following satiety) differ in fundamental ways from those measured during states of overpowering desire (i.e. craving) to use drugs. We support this position by way of a meta-analysis revealing that fMRI cue exposure studies using nicotine-deprived smokers have produced different patterns of brain activation to those using non-deprived smokers. Regarding brain imaging studies of craving, intensity of the urges matter, and more explicit attention to urge intensity in future work has the potential to yield valuable information about the nature of craving. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Workflow-based approaches to neuroimaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissell, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images requires a complex sequence of data processing steps to proceed from raw image data to the final statistical tests. Neuroimaging researchers have begun to apply workflow-based computing techniques to automate data analysis tasks. This chapter discusses eight major components of workflow management systems (WFMSs): the workflow description language, editor, task modules, data access, verification, client, engine, and provenance, and their implementation in the Fiswidgets neuroimaging workflow system. Neuroinformatics challenges involved in applying workflow techniques in the domain of neuroimaging are discussed.

  13. Design, Evaluation and Validation, and Analysis of a Five-Dimensional Leadership Questionnaire for a Project Leader in an International Scientific Research Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfinger, Roman

    2008-01-01

    The basic goal of the study is to develop a five dimensional leadership questionnaire for a project leader in an international scientific research laboratory and to verify statistically the independency of the individual questions from each other to ensure low overlap in content and meaning by achieving low correlation coefficients. This leadership questionnaire is designed to examine the behavior, personality, and character attributes of a project or experiment team leader in an international scientific research laboratory as perceived by her/his team members during the planning, design, implementation, and execution of the project itself. The leadership questionnaire is applied to a sample of about 40 participants from different international scientific research laboratories. This sample should represent in age, rank, and profession the whole population of employees and team members currently working in different international scientific research laboratories dealing with physics, informatics, and engineeri...

  14. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer--definitions, state of the art and further directions--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Bo; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour

    2011-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC.

  15. Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Baker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in the development and use of academic skills is widely recognized. Metacognition is typically defined as the awareness and control of one's own cognitive processes. In the domain of reading, the most important metacognitive skill is comprehension monitoring, the evaluation and regulation of comprehension. Readers who monitor their understanding realize when they have encountered difficulty making sense of the text, and they apply error correction procedures to attempt to resolve the difficulty. Metacognition depends on executive control skills that continue to develop into early adulthood, in parallel with the maturation of the executive control regions of the prefrontal cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and event-related potentials (ERP have been used for some time to study neural correlates of basic reading processes such as word identification, but it is only within recent years that researchers have turned to the higher-level processes of text comprehension. The article describes illustrative studies that reveal changes in neural activity when adults apply lexical, syntactic, or semantic standards to evaluate their understanding.

  16. Learning Neuroimaging. 100 essential cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asis Bravo-Rodriguez, Francisco de [Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain). Diagnostic and Therapeutics Neuroradiology; Diaz-Aguilera, Rocio [Alto Guadalquivir Hospital, Andujar, Jaen (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Hygino da Cruz, Luiz Celso [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). CDPI and IRM Ressonancia Magnetica

    2012-07-01

    Neuroradiology is the branch of radiology that comprises both imaging and invasive procedures related to the brain, spine and spinal cord, head, neck, organs of special sense (eyes, ears, nose), cranial and spinal nerves, and cranial, cervical, and spinal vessels. Special training and skills are required to enable the neuroradiologist to function as an expert diagnostic and therapeutic consultant and practitioner. In addition to knowledge of imaging findings, the neuroradiologist is required to learn the fundamentals of structural and functional neuroanatomy, neuropathology, and neuropathophysiology as well as the clinical manifestations of diseases of the brain, spine and spinal cord, head, neck, and organs of special sense. This book is intended as an introduction to neuroradiology and aims to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of this highly specialized radiological subspecialty. One hundred illustrated cases from clinical practice are presented in a standard way. Each case is supported by representative images and is divided into three parts: a brief summary of the patient's medical history, a discussion of the disease, and a description of the most characteristic imaging features of the disorder. The focus is not only on common neuroradiological entities such as stroke and acute head trauma but also on less frequent disorders that the practitioner should recognize. Learning Neuroimaging: 100 Essential Cases is an ideal resource for neuroradiology and radiology residents, neurology residents, neurosurgery residents, nurses, radiology technicians, and medical students. (orig.)

  17. Neuroimaging of motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    It is agreed that conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spine is one of the core elements in the differential diagnostic work up of patients with clinical signs of motor neuron diseases (MNDs), for example amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to exclude MND mimics. However, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI signs in these disorders are moderate to low and do not have an evidence level higher than class IV (good clinical practice point). Currently computerized MRI analyses in ALS and other MNDs are not techniques used for individual diagnosis. However, they have improved the anatomical understanding of pathomorphological alterations in gray and white matter in various MNDs and the changes in functional networks by quantitative comparisons between patients with MND and controls at group level. For multiparametric MRI protocols, including T1-weighted three-dimensional datasets, diffusion-weighted imaging and functional MRI, the potential as a 'dry' surrogate marker is a subject of investigation in natural history studies with well defined patients. The additional value of MRI with respect to early diagnosis at an individual level and for future disease-modifying multicentre trials remains to be defined. There is still the need for more longitudinal studies in the very early stages of disease or when there is clinical uncertainty and for better standardization in the acquisition and postprocessing of computer-based MRI data. These requirements are to be addressed by establishing quality-controlled multicentre neuroimaging databases.

  18. Neuroimaging of the Philadelphia neurodevelopmental cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Elliott, Mark A; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Calkins, Monica E; Hopson, Ryan; Jackson, Chad; Keefe, Jack; Riley, Marisa; Mentch, Frank D; Sleiman, Patrick; Verma, Ragini; Davatzikos, Christos; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2014-02-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale, NIMH funded initiative to understand how brain maturation mediates cognitive development and vulnerability to psychiatric illness, and understand how genetics impacts this process. As part of this study, 1445 adolescents ages 8-21 at enrollment underwent multimodal neuroimaging. Here, we highlight the conceptual basis for the effort, the study design, and the measures available in the dataset. We focus on neuroimaging measures obtained, including T1-weighted structural neuroimaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling, functional imaging tasks of working memory and emotion identification, and resting state imaging of functional connectivity. Furthermore, we provide characteristics regarding the final sample acquired. Finally, we describe mechanisms in place for data sharing that will allow the PNC to become a freely available public resource to advance our understanding of normal and pathological brain development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  20. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Charles; Peterson, Andrew; Webster, Fiona; Graham, Mackenzie; Cruse, Damian; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Gofton, Teneille; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Lazosky, Andrea; Naci, Lorina; Norton, Loretta; Speechley, Kathy; Young, Bryan; Owen, Adrian M

    2014-05-20

    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to "yes" or "no" answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients' interests, and we explore conceptual issues in the

  1. [Neuroimaging and Blood Biomarkers in Functional Prognosis after Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, João Paulo; Costa, Joana Santos; Sargento-Freitas, João; Oliveira, Sandra; Mendes, Bruno; Laíns, Jorge; Pinheiro, João

    2016-11-01

    Stroke remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world and it is associated with an important long-term functional disability. Some neuroimaging resources and certain peripheral blood or cerebrospinal fluid proteins can give important information about etiology, therapeutic approach, follow-up and functional prognosis in acute ischemic stroke patients. However, among the scientific community, there is currently more interest in the stroke vital prognosis over the functional prognosis. Predicting the functional prognosis during acute phase would allow more objective rehabilitation programs and better management of the available resources. The aim of this work is to review the potential role of acute phase neuroimaging and blood biomarkers as functional recovery predictors after ischemic stroke. Review of the literature published between 2005 and 2015, in English, using the terms "ischemic stroke", "neuroimaging" e "blood biomarkers". We included nine studies, based on abstract reading. Computerized tomography, transcranial doppler ultrasound and diffuse magnetic resonance imaging show potential predictive value, based on the blood flow study and the evaluation of stroke's volume and localization, especially when combined with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Several biomarkers have been studied as diagnostic, risk stratification and prognostic tools, namely the S100 calcium binding protein B, C-reactive protein, matrix metalloproteinases and cerebral natriuretic peptide. Although some biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques have potential predictive value, none of the studies were able to support its use, alone or in association, as a clinically useful functionality predictor model. All the evaluated markers were considered insufficient to predict functional prognosis at three months, when applied in the first hours after stroke. Additional studies are necessary to identify reliable predictive markers for functional

  2. Human neuroimaging as a "Big Data" science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-06-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has led to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of "big data". A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a multifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociological and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, "big data" can become "big" brain science.

  3. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Five dimensional cosmological traversable wormhole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, S.; Rostami, T., E-mail: t_rostami@sbu.ac.ir; Jalalzadeh, S., E-mail: s-jalalzadeh@sbu.ac.ir

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, a traversable wormhole in the Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW) model with one extra spacelike compact dimension is studied. We have chosen dynamical compactification as the evolution of the fifth dimension. In this respect, we study how the existence of the extra dimension affects the behavior of the energy density, the shape function and the scale factor. It is shown that the total matter can be non-exotic and the violation of the weak energy condition can be avoided.

  5. Five dimensional cosmological traversable wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Najafi, S; Jalalzadeh, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a traversable wormhole in the Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model with one extra spacelike compact dimension is studied. We have chosen dynamical compactification as the evolution of the fifth dimension. In this respect, we study how the existence of the extra dimension, affect the behavior of the energy density, the shape function and the scale factor. It is shown that the total matter can be non-exotic and the violation of the weak energy condition can be avoided.

  6. On Five-dimensional Superspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzenko, S M; Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Linch, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Recent one-loop calculations of certain supergravity-mediated quantum corrections in supersymmetric brane-world models employ either the component formulation (hep-th/0305184) or the superfield formalism with only half of the bulk supersymmetry manifestly realized (hep-th/0305169 and hep-th/0411216). There are reasons to expect, however, that 5D supergraphs provide a more efficient setup to deal with these and more involved (in particular, higher-loop) calculations. As a first step toward elaborating such supergraph techniques, we develop in this note a manifestly supersymmetric formulation for 5D globally supersymmetric theories with eight supercharges. Simple rules are given to reduce 5D superspace actions to a hybrid form which keeps manifest only the 4D, N=1 Poincare supersymmetry. (Previously, such hybrid actions were carefully worked out by rewriting the component actions in terms of simple superfields). To demonstrate the power of this formalism for model building applications, two families of off-shel...

  7. Neuroimaging of Parkinson's disease: Expanding views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P; Sundman, Mark H; Hickey, Patrick; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-12-01

    Advances in molecular and structural and functional neuroimaging are rapidly expanding the complexity of neurobiological understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD). This review article begins with an introduction to PD neurobiology as a foundation for interpreting neuroimaging findings that may further lead to more integrated and comprehensive understanding of PD. Diverse areas of PD neuroimaging are then reviewed and summarized, including positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, transcranial sonography, magnetoencephalography, and multimodal imaging, with focus on human studies published over the last five years. These included studies on differential diagnosis, co-morbidity, genetic and prodromal PD, and treatments from L-DOPA to brain stimulation approaches, transplantation and gene therapies. Overall, neuroimaging has shown that PD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving many neurotransmitters, brain regions, structural and functional connections, and neurocognitive systems. A broad neurobiological understanding of PD will be essential for translational efforts to develop better treatments and preventive strategies. Many questions remain and we conclude with some suggestions for future directions of neuroimaging of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuroimaging and biomarkers in addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have made a significant contribution to the efforts to identify measurable indices, or biomarkers, of addictions and their treatments. Biomarkers in addiction treatment are needed to provide targets for treatment, detect treatment subgroups, predict treatment response, and broadly improve outcomes. Neuroimaging is important to biomarkers research as it relates neural circuits to both molecular mechanisms and behavior. A focus of recent efforts in neuroimaging in addiction has been to elucidate the neural correlates associated with dimensions of functioning in substance-use and related disorders, such as cue-reactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive control, among others. These dimensions of functioning have been related to addiction treatment outcomes and relapse, and therefore, a better understanding of these dimensions and their neural correlates may help to identify brain-behavior biomarkers of treatment response. This paper reviews recent neuroimaging studies that report potential biomarkers in addiction treatment related to cue-reactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive control, as well as recent advances in neuroimaging that may facilitate efforts to determine reliable biomarkers. This important initial work has begun to identify possible mediators and moderators of treatment response, and multiple promising indices are being tested.

  9. 基于五维混沌系统的图像加密研究%Five-dimensional chaotic system based image encryption algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高亮; 朱博; 孙鸣; 朱建良

    2011-01-01

    随着计算机技术、信息技术和通讯技术等高科技技术在近年来的迅猛发展,信息加密越来越受到人们的重视,提出了基于五维混沌系统用来实现图像加密的方法,并利用迭代次数和方式作为密码,实现了图像加密和解密,为信息加密提供了一种新方法.%With computer technology, information technology and communications technology, high technology, rapid development in recent years, more and more people pay close attention to information encryption. This paper, based on five-dimensional chaotic system realizes image encryption method, and means of using the number of iterations as the password, to realize the image encryption and decryption,the information provides a new method of encryption.

  10. Five-dimensional long bones biometry for estimation of femur length and fetal weight at term compared to two-dimensional ultrasound: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Mohamed; Alanwar, Ahmed A; Etman, Mohamed K; Elsokkary, Mohammed S; Elkotb, Ahmed M; Hasanien, Ahmad S; KhalafAllah, Ali E; Noah, Nancy M

    2017-07-27

    This study aimed to evaluate accuracy of five-dimensional long bones (5D LB) compared to two-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) biometry to predict fetal weight among normal term women. Fifty six normal term women were recruited at Ain Shams Maternity Hospital, Egypt from 14 May to 30 November 2015. Fetal weight was estimated by Hadlock's IV formula using 2DUS and 5D LB. Estimated fetal weights (EFW) by 2DUS and 5D LB were compared with actual birth weights (ABW). Mean femur length (FL) was 7.07 ± 0.73 cm and 6.74 ± 0.67 cm by 2DUS and 5D LB (p = .02). EFW was 3309.86 ± 463.06 g by 2DUS and 3205.46 ± 447.85 g by 5D LB (p = .25). No statistical difference was observed between ABW and EFW by 2DUS (p = .7) or 5D LB (p = .45). Positive correlation was found between EFW by 2DUS, 5D LB, and ABW (r = 0.67 and 0.7; p ABW (p = .15). 2DUS and 5D LB had same accuracy for fetal weight estimation at normal term pregnancy.

  11. Mathematical modeling and visualization of functional neuroimages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    This dissertation presents research results regarding mathematical modeling in the context of the analysis of functional neuroimages. Specifically, the research focuses on pattern-based analysis methods that recently have become popular within the neuroimaging community. Such methods attempt...... to predict or decode experimentally defined cognitive states based on brain scans. The topics covered in the dissertation are divided into two broad parts: The first part investigates the relative importance of model selection on the brain patterns extracted form analysis models. Typical neuroimaging data...... of model regularization parameter choices on the model generalization, the reliability of the spatial brain patterns extracted from the analysis model, and the ability of the resulting model to identify relevant brain networks defining the underlying neural encoding of the experiment. We show that known...

  12. Turner syndrome: neuroimaging findings: structural and functional.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including the parietal lobe; cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus; and basal ganglia; and perhaps differences in "connectivity" between frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Finally, there is preliminary evidence that genomic imprinting, sex hormones and growth hormone have significant modulatory effects on brain maturation in TS.

  13. Nipype: a flexible, lightweight and extensible neuroimaging data processing framework in python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Burns, Christopher D; Madison, Cindee; Clark, Dav; Halchenko, Yaroslav O; Waskom, Michael L; Ghosh, Satrajit S

    2011-01-01

    Current neuroimaging software offer users an incredible opportunity to analyze their data in different ways, with different underlying assumptions. Several sophisticated software packages (e.g., AFNI, BrainVoyager, FSL, FreeSurfer, Nipy, R, SPM) are used to process and analyze large and often diverse (highly multi-dimensional) data. However, this heterogeneous collection of specialized applications creates several issues that hinder replicable, efficient, and optimal use of neuroimaging analysis approaches: (1) No uniform access to neuroimaging analysis software and usage information; (2) No framework for comparative algorithm development and dissemination; (3) Personnel turnover in laboratories often limits methodological continuity and training new personnel takes time; (4) Neuroimaging software packages do not address computational efficiency; and (5) Methods sections in journal articles are inadequate for reproducing results. To address these issues, we present Nipype (Neuroimaging in Python: Pipelines and Interfaces; http://nipy.org/nipype), an open-source, community-developed, software package, and scriptable library. Nipype solves the issues by providing Interfaces to existing neuroimaging software with uniform usage semantics and by facilitating interaction between these packages using Workflows. Nipype provides an environment that encourages interactive exploration of algorithms, eases the design of Workflows within and between packages, allows rapid comparative development of algorithms and reduces the learning curve necessary to use different packages. Nipype supports both local and remote execution on multi-core machines and clusters, without additional scripting. Nipype is Berkeley Software Distribution licensed, allowing anyone unrestricted usage. An open, community-driven development philosophy allows the software to quickly adapt and address the varied needs of the evolving neuroimaging community, especially in the context of increasing demand for

  14. Neuroimaging studies of aggressive and violent behavior: current findings and implications for criminology and criminal justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufkin, Jana L; Luttrell, Vickie R

    2005-04-01

    With the availability of new functional and structural neuroimaging techniques, researchers have begun to localize brain areas that may be dysfunctional in offenders who are aggressive and violent. Our review of 17 neuroimaging studies reveals that the areas associated with aggressive and/or violent behavioral histories, particularly impulsive acts, are located in the prefrontal cortex and the medial temporal regions. These findings are explained in the context of negative emotion regulation, and suggestions are provided concerning how such findings may affect future theoretical frameworks in criminology, crime prevention efforts, and the functioning of the criminal justice system.

  15. From translation to version management: a history and review of methods for the cultural adaptation of the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Rosalind; Gudex, Claire; Selai, Caroline; Herdman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The EuroQol five-dimensional (EQ-5D) questionnaire is used worldwide as a patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument for the measurement and valuation of health. Several variants of the instrument now exist, including versions with three and five levels of severity and one for respondents aged 8 to 14 years. From the outset, a demand for new language versions of the EQ-5D questionnaire meant that there was a need to implement standardized procedures, which ensured that such versions were produced following international recommendations for the cultural adaptation of patient-reported outcomes. The availability of new variants and formats of the instrument, such as telephone-administered or electronic formats, complicated the task of providing and controlling the quality of cultural adaptations. Although cultural adaptations of the instrument are widely used, the procedures currently used to produce them have not been widely disseminated. The present article therefore describes the evolution of the production of other language versions of the instrument from the earliest days of simultaneous production and translation of the EQ-5D questionnaire to the more recent, broader-based strategy of version management. We describe current adaptation procedures and innovations within those procedures. We also describe how version management is organized within the EuroQol Group, review aspects related to quality control, and provide an overview of the number of currently available language versions for each variant of the EQ-5D questionnaire: three-level, five-level, and youth versions. We conclude by discussing some of the relevant issues related to cultural adaptation for frequently used instruments such as the EQ-5D questionnaire.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  17. Ionization penalty in nonlinear Raman neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Aleksandr A; Fedotov, Ilya V; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V; Ivashkina, Olga I; Zots, Marina A; Fedotov, Andrei B; Anokhin, Konstantin V; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-02-15

    Light-assisted ionization accompanying coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of ultrashort laser pulses in brain tissue is shown to manifest itself in a detectable blueshift of the anti-Stokes signal. This blueshift can serve as an indicator of ionization processes in CARS-based neuroimaging.

  18. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, S J A; van den Berg, S M; Pannekoek, J N; Elzinga, B M; van der Wee, N J A

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience.

  19. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J A van der Werff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person’s resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience.

  20. Neuropsychiatric lupus: classification criteria in neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Tania M; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Rueda-Lopes, Fernanda; Bizzo, Bernardo C; Fonseca, Rochele P; Gasparetto, Emerson L

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review described the criteria and main evaluations methods procedures used to classify neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) patients. Also, within the evaluations methods, this review aimed to identify the main contributions of neuropsychological measurements in neuroimaging studies. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE and SCOPUS databases with the terms related to neuropsychiatric syndromes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and neuroimaging techniques. Sixty-six abstracts were found; only 20 were completely analyzed and included. Results indicated that the 1999 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria is the most used to classify NPSLE samples together with laboratorial, cognitive, neurological and psychiatric assessment procedures. However, the recommended ACR assessment procedures to classify NPSLE patients are being used incompletely, especially the neuropsychological batteries. Neuropsychological instruments and neuroimaging techniques have been used mostly to characterize NPSLE samples, instead of contributing to their classifications. The most described syndromes in neuroimaging studies have been seizure/cerebrovascular disease followed by cognitive dysfunctions as well as headache disorder.

  1. Neuroimaging studies of social cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Yassin, Walid; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-05-01

    Impaired social cognition is considered a core contributor to unfavorable psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. Rather than being a unitary process, social cognition is a collection of multifaceted processes that recruit multiple brain structures, thus structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are ideal methodologies for revealing the underlying pathophysiology of impaired social cognition. Many neuroimaging studies have suggested that in addition to white-matter deficits, schizophrenia is associated with decreased gray-matter volume in multiple brain areas, especially fronto-temporal and limbic regions. However, few schizophrenia studies have examined associations between brain abnormalities and social cognitive disabilities. During the last decade, we have investigated structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, and our findings have been confirmed by us and others. By assessing different types of social cognitive abilities, structural abnormalities in multiple brain regions have been found to be associated with disabilities in social cognition, such as recognition of facial emotion, theory of mind, and empathy. These structural deficits have also been associated with alexithymia and quality of life in ways that are closely related to the social cognitive disabilities found in schizophrenia. Here, we overview a series of neuroimaging studies from our laboratory that exemplify current research into this topic, and discuss how it can be further tackled using recent advances in neuroimaging technology.

  2. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, George A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical School, P.O. Box 103, Ioannina (Greece); Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. (orig.)

  3. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, S. J. A.; van den Berg, S. M.; Pannekoek, J. N.; Elzinga, B. M.; van der Wee, N. J. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience. PMID:23675330

  4. Structural Neuroimaging in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, Meike W.; Smits, Marion

    2012-01-01

    The role of structural neuroimaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming increasingly important. As a consequence, a basic understanding of what are normal brain changes in aging is key to be able to recognize what is abnormal. The first part of this article discusses normal vers

  5. The open-source neuroimaging research enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Daniel S; Archie, Kevin A; Olsen, Timothy R; Ramaratnam, Mohana

    2007-11-01

    While brain imaging in the clinical setting is largely a practice of looking at images, research neuroimaging is a quantitative and integrative enterprise. Images are run through complex batteries of processing and analysis routines to generate numeric measures of brain characteristics. Other measures potentially related to brain function - demographics, genetics, behavioral tests, neuropsychological tests - are key components of most research studies. The canonical scanner - PACS - viewing station axis used in clinical practice is therefore inadequate for supporting neuroimaging research. Here, we model the neuroimaging research enterprise as a workflow. The principal components of the workflow include data acquisition, data archiving, data processing and analysis, and data utilization. We also describe a set of open-source applications to support each step of the workflow and the transitions between these steps. These applications include DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN MEDICINE viewing and storage tools, the EXTENSIBLE NEUROIMAGING ARCHIVE TOOLKIT data archiving and exploration platform, and an engine for running processing/analysis pipelines. The overall picture presented is aimed to motivate open-source developers to identify key integration and communication points for interoperating with complimentary applications.

  6. On small sample experiments in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    Most human brain imaging experiments involve a number of subjects that is unusually low by accepted statistical standards. Although there are anumber of practical reasons for using small samples in neuroimaging we need to face the question regarding whether results obtained with only a fewsubjects...

  7. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the degree of ... MRI is the method of choice to investigate ... regional gray and white matter volumes .... relation of the cerebellar affection with disease ... were mostly done on mentally retarded cases23 ... vide a certain correlation between the.

  9. PET radioligand injection for pig neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Munk, Ole Lajord; Landau, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Pigs are useful models in neuroimaging studies with positron emission tomography. Radiolabeled ligands are injected intravenously at the start of the scan and in pigs, the most easily accessible route of administration is the ear vein. However, in brain studies the short distance between the brai...

  10. On small sample experiments in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    Most human brain imaging experiments involve a number of subjects that is unusually low by accepted statistical standards. Although there are anumber of practical reasons for using small samples in neuroimaging we need to face the question regarding whether results obtained with only a fewsubjects...

  11. Online open neuroimaging mass meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple format and a web service performs the numerical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system allows for mass meta-analysis, e...

  12. Neuroimaging in psychiatry: an update on neuroimaging in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Brian D; Nguyen, T; Hayhow, B; Looi, Jcl

    2016-04-01

    We offered guidance on the role of structural and functional neuroimaging modalities for the general psychiatrist and for trainees in the clinical setting. We outlined the utility of neuroimaging modalities in the clinical setting, specifically with a view to understanding the pathophysiology of manifestations of disease. Both structural and functional neuroimaging modalities have a clear role in diagnostic evaluation in the spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Whilst the role of neuroimaging in patients with mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders is less clear, structural and functional imaging modalities have utility in the clinical setting in the form of diagnostic refinement and in understanding the pathophysiology of disorders, towards explaining manifestations and planning treatment. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  13. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Toyozato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25], we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space–time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009 [23].

  14. Neuroimaging in the Diagnostic Evaluation of Eye Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmáry, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Ocular or eye pain is a frequent complaint encountered not only by eye care providers but neurologists. Isolated eye pain is non-specific and non-localizing; therefore, it poses significant differential diagnostic problems. A wide range of neurologic and ophthalmic disorders may cause pain in, around, or behind the eye. These include ocular and orbital diseases and primary and secondary headaches. In patients presenting with an isolated and chronic eye pain, neuroimaging is usually normal. However, at the beginning of a disease process or in low-grade disease, the eye may appear "quiet," misleading a provider lacking familiarity with underlying disorders and high index of clinical suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of some neuro-ophthalmic causes of eye pain could result in significant neurologic and ophthalmic morbidity, conceivably even mortality. This article reviews some recent advances in imaging of the eye, the orbit, and the brain, as well as research in which neuroimaging has advanced the discovery of the underlying pathophysiology and the complex differential diagnosis of eye pain.

  15. [Neuroimaging in psychiatry: multivariate analysis techniques for diagnosis and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambeitz, J; Koutsouleris, N

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies successfully applied multivariate analysis to neuroimaging data demonstrating the potential utility of neuroimaging for clinical diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Summary of the current state of research regarding the application of neuroimaging in the field of psychiatry. Literature review of current studies. Results of current studies indicate the potential application of neuroimaging data across various diagnoses, such as depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and dementia. Potential applications include disease classification, differential diagnosis and prediction of disease course. The results of the studies are heterogeneous although some studies report promising findings. Further multicentre studies are needed with clearly specified patient populations to systematically investigate the potential utility of neuroimaging for the clinical routine.

  16. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S

    2010-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released - when it is just an idea being developed.

  17. Functional neuro-imaging as a pre-surgical tool in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Zulfi Haneef; David K. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuro-imaging techniques are helpful in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy for localization of the epileptogenic zone as ancillary tools to electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or when other localization techniques are normal, non-concordant or discordant. Positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (ictal SPECT) imaging are traditional tests that have been reported to have good sensitivity and specificit...

  18. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  19. Deficient Approaches to Human Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eStelzer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the workhorse of imaging-based human cognitive neuroscience. The use of fMRI is ever-increasing; within the last 4 years more fMRI studies have been published than in the previous 17 years. This large body of research has mainly focused on the functional localization of condition- or stimulus-dependent changes in the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD signal.In recent years, however, many aspects of the commonly practiced analysis frameworks and methodologies have been critically reassessed. Here we summarize these critiques, providing an overview of the major conceptual and practical deficiencies in widely used brain-mapping approaches, and exemplify some of these issues by the use of imaging data and simulations. In particular, we discuss the inherent pitfalls and shortcomings of methodologies for statistical parametric mapping. Our critique emphasizes recent reports of excessively high numbers of both false positive and false negative findings in fMRI brain mapping. We outline our view regarding the broader scientific implications of these methodological considerations and briefly discuss possible solutions.

  20. Mathematical modeling and visualization of functional neuroimages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    This dissertation presents research results regarding mathematical modeling in the context of the analysis of functional neuroimages. Specifically, the research focuses on pattern-based analysis methods that recently have become popular analysis tools within the neuroimaging community. Such methods...... attempt to predict or decode experimentally defined cognitive states based on brain scans. The topics covered in the dissertation are divided into two broad parts: The first part investigates the relative importance of model selection on the brain patterns extracted form analysis models. Typical...... influence of model regularization parameter choices on the model generalization, the reliability of the spatial brain patterns extracted from the analysis model, and the ability of the model to identify relevant brain networks defining the underlying neural encoding of the experiment. We show that known...

  1. Energy landscape analysis of neuroimaging data

    CERN Document Server

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Computational neuroscience models have been used for understanding neural dynamics in the brain and how they may be altered when physiological or other conditions change. We review and develop a data-driven approach to neuroimaging data called the energy landscape analysis. The methods are rooted in statistical physics theory, in particular, the Ising model, also known as the (pairwise) maximum entropy model and Boltzmann machine. The methods have been applied to fitting electrophysiological data in neuroscience for a decade, but its use in neuroimaging data is still in its infancy. We first review the methods and discuss some algorithms and technical aspects. Then, we apply the methods to functional magnetic resonance imaging data recorded from healthy individuals to inspect the relationship between the accuracy of fitting, the size of the brain system to be analyzed, and the data length.

  2. Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N. Braskie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD is moderately to highly heritable. Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (APOE4 has been replicated consistently as an AD risk factor over many studies, and recently confirmed variants in other genes such as CLU, CR1, and PICALM each increase the lifetime risk of AD. However, much of the heritability of AD remains unexplained. AD is a complex disease that is diagnosed largely through neuropsychological testing, though neuroimaging measures may be more sensitive for detecting the incipient disease stages. Difficulties in early diagnosis and variable environmental contributions to the disease can obscure genetic relationships in traditional case-control genetic studies. Neuroimaging measures may be used as endophenotypes for AD, offering a reliable, objective tool to search for possible genetic risk factors. Imaging measures might also clarify the specific mechanisms by which proposed risk factors influence the brain.

  3. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data.

  4. Neuroimaging studies of self-reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews some basic findings and methodological issues in neuroimaging studies of self-referential processing.As a general rule,making judgments about one's self,inclusive of personality trait adjectives or current mental states(person's prefer ences,norms,aesthetic values and feeling)uniformly generates medial prefrontal activations,regardless of stimulus materials(words or pictures)and modality(visual or auditory).Cingulate activations are also observed in association with most self-referential processing.Methodological issues include treating self-referential processing as either representing one's own personality traits or representing one's own current mental states.Finally,self-referential processing could Be considered as implement of "I think therefore I am" approach to neuroimaging the self.

  5. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Elyas Jung Haziot

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A significant increase in the incidence of cognitive impairment in HIV/AIDS patients has been continuously observed. Consequently, three classification categories of cognitive impairment have been proposed: asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND, that correspond to the mild and intermediate forms, and HIV-associated dementia (HAD for the most severe cases. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is a broad term that encompasses these three categories. Moreover, the application of neuroimaging methods has led to a major breakthrough in understanding of the neurological changes in HIV, providing greater reliability in the exclusion of associated diseases and allowing earlier diagnosis. Therefore, abnormalities and/or specific neuroimaging elements may soon be incorporated into the HAND classification criteria, which will be of great value in the management of these diseases, including in the optimization of high CNS penetration antiretroviral regimens.

  6. Energy landscape analysis of neuroimaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Computational neuroscience models have been used for understanding neural dynamics in the brain and how they may be altered when physiological or other conditions change. We review and develop a data-driven approach to neuroimaging data called the energy landscape analysis. The methods are rooted in statistical physics theory, in particular the Ising model, also known as the (pairwise) maximum entropy model and Boltzmann machine. The methods have been applied to fitting electrophysiological data in neuroscience for a decade, but their use in neuroimaging data is still in its infancy. We first review the methods and discuss some algorithms and technical aspects. Then, we apply the methods to functional magnetic resonance imaging data recorded from healthy individuals to inspect the relationship between the accuracy of fitting, the size of the brain system to be analysed and the data length. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  7. Occipital headaches and neuroimaging in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Joshua J; Gelfand, Amy A; Goadsby, Peter J; Bass, Nancy

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the common thinking, as reinforced by the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta), that occipital headaches in children are rare and suggestive of serious intracranial pathology. We performed a retrospective chart review cohort study of all patients ≤18 years of age referred to a university child neurology clinic for headache in 2009. Patients were stratified by headache location: solely occipital, occipital plus other area(s) of head pain, or no occipital involvement. Children with abnormal neurologic examinations were excluded. We assessed location as a predictor of whether neuroimaging was ordered and whether intracranial pathology was found. Analyses were performed with cohort study tools in Stata/SE 13.0 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). A total of 308 patients were included. Median age was 12 years (32 months-18 years), and 57% were female. Headaches were solely occipital in 7% and occipital-plus in 14%. Patients with occipital head pain were more likely to undergo neuroimaging than those without occipital involvement (solely occipital: 95%, relative risk [RR] 10.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-77.3; occipital-plus: 88%, RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.5-9.2; no occipital pain: 63%, referent). Occipital pain alone or with other locations was not significantly associated with radiographic evidence of clinically significant intracranial pathology. Children with occipital headache are more likely to undergo neuroimaging. In the absence of concerning features on the history and in the setting of a normal neurologic examination, neuroimaging can be deferred in most pediatric patients when occipital pain is present. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Sports concussions and aging: a neuroimaging investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sebastien; De Beaumont, Louis; Henry, Luke C; Boulanger, Yvan; Evans, Alan C; Bourgouin, Pierre; Poirier, Judes; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse

    2013-05-01

    Recent epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a link between cognitive decline in late adulthood and sports concussions sustained in early adulthood. In order to provide the first in vivo neuroanatomical evidence of this relation, the present study probes the neuroimaging profile of former athletes with concussions in relation to cognition. Former athletes who sustained their last sports concussion >3 decades prior to testing were compared with those with no history of traumatic brain injury. Participants underwent quantitative neuroimaging (optimized voxel-based morphometry [VBM], hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS; medial temporal lobes and prefrontal cortices), and neuropsychological testing, and they were genotyped for APOE polymorphisms. Relative to controls, former athletes with concussions exhibited: 1) Abnormal enlargement of the lateral ventricles, 2) cortical thinning in regions more vulnerable to the aging process, 3) various neurometabolic anomalies found across regions of interest, 4) episodic memory and verbal fluency decline. The cognitive deficits correlated with neuroimaging findings in concussed participants. This study unveiled brain anomalies in otherwise healthy former athletes with concussions and associated those manifestations to the long-term detrimental effects of sports concussion on cognitive function. Findings from this study highlight patterns of decline often associated with abnormal aging.

  9. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

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    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  10. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing.

  11. Functional neuroimaging in Tourette syndrome: recent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debes NM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanette Mol Debes, Marie Préel, Liselotte Skov Pediatric Department, Tourette Clinic, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, DenmarkAbstract: The most recent functional neuroimaging studies on Tourette syndrome (TS are reviewed in this paper. Although it can be difficult to compare functional neuroimaging studies due to differences in methods, differences in age of the included subjects, and differences in the extent to which the presence of comorbidity, medical treatment, and severity of tics are considered in the various studies; most studies show that the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit seems to be involved in the generation of tics. Changes in this circuit seem to be correlated with tic severity. Correlations have been found between the presence of tics and hypermetabolism in various brain regions. Abnormalities of GABAergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with TS have been suggested. During tic suppression, increased activity in the inferior frontal gyrus is seen. The premotor cortex might be involved in inhibition of motor control in subjects with TS. The right anterior insula is suggested to be a part of the urge–tic network. Several studies have shown altered motor network activations and sensorimotor gating deficits in subjects with TS. In future studies, inclusion of more well-defined subjects and further examination of premonitory urge and tic suppression is needed in order to increase the knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment possibilities of TS. Keywords: functional neuroimaging, Tourette syndrome

  12. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  13. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D. Bigler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1 the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2 how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3 how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  14. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  15. Fusing multiple neuroimaging modalities to assess group differences in perception-action coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraskin, Jordan; Sherwin, Jason; Lieberman, Gregory; Garcia, Javier O; Verstynen, Timothy; Vettel, Jean M; Sajda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the last few decades, non-invasive neuroimaging has revealed macro-scale brain dynamics that underlie perception, cognition and action. Advances in non-invasive neuroimaging target two capabilities; 1) increased spatial and temporal resolution of measured neural activity, and 2) innovative methodologies to extract brain-behavior relationships from evolving neuroimaging technology. We target the second. Our novel methodology integrated three neuroimaging methodologies and elucidated expertise-dependent differences in functional (fused EEG-fMRI) and structural (dMRI) brain networks for a perception-action coupling task. A set of baseball players and controls performed a Go/No-Go task designed to mimic the situation of hitting a baseball. In the functional analysis, our novel fusion methodology identifies 50ms windows with predictive EEG neural correlates of expertise and fuses these temporal windows with fMRI activity in a whole-brain 2mm voxel analysis, revealing time-localized correlations of expertise at a spatial scale of millimeters. The spatiotemporal cascade of brain activity reflecting expertise differences begins as early as 200ms after the pitch starts and lasting up to 700ms afterwards. Network differences are spatially localized to include motor and visual processing areas, providing evidence for differences in perception-action coupling between the groups. Furthermore, an analysis of structural connectivity revealed that the players have significantly more connections between cerebellar and left frontal/motor regions, and many of the functional activation differences between the groups are located within structurally defined network modules that differentiate expertise. In short, our novel method illustrates how multimodal neuroimaging can provide specific macro-scale insights into the functional and structural correlates of expertise development.

  16. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  17. Neural correlates of fear: insights from neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garfinkel SN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarah N Garfinkel,1,2 Hugo D Critchley1,2 1Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, 2Department of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK Abstract: Fear anticipates a challenge to one's well-being and is a reaction to the risk of harm. The expression of fear in the individual is a constellation of physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and experiential responses. Fear indicates risk and will guide adaptive behavior, yet fear is also fundamental to the symptomatology of most psychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging studies of normal and abnormal fear in humans extend knowledge gained from animal experiments. Neuroimaging permits the empirical evaluation of theory (emotions as response tendencies, mental states, and valence and arousal dimensions, and improves our understanding of the mechanisms of how fear is controlled by both cognitive processes and bodily states. Within the human brain, fear engages a set of regions that include insula and anterior cingulate cortices, the amygdala, and dorsal brain-stem centers, such as periaqueductal gray matter. This same fear matrix is also implicated in attentional orienting, mental planning, interoceptive mapping, bodily feelings, novelty and motivational learning, behavioral prioritization, and the control of autonomic arousal. The stereotyped expression of fear can thus be viewed as a special construction from combinations of these processes. An important motivator for understanding neural fear mechanisms is the debilitating clinical expression of anxiety. Neuroimaging studies of anxiety patients highlight the role of learning and memory in pathological fear. Posttraumatic stress disorder is further distinguished by impairment in cognitive control and contextual memory. These processes ultimately need to be targeted for symptomatic recovery. Neuroscientific knowledge of fear has broader relevance to understanding human and societal behavior. As yet, only some of

  18. Utilization of Emergent Neuroimaging for Thrombolysis-Eligible Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanossian, Nerses; Fu, Katherine A; Liebeskind, David S; Starkman, Sidney; Hamilton, Scott; Villablanca, J Pablo; Burgos, Adrian M; Conwit, Robin; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2017-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic imaging of stroke include multimodal techniques such as noninvasive angiography and perfusion imaging. We aimed to characterize trends in neuroimaging utilization among acute stroke patients. Utilization of multimodal imaging for acute stroke in the community has remained largely uncharacterized despite its increased adoption at academic medical centers. We quantified neuroimaging utilization in the emergency department (ED) for 1,700 hyperacute stroke patients presenting Neuroimaging.

  19. Localization of abelian gauge fields on thick branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaquera-Araujo, Carlos A. [Universidad de Colima, Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Colima (Mexico); Corradini, Olindo [Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Facultad de Ciencias en Fisica y Matematicas, Tuxtla Gutierrez (Mexico); Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche, Modena (Italy)

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we explore a mechanism for abelian gauge field localization on thick branes based on a five-dimensional Stueckelberg-like action. A normalizable zero mode is found through the identification of a suitable coupling function between the brane and the gauge field. The same mechanism is studied for the localization of the abelian Kalb-Ramond field. (orig.)

  20. Chronic disorders of consciousness: role of neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremneva, E.; Sergeev, D.; Zmeykina, E.; Legostaeva, L.; Piradov, M.

    2017-08-01

    Chronic disorders of consciousness are clinically challenging conditions, and advanced methods of imaging for better understanding of diagnosis and prognosis are needed. Recent functional neuroradiological studies utilizing PET and fMRI demonstrated that besides widespread neuronal loss disruption of interconnection between certain cortical networks after the injury may also play the leading role in the development of behaviourally assessed unresponsiveness. Functional and structural connectivity, evaluated by neuroimaging approaches, may correlate with clinical status and may also play prognostic role. Integration of data from various diagnostic modalities is needed for further progress in this area.

  1. Neuroimaging of sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2006-03-01

    Herein are presented the results of research in the area of sleep neuroimaging over the past year. Significant work has been performed to clarify the basic mechanisms of sleep in humans. New studies also extend prior observations regarding altered brain activation in response to sleep deprivation by adding information regarding vulnerability to sleep deprivation and regarding the influence of task difficulty on aberrant responses. Studies in sleep disorder medicine have yielded significant findings in insomnia, depression, and restless legs syndrome. Extensive advances have been made in the area of sleep apnea where physiologic challenges have been used to probe brain activity in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea syndrome.

  2. [Conversion disorder : functional neuroimaging and neurobiological mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, J; Piette, C; Salmon, E; Scantamburlo, G

    2017-04-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder often encountered in neurology services. This condition without organic lesions was and still is sometimes referred as an imaginary illness or feigning. However, the absence of organic lesions does not exclude the possibility of cerebral dysfunction. The etiologic mechanisms underlying this disorder remain uncertain even today.The advent of cognitive and functional imaging opens up a field of exploration for psychiatry in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying mental disorders and especially the conversion disorder. This article reports several neuroimaging studies of conversion disorder and attempts to generate hypotheses about neurobiological mechanisms.

  3. Epistemological considerations on neuroimaging--a crucial prerequisite for neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian G; Huber, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    Whereas ethical considerations on imaging techniques and interpretations of neuroimaging results flourish, there is not much work on their preconditions. In this paper, therefore, we discuss epistemological considerations on neuroimaging and their implications for neuroethics. Neuroimaging uses indirect methods to generate data about surrogate parameters for mental processes, and there are many determinants influencing the results, including current hypotheses and the state of knowledge. This leads to an interdependence between hypotheses and data. Additionally, different levels of description are involved, especially when experiments are designed to answer questions pertaining to broad concepts like the self, empathy or moral intentions. Interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks are needed to integrate findings from the life sciences and the humanities and to translate between them. While these epistemological issues are not specific for neuroimaging, there are some reasons why they are of special importance in this context: Due to their inferential proximity, 'neuro-images' seem to be self-evident, suggesting directness of observation and objectivity. This has to be critically discussed to prevent overinterpretation. Additionally, there is a high level of attention to neuroimaging, leading to a high frequency of presentation of neuroimaging data and making the critical examination of their epistemological properties even more pressing. Epistemological considerations are an important prerequisite for neuroethics. The presentation and communication of the results of neuroimaging studies, the potential generation of new phenomena and new 'dysfunctions' through neuroimaging, and the influence on central concepts at the foundations of ethics will be important future topics for this discipline.

  4. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Nagaraj, Usha D; Pearl, Phillip L

    2015-07-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms "Cornelia," "Brachmann" and "de Lange." The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present.

  6. Neuroimaging of herpesvirus infections in children

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    Baskin, Henry J. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hedlund, Gary [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Six members of the herpesvirus family cause well-described neurologic disease in children: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster (VZV), Epstein-Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). When herpesviruses infect the central nervous system (CNS), the clinical presentation is non-specific and often confounding. The clinical urgency is often underscored by progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, or even death, and prompt diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on neuroimaging. This review focuses on the spectrum of cerebral manifestations caused by these viruses, particularly on non-congenital presentations. Recent advances in our understanding of these viruses are discussed, including new polymerase chain reaction techniques that allow parallel detection, which has improved our recognition that the herpesviruses are neurotropic and involve the CNS more often than previously thought. Evolving knowledge has also better elucidated viral neuropathology, particularly the role of VZV vasculitis in the brain, HHV-6 in febrile seizures, and herpesvirus reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. The virology, clinical course, and CNS manifestations of each virus are reviewed, followed by descriptions of neuroimaging findings when these agents infect the brain. Characteristic but often subtle imaging findings are discussed, as well as technical pearls covering appropriate use of MRI and MRI adjuncts to help differentiate viral infection from mimics. (orig.)

  7. Auditory verbal hallucinations: neuroimaging and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlken, M M; Hugdahl, K; Sommer, I E C

    2017-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a frequently occurring phenomenon in the general population and are considered a psychotic symptom when presented in the context of a psychiatric disorder. Neuroimaging literature has shown that AVH are subserved by a variety of alterations in brain structure and function, which primarily concentrate around brain regions associated with the processing of auditory verbal stimuli and with executive control functions. However, the direction of association between AVH and brain function remains equivocal in certain research areas and needs to be carefully reviewed and interpreted. When AVH have significant impact on daily functioning, several efficacious treatments can be attempted such as antipsychotic medication, brain stimulation and cognitive-behavioural therapy. Interestingly, the neural correlates of these treatments largely overlap with brain regions involved in AVH. This suggests that the efficacy of treatment corresponds to a normalization of AVH-related brain activity. In this selected review, we give a compact yet comprehensive overview of the structural and functional neuroimaging literature on AVH, with a special focus on the neural correlates of efficacious treatment.

  8. Neuroimaging in Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG sequence in huntingtin gene (HTT) on chromosome 4. HD manifests with chorea, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Although advances in genetics allow identification of individuals carrying the HD gene, much is still unknown about the mechanisms underlying the development of overt clinical symptoms and the transitional period between premanifestation and manifestation of the disease. HD has no cure and patients rely only in symptomatic treatment. There is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that are able to monitor disease progression and assess the development and efficacy of novel disease modifying drugs. Over the past years, neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have provided important advances in our understanding of HD. MRI provides information about structural and functional organization of the brain, while PET can detect molecular changes in the brain. MRI and PET are able to detect changes in the brains of HD gene carriers years ahead of the manifestation of the disease and have also proved to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique has been validated as an optimal biomarker. An integrative multimodal imaging approach, which combines different MRI and PET techniques, could be recommended for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive therapies in HD. In this article we review the current neuroimaging literature in HD. PMID:24976932

  9. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  10. Neuroimaging genetic approaches to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebois, Lauren A M; Wolff, Jonathan D; Ressler, Kerry J

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging genetic studies that associate genetic and epigenetic variation with neural activity or structure provide an opportunity to link genes to psychiatric disorders, often before psychopathology is discernable in behavior. Here we review neuroimaging genetics studies with participants who have Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Results show that genes related to the physiological stress response (e.g., glucocorticoid receptor and activity, neuroendocrine release), learning and memory (e.g., plasticity), mood, and pain perception are tied to neural intermediate phenotypes associated with PTSD. These genes are associated with and sometimes predict neural structure and function in areas involved in attention, executive function, memory, decision-making, emotion regulation, salience of potential threats, and pain perception. Evidence suggests these risk polymorphisms and neural intermediate phenotypes are vulnerabilities toward developing PTSD in the aftermath of trauma, or vulnerabilities toward particular symptoms once PTSD has developed. Work distinguishing between the re-experiencing and dissociative sub-types of PTSD, and examining other PTSD symptom clusters in addition to the re-experiencing and hyperarousal symptoms, will further clarify neurobiological mechanisms and inconsistent findings. Furthermore, an exciting possibility is that genetic associations with PTSD may eventually be understood through differential intermediate phenotypes of neural circuit structure and function, possibly underlying the different symptom clusters seen within PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Locally localized gravity and geometric transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, Dionisio [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)]. E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br; Brito, Francisco A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Gomes, Adalto Rodrigues [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Maranhao, 65025-001 Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil)

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we analyze the local localization of gravity in AdS{sub 4} thick brane embedded in AdS{sub 5} space. The 3-brane is modelled by domain wall solution of a theory with a bulk scalar field coupled to five-dimensional gravity. In addition to small four-dimensional cosmological constant, the vacuum expectation value (vev) of the scalar field controls the emergence of a localized four-dimensional quasi-zero mode. We introduce high temperature effects, and we show that gravity localization on a thick 3-brane is favored below a critical temperature T{sub c}. These investigations suggest the appearance of another critical temperature T*, where the thick 3-brane engenders the geometric (author)

  12. Modeling Latency and Shape Changes in Trial Based Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2011-01-01

    To overcome poor signal-to-noise ratios in neuroimaging, data sets are often acquired over repeated trials that form a three-way array of spacetimetrials. As neuroimaging data contain multiple inter-mixed signal components blind signal separation and decomposition methods are frequently invoked...

  13. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  14. Schizophrenia: What do we know from neuroimaging research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Bosch, M.P.C.; Zedlitz, A.M.E.E.; Hadzibeganovic, T.; Kralingen, R.B.A.S. van

    2009-01-01

    Objectives A summary of the main neuroimaging findings in the field of schizophrenia will be given in order to get a better understanding of this disorder. Methods The authors conducted an extensive literature review, using PubMed and the internet. Results Neuroimaging research on schizophrenia has

  15. Visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging by sensitivity maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Lund, Torben Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    There is significant current interest in decoding mental states from neuroimages. In this context kernel methods, e.g., support vector machines (SVM) are frequently adopted to learn statistical relations between patterns of brain activation and experimental conditions. In this paper we focus......, and conclude that the sensitivity map is a versatile and computationally efficient tool for visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging....

  16. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  17. Neuropathology of mild traumatic brain injury: relationship to neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Maxwell, William L

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging identified abnormalities associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are but gross indicators that reflect underlying trauma-induced neuropathology at the cellular level. This review examines how cellular pathology relates to neuroimaging findings with the objective of more closely relating how neuroimaging findings reveal underlying neuropathology. Throughout this review an attempt will be made to relate what is directly known from post-mortem microscopic and gross anatomical studies of TBI of all severity levels to the types of lesions and abnormalities observed in contemporary neuroimaging of TBI, with an emphasis on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, it is impossible to discuss the neuropathology of mTBI without discussing what occurs with more severe injury and viewing pathological changes on some continuum from the mildest to the most severe. Historical milestones in understanding the neuropathology of mTBI are reviewed along with implications for future directions in the examination of neuroimaging and neuropathological correlates of TBI.

  18. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  19. New advances in fetal MR neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France)

    2006-07-15

    MR is now routinely and widely used in fetal neuroimaging and has proven to be valuable in the detection of many cerebral lesions, either genetically determined or acquired in utero. However, its efficiency has certain limits in the detection of diffuse white-matter abnormalities, the evaluation of fibre development and the demonstration of metabolic disorders. Moreover, conventional fetal MR imaging provides only a morphological approach to the fetal brain. New techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, proton MR spectroscopy and functional MR imaging are developing. The majority of these are not used routinely. The principles, aims, technical problems and possible applications of these techniques for imaging the fetus are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Histiocytosis: a review focusing on neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Barcessat Gabbay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Histiocytosis is a systemic disease that usually affects the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to discuss the neuroimaging characteristics of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH, the most common of these diseases; and the non-Langerhans cells histiocytosis (NLCH, which includes entities such as hemophagocytic syndrome, Erdheim-Chester and Rosai-Dorfman diseases. Method: Literature review and illustrative cases with pathologic confirmation. Results: In LCH, the most common findings are 1 osseous lesions in the craniofacial bones and/or skull base; 2 intracranial, extra-axial changes; 3 intra-axial parenchymal changes (white and gray matter; 4 atrophy. Among the NLCH, diagnosis usually requires correlation with clinical and laboratory criteria. The spectrum of presentation includes intraparenchymal involvement, meningeal lesions, orbits and paranasal sinus involvement. Conclusion: It is important the recognition of the most common imaging patterns, in order to include LCH and NLCH in the differential diagnosis, whenever pertinent.

  1. The teen brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedd, Jay N

    2008-04-01

    Few parents of a teenager are surprised to hear that the brain of a 16-year-old is different from the brain of an 8-year-old. Yet to pin down these differences in a rigorous scientific way has been elusive. Magnetic resonance imaging, with the capacity to provide exquisitely accurate quantifications of brain anatomy and physiology without the use of ionizing radiation, has launched a new era of adolescent neuroscience. Longitudinal studies of subjects from ages 3-30 years demonstrate a general pattern of childhood peaks of gray matter followed by adolescent declines, functional and structural increases in connectivity and integrative processing, and a changing balance between limbic/subcortical and frontal lobe functions, extending well into young adulthood. Although overinterpretation and premature application of neuroimaging findings for diagnostic purposes remains a risk, converging data from multiple imaging modalities is beginning to elucidate the implications of these brain changes on cognition, emotion, and behavior.

  2. [Functional neuroimaging of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, M; Parellada, E; Fernández-Egea, E; Bernardo, M; Lomeña, F

    2003-01-01

    The neurobiological bases underlying the generation of auditory hallucinations, a distressing and paradigmatic symptom of schizophrenia, are still unknown in spite of in-depth phenomenological descriptions. This work aims to make a critical review of the latest published literature in recent years, focusing on functional neuroimaging studies (PET, SPECT, fMRI) of auditory hallucinations. Thus, the studies are classified according to whether they are sensory activation, trait and state. The two main hypotheses proposed to explain the phenomenon, external speech vs. subvocal or inner speech, are also explained. Finally, the latest unitary theory as well as the limitations the studies published are commented on. The need to continue investigating in this field, that is still underdeveloped, is posed in order to understand better the etiopathogenesis of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  3. How Shakespeare tempests the brain: neuroimaging insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidel, James L; Davis, Philip M; Gonzalez-Diaz, Victorina; Martin, Clara D; Thierry, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    Shakespeare made extensive use of the functional shift (FS), a rhetorical device involving a change in the grammatical status of words, e.g., using nouns as verbs. Previous work using event-related brain potentials showed how FS triggers a surprise effect inviting mental re-evaluation, seemingly independent of semantic processing. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activation in participants making judgements on the semantic relationship between sentences -some containing a Shakespearean FS- and subsequently presented words. Behavioural performance in the semantic decision task was high and unaffected by sentence type. However, neuroimaging results showed that sentences featuring FS elicited significant activation beyond regions classically activated by typical language tasks, including the left caudate nucleus, the right inferior frontal gyrus and the right inferior temporal gyrus. These findings show how Shakespeare's grammatical exploration forces the listener to take a more active role in integrating the meaning of what is said.

  4. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvaz M. A.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik,P.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-10-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

  5. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Nagaraj, Usha D. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Pearl, Phillip L. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms ''Cornelia'', ''Brachmann'' and ''de Lange.'' The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present. (orig.)

  6. Basics of Multivariate Analysis in Neuroimaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Christian Georg

    2010-01-01

    Multivariate analysis techniques for neuroimaging data have recently received increasing attention as they have many attractive features that cannot be easily realized by the more commonly used univariate, voxel-wise, techniques1,5,6,7,8,9. Multivariate approaches evaluate correlation/covariance of activation across brain regions, rather than proceeding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Thus, their results can be more easily interpreted as a signature of neural networks. Univariate approaches, on the other hand, cannot directly address interregional correlation in the brain. Multivariate approaches can also result in greater statistical power when compared with univariate techniques, which are forced to employ very stringent corrections for voxel-wise multiple comparisons. Further, multivariate techniques also lend themselves much better to prospective application of results from the analysis of one dataset to entirely new datasets. Multivariate techniques are thus well placed to provide information about mean differences and correlations with behavior, similarly to univariate approaches, with potentially greater statistical power and better reproducibility checks. In contrast to these advantages is the high barrier of entry to the use of multivariate approaches, preventing more widespread application in the community. To the neuroscientist becoming familiar with multivariate analysis techniques, an initial survey of the field might present a bewildering variety of approaches that, although algorithmically similar, are presented with different emphases, typically by people with mathematics backgrounds. We believe that multivariate analysis techniques have sufficient potential to warrant better dissemination. Researchers should be able to employ them in an informed and accessible manner. The current article is an attempt at a didactic introduction of multivariate techniques for the novice. A conceptual introduction is followed with a very simple application to a diagnostic

  7. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS: Report 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36% cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%, and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%. Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%. Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses, 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  8. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy--Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review. Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  9. Two pitfalls of BOLD fMRI magnitude-based neuroimage analysis: non-negativity and edge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-08-15

    BOLD fMRI is accepted as a noninvasive imaging modality for neuroimaging and brain mapping. A BOLD fMRI dataset consists of magnitude and phase components. Currently, only the magnitude is used for neuroimage analysis. In this paper, we show that the fMRI-magnitude-based neuroimage analysis may suffer two pitfalls: one is that the magnitude is non-negative and cannot differentiate positive from negative BOLD activity; the other is an edge effect that may manifest as an edge enhancement or a spatial interior dip artifact at a local uniform BOLD region. We demonstrate these pitfalls via numeric simulations using a BOLD fMRI model and also via a phantom experiment. We also propose a solution by making use of the fMRI phase image, the counterpart of the fMRI magnitude.

  10. Neuroimaging of resilience to stress: current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, Steven J A; Pannekoek, J Nienke; Stein, Dan J; van der Wee, Nic J A

    2013-09-01

    Resilience is defined as a dynamic, multidimensional process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. The complex nature of this construct makes it a difficult topic to study in neuroimaging research; however, in this article, we propose ways to operationalize resilience. The limited amount of structural and functional neuroimaging studies specifically designed to examine resilience have mainly focused on investigating alterations in regions of the brain involved in emotion and stress regulation circuitry. In the future, neuroimaging of resilience is expected to benefit from functional and structural connectivity approaches and the use of novel imaging task paradigms.

  11. EVALUATION OF NEUROIMAGING IN CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hasanpour avanji

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveCerebral palsy (CP, a common static motor neurological disorder of childhood with wide spectrum of underlying etiologies, can be demonstrated with different neuro imaging techniques. We undertook this study to investigate the diagnosis of intracranial lesions in children with CP and its correlation between clinical deficits and neuroradiological findings.Materials and methodsIn this prospective hospital-based study, the data of 120 patients with CP, aged below 18 years, referring to the neurology clinic of the Ali Asghar Pediatric hospital in Tehran was studied; data on their cranial neuroimaging findings was analyzed any possible association(s between the gestational ages, prenatal history and neurological deficits were investigated.ResultsOf the 120 patients, 72 (60% were male; 75% were aged below 7 years.Common predisposing factors were prenatal asphyxia, LBW, prematurity and toxemia of pregnancy. Of the 120 cases, 90%(107 had spastic CP, with the quadriplegic type being the most common (54%, followed by spastic paraplegia (21%; twenty-four patients (20% had significant Preventricular Leucomalacia (PVL, a finding more common among those born pre-term.Sixteen patients had hemiplegic CP, 14 of whom showed unilateral lesions on brain MRI imaging. Ten (8% had extra pyramidal CP, a condition more common among term born infants, while six of the 10(72% showed significant abnormalities on the basal ganglia. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 60 (50% of patients and PVL in 20%; encephalomalacia, gliosis, middle cerebral artery infarcts, PVL and gliosis indicated hypoxia as a risk factor for CP. Extent of MRI lesions correlated with the severity of neurological deficits in CP lesions, which were more extensive in Quadriplegics and double hemiplegics rather than paraplegics, and among those delivered preterm as compared to those born at term.ConclusionRadiological findings were found to be closely related to the type of CP and the neurological

  12. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  13. Neuroimaging of Fear-Associated Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, John A; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning has been commonly used as a model of emotional learning in animals and, with the introduction of functional neuroimaging techniques, has proven useful in establishing the neurocircuitry of emotional learning in humans. Studies of fear acquisition suggest that regions such as amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and hippocampus play an important role in acquisition of fear, whereas studies of fear extinction suggest that the amygdala is also crucial for safety learning. Extinction retention testing points to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex as an essential region in the recall of the safety trace, and explicit learning of fear and safety associations recruits additional cortical and subcortical regions. Importantly, many of these findings have implications in our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease. Recent studies using clinical populations have lent insight into the changes in regional activity in specific disorders, and treatment studies have shown how pharmaceutical and other therapeutic interventions modulate brain activation during emotional learning. Finally, research investigating individual differences in neurotransmitter receptor genotypes has highlighted the contribution of these systems in fear-associated learning.

  14. Neuroimaging revolutionizes therapeutic approaches to chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsook David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An understanding of how the brain changes in chronic pain or responds to pharmacological or other therapeutic interventions has been significantly changed as a result of developments in neuroimaging of the CNS. These developments have occurred in 3 domains : (1 Anatomical Imaging which has demonstrated changes in brain volume in chronic pain; (2 Functional Imaging (fMRI that has demonstrated an altered state in the brain in chronic pain conditions including back pain, neuropathic pain, and complex regional pain syndromes. In addition the response of the brain to drugs has provided new insights into how these may modify normal and abnormal circuits (phMRI or pharmacological MRI; (3 Chemical Imaging (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy or MRS has helped our understanding of measures of chemical changes in chronic pain. Taken together these three domains have already changed the way in which we think of pain – it should now be considered an altered brain state in which there may be altered functional connections or systems and a state that has components of degenerative aspects of the CNS.

  15. Sleep neuroimaging and models of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo eTagliazucchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced or absent sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses towards spontaneous (or ``resting state'' activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages.

  16. Neuroimaging in pre-motor Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Barber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease begins long before the onset of clinical motor symptoms, resulting in substantial cell loss by the time a diagnosis can be made. The period between the onset of neurodegeneration and the development of motoric disease would be the ideal time to intervene with disease modifying therapies. This pre-motor phase can last many years, but the lack of a specific clinical phenotype means that objective biomarkers are needed to reliably detect prodromal disease. In recent years, recognition that patients with REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD are at particularly high risk of future parkinsonism has enabled the development of large prodromal cohorts in which to investigate novel biomarkers, and neuroimaging has generated some of the most promising results to date. Here we review investigations undertaken in RBD and other pre-clinical cohorts, including modalities that are well established in clinical Parkinson's as well as novel imaging methods. Techniques such as high resolution MRI of the substantia nigra and functional imaging of Parkinsonian brain networks have great potential to facilitate early diagnosis. Further longitudinal studies will establish their true value in quantifying prodromal neurodegeneration and predicting future Parkinson's.

  17. Neuroimaging with functional near infrared spectroscopy: From formation to interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Vega, Javier; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos G.; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe

    2017-09-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is gaining momentum as a functional neuroimaging modality to investigate the cerebral hemodynamics subsequent to neural metabolism. As other neuroimaging modalities, it is neuroscience's tool to understand brain systems functions at behaviour and cognitive levels. To extract useful knowledge from functional neuroimages it is critical to understand the series of transformations applied during the process of the information retrieval and how they bound the interpretation. This process starts with the irradiation of the head tissues with infrared light to obtain the raw neuroimage and proceeds with computational and statistical analysis revealing hidden associations between pixels intensities and neural activity encoded to end up with the explanation of some particular aspect regarding brain function.To comprehend the overall process involved in fNIRS there is extensive literature addressing each individual step separately. This paper overviews the complete transformation sequence through image formation, reconstruction and analysis to provide an insight of the final functional interpretation.

  18. Functional Neuroimaging of Motor Control inParkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Løkkegaard, Annemette

    2014-01-01

    and yielded consistent alterations in neural activity in patients with PD. Differences in cortical activation between PD patients and healthy controls converged in a left-lateralized fronto-parietal network comprising the presupplementary motor area, primary motor cortex, inferior parietal cortex......Functional neuroimaging has been widely used to study the activation patterns of the motor network in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but these studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis of previous neuroimaging studies was performed to identify patterns of abnormal...... movement-related activation in PD that were consistent across studies. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) of functional neuroimaging studies probing motor function in patients with PD. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 283 patients with PD reported in 24 functional neuroimaging studies...

  19. Neuroimaging biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-09-01

    Reviewed herein are contemporary neuroimaging methods that detect abnormalities associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite advances in demonstrating underlying neuropathology in a subset of individuals who sustain mTBI, considerable disagreement persists in neuropsychology about mTBI outcome and metrics for evaluation. This review outlines a thesis for the select use of sensitive neuroimaging methods as potential biomarkers of brain injury recognizing that the majority of individuals who sustain an mTBI recover without neuroimaging signs or neuropsychological sequelae detected with methods currently applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several measures that could serve as mTBI biomarkers including the detection of hemosiderin and white matter abnormalities, assessment of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative measures that directly assess neuroanatomy. Improved prediction of neuropsychological outcomes in mTBI may be achieved with the use of targeted neuroimaging markers.

  20. Addressing Confounding in Predictive Models with an Application to Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Kristin A; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Doshi, Jimit; Davatzikos, Christos; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-01

    Understanding structural changes in the brain that are caused by a particular disease is a major goal of neuroimaging research. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) comprises a collection of tools that can be used to understand complex disease efxcfects across the brain. We discuss several important issues that must be considered when analyzing data from neuroimaging studies using MVPA. In particular, we focus on the consequences of confounding by non-imaging variables such as age and sex on the results of MVPA. After reviewing current practice to address confounding in neuroimaging studies, we propose an alternative approach based on inverse probability weighting. Although the proposed method is motivated by neuroimaging applications, it is broadly applicable to many problems in machine learning and predictive modeling. We demonstrate the advantages of our approach on simulated and real data examples.

  1. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced understanding biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Methods Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). Results 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Conclusion Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. PMID:25684554

  2. Functional neuroimaging of traumatic brain injury: advances and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irimia A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Irimia, John Darrell Van Horn USC Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Functional deficits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI can have significant and enduring consequences upon patients’ life quality and expectancy. Although functional neuroimaging is essential for understanding TBI pathophysiology, an insufficient amount of effort has been dedicated to the task of translating functional neuroimaging findings into information with clinical utility. The purpose of this review is to summarize the use of functional neuroimaging techniques – especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography – for advancing current knowledge of TBI-related brain dysfunction and for improving the rehabilitation of TBI patients. We focus on seven core areas of functional deficits, namely consciousness, motor function, attention, memory, higher cognition, personality, and affect, and, for each of these, we summarize recent findings from neuroimaging studies which have provided substantial insight into brain function changes due to TBI. Recommendations are also provided to aid in setting the direction of future neuroimaging research and for understanding brain function changes after TBI. Keywords: cognitive decline, personality change, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging

  3. Human Neuroimaging as a “Big Data” Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has lead to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of “big data”. A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a mutifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociologial and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, “big data” can become “big” brain science. PMID:24113873

  4. Neuroimaging in autism--from basic science to translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Christine; Murphy, Declan

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade, human neuroimaging studies have provided invaluable insights into the neural substrates that underlie autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although observations from multiple neuroimaging approaches converge in suggesting that changes in brain structure, functioning and connectivity are associated with ASD, the neurobiology of this disorder is complex, and considerable aetiological and phenotypic heterogeneity exists among individuals on the autism spectrum. Characterization of the neurobiological alterations that underlie ASD and development of novel pharmacotherapies for ASD, therefore, requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Consequently, pressure is growing to combine neuroimaging data with information provided by other disciplines to translate research findings into clinically useful biomarkers. So far, however, neuroimaging studies in patients with ASD have mainly been conducted in isolation, and the low specificity of neuroimaging measures has hindered the development of biomarkers that could aid clinical trials and/or facilitate patient identification. Novel approaches to acquiring and analysing data on brain characteristics are currently being developed to overcome these inherent limitations, and to integrate neuroimaging into translational research. Here, we discuss promising new studies of cortical pathology in patients with ASD, and outline how the novel insights thereby obtained could inform diagnosis and treatment of ASD in the future.

  5. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: A systematic review: Lack of neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced the understanding of biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest that hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lost in localization: A solution with neuroinformatics 2.0?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2009-01-01

    The commentary by Derrfuss and Mar (Derrfuss, J., Mar, R.A., 2009. Lost in localization: The need for a universal coordinate database. NeuroImage, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.01.053.) discusses some of the limitations of the present databases and calls for a universal coordinate database. Here I...

  7. Advanced Neuroimaging of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Gordon W; Hernandez, Maria Valdez; Thrippleton, Michael J; Doubal, Fergus N; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is characterised by damage to deep grey and white matter structures of the brain and is responsible for a diverse range of clinical problems that include stroke and dementia. In this review, we describe advances in neuroimaging published since January 2015, mainly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that, in general, are improving quantification, observation and investigation of SVD focussing on three areas: quantifying the total SVD burden, imaging brain microstructural integrity and imaging vascular malfunction. Methods to capture 'whole brain SVD burden' across the spectrum of SVD imaging changes will be useful for patient stratification in clinical trials, an approach that we are already testing. More sophisticated imaging measures of SVD microstructural damage are allowing the disease to be studied at earlier stages, will help identify specific factors that are important in development of overt SVD imaging features and in understanding why specific clinical consequences may occur. Imaging vascular function will help establish the precise blood vessel and blood flow alterations at early disease stages and, together with microstructural integrity measures, may provide important surrogate endpoints in clinical trials testing new interventions. Better knowledge of SVD pathophysiology will help identify new treatment targets, improve patient stratification and may in future increase efficiency of clinical trials through smaller sample sizes or shorter follow-up periods. However, most of these methods are not yet sufficiently mature to use with confidence in clinical trials, although rapid advances in the field suggest that reliable quantification of SVD lesion burden, tissue microstructural integrity and vascular dysfunction are imminent.

  8. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  9. A neuroimaging study in childhood autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. I. Mullick

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood autism is now widely viewed as being of developmental neurological origin. Abnormality in neuroimaging is reported in autism.Objectives: To delineate the proportion of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electro encephalography (EEG abnormality among the children with Autism and to assess any association of MRI and EEG changes with co morbid mental illness.Methods: It was a cross sectional descriptive study done at a child and adolescent consultation centre, Dhaka. The study was Carried out from January 2009 to December 2009. Both boys and girls were included in the study. A total of 42 children with childhood autism aged between two and 12 years partici­pated in this study. Diagnosis of autism was based on ICD-10(DCR criteria. Results: Abnormalities were found to be 35.7% in MRI and 42.9% in EEG. EEG abnormalities were found in the form of defuse slow waves activities, generalized faster activities, epileptogenic discharge and mixed discharge. The abnormalities in MRI was found in the form of diffuse cortical atrophic changes, focal cortical atrophy in frontal and temporal cortex with widening of major sulci, prominent ventricles, periventricular degeneration and abnormal basal ganglia. EEG changes were significantly associated with increased number of co-morbid illness (mental retardation, epilepsy and others. Conclusion: A number of abnom1alities that observed in the present study indicative of relations between structural and physiological dysfunctions and childhood autism. Further exploratory and in-depth researches are certainly required in this field. Intervention of autism needs to address co morbidities for better outcome.

  10. Analyzing neuroimaging data with subclasses: A shrinkage approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Johannes; Bartz, Daniel; Hebart, Martin N; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods used to analyze neuroimaging data, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is commonly applied for binary classification problems. LDAs popularity derives from its simplicity and its competitive classification performance, which has been reported for various types of neuroimaging data. Yet the standard LDA approach proves less than optimal for binary classification problems when additional label information (i.e. subclass labels) is present. Subclass labels allow to model structure in the data, which can be used to facilitate the classification task. In this paper, we illustrate how neuroimaging data exhibit subclass labels that may contain valuable information. We also show that the standard LDA classifier is unable to exploit subclass labels. We introduce a novel method that allows subclass labels to be incorporated efficiently into the classifier. The novel method, which we call Relevance Subclass LDA (RSLDA), computes an individual classification hyperplane for each subclass. It is based on regularized estimators of the subclass mean and uses other subclasses as regularization targets. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of our method on data drawn from two different neuroimaging modalities: (I) EEG data from brain-computer interfacing with event-related potentials, and (II) fMRI data in response to different levels of visual motion. We show that RSLDA outperforms the standard LDA approach for both types of datasets. These findings illustrate the benefits of exploiting subclass structure in neuroimaging data. Finally, we show that our classifier also outputs regularization profiles, enabling researchers to interpret the subclass structure in a meaningful way. RSLDA therefore yields increased classification accuracy as well as a better interpretation of neuroimaging data. Since both results are highly favorable, we suggest to apply RSLDA for various classification problems within neuroimaging and beyond. Copyright © 2015

  11. Five-dimensional Janis-Newman algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Erbin, Harold

    2014-01-01

    The Janis-Newman algorithm has been shown to be successful in finding new sta- tionary solutions of four-dimensional gravity. Attempts for a generalization to higher dimensions have already been found for the restricted cases with only one angular mo- mentum. In this paper we propose an extension of this algorithm to five dimensions with two angular momenta - using the prescription of G. Giampieri - through two specific examples, that are the Myers-Perry and BMPV black holes. We also discuss possible enlargements of our prescriptions to other dimensions and maximal number of angular momenta, and show how dimensions higher than six appear to be much more challenging to treat within this framework. Nonetheless this general algorithm provides a unification of the formulation in d = 3, 4, 5 of the Janis-Newman algorithm, from which which expose several examples including the BTZ black hole.

  12. CP Violation from Five-Dimensional QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzadkowski, Bohdan; Wudka, José

    2004-11-01

    It is shown that QED in (1+4)-dimensional space-time, with the fifth dimension compactified on a circle, is, in general, a CP violating theory. Depending on the fermionic boundary conditions, CP violation may be either explicit (through the Scherk-Schwarz mechanism) or spontaneous (via the Hosotani mechanism). The fifth component of the gauge field acquires (at the one-loop level) a nonzero vacuum expectation value which, in the presence of two fermionic fields, leads to spontaneous CP violation when the boundary conditions are CP symmetric. Phenomenological consequences are illustrated by a calculation of the electric dipole moment for the fermionic zero modes.

  13. Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care: Voices in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Borgelt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Images of brain function, popularly called neuroimages, have become a mainstay of contemporary communication about neuroscience and mental health. Paralleling media coverage of neuroimaging research and the high visibility of clinics selling scans is pressure from sponsors to move basic research about brain function along the translational pathway. Indeed, neuroimaging benefit mental health care with early or tailored intervention, opportunities for education and planning, and access to resources afforded by objectification of disorder. However, risks of premature technology transfer, such as misinterpretation, misrepresentation, and increased stigmatization, could compromise patient care.Stakeholder views on neuroimaging for mental health care are a largely untapped resource of information and guidance for translational efforts. We argue that the insights of key stakeholders – researchers, healthcare providers, patients, and families - have an essential role to play upstream in professional, critical, and ethical discourse about neuroimaging in mental health. Here we integrate previously orthogonal lines of inquiry involving stakeholder research to describe the translational landscape as well as challenges on its horizon.

  14. Near-infrared neuroimaging with NinPy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Strangman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been substantial recent growth in the use of non-invasive optical brain imaging in studies of human brain function in health and disease. Near-infrared neuroimaging (NIN is one of the most promising of these techniques and, although NIN hardware continues to evolve at a rapid pace, software tools supporting optical data acquisition, image processing, statistical modeling and visualization remain less refined. Python, a modular and computationally efficient development language, can support functional neuroimaging studies of diverse design and implementation. In particular, Python's easily readable syntax and modular architecture allow swift prototyping followed by efficient transition to stable production systems. As an introduction to our ongoing efforts to develop Python software tools for structural and functional neuroimaging, we discuss: (i the role of noninvasive diffuse optical imaging in measuring brain function, (ii the key computational requirements to support NIN experiments, (iii our collection of software tools to support near-infrared neuroimaging, called NinPy, and (iv future extensions of these tools that will allow integration of optical with other structural and functional neuroimaging data sources. Source code for the software discussed here will be made available at www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/Neural_SystemsGroup/software.html.

  15. Optimising neuroimaging effectiveness in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, M O; Wade, C; McCarron, P

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in neurology frequently depends on clinical assessment and neuroimaging interpretation. We assessed neuroimaging discrepancy rates in reported findings between general radiologists and neuroradiologists among patients from a district general hospital (DGH). A neuroradiologist's report was sought on selected DGH patients over 28 months. Pre-planned outcomes included comparisons of primary findings (main diagnosis or abnormality), secondary findings (differential diagnoses and incidental findings) and advice from neuroradiologists for further investigations. A total of 233 patients (119 men and 114 women), mean age 47.2 (SD 17.8) years were studied: 43 had a computed tomography (CT) brain scan only, 37 had CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and 153 had only MRI scans. Discrepancies in the primary diagnosis/abnormality were identified in 33 patients (14.2%). This included 7 of 43 patients (16.3%) who had a CT brain scan as their only neuroimaging. Secondary outcomes differed in 50 patients (21.5%). Neuroradiologists recommended further neuroimaging for 29 patients (12.4%). The most common discrepancies in the primary diagnosis/abnormality were misinterpreting normal for hippocampal sclerosis and missed posterior fossa lesions. There was no evidence of temporal changes in discrepancy rates. Selecting CT and MR neuroimaging studies from general hospitals for reviewing by neuroradiologists is an important and effective way of optimising management of neurological patients.

  16. Neuroimaging of Parkinson’s Disease: Expanding views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P.; Sundman, Mark H.; Hickey, Patrick; Chen, Nankuei

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular and structural and functional neuroimaging are rapidly expanding the complexity of neurobiological understanding of Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review article begins with an introduction to PD neurobiology as a foundation for interpreting neuroimaging findings that may further lead to more integrated and comprehensive understanding of PD. Diverse areas of PD neuroimaging are then reviewed and summarized, including positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, transcranial sonography, magnetoencephalography, and multimodal imaging, with focus on human studies published over the last five years. These included studies on differential diagnosis, co-morbidity, genetic and prodromal PD, and treatments from L-DOPA to brain stimulation approaches, transplantation and gene therapies. Overall, neuroimaging has shown that PD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving many neurotransmitters, brain regions, structural and functional connections, and neurocognitive systems. A broad neurobiological understanding of PD will be essential for translational efforts to develop better treatments and preventive strategies. Many questions remain and we conclude with some suggestions for future directions of neuroimaging of PD. PMID:26409344

  17. Neuroimaging in Parkinson disease: from research setting to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Marios

    2014-12-01

    Over the past three decades, neuroimaging studies-including structural, functional and molecular modalities-have provided invaluable insights into the mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease (PD). Observations from multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical changes that affect receptor sites and neurotransmitter systems. Characterization of the neurobiological alterations that lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with PD has considerably aided the in vivo investigation of aetiology and pathophysiology, and the identification of novel targets for pharmacological or surgical treatments, including cell therapy. Although PD is now considered to be very complex, no neuroimaging modalities are specifically recommended for routine use in clinical practice. However, conventional MRI and dopamine transporter imaging are commonly used as adjuvant tools in the differential diagnosis between PD and nondegenerative causes of parkinsonism. First-line neuroimaging tools that could have an impact on patient prognosis and treatment strategies remain elusive. This Review discusses the lessons learnt from decades of neuroimaging research in PD, and the promising new approaches with potential applicability to clinical practice.

  18. On Statistical Analysis of Neuroimages with Imperfect Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Hwa; Ravi, Sathya N.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Singh, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies in neuroscience/neuroimaging seek to perform statistical inference on the acquired brain image scans for diagnosis as well as understanding the pathological manifestation of diseases. To do so, an important first step is to register (or co-register) all of the image data into a common coordinate system. This permits meaningful comparison of the intensities at each voxel across groups (e.g., diseased versus healthy) to evaluate the effects of the disease and/or use machine learning algorithms in a subsequent step. But errors in the underlying registration make this problematic, they either decrease the statistical power or make the follow-up inference tasks less effective/accurate. In this paper, we derive a novel algorithm which offers immunity to local errors in the underlying deformation field obtained from registration procedures. By deriving a deformation invariant representation of the image, the downstream analysis can be made more robust as if one had access to a (hypothetical) far superior registration procedure. Our algorithm is based on recent work on scattering transform. Using this as a starting point, we show how results from harmonic analysis (especially, non-Euclidean wavelets) yields strategies for designing deformation and additive noise invariant representations of large 3-D brain image volumes. We present a set of results on synthetic and real brain images where we achieve robust statistical analysis even in the presence of substantial deformation errors; here, standard analysis procedures significantly under-perform and fail to identify the true signal. PMID:27042168

  19. Machine Learning for Neuroimaging with Scikit-Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eAbraham

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical machine learning methods are increasingly used for neuroimaging data analysis. Their main virtue is their ability to model high-dimensional datasets, e.g. multivariate analysis of activation images or resting-state time series. Supervised learning is typically used in decoding or encoding settings to relate brain images to behavioral or clinical observations, while unsupervised learning can uncover hidden structures in sets of images (e.g. resting state functional MRI or find sub-populations in large cohorts. By considering different functional neuroimaging applications, we illustrate how scikit-learn, a Python machine learning library, can be used to perform some key analysis steps. Scikit-learn contains a very large set of statistical learning algorithms, both supervised and unsupervised, and its application to neuroimaging data provides a versatile tool to study the brain.

  20. Looking inside the brain the power of neuroimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-01-01

    It is now possible to witness human brain activity while we are talking, reading, or thinking, thanks to revolutionary neuroimaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These groundbreaking advances have opened infinite fields of investigation—into such areas as musical perception, brain development in utero, and faulty brain connections leading to psychiatric disorders—and have raised unprecedented ethical issues. In Looking Inside the Brain, one of the leading pioneers of the field, Denis Le Bihan, offers an engaging account of the sophisticated interdisciplinary research in physics, neuroscience, and medicine that have led to the remarkable neuroimaging methods that give us a detailed look into the human brain. Introducing neurological anatomy and physiology, Le Bihan walks readers through the historical evolution of imaging technology—from the x-ray and CT scan to the PET scan and MRI—and he explains how neuroimaging uncovers afflictions like stroke or cancer and the workings of high...

  1. Building better biomarkers: brain models in translational neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Chang, Luke J; Lindquist, Martin A; Wager, Tor D

    2017-02-23

    Despite its great promise, neuroimaging has yet to substantially impact clinical practice and public health. However, a developing synergy between emerging analysis techniques and data-sharing initiatives has the potential to transform the role of neuroimaging in clinical applications. We review the state of translational neuroimaging and outline an approach to developing brain signatures that can be shared, tested in multiple contexts and applied in clinical settings. The approach rests on three pillars: (i) the use of multivariate pattern-recognition techniques to develop brain signatures for clinical outcomes and relevant mental processes; (ii) assessment and optimization of their diagnostic value; and (iii) a program of broad exploration followed by increasingly rigorous assessment of generalizability across samples, research contexts and populations. Increasingly sophisticated models based on these principles will help to overcome some of the obstacles on the road from basic neuroscience to better health and will ultimately serve both basic and applied goals.

  2. Neuroethics, neuroimaging, and disorders of consciousness: promise or peril?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2011-01-01

    The advent of powerful neuroimaging tools such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has begun to redefine how we diagnose, define, and understand disorders of consciousness such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states. In my paper, I review how research using these methods is both elucidating these brain states and creating diagnostic dilemmas related to their classification as the specificity and sensitivity of traditional behavior-based assessments are weighed against sensitive but not yet fully validated neuroimaging data. I also consider how these methods are being studied as potential communication vectors for therapeutic use in subjects who heretofore have been thought to be unresponsive or minimally conscious. I conclude by considering the ethical challenges posed by novel diagnostic and therapeutic neuroimaging applications and contextualize these scientific developments against the broader needs of patients and families touched by severe brain injury.

  3. Machine learning for neuroimaging with scikit-learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alexandre; Pedregosa, Fabian; Eickenberg, Michael; Gervais, Philippe; Mueller, Andreas; Kossaifi, Jean; Gramfort, Alexandre; Thirion, Bertrand; Varoquaux, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods are increasingly used for neuroimaging data analysis. Their main virtue is their ability to model high-dimensional datasets, e.g., multivariate analysis of activation images or resting-state time series. Supervised learning is typically used in decoding or encoding settings to relate brain images to behavioral or clinical observations, while unsupervised learning can uncover hidden structures in sets of images (e.g., resting state functional MRI) or find sub-populations in large cohorts. By considering different functional neuroimaging applications, we illustrate how scikit-learn, a Python machine learning library, can be used to perform some key analysis steps. Scikit-learn contains a very large set of statistical learning algorithms, both supervised and unsupervised, and its application to neuroimaging data provides a versatile tool to study the brain.

  4. When Should Neuroimaging be Applied in the Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    When does neuroimaging constitute a sufficiently developed technology to be put into use in the work of determining whether or not a defendant is guilty of crime? This question constitutes the starting point of the present paper. First, it is suggested that an overall answer is provided by what...... is referred to as the “ideal comparative view.” Secondly, it is—on the ground of this view—argued that the answer as to whether neuroimaging technology should be applied presupposes penal theoretical considerations. Thirdly, it is argued that the retributivist theory of punishment is not well......-suited for delivering the sort of theoretical guidance that is required for assessing the desirability of using neuroimaging in the work of the criminal court....

  5. Ischemic Stroke Treatment Trials: Neuroimaging Advancements and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek P; Heit, Jeremy J

    2017-06-01

    There have been significant advancements in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the last 2 decades. Recent trials have placed a significant emphasis on minimizing the time from symptom onset to stroke treatment by reperfusion therapies, which decreases the cerebral infarct volume and improves clinical outcomes. These clinical advances have paralleled and been aided by advances in neuroimaging. However, controversy remains regarding how much time should be spent on neuroimaging evaluation versus expediting patient treatment. In this review article, we examine the key endovascular stroke trials published in the past 25 years, and we briefly highlight the failures and successes of endovascular stroke trials performed in the past 4 years. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using time from symptom onset versus neuroimaging in determining endovascular stroke therapy candidacy.

  6. Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging: Ethical and Medicolegal Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid advances in neurosciences in the last three decades, there has been an exponential increase in the use of neuroimaging both in basic sciences and clinical research involving human subjects. During routine neuroimaging, incidental findings that are not part of the protocol or scope of research agenda can occur and they often pose a challenge as to how they should be handled to abide by the medicolegal principles of research ethics. This paper reviews the issue from various ethical (do no harm, general duty to rescue, and mutual benefits and owing) and medicolegal perspectives (legal liability, fiduciary duties, Law of Tort, and Law of Contract) with a suggested protocol of approach.

  7. Neuroimaging and clinical neurophysiology in cluster headache and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Lars; Sandrini, Giorgio; Perrotta, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Clinical neurophysiology and neuroimaging are two non-invasive approaches used to investigate the pathophysiological basis of primary headaches, including cluster headache (CH) and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Modern neuroimaging has revolutionized our understanding...

  8. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Bradley R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques—such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy—allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development. PMID:23917850

  9. Neuroimaging of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Sterzer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of functional and structural neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Most functional neuroimaging studies have persued the hypothesis that pathological aggression is a consequence of deficits in the neural circuits involved in emotion processing. There is converging evidence for deficient neural responses to emotional stimuli in youths with a propensity towards aggressive behaviour. In addition, recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour is also associated with abnormalities in neural processes that subserve both the inhibitory control of behaviour and the flexible adaptation of behaviour in accord with reinforcement information. Structural neuroimaging studies in children and adolescents with conduct problems are still scarce, but point to deficits in brain structures in volved in the processing of social information and in the regulation of social and goal directed behaviour. The indisputable progress that this research field has made in recent years notwithstanding, the overall picture is still rather patchy and there are inconsistencies between studies that await clarification. Despite this, we attempt to provide an integrated view on the neural abnormalities that may contribute to various forms of juvenile aggression and violence, and discuss research strategies that may help to provide a more profound understanding of these important issues in the future.

  10. Memory Systems, Processing Modes, and Components: Functional Neuroimaging Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Roberto; Moscovitch, Morris

    2013-01-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a major theoretical debate in the memory domain regarding the multiple memory systems and processing modes frameworks. The components of processing framework argued for a middle ground: Instead of neatly divided memory systems or processing modes, this framework proposed the existence of numerous processing components that are recruited in different combinations by memory tasks and yield complex patterns of associations and dissociations. Because behavioral evidence was not sufficient to decide among these three frameworks, the debate was largely abandoned. However, functional neuroimaging evidence accumulated during the last two decades resolves the stalemate, because this evidence is more consistent with the components framework than with the other two frameworks. For example, functional neuroimaging evidence shows that brain regions attributed to one memory system can contribute to tasks associated with other memory systems and that brain regions attributed to the same processing mode (perceptual or conceptual) can be dissociated from each other. Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that memory processes are supported by transient interactions between a few regions called process-specific alliances. These conceptual developments are an example of how functional neuroimaging can contribute to theoretical debates in cognitive psychology. PMID:24163702

  11. Online Open Neuroimaging Mass Meta-Analysis with a Wiki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Arup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple comma-separated values format and a web service performs the numerical statistical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system...

  12. Neuroimaging Research with Children: Ethical Issues and Case Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Donna

    2007-01-01

    There are few available resources for learning and teaching about ethical issues in neuroimaging research with children, who constitute a special and vulnerable population. Here, a brief review of ethical issues in developmental research, situated within the emerging field of neuroethics, highlights the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of…

  13. Functional Neuroimaging of Appetite and Gut–Brain Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Ultimately, eating decisions are made in the brain, based on the integration
    of multiple neural and hormonal signals. Since the early 1990s the use of
    functional
    neuroimaging techniques has continued to increase. Their application
    in the study of the regulation of food intake and gut

  14. Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejareh dar, Maryam; Kanaan, Richard AA

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is a syndrome of neurological symptoms arising without organic cause, arguably in response to emotional stress, but the exact neural substrates of these symptoms and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood with the hunt for a biological basis afoot for centuries. In the past 15 years, novel insights have been gained with the advent of functional neuroimaging studies in patients suffering from CDs in both motor and nonmotor domains. This review summarizes recent functional neuroimaging studies including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) to see whether they bring us closer to understanding the etiology of CD. Convergent functional neuroimaging findings suggest alterations in brain circuits that could point to different mechanisms for manifesting functional neurological symptoms, in contrast with feigning or healthy controls. Abnormalities in emotion processing and in emotion-motor processing suggest a diathesis, while differential reactions to certain stressors implicate a specific response to trauma. No comprehensive theory emerges from these clues, and all results remain preliminary, but functional neuroimaging has at least given grounds for hope that a model for CD may soon be found. PMID:26834476

  15. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Bradley R; Welsh, Robert C; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques--such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy--allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development.

  16. Testing for difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a meta-analytic method that tests for the difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments. We use kernel density estimation in three-dimensional brain space to convert points representing focal brain activations into a voxel-based representation. We find the maximum...

  17. Update on neuroimaging phenotypes of mid-hindbrain malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice [University Hospital of Lille (CHRU), Department of Neuroradiology, MRI 3T Research, Plateforme Imagerie du vivant, IMPRT-IFR 114, Lille-Cedex (France); CHU Saint-Pierre, Radiology Department, Pediatric Neuroradiology Section, Brussels (Belgium); Severino, Mariasavina [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuroradiology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Nguema-Edzang, Beatrice; Toure, Cisse; Soto Ares, Gustavo [University Hospital of Lille (CHRU), Department of Neuroradiology, MRI 3T Research, Plateforme Imagerie du vivant, IMPRT-IFR 114, Lille-Cedex (France); Barkovich, Anthony James [University of California, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-10-23

    Neuroimaging techniques including structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional positron emission tomography (PET) are useful in categorizing various midbrain-hindbrain (MHB) malformations, both in allowing diagnosis and in helping to understand the developmental processes that were disturbed. Brain imaging phenotypes of numerous malformations are characteristic features that help in guiding the genetic testing in case of direct neuroimaging-genotype correlation or, at least, to differentiate among MHB malformations entities. The present review aims to provide the reader with an update of the use of neuroimaging applications in the fine analysis of MHB malformations, using a comprehensive, recently proposed developmental and genetic classification. We have performed an extensive systematic review of the literature, from the embryology main steps of MHB development through the malformations entities, with regard to their molecular and genetic basis, conventional MRI features, and other neuroimaging characteristics. We discuss disorders in which imaging features are distinctive and how these features reflect the structural and functional impairment of the brain. Recognition of specific MRI phenotypes, including advanced imaging features, is useful to recognize the MHB malformation entities, to suggest genetic investigations, and, eventually, to monitor the disease outcome after supportive therapies. (orig.)

  18. Visualization of Nonlinear Classification Models in Neuroimaging - Signed Sensitivity Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Schmah, Tanya; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2012-01-01

    Classification models are becoming increasing popular tools in the analysis of neuroimaging data sets. Besides obtaining good prediction accuracy, a competing goal is to interpret how the classifier works. From a neuroscientific perspective, we are interested in the brain pattern reflecting...

  19. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB.

  20. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: A survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers, whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neur...

  1. A review of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Shi, Shenxun

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent internationally, and constitute a substantial social and economic burden for patients, their families, and society. A number of neuroimaging studies have investigated the etiology of anxiety disorders in China in the last decade. We discuss the findings of these studies, and compare them with the results of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders outside China. A literature search was conducted using the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, the Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals Database, the Chinese Journal Full-text Database, and PubMed, from 1989 to April 2009. We selected neuroimaging studies in which all participants and researchers were Chinese. Twenty-five studies fit our inclusion criteria. Nine studies examined general anxiety disorder (GAD) and/or panic disorder (PD), eight examined obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and eight examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Our literature review revealed several general findings. First, reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was found in the frontal lobe and temporal lobe in patients with GAD and PD compared with healthy controls. Second, when viewing images with negative and positive valence, relatively increased or decreased activation was found in several brain areas in patients with GAD and PD, respectively. Third, studies with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging revealed that OCD patients exhibited hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in some brain regions compared with healthy controls. Neuroimaging studies of PTSD indicate that the hippocampal volume and the N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) level and the NAA/creatine ratio in the hippocampus are decreased in patients relative to controls. Neuroimaging studies within and outside China have provided evidence of specific neurobiological changes associated with anxiety disorders. However, results have not been entirely consistent across different studies

  2. The Neuro-Image: Alain Resnais's Digital Cinema without the Digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes to read cinema in the digital age as a new type of image, the neuroimage. Going back to Gilles Deleuze's cinema books and it is argued that the neuro-image is based in the future. The cinema of Alain Resnais is analyzed as a neuro-image and digital cinema .

  3. The Neuro-Image: Alain Resnais's Digital Cinema without the Digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes to read cinema in the digital age as a new type of image, the neuroimage. Going back to Gilles Deleuze's cinema books and it is argued that the neuro-image is based in the future. The cinema of Alain Resnais is analyzed as a neuro-image and digital cinema .

  4. Looking for Neuroimaging Markers in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Clinical Trials: A Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis Study in Granulin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Enrico; Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso; Diano, Matteo; Gazzina, Stefano; Gualeni, Vera; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Magoni, Mauro; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In light of future pharmacological interventions, neuroimaging markers able to assess the response to treatment would be crucial. In Granulin (GRN) disease, preclinical data will prompt pharmacological trials in the future. Two main points need to be assessed: (1) to identify target regions in different disease stages and (2) to determine the most accurate functional and structural neuroimaging index to be used. To this aim, we have taken advantage of the multivariate approach of multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to explore the information of brain activity patterns in a cohort of GRN Thr272fs carriers at different disease stages (14 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients and 17 asymptomatic carriers) and a group of 33 healthy controls. We studied structural changes by voxel-based morphometry (VBM), functional connectivity by assessing salience, default mode, fronto-parietal, dorsal attentional, executive networks, and local connectivity by regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF), fractional ALFF (fALFF), degree centrality, and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity. In FTD patients with GRN mutation, the most predictive measure was VBM structural analysis, while in asymptomatic carriers the best predictor marker was the local connectivity measure (fALFF). Altogether, all indexes demonstrated fronto-temporo-parietal damage in GRN pathology, with widespread structural damage of fronto-parietal and temporal regions when disease is overt. MVPA could be of aid in identifying the most accurate neuroimaging marker for clinical trials. This approach was able to identify both the target region and the best neuroimaging approach, which would be specific in the different disease stages. Further studies are needed to simultaneously integrate multimodal indexes in a classifier able to trace the disease progression moving from preclinical to clinical stage of the disease.

  5. CBRAIN: a web-based, distributed computing platform for collaborative neuroimaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Tarek; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Kassis, Nicolas; Beck, Natacha; Adalat, Reza; Das, Samir; Glatard, Tristan; Evans, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    The Canadian Brain Imaging Research Platform (CBRAIN) is a web-based collaborative research platform developed in response to the challenges raised by data-heavy, compute-intensive neuroimaging research. CBRAIN offers transparent access to remote data sources, distributed computing sites, and an array of processing and visualization tools within a controlled, secure environment. Its web interface is accessible through any modern browser and uses graphical interface idioms to reduce the technical expertise required to perform large-scale computational analyses. CBRAIN's flexible meta-scheduling has allowed the incorporation of a wide range of heterogeneous computing sites, currently including nine national research High Performance Computing (HPC) centers in Canada, one in Korea, one in Germany, and several local research servers. CBRAIN leverages remote computing cycles and facilitates resource-interoperability in a transparent manner for the end-user. Compared with typical grid solutions available, our architecture was designed to be easily extendable and deployed on existing remote computing sites with no tool modification, administrative intervention, or special software/hardware configuration. As October 2013, CBRAIN serves over 200 users spread across 53 cities in 17 countries. The platform is built as a generic framework that can accept data and analysis tools from any discipline. However, its current focus is primarily on neuroimaging research and studies of neurological diseases such as Autism, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Multiple Sclerosis as well as on normal brain structure and development. This technical report presents the CBRAIN Platform, its current deployment and usage and future direction.

  6. Communication and the primate brain: insights from neuroimaging studies in humans, chimpanzees and macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Petkov, Christopher I

    2011-04-01

    Considerable knowledge is available on the neural substrates for speech and language from brain-imaging studies in humans, but until recently there was a lack of data for comparison from other animal species on the evolutionarily conserved brain regions that process species-specific communication signals. To obtain new insights into the relationship of the substrates for communication in primates, we compared the results from several neuroimaging studies in humans with those that have recently been obtained from macaque monkeys and chimpanzees. The recent work in humans challenges the longstanding notion of highly localized speech areas. As a result, the brain regions that have been identified in humans for speech and nonlinguistic voice processing show a striking general correspondence to how the brains of other primates analyze species-specific vocalizations or information in the voice, such as voice identity. The comparative neuroimaging work has begun to clarify evolutionary relationships in brain function, supporting the notion that the brain regions that process communication signals in the human brain arose from a precursor network of regions that is present in nonhuman primates and is used for processing species-specific vocalizations. We conclude by considering how the stage now seems to be set for comparative neurobiology to characterize the ancestral state of the network that evolved in humans to support language.

  7. Neuroimaging Biomarkers Predict Brain Structural Connectivity Change in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Füchtemeier, Martina; Foddis, Marco; Mueller, Susanne; Trueman, Rebecca C.; Zille, Marietta; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Kypraios, Theodore; Shaw, Laurence; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Chronic hypoperfusion in the mouse brain has been suggested to mimic aspects of vascular cognitive impairment, such as white matter damage. Although this model has attracted attention, our group has struggled to generate a reliable cognitive and pathological phenotype. This study aimed to identify neuroimaging biomarkers of brain pathology in aged, more severely hypoperfused mice. Methods— We used magnetic resonance imaging to characterize brain degeneration in mice hypoperfused by refining the surgical procedure to use the smallest reported diameter microcoils (160 μm). Results— Acute cerebral blood flow decreases were observed in the hypoperfused group that recovered over 1 month and coincided with arterial remodeling. Increasing hypoperfusion resulted in a reduction in spatial learning abilities in the water maze that has not been previously reported. We were unable to observe severe white matter damage with histology, but a novel approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging data, graph theory, revealed substantial reorganization of the hypoperfused brain network. A logistic regression model from the data revealed that 3 network parameters were particularly efficient at predicting group membership (global and local efficiency and degrees), and clustering coefficient was correlated with performance in the water maze. Conclusions— Overall, these findings suggest that, despite the autoregulatory abilities of the mouse brain to compensate for a sudden decrease in blood flow, there is evidence of change in the brain networks that can be used as neuroimaging biomarkers to predict outcome. PMID:28070001

  8. Neuroimaging Biomarkers Predict Brain Structural Connectivity Change in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Füchtemeier, Martina; Foddis, Marco; Mueller, Susanne; Trueman, Rebecca C; Zille, Marietta; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Kypraios, Theodore; Shaw, Laurence; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Farr, Tracy D

    2017-02-01

    Chronic hypoperfusion in the mouse brain has been suggested to mimic aspects of vascular cognitive impairment, such as white matter damage. Although this model has attracted attention, our group has struggled to generate a reliable cognitive and pathological phenotype. This study aimed to identify neuroimaging biomarkers of brain pathology in aged, more severely hypoperfused mice. We used magnetic resonance imaging to characterize brain degeneration in mice hypoperfused by refining the surgical procedure to use the smallest reported diameter microcoils (160 μm). Acute cerebral blood flow decreases were observed in the hypoperfused group that recovered over 1 month and coincided with arterial remodeling. Increasing hypoperfusion resulted in a reduction in spatial learning abilities in the water maze that has not been previously reported. We were unable to observe severe white matter damage with histology, but a novel approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging data, graph theory, revealed substantial reorganization of the hypoperfused brain network. A logistic regression model from the data revealed that 3 network parameters were particularly efficient at predicting group membership (global and local efficiency and degrees), and clustering coefficient was correlated with performance in the water maze. Overall, these findings suggest that, despite the autoregulatory abilities of the mouse brain to compensate for a sudden decrease in blood flow, there is evidence of change in the brain networks that can be used as neuroimaging biomarkers to predict outcome. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Clinical functional MRI. Presurgical functional neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, C. (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2007-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) permits noninvasive imaging of the ''human brain at work'' under physiological conditions. This is the first textbook on clinical fMRI. It is devoted to preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies, which are the most well-established clinical applications. By localizing and lateralizing specific brain functions, as well as epileptogenic zones, fMRI facilitates the selection of a safe treatment and the planning and performance of function-preserving neurosurgery. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of the physiological and methodological background, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, diagnostic possibilities and limitations, and other related techniques. All chapters are written by recognized experts in their fields, and the book is designed to be of value to beginners, trained clinicians and experts alike. (orig.)

  10. A review of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jing Chen, Shenxun ShiDepartment of Psychiatry, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaBackground: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent internationally, and constitute a substantial social and economic burden for patients, their families, and society. A number of neuroimaging studies have investigated the etiology of anxiety disorders in China in the last decade. We discuss the findings of these studies, and compare them with the results of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders outside China.Method: A literature search was conducted using the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, the Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals Database, the Chinese Journal Full-text Database, and PubMed, from 1989 to April 2009. We selected neuroimaging studies in which all participants and researchers were Chinese.Results: Twenty-five studies fit our inclusion criteria. Nine studies examined general anxiety disorder (GAD and/or panic disorder (PD, eight examined obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and eight examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Our literature review revealed several general findings. First, reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF was found in the frontal lobe and temporal lobe in patients with GAD and PD compared with healthy controls. Second, when viewing images with negative and positive valence, relatively increased or decreased activation was found in several brain areas in patients with GAD and PD, respectively. Third, studies with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS imaging revealed that OCD patients exhibited hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in some brain regions compared with healthy controls. Neuroimaging studies of PTSD indicate that the hippocampal volume and the N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA level and the NAA/creatine ratio in the hippocampus are decreased in patients relative to controls.Conclusion: Neuroimaging studies within and outside China have provided

  11. Neuroimaging schizophrenia: a picture is worth a thousand words, but is it saying anything important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Anthony O; Buckley, Peter F; Hanna, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by neurostructural and neurofunctional aberrations that have now been demonstrated through neuroimaging research. The article reviews recent studies that have attempted to use neuroimaging to understand the relation between neurological abnormalities and aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia. Neuroimaging studies show that neurostructural and neurofunctional abnormalities are present in people with schizophrenia and their close relatives and may represent putative endophenotypes. Neuroimaging phenotypes predict the emergence of psychosis in individuals classified as high-risk. Neuroimaging studies have linked structural and functional abnormalities to symptoms; and progressive structural changes to clinical course and functional outcome. Neuroimaging has successfully indexed the neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects of schizophrenia treatments. Pictures can inform about aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia including etiology, onset, symptoms, clinical course, and treatment effects but this assertion is tempered by the scientific and practical limitations of neuroimaging.

  12. Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging: Ethical and Medicolegal Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid advances in neurosciences in the last three decades, there has been an exponential increase in the use of neuroimaging both in basic sciences and clinical research involving human subjects. During routine neuroimaging, incidental findings that are not part of the protocol or scope of research agenda can occur and they often pose a challenge as to how they should be handled to abide by the medicolegal principles of research ethics. This paper reviews the issue from various ethical (do no harm, general duty to rescue, and mutual benefits and owing and medicolegal perspectives (legal liability, fiduciary duties, Law of Tort, and Law of Contract with a suggested protocol of approach.

  13. Pain perception and hypnosis: findings from recent functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Caltagirone, Saverio Simone; Savoja, Valeria; Piacentino, Daria; Callovini, Gemma; Manfredi, Giovanni; Sani, Gabriele; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hypnosis modulates pain perception and tolerance by affecting cortical and subcortical activity in brain regions involved in these processes. By reviewing functional neuroimaging studies focusing on pain perception under hypnosis, the authors aimed to identify brain activation-deactivation patterns occurring in hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Different changes in brain functionality occurred throughout all components of the pain network and other brain areas. The anterior cingulate cortex appears to be central in modulating pain circuitry activity under hypnosis. Most studies also showed that the neural functions of the prefrontal, insular, and somatosensory cortices are consistently modified during hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies support the clinical use of hypnosis in the management of pain conditions.

  14. SchizConnect: Virtual Data Integration in Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambite, Jose Luis; Tallis, Marcelo; Alpert, Kathryn; Keator, David B.; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Konstantinidis, George; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Turner, Jessica A.; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific domains, including neuroimaging studies, there is a need to obtain increasingly larger cohorts to achieve the desired statistical power for discovery. However, the economics of imaging studies make it unlikely that any single study or consortia can achieve the desired sample sizes. What is needed is an architecture that can easily incorporate additional studies as they become available. We present such architecture based on a virtual data integration approach, where data remains at the original sources, and is retrieved and harmonized in response to user queries. This is in contrast to approaches that move the data to a central warehouse. We implemented our approach in the SchizConnect system that integrates data from three neuroimaging consortia on Schizophrenia: FBIRN's Human Imaging Database (HID), MRN's Collaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics System (COINS), and the NUSDAST project at XNAT Central. A portal providing harmonized access to these sources is publicly deployed at schizconnect.org. PMID:26688837

  15. Post-stroke cognitive dysfunctions: A clinical and neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Yuryevich Emelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging examinations were made in 65 patients (52 men and 13 women aged 65.6±10.1 years who had experienced ischemic stroke. Cognitive impairments (CI were heterogeneous; regulatory functions, attention, and counting were most significantly affected in moderate CI. In mild dementia, mainly poor attention and regulatory dysfunctions were added by clearly-cut impairments of memory, orientation, and visual-spatial function. Brain atrophy, white matter changes, and small focal gray matter damages along with focal post-stroke changes were revealed by neuroimaging in most patients. It was found that besides the volume and location of a damage focus, the signs of impaired integrated mental activity of the brain, regulatory dysfunctions in particular, should be a necessary condition for the verification of post-stroke CI.

  16. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI.

  17. Harnessing graphics processing units for improved neuroimaging statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Villani, Mattias; Laconte, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Simple models and algorithms based on restrictive assumptions are often used in the field of neuroimaging for studies involving functional magnetic resonance imaging, voxel based morphometry, and diffusion tensor imaging. Nonparametric statistical methods or flexible Bayesian models can be applied rather easily to yield more trustworthy results. The spatial normalization step required for multisubject studies can also be improved by taking advantage of more robust algorithms for image registration. A common drawback of algorithms based on weaker assumptions, however, is the increase in computational complexity. In this short overview, we will therefore present some examples of how inexpensive PC graphics hardware, normally used for demanding computer games, can be used to enable practical use of more realistic models and accurate algorithms, such that the outcome of neuroimaging studies really can be trusted.

  18. Understanding the impact of TV commercials: electrical neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Kong, Wanzeng; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wei, Daming

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a greater interest in the marketing world in using neuroimaging tools to evaluate the efficacy of TV commercials. This field of research is known as neuromarketing. In this article, we illustrate some applications of electrical neuroimaging, a discipline that uses electroencephalography (EEG) and intensive signal processing techniques for the evaluation of marketing stimuli. We also show how the proper usage of these methodologies can provide information related to memorization and attention while people are watching marketing-relevant stimuli. We note that temporal and frequency patterns of EEG signals are able to provide possible descriptors that convey information about the cognitive process in subjects observing commercial advertisements (ads). Such information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. Evidence of this research shows how EEG methodologies could be employed to better design new products that marketers are going to promote and to analyze the global impact of video commercials already broadcast on TV.

  19. Multiple comparison procedures for neuroimaging genomewide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wen-Yu; Nichols, Thomas E; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Recent research in neuroimaging has focused on assessing associations between genetic variants that are measured on a genomewide scale and brain imaging phenotypes. A large number of works in the area apply massively univariate analyses on a genomewide basis to find single nucleotide polymorphisms that influence brain structure. In this paper, we propose using various dimensionality reduction methods on both brain structural MRI scans and genomic data, motivated by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. We also consider a new multiple testing adjustment method and compare it with two existing false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment methods. The simulation results suggest an increase in power for the proposed method. The real-data analysis suggests that the proposed procedure is able to find associations between genetic variants and brain volume differences that offer potentially new biological insights. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypot...

  1. Partial Least Squares tutorial for analyzing neuroimaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Van Roon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial least squares (PLS has become a respected and meaningful soft modeling analysis technique that can be applied to very large datasets where the number of factors or variables is greater than the number of observations. Current biometric studies (e.g., eye movements, EKG, body movements, EEG are often of this nature. PLS eliminates the multiple linear regression issues of over-fitting data by finding a few underlying or latent variables (factors that account for most of the variation in the data. In real-world applications, where linear models do not always apply, PLS can model the non-linear relationship well. This tutorial introduces two PLS methods, PLS Correlation (PLSC and PLS Regression (PLSR and their applications in data analysis which are illustrated with neuroimaging examples. Both methods provide straightforward and comprehensible techniques for determining and modeling relationships between two multivariate data blocks by finding latent variables that best describes the relationships. In the examples, the PLSC will analyze the relationship between neuroimaging data such as Event-Related Potential (ERP amplitude averages from different locations on the scalp with their corresponding behavioural data. Using the same data, the PLSR will be used to model the relationship between neuroimaging and behavioural data. This model will be able to predict future behaviour solely from available neuroimaging data. To find latent variables, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD for PLSC and Non-linear Iterative PArtial Least Squares (NIPALS for PLSR are implemented in this tutorial. SVD decomposes the large data block into three manageable matrices containing a diagonal set of singular values, as well as left and right singular vectors. For PLSR, NIPALS algorithms are used because it provides amore precise estimation of the latent variables. Mathematica notebooks are provided for each PLS method with clearly labeled sections and subsections. The

  2. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis for Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD, is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed 9 types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging.

  3. Human functional neuroimaging of brain changes associated with practice

    OpenAIRE

    GARAVAN, HUGH PATRICK

    2005-01-01

    PUBLISHED The discovery that experience-driven changes in the human brain can occur from a neural to a cortical level throughout the lifespan has stimulated a proliferation of research into how neural function changes in response to experience, enabled by neuroimaging methods such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Studies attempt to characterize these changes by examining how practice on a task affects the functional anatomy underlying performance. ...

  4. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    OpenAIRE

    BOKDE, ARUN

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypot...

  5. Human fear conditioning and extinction in neuroimaging: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sehlmeyer

    Full Text Available Fear conditioning and extinction are basic forms of associative learning that have gained considerable clinical relevance in enhancing our understanding of anxiety disorders and facilitating their treatment. Modern neuroimaging techniques have significantly aided the identification of anatomical structures and networks involved in fear conditioning. On closer inspection, there is considerable variation in methodology and results between studies. This systematic review provides an overview of the current neuroimaging literature on fear conditioning and extinction on healthy subjects, taking into account methodological issues such as the conditioning paradigm. A Pubmed search, as of December 2008, was performed and supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key articles. Two independent reviewers made the final study selection and data extraction. A total of 46 studies on cued fear conditioning and/or extinction on healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed. The influence of specific experimental factors, such as contingency and timing parameters, assessment of conditioned responses, and characteristics of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, on cerebral activation patterns was examined. Results were summarized descriptively. A network consisting of fear-related brain areas, such as amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex, is activated independently of design parameters. However, some neuroimaging studies do not report these findings in the presence of methodological heterogeneities. Furthermore, other brain areas are differentially activated, depending on specific design parameters. These include stronger hippocampal activation in trace conditioning and tactile stimulation. Furthermore, tactile unconditioned stimuli enhance activation of pain related, motor, and somatosensory areas. Differences concerning experimental factors may partly explain the variance

  6. Neuroimaging of Psychopathy and Antisocial Behavior: A Targeted Review

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide a selective and targeted review of the neuroimaging literature on psychopathic tendencies and antisocial behavior and to explore the extent to which this literature supports recent cognitive neuroscientific models of psychopathy and antisocial behavior. The literature reveals that individuals who present with an increased risk for reactive, but not instrumental, aggression show increased amygdala responses to emotionally evocative stimuli. This is consis...

  7. Neuroimaging of Cerebrovascular Disease in the Aging Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ajay; Nair, Sreejit; Andrew D Schweitzer; Kishore, Sirish; Johnson, Carl E.; Comunale, Joseph P.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease remains a significant public health burden with its greatest impact on the elderly population. Advances in neuroimaging techniques allow detailed and sophisticated evaluation of many manifestations of cerebrovascular disease in the brain parenchyma as well as in the intracranial and extracranial vasculature. These tools continue to contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial processes that occur in the age-dependent development of cerebrovascular disease. Str...

  8. Neuroimaging essentials in essential tremor: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Sarvi; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Essential tremor is regarded to be a disease of the central nervous system. Neuroimaging is a rapidly growing field with potential benefits to both diagnostics and research. The exact role of imaging techniques with respect to essential tremor in research and clinical practice is not clear. A systematic review of the different imaging techniques in essential tremor is lacking in the literature. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms essential tremor and familial tremor with the following keywords: imaging, mri, vbm, dwi, fmri, pet and spect, both in abbreviated form as well as in full form. We summarize and discuss the quality and the external validity of each study and place the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of essential tremor. A total of 48 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 29 functional and metabolic studies. The quality of the studies varied, especially concerning inclusion criteria. Functional imaging studies indicated cerebellar hyperactivity during rest and during tremor. The studies also pointed to the involvement of the thalamus, the inferior olive and the red nucleus. Structural studies showed less consistent results. Neuroimaging techniques in essential tremor give insight into the pathophysiology of essential tremor indicating the involvement of the cerebellum as the most consistent finding. GABAergic dysfunction might be a major premise in the pathophysiological hypotheses. Inconsistencies between studies can be partly explained by the inclusion of heterogeneous patient groups. Improvement of scientific research requires more stringent inclusion criteria and application of advanced analysis techniques. Also, the use of multimodal neuroimaging techniques is a promising development in movement disorders research. Currently, the role of imaging techniques in essential tremor in daily clinical practice is limited.

  9. Shift Invariant Multi-linear Decomposition of Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Arnfred, Sidse M.

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithm for multilinear decomposition that allows for arbitrary shifts along one modality. The method is applied to neural activity arranged in the three modalities space, time, and trial. Thus, the algorithm models neural activity as a linear superposition of components with a fi...... in data derived from neural activity--a problem that has caused degenerate solutions especially in modeling neuroimaging data with instantaneous multilinear decompositions. Our algorithm is available for download at www.erpwavelab.org....

  10. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Virgile; Da Mota, Benoit; Loth, Eva; Varoquaux, Gaël; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Brühl, Rüdiger; Butzek, Brigitte; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Lemaitre, Hervé; Mann, Karl; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Schad, Daniel J; Schümann, Gunter; Frouin, Vincent; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Thirion, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypotheses and call for more refined models for statistical inference. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of robust regression as a tool for analyzing large neuroimaging cohorts. First, we use an analytic test based on robust parameter estimates; based on simulations, this procedure is shown to provide an accurate statistical control without resorting to permutations. Second, we show that robust regression yields more detections than standard algorithms using as an example an imaging genetics study with 392 subjects. Third, we show that robust regression can avoid false positives in a large-scale analysis of brain-behavior relationships with over 1500 subjects. Finally we embed robust regression in the Randomized Parcellation Based Inference (RPBI) method and demonstrate that this combination further improves the sensitivity of tests carried out across the whole brain. Altogether, our results show that robust procedures provide important advantages in large-scale neuroimaging group studies.

  11. Research updates in neuroimaging studies of children who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun

    2014-05-01

    In the past two decades, neuroimaging investigations of stuttering have led to important discoveries of structural and functional brain differences in people who stutter, providing significant clues to the neurological basis of stuttering. One major limitation, however, has been that most studies so far have only examined adults who stutter, whose brain and behavior likely would have adopted compensatory reactions to their stuttering; these confounding factors have made interpretations of the findings difficult. Developmental stuttering is a neurodevelopmental condition, and like many other neurodevelopmental disorders, stuttering is associated with an early childhood onset of symptoms and greater incidence in males relative to females. More recent studies have begun to examine children who stutter using various neuroimaging techniques that allow examination of functional neuroanatomy and interaction of major brain areas that differentiate children who stutter compared with age-matched controls. In this article, I review these more recent neuroimaging investigations of children who stutter, in the context of what we know about typical brain development, neuroplasticity, and sex differences relevant to speech and language development. Although the picture is still far from complete, these studies have potential to provide information that can be used as early objective markers, or prognostic indicators, for persistent stuttering in the future. Furthermore, these studies are the first steps in finding potential neural targets for novel therapies that may involve modulating neuroplastic growth conducive to developing and maintaining fluent speech, which can be applied to treatment of young children who stutter.

  12. The neuroimaging research process from the participants' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Richard; Peel, Elizabeth; Shaw, Rachel L; Senior, Carl

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate participants' experiences of taking part in research conducted using fMRI or MEG procedures. Forty-four participants completed a questionnaire after taking part in either fMRI or MEG experiments; the questionnaire asked about experiences of and attitudes toward fMRI/MEG. Ten follow-up interviews were conducted to enable an in-depth analysis of these attitudes and experiences. The findings were generally positive: all participants thought fMRI and MEG were safe procedures, 93% would recommend participating in neuroimaging research to their friends and family, and participants were positive about participating in future neuroimaging research. However, some negative issues were identified. Some participants reported feeling nervous prior to scanning procedures, several participants reported side-effects after taking part, a number of participants were upset at being in a confined space and some participants did not feel confident about exiting the scanner in an emergency. Several recommendations for researchers are made, including a virtual tour of the scanning equipment during the consenting process in order to better prepare potential participants for the scanning experience and to minimize the potential psychological discomfort sometimes experienced in neuroimaging research.

  13. Meta-analytic methods for neuroimaging data explained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radua Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of neuroimaging studies has grown exponentially in recent years and their results are not always consistent. Meta-analyses are helpful to summarize this vast literature and also offer insights that are not apparent from the individual studies. In this review, we describe the main methods used for meta-analyzing neuroimaging data, with special emphasis on their relative advantages and disadvantages. We describe and discuss meta-analytical methods for global brain volumes, methods based on regions of interest, label-based reviews, voxel-based meta-analytic methods and online databases. Regions of interest-based methods allow for optimal statistical analyses but are affected by a limited and potentially biased inclusion of brain regions, whilst voxel-based methods benefit from a more exhaustive and unbiased inclusion of studies but are statistically more limited. There are also relevant differences between the different available voxel-based meta-analytic methods, and the field is rapidly evolving to develop more accurate and robust methods. We suggest that in any meta-analysis of neuroimaging data, authors should aim to: only include studies exploring the whole brain; ensure that the same threshold throughout the whole brain is used within each included study; and explore the robustness of the findings via complementary analyses to minimize the risk of false positives.

  14. Multimodal functional neuroimaging: integrating functional MRI and EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging.

  15. Abnormal Neuroimaging in a Case of Infant Botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ryan J; Messacar, Kevin; Stence, Nicholas V; Press, Craig A; Carpenter, Todd C

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of abnormal neuroimaging in a case of infant botulism. The clinical findings of the patient with constipation, bulbar weakness, and descending, symmetric motor weakness are consistent with the classic findings of infant botulism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, revealed restricted diffusion in the brain and enhancement of the cervical nerve roots. Traditionally, normal neuroimaging was used to help differentiate infant botulism from other causes of weakness in infants. Abnormal neuroimaging is seen in other causes of weakness in an infant including metabolic disorders and hypoxic-ischemic injury, but these diagnoses did not fit the clinical findings in this case. The explanation for the MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots is unclear as botulinum toxin acts at presynaptic nerve terminals and does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Possible explanations for the findings include inflammation from the botulinum toxin at the synapse, alterations in sensory signaling and retrograde transport of the botulinum toxin. The patient was treated with human botulism immune globulin and had rapid recovery in weakness. A stool sample from the patient was positive for Type A Clostridium botulinum toxin eventually confirming the diagnosis of infant botulism. The findings in this case support use of human botulism immune globulin when the clinical findings are consistent with infant botulism despite the presence of MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots.

  16. Neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction An 8-year bibliometric analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Du; Xiaoxia Yang; Hong Song; Bo Chen; Lin Li; Yue Pan; Qiong Wu; Jia Li

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To identify global research trends in neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science.DATA RETRIEVAL:We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrieval for neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction containing the key words "CT,magnetic resonance imaging,MRI,transcranial Doppler,transvaginal color Doppler,digital subtraction angiography,and cerebral infarction" using the Web of Science.SELECTION CRITERIA:Inclusion criteria were:(a) peer-reviewed articles on neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) original research articles and reviews; and (c) publication between 2004-2011.Exclusion criteria were:(a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; and (b) corrected papers or book chapters.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:(1)Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country;(3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction.RESULTS:Imaging has become the predominant method used in diagnosing cerebral infarction.The most frequently used clinical imaging methods were digital subtraction angiography,CT,MRI,and transcranial color Doppler examination.Digital subtraction angiography is used as the gold standard.However,it is a costly and time-consuming invasive diagnosis that requires some radiation exposure,and is poorly accepted by patients.As such,it is mostly adopted in interventional therapy in the clinic.CT is now accepted as a rapid,simple,and reliable non-invasive method for use in diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease and preoperative appraisal.Ultrasonic Doppler can be used to reflect the hardness of the vascular wall and the nature of the plaque more clearly than CT and MRI.CONCLUSION:At present,there is no unified standard of classification of cerebral infarction

  17. Investigating Human Neurovascular Coupling Using Functional Neuroimaging: A Critical Review of Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, Clément; Benali, Habib; Chabriat, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC). They are possibly impaired at early stages of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in humans has been made possible with the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. After a brief review of the current knowledge about possible mechanisms acting in NVC we selected seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature. All these models were described using the same procedure. We compared their physiological assumptions, mathematical formalism, and validation. In particular, we pointed out their strong differences in terms of complexity. Finally, we discussed their validity and their potential applications. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology.

  18. Investigating human neurovascular coupling using functional neuroimaging: a critical review of dynamic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eHuneau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC. They are possibly impaired at early stage of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in human has been made possible since the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. We reviewed the seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature and described their physiological assumption, mathematical formalism and validation. All models were described regarding a constant schematic formalism. Differences between them, particularly regarding their complexity, and hence, their potential use were finally evaluated. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology.

  19. Perception of affective and linguistic prosody: an ALE meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyk, Michel; Brown, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Prosody refers to the melodic and rhythmic aspects of speech. Two forms of prosody are typically distinguished: 'affective prosody' refers to the expression of emotion in speech, whereas 'linguistic prosody' relates to the intonation of sentences, including the specification of focus within sentences and stress within polysyllabic words. While these two processes are united by their use of vocal pitch modulation, they are functionally distinct. In order to examine the localization and lateralization of speech prosody in the brain, we performed two voxel-based meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of the perception of affective and linguistic prosody. There was substantial sharing of brain activations between analyses, particularly in right-hemisphere auditory areas. However, a major point of divergence was observed in the inferior frontal gyrus: affective prosody was more likely to activate Brodmann area 47, while linguistic prosody was more likely to activate the ventral part of area 44.

  20. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy – Report from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju AGGARWAL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Aggarwal A, Mittal H, Debnath SKR, Rai A. Neuroimaging in Cerebral Palsy–Report from North India. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(3:41- 46. ObjectiveOnly few Indian reports exist on neuroimaging abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy (CP from India. Materials & MethodsWe studied the clinico-radiological profile of 98 children diagnosed as CP at a tertiary centre in North India. Relevant investigations were carried out to determine the etiology. ResultsAmong the 98 children studied, 80.5% were males and 22.2% were premature. History of birth asphyxia was present in 41.9%. Quadriplegic CP was seen in 77.5%, hemiplegic in 11.5%, and diplegic in 10.5%. Other abnormalities were microcephaly (60.5%, epilepsy (42%, visual abnormality (37%, and hearing abnormality (20%. Neuroimaging was abnormal in 94/98 (95.91%.Abnormalities were periventricular white matter abnormalities (34%, deep grey matter abnormalities (47.8%, malformations (11.7%, and miscellaneous lesions (6.4%. Neuroimaging findings did not relate to the presence of birth asphyxia, sex, epilepsy, gestation, type of CP, or microcephaly. ConclusionsNeuroimaging is helpful for etiological diagnosis, especially malformations.  ReferencesSinghi PD, Ray M, Suri G. Clinical spectrum of cerebral palsy in north India-an analysis of 1000 cases. J Trop Pediatr 2002 48(3; 162-6.Sharma P, Sharma U, Kabra A. Cerebral Palsy-Clinical Profile and Predisposing Factors. Indian Pediatr 1999;36(10:1038-42.Nelson KB, Ellenberg JH. Antecedents of cerebral palsy. Multivariate analysis of risk. N Engl J Med 1986 315(2:81-6.Krägeloh-Mann I, Horber V. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy: a systematic review. Dev Med Child Neurol 2007; 49(2:144-51.Rosenbaum P, Paneth N, Leviton A, Goldstein M, Bax M, Damiano D, et al. A report: the definition and classification of cerebral palsy April 2006. Dev Med Child Neurol Suppl 2007

  1. Data sharing and publishing in the field of neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breeze Janis L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is growing recognition of the importance of data sharing in the neurosciences, and in particular in the field of neuroimaging research, in order to best make use of the volumes of human subject data that have been acquired to date. However, a number of barriers, both practical and cultural, continue to impede the widespread practice of data sharing; these include: lack of standard infrastructure and tools for data sharing, uncertainty about how to organize and prepare the data for sharing, and researchers’ fears about unattributed data use or missed opportunities for publication. A further challenge is how the scientific community should best describe and/or reference shared data that is used in secondary analyses. Finally, issues of human research subject protections and the ethical use of such data are an ongoing source of concern for neuroimaging researchers. One crucial issue is how producers of shared data can and should be acknowledged and how this important component of science will benefit individuals in their academic careers. While we encourage the field to make use of these opportunities for data publishing, it is critical that standards for metadata, provenance, and other descriptors are used. This commentary outlines the efforts of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing to coordinate and establish such standards, as well as potential ways forward to relieve the issues that researchers who produce these massive, reusable community resources face when making the data rapidly and freely available to the public. Both the technical and human aspects of data sharing must be addressed if we are to go forward.

  2. High-Throughput Neuroimaging-Genetics Computational Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo D Dinov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical and phenotypic data and meta-data. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI at University of Southern California (USC. INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize diverse suites of software tools and web-services. These pipeline workflows are represented as portable XML objects which transfer the execution instructions and user specifications from the client user machine to remote pipeline servers for distributed computing. Using Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s data, we provide several examples of translational applications using this infrastructure.

  3. The RUMBA software: tools for neuroimaging data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Benjamin Martin; Rebbechi, Donovan; Hanson, Stephen Jose; Grasso, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    The enormous scale and complexity of data sets in functional neuroimaging makes it crucial to have well-designed and flexible software for image processing, modeling, and statistical analysis. At present, researchers must choose between general purpose scientific computing environments (e.g., Splus and Matlab), and specialized human brain mapping packages that implement particular analysis strategies (e.g., AFNI, SPM, VoxBo, FSL or FIASCO). For the vast majority of users in Human Brain Mapping and Cognitive Neuroscience, general purpose computing environments provide an insufficient framework for a complex data-analysis regime. On the other hand, the operational particulars of more specialized neuroimaging analysis packages are difficult or impossible to modify and provide little transparency or flexibility to the user for approaches other than massively multiple comparisons based on inferential statistics derived from linear models. In order to address these problems, we have developed open-source software that allows a wide array of data analysis procedures. The RUMBA software includes programming tools that simplify the development of novel methods, and accommodates data in several standard image formats. A scripting interface, along with programming libraries, defines a number of useful analytic procedures, and provides an interface to data analysis procedures. The software also supports a graphical functional programming environment for implementing data analysis streams based on modular functional components. With these features, the RUMBA software provides researchers programmability, reusability, modular analysis tools, novel data analysis streams, and an analysis environment in which multiple approaches can be contrasted and compared. The RUMBA software retains the flexibility of general scientific computing environments while adding a framework in which both experts and novices can develop and adapt neuroimaging-specific analyses.

  4. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize

  5. Pediatric functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging: tactics for encouraging task compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silk Jennifer S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging technology has afforded advances in our understanding of normal and pathological brain function and development in children and adolescents. However, noncompliance involving the inability to remain in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner to complete tasks is one common and significant problem. Task noncompliance is an especially significant problem in pediatric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI research because increases in noncompliance produces a greater risk that a study sample will not be representative of the study population. Method In this preliminary investigation, we describe the development and application of an approach for increasing the number of fMRI tasks children complete during neuroimaging. Twenty-eight healthy children ages 9-13 years participated. Generalization of the approach was examined in additional fMRI and event-related potential investigations with children at risk for depression, children with anxiety and children with depression (N = 120. Essential features of the approach include a preference assessment for identifying multiple individualized rewards, increasing reinforcement rates during imaging by pairing tasks with chosen rewards and presenting a visual 'road map' listing tasks, rewards and current progress. Results Our results showing a higher percentage of fMRI task completion by healthy children provides proof of concept data for the recommended tactics. Additional support was provided by results showing our approach generalized to several additional fMRI and event-related potential investigations and clinical populations. Discussion We proposed that some forms of task noncompliance may emerge from less than optimal reward protocols. While our findings may not directly support the effectiveness of the multiple reward compliance protocol, increased attention to how rewards are selected and delivered may aid cooperation with completing fMRI tasks Conclusion The

  6. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  7. Multimodal Neuroimaging-Informed Clinical Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Halloran, Rafael; Kopell, Brian H.; Sprooten, Emma; Goodman, Wayne K.; Frangou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS). We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key gray matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability therefore relevant

  8. Neuroimaging and other investigations in patients presenting with headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callum W Duncan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is very common. In the United Kingdom, it accounts for 4.4% of primary care consultations, 30% of referrals to neurology services and 0.5-0.8% of alert patients presenting to emergency departments. Primary headache disorders account for the majority of patients and most patients do not require investigation. Warning features (red flags in the history and on examination help target those who need investigation and what investigations are required. This article summarizes the typical presentations of the common secondary headaches and what neuroimaging and other investigations are appropriate for each headache type.

  9. Frequency Constrained ShiftCP Modeling of Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer H.

    2011-01-01

    The shift invariant multi-linear model based on the CandeComp/PARAFAC (CP) model denoted ShiftCP has proven useful for the modeling of latency changes in trial based neuroimaging data[17]. In order to facilitate component interpretation we presently extend the shiftCP model such that the extracted...... components can be constrained to pertain to predefined frequency ranges such as alpha, beta and gamma activity. To infer the number of components in the model we propose to apply automatic relevance determination by imposing priors that define the range of variation of each component of the shiftCP model...

  10. Accelerating Neuroimage Registration through Parallel Computation of Similarity Metric.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Gang Luo

    Full Text Available Neuroimage registration is crucial for brain morphometric analysis and treatment efficacy evaluation. However, existing advanced registration algorithms such as FLIRT and ANTs are not efficient enough for clinical use. In this paper, a GPU implementation of FLIRT with the correlation ratio (CR as the similarity metric and a GPU accelerated correlation coefficient (CC calculation for the symmetric diffeomorphic registration of ANTs have been developed. The comparison with their corresponding original tools shows that our accelerated algorithms can greatly outperform the original algorithm in terms of computational efficiency. This paper demonstrates the great potential of applying these registration tools in clinical applications.

  11. Multimodal neuroimaging-informed clinical applications in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eO'Halloran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroimaging data acquisition and analysis hold the promise to enhance the ability to make diagnostic and prognostic predictions and perform treatment planning in neuropsychiatric disorders. Prior research using a variety of types of neuroimaging techniques has confirmed that neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with dysfunction in anatomical and functional brain circuits. We first discuss current challenges associated with the identification of reliable neuroimaging markers for diagnosis and prognosis in mood disorders and for neurosurgical treatment planning for deep brain stimulation (DBS. We then present data on the use of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and prognosis of mood disorders and for DBS treatment planning. We demonstrate how multivariate analyses of functional activation and connectivity parameters can be used to differentiate patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder and non-affective psychosis. We also present data on connectivity parameters that mediate acute treatment response in affective and non-affective psychosis. We then focus on precision mapping of functional connectivity in native space. We describe the benefits of integrating anatomical fiber reconstruction with brain functional parameters and cortical surface measures to derive anatomically-informed connectivity metrics within the morphological context of each individual brain. We discuss how this approach may be particularly promising in psychiatry, given the clinical and etiological heterogeneity of the disorders, and particularly in treatment response prediction and planning. Precision mapping of connectivity is essential for DBS. In DBS, treatment electrodes are inserted into positions near key grey matter nodes within the circuits considered relevant to disease expression. However, targeting white matter tracts that underpin connectivity within these circuits may increase treatment efficacy and tolerability

  12. The emerging role of advanced neuroimaging techniques for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Martha; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases are an increasingly encountered and frightening manifestation of systemic cancer. More effective therapeutic strategies for the primary tumor are resulting in longer patient survival on the one hand while on the other, better brain tumor detection has resulted from increased availability and development of more precise brain imaging methods. This review focuses on the emerging role of functional neuroimaging techniques; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET), in establishing diagnosis, for monitoring treatment response with an emphasis on new targeted as well as immunomodulatory therapies and for predicting prognosis in patients with brain metastases.

  13. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: a survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. A total of 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one's career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training.

  14. Clinical Spectrum Of Acute Disseminated Encephalo Myelitis In Relation To Aetiology And Neuroimaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute disseminated Encephalo Myelitis (ADEM is an important neurological cause of mortality and morbidity and many aspects of the aetiopathogenesis and clinical presentation are still not clear. More studies are needed to be continued particularly from developing countries on ADEM. Aims & Objects: To study the clinical spectrum of ADEM in relation to aetiology and neuroimaging study and to compare the findings observed in the other parts of India and abroad. Materials and Methods: Clinical examinations, neuroimaging study and electrophysiological tests and follow up in 62 patients of ADEM in the Bangur Institute of Neurology, Kolkata, India from January 1996 to March 2004. Results: Thirty Four patients (54.83% were below 20 years. Among the preceding events, presumptive viral infections accounted for 32.25% of the total cases, specific viral infections in 43.54% cases, and sample antirabies vaccinations in 24.19% cases. Myeloradiculitis were the common neuroparalytic complications following semple anti rabies vaccination found in 10 patients and in another 5 post vaccinated patients had multiple sites of involvement. Acute cerebellar ataxia was the common clinical presentation following varicella infection found in 8 cases and another 6 cases had multiple sites involvement. Multimodal evoked potential studies corresponds to the clinical localization of lesions. MRI studies disclosed that white matter lesions were maximum in subcortical white matter and periventricular regions. No signal alterations were observed in 4 cases of acute cerebellar ataxia following varicellar infection and 4 cases of Myeloradiculitis following semple anti rabies vaccinations. Out of 62 patients, 50 patients survived (80.64%, among them 22 patients (44% had significant motor disability and rest 28 (56% recovered well in the functional status. Mortality found in the study was in 12 patients (19.36%. Conclusion: Specific viral infections is the common

  15. CBRAIN: A web-based, distributed computing platform for collaborative neuroimaging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek eSherif

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Brain Imaging Research Platform (CBRAIN is a web-based collaborative research platform developed in response to the challenges raised by data-heavy, compute-intensive neuroimaging research. CBRAIN offers transparent access to remote data sources, distributed computing sites and an array of processing and visualization tools within a controlled, secure environment. Its web interface is accessible through any modern browser and uses graphical interface idioms to reduce the technical expertise required to perform large-scale computational analyses. CBRAIN’s flexible meta-scheduling has allowed the incorporation of a wide range of heterogeneous computing sites, currently including nine national research High Performance Computing (HPC centers in Canada, one in Korea, one in Germany and several local research servers. CBRAIN leverages remote computing cycles and facilitates resource-interoperability in a transparent manner for the end-user. Compared with typical grid solutions available, our architecture was designed to be easily extendable and deployed on existing remote computing sites with no tool modification, administrative intervention or special software/hardware configuration. As October 2013, CBRAIN serves over 200 users spread across 53 cities in 17 countries. The platform is built as a generic framework that can accept data and analysis tools from any discipline. However, its current focus is primarily on neuroimaging research and studies of neurological diseases such as Autism, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, Multiple Sclerosis as well as on normal brain structure and development. This technical report presents the CBRAIN Platform, its current deployment and usage and future direction.

  16. How Configural Is the Configural Superiority Effect? A Neuroimaging Investigation of Emergent Features in Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Olivia M; Harel, Assaf; Bennett, Kevin B

    2017-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus is dependent not only upon local features, but also on the arrangement of those features. When stimulus features are perceptually well organized (e.g., symmetric or parallel), a global configuration with a high degree of salience emerges from the interactions between these features, often referred to as emergent features. Emergent features can be demonstrated in the Configural Superiority Effect (CSE): presenting a stimulus within an organized context relative to its presentation in a disarranged one results in better performance. Prior neuroimaging work on the perception of emergent features regards the CSE as an "all or none" phenomenon, focusing on the contrast between configural and non-configural stimuli. However, it is still not clear how emergent features are processed between these two endpoints. The current study examined the extent to which behavioral and neuroimaging markers of emergent features are responsive to the degree of configurality in visual displays. Subjects were tasked with reporting the anomalous quadrant in a visual search task while being scanned. Degree of configurality was manipulated by incrementally varying the rotational angle of low-level features within the stimulus arrays. Behaviorally, we observed faster response times with increasing levels of configurality. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increases in response magnitude across multiple visual areas in occipito-temporal cortex, primarily early visual cortex and object-selective cortex. Our findings suggest that the neural correlates of emergent features can be observed even in response to stimuli that are not fully configural, and demonstrate that configural information is already present at early stages of the visual hierarchy.

  17. Functional neuro-imaging as a pre-surgical tool in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chen, David K

    2014-03-01

    Functional neuro-imaging techniques are helpful in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy for localization of the epileptogenic zone as ancillary tools to electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or when other localization techniques are normal, non-concordant or discordant. Positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (ictal SPECT) imaging are traditional tests that have been reported to have good sensitivity and specificity although the results are better with more expertise as is true for any technique. More recently magnetoencephalogram/magnetic source imaging (MEG/MSI), diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used in localization and functional mapping during the pre-surgical work-up of epilepsy. Newer techniques such as fMRI-EEG, functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging and near infra-red spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magneto nanoparticles hold promise for further development that could then be applied in the work-up of epilepsy surgery. In this manuscript, we review these techniques and their current position in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy.

  18. A comparison of neuroimaging findings in childhood onset schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Andrea Baribeau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD and childhood onset schizophrenia (COS are pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders associated with significant morbidity. Both conditions are thought to share an underlying genetic architecture. A comparison of neuroimaging findings across ASD and COS with a focus on altered neurodevelopmental trajectories can shed light on potential clinical biomarkers and may highlight an underlying etiopathogenesis. Methods: A comprehensive review of the medical literature was conducted to summarize neuroimaging data with respect to both conditions in terms of structural imaging (including volumetric analysis, cortical thickness and morphology, and region of interest studies, white matter analysis (include volumetric analysis and diffusion tensor imaging and functional connectivity. Results: In ASD, a pattern of early brain overgrowth in the first few years of life is followed by dysmaturation in adolescence. Functional analyses have suggested impaired long-range connectivity as well as increased local and/or subcortical connectivity in this condition. In COS, deficits in cerebral volume, cortical thickness, and white matter maturation seem most pronounced in childhood and adolescence, and may level off in adulthood. Deficits in local connectivity, with increased long-range connectivity have been proposed, in keeping with exaggerated cortical thinning.Conclusions: The neuroimaging literature supports a neurodevelopmental origin of both ASD and COS and provides evidence for dynamic changes in both conditions that vary across space and time in the developing brain. Looking forward, imaging studies which capture the early post natal period, which are longitudinal and prospective, and which maximize the signal to noise ratio across heterogeneous conditions will be required to translate research findings into a clinical environment.

  19. Musical hallucinations: a brief review of functional neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Francesco; Attademo, Luigi; Blackmon, Karen; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-12-19

    Musical hallucinations are uncommon phenomena characterized by intrusive and frequently distressful auditory musical percepts without an external source, often associated with hypoacusis, psychiatric illness, focal brain lesion, epilepsy, and intoxication/pharmacology. Their physiological basis is thought to involve diverse mechanisms, including "release" from normal sensory or inhibitory inputs as well as stimulation during seizures, or they can be produced by functional or structural disorders in diverse cortical and subcortical areas. The aim of this review is to further explore their pathophysiology, describing the functional neuroimaging findings regarding musical hallucinations. A literature search of the PubMed electronic database was conducted through to 29 December 2015. Search terms included "musical hallucinations" combined with the names of specific functional neuroimaging techniques. A total of 18 articles, all clinical case reports, providing data on 23 patients, comprised the set we reviewed. Diverse pathological processes and patient populations with musical hallucinations were included in the studies. Converging data from multiple studies suggest that the superior temporal sulcus is the most common site and that activation is the most common mechanism. Further neurobiological research is needed to clarify the pathophysiology of musical hallucinations.

  20. Self-development: integrating cognitive, socioemotional, and neuroimaging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Jennifer H; Peake, Shannon J

    2012-01-01

    This review integrates cognitive, socioemotional, and neuroimaging perspectives on self-development. Neural correlates of key processes implicated in personal and social identity are reported from studies of children, adolescents, and adults, including autobiographical memory, direct and reflected self-appraisals, and social exclusion. While cortical midline structures of medial prefrontal cortex and medial posterior parietal cortex are consistently identified in neuroimaging studies considering personal identity from a primarily cognitive perspective ("who am I?"), additional regions are implicated by studies considering personal and social identity from a more socioemotional perspective ("what do others think about me, where do I fit in?"), especially in child or adolescent samples. The involvement of these additional regions (including tempo-parietal junction and posterior superior temporal sulcus, temporal poles, anterior insula, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex, middle cingulate cortex, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex) suggests mentalizing, emotion, and emotion regulation are central to self-development. In addition, these regions appear to function atypically during personal and social identity tasks in autism and depression, exhibiting a broad pattern of hypoactivation and hyperactivation, respectively.

  1. Assessing the Neuroendocrine Stress Response in the Functional Neuroimaging Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony P.; Liberzon, Israel

    2009-01-01

    Neural regulation of stress responses, and the feedback of stress hormones to the brain, reflect complex brain-body interactions that may underlie the effects of psychological stress on health. Elucidating the brain circuitry involved in the cortical control of limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the cortical “targets” of cortisol that in turn modulates brain function, requires careful assessment of glucocorticoid hormones, in the context of the neuroimaging paradigms. Here we discuss approaches for assessment of endocrine function in the context of neuroimaging, including methods of blood and saliva specimen collection, and methods for drug/hormone administration. We also briefly discuss important temporal considerations, including appropriate timing of sample collections for hormones with different time-courses of activation (e.g. ACTH vs. cortisol), the pharmacokinetics of both endogenous hormones and administered agents, and circadian considerations. These are crucial to experimental designs of rhythmic hormonal systems and multiple feedback loops. We briefly address psychological/behavioral ‘activation’ paradigms used for inducing endogenous LHPA axis responses within or in proximity to scanner, as well as strategies for administration of exogenous hormones or secretagogues. Finally, we discuss some of the analyses issues in terms of hormone responses (e.g. response and area under curve, diurnal variability) and strategies for linking measured levels of peripheral humoral factor to brain activity (e.g. hormone responses as between subject regressors of BOLD activations, hormone levels as within subject regressors in analyses of covariance of brain activity over time, etc.). PMID:19481160

  2. Neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Ila M; Chags, Marcos H N; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2014-01-01

    Specific phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by irrational fear and avoidance of specific things or situations, interfering significantly with the patients' daily life. Treatment for the disorder consists of both pharmacological and psychological approaches, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Neuroimaging techniques have been used in an attempt to improve our understanding of the neurobiology of SP and of the effects of treatment options available. This review describes the design and results of eight articles investigating the neuroimaging correlates of pharmacological and psychological treatments for SP. The studies show that CBT is effective in SP, leading to a reduction of anxiety symptoms that is accompanied by functional alterations in the brain. The results of pharmacological interventions for SP are less uniform, but suggest that the partial agonist of the NMDA (N-methyl D-aspartate) receptor DCS (D-cycloserine) can be used in combination with psychotherapy techniques for the achievement of quicker treatment response and that DCS modulates the function of structures implicated in the neurobiology of SP. Further research should explore the augmentation of CBT treatment with DCS in controlled trials.

  3. Publication trends in neuroimaging of minimally conscious states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Garnett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We used existing and customized bibliometric and scientometric methods to analyze publication trends in neuroimaging research of minimally conscious states and describe the domain in terms of its geographic, contributor, and content features. We considered publication rates for the years 2002–2011, author interconnections, the rate at which new authors are added, and the domains that inform the work of author contributors. We also provided a content analysis of clinical and ethical themes within the relevant literature. We found a 27% growth in the number of papers over the period of study, professional diversity among a wide range of peripheral author contributors but only few authors who dominate the field, and few new technical paradigms and clinical themes that would fundamentally expand the landscape. The results inform both the science of consciousness as well as parallel ethics and policy studies of the potential for translational challenges of neuroimaging in research and health care of people with disordered states of consciousness.

  4. Behavioural, computational, and neuroimaging studies of acquired apraxia of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrie J Ballard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A critical examination of speech motor control depends on an in-depth understanding of network connectivity associated with Brodmann areas 44 and 45 and surrounding cortices. Damage to these areas has been associated with two conditions - the speech motor programming disorder apraxia of speech (AOS and the linguistic / grammatical disorder of Broca’s aphasia. Here we focus on AOS, which is most commonly associated with damage to posterior Broca's area and adjacent cortex. We provide an overview of our own studies into the nature of AOS, including behavioral and neuroimaging methods, to explore components of the speech motor network that are associated with normal and disordered speech motor programming in AOS. Behavioral, neuroimaging, and computational modeling studies are indicating that AOS is associated with impairment in learning feedforward models and/or implementing feedback mechanisms and with the functional contribution of BA6. While functional connectivity methods are not yet routinely applied to the study of AOS, we highlight the need for focusing on the functional impact of localised lesions throughout the speech network, as well as larger scale comparative studies to distinguish the unique behavioral and neurological signature of AOS. By coupling these methods with neural network models, we have a powerful set of tools to improve our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie AOS, and speech production generally.

  5. Understanding face perception by means of prosopagnosia and neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossion, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the human neuro-anatomy of face recognition is a long-standing goal of Cognitive Neuroscience. Studies of patients with face recognition impairment following brain damage (i.e., acquired prosopagnosia) have revealed the specificity of face recognition, the importance and nature of holistic/configural perception of individual faces, and the distribution of this function in the ventral occipito-temporal (VOT) cortex, with a right hemispheric dominance. Yet, neuroimaging studies in this field have essentially focused on a single face-selective area of the VOT and underestimated the right hemisphere superiority. Findings in these studies have also been taken as supporting a hierarchical view of face perception, according to which a face is decomposed into parts in early face-selective areas, these parts being subsequently integrated into a whole representation in higher-order areas. This review takes a historical and current perspective on the study of acquired prosopagnosia and neuroimaging that challenges this latter view. It argues for a combination of these methods, an approach suggesting a coarse-to-fine emergence of the holistic face percept in a non-hierarchical network of cortical face-selective areas.

  6. Anatomical and functional neuroimaging in awake, behaving marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Afonso C

    2017-03-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small New World monkey that has gained significant recent interest in neuroscience research, not only because of its compatibility with gene editing techniques, but also due to its tremendous versatility as an experimental animal model. Neuroimaging modalities, including anatomical (MRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), complemented by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and electrophysiology, have been at the forefront of unraveling the anatomical and functional organization of the marmoset brain. High-resolution anatomical MRI of the marmoset brain can be obtained with remarkable cytoarchitectonic detail. Functional MRI of the marmoset brain has been used to study various sensory systems, including somatosensory, auditory, and visual pathways, while resting-state fMRI studies have unraveled functional brain networks that bear great correspondence to those previously described in humans. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of the marmoset brain has enabled the simultaneous recording of neuronal activity from thousands of neurons with single cell spatial resolution. In this article, we aim to review the main results obtained by our group and by our colleagues in applying neuroimaging techniques to study the marmoset brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 373-389, 2017.

  7. PET-based molecular nuclear neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Ho [Gil Medical Center, Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear neuro-imaging in CNS drug discovery and development can be divided into four categories that are clearly inter-related. (1) Neuroreceptor mapping to examine the involvement of specific neurotransmitter system in CNS diseases, drug occupancy characteristics and perhaps examine mechanisms of action;(2) Structural and spectroscopic imaging to examine morphological changes and their consequences;(3) Metabolic mapping to provide evidence of central activity and CNS fingerprinting the neuroanatomy of drug effects;(4) Functional mapping to examine disease-drug interactions. In addition, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents could be achieved by modifying stem cells to release specific drugs at the site of transplantation('stem cell pharmacology'). Future exploitation of stem cell biology, including enhanced release of therapeutic factors through genetic stem cell engineering might thus constitute promising pharmaceutical approaches to treating diseases of the nervous system. With continued improvements in instrumentation, identification of better imaging probes by innovative chemistry, molecular nuclear neuro-imaging promise to play increasingly important roles in disease diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Neuroimaging in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma: differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Elida; Lucaya, Javier; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Sainz, Pilar; Olivé, Teresa; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Ortega, Juan J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in therapy for pediatric hematologic neoplasms have greatly improved the prognosis but have resulted in an increased incidence of associated complications and toxic effects. The main neuroimaging features in pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were retrospectively reviewed. To simplify the approach and facilitate differential diagnosis, the neuroimaging features have been classified into three main categories: central nervous system manifestations of primary disease, side effects of therapeutic procedures (radiation therapy, chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation), and complications due to immunosuppression, particularly infections. Manifestations of primary disease include cerebrovascular complications (hemorrhage, cerebral infarction) and central nervous system involvement (infiltration of the meninges, parenchyma, bone marrow, orbit, and spine). Effects of radiation therapy include white matter disease, mineralizing microangiopathy, parenchymal brain volume loss, radiation-induced cryptic vascular malformations, and second neoplasms. Effects of chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation include hemorrhage, dural venous thrombosis, white matter disease, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy. Both the underlying malignancy and antineoplastic therapy can cause immunosuppression. Fungi are the most frequent causal microorganisms in immunosuppressed patients with infection. Familiarity with the imaging findings is essential for proper diagnosis of neurologic symptoms in pediatric patients with oncohematologic disease. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  9. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  10. Neuroimaging findings of Zika virus infection: a review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Mehrjardi, Mohammad; Keshavarz, Elham; Poretti, Andrea; Hazin, Adriano N

    2016-12-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus from the Flaviviridae family. It is usually transmitted by mosquito bite. There have been no reports of severe symptoms caused by ZIKV infection up until the last few years. In October 2013 an outbreak was reported in French Polynesia with severe neurological complications in some affected cases. In November 2015, the Ministry of Health of Brazil attributed the increased number of neonatal microcephaly cases in northeastern Brazil to congenital ZIKV infection. The rapid spread of the virus convinced the World Health Organization to announce ZIKV infection as a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern" in February 2016. The main neuroimaging findings in congenital ZIKV infection include microcephaly which is the hallmark of the disease, other malformations of cortical development (e.g., lissencephaly, heterotopia, etc.), parenchymal calcifications, unilateral or bilateral ventriculomegaly, enlarged extra-axial CSF spaces, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, agenesis of the cavum septum pellucidum, cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia, and ocular abnormalities. ZIKV infection may also cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in adults. Familiarity with neuroimaging findings of congenital and acquired ZIKV infection is crucial to suspect this disease in residents of endemic regions and travelers to these areas.

  11. Paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder? Evidence from neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyser, C.; Veltman, D.J.; de Haan, E.; Boer, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present an overview of neuroimaging data on paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and discuss implications for further research. Method: Medline PsycINFO databases and reference lists were searched for relevant articles. All neuroimaging studies up to October 1, 2008 involving

  12. Neurobiological Foundations of Acupuncture: The Relevance and Future Prospect Based on Neuroimaging Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Lijun Bai; Lixing Lao

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is currently gaining popularity as an important modality of alternative and complementary medicine in the western world. Modern neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetoencephalography open a window into the neurobiological foundations of acupuncture. In this review, we have summarized evidence derived from neuroimaging studies and tried to elucidate both neurophysiological correlates and key experimental facto...

  13. Neural Correlates of Visual Perceptual Expertise: Evidence from Cognitive Neuroscience Using Functional Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Kok, Ellen M.; van Geel, Koos; de Bruin, Anique B. H.; Sorger, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is a useful approach to study the neural correlates of visual perceptual expertise. The purpose of this paper is to review the functional-neuroimaging methods that have been implemented in previous research in this context. First, we will discuss research questions typically addressed in visual expertise research. Second,…

  14. Model sparsity and brain pattern interpretation of classification models in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Churchill, Nathan W

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in applying discriminative multivariate analysis techniques to the analysis of functional neuroimaging data. Model interpretation is of great importance in the neuroimaging context, and is conventionally based on a ‘brain map’ derived from the classification model...

  15. More education, less administration: reflections of neuroimagers' attitudes to ethics through the qualitative looking glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehagia, A A; Tairyan, K; Federico, C; Glover, G H; Illes, J

    2012-12-01

    In follow-up to a large-scale ethics survey of neuroscientists whose research involves neuroimaging, brain stimulation and imaging genetics, we conducted focus groups and interviews to explore their sense of responsibility about integrating ethics into neuroimaging and readiness to adopt new ethics strategies as part of their research. Safety, trust and virtue were key motivators for incorporating ethics into neuroimaging research. Managing incidental findings emerged as a predominant daily challenge for faculty, while student reports focused on the malleability of neuroimaging data and scientific integrity. The most frequently cited barrier was time and administrative burden associated with the ethics review process. Lack of scholarly training in ethics also emerged as a major barrier. Participants constructively offered remedies to these challenges: development and dissemination of best practices and standardized ethics review for minimally invasive neuroimaging protocols. Students in particular, urged changes to curricula to include early, focused training in ethics.

  16. NeuroDebian Virtual Machine Deployment Facilitates Trainee-Driven Bedside Neuroimaging Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Kenney-Jung, Daniel; Botha, Hugo; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2016-09-21

    Freely available software, derived from the past 2 decades of neuroimaging research, is significantly more flexible for research purposes than presently available clinical tools. Here, we describe and demonstrate the utility of rapidly deployable analysis software to facilitate trainee-driven translational neuroimaging research. A recipe and video tutorial were created to guide the creation of a NeuroDebian-based virtual computer that conforms to current neuroimaging research standards and can exist within a HIPAA-compliant system. This allows for retrieval of clinical imaging data, conversion to standard file formats, and rapid visualization and quantification of individual patients' cortical and subcortical anatomy. As an example, we apply this pipeline to a pediatric patient's data to illustrate the advantages of research-derived neuroimaging tools in asking quantitative questions "at the bedside." Our goal is to provide a path of entry for trainees to become familiar with common neuroimaging tools and foster an increased interest in translational research.

  17. Neuroimaging and the school-based assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Paul B; Bigler, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging contributes to a greater understanding of brain pathology following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and has the ability to guide neurorehabilitation decisions. When integrated with the school-based psychoeducational assessment of a child with a TBI, neuroimaging can provide a different perspective when interpreting educational and behavioral variables relevant to school-based neurorehabilitation. School psychologists conducting traditional psychoeducational assessments of children with TBI seldom obtain and integrate neuroimaging, despite its availability. This article presents contextual information on the medical assessment of TBI, major types of neuroimaging, and networks of the brain. A case study illustrates the value of incorporating neuroimaging into the standard school-based psychoeducational evaluations of children with traumatic brain injury.

  18. The utility of neuroimaging studies for informing educational practice and policy in reading disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jessica M; Myers, Chelsea A; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Educational neuroscience is an emerging scientific field that brings together researchers from neuroscience, psychology, and education to explore the neurocognitive processes underlying educational practice and theory. In this brief article, we take reading disorder (RD, also known as developmental dyslexia) as an example, and explore trends in neuroimaging research, which may have future implications for educational practice and policy. Specifically, we present two examples that have been central to research efforts in our laboratory: (a) utilizing multimodal neuroimaging to optimize criteria to diagnose RD, and (b) identifying neuroimaging markers that predict future academic outcomes. Such research is faced with important challenges, and rigorous validation is necessary before any claims of the widespread practical utility of neuroimaging can be made. Nevertheless, we contend that neuroimaging studies offer opportunities for providing critical information that could lead to advancing theory of reading and RD. This could in turn lead to better diagnostic criteria and more accurate and earlier identification of RD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. CLINICAL AND NEUROIMAGING STUDIES IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE SPONTANEOUS INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaya P. Danovska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To define the prognostic value of clinical and neuroimaging parameters on the 30-th day mortality and clinical outcome after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH. Materials and methods: we examined 88 patients with sICH admitted to Neurology Clinic, UMHAT Pleven within 48 hours after clinical symptoms onset. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score was used to assess the primary stroke severity; neurological deficit on admission was assessed by National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS; clinical outcome at discharge was evaluated by modified Rankin Scale (mRS and by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS on the 30-th day after sICH onset. Hematoma volume was measured by the formula of Kothari: AxBxC/2 in ml. The statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 19.0 and Statgraphics plus 4.1 for Windows. Results: Initial assessment of primary stroke severity and neurological deficit by GCS и NIHSS, hematoma localization and volume were found strongly correlated with the clinical outcome on the 30-th day after the sICH onset. Age and vascular risk factors did not correlate with the clinical outcome. Male patients had better survival on the 30-th day compared with the female ones. Discussion: Neurological deficit on admission, hematoma localization and volume were found reliable predictors of the 30-th day clinical outcome that could serve for early stratification of patients and optimal choice of therapeutic approach.

  20. Towards structured sharing of raw and derived neuroimaging data across existing resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keator, D B; Helmer, K; Steffener, J; Turner, J A; Van Erp, T G M; Gadde, S; Ashish, N; Burns, G A; Nichols, B N

    2013-11-15

    Data sharing efforts increasingly contribute to the acceleration of scientific discovery. Neuroimaging data is accumulating in distributed domain-specific databases and there is currently no integrated access mechanism nor an accepted format for the critically important meta-data that is necessary for making use of the combined, available neuroimaging data. In this manuscript, we present work from the Derived Data Working Group, an open-access group sponsored by the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) and the International Neuroimaging Coordinating Facility (INCF) focused on practical tools for distributed access to neuroimaging data. The working group develops models and tools facilitating the structured interchange of neuroimaging meta-data and is making progress towards a unified set of tools for such data and meta-data exchange. We report on the key components required for integrated access to raw and derived neuroimaging data as well as associated meta-data and provenance across neuroimaging resources. The components include (1) a structured terminology that provides semantic context to data, (2) a formal data model for neuroimaging with robust tracking of data provenance, (3) a web service-based application programming interface (API) that provides a consistent mechanism to access and query the data model, and (4) a provenance library that can be used for the extraction of provenance data by image analysts and imaging software developers. We believe that the framework and set of tools outlined in this manuscript have great potential for solving many of the issues the neuroimaging community faces when sharing raw and derived neuroimaging data across the various existing database systems for the purpose of accelerating scientific discovery.

  1. Comparative primate neuroimaging: insights into human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, James K

    2014-01-01

    Comparative neuroimaging can identify unique features of the human brain and teach us about human brain evolution. Comparisons with chimpanzees, our closest living primate relative, are critical in this endeavor. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to compare brain size development, brain structure proportions and brain aging. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to compare resting brain glucose metabolism. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been used to compare auditory and visual system pathways, as well as resting-state networks of connectivity. Finally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been used to compare structural connectivity. Collectively, these methods have revealed human brain specializations with respect to development, cortical organization, connectivity, and aging. These findings inform our knowledge of the evolutionary changes responsible for the special features of the modern human mind.

  2. Neuroimaging in refractory epilepsy. Current practice and evolving trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (Malaysia); Lim, K.S.; Tan, C.T. [Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Neuroimaging is imperative in diagnostic work up and therapeutic assessment of refractory epilepsy. • Identification of epileptogenic zone on EEG, MRI and functional imaging improves the success of surgery. • High performance MRI greatly enhanced metabolic information and elucidate brain functions. • Optimisation of epilepsy protocols in structural and functional MRI are presented in this article. - Abstract: Identification of the epileptogenic zone is of paramount importance in refractory epilepsy as the success of surgical treatment depends on complete resection of the epileptogenic zone. Imaging plays an important role in the locating and defining anatomic epileptogenic abnormalities in patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the current MRI sequences used in epilepsy imaging with special emphasis of lesion seen in our practices. Optimisation of epilepsy imaging protocols are addressed and current trends in functional MRI sequences including MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging and fusion MR with PET and SPECT are discussed.

  3. Neuroimaging in stroke and non-stroke pusher patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiza Elaine Grespan Santos-Pontelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pusher behavior (PB is a disorder of postural control affecting patients with encephalic lesions. This study has aimed to identify the brain substrates that are critical for the occurrence of PB, to analyze the influence of the midline shift (MS and hemorrhagic stroke volume (HSV on the severity and prognosis of the PB. We identified 31 pusher patients of a neurological unit, mean age 67.4±11.89, 61.3% male. Additional neurological and functional examinations were assessed. Neuroimaging workup included measurement of the MS, the HSV in patients with hemorrhagic stroke, the analysis of the vascular territory, etiology and side of the lesion. Lesions in the parietal region (p=0.041 and thalamus (p=0.001 were significantly more frequent in PB patients. Neither the MS nor the HSV were correlated with the PB severity or recovery time.

  4. Neuroimaging: a story of physicians and basic scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Bastianello, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Until just a few decades ago, it was very difficult to detect, non invasively, physiological signals from the brain. However, the discoveries in physics, the evolution of information technology, and the invention of non-invasive biomedical technologies in the last decades of the twentieth century transformed this scenario and created numerous opportunities for studying the brain in living subjects. The authors trace the extraordinary evolution of brain imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, emission tomography, and ?functional neuroimaging?) in the second part of the twentieth century. Not only have these methods had a remarkable clinical impact, they have also been outstanding research tools in the field of the neurosciences. In their most recent applications, they are employed in the quest to uncover the neuronal substrate of the human mind.

  5. Preclinical PET Neuroimaging of [11C]Bexarotene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Rotstein PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Activation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs has been proposed as a therapeutic mechanism for the treatment of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We previously reported radiolabeling of a Food and Drug Administration-approved RXR agonist, bexarotene, by copper-mediated [11C]CO2 fixation and preliminary positron emission tomography (PET neuroimaging that demonstrated brain permeability in nonhuman primate with regional binding distribution consistent with RXRs. In this study, the brain uptake and saturability of [11C]bexarotene were studied in rats and nonhuman primates by PET imaging under baseline and greater target occupancy conditions. [11C]Bexarotene displays a high proportion of nonsaturable uptake in the brain and is unsuitable for RXR occupancy measurements in the central nervous system.

  6. Motivating forces of human actions. Neuroimaging reward and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Henrik; Abler, Birgit; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Erk, Susanne

    2005-11-15

    In neuroeconomics, reward and social interaction are central concepts to understand what motivates human behaviour. Both concepts are investigated in humans using neuroimaging methods. In this paper, we provide an overview about these results and discuss their relevance for economic behaviour. For reward it has been shown that a system exists in humans that is involved in predicting rewards and thus guides behaviour, involving a circuit including the striatum, the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala. Recent studies on social interaction revealed a mentalizing system representing the mental states of others. A central part of this system is the medial prefrontal cortex, in particular the anterior paracingulate cortex. The reward as well as the mentalizing system is engaged in economic decision-making. We will discuss implications of this study for neuromarketing as well as general implications of these results that may help to provide deeper insights into the motivating forces of human behaviour.

  7. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  8. Clinical functional MRI. Persurgical functional neuroimaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, Christoph (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Division of Diagnostic and Inventional Neuroradiology

    2015-06-01

    The second, revised edition of this successful textbook provides an up-to-date description of the use of preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of practical aspects, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, and diagnostic possibilities and limitations. Relevant information on brain physiology, functional neuroanatomy, imaging technique, and methodology is provided by recognized experts in these fields. Compared with the first edition, chapters have been updated to reflect the latest developments and in particular the current use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Entirely new chapters are included on resting-state presurgical fMRI and the role of DTI and tractography in brain tumor surgery. Further chapters address multimodality functional neuroimaging, brain plasticity, and pitfalls, tips, and tricks.

  9. What can functional neuroimaging tell the experimental psychologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Richard

    2005-02-01

    I argue here that functional neuroimaging data--which I restrict to the haemodynamic techniques of fMRI and PET--can inform psychological theorizing, provided one assumes a "systematic" function-structure mapping in the brain. In this case, imaging data simply comprise another dependent variable, along with behavioural data, that can be used to test competing theories. In particular, I distinguish two types of inference: function-to-structure deduction and structure-to-function induction. With the former inference, a qualitatively different pattern of activity over the brain under two experimental conditions implies at least one different function associated with changes in the independent variable. With the second type of inference, activity of the same brain region(s) under two conditions implies a common function, possibly not predicted a priori. I illustrate these inferences with imaging studies of recognition memory, short-term memory, and repetition priming. I then consider in greater detail what is meant by a "systematic" function-structure mapping and argue that, particularly for structure-to-function induction, this entails a one-to-one mapping between functional and structural units, although the structural unit may be a network of interacting regions and care must be taken over the appropriate level of functional/structural abstraction. Nonetheless, the assumption of a systematic function-structure mapping is a "working hypothesis" that, in common with other scientific fields, cannot be proved on independent grounds and is probably best evaluated by the success of the enterprise as a whole. I also consider statistical issues such as the definition of a qualitative difference and methodological issues such as the relationship between imaging and behavioural data. I finish by reviewing various objections to neuroimaging, including neophrenology, functionalism, and equipotentiality, and by observing some criticisms of current practice in the imaging

  10. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E.; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I.; Nichols, David; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D.; Wise, Richard G.; Curran, H. Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD’s marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug’s other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of “ego-dissolution” and “altered meaning,” implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of “self” or “ego” and its processing of “meaning.” Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others. PMID:27071089

  11. Ethical concepts and future challenges of neuroimaging: an Islamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Delaimy, Wael K

    2012-09-01

    Neuroscience is advancing at a rapid pace, with new technologies and approaches that are creating ethical challenges not easily addressed by current ethical frameworks and guidelines. One fascinating technology is neuroimaging, especially functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Although still in its infancy, fMRI is breaking new ground in neuroscience, potentially offering increased understanding of brain function. Different populations and faith traditions will likely have different reactions to these new technologies and the ethical challenges they bring with them. Muslims are approximately one-fifth of world population and they have a specific and highly regulated ethical and moral code, which helps them deal with scientific advances and decision making processes in an Islamically ethical manner. From this ethical perspective, in light of the relevant tenets of Islam, neuroimaging poses various challenges. The privacy of spirituality and the thought process, the requirement to put community interest before individual interest, and emphasis on conscious confession in legal situations are Islamic concepts that can pose a challenge for the use of something intrusive such as an fMRI. Muslim moral concepts such as There shall be no harm inflicted or reciprocated in Islam and Necessities overrule prohibitions are some of the criteria that might appropriately be used to guide advancing neuroscience. Neuroscientists should be particularly prudent and well prepared in implementing neuroscience advances that are breaking new scientific and ethical ground. Neuroscientists should also be prepared to assist in setting the ethical frameworks in place in advance of what might be perceived as runaway applications of technology.

  12. Application of neuroanatomical ontologies for neuroimaging data annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Turner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotation of functional neuroimaging results for data sharing and reuse is particularly challenging, due to the diversity of terminologies of neuroanatomical structures and cortical parcellation schemes. To address this challenge, we extended the Foundational Model of Anatomy Ontology (FMA to include cytoarchitectural, Brodmann area labels, and a morphological cortical labeling scheme (e.g., the part of Brodmann area 6 in the left precentral gyrus. This representation was also used to augment the neuroanatomical axis of RadLex, the ontology for clinical imaging. The resulting neuroanatomical ontology contains explicit relationships indicating which brain regions are “part of” which other regions, across cytoarchitectural and morphological labeling schemas. We annotated a large functional neuroimaging dataset with terms from the ontology and applied a reasoning engine to analyze this dataset in conjunction with the ontology, and achieved successful inferences from the most specific level (e.g., how many subjects showed activation in a sub-part of the middle frontal gyrus to more general (how many activations were found in areas connected via a known white matter tract?. In summary, we have produced a neuroanatomical ontology that harmonizes several different terminologies of neuroanatomical structures and cortical parcellation schemes. This neuranatomical ontology is publicly available as a view of FMA at the Bioportal website at http://rest.bioontology.org/bioportal/ontologies/download/10005. The ontological encoding of anatomic knowledge can be exploited by computer reasoning engines to make inferences about neuroanatomical relationships described in imaging datasets using different terminologies. This approach could ultimately enable knowledge discovery from large, distributed fMRI studies or medical record mining.

  13. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T; Williams, Tim M; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I; Nichols, David; Hellyer, Peter J; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D; Wise, Richard G; Curran, H Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J

    2016-04-26

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD's marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug's other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of "ego-dissolution" and "altered meaning," implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of "self" or "ego" and its processing of "meaning." Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others.

  14. Application of Neuroanatomical Ontologies for Neuroimaging Data Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jessica A.; Mejino, Jose L. V.; Brinkley, James F.; Detwiler, Landon T.; Lee, Hyo Jong; Martone, Maryann E.; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    The annotation of functional neuroimaging results for data sharing and re-use is particularly challenging, due to the diversity of terminologies of neuroanatomical structures and cortical parcellation schemes. To address this challenge, we extended the Foundational Model of Anatomy Ontology (FMA) to include cytoarchitectural, Brodmann area labels, and a morphological cortical labeling scheme (e.g., the part of Brodmann area 6 in the left precentral gyrus). This representation was also used to augment the neuroanatomical axis of RadLex, the ontology for clinical imaging. The resulting neuroanatomical ontology contains explicit relationships indicating which brain regions are “part of” which other regions, across cytoarchitectural and morphological labeling schemas. We annotated a large functional neuroimaging dataset with terms from the ontology and applied a reasoning engine to analyze this dataset in conjunction with the ontology, and achieved successful inferences from the most specific level (e.g., how many subjects showed activation in a subpart of the middle frontal gyrus) to more general (how many activations were found in areas connected via a known white matter tract?). In summary, we have produced a neuroanatomical ontology that harmonizes several different terminologies of neuroanatomical structures and cortical parcellation schemes. This neuroanatomical ontology is publicly available as a view of FMA at the Bioportal website1. The ontological encoding of anatomic knowledge can be exploited by computer reasoning engines to make inferences about neuroanatomical relationships described in imaging datasets using different terminologies. This approach could ultimately enable knowledge discovery from large, distributed fMRI studies or medical record mining. PMID:20725521

  15. Neuroimaging of young adults with stroke in Ilorin Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyinloye, Olalekan; Nzeh, Donald; Adesiyun, Olusola; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Akande, Halimat; Sanya, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Stroke in young adults is relatively uncommon. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most valuable tools for the diagnosis of stroke. Recent data on stroke in young adults in Nigeria is sparse. The aim of this study is to document the imaging pattern in young patients aged 15-45 years with suspected cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in the Nigerian environment. This was a retrospective study of 69 patients aged 15-45 years, with clinical diagnosis of stroke, referred for neuro-imaging, from October 2008 to November 2013. All patients with the clinical diagnosis of stroke within this age group were recruited into the study. Images were obtained from a four slice channel general electric CT machine and a 0.2 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Concerto MRI scanner. A total of 69 patients (44 males and 25 females) were studied. Sixty out of 69 (87.0%) patients were accurately diagnosed with CVA, with 9 (13.0) cases of misdiagnoses. A total of 21 (35%) out of the 60 cases confirmed on imaging had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), 10 (16.7%) had subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 29 (48.3%) had cerebral infarct (CI). Hypertension was the common risk factor for all stroke subtypes. The most common location for ICH, was the basal ganglia in 8 (38.8%), while the commonest pattern for CI, was lacunar infarct in the basal ganglia (51.7%). The incidence of hemorrhagic CVA (ICH and SAH combined) was slightly higher than ischemic CVA in this study. Lacunar infarcts in the basal ganglia and also ICH in the basal ganglia were the most common patterns, both are strongly linked to hypertension. A diagnostic protocol of stroke in young adults, to include neuroimaging and other ancillary investigations is advocated for stroke in young adults as some of the etiologies are treatable.

  16. [A review of the neuroimaging studies of alcoholism].

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    Matsushita, Sachio; Higuchi, Susumu

    2007-12-01

    In this article, we reviewed brain damage seen in patients with alcohol dependence briefly focusing on neuroimaging studies. In uncomplicated alcoholic patients, a high incidence of cortical shrinkage and ventricular dilatation were reported using brain CT scans. In older alcoholics, prefrontal gray matter deficits were especially marked when compared with younger alcoholics. Reversibility of brain shrinkage is a common neuroimaging finding in patients with alcohol dependence and a study by Gazdinski et al. reported more rapid brain tissue gain during the first month of sobriety than in the following months. Another MRI study using deformation-based morphometry revealed significant shrinkage in the frontal and temporal lobes within 1 week of abstinence of alcoholic patients. This study followed participants for 8 months longitudinally and revealed that abstaining alcoholics recovered tissue volumes significantly faster than nonalcoholic controls in the parietal and frontal lobes and this study also revealed that when abstaining alcoholics were compared with relapsed alcoholics, additional regions with significantly greater recovery in abstainers were the temporal lobes, thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, corpus callosum, anterior cingulate, insula, and subcortical white matter. Finally we introduced a MR spectroscopy (MRS) study on alcoholic patients. This study using proton MRS indicated that with short-term abstinence, cerebellar choline and frontomesial N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were significantly increased. Findings showing that a cerebellar choline increase and a frontomesial NAA increase were detected at stable water integrals and creatine concentrations, serum electrolytes and red blood cell indices suggest that early brain recovery through abstinence does not simply reflect rehydration. This might indicate that even the adult brain has capacities for regrowth and further understanding of the mechanisms of recovery of alcoholics' brains may result in a valuable

  17. Development of PowerMap: a software package for statistical power calculation in neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E; Hayasaka, Satoru

    2012-10-01

    Although there are a number of statistical software tools for voxel-based massively univariate analysis of neuroimaging data, such as fMRI (functional MRI), PET (positron emission tomography), and VBM (voxel-based morphometry), very few software tools exist for power and sample size calculation for neuroimaging studies. Unlike typical biomedical studies, outcomes from neuroimaging studies are 3D images of correlated voxels, requiring a correction for massive multiple comparisons. Thus, a specialized power calculation tool is needed for planning neuroimaging studies. To facilitate this process, we developed a software tool specifically designed for neuroimaging data. The software tool, called PowerMap, implements theoretical power calculation algorithms based on non-central random field theory. It can also calculate power for statistical analyses with FDR (false discovery rate) corrections. This GUI (graphical user interface)-based tool enables neuroimaging researchers without advanced knowledge in imaging statistics to calculate power and sample size in the form of 3D images. In this paper, we provide an overview of the statistical framework behind the PowerMap tool. Three worked examples are also provided, a regression analysis, an ANOVA (analysis of variance), and a two-sample T-test, in order to demonstrate the study planning process with PowerMap. We envision that PowerMap will be a great aide for future neuroimaging research.

  18. Neuroimaging overuse is more common in Medicare compared with the VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James F; Kerr, Eve A; McCammon, Ryan J; Holleman, Rob; Langa, Kenneth M; Callaghan, Brian C

    2016-08-23

    To inform initiatives to reduce overuse, we compared neuroimaging appropriateness in a large Medicare cohort with a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) cohort. Separate retrospective cohorts were established in Medicare and in VA for headache and neuropathy from 2004 to 2011. The Medicare cohorts included all patients enrolled in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) with linked Medicare claims (HRS-Medicare; n = 1,244 for headache and 998 for neuropathy). The VA cohorts included all patients receiving services in the VA (n = 93,755 for headache and 183,642 for neuropathy). Inclusion criteria were age over 65 years and an outpatient visit for incident neuropathy or a primary headache. Neuroimaging use was measured with Current Procedural Terminology codes and potential overuse was defined using published criteria for use with administrative data. Increasingly specific appropriateness criteria excluded nontarget conditions for which neuroimaging may be appropriate. For both peripheral neuropathy and headache, potentially inappropriate imaging was more common in HRS-Medicare compared with the VA. Forty-nine percentage of all headache patients received neuroimaging in HRS-Medicare compared with 22.1% in the VA (p neuroimaging compared with 9.0% in the VA (p neuroimaging is likely less common in the VA than in a Medicare population. Better understanding the reasons for the more selective use of neuroimaging in the VA could help inform future initiatives to reduce overuse of diagnostic testing. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Gravity localization in sine-Gordon braneworlds

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    Cruz, W.T., E-mail: wilamicruz@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará (IFCE), Campus Juazeiro do Norte, 63040-540 Juazeiro do Norte, Ceará (Brazil); Maluf, R.V., E-mail: r.v.maluf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), C.P. 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Sousa, L.J.S., E-mail: luisjose@fisica.ufc.br [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará (IFCE), Campus Canindé, 62700-000 Canindé, Ceará (Brazil); Almeida, C.A.S., E-mail: carlos@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), C.P. 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    In this work we study two types of five-dimensional braneworld models given by sine-Gordon potentials. In both scenarios, the thick brane is generated by a real scalar field coupled to gravity. We focus our investigation on the localization of graviton field and the behaviour of the massive spectrum. In particular, we analyse the localization of massive modes by means of a relative probability method in a Quantum Mechanics context. Initially, considering a scalar field sine-Gordon potential, we find a localized state to the graviton at zero mode. However, when we consider a double sine-Gordon potential, the brane structure is changed allowing the existence of massive resonant states. The new results show how the existence of an internal structure can aid in the emergence of massive resonant modes on the brane.

  20. Ethical issues in neuroimaging health research: an IPA study with research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rachel L; Senior, Carl; Peel, Elizabeth; Cooke, Richard; Donnelly, Louise S

    2008-11-01

    Neuroimaging is increasingly used to understand conditions like stroke and epilepsy. However, there is growing recognition that neuroimaging can raise ethical issues. We used interpretative phenomenological analysis to analyse interview data pre-and post-scan to explore these ethical issues. Findings show participants can become anxious prior to scanning and the protocol for managing incidental findings is unclear. Participants lacked a frame of reference to contextualize their expectations and often drew on medical narratives. Recommendations to reduce anxiety include dialogue between researcher and participant to clarify understanding during consent and the use of a ;virtual tour' of the neuroimaging experience.

  1. Identification of neural targets for the treatment of psychiatric disorders: the role of functional neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, David R; Epstein, Jane; Catenaccio, Eva; Stern, Emily

    2011-04-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of psychiatric disorders has been influenced by evolving neurobiological models of symptom generation. The advent of functional neuroimaging and advances in the neurosciences have revolutionized understanding of the functional neuroanatomy of psychiatric disorders. This article reviews neuroimaging studies of depression from the last 3 decades and describes an emerging neurocircuitry model of mood disorders, focusing on critical circuits of cognition and emotion, particularly those networks involved in the regulation of evaluative, expressive and experiential aspects of emotion. The relevance of this model for neurotherapeutics is discussed, as well as the role of functional neuroimaging of psychiatric disorders.

  2. Revisiting neuroimaging of abusive head trauma in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kevin Li-Chun; Zimmerman, Robert A; Kao, Hung Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to use a mechanism-based approach to review the neuroimaging findings of abusive head trauma to infants. Advanced neuroimaging provides insights into not only the underlying mechanisms of craniocerebral injuries but also the long-term prognosis of brain injury for children on whom these injuries have been inflicted. Knowledge of the traumatic mechanisms, the key neuroimaging findings, and the implications of functional imaging findings should help radiologists characterize the underlying causes of the injuries inflicted, thereby facilitating effective treatment.

  3. Does neural input or processing play a greater role in the magnitude of neuroimaging signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Harris

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on how hemodynamic neuroimaging signals such as fMRI can be interpreted in terms of the underlying evoked activity is an understanding of neurovascular coupling mechanisms that actually generate hemodynamic responses. The predominant view at present is that the hemodynamic response is most correlated with synaptic input and subsequent neural processing rather than spiking output. It is still not clear whether input or processing is more important in the generation of hemodynamics responses. In order to investigate this we measured the hemodynamic and neural responses to electrical whisker pad stimuli in rat whisker barrel somatosensory cortex both before and after the local cortical injections of the GABA-A agonist muscimol. Muscimol would not be expected to affect the thalamocortical input into the cortex but would inhibit subsequent intra-cortical processing. Pre-muscimol infusion whisker stimuli elicited the expected neural and accompanying hemodynamic responses to that reported previously. Following infusion of muscimol, although the temporal profile of neural responses to each pulse of the stimulus train was similar, the average response was reduced in magnitude by ~79% compared to that elicited pre-infusion. The whisker-evoked hemodynamic responses were reduced by a commensurate magnitude suggesting that, although the neurovascular coupling relationships were similar for synaptic input as well as for cortical processing, the magnitude of the overall response is dominated by processing rather than from that produced from the thalamocortical input alone.

  4. Remapping of memory encoding and retrieval networks: insights from neuroimaging in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kentaro; Osada, Takahiro; Adachi, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Advancements in neuroimaging techniques have allowed for the investigation of the neural correlates of memory functions in the whole human brain. Thus, the involvement of various cortical regions, including the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC), has been repeatedly reported in the human memory processes of encoding and retrieval. However, the functional roles of these sites could be more fully characterized utilizing nonhuman primate models, which afford the potential for well-controlled, finer-scale experimental procedures that are inapplicable to humans, including electrophysiology, histology, genetics, and lesion approaches. Yet, the presence and localization of the functional counterparts of these human memory-related sites in the macaque monkey MTL or PPC were previously unknown. Therefore, to bridge the inter-species gap, experiments were required in monkeys using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the same methodology adopted in human studies. Here, we briefly review the history of experimentation on memory systems using a nonhuman primate model and our recent fMRI studies examining memory processing in monkeys performing recognition memory tasks. We will discuss the memory systems common to monkeys and humans and future directions of finer cell-level characterization of memory-related processes using electrophysiological recording and genetic manipulation approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of rostral Brodmann area 6 in mental-operation tasks: an integrative neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Okada, Tomohisa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fukuyama, Hidena; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that classical 'motor' areas may also have cognitive functions. We performed three neuroimaging experiments to investigate the functional neuroanatomy underlying three types of nonmotor mental-operation tasks: numerical, verbal, and spatial. (i) Positron emission tomography showed that parts of the posterior frontal cortex, which are consistent with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the rostral part of the dorsolateral premotor cortex (PMdr), were active during all three tasks. We also observed activity in the posterior parietal cortex and cerebellar hemispheres during all three tasks. Electrophysiological monitoring confirmed that there were no skeletomotor, oculomotor or articulatory movements during task performance. (ii) Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that PMdr activity during the mental-operation tasks was localized in the depths of the superior precentral sulcus, which substantially overlapped the region active during complex finger movements and was located dorsomedial to the presumptive frontal eye fields. (iii) Single-trial fMRI showed a transient increase in activity time-locked to the performance of mental operations in the pre-SMA and PMdr. The results of the present study suggest that the PMdr is important in the rule-based association of symbolic cues and responses in both motor and nonmotor behaviors.

  6. CUDA optimization strategies for compute- and memory-bound neuroimaging algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daren; Dinov, Ivo; Dong, Bin; Gutman, Boris; Yanovsky, Igor; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-06-01

    As neuroimaging algorithms and technology continue to grow faster than CPU performance in complexity and image resolution, data-parallel computing methods will be increasingly important. The high performance, data-parallel architecture of modern graphical processing units (GPUs) can reduce computational times by orders of magnitude. However, its massively threaded architecture introduces challenges when GPU resources are exceeded. This paper presents optimization strategies for compute- and memory-bound algorithms for the CUDA architecture. For compute-bound algorithms, the registers are reduced through variable reuse via shared memory and the data throughput is increased through heavier thread workloads and maximizing the thread configuration for a single thread block per multiprocessor. For memory-bound algorithms, fitting the data into the fast but limited GPU resources is achieved through reorganizing the data into self-contained structures and employing a multi-pass approach. Memory latencies are reduced by selecting memory resources whose cache performance are optimized for the algorithm's access patterns. We demonstrate the strategies on two computationally expensive algorithms and achieve optimized GPU implementations that perform up to 6× faster than unoptimized ones. Compared to CPU implementations, we achieve peak GPU speedups of 129× for the 3D unbiased nonlinear image registration technique and 93× for the non-local means surface denoising algorithm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CoSMoMVPA: multi-modal multivariate pattern analysis of neuroimaging datain Matlab / GNU Octave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaas N Oosterhof

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen an increase in the popularity of multivariate pattern (MVP analysis of functional magnetic resonance (fMRI data, and, to a much lesser extent, magneto- and electro-encephalography (M/EEG data. We present CoSMoMVPA, a lightweight MVPA (MVP analysis toolbox implemented in the intersection of the Matlab and GNU Octave languages, that treats both fMRI and M/EEG data as first-class citizens.CoSMoMVPA supports all state-of-the-art MVP analysis techniques, including searchlight analyses, classification, correlations, representational similarity analysis, and the time generalization method. These can be used to address both data-driven and hypothesis-driven questions about neural organization and representations, both within and across: space, time, frequency bands, neuroimaging modalities, individuals, and species.It uses a uniform data representation of fMRI data in the volume or on the surface, and of M/EEG data at the sensor and source level. Through various external toolboxes, it directly supports reading and writing a variety of fMRI and M/EEG neuroimaging formats, and, where applicable, can convert between them. As a result, it can be integrated readily in existing pipelines and used with existing preprocessed datasets. CoSMoMVPA overloads the traditional volumetric searchlight concept to support neighborhoods for M/EEG and surface-based fMRI data, which supports localization of multivariate effects of interest across space, time, and frequency dimensions. CoSMoMVPA also provides a generalized approach to multiple comparison correction across these dimensions using Threshold-Free Cluster Enhancement with state-of-the-art clustering and permutation techniques.CoSMoMVPA is highly modular and uses abstractions to provide a uniform interface for a variety of MVP measures. Typical analyses require a few lines of code, making it accessible to beginner users. At the same time, expert programmers can easily extend its functionality

  8. Neuroimaging findings of congenital Zika virus infection: a pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Mehrjardi, Mohammad; Poretti, Andrea; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Werner, Heron; Keshavarz, Elham; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne arbovirus from the Flaviviridae family. It had caused several epidemics since its discovery in 1947, but there was no significant attention to this virus until the recent outbreak in Brazil in 2015. The main concern is the causal relationship between prenatal ZIKV infection and congenital microcephaly, which has been confirmed recently. Moreover, ZIKV may cause other central nervous system abnormalities such as brain parenchymal atrophy with secondary ventriculomegaly, intracranial calcification, malformations of cortical development (such as polymicrogyria, and lissencephaly-pachygyria), agenesis/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia, sensorineural hearing-loss, and ocular abnormalities as well as arthrogryposis in the infected fetuses. Postnatal (acquired) ZIKV infection usually has an asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic course, while prenatal (congenital) ZIKV infection has a more severe course and may cause severe brain anomalies that are described as congenital Zika syndrome. In this pictorial essay, we aim to illustrate the prenatal and postnatal neuroimaging findings that may be seen in fetuses and neonates with congenital Zika syndrome, and will discuss possible radiological differential diagnoses. A detailed knowledge of these findings is paramount for an early correct diagnosis, prognosis determination, and counseling of the affected children and families.

  9. Neuroimaging correlates of cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2015-08-01

    There has been a gradual shift in the definition of Parkinson's disease, from a movement disorder to a neurodegenerative condition affecting multiple cognitive domains. Mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) is a frequent comorbidity in PD that is associated with progression to dementia (PDD) and debilitating consequences for patients and caregivers. At present, the pathophysiology underpinning cognitive impairment in PD is not established, although emerging evidence has suggested that multi-modal imaging biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of PD-MCI and PDD, thereby identifying at-risk patients to enable treatment at the earliest stage possible. Structural MRI studies have revealed prominent grey matter atrophy and disruptions of white matter tracts in PDD, although findings in non-demented PD have been more variable. There is a need for further longitudinal studies to clarify the spatial and temporal progression of morphological changes in PD, as well as to assess their underlying involvement in the evolution of cognitive deficits. In this review, we discuss the aetiology and neuropsychological profiles of PD-MCI and PDD, summarize the putative imaging substrates in light of evidence from multi-modal neuroimaging studies, highlight limitations in the present literature, and suggest recommendations for future research.

  10. Electrical neuroimaging reveals early generator modulation to emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M; Mohr, Christine; Carbonnel, Serge; Landis, Theodor

    2004-04-01

    Functional electrical neuroimaging investigated incidental emotional word processing. Previous research suggests that the brain may differentially respond to the emotional content of linguistic stimuli pre-lexically (i.e., before distinguishing that these stimuli are words). We investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms of this apparent paradox and in particular whether the initial differentiation of emotional stimuli is marked by different brain generator configurations using high-density, event-related potentials. Such would support the existence of specific cerebral resources dedicated to emotional word processing. A related issue concerns the possibility of right-hemispheric specialization in the processing of emotional stimuli. Thirteen healthy men performed a go/no-go lexical decision task with bilateral word/non-word or non-word/non-word stimulus pairs. Words included equal numbers of neutral and emotional stimuli, but subjects made no explicit discrimination along this dimension. Emotional words appearing in the right visual field (ERVF) yielded the best overall performance, although the difference between emotional and neutral words was larger for left than for right visual field presentations. Electrophysiologically, ERVF presentations were distinguished from all other conditions over the 100-140 ms period by a distinct scalp topography, indicative of different intracranial generator configurations. A distributed linear source estimation (LAURA) of this distinct scalp potential field revealed bilateral lateral-occipital sources with a right hemisphere current density maximum. These data support the existence of a specialized brain network triggered by the emotional connotation of words at a very early processing stage.

  11. Neural mechanisms of mindfulness and meditation: Evidence from neuroimaging studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; R; Marchand

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness is the dispassionate,moment-by-moment awareness of sensations,emotions and thoughts.Mindfulness-based interventions are being increasingly used for stress,psychological well being,coping with chronic illness as well as adjunctive treatments for psychiatric disorders.However,the neural mechanisms associated with mindfulness have not been well characterized.Recent functional and structural neuroimaging studies are beginning to provide insights into neural processes associated with the practice of mindfulness.A review of this literature revealed compelling evidence that mindfulness impacts the function of the medial cortex and associated default mode network as well as insula and amygdala.Additionally,mindfulness practice appears to effect lateral frontal regions and basal ganglia,at least in some cases.Structural imaging studies are consistent with these findings and also indicate changes in the hippocampus.While many questions remain unanswered,the current literature provides evidence of brain regions and networks relevant for understanding neural processes associated with mindfulness.

  12. What can neuroimaging findings tell us about sleep disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2004-06-01

    Models of the pathophysiology of human sleep disorders have only recently been tested using nuclear medicine assessments, which have greatly increased our understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in the human sleep-wake cycle. Dramatic changes in function have been observed in large-scale neuronal networks during sleep. Broad declines in heteromodal-association-cortical function, and relative increases in limbic and paralimbic function have been observed. These cortical areas are responsible for essential aspects of human behavior, allowing us to interact with the world around us and to evaluate the significance of important events in our lives. Preliminary findings suggest that fundamental alterations in the function of these neural systems occur in sleep disorders. In depression, alterations in rapid-eye-movement and slow-wave sleep appear linked to a sleep-related dysfunctional arousal in primary limbic and paralimbic structures (amygdala), and hypofunction in frontal cortical areas. Pharmacologic interventions partially reverse these alterations. Preliminary studies in insomia indicate a subcortical hyperarousal and a failure of sleep to provide normal restoration of function in the prefrontal cortex, leading to chronic sleep deprivation. This review discusses functional neuroimaging data on normal sleep, and on the pathophysiology of insomnia related to depression and primary insomnia.

  13. Affective neuroimaging in generalized anxiety disorder: an integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonzo, Gregory A; Etkin, Amit

    2017-06-01

    Affective neuroimaging has contributed to our knowledge of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) through measurement of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses, which facilitate inference on neural responses to emotional stimuli during task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this article, the authors provide an integrated review of the task-based affective fMRI literature in GAD. Studies provide evidence for variable presence and directionality of BOLD abnormalities in limbic and prefrontal regions during reactivity to, regulation of, and learning from emotional cues. We conclude that understanding the sources of this variability is key to accelerating progress in this area. We propose that the cardinal symptom of GAD-worry-predominantly reflects stimulus-independent mental processes that impose abnormal, inflexible functional brain configurations, ie, the overall pattern of information transfer among behaviorally relevant neural circuits at a given point in time. These configurations that are inflexible to change from the incoming flux of environmental stimuli may underlie inconsistent task-based findings.

  14. Behavioral endophenotypes of drug addiction: Etiological insights from neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Bianca; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the elucidation of neurobehavioral endophenotypes associated with drug addiction made possible by the translational neuroimaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Increasingly, these non-invasive imaging approaches have been the catalyst for advancing our understanding of the etiology of drug addiction as a brain disorder involving complex interactions between pre-disposing behavioral traits, environmental influences and neural perturbations arising from the chronic abuse of licit and illicit drugs. In this article we discuss the causal role of trait markers associated with impulsivity and novelty-/sensation-seeking in speeding the development of compulsive drug administration and in facilitating relapse. We also discuss the striking convergence of imaging findings from these behavioural traits and addiction in rats, monkeys and humans with a focus on biomarkers of dopamine neurotransmission, and highlight areas where further research is needed to disambiguate underlying causal mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  15. Understanding the minds of others: A neuroimaging meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Johnson, Halle; Henry, Julie D; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is an important skill that refers broadly to the capacity to understand the mental states of others. A large number of neuroimaging studies have focused on identifying the functional brain regions involved in ToM, but many important questions remain with respect to the neural networks implicated in specific types of ToM tasks. In the present study, we conducted a series of activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses on 144 datasets (involving 3150 participants) to address these questions. The ALE results revealed common regions shared across all ToM tasks and broader task parameters, but also some important dissociations. In terms of commonalities, consistent activation was identified in the medial prefrontal cortex and bilateral temporoparietal junction. On the other hand, ALE contrast analyses on our dataset, as well as meta-analytic connectivity modelling (MACM) analyses on the BrainMap database, indicated that different types of ToM tasks reliably elicit activity in unique brain areas. Our findings provide the most accurate picture to date of the neural networks that underpin ToM function.

  16. Developing High-Density Diffuse Optical Tomography for Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian Richard

    Clinicians who care for brain-injured patients and premature infants desire a bedside monitor of brain function. A decade ago, there was hope that optical imaging would be able to fill this role, as it combined fMRI's ability to construct cortical maps with EEG's portable, cap-based systems. However, early optical systems had poor imaging performance, and the momentum for the technique slowed. In our lab, we develop diffuse optical tomography (DOT), which is a more advanced method of performing optical imaging. My research has been to pioneer the in vivo use of DOT for advanced neuroimaging by (1) quantifying the advantages of DOT through both in silico simulation and in vivo performance metrics, (2) restoring confidence in the technique with the first retinotopic mapping of the visual cortex (a benchmark for fMRI and PET), and (3) creating concepts and methods for the clinical translation of DOT. Hospitalized patients are unable to perform complicated neurological tasks, which has motivated us to develop the first DOT methods for resting-state brain mapping with functional connectivity. Finally, in collaboration with neonatologists, I have extended these methods with proof-of-principle imaging of brain-injured premature infants. This work establishes DOT's improvements in imaging performance and readies it for multiple clinical and research roles.

  17. Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Correlates of Aggression and Violence in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth M. Weiss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed.

  18. Hemimegalencephaly: Clinical, EEG, neuroimaging, and IMP-SPECT correlation

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    Konkol, R.J.; Maister, B.H.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Iofetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (IMP-SPECT) was performed on 2 girls (5 1/2 and 6 years of age) with histories of intractable seizures, developmental delay, and unilateral hemiparesis secondary to hemimegalencephaly. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed frequent focal discharges in 1 patient, while a nearly continuous burst suppression pattern over the malformed hemisphere was recorded in the other. IMP-SPECT demonstrated a good correlation with neuroimaging studies. In spite of the different EEG patterns, which had been proposed to predict contrasting clinical outcomes, both IMP-SPECT scans disclosed a similar decrease in tracer uptake in the malformed hemisphere. These results are consistent with the pattern of decreased tracer uptake found in other interictal studies of focal seizures without cerebral malformations. In view of recent recommendations for hemispherectomy in these patients, we suggest that the IMP-SPECT scan be used to compliment EEG as a method to define the extent of abnormality which may be more relevant to long-term prognosis than EEG alone.

  19. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed.

  20. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease: preclinical challenges toward clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Derek; Hall, Benjamin M; Annapragada, Ananth; Pautler, Robia G

    2016-09-01

    The scope of this review focuses on recent applications in preclinical and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward accomplishing the goals of early detection and responses to therapy in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Driven by the outstanding efforts of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a truly invaluable resource, the initial use of MRI in AD imaging has been to assess changes in brain anatomy, specifically assessing brain shrinkage and regional changes in white matter tractography using diffusion tensor imaging. However, advances in MRI have led to multiple efforts toward imaging amyloid beta plaques first without and then with the use of MRI contrast agents. These technological advancements have met with limited success and are not yet appropriate for the clinic. Recent developments in molecular imaging inclusive of high-power liposomal-based MRI contrast agents as well as fluorine 19 ((19)F) MRI and manganese enhanced MRI have begun to propel promising advances toward not only plaque imaging but also using MRI to detect perturbations in subcellular processes occurring within the neuron. This review concludes with a discussion about the necessity for the development of novel preclinical models of AD that better recapitulate human AD for the imaging to truly be meaningful and for substantive progress to be made toward understanding and effectively treating AD. Furthermore, the continued support of outstanding programs such as ADNI as well as the development of novel molecular imaging agents and MRI fast scanning sequences will also be requisite to effectively translate preclinical findings to the clinic.

  1. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE.

  2. Functional neuroimaging of semantic and episodic musical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platel, Hervé

    2005-12-01

    The distinction between episodic and semantic memory has become very popular since it was first proposed by Tulving in 1972. So far, very few neuropsychological, psychophysical, and imaging studies have related to the mnemonic aspects of music, notably on the long-term memory features, and practically nothing is known about the functional anatomy of long-term memory for music. Numerous functional imaging studies have shown that retrieval from semantic and episodic memory is subserved by distinct neural networks. For instance, the HERA model (hemispheric encoding/retrieval asymmetry) ascribes to the left prefrontal cortex a preferential role in the encoding process of episodic material and the recall of semantic information, while the right prefrontal cortex would preferentially operate in the recall of episodic information. However, these results were essentially obtained with verbal and visuo-spatial material. We have done a study to determine the neural substrates underlying the semantic and episodic components of music using familiar and nonfamiliar melodic tunes. Two distinct patterns of activations were found: bilateral activation of the middle and superior frontal areas and precuneus for episodic memory, and activation of the medial and orbital frontal cortex bilaterally, left angular gyrus, and the anterior part of the left middle and superior temporal gyri for semantic memory. We discuss these findings in light of the available neuropsychological data obtained in brain-damaged subjects and functional neuroimaging studies.

  3. Functional neuroimaging of conversion disorder: the role of ancillary activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Matthew J; Ghaffar, Omar; Staines, W Richard; Downar, Jonathan; Feinstein, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies investigating the neuroanatomy of conversion disorder have yielded inconsistent results that may be attributed to small sample sizes and disparate methodologies. The objective of this study was to better define the functional neuroanatomical correlates of conversion disorder. Ten subjects meeting clinical criteria for unilateral sensory conversion disorder underwent fMRI during which a vibrotactile stimulus was applied to anesthetic and sensate areas. A block design was used with 4 s of stimulation followed by 26 s of rest, the pattern repeated 10 times. Event-related group averages of the BOLD response were compared between conditions. All subjects were right-handed females, with a mean age of 41. Group analyses revealed 10 areas that had significantly greater activation (p conversion symptoms are associated with a pattern of abnormal cerebral activation comprising neural networks implicated in emotional processing and sensory integration. Further study of the roles and potential interplay of these networks may provide a basis for an underlying psychobiological mechanism of conversion disorder.

  4. Three brain collections for comparative neuroanatomy and neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2011-05-01

    In the context of increasing extinction rates and the potential loss of essential evolutionary biological and anthropological information, it is an important task to support efforts to prepare, preserve, and curate collections of histological brain sections; to disseminate information on such collections in the neuroscience community; and to make the collections publicly available. This review emphasizes the importance of complete, serially sectioned human brains of different ontogenetic stages as well as those of adult and old human individuals for neurobiological and medical research. Such histological sections enable microstructural analyses and anatomical evaluations of functional and structural neuroimaging data, for example, based on magnetic resonance imaging. Here, this review provides the first detailed and updated account of the content of the Stephan, Zilles, and Zilles-Amunts collections, which consist of serially sectioned and cell body- and myelin-stained histological preparations. Finally, this review will give an overview of past and recent research using these collections to increase our understanding of the detailed patterns of divergent brain evolution in primates as well as of the structural organization of the human brain.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 Clinical Core: Progress and plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Donohue, Michael; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the current status of the Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), and summarizes planning for the next stage of the project. Clinical Core activities and plans were synthesized based on discussions among the Core leaders and external advisors. The longitudinal data in ADNI-2 provide natural history data on a clinical trials population and continue to inform refinement and standardization of assessments, models of trajectories, and clinical trial methods that have been extended into sporadic preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plans for the next phase of the ADNI project include maintaining longitudinal follow-up of the normal and mild cognitive impairment cohorts, augmenting specific clinical cohorts, and incorporating novel computerized cognitive assessments and patient-reported outcomes. A major hypothesis is that AD represents a gradually progressive disease that can be identified precisely in its long presymptomatic phase, during which intervention with potentially disease-modifying agents may be most useful. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren, E-mail: warren.reed@sydney.edu.au [Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  7. Prediction of children's reading skills using behavioral, functional, and structural neuroimaging measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, Fumiko; Ueno, Takefumi; Reiss, Allan L; Meyler, Ann; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Glover, Gary H; Keller, Timothy A; Kobayashi, Nobuhisa; Mazaika, Paul; Jo, Booil; Just, Marcel Adam; Gabrieli, John D E

    2007-06-01

    The ability to decode letters into language sounds is essential for reading success, and accurate identification of children at high risk for decoding impairment is critical for reducing the frequency and severity of reading impairment. We examined the utility of behavioral (standardized tests), and functional and structural neuroimaging measures taken with children at the beginning of a school year for predicting their decoding ability at the end of that school year. Specific patterns of brain activation during phonological processing and morphology, as revealed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray and white matter densities, predicted later decoding ability. Further, a model combining behavioral and neuroimaging measures predicted decoding outcome significantly better than either behavioral or neuroimaging models alone. Results were validated using cross-validation methods. These findings suggest that neuroimaging methods may be useful in enhancing the early identification of children at risk for poor decoding and reading skills. Copyright (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Towards Confirming Neural Circuit Inference from Population Calcium Imaging. NIPS Workshop on Connectivity Inference in Neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    NeuroData; Mishchenko, Y.; AM, Packer; TA, Machado; Yuste, R.; Paninski, L

    2015-01-01

    Vogelstein JT, Mishchenko Y, Packer AM, Machado TA, Yuste R, Paninski L. Towards Confirming Neural Circuit Inference from Population Calcium Imaging. NIPS Workshop on Connectivity Inference in Neuroimaging, 2009

  9. How can neuroimaging facilitate the diagnosis and stratification of patients with psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Matthew J; McGuire, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychosis are associated with improved outcome in terms of future functioning, symptoms and treatment response. Identifying neuroimaging biomarkers for illness onset and treatment response would lead to immediate clinical benefits. In this review we discuss if neuroimaging may be utilised to diagnose patients with psychosis, predict those who will develop the illness in those at high risk, and stratify patients. State-of-the-art developments in the field are critically examined including multicentre studies, longitudinal designs, multimodal imaging and machine learning as well as some of the challenges in utilising future neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical trials. As many of these developments are already being applied in neuroimaging studies of Alzheimer's disease, we discuss what lessons have been learned from this field and how they may be applied to research in psychosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Federating distributed and heterogeneous information sources in neuroimaging: the NeuroBase Project.

    OpenAIRE

    Barillot, Christian; Benali, Habib; Dojat, Michel; Gaignard, Alban; Gibaud, Bernard; Kinkingnéhun, Serge; Matsumoto, Jean-Pierre; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Simon, Eric; Temal, Lynda

    2006-01-01

    The NeuroBase project aims at studying the requirements for federating, through the Internet, information sources in neuroimaging. These sources are distributed in different experimental sites, hospitals or research centers in cognitive neurosciences, and contain heterogeneous data and image processing programs. More precisely, this project consists in creating of a shared ontology, suitable for supporting various neuroimaging applications, and a computer architecture for accessing and sharin...

  11. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  12. The ENIGMA Consortium: large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  13. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Renteria, Miguel E.; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replication of finding...

  14. The ENIGMA Consortium: Large-scale collaborative analyses of neuroimaging and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul; Stein, J.L.; Medland, Sarah Elizabeth; Hibar, Derrek; Vásquez, Arias; Rentería, Miguel; Toro, Roberto; Jahanshad, Neda; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret; Martin, Nicholas; Agartz, Ingrid; Alda, Martin; Alhusaini, Saud

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a collaborative network of researchers working together on a range of large-scale studies that integrate data from 70 institutions worldwide. Organized into Working Groups that tackle questions in neuroscience, genetics, and medicine, ENIGMA studies have analyzed neuroimaging data from over 12,826 subjects. In addition, data from 12,171 individuals were provided by the CHARGE consortium for replicatio...

  15. Decoding the complex brain: multivariate and multimodal analyses of neuroimaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salami, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    Functional brain images are extraordinarily rich data sets that reveal distributed brain networks engaged in a wide variety of cognitive operations. It is a substantial challenge both to create models of cognition that mimic behavior and underlying cognitive processes and to choose a suitable analytic method to identify underlying brain networks. Most of the contemporary techniques used in analyses of functional neuroimaging data are based on univariate approaches in which single image elements (i.e. voxels) are considered to be computationally independent measures. Beyond univariate methods (e.g. statistical parametric mapping), multivariate approaches, which identify a network across all regions of the brain rather than a tessellation of regions, are potentially well suited for analyses of brain imaging data. A multivariate method (e.g. partial least squares) is a computational strategy that determines time-varying distributed patterns of the brain (as a function of a cognitive task). Compared to its univariate counterparts, a multivariate approach provides greater levels of sensitivity and reflects cooperative interactions among brain regions. Thus, by considering information across more than one measuring point, additional information on brain function can be revealed. Similarly, by considering information across more than one measuring technique, the nature of underlying cognitive processes become well-understood. Cognitive processes have been investigated in conjunction with multiple neuroimaging modalities (e.g. fMRI, sMRI, EEG, DTI), whereas the typical method has been to analyze each modality separately. Accordingly, little work has been carried out to examine the relation between different modalities. Indeed, due to the interconnected nature of brain processing, it is plausible that changes in one modality locally or distally modulate changes in another modality. This thesis focuses on multivariate and multimodal methods of image analysis applied to

  16. Heads in the Cloud: A Primer on Neuroimaging Applications of High Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatil, Anwar S; Younas, Sohail; Pourreza, Hossein; Figley, Chase R

    2015-01-01

    With larger data sets and more sophisticated analyses, it is becoming increasingly common for neuroimaging researchers to push (or exceed) the limitations of standalone computer workstations. Nonetheless, although high-performance computing platforms such as clusters, grids and clouds are already in routine use by a small handful of neuroimaging researchers to increase their storage and/or computational power, the adoption of such resources by the broader neuroimaging community remains relatively uncommon. Therefore, the goal of the current manuscript is to: 1) inform prospective users about the similarities and differences between computing clusters, grids and clouds; 2) highlight their main advantages; 3) discuss when it may (and may not) be advisable to use them; 4) review some of their potential problems and barriers to access; and finally 5) give a few practical suggestions for how interested new users can start analyzing their neuroimaging data using cloud resources. Although the aim of cloud computing is to hide most of the complexity of the infrastructure management from end-users, we recognize that this can still be an intimidating area for cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other neuroimaging researchers lacking a strong computational background. Therefore, with this in mind, we have aimed to provide a basic introduction to cloud computing in general (including some of the basic terminology, computer architectures, infrastructure and service models, etc.), a practical overview of the benefits and drawbacks, and a specific focus on how cloud resources can be used for various neuroimaging applications.

  17. Visual systems for interactive exploration and mining of large-scale neuroimaging data archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Van Horn, John D

    2012-01-01

    While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the populating of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do and these archives grow in size, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information that these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the informatics visualization for neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework for the graphical rendering of, and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, detail its development, and demonstrate its usage in examining a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining.

  18. Responsible Reporting: Neuroimaging News in the Age of Responsible Research and Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Irja Marije; Kupper, Frank; Arentshorst, Marlous; Broerse, Jacqueline

    2016-08-01

    Besides offering opportunities in both clinical and non-clinical domains, the application of novel neuroimaging technologies raises pressing dilemmas. 'Responsible Research and Innovation' (RRI) aims to stimulate research and innovation activities that take ethical and social considerations into account from the outset. We previously identified that Dutch neuroscientists interpret "responsible innovation" as educating the public on neuroimaging technologies via the popular press. Their aim is to mitigate (neuro)hype, an aim shared with the wider emerging RRI community. Here, we present results of a media-analysis undertaken to establish whether the body of articles in the Dutch popular press presents balanced conversations on neuroimaging research to the public. We found that reporting was mostly positive and framed in terms of (healthcare) progress. There was rarely a balance between technology opportunities and limitations, and even fewer articles addressed societal or ethical aspects of neuroimaging research. Furthermore, neuroimaging metaphors seem to favour oversimplification. Current reporting is therefore more likely to enable hype than to mitigate it. How can neuroscientists, given their self-ascribed social responsibility, address this conundrum? We make a case for a collective and shared responsibility among neuroscientists, journalists and other stakeholders, including funders, committed to responsible reporting on neuroimaging research.

  19. Visual Systems for Interactive Exploration and Mining of Large-Scale Neuroimaging Data Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eBowman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the population of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN program for the graphical rendering of and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, describe its development, and demonstrate its use to examine a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical MRI image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies and drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining.

  20. Heads in the Cloud: A Primer on Neuroimaging Applications of High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatil, Anwar S.; Younas, Sohail; Pourreza, Hossein; Figley, Chase R.

    2015-01-01

    With larger data sets and more sophisticated analyses, it is becoming increasingly common for neuroimaging researchers to push (or exceed) the limitations of standalone computer workstations. Nonetheless, although high-performance computing platforms such as clusters, grids and clouds are already in routine use by a small handful of neuroimaging researchers to increase their storage and/or computational power, the adoption of such resources by the broader neuroimaging community remains relatively uncommon. Therefore, the goal of the current manuscript is to: 1) inform prospective users about the similarities and differences between computing clusters, grids and clouds; 2) highlight their main advantages; 3) discuss when it may (and may not) be advisable to use them; 4) review some of their potential problems and barriers to access; and finally 5) give a few practical suggestions for how interested new users can start analyzing their neuroimaging data using cloud resources. Although the aim of cloud computing is to hide most of the complexity of the infrastructure management from end-users, we recognize that this can still be an intimidating area for cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other neuroimaging researchers lacking a strong computational background. Therefore, with this in mind, we have aimed to provide a basic introduction to cloud computing in general (including some of the basic terminology, computer architectures, infrastructure and service models, etc.), a practical overview of the benefits and drawbacks, and a specific focus on how cloud resources can be used for various neuroimaging applications. PMID:27279746

  1. Neurovascular and neuroimaging effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin receptor agonist psilocin in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Aisling; Howarth, Clare; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sharp, Trevor; Sibson, Nicola R; Martin, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The development of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) has presented the opportunity for investigation of the neurophysiological effects of drugs in vivo. Psilocin, a hallucinogen metabolised from psilocybin, was recently reported to evoke brain region-specific, phMRI signal changes in humans. The present study investigated the effects of psilocin in a rat model using phMRI and then probed the relationship between neuronal and haemodynamic responses using a multimodal measurement preparation. Psilocin (2 mg/kg or 0.03 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle was administered to rats (N=6/group) during either phMRI scanning or concurrent imaging of cortical blood flow and recording of local field potentials. Compared to vehicle controls psilocin (2 mg/kg) evoked phMRI signal increases in a number of regions including olfactory and limbic areas and elements of the visual system. PhMRI signal decreases were seen in other regions including somatosensory and motor cortices. Investigation of neurovascular coupling revealed that whilst neuronal responses (local field potentials) to sensory stimuli were decreased in amplitude by psilocin administration, concurrently measured haemodynamic responses (cerebral blood flow) were enhanced. The present findings show that psilocin evoked region-specific changes in phMRI signals in the rat, confirming recent human data. However, the results also suggest that the haemodynamic signal changes underlying phMRI responses reflect changes in both neuronal activity and neurovascular coupling. This highlights the importance of understanding the neurovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations for interpreting haemodynamic neuroimaging data.

  2. Gravity localization in sine-Gordon braneworlds

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, W T; Sousa, L J S; Almeida, C A S

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study two types of five-dimensional braneworld models given by sine-Gordon potentials. In both scenarios, the thick brane is generated by a real scalar field coupled to gravity. We focus our investigation on the localization of graviton field and the behaviour of the massive spectrum. In particular, we analyse the localization of massive modes by means of a relative probability method in a Quantum Mechanics context. Initially, considering a scalar field sine-Gordon potential, we find a resonance to the graviton at zero mode. However, when we consider a double sine-Gordon potential, the brane structure is changed allowing the existence of massless and massive resonant states. The new results show how the existence of an internal structure can aid in the emergence of massive resonant modes on the brane.

  3. Boosting bioluminescence neuroimaging: an optimized protocol for brain studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswendt, Markus; Adamczak, Joanna; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used for optical cell tracking approaches. However, reliable and quantitative bioluminescence of transplanted cells in the brain is highly challenging. In this study we established a new bioluminescence imaging protocol dedicated for neuroimaging, which increases sensitivity especially for noninvasive tracking of brain cell grafts. Different D-Luciferin concentrations (15, 150, 300 and 750 mg/kg), injection routes (i.v., i.p., s.c.), types of anesthesia (Isoflurane, Ketamine/Xylazine, Pentobarbital) and timing of injection were compared using DCX-Luc transgenic mice for brain specific bioluminescence. Luciferase kinetics was quantitatively evaluated for maximal photon emission, total photon emission and time-to-peak. Photon emission followed a D-Luciferin dose-dependent relation without saturation, but with delay in time-to-peak increasing for increasing concentrations. The comparison of intravenous, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal substrate injection reflects expected pharmacokinetics with fastest and highest photon emission for intravenous administration. Ketamine/Xylazine and Pentobarbital anesthesia showed no significant beneficial effect on maximal photon emission. However, a strong difference in outcome was observed by injecting the substrate pre Isoflurane anesthesia. This protocol optimization for brain specific bioluminescence imaging comprises injection of 300 mg/kg D-Luciferin pre Isoflurane anesthesia as an efficient and stable method with a signal gain of approx. 200% (compared to 150 mg/kg post Isoflurane). Gain in sensitivity by the novel imaging protocol was quantitatively assessed by signal-to-noise calculations of luciferase-expressing neural stem cells grafted into mouse brains (transplantation of 3,000-300,000 cells). The optimized imaging protocol lowered the detection limit from 6,000 to 3,000 cells by a gain in signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Neuroimaging study of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murasugi, Hiroko (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) has been attracting attention in recent years because of its brain malformation and progressive muscular dystrophy. The intravitam recognition of brain malformation has been remarkably enhanced by the advent of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques such as CT and MRI. In this study, 87 cranial CT scans and 22 MRIs of the brain, carried out on 60 patients with FCMD, were systematically surveyed, and the correlation between neuroradiological findings and clinical disabilities, and, in two autopsy cases, neuropathological findings was evaluated. Four cases of lissencephalic, 29 of pachygyric, and one of polymicrogyric (suspected) brain surface, and 2 normal brain surfaces were recognized. The patients with lissencephalic brain surface were compared using Dobyns' criteria. Grading of pachygyria was judged as bilateral II in 52% of cases and bilateral I in 48%. The surface of the occipital lobe could not be confirmed with either CT or MRI. Polymicrogyria was suspected using MRI but could not confirmed with CT. Five caces of lissencephaly had never learned any meaningful words and all but one were bedridden because of poor head control. The abilities of patients were better when the grading of pachygyria was milder. Mental disability and peak motor function correlate more closely with the degree and extent of brain malformation than with muscle degeneration. The decrease in radiodensity in the white matter was remarkable in 12 out of 19 cases (63%), and was usually bilaterally symmetrical. An increase in radiodensity in the white matter with age was observed in 3 patients. The rate of myelination was slower than normal in 3 out of the 6 cases. (author).

  5. The child with a cephalocele: etiology, neuroimaging, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Poza, M; Sola, J; Soler, C L; Montalvo, C G; Domingo, R; Puche, A; Ramón, F H; Azorín, P; Lasso, R

    1996-09-01

    We report a series of 46 children who were treated for one of the diverse forms of cranium bifidum during a period of 22 years. The purpose of the survey was to investigate pathogenetic factors involved in the development of cranial dysraphism and to analyze clinical and pathological factors that influence the patients' outcome. We also investigated the existence of associated intracranial anomalies, in a systematic way, using modern methods of neuroimaging, and related the findings to the patients' final results. The lesions were classified as encephalocele (n = 15), cranial meningocele (n = 3), atretic cephalocele (n = 26), cranium bifidum occultum (n = 1), and exencephaly (n = 1). There was an excess of the atretic form of cephaloceles in our series, a fact that probably reflects geographical variations described for cephaloceles in general. The location of the lesions was occipital in 29 children, parietal in 16, and temporal and frontobasal in one case each. In seven cases there was parental consanguinity. A familial history of malformations of the central nervous system was encountered in eight instances. Associated systemic abnormalities were present in 23 patients, while central nervous system anomalies were found in 36 children. Cephalocele repair was undertaken on 35 occasions. There were no surgical fatalities in the series. The mean follow-up time was of 7 years. Overall mortality for the whole group was of 17/46 or 36%. Twenty of the 29 survivors had no neurological sequelae, but only 18 children exhibited a competitive intelligence level. A good outcome was found to correlate well with: an average head size at birth, a normal initial neurological condition, operability of the lesions, and an absence of disorders of the neuronal migration. Neurological outcome depended also on the occurrence or not of hydrocephalus, while the intelligence level was mainly related to the absence of cerebral tissue within the sac of the malformation.

  6. Enhanced photoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs

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    Witte, Russell S.; Kim, K.; Agarwal, A.; Fan, W.; Kopelman, R.; Kotov, N.; Kipke, D.; O'Donnell, M.

    2008-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.

  7. Multiple sclerosis in malaysia: demographics, clinical features, and neuroimaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S; Rose, N; Masita, A; Dhaliwal, J S; Puvanarajah, S D; Rafia, M H; Muda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here.

  8. Neuroimaging and the search for a cure for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Jeffrey R

    2013-12-01

    As radiologists, our role in the workup of the dementia patient has long been limited by the sensitivity of our imaging tools and lack of effective treatment options. Over the past 30 years, we have made tremendous strides in understanding the genetic, molecular, and cellular basis of Alzheimer disease (AD). We now know that the pathologic features of AD are present 1 to 2 decades prior to development of symptoms, though currently approved symptomatic therapies are administered much later in the disease course. The search for true disease-modifying therapy continues and many clinical trials are underway. Current outcome measures, based on cognitive tests, are relatively insensitive to pathologic disease progression, requiring long, expensive trials with large numbers of participants. Biomarkers, including neuroimaging, have great potential to increase the power of trials by matching imaging methodology with therapeutic mechanism. One of the most important advances over the past decade has been the development of in vivo imaging probes targeted to amyloid beta protein, and one agent is already available for clinical use. Additional advances include automated volumetric imaging methods to quantitate cerebral volume loss. Use of such techniques in small, early phase trials are expected to significantly increase the number and quality of candidate drugs for testing in larger trials. In addition to a critical role in trials, structural, molecular, and functional imaging techniques can give us a window on the etiology of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. This combination of developments has potential to bring diagnostic radiology to the forefront in AD research, therapeutic trials, and patient care. ©RSNA, 2013.

  9. Clinical and neuroimaging study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

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    JIN Miao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, slow saccade, hyporeflexia, action tremor, cognitive decline and peripheral neuropathy. The brain MRI shows obvious atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem, indicating typical change of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. SCA2 is caused by an expanded cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG trinucleotide repeat in the encoding region of ATXN2. The normal CAG repeats range from 13 to 31, and ataxic phenotype occurs when the repeats are more than 34. This study focused on the clinical and imaging features of 5 SCA2 families confirmed by genetic testing. The correlation between phenotype and genotype was analyzed. Methods The pathological CAG triplet repeat expansions of SCA1-3, 6, 7, 17 and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA genes were analyzed in the probands of 708 autosomal dominant SCA families and 119 sporadic SCA cases. The CAG repeat of ATXN2 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis. Fragment analysis based on CEQ8000 sequencer were applied to analyze expanded alleles. Results Expanded CAG repeats of ATXN2 gene were detected in 45 probands of SCA2 families. Most of the patients manifested with the typical clinical features of SCA2 such as cerebellar ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, slow saccade and hyporeflexia. Some of them also associated with action tremor. The brain MRI showed obvious atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem. The correlation between clinical features and CAG repeat of ATXN2 gene was studied carefully in 5 families. Conclusion Genetic analysis provides the basis for the diagnosis of SCA2. Clinical and neuroimaging features are very helpful in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease. For the identification of cases carrying intermediate allele, it is important to combine clinical, imaging features with dynamic mutation analysis in the affected

  10. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald’s criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here.

  11. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  12. Homocystinuria: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings - of Iranian Pediatric patients

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    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Jafari N, Alai MR, Jabbehdari S, Ahmad Abadi F, NejadBiglari H. Homocystinuria: Diagnosis and Neuroimaging Findings - of Iranian Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:94-98.AbstractObjectiveHomocystinuria is a neurometabolic diseases characterized by symptoms include Neurodevelopmental delay, lens dislocation, long limbs and thrombosis.Materials & MethodsThe patients who were diagnosed as homocystinuria marfaniod habits, seizure in the Neurology Department of Mofid Children’s Hospital in Tehran, Iran between 2004 and 2014 were included in our study. The disorder was confirmed by clinical andneuroimaging findings along withneurometabolic and genetic assessment fromreference laboratory in Germany. We assessed age, gender, past medical history, developmental status, clinical manifestations, and neuroimagingfindings of 20 patients with homocystinuria.ResultsA total of 75% of patients were offspring from consanguineous marriages. A total of 95% of patients had a history of developmental delay and 40% had developmental regression. A total of 75% had seizures from these 45% showed refractory seizures. Seizures among 13 patients werecontrolled with suitable homocystinuria treatment. The patients with homocystinuriawere followed for approximately 10 years and the follow-ups showed that the patients with an early diagnosis and treatment had more favorable clinical responses for growth index,controlled refractory seizures, neurodevelopmental status, and neuroimaging findings. Neuroimaging findings include brain atrophy and/or white matter involvement.ConclusionAccording to the results of this study, we suggest that early assessment and detectionplayan important role in the prevention of disease progression and clinical signs. Homocystinuria in patients with a positive family history, developmental delays, or regression, refractory, or recurrent seizures should take

  13. Neuroimaging of goal-directed behavior in midlife women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Kelly; Martin, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interventions to improve health behaviors based on conventional cognitive and behavioral theories have been extensively studied; however, advances in neuroimaging technology make it possible to assess the neurophysiological basis of health behaviors, such as physical activity. The goals of this approach are to support new interventions to achieve optimal outcomes. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess differences in brain responses in healthy weight to obese midlife women during a goal-directed decision task. Thirty nondiabetic, midlife (age 47-55 years) women with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 18.5 to 40 kg/m were recruited. A descriptive, correlational design was used to assess the relationship between brain activations and weight status. Participants underwent a goal-directed behavior task in the fMRI scanner consisting of a learning and implementation phase. The task was designed to assess both goal-directed and habitual behaviors. One participant was omitted from the analysis because of excessive motion (>4 mm), and six were omitted because of fewer than 50% correct responses on the exit survey. Four participants developed claustrophobia in the scanner and were disqualified from further participation. The remaining 19 participants were included in the final analysis. Brain responses while participants learned goal-directed behavior showed a positive correlation with BMI in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and a negative correlation with BMI in the insula. During the implementation of goal-directed behavior, brain responses in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) negatively correlated with BMI. These results indicate that overweight women activate regions associated with cognitive control to a greater degree than healthy weight women during goal-directed learning. The brain regions activated (dmPFC, dlPFC, insula) are associated with cognitive control and self-regulation. On the other hand

  14. Neurofunctional systems. 3D reconstructions with correlated neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Fiekert, W.; Gerke, M.; Vogt, H.; Weirich, D.; Wesemann, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Abt. Neuroanatomie; Weinrich, W. [Staedtisches Krankenhaus Nordstadt, Hannover (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    1998-12-31

    This book introduces, for the first time, computer-generated images of the neurofunctional systems of the human brain. These images are more accurate than drawings. The main views presented are of the medial lemniscus system, auditory system, visual system, basal ganglia, corticospinal system, and the limbic system. The arteries and sulci of the cerebral hemispheres are also illustrated by computer. These images provide a three-dimensional orientation of the intracranial space and help, for example, to assess vascular functional disturbance of the brain. Clinicians will find these images valuable for the spatial interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET) images since many neurofunctional systems cannot be visualized as isolated structures in neuroimaging. Computer-assisted surface reconstructions of the neurofunctional systems and the cerebral arteries serve as a basis for constructing these computer-generated images. The surface reconstructions are anatomically realistic having been created from brain sections with minimal deformations. The method of computer graphics, known as ray tracing, produces digital images form these reconstructions. The computer-generated methods are explained. The computer-generated images are accompanied by illustrations and texts on neuroanatomy and clinical practice. The neurofunctional systems of the human brain are also shown in sections so that the reader can mentally reconstruct the neurofunctional systems, thus facilitating the transformation of information into textbooks and atlantes of MR and CT imaging. The aim of this book is acquaint the reader with the three-dimensional aspects of the neurofunctional systems and the cerebral arteries of the human brain using methods of computer graphics. Computer scientists and those interested in this technique are provided with basic neuroanatomic and neurofunctional information. Physicians will have a clearer understanding

  15. Reading the Freudian theory of sexual drives from a functional neuroimaging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoléru, Serge

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential tasks of neuropsychoanalysis is to investigate the neural correlates of sexual drives. Here, we consider the four defining characteristics of sexual drives as delineated by Freud: their pressure, aim, object, and source. We systematically examine the relations between these characteristics and the four-component neurophenomenological model that we have proposed based on functional neuroimaging studies, which comprises a cognitive, a motivational, an emotional and an autonomic/neuroendocrine component. Functional neuroimaging studies of sexual arousal (SA) have thrown a new light on the four fundamental characteristics of sexual drives by identifying their potential neural correlates. While these studies are essentially consistent with the Freudian model of drives, the main difference emerging between the functional neuroimaging perspective on sexual drives and the Freudian theory relates to the source of drives. From a functional neuroimaging perspective, sources of sexual drives, conceived by psychoanalysis as processes of excitation occurring in a peripheral organ, do not seem, at least in adult subjects, to be an essential part of the determinants of SA. It is rather the central processing of visual or genital stimuli that gives to these stimuli their sexually arousing and sexually pleasurable character. Finally, based on functional neuroimaging results, some possible improvements to the psychoanalytic theory of sexual drives are suggested.

  16. Structural and functional neuroimaging findings associated with the use of clozapine in schizophrenia: a systematic review

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    Giovana J. Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Schizophrenia is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders, and its current treatment relies on antipsychotic medications with only partial effectiveness. Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic with a specific profile of action indicated for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Neuroimaging studies assessing the effects of clozapine could help shed light on the neural underpinnings of the effects of this drug in the brain. The objective of this study was to review the available literature on the structural and functional neuroimaging findings associated with use of clozapine. Method: We conducted a systematic review of the indexed literature using the PubMed, BIREME, and ISI Web of Knowledge search engines and the following keywords: clozapine, neuroimaging, computed tomography, MRI, functional magnetic resonance, PET, SPECT, and DTI. Results: A total of 23 articles were included in the review. In structural studies, the use of clozapine was associated with volume reductions in the basal ganglia, especially the caudate nucleus, where functional neuroimaging studies also found decreased perfusion. In the frontal lobe, clozapine treatment was associated with increased gray matter volume and reduced perfusion. Conclusion: The results of the studies reviewed suggest that the use of clozapine is associated with distinctive structural and functional neuroimaging findings that are not shared with other antipsychotics.

  17. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability.

  18. The 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging: A bibliometric analysis.

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    Kim, Hye Jeong; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Kwanseop; Bae, Jong Seok; Lee, Ju-Hun

    2016-06-18

    The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging. Based on the database of Journal Citation Reports, we selected 669 journals that were considered as potential outlets for neuroimaging articles. The Web of Science search tools were used to identify the 100 most-cited articles relevant to neuroimaging within the selected journals. The following information was recorded for each article: publication year, journal, category and impact factor of journal, number of citations, number of annual citations, authorship, department, institution, country, article type, imaging technique used, and topic. The 100 most-cited articles in neuroimaging were published between 1980 and 2012, with 1995-2004 producing 69 articles. Citations ranged from 4384 to 673 and annual citations ranged from 313.1 to 24.9. The majority of articles were published in radiology/imaging journals (n=75), originated in the United States (n=58), were original articles (n=63), used MRI as imaging modality (n=85), and dealt with imaging technique (n=45). The Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain at John Radcliffe Hospital (n=10) was the leading institutions and Karl J. Friston (n=11) was the most prolific author. Our study presents a detailed list and an analysis of the 100 most-cited articles in the field of neuroimaging, which provides an insight into historical developments and allows for recognition of the important advances in this field.

  19. Seeing responsibility: can neuroimaging teach us anything about moral and legal responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, David; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    As imaging technologies help us understand the structure and function of the brain, providing insight into human capabilities as basic as vision and as complex as memory, and human conditions as impairing as depression and as fraught as psychopathy, some have asked whether they can also help us understand human agency. Specifically, could neuroimaging lead us to reassess the socially significant practice of assigning and taking responsibility? While responsibility itself is not a psychological process open to investigation through neuroimaging, decision-making is. Over the past decade, different researchers and scholars have sought to use neuroimaging (or the results of neuroimaging studies) to investigate what is going on in the brain when we make decisions. The results of this research raise the question whether neuroscience-especially now that it includes neuroimaging-can and should alter our understandings of responsibility and our related practice of holding people responsible. It is this question that we investigate here. © 2014 by The Hastings Center.

  20. Structural Neuroimaging of the Medial Temporal Lobe in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; de Celis Alonso, Benito; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTA) is being used as a criterion to support a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are several structural neuroimaging approaches for quantifying MTA, including semiquantitative visual rating scales, volumetry (3D), planimetry (2D), and linear measures (1D). Current applications of structural neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease clinical trials (ADCTs) incorporate it as a tool for improving the selection of subjects for enrollment or for stratification, for tracking disease progression, or providing evidence of target engagement for new therapeutic agents. It may also be used as a surrogate marker, providing evidence of disease-modifying effects. However, despite the widespread use of volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ADCTs, there are some important challenges and limitations, such as difficulties in the interpretation of results, limitations in translating results into clinical practice, and reproducibility issues, among others. Solutions to these issues may arise from other methodologies that are able to link the results of volumetric MRI from trials with conventional MRIs performed in routine clinical practice (linear or planimetric methods). Also of potential benefit are automated volumetry, using indices for comparing the relative rate of atrophy of different regions instead of absolute rates of atrophy, and combining structural neuroimaging with other biomarkers. In this review, authors present the existing structural neuroimaging approaches for MTA quantification. They then discuss solutions to the limitations of the different techniques as well as the current challenges of the field. Finally, they discuss how the current advances in AD neuroimaging can help AD diagnosis.

  1. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence.

  2. Neuroimaging as a biomarker in symptom validity and performance validity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    How neuropsychological assessment findings are deemed valid has been a topic of numerous articles but few have addressed any role that neuroimaging studies could provide. Within military and various clinical samples of individuals undergoing neuropsychological evaluations, high levels of failure on measures of symptom validity testing (SVT) and/or performance validity testing (PVT) have been reported. Where 'failure' is defined as a below cut-score performance on some pre-determined set-point on a SVT/PVT measure, are such failures always indicative of invalid test findings or are there other explanations, especially based on informative neuroimaging findings? This review starts with the premise that even though the SVT/PVT task is designed to be simple and easy to perform, it nonetheless requires intact frontoparietal attention, working memory and task engagement (motivation) networks. If there is damage or pathology within any aspect of these networks as demonstrated by neuroimaging findings, the patient may perform below the cut-point as a result of the underlying damage or pathophysiology. The argument is made that neuroimaging findings should be considered as to where SVT/PVT cut-points are established and there should be much greater flexibility in SVT/PVT measures based on other personal, demographic and neuroimaging information. Several case studies are used to demonstrate these points.

  3. A review of the recent advances in neuroimaging of frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Federico; Orsi, Laura; Cicerale, Alessandro; Rubino, Elisa; Rainero, Innocenzo; Bergui, Mauro; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    The term "frontotemporal lobar degeneration" (FTLD) includes a large set of neurodegenerative diseases, which are heterogeneous in their genetic, pathologic and clinical aspects. This review will focus on the most recent contribution of neuroimaging tools on the diagnosis, characterization and pathogenesis of FTLD. Scopus, Ovid, PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for articles published from January 2012 up to December 2014. Searches were limited to articles published in English. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration as a key word was always in the search queries in combination with logic AND, and at least one other key word. We found 91 papers of interest and reviewed their contents, finding in particular 4 major topics: the contribution of neuroimaging on the differential diagnosis; patients' functional characterization; new neuroimaging tools under development and pre-symptomatic genetic forms. Neuroimaging techniques have shown to be useful supporting tools in diagnosis, even if not always determinant to reach a conclusive decision, and quite important to identify phenocopies. At the moment, there is not a neuroimaging biomarker that could track the progressive course of dementias and the effect of therapies, but it is possible that in the future Diffusion Tensor Imaging and molecular imaging could fill this void. Monitoring the evolution of the pathology in vivo for at least 5 years is essential, and this would only be possible in a large multicenter study; asymptomatic forms would require even longer observation periods.

  4. Structural and functional neuroimaging findings associated with the use of clozapine in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Giovana J; Chagas, Marcos H; Silva, Carlos H; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Crippa, José A; Hallak, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders, and its current treatment relies on antipsychotic medications with only partial effectiveness. Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic with a specific profile of action indicated for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Neuroimaging studies assessing the effects of clozapine could help shed light on the neural underpinnings of the effects of this drug in the brain. The objective of this study was to review the available literature on the structural and functional neuroimaging findings associated with use of clozapine. We conducted a systematic review of the indexed literature using the PubMed, BIREME, and ISI Web of Knowledge search engines and the following keywords: clozapine, neuroimaging, computed tomography, MRI, functional magnetic resonance, PET, SPECT, and DTI. A total of 23 articles were included in the review. In structural studies, the use of clozapine was associated with volume reductions in the basal ganglia, especially the caudate nucleus, where functional neuroimaging studies also found decreased perfusion. In the frontal lobe, clozapine treatment was associated with increased gray matter volume and reduced perfusion. The results of the studies reviewed suggest that the use of clozapine is associated with distinctive structural and functional neuroimaging findings that are not shared with other antipsychotics.

  5. Computational analysis in epilepsy neuroimaging: A survey of features and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohith G. Kini

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging and machine learning allow semi-automated detection of malformations of cortical development (MCDs, a common cause of drug resistant epilepsy. A frequently asked question in the field is what techniques currently exist to assist radiologists in identifying these lesions, especially subtle forms of MCDs such as focal cortical dysplasia (FCD Type I and low grade glial tumors. Below we introduce some of the common lesions encountered in patients with epilepsy and the common imaging findings that radiologists look for in these patients. We then review and discuss the computational techniques introduced over the past 10 years for quantifying and automatically detecting these imaging findings. Due to large variations in the accuracy and implementation of these studies, specific techniques are traditionally used at individual centers, often guided by local expertise, as well as selection bias introduced by the varying prevalence of specific patient populations in different epilepsy centers. We discuss the need for a multi-institutional study that combines features from different imaging modalities as well as computational techniques to definitively assess the utility of specific automated approaches to epilepsy imaging. We conclude that sharing and comparing these different computational techniques through a common data platform provides an opportunity to rigorously test and compare the accuracy of these tools across different patient populations and geographical locations. We propose that these kinds of tools, quantitative imaging analysis methods and open data platforms for aggregating and sharing data and algorithms, can play a vital role in reducing the cost of care, the risks of invasive treatments, and improve overall outcomes for patients with epilepsy.

  6. Cortical somatosensory reorganization in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a multimodal neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOS ePAPADELIS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although cerebral palsy (CP is among the most common causes of physical disability in early childhood, we know little about the functional and structural changes of this disorder in the developing brain. Here, we investigated with three different neuroimaging modalities (magnetoencephalography (MEG, diffusion tension imaging (DTI, and resting state fMRI whether spastic CP is associated with functional and anatomical abnormalities in the sensorimotor network. Ten children participated in the study: four with diplegic CP (DCP, three with hemiplegic CP (HCP, and three typically-developing (TD children. Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs were recorded in response to pneumatic stimuli applied to digits D1, D3, and D5 of both hands. Several parameters of water diffusion were calculated from DTI between the thalamus and the precentral and postcentral gyri in both hemispheres. The sensorimotor resting state networks (RSNs were examined by using an independent component analysis method. Tactile stimulation of the fingers elicited the first prominent cortical response at ~50 ms, in all except one child, localized over the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. In five CP children, abnormal somatotopic organization was observed in the affected (or more affected hemisphere. Euclidean distances were markedly different between the two hemispheres in the HCP children, and between DCP and TD children for both hemispheres. DTI analysis revealed decreased fractional anisotropy and increased apparent diffusion coefficient for the thalamocortical pathways in the more affected compared to less affected hemisphere in CP children. Rs-fMRI results indicated absent and/or abnormal sensorimotor RSNs for children with HCP and DCP consistent with the severity and location of their lesions. Our findings suggest an abnormal somatosensory processing mechanism in the sensorimotor network of children with CP possibly as a result of diminished thalamocortical projections.

  7. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Higuchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and arXiv:1402.1346, the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space–time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099 for the U(1 gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali–Shifman mechanism (arXiv:hep-th/9612128, where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza–Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall–Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5,μ components (μ=0,1,2,3 of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  8. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N; Kinney, Hannah C; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm(3) multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal.

  9. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm3 multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal. PMID:26066023

  10. Using Make for Reproducible and Parallel Neuroimaging Workflow and Quality Assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. Askren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper is to describe how we can program neuroimaging workflow using Make, a software development tool designed for describing how to build executables from source files. We show that we can achieve many of the features of more sophisticated neuroimaging pipeline systems, including reproducibility, parallelization, fault tolerance, and quality assurance reports. We suggest that Make represents a large step towards these features with only a modest increase in programming demands over shell scripts. This approach reduces the technical skill and time required to write, debug, and maintain neuroimaging workflows in a dynamic environment, where pipelines are often modified to accommodate new best practices or to study the effect of alternative preprocessing steps, and where the underlying packages change frequently. This paper has a comprehensive accompanying manual with lab practicals and examples (see Supplemental Materials and all data, scripts and makefiles necessary to run the practicals and examples are available in the makepipelines project at NITRC.

  11. Functional and clinical insights from neuroimaging studies in childhood-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, Anna E; Sastry, Nevin V; Gogtay, Nitin

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia is a rare pediatric onset psychiatric disorder continuous with and typically more severe than its adult counterpart. Neuroimaging research conducted on this population has revealed similarly severe neural abnormalities. When taken as a whole, neuroimaging research in this population shows generally decreased cortical gray matter coupled with white matter connectivity abnormalities, suggesting an anatomical basis for deficits in executive function. Subcortical abnormalities are pronounced in limbic structures, where volumetric deficits are likely related to social skill deficits, and cerebellar deficits that have been correlated to cognitive abnormalities. Structures relevant to motor processing also show a significant alteration, with volumetric increase in basal ganglia structures likely due to antipsychotic administration. Neuroimaging of this disorder shows an important clinical image of exaggerated cortical loss, altered white matter connectivity, and differences in structural development of subcortical areas during the course of development and provides important background to the disease state.

  12. Using neuroimaging to understand the cortical mechanisms of auditory selective attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adrian KC; Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G

    2013-01-01

    Over the last four decades, a range of different neuroimaging tools have been used to study human auditory attention, spanning from classic event-related potential studies using electroencephalography to modern multimodal imaging approaches (e.g., combining anatomical information based on magnetic resonance imaging with magneto- and electroencephalography). This review begins by exploring the different strengths and limitations inherent to different neuroimaging methods, and then outlines some common behavioral paradigms that have been adopted to study auditory attention. We argue that in order to design a neuroimaging experiment that produces interpretable, unambiguous results, the experimenter must not only have a deep appreciation of the imaging technique employed, but also a sophisticated understanding of perception and behavior. Only with the proper caveats in mind can one begin to infer how the cortex supports a human in solving the “cocktail party” problem. PMID:23850664

  13. A composite multivariate polygenic and neuroimaging score for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovych, Roman; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) are characterized by widespread pathological changes in the brain. At the same time, Alzheimer's disease is heritable with complex genetic underpinnings that may influence the timing of the related pathological changes in the brain and can affect the progression from MCI to AD. In this paper, we present a multivariate imaging genetics approach for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We employ multivariate pattern recognition approaches to obtain neuroimaging and polygenic discriminators between the healthy individuals and AD patients. We then design, in a linear manner, a composite imaging-genetic score for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We apply our approach within the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and show that the integration of polygenic and neuroimaging information improves prediction of conversion to AD.

  14. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear.

  15. Neuroimaging markers for the prediction and early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Michael; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Hampel, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive age-related neurodegenerative disease. At the time of clinical manifestation of dementia, significant irreversible brain damage is already present, rendering the diagnosis of AD at early stages of the disease an urgent prerequisite for therapeutic treatment to halt, or at least slow, disease progression. In this Review, we discuss various neuroimaging measures that are proving to have potential value as biomarkers of AD pathology for the detection and prediction of AD before the onset of dementia. Recent studies that have identified AD-like structural and functional brain changes in elderly people who are cognitively within the normal range or who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are discussed. A dynamic sequence model of changes that occur in neuroimaging markers during the different disease stages is presented and the predictive value of multimodal neuroimaging for AD dementia is considered. PMID:21696834

  16. Generalized Attractors in Five-Dimensional Gauged Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Inbasekar, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study study generalized attractors in N=2 gauged supergravity theory in five dimensions coupled to arbitrary number of hyper, vector and tensor multiplets. We look for attractor solutions with constant anholonomy coefficients. By analyzing the equations of motion we derive the attractor potential. We further show that the generalized attractor potential can be obtained from the fermionic shifts. We study some simple examples and show that constant anholonomy gives rise to homogeneous black branes in five dimensions.

  17. Charge Orbits of Extremal Black Holes in Five Dimensional Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cerchiai, Bianca L; Marrani, Alessio; Zumino, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We derive the U-duality charge orbits, as well as the related moduli spaces, of "large" and "small" extremal black holes in non-maximal ungauged Maxwell-Einstein supergravities with symmetric scalar manifolds in d=5 space-time dimensions. The stabilizer groups of the various classes of orbits are obtained by determining and solving suitable U-invariant sets of constraints, both in "bare" and "dressed" charges bases, with various methods. After a general treatment of attractors in real special geometry (also considering non-symmetric cases), the N=2 "magic" theories, as well as the N=2 Jordan symmetric sequence, are analyzed in detail. Finally, the half-maximal (N=4) matter-coupled supergravity is also studied in this context.

  18. Neuroimaging communality between schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder: a putative basis for schizo-obsessive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Hermesh, Haggai; Zohar, Joseph; Weizman, Abraham

    2003-07-01

    Four major brain regions have been repeatedly implicated in the pathophysiology of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in in vivo neuroimaging studies: the caudate nucleus, the orbitofrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate gyrus and the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. The present review describes the neuroimaging studies on schizophrenia, pertaining to these brain regions. Our working hypothesis is that such common brain regions, if dysfunctional in schizophrenic patients, would be candidates for a neural network subserving the newly emerging syndrome of schizo-obsessive disorder. Findings, though, are controversial. We conclude that further studies, aimed at specific monitoring of these brain regions, in patients suffering from the schizo-obsessive syndrome are warranted.

  19. Constructive interference in steady-state/FIESTA-C clinical applications in neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Makarand; Kulkami, Makarand

    2011-04-01

    High spatial resolution is one of the major problems in neuroimaging, particularly in cranial and spinal nerve imaging. Constructive interference in steady-state/fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition with phase cycling is a robust sequence in imaging the cranial and spinal nerve pathologies. This pictorial review is a concise article about the applications of this sequence in neuroimaging with clinical examples. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Linking variability in brain chemistry and circuit function through multimodal human neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Hariri, A R

    2012-01-01

    to assay in vivo regional brain chemistry and function, respectively. Typically, these neuroimaging modalities are implemented independently despite the capacity for integrated data sets to offer unique insight into molecular mechanisms associated with brain function. Through examples from the serotonin...... and dopamine system and its effects on threat- and reward-related brain function, we review evidence for how such a multimodal neuroimaging strategy can be successfully implemented. Furthermore, we discuss how multimodal PET-fMRI can be integrated with techniques such as imaging genetics, pharmacological...

  1. EFNS Task Force on Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe : present status and recommendations for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantano, P; Chollet, F; Paulson, O; von Kummer, R; Laihinen, A; Leenders, K; Yancheva, S

    2001-01-01

    A Task Force on 'Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe' was appointed in September 1998 by the education committee of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) in order to: (1) examine the present status of teaching of neuroimaging in the training of neurology in E

  2. Neuroimaging of Brain Injuries and Disorders at Cleveland Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    interventions. Functional MRI is an imaging method that detects increases in cerebral blood volume, flow, and oxygenation that occur locally in response...contributed by primary blast to TBI are less known, although some similarities, such as edema and oxidative stress, common to mechanical TBI have been

  3. Pure geometric thick f(R)-branes: stability and localization of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Yu-Xiao [Lanzhou University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    We study two exactly solvable five-dimensional thick brane world models in pure metric f(R) gravity. Working in the Einstein frame, we show that these solutions are stable against small linear perturbations, including the tensor, vector, and scalar modes. For both models, the corresponding gravitational zero mode is localized on the brane, which leads to the four-dimensional Newton law; while the massive modes are non-localized and only contribute a small correction to the Newton law at a large distance. (orig.)

  4. Pure geometric thick f( R)-branes: stability and localization of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    We study two exactly solvable five-dimensional thick brane world models in pure metric f( R) gravity. Working in the Einstein frame, we show that these solutions are stable against small linear perturbations, including the tensor, vector, and scalar modes. For both models, the corresponding gravitational zero mode is localized on the brane, which leads to the four-dimensional Newton law; while the massive modes are non-localized and only contribute a small correction to the Newton law at a large distance.

  5. Movement and afferent representations in human motor areas: a simultaneous neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic/peripheral nerve-stimulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi eShitara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to primary motor cortex (M1 is an emerging technique that can examine motor-system functionality through evoked activity. However, because sensory afferents from twitching muscles are widely represented in motor areas the amount of evoked activity directly resulting from TMS remains unclear. We delivered suprathreshold TMS to left M1 or electrically stimulated the right median nerve (MNS in 18 healthy volunteers while simultaneously conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging and monitoring with electromyography (EMG. We examined in detail the localization of TMS-, muscle afferent- and superficial afferent-induced activity in M1 subdivisions. Muscle afferent- and TMS-evoked activity occurred mainly in rostral M1, while superficial afferents generated a slightly different activation distribution. In 12 participants who yielded quantifiable EMG, differences in brain activity ascribed to differences in movement-size were adjusted using integrated information from the EMGs. Sensory components only explained 10-20% of the suprathreshold TMS-induced activity, indicating that locally and remotely evoked activity in motor areas mostly resulted from the recruitment of neural and synaptic activity. The present study appears to justify the use of fMRI combined with suprathreshold TMS to M1 for evoked motor network imaging.

  6. Extrinsic information influences taste and flavor perception: a review from psychological and neuroimaging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Masako; Dan, Ippeita

    2013-03-01

    The perception of taste and flavor can be greatly biased by extrinsic cues, or the information about a food that comes from outside of the food itself, such as package designs, brands, prices, and so on. In order to understand taste/flavor experiences in a broader context, it is necessary to consider factors other than the food/tastants themselves. This review aims to summarize some of the relevant findings from psychological and neuroimaging studies, focusing on depicting how extrinsic cues exert their effect on taste and flavor. Currently, the most frequently considered psychological mediator for the effects of extrinsic cues is expectation. Depending on the gap between expectation and taste/flavor experience, four major models predict outcomes of expectation effects: (1) assimilation, (2) generalized-negativity, (3) contrast, and (4) assimilation-contrast. Among them, the most influential is the assimilation model proposing that taste/flavor experiences are modified toward what one expects. Thus far, all the neuroimaging studies examining the influence of extrinsic cues have dealt with assimilation effects. They suggest that when extrinsic cues influence taste/flavor perception, cortical representations of taste/flavor are also modulated. Collectively neuroimaging findings partly answer questions arising from psychological aspects: the influence of extrinsic cues is not due to superficial response bias but to truly changed perception. These findings, albeit limited to assimilation effects, suggest that combined understanding from both psychological and neuroimaging studies would help deepen our understanding of the taste experience. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Sev...

  8. Sparse multivariate measures of similarity between intra-modal neuroimaging datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, M.J.; Mehta, M.A.; Merlo Pich, E.; Risterucci, C.; Zelaya, F.; Reinders, A.A.T.S.; Williams, S.; Dazzan, P.; Doyle, O.M.; Marquand, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of neuroimaging studies are based on either combining more than one data modality (inter-modal) or combining more than one measurement from the same modality (intra-modal). To date, most intra-modal studies using multivariate statistics have focused on differences between datase

  9. The hallucinating brain : A review of structural and functional neuroimaging studies of hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Paul; Laroi, Frank; McGuire, Philip K.; Aleman, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Hallucinations remains one of the most intriguing phenomena in psychopathology. In the past two decades the advent of neuroimaging techniques have allowed researchers to investigate what is happening in the brain of those who experience hallucinations. In this article we review both structural and f

  10. Examining Reading Development and Reading Disability in English Language Learners: Potential Contributions from Functional Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Kenneth R.; Sandak, Rebecca; Frost, Stephen J.; Moore, Dina; Mencl, W. Einar

    2005-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have suggested that across different written languages, skilled reading behavior is supported by similar, largely left hemisphere (LH), networks. In addition, recent studies of reading disability (RD) in monolingual readers, conducted in several languages, suggest a common neurobiological signature for this syndrome…

  11. Neuroimaging in clinical studies of craving: importance of reward and control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Rachel E; Hutchison, Kent E

    2013-06-01

    Research on neurobiological mechanisms, especially the function of networks that underlie reward and cognitive control, may offer an opportunity to explore how existing treatments work and provide means for developing new treatments for substance use disorders. In this respect, the special issue of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors highlights efforts to integrate translational neuroimaging with clinical research by actively linking neuroimaging measures with psychosocial treatment mechanisms. Based on several of the articles in this special issue, mindfulness-based approaches appear poised to make rapid progress in terms of integrating neuroimaging with research on mechanisms that mediate treatment success. This commentary briefly discusses research on incentive salience and cognitive control networks in the context of addiction, followed by a discussion of specific studies within this special issue that address the integration of neuroimaging assessments in the context of mindfulness approaches. Future work may be able to leverage measures of changes in networks and regions that underlie reward processing and cognitive control to better understand how treatments work, especially for mindfulness-based approaches. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  12. Neuroimaging standards for research into small vessel disease and its contribution to ageing and neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Smith, Eric E.; Biessels, Geert J.; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fazekas, Franz; Frayne, Richard; Lindley, Richard I.; O'Brien, John T.; Barkhof, Frederik; Benavente, Oscar R.; Black, Sandra E.; Brayne, Carol; Breteler, Monique; Chabriat, Hugues; DeCarli, Charles; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Doubal, Fergus; Duering, Marco; Fox, Nick C.; Greenberg, Steven; Hachinski, Vladimir; Kilimann, Ingo; Mok, Vincent; van Oostenbrugge, Robert; Pantoni, Leonardo; Speck, Oliver; Stephan, Blossom C. M.; Teipel, Stefan; Viswanathan, Anand; Werring, David; Chen, Christopher; Smith, Colin; van Buchem, Mark; Norrving, Bo; Gorelick, Philip B.; Dichgans, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common accompaniment of ageing. Features seen on neuroimaging include recent small subcortical infarcts, lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, and brain atrophy. SVD can present as a stroke or cognitive decline, or can have

  13. Timing deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) : Evidence from neurocognitive and neuroimaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Rubia, Katya

    Relatively recently, neurocognitive and neuroimaging studies have indicated that individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have deficits in a range of timing functions and their underlying neural networks. Despite this evidence, timing deficits in ADHD are still somewhat

  14. Data mining a functional neuroimaging database for functional segregation in brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Balslev, Daniela; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    We describe a specialized neuroinformatic data mining technique in connection with a meta-analytic functional neuroimaging database: We mine for functional segregation within brain regions by identifying journal articles that report brain activations within the regions and clustering the abstract...

  15. Mining for associations between text and brain activation in a functional neuroimaging database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai; Balslev, D.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a method for mining a neuroimaging database for associations between text and brain locations. The objective is to discover association rules between words indicative of cognitive function as described in abstracts of neuroscience papers and sets of reported stereotactic Talairach...

  16. Timing deficits in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) : Evidence from neurocognitive and neuroimaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Rubia, Katya

    2013-01-01

    Relatively recently, neurocognitive and neuroimaging studies have indicated that individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have deficits in a range of timing functions and their underlying neural networks. Despite this evidence, timing deficits in ADHD are still somewhat n

  17. [Clinical and neuroimaging features of central nervous system impairments in acute intermittent porphyria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Peng, Bin; You, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2011-10-25

    To analyze the clinical and neuroimaging features of central nervous system impairments in acute intermittent porphyria, and explore the possible mechanisms. Six cases with intracranial lesions at our hospital from 1991 to 2011 and 13 cases reported in literatures were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical manifestations of central nervous system impairments included seizures, unconsciousness and cortical blindness, etc. EEG (electroencephalogram) showed slow wave or normal. CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) test indicated slightly higher or normal level of CSF protein. Neuroimaging studies showed two types of intracranial lesions. One type (n = 4) mainly affected the cortex and subcortical white matter, especially involving white matter. Another type (n = 2) affected the deep nuclei such as caudate, putamen and thalamus symmetrically. The symptoms of 13 cases reported in literature with central nervous system impairments included unconsciousness, hallucinations, seizures and cortical blindness. Their neuroimaging manifestations were similar with those of the patients at our hospital. Two additional cases showed predominantly cerebral cortex lesions with no involvement of white matter. Acute intermittent porphyria can affect central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. The neuroimaging features of brain may be lesions located in cortex, subcortical white matter and deep nuclei with different mechanisms. A correct diagnosis and a treatment decision should be made during an early stage.

  18. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis : Neuroimaging and Long-term Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersbergen, Karina J.; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; de Vries, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Neonates are known to have a higher risk of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis than children of other age groups. The exact incidence in neonates remains unknown and is likely to be underestimated, as clinical presentation is nonspecific and diagnosis can only be made when dedicated neuroimaging techniq

  19. Integrating Genetic, Psychopharmacological and Neuroimaging Studies: A Converging Methods Approach to Understanding the Neurobiology of ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durston, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how combining multiple approaches can inform us about the neurobiology of ADHD. Converging evidence from genetic, psychopharmacological and functional neuroimaging studies has implicated dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry in ADHD. However, while the observation of converging evidence from multiple vantage points…

  20. A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging research in autistic spectrum disorders: Attention, inhibition and cognitive flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are devastating neurodevelopmental disorders of unknown aetiology with characteristic deficits in social interaction, communication and behaviour. Individuals with ASD show deficits in executive function (EF), which are hypothesised to underlie core repetitive, stereotyped behaviours of autism. Neuroimaging research has identified structural brain abnormalities in ASD, which coincide with brain regions involved in EF. Therefore, we reviewed the l...