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Sample records for fission time scales

  1. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range w

  2. Viscosity and fission time scale of Dy-156 at high excitation energies and large angular momenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vantHof, G; Bacelar, JCS; Dioszegi, [No Value; Harakeh, MN; Hesselink, WHA; KalantarNayestanaki, N; Kugler, A; vanderPloeg, H; Plompen, AJM; vanSchagen, JPS

    1996-01-01

    The reaction Ar-40 + Cd-116 --> Dy-156* --> fission as Studied at beam energies E(b) = 216 MeV and E(b) = 238 MeV, wherein gamma-rays were measured in coincidence with fission fragments. From these spectra the nuclear viscosity gamma and fission time scale were deduced by comparing to statistical

  3. Viscosity, fission time scale and deformation of Dy-156

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Hof, G; Bacelar, JCS; Dioszegi, [No Value; Harakeh, MN; Hesselink, WHA; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kugler, A; van der Ploeg, H; Plompen, AJM; van Schagen, JPS

    1998-01-01

    In the fusion-fission reaction Ar-40 + Cd-116 --> Dy-156*, fission, at E-b = 216 MeV and 238 MeV, gamma-rays were measured in coincidence with fission fragments. The interpretation of the gamma-ray spectra is done with the help of a modified version of the statistical-model code CASCADE. The spectra

  4. TIME SCALES OF FUSION-FISSION REACTIONS CALCULATED FROM PRESCISSION NEUTRON MULTIPLICITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIWEKWILCZYNSKA, K; WILCZYNSKI, J; SIEMSSEN, RH; WILSCHUT, HW

    1995-01-01

    The time scale of fusion-fission reactions was found to be in the range from tau(f) = 5 . 10(-20) to 5 . 10(-19) s. This result was obtained from the analysis of the prescission neutron multiplicities with a new method combining the time-dependent statistical cascade calculations with the nuclear

  5. Fission time-scale from the measurement of pre-scission light particles and -ray multiplicities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ramachandran; A Chatterjee; A Navin; K Mahata; A Shrivastava; V Tripathi; S Kailas; V Nanal; R G Pillay; A Saxena; R G Thomas; D R Chakrabarty; V M Datar; Suresh Kumar; P K Sahu

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the experimental result on simultaneous measurement of pre-scission neutron, proton, -particle and GDR -ray multiplicities for the reaction 28Si+175Lu at 159 MeV using the BARC–TIFR Pelletron–LINAC accelerator facility is given. The data were analysed using deformation-dependent particle transmission coefficients, binding energies and level densities which are incorporated in the code JOANNE2 to extract fission time-scales and mean deformation of the saddle-to-scission emitter. The neutron, light charged particle and GDR -ray multiplicity data could be explained consistently. The emission of neutrons seems to be favoured towards larger deformation as compared to charged particles. The pre-saddle time-scale is deduced as (0–2) × 10−21 s whereas the saddle-to-scission time-scale is (36–39) × 10−21 s. The total fission time-scale is deduced as (36–41) × 10−21 s.

  6. Fission time scales from anisotropic in-plane distributions in 100Mo+100Mo and 120Sn+120Sn collisions around 20A MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, G.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.; Wessels, J. P.; Charity, R. J.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Stelzer, H.

    1993-10-01

    The characteristics of the fission step following a binary deep-inelastic interaction have been reconstructed for three-body events detected in the reaction 100Mo+100Mo at 18.7A MeV and 12-Sn+120Sn at 18.4A MeV. The observed anisotropy of the in-plane angular distributions points to the fast decay of a rotating (and strongly deformed) nuclear object formed at the end of the deep-inelastic interaction. The derived time scale of the process indicates that asymmetric divisions are faster than symmetric ones.

  7. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: deformation-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate non-adiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behaviour. Those beginning just beyond the ...

  8. Fundamental Fission Research with the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinrath, Verena; Niffte Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed a novel instrument for fission research - a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which enables detailed tracking of charged particles emitted in neutron-induced fission. While the primary goal of the project is to measure fission cross sections with unprecedented precision, the TPC can also facilitate more fundamental fission studies. The detector's high efficiency (4-pi acceptance) and precise tracking capabilities (including energy deposition) provide a large amount of valuable information. Recent data collected during engineering runs using a U238/U235 target will be used to generate fission fragment angular distributions and yields as a function of incident neutron energy. These experimental results can lend insight into the evolution of nuclear shapes with respect to energy on the path to scission and therefore immediately drive fission theory development. Preliminary angular distributions and yields using the NIFFTE TPC will be presented. Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment.

  9. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: boost-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Quadrupole constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickl...

  10. Innovative Fission Measurements with a Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffner, M D; Barnes, P D; Klay, J L

    2005-11-16

    This study explores a pioneering idea to utilize a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure fission cross sections and other fission quantities. The TPC is inherently capable of measuring fragments from fission events, decay alphas, and beam-material scatters. This document explores whether the TPC can improve the precision of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section and measure other new and significant fission quantities simultaneously. This work shows that the TPC can in fact deliver sub-1% cross section measurements and should provide breakthroughs in both the quality and quantity of information available from neutron-induced fission experiments.

  11. Induced Fission of $^{240}$Plutonium within a Real-Time Microscopic Framework}

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgac, Aurel; Roche, Kenneth J; Stetcu, Ionel

    2015-01-01

    We describe the fissioning dynamics of $^{240}$Pu from a configuration in the proximity of the outer fission barrier to full scission and the formation of the fragments within an implementation of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) extended to superfluid systems and real-time dynamics. We predict the total kinetic energy released, the average proton and neutron numbers, and the excitation energies of the fission fragments. The fission fragments emerge with properties similar to those determined experimentally, while the fission dynamics appears to be quite complex, with various shape and pairing modes being excited during the evolution. The time scales of the evolution are found to be much slower than previously expected and the role of the collective inertia in the dynamics is found to be negligible.

  12. Late Time Emission of Prompt Fission Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Talou, P; Stetcu, I; Lestone, J P; McKigney, E; Chadwick, M B

    2016-01-01

    The emission of prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays within a few nanoseconds to a few microseconds following the scission point is studied in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism applied to the deexcitation of primary excited fission fragments. Neutron and $\\gamma$-ray evaporations from fully accelerated fission fragments are calculated in competition at each stage of the decay, and the role of isomers in the fission products, before $\\beta$-decay, is analyzed. The time evolution of the average total $\\gamma$-ray energy, average total $\\gamma$-ray multiplicity, and fragment-specific $\\gamma$-ray spectra, is presented in the case of neutron-induced fission reactions of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu, as well as spontaneous fission of $^{252}$Cf. The production of specific isomeric states is calculated and compared to available experimental data. About 7% of all prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays are predicted to be emitted between 10 nsec and 5 $\\mu$sec following fission, in the case of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu $(n_{\\rm th},f)$ reactio...

  13. Fission life-time calculation using a complex absorbing potential

    CERN Document Server

    Scamps, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A comparison between the semi-classical approximation and the full quantum calculation with a complex absorbing potential is made with a model of the fission of 258Fm. The potential barrier is obtained with the constrained Skyrme HF+BCS theory. The life-time obtained by the two calculations agree with each other the difference being only by 25%.

  14. Fission life-time calculation using a complex absorbing potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scamps Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between the semi-classical approximation and the full quantum calculation with a complex absorbing potential is made with a model of the fission of 258Fm. The potential barrier is obtained with the constrained Skyrme HF+BCS theory. The life-time obtained by the two calculations agree with each other the difference being only by 25%.

  15. Spatial- and Time-Correlated Detection of Fission Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platkevic M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal to measure angular correlations of fission fragments in rare fission decay (e.g. ternary and quaternary fission, a multi-detector coincidence system based on two and up to four position sensitive pixel detectors Timepix has been built. In addition to the high granularity, wide dynamic range and per pixel signal threshold, these devices are equipped with per pixel energy and time sensitivity providing more information (position, energy, time, enhances particle-type identification and selectivity of event-by-event detection. Operation of the device with the integrated USB 2.0 based readout interface FITPix and the control and data acquisition software tool Pixelman enables online visualization and flexible/adjustable operation for a different type of experiments. Spatially correlated fission fragments can be thus registered in coincidence. Similarly triggered measurements are performed using an integrated spectrometric module with analogue signal chain electronics. The current status of development together with demonstration of the technique with a 252Cf source is presented.

  16. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusev, G., E-mail: rusev@lanl.gov; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  17. Semi-empirical formula for spontaneous fission half life time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P., E-mail: drkpsanthosh@gmail.co [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Payyanur Campus 670 327 (India); Biju, R.K.; Sahadevan, Sabina [P G Department of Physics and Research Centre, Payyanur College, Payyanur 670 327 (India)

    2010-01-15

    A new semi-empirical formula is proposed for determining the spontaneous fission half lives, which works well for the mass region from {sup 232}Th to {sup 286}114. The computed spontaneous fission half life times are also compared with other semi-empirical formula predictions. The alpha decay half lives are systematically computed for heavy and super heavy region with proton numbers varying from 90<=Z<=122 using Coulomb and Proximity Potential Model. The comparison between computed alpha decay half lives and the present spontaneous fission semi-empirical formula predictions of even-even isotopes with Z=90-122 are studied. It is found that in super heavy region the isotopes {sup 270-274}Ds, {sup 272-278}112, {sup 272-282}114, {sup 274-292}116, {sup 276-298}118, {sup 276-308}120 and {sup 278-314}122 will survive fission and can be synthesized and identified via alpha decay.

  18. NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber for Fission Cross Section Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ryan; Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    In order to design safer and more efficient Generation IV nuclear reactors, more accurate knowledge of fission cross sections is needed. The goal of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) used by the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration is to measure the cross sections of several fissile materials to within 1% uncertainty. The ability of the TPC to produce 3D ``pictures'' of charged particle trajectories will eliminate unwanted alpha particles in the data. Another important source of error is the normalization of data the U-235 standard. NIFFTE will use the H(n,n)H reaction instead, which is known to better than 0.2%. The run control and monitoring system will eventually allow for nearly complete automation and off-site monitoring of the experiment. This presentation will cover the need for precision measurements and an overview of the experiment. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Energy Research.

  19. Sustainable, Full-Scope Nuclear Fission Energy at Planetary Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petroski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A nuclear fission-based energy system is described that is capable of supplying the energy needs of all of human civilization for a full range of human energy use scenarios, including both very high rates of energy use and strikingly-large amounts of total energy-utilized. To achieve such “planetary scale sustainability”, this nuclear energy system integrates three nascent technologies: uranium extraction from seawater, manifestly safe breeder reactors, and deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste. In addition to these technological components, it also possesses the sociopolitical quality of manifest safety, which involves engineering to a very high degree of safety in a straightforward manner, while concurrently making the safety characteristics of the resulting nuclear systems continually manifest to society as a whole. Near-term aspects of this nuclear system are outlined, and representative parameters given for a system of global scale capable of supplying energy to a planetary population of 10 billion people at a per capita level enjoyed by contemporary Americans, i.e., of a type which might be seen a half-century hence. In addition to being sustainable from a resource standpoint, the described nuclear system is also sustainable with respect to environmental and human health impacts, including those resulting from severe accidents.

  20. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  1. Comparison of 252Cf time correlated induced fission with AmLi induced fission on fresh MTR reserach reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Jay Prakash [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to calibrate the Advanced Experimental Fuel Counter (AEFC), benchmark MCNP simulations using experimental results, investigate the effects of change in fuel assembly geometry, and finally to show the boost in doubles count rates with 252Cf active soruces due to the time correlated induced fission (TCIF) effect.

  2. Timing robustness in the budding and fission yeast cell cycles.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangla, Karan

    2010-02-01

    Robustness of biological models has emerged as an important principle in systems biology. Many past analyses of Boolean models update all pending changes in signals simultaneously (i.e., synchronously), making it impossible to consider robustness to variations in timing that result from noise and different environmental conditions. We checked previously published mathematical models of the cell cycles of budding and fission yeast for robustness to timing variations by constructing Boolean models and analyzing them using model-checking software for the property of speed independence. Surprisingly, the models are nearly, but not totally, speed-independent. In some cases, examination of timing problems discovered in the analysis exposes apparent inaccuracies in the model. Biologically justified revisions to the model eliminate the timing problems. Furthermore, in silico random mutations in the regulatory interactions of a speed-independent Boolean model are shown to be unlikely to preserve speed independence, even in models that are otherwise functional, providing evidence for selection pressure to maintain timing robustness. Multiple cell cycle models exhibit strong robustness to timing variation, apparently due to evolutionary pressure. Thus, timing robustness can be a basis for generating testable hypotheses and can focus attention on aspects of a model that may need refinement.

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni, E-mail: Giovanni.Pastore@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Swiler, L.P., E-mail: LPSwile@sandia.gov [Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1318 (United States); Hales, J.D., E-mail: Jason.Hales@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Novascone, S.R., E-mail: Stephen.Novascone@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Perez, D.M., E-mail: Danielle.Perez@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Spencer, B.W., E-mail: Benjamin.Spencer@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Luzzi, L., E-mail: Lelio.Luzzi@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, via La Masa 34, I-20156 Milano (Italy); Van Uffelen, P., E-mail: Paul.Van-Uffelen@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Karlsruhe (Germany); Williamson, R.L., E-mail: Richard.Williamson@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code with a recently implemented physics-based model for fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO{sub 2} single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information in the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior predictions with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, significantly higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  4. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  5. The Fission Fragment Time-Of Spectrometer Verdi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Borcea, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Oberstedt, A.; Göök, A.; Belgya, T.; Kis, Z.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takács, K.; Martinez-Perez, T.

    2011-10-01

    For the investigation of correlated fission characteristics like fragment mass-and energy-distributions the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI is being constructed. With this instrument we aim at the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron masses, avoiding prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may be inferred as a function of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. In order to arrive at a mass resolving power ΔA VERDI spectrometer performed at the Budapest Research Reactor.

  6. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  7. Fission time scales from anisotropic in-plane distributions in [sup 100]Mo+[sup 100]Mo and [sup 120]Sn+[sup 120]Sn collisions around 20[ital A] MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Bizzeti, P.G.; Maurenzig, P.R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Universita di Firenze, I-50125 Florence (Italy)); Wessels, J.P.; Charity, R.J.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Stelzer, H. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, W-6100 Darmstadt (Germany))

    1993-10-18

    The characteristics of the fission step following a binary deep-inelastic interaction have been reconstructed for three-body events detected in the reaction [sup 100]Mo+[sup 100]Mo at 18.7[ital A] MeV and [sup 12[minus

  8. Neutron-induced fission of even- and odd-mass plutonium isotopes within a four-dimensional Langevin framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Mirfathi, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron multiplicity prior to scission and evaluation of mass distribution of fission fragments with the fission time scale for neutron induced fission of plutonium isotopes are investigated using a dynamical Langevin approach. Also, mass yield of fragments and prompt neutron multiplicity in different time scales of the fission process are compared with experimental data. Reasonable agreement is achieved between calculated and available experimental data.

  9. Irreversibility time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, G

    2006-06-01

    Entropy creation rate is introduced for a system interacting with thermostats (i.e., for a system subject to internal conservative forces interacting with "external" thermostats via conservative forces) and a fluctuation theorem for it is proved. As an application, a time scale is introduced, to be interpreted as the time over which irreversibility becomes manifest in a process leading from an initial to a final stationary state of a mechanical system in a general nonequilibrium context. The time scale is evaluated in a few examples, including the classical Joule-Thompson process (gas expansion in a vacuum).

  10. Artificial diamonds as radiation-hard detectors for ultra-fast fission-fragment timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberstedt, S., E-mail: stephan.oberstedt@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Borcea, R.; Bryś, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Oberstedt, A. [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Akademin för Naturvetenskap och Technik, Örebro Universitet, S-70182 Örebro (Sweden); Vidali, M. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2013-06-21

    In the framework of the construction of the double time-of-flight spectrometer VERDI, where we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously, ultra-fast time pick-up detectors based on artificial diamond material were investigated for the first time with fission fragments from {sup 252}Cf (0.5MeV/ufission-fragments/cm{sup 2} together with more than 3.5×10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2} and 3×10{sup 10}α-particles/cm{sup 2}. This fluence is characteristic for fission experiments. The pre-requisite for the observed signal stability is the application of priming of the diamond material with a strong β-source for about 48 h. The intrinsic timing resolution of a 100μm thick polycrystalline CVD diamond detector with a size of 1×1 cm{sup 2} was determined to σ{sub int}=(283±41)ps by comparison with Monte-Carlo simulations. Using broadband pre-amplifiers, 4-fold segmented detectors of same total size and with a thickness of 180μm show an intrinsic timing resolution of σ{sub int}=(106±21)ps. This is highly competitive with the best micro-channel plate detectors. Due to the limited and batch-dependent charge collection efficiency of poly-crystalline diamond material, the detection efficiency for fission fragments may be smaller than 100%. -- Highlights: ► First use of chemical vapor deposited diamond for heavy ions with kinetic energies below 2 MeV per nucleon. ► Fission-fragment time-of-flight measurements with a timing resolution better than 150 ps. ► Radiation-hard fission event trigger to be used in an intense neutron field.

  11. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Bayatyan, G L; Carlini, R; Danagulyan, S; Eden, T; Egiyan, K; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Grigoryan, N K; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, P; Hashimoto, O; Johnston, K; Keppel, C; Knyazyan, S; Majewski, S; Margaryan, A; Margaryan, Yu L; Marikian, G G; Martoff, J; Mkrtchyan, H G; Parlakyan, L; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Simicevic, N; Tadevosyan, V; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Vartanian, G S; Vulcan, W; Wells, S; Wood, S

    1999-01-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1-2 Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200 ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21x21 cm sup 2 was achieved.

  12. Decay Heat Analyses after Thermal-Neutron Fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu by SCALE-6.1.3 with Recently Available Fission Product Yield Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Gil, Choong-Sup; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The heat reaches about 1.5% after one hour and falls to 0.4% after a day. After a week it will be about 0.2%. The reactor, however, still requires further cooling for several years to keep the fuel rods safe. In general, the decay heat in the reactors can be calculated using a summation calculation method, which is simply the sum of the activities of the fission products produced during the fission process and after the reactor shutdown weighted by the mean decay energies. Consequently, the method is strongly dependent on the available nuclear structure data. Nowadays, the method has been implemented in various burnup and depletion programs such as ORIGEN and CINDER. In this study, the decay heat measurements after thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu have been evaluated by the ORIGEN-S with the decay data and fission product yield libraries included in the SCALE-6.1.3 software package. The new libraries were applied to the decay heat calculations, and the results were compared with those by the ORIGEN reference calculation. The decay heat measurements for very short cooling times after thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu have been evaluated by the ORIGEN-S summation calculation. The reference calculation results by the latest ORIGEN data libraries of the SCALE-6.1.3 have been validated with the measurements by ORNL and Studsvik. In addition, the generation of the new ORIGEN yield libraries has been completed based on the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.1, JENDL/FPY-2011, and JENDL-4.0. The new libraries have been successfully applied to the decay heat calculations and comparative analyses have been devoted to verifying the importance of the fission product yield data when estimating the decay heat values for each isotope in a very short time. The decay data library occupies an important position in the ORIGEN summation calculation along with the fission product yield library.

  13. Microscopic description of fission dynamics: Toward a 3D computation of the time dependent GCM equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regnier D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to perform calculations with more than two collective degree of freedom. Meanwhile, it is well-known from both semi-phenomenological and fully microscopic approaches that at least four or five dimensions may play a role in the dynamics of fission. To overcome this limitation, we develop the code FELIX aiming to solve the TDGCM+GOA equation for an arbitrary number of collective variables. In this talk, we report the recent progress toward this enriched description of fission dynamics. We will briefly present the numerical methods adopted as well as the status of the latest version of FELIX. Finally, we will discuss fragments yields obtained within this approach for the low energy fission of major actinides.

  14. Microscopic description of fission dynamics: Toward a 3D computation of the time dependent GCM equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to perform calculations with more than two collective degree of freedom. Meanwhile, it is well-known from both semi-phenomenological and fully microscopic approaches that at least four or five dimensions may play a role in the dynamics of fission. To overcome this limitation, we develop the code FELIX aiming to solve the TDGCM+GOA equation for an arbitrary number of collective variables. In this talk, we report the recent progress toward this enriched description of fission dynamics. We will briefly present the numerical methods adopted as well as the status of the latest version of FELIX. Finally, we will discuss fragments yields obtained within this approach for the low energy fission of major actinides.

  15. Development of industrial-scale fission {sup 99}Mo production process using low enriched uranium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Kon; Lee, Jun Sig [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Beyer, Gerd J. [Grunicke Strasse 15, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) is the most important isotope because its daughter isotope, technetium-99m ({sup 99}mTc), has been the most widely used medical radioisotope for more than 50 years, accounting for > 80% of total nuclear diagnostics worldwide. In this review, radiochemical routes for the production of {sup 99}Mo, and the aspects for selecting a suitable process strategy are discussed from the historical viewpoint of {sup 99}Mo technology developments. Most of the industrial-scale {sup 99}Mo processes have been based on the fission of {sup 235}U. Recently, important issues have been raised for the conversion of fission {sup 99}Mo targets from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium (LEU). The development of new LEU targets with higher density was requested to compensate for the loss of {sup 99}Mo yield, caused by a significant reduction of {sup 235}U enrichment, from the conversion. As the dramatic increment of intermediate level liquid waste is also expected from the conversion, an effective strategy to reduce the waste generation from the fission {sup 99}Mo production is required. The mitigation of radioxenon emission from medical radioisotope production facilities is discussed in relation with the monitoring of nuclear explosions and comprehensive nuclear test ban. Lastly, the {sup 99}Mo production process paired with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's own LEU target is proposed as one of the most suitable processes for the LEU target.

  16. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  17. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, C W; Meierbachtol, K; Bredeweg, T; Jandel, M; Jorgenson, H J; Laptev, A; Rusev, G; Shields, D W; White, M; Blakeley, R E; Mader, D M; Hecht, A A

    2014-01-01

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEterminiation in fission Research (SPIDER) is a $2E-2v$ spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with $\\alpha$-particles from $^{229}$Th and its decay chain and $\\alpha$-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from $^{252}$Cf. Each detector module is comprised of a thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times on the order of 70 ns were measured with 200 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to precision of 0.5%. An ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for mode...

  18. Fission Multiplicity Detection with Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination from Higher-Order Time Correlation Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberer, R.B.

    2002-11-12

    The current practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile materials using neutrons is dominated by the {sup 3}He detector. This has been the case since the mid 1980s when Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) was replaced with thermal well counters and neutron multiplicity counting (NMC). The thermal well counters detect neutrons by neutron capture in the {sup 3}He detector subsequent to moderation. The process of detection requires from 30 to 60 {micro}s. As will be explained in Section 3.3 the rate of detecting correlated neutrons (signal) from the same fission are independent of this time but the rate of accidental correlations (noise) are proportional to this time. The well counters are at a distinct disadvantage when there is a large source of uncorrelated neutrons present from ({alpha}, n) reactions for example. Plastic scintillating detectors, as were used in FMD, require only about 20 ns to detect neutrons from fission. One thousandth as many accidental coincidences are therefore accumulated. The major problem with the use of fast-plastic scintillation detectors, however, is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable in these detectors. For this thesis, a new technique was developed to use higher-order time correlation statistics to distinguish combinations of neutron and gamma ray detections in fast-plastic scintillation detectors. A system of analysis to describe these correlations was developed based on simple physical principles. Other sources of correlations from non-fission events are identified and integrated into the analysis developed for fission events. A number of ratios and metric are identified to determine physical properties of the source from the correlations. It is possible to determine both the quantity being measured and detection efficiency from these ratios from a single measurement without a separate calibration. To account for detector dead-time, an alternative analytical technique

  19. Microscopic predictions of fission yields based on the time dependent GCM formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regnier D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA. Previous studies reported promising results by numerically solving the TDGCM+GOA equation with a finite difference technique. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to properly control numerical errors. In addition, it prevents one from performing calculations with more than two collective variables. To overcome these limitations, we developed the new code FELIX-1.0 that solves the TDGCM+GOA equation based on the Galerkin finite element method. In this article, we briefly illustrate the capabilities of the solver FELIX-1.0, in particular its validation for n+239Pu low energy induced fission. This work is the result of a collaboration between CEA,DAM,DIF and LLNL on nuclear fission theory.

  20. Microscopic predictions of fission yields based on the time dependent GCM formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization in nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. One of the most promising theoretical frameworks is the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) applied under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Previous studies reported promising results by numerically solving the TDGCM+GOA equation with a finite difference technique. However, the computational cost of this method makes it difficult to properly control numerical errors. In addition, it prevents one from performing calculations with more than two collective variables. To overcome these limitations, we developed the new code FELIX-1.0 that solves the TDGCM+GOA equation based on the Galerkin finite element method. In this article, we briefly illustrate the capabilities of the solver FELIX-1.0, in particular its validation for n+239Pu low energy induced fission. This work is the result of a collaboration between CEA,DAM,DIF and LLNL on nuclear fission theory.

  1. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perriot, Romain Thibault [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  2. Fission-product energy release for times following thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U between 2 and 14000 seconds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J.K.; Emery, J.F.; Love, T.A.; McConnell, J.W.; Northcutt, K.J.; Peelle, R.W.; Weaver, H.

    1977-10-01

    Fission-product decay energy-releases rates were measured for thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U. Samples of mass 1 to 10 ..mu..g were irradiated for 1 to 100 sec by use of the fast pneumatic-tube facility at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The resulting beta- and gamma-ray emissions were counted for times-after-fission between 2 and 14,000 seconds. The data were obtained for beta and gamma rays separately as spectral distributions, N(E/sub ..gamma../) vs E/sub ..gamma../ and N(E/sub beta/) vs E/sub ..beta../. For the gamma-ray data the spectra were obtained by using a NaI detector, while for the beta-ray data the spectra were obtained by using an NE-110 detector with an anticoincidence mantle. The raw data were unfolded to provide spectral distributions of modest resolution. These were integrated over E/sub ..gamma../ and E/sub ..beta../ to provide total yield and energy integrals as a function of time after fission. Results are low compared to the present 1973 ANS Decay-heat standard. A complete description of the experimental apparatus and data-reduction techniques is presented. The final integral data are given in tabular and graphical form and are compared with published data. 41 figures, 13 tables.

  3. A high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragments and ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosev, Krasimir Milchev

    2007-07-01

    For the purpose of fission-fragment detection a double time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer has been developed. The key component of the TOF spectrometer is a TOF detector consisting of multichannel-plate (MCP) detectors with a position-sensitive readout, a foil for secondary electron (SE) production and an electrostatic mirror. The fission fragments are detected by measuring the SEs impinging on the position-sensitive anode after emission from the foil, acceleration and deflection by the electrostatic mirror. The functionality of the different detector components is proven in detail. Optimised schemes for the high-voltage supplies of the MCP detectors have been implemented successfully. In order to process the multichannel-plate detector signals optimally, a new state-of-the-art constant-fraction discriminator based on the amplitude and rise time compensated technique with very low threshold capabilities and optimised walk properties has been developed and incorporated into the setup. In a setup consisting of two mirror MCP detectors, we could successfully observe the TOF spectrum of a mixed ({sup 226}Ra,{sup 222}Rn,{sup 210}Po,{sup 218}Po,{sup 214}Po) {alpha}-source. Testing photo-fission experiments were performed at the bremsstrahlung facility at the ELBE accelerator. The setup consisted of two mirror detectors (first arm) and a 80 mm diameter MCP detector (second arm) with a {sup 238}U target positioned in between. TOF measurements with two bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 12.9 and 16.0 MeV were carried out. A clear cut separation of the TOF peaks for the medium-mass and heavy fission fragments was observed. (orig.)

  4. Jensen's Functionals on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider Jensen’s functionals on time scales and discuss its properties and applications. Further, we define weighted generalized and power means on time scales. By applying the properties of Jensen’s functionals on these means, we obtain several refinements and converses of Hölder’s inequality on time scales.

  5. Time scales in LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Pireaux, S

    2007-01-01

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  6. Overview of research by the fission group in Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Chourdhury

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear fission studies in Trombay began nearly six decades ago, with the commissioning of the APSARA research reactor. Early experimental work was based on mass, kinetic energy distributions, neutron and X-ray emission in thermal neutron fission of 235U, which were carried out with indigenously developed detectors and electronics instrumentation. With the commissioning of CIRUS reactor and the availability of higher neutron flux, advanced experiments were carried out on ternary fission, pre-scission neutron emission, fragment charge distributions, quarternary fission, etc. In the late eighties, heavy-ion beams from the pelletron-based medium energy heavy-ion accelerator were available, which provided a rich variety of possibilities in nuclear fission studies. Pioneering work on fragment angular distributions, fission time-scales, transfer-induced fission, -ray multiplicities and mass–energy correlations were carried out, providing important information on the dynamics of the fission process. More recently, work on fission fragment -ray spectroscopy has been initiated, to understand the nuclear structure aspects of the neutron-rich fission fragment nuclei. There have also been parallel efforts to carry out theoretical studies in the areas of shell effects, superheavy nuclei, fusion–fission dynamics, fragment angular distributions, etc. to complement the experimental studies. This paper will provide a glimpse of the work carried out by the fission group at Trombay in the above-mentioned topics.

  7. On the Geologic Time Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradstein, F.M.; Ogg, J.G.; Hilgen, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the international divisions and ages in the Geologic Time Scale, published in 2012 (GTS2012). Since 2004, when GTS2004 was detailed, major developments have taken place that directly bear and have considerable impact on the intricate science of geologic time scaling. Precam br

  8. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  9. Fine-scale population genetic structure in a fission-fusion society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, Elizabeth A; Maldonado, Jésus E; Hollister-Smith, Julie A; Poole, Joyce H; Moss, Cynthia J; Fleischer, Robert C; Alberts, Susan C

    2008-06-01

    Nonrandom patterns of mating and dispersal create fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations - especially of social mammals - with important evolutionary and conservation genetic consequences. Such structure is well-characterized for typical mammalian societies; that is, societies where social group composition is stable, dispersal is male-biased, and males form permanent breeding associations in just one or a few social groups over the course of their lives. However, genetic structure is not well understood for social mammals that differ from this pattern, including elephants. In elephant societies, social groups fission and fuse, and males never form permanent breeding associations with female groups. Here, we combine 33 years of behavioural observations with genetic information for 545 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), to investigate how mating and dispersal behaviours structure genetic variation between social groups and across age classes. We found that, like most social mammals, female matrilocality in elephants creates co-ancestry within core social groups and significant genetic differentiation between groups (Phi(ST) = 0.058). However, unlike typical social mammals, male elephants do not bias reproduction towards a limited subset of social groups, and instead breed randomly across the population. As a result, reproductively dominant males mediate gene flow between core groups, which creates cohorts of similar-aged paternal relatives across the population. Because poaching tends to eliminate the oldest elephants from populations, illegal hunting and poaching are likely to erode fine-scale genetic structure. We discuss our results and their evolutionary and conservation genetic implications in the context of other social mammals.

  10. Photophysical characterization and time-resolved spectroscopy of a anthradithiophene dimer: exploring the role of conformation in singlet fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jacob C; Zhang, Ruomeng; Hallani, Rawad K; Pensack, Ryan D; Sanders, Samuel N; Oblinsky, Daniel G; Parkin, Sean R; Campos, Luis M; Anthony, John E; Scholes, Gregory D

    2017-08-30

    Quantitative singlet fission has been observed for a variety of acene derivatives such as tetracene and pentacene, and efforts to extend the library of singlet fission compounds is of current interest. Preliminary calculations suggest anthradithiophenes exhibit significant exothermicity between the first optically-allowed singlet state, S1, and 2 × T1 with an energy difference of >5000 cm(-1). Given the fulfillment of this ingredient for singlet fission, here we investigate the singlet fission capability of a difluorinated anthradithiophene dimer (2ADT) covalently linked by a (dimethylsilyl)ethane bridge and derivatized by triisobutylsilylethynyl (TIBS) groups. Photophysical characterization of 2ADT and the single functionalized ADT monomer were carried out in toluene and acetone solution via absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and their photo-initiated dynamics were investigated with time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In accordance with computational predictions, two conformers of 2ADT were observed via fluorescence spectroscopy and were assigned to structures with the ADT cores trans or cis to one another about the covalent bridge. The two conformers exhibited markedly different excited state deactivation mechanisms, with the minor trans population being representative of the ADT monomer showing primarily radiative decay, while the dominant cis population underwent relaxation into an excimer geometry before internally converting to the ground state. The excimer formation kinetics were found to be solvent dependent, yielding time constants of ∼1.75 ns in toluene, and ∼600 ps in acetone. While the difference in rates elicits a role for the solvent in stabilizing the excimer structure, the rate is still decidedly long compared to most singlet fission rates of analogous dimers, suggesting that the excimer is neither a kinetic nor a thermodynamic trap, yet singlet fission was still not observed. The result

  11. Photophysical characterization and time-resolved spectroscopy of a anthradithiophene dimer: exploring the role of conformation in singlet fission

    KAUST Repository

    Dean, Jacob C.

    2017-08-18

    Quantitative singlet fission has been observed for a variety of acene derivatives such as tetracene and pentacene, and efforts to extend the library of singlet fission compounds is of current interest. Preliminary calculations suggest anthradithiophenes exhibit significant exothermicity between the first optically-allowed singlet state, S1, and 2 × T1 with an energy difference of >5000 cm−1. Given the fulfillment of this ingredient for singlet fission, here we investigate the singlet fission capability of a difluorinated anthradithiophene dimer (2ADT) covalently linked by a (dimethylsilyl)ethane bridge and derivatized by triisobutylsilylethynyl (TIBS) groups. Photophysical characterization of 2ADT and the single functionalized ADT monomer were carried out in toluene and acetone solution via absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and their photo-initiated dynamics were investigated with time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In accordance with computational predictions, two conformers of 2ADT were observed via fluorescence spectroscopy and were assigned to structures with the ADT cores trans or cis to one another about the covalent bridge. The two conformers exhibited markedly different excited state deactivation mechanisms, with the minor trans population being representative of the ADT monomer showing primarily radiative decay, while the dominant cis population underwent relaxation into an excimer geometry before internally converting to the ground state. The excimer formation kinetics were found to be solvent dependent, yielding time constants of ∼1.75 ns in toluene, and ∼600 ps in acetone. While the difference in rates elicits a role for the solvent in stabilizing the excimer structure, the rate is still decidedly long compared to most singlet fission rates of analogous dimers, suggesting that the excimer is neither a kinetic nor a thermodynamic trap, yet singlet fission was still not observed. The result

  12. Inversion of the Odd-Even Effect in Cold Fission from the Time-Dependent Pairing Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirea M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A peculiar phenomenon was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd partition yields are favored over the even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. In this contribution, a microscopic model is proposed for the explanation of this odd-even effect in cold fission. This explanation is based on a mixing configuration mechanism that is produced during the fission process. This configuration mixing mechanism is obtained dynamically by solving a the generalized system of time-dependent pairing equations, which include a pair-breaking effect. The time dependent equations of motion for the pair breaking effect were corroborated with a condition that fixes dynamically the number of particles on the two fission fragment. The single particle level scheme was calculated with the Woods-Saxon superasymmetric two center shell model, providing a continuous variation of the single particle energies and of the wave functions from one nucleus up to two separated fragments. A first rule can be extracted from this model. The even-even fission products cannot be obtained at zero excitation energies because of the existence of dynamical excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  13. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidizing dissolution of the fuel meat in hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. The resulting solution is directly behind added to an over stoichiometric amount of potassium hydroxide solution. Uranium and the bulk of fission products are precipitated together with the transuranium compounds. The filtrate contains the molybdenum and the soluble fission product species. It is further treated similar to the in-full scale proven process. The generated off gas stream is handled also as experienced before after passing through KOH washing solution. The generated alkaline fluoride containing waste solution is noncorrosive. Nevertheless fluoride can be selectively bonded as in soluble CaF2 by addition of a mixture of solid calcium hydroxide calcium carbonate to the sand cement mixture used for waste solidification. The generated elevated amounts of LEU remnants can be recycled and retargeted. The related technology permits the minimization of the generated fuel waste, saving environment, and improving processing economy.

  14. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  15. Integral equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of integral equations on time scales. It also contains elegant analytical and numerical methods. This book is primarily intended for senior undergraduate students and beginning graduate students of engineering and science courses. The students in mathematical and physical sciences will find many sections of direct relevance. The book contains nine chapters and each chapter is pedagogically organized. This book is specially designed for those who wish to understand integral equations on time scales without having extensive mathematical background.

  16. Recent studies in heavy ion induced fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, R. K.

    2001-08-01

    rigid rotation of the nascent fragments at scission and (ii) due to statistical excitation of the spin bearing collective modes in the fissioning nucleus. One of the collective modes -- the tilting mode depends on the K quantum number and is responsible for the emission angle dependence of fragment spin. In our studies, we have shown conclusively that the collective statistical spin modes get strongly suppressed for high K values corresponding to large rotational frequencies along the fission axis. These results bring out the importance of the dynamical effects in the heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions. The present article will review the work carried out on the above aspects in heavy ion fission reactions as well as on the fission time scales, and some of the recent studies on the mass-energy correlations of fission fragments at near-barrier bombarding energies.

  17. A Time scales Noether's theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Anerot, Baptiste; Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    We prove a time scales version of the Noether's theorem relating group of symmetries and conservation laws. Our result extends the continuous version of the Noether's theorem as well as the discrete one and corrects a previous statement of Bartosiewicz and Torres in \\cite{BT}.

  18. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Carlier-Grynkorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1+, a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics.

  19. Integrable Equations on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Gurses, Metin; Guseinov, Gusein Sh.; Silindir, Burcu

    2005-01-01

    Integrable systems are usually given in terms of functions of continuous variables (on ${\\mathbb R}$), functions of discrete variables (on ${\\mathbb Z}$) and recently in terms of functions of $q$-variables (on ${\\mathbb K}_{q}$). We formulate the Gel'fand-Dikii (GD) formalism on time scales by using the delta differentiation operator and find more general integrable nonlinear evolutionary equations. In particular they yield integrable equations over integers (difference equations) and over $q...

  20. Generalized Energy-Dependent Q Values for Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2010-03-31

    We extend Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q value for major and minor actinides on the incident neutron energies in the range 0 {le} E{sub n} {le} 20 MeV. Our parameterization is based on the actinide evaluations recommended for the ENDF/B-VII.1 release. This paper describes the calculation of energydependent fission Q values based on the calculation of the prompt energy release in fission by Madland. This calculation was adopted for use in the LLNL ENDL database and then generalized to obtain the prompt fission energy release for all actinides. Here the calculation is further generalized to the total energy release in fission. There are several stages in a fission event, depending on the time scale. Neutrons and gammas may be emitted at any time during the fission event.While our discussion here is focussed on compound nucleus creation by an incident neutron, similar parameterizations could be obtained for incident gammas or spontaneous fission.

  1. The nature of singlet exciton fission in carotenoid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Andrew J; Maiuri, Margherita; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Friend, Richard H; Clark, Jenny

    2015-04-22

    Singlet exciton fission allows the fast and efficient generation of two spin triplet states from one photoexcited singlet. It has the potential to improve organic photovoltaics, enabling efficient coupling to the blue to ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum to capture the energy generally lost as waste heat. However, many questions remain about the underlying fission mechanism. The relation between intermolecular geometry and singlet fission rate and yield is poorly understood and remains one of the most significant barriers to the design of new singlet fission sensitizers. Here we explore the structure-property relationship and examine the mechanism of singlet fission in aggregates of astaxanthin, a small polyene. We isolate five distinct supramolecular structures of astaxanthin generated through self-assembly in solution. Each is capable of undergoing intermolecular singlet fission, with rates of triplet generation and annihilation that can be correlated with intermolecular coupling strength. In contrast with the conventional model of singlet fission in linear molecules, we demonstrate that no intermediate states are involved in the triplet formation: instead, singlet fission occurs directly from the initial 1B(u) photoexcited state on ultrafast time scales. This result demands a re-evaluation of current theories of polyene photophysics and highlights the robustness of carotenoid singlet fission.

  2. Fission barriers of two odd-neutron actinide nuclei taking into account the time-reversal symmetry breaking at the mean-field level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Meng-Hock; Bonneau, L.; Quentin, P.; Hao, T. V. Nhan; Wagiran, Husin

    2017-01-01

    Background: For a long time, fission barriers of actinide nuclei have been mostly microscopically calculated for even-even fissioning systems. Calculations in the case of odd nuclei have been performed merely within a so-called equal-filling approximation (EFA) as opposed to an approach taking explicitly into account the time-reversal-breaking properties at the mean-field level—and for only one single-particle configuration. Purpose: We study the dependence of the fission barriers on various relevant configurations (e.g., to evaluate the so-called specialization energy). In addition, we want to assess the relevance of the EFA approach as a function of the deformation, which has been already found for the ground-state deformation. Methods: Calculations within the Hartree-Fock plus BCS approach with self-consistent particle blocking have been performed by using the SkM* Skyrme effective interaction in the particle-hole channel and a seniority force in the particle-particle channel. Axial symmetry has been imposed throughout the whole fission path while the intrinsic parity symmetry has been allowed to be broken in the outer fission barrier region. Results: Potential-energy curves have been determined for six different configurations in 235U and four in 239Pu. Inner and outer fission barriers have been calculated along with some spectroscopic properties in the fission isomeric well. These results have been compared with available data. The influence of time-reversal-breaking mean fields on the solutions has been investigated. Conclusions: A sizable configuration dependence of the fission barrier (width and height) has been demonstrated. A reasonable agreement with available systematic evaluations of fission-barrier heights has been found. The EFA approach has been validated at the large elongations occurring at the outer-barrier region.

  3. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  4. Laboratory-Scale Bismuth Phosphate Extraction Process Simulation To Track Fate of Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. JEFFREY; Lindberg, Michael J.; Jones, Thomas E.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-02-28

    Recent field investigation that collected and characterized vadose zone sediments from beneath inactive liquid disposal facilities at the Hanford 200 Areas show lower than expected concentrations of a long-term risk driver, Tc-99. Therefore laboratory studies were performed to re-create one of the three processes that were used to separate the plutonium from spent fuel and that created most of the wastes disposed or currently stored in tanks at Hanford. The laboratory simulations were used to compare with current estimates based mainly on flow sheet estimates and spotty historical data. Three simulations of the bismuth phosphate precipitation process show that less that 1% of the Tc-99, Cs-135/137, Sr-90, I-129 carry down with the Pu product and thus these isotopes should have remained within the metals waste streams that after neutralization were sent to single shell tanks. Conversely, these isotopes should not be expected to be found in the first and subsequent cycle waste streams that went to cribs. Measurable quantities (~20 to 30%) of the lanthanides, yttrium, and trivalent actinides (Am and Cm) do precipitate with the Pu product, which is higher than the 10% estimate made for current inventory projections. Surprisingly, Se (added as selenate form) also shows about 10% association with the Pu/bismuth phosphate solids. We speculate that the incorporation of some Se into the bismuth phosphate precipitate is caused by selenate substitution into crystal lattice sites for the phosphate. The bulk of the U daughter product Th-234 and Np-237 daughter product Pa-233 also associate with the solids. We suspect that the Pa daughter products of U (Pa-234 and Pa-231) would also co-precipitate with the bismuth phosphate induced solids. No more than 1 % of the Sr-90 and Sb-125 should carry down with the Pu product that ultimately was purified. Thus the current scheme used to estimate where fission products end up being disposed overestimates by one order of magnitude the

  5. Dynamical fission life-times deduced from gamma-ray emission observed in the fusion-fission reaction : Ne-20 on Bi-209.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderPloeg, H; Bacelar, JCS; Buda, A; Dioszegi, [No Value; vantHof, G; vanderWoude, A

    1996-01-01

    The gamma-ray emission spectra between 4 and 20 MeV have been measured for the fusion-fission reactions Ne-20 on Bi-209 --> Np-229* at beam energies 150, 186 and 220 MeV. In addition for the latter experiment the angular dependence of the gamma-ray emission with respect to the spin axis has been

  6. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  7. Time scale of stationary decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonyi, Janos

    2017-07-01

    The decoherence of a test particle interacting with an ideal gas is studied by the help of the effective Lagrangian, derived in the leading order of the perturbation expansion and in order O (∂t2) . The stationary decoherence time is found to be comparable to or longer than the diffusion time. The decoherence time reaches its minimal value for classical, completely decohered environment, suggesting that physical decoherence is slowed down as compared with diffusion by the quantum coherence of the environment.

  8. Symmetric and asymmetric ternary fission of hot nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.; Leegte, H. K. W.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Grotowski, K.; Panasiewicz, A.; Sosin, Z.; Wieloch, A.

    1993-07-01

    Emission of α particles accompanying fusion-fission processes in the 40Ar +232Th reaction at E(40Ar) = 365 MeV was studied in a wide range of in-fission-plane and out-of-plane angles. The exact determination of the emission angles of both fission fragments combined with the time-of-flight measurements allowed us to reconstruct the complete kinematics of each ternary event. The coincident energy spectra of α particles were analyzed by using predictions of the energy spectra of the statistical code cascade . The analysis clearly demonstrates emission from the composite system prior to fission, emission from fully accelerated fragments after fission, and also emission during scission. The analysis is presented for both symmetric and asymmetric fission. The results have been analyzed using a time-dependent statistical decay code and confronted with dynamical calculations based on a classical one-body dissipation model. The observed near-scission emission is consistent with evaporation from a dinuclear system just before scission and evaporation from separated fragments just after scission. The analysis suggests that the time scale of fission of the hot composite systems is long (about 7×10-20 s) and the motion during the descent to scission almost completely damped.

  9. Fission in a Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A three-year theory project was undertaken to study the fission process in extreme astrophysical environments, such as the crust of neutron stars. In the first part of the project, the effect of electron screening on the fission process was explored using a microscopic approach. For the first time, these calculations were carried out to the breaking point of the nucleus. In the second part of the project, the population of the fissioning nucleus was calculated within the same microscopic framework. These types of calculations are extremely computer-intensive and have seldom been applied to heavy deformed nuclei, such as fissioning actinides. The results, tools and methodologies produced in this work will be of interest to both the basic-science and nuclear-data communities.

  10. Stochastic dynamic equations on general time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bohner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we construct stochastic integral and stochastic differential equations on general time scales. We call these equations stochastic dynamic equations. We provide the existence and uniqueness theorem for solutions of stochastic dynamic equations. The crucial tool of our construction is a result about a connection between the time scales Lebesgue integral and the Lebesgue integral in the common sense.

  11. Some integral inequalities on time scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adnan Tuna; Servet Kutukcu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we study the reverse Holder type inequality and Holder in-equality in two dimensional case on time scales. We also obtain many integral inequalities by using H(o)lder inequalities on time scales which give Hardy's inequalities as spacial cases.

  12. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  13. Time Scale in Least Square Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Yeniay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of dynamic equations in time scale is a new area in mathematics. Time scale tries to build a bridge between real numbers and integers. Two derivatives in time scale have been introduced and called as delta and nabla derivative. Delta derivative concept is defined as forward direction, and nabla derivative concept is defined as backward direction. Within the scope of this study, we consider the method of obtaining parameters of regression equation of integer values through time scale. Therefore, we implemented least squares method according to derivative definition of time scale and obtained coefficients related to the model. Here, there exist two coefficients originating from forward and backward jump operators relevant to the same model, which are different from each other. Occurrence of such a situation is equal to total number of values of vertical deviation between regression equations and observation values of forward and backward jump operators divided by two. We also estimated coefficients for the model using ordinary least squares method. As a result, we made an introduction to least squares method on time scale. We think that time scale theory would be a new vision in least square especially when assumptions of linear regression are violated.

  14. Adolescent Time Attitude Scale: Adaptation into Turkish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Eyüp; Sahranç, Ümit; Kaya, Mehmet; Turan, Mehmet Emin

    2017-01-01

    This research is aimed at examining the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Time Attitude Scale. Data was collected from 433 adolescents; 206 males and 227 females participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis performed to discover the structural validity of the scale. The internal consistency method was used for…

  15. Fission description: First steps towards a full resolution of the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrière, Marc; Dubray, Noël; Schunck, Nicolas; Regnier, David; Dossantos-Uzarralde, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical description of low energy fission is, in our full microscopic approach, decomposed in two steps. In the first step we generate the Potential Energy Surface (PES) of the compound system we want to describe with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method with a Gogny interaction. The second step uses the Time Dependent Generator Coordinate Method (TDGCM) with the Gaussian Overlap Approximation (GOA). The GOA holds in two assumptions: the overlap matrix between HFB states has a gaussian shape (with respect to the difference between coordinates of states in deformation space); and the expectation value of the collective hamiltonian between these states can be expanded up to order two, leading in this case to a Schrödinger-like equation. In this work we replace TDGCM+GOA in the second step of our approach by an exact treatment of the TDGCM. The main equation of this method is the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation and involves two objects: the overlap matrix and the collective hamiltonian. We first calculate these matrices on a PES. Then, we build an "exact TDGCM" solver using a finite element method and a Crank-Nicolson scheme. In this talk, we will present the time-dependent Hill-Wheeler equation and discretization schemes (in time and deformation space). The analytic calculation of overlap matrix and collective hamiltonian will be detailed. Finally, first results with an exact treatment of the TDGCM will be discussed.

  16. Hardy type inequalities on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi P; Saker, Samir H

    2016-01-01

    The book is devoted to dynamic inequalities of Hardy type and extensions and generalizations via convexity on a time scale T. In particular, the book contains the time scale versions of classical Hardy type inequalities, Hardy and Littlewood type inequalities, Hardy-Knopp type inequalities via convexity, Copson type inequalities, Copson-Beesack type inequalities, Liendeler type inequalities, Levinson type inequalities and Pachpatte type inequalities, Bennett type inequalities, Chan type inequalities, and Hardy type inequalities with two different weight functions. These dynamic inequalities contain the classical continuous and discrete inequalities as special cases when T = R and T = N and can be extended to different types of inequalities on different time scales such as T = hN, h > 0, T = qN for q > 1, etc.In this book the authors followed the history and development of these inequalities. Each section in self-contained and one can see the relationship between the time scale versions of the inequalities and...

  17. The Second Noether Theorem on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Malinowska, Agnieszka B.; Natália Martins

    2013-01-01

    We extend the second Noether theorem to variational problems on time scales. As corollaries we obtain the classical second Noether theorem, the second Noether theorem for the $h$ -calculus and the second Noether theorem for the $q$ -calculus.

  18. Ternary fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Balasubramaniam; K R Vijayaraghavan; C Karthikraj

    2015-09-01

    We present the ternary fission of 252Cf and 236U within a three-cluster model as well as in a level density approach. The competition between collinear and equatorial geometry is studied by calculating the ternary fragmentation potential as a function of the angle between the lines joining the stationary middle fragment and the two end fragments. The obtained results for the 16O accompanying ternary fission indicate that collinear configuration is preferred to equatorial configuration. Further, for all the possible third fragments, the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated corresponding to an arrangement in which the heaviest and the lightest fragments are considered at the end in a collinear configuration. The PES reveals several possible ternary modes including true ternary modes where the three fragments are of similar size. The complete mass distributions of Si and Ca which accompanied ternary fission of 236U is studied within a level density picture. The obtained results favour several possible ternary combinations.

  19. Fission waves can oscillate

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  20. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Arnold, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blakeley, R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, A.A.; Heffern, L.E. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mader, D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M.; Sierk, A.; White, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using {sup 229}Th and {sup 252}Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  1. Fission Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  2. Relaxation times and modes of disturbed aggregate distribution in micellar solutions with fusion and fission of micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, Anatoly I.; Adzhemyan, Loran Ts.; Shchekin, Alexander K., E-mail: akshch@list.ru [Department of Statistical Physics, Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, Petrodvoretz, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    We have performed direct numerical calculations of the kinetics of relaxation in the system of surfactant spherical micelles under joint action of the molecular mechanism with capture and emission of individual surfactant molecules by molecular aggregates and the mechanism of fusion and fission of the aggregates. As a basis, we have taken the difference equations of aggregation and fragmentation in the form of the generalized kinetic Smoluchowski equations for aggregate concentrations. The calculations have been made with using the droplet model of molecular surfactant aggregates and two modified Smoluchowski models for the coefficients of aggregate-monomer and aggregate-aggregate fusions which take into account the effects of the aggregate size and presence of hydrophobic spots on the aggregate surface. A full set of relaxation times and corresponding relaxation modes for nonequilibrium aggregate distribution in the aggregation number has been found. The dependencies of these relaxation times and modes on the total concentration of surfactant in the solution and the special parameter controlling the probability of fusion in collisions of micelles with other micelles have been studied.

  3. Fission Product Decay Heat Calculations for Neutron Fission of 232Th

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, P. N.; Hai, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    Precise information on the decay heat from fission products following times after a fission reaction is necessary for safety designs and operations of nuclear-power reactors, fuel storage, transport flasks, and for spent fuel management and processing. In this study, the timing distributions of fission products' concentrations and their integrated decay heat as function of time following a fast neutron fission reaction of 232Th were exactly calculated by the numerical method with using the DHP code.

  4. Time invariant scaling in discrete fragmentation models

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. We consider moments of arbitrary orders of the mass multiplicity spectrum and derive scaling properties pertaining to their time evolution. We suggest that the mass weighted multiplicity is a suitable observable for the discovery of scaling. Numerical tests validate such properties, even for moderate values of the initial mass (nuclei, percolation clusters, jets of particles etc.). Finite size effects can be simply parametrized.

  5. Stability of superheavy elements around Z=120 probed by the study of their fission time obtained by the crystal blocking method; Stabilite d'elements superlourds au voisinage de Z=120 testee par l'etude de leurs temps de fission deduits par la methode du blocage cristallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laget, M

    2007-10-15

    While the existence of an island of stability beyond Z=110 is theoretically acquired, the location of this island ranges from Z=114 to Z=126 depending on models. In this work, the stability of super-heavy nuclei is probed through the study of their fission time. The chosen experimental method, the crystal blocking method, is sensitive to the presence of possible long time components in the fission time distribution which indicates a fission mechanism occurring after the formation of a compound nucleus. The blocking dips were therefore constituted for the various products of the reaction U{sup 238} + Ni (6.6 MeV/A) {yields} 120, the experimental set-up allowing us to clearly identify and select the reaction mechanisms. The comparison of the blocking dip constituted for quasi-elastic scattering events with the one obtained for the fission fragments of a Z=120, combined with the study of kinematical properties of these fission fragments, give evidences of the existence of very long fission times (> 10{sup -18} s) only compatible with a fusion-fission mechanism implying a non vanishing fission barrier height for Z=120. The second part outlines microscopic calculations of fission barrier heights, carried out in the framework of the finite temperature of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory. Because of the progressive vanishing of the pairing correlation with T, which happens differently at the ground state and at the top of the barrier, B{sub f} first grows until T {approx_equal} 0.8 MeV before dropping with T owing to shell-effects damping with temperature. (author)

  6. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  7. Multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Bohner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales, taking readers beyond the traditional calculus texts. Covering topics from parameter-dependent integrals to partial differentiation on time scales, the book’s nine pedagogically oriented chapters provide a pathway to this active area of research that will appeal to students and researchers in mathematics and the physical sciences. The authors present a clear and well-organized treatment of the concept behind the mathematics and solution techniques, including many practical examples and exercises.

  8. Decay modes in spontaneous fission

    CERN Document Server

    Gönnenwein, F

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous fission (SF) is considered to be the choice reaction for studying the influence of shell and pairing effects in fission in general, and in particular their impact on the mass and energy distributions of fission fragments. For the time being some 35 SF reactions have been analysed in detail for elements ranging from Pu up to Rf. Going from the lighter to the heavier actinides both, the distributions of fragment mass (or charge) and of total kinetic energy undergo dramatic changes. It is observed in experiment, however, that these distributions may be well described as a superposition of a few fission modes, each with its own characteristic mass an energy pattern. The experimental modes are traced in theory to fine structures in the potential energy surface of a fissioning nucleus, provided shell and pairing corrections to the basic liquid drop model are accounted for.

  9. Material recognition using neutron/gamma interrogation with time tagged fission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, X.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Material recognition is studied by measuring simultaneously the transmission of neutron and gamma rays produced by a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source. The possibility to derive direct signatures to identify light elements (C,N,O) by using the measured transmission versus neutron time of flight is demonstrated. The yield of the transmitted gamma ray as a function of energy in the range 0.1-5.5 MeV provides high precision identification of the atomic number of the sample. A tomography system, currently under construction, is described. (authors)

  10. Comparison Of 252Cf Time Correlated Induced Fisssion With AmLi Induced Fission On Fresh MTR Research Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Jay Prakash [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-03-30

    The effective application of international safeguards to research reactors requires verification of spent fuel as well as fresh fuel. To accomplish this goal various nondestructive and destructive assay techniques have been developed in the US and around the world. The Advanced Experimental Fuel Counter (AEFC) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) combining both neutron and gamma measurement capabilities. Since spent fuel assemblies are stored in water, the system was designed to be watertight to facilitate underwater measurements by inspectors. The AEFC is comprised of six 3He detectors as well as a shielded and collimated ion chamber. The 3He detectors are used for active and passive neutron coincidence counting while the ion chamber is used for gross gamma counting. Active coincidence measurement data is used to measure residual fissile mass, whereas the passive coincidence measurement data along with passive gamma measurement can provide information about burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment. In the past, most of the active interrogation systems along with the AEFC used an AmLi neutron interrogation source. Owing to the difficulty in obtaining an AmLi source, a 252Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source was used during a 2014 field trail in Uzbekistan as an alternative. In this study, experiments were performed to calibrate the AEFC instrument and compare use of the 252Cf spontaneous fission source and the AmLi (α,n) neutron emission source. The 252Cf source spontaneously emits bursts of time-correlated prompt fission neutrons that thermalize in the water and induce fission in the fuel assembly. The induced fission (IF) neutrons are also time correlated resulting in more correlated neutron detections inside the 3He detector, which helps reduce the statistical errors in doubles when using the 252Cf interrogation source instead of

  11. Structure of Student Time Management Scale (STMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of constructing a Student Time Management Scale (STMS), the initial version was administered and data were collected from 523 standard eleventh students. (Mean age = 15.64). The data obtained were subjected to Reliability and Factor analysis using PASW Statistical software version 18. From 42 items 14 were dropped, resulting in the…

  12. Some Nonlinear Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Nian Li; Weihong Sheng

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales, which provide explicit bounds on unknown functions. The inequalities given here unify and extend some inequalities in (B G Pachpatte, On some new inequalities related to a certain inequality arising in the theory of differential equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 251 (2000) 736--751).

  13. The Second Noether Theorem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka B. Malinowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the second Noether theorem to variational problems on time scales. As corollaries we obtain the classical second Noether theorem, the second Noether theorem for the h-calculus and the second Noether theorem for the q-calculus.

  14. The second Noether theorem on time scale

    OpenAIRE

    Malinowska, Agnieszka B.; Martins, Natália

    2014-01-01

    We extend the second Noether theorem to variational problems on time scales. Our result provides as corollaries the classical second Noether theorem, the second Noether theorem for the $h$-calculus and the second Noether theorem for the $q$-calculus.

  15. Some Nonlinear Integral Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei Nian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear integral inequalities on time scales. Our results unify and extend some continuous inequalities and their corresponding discrete analogues. The theoretical results are illustrated by a simple example at the end of this paper.

  16. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e{sup -}). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for

  17. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  18. A Derivation of Source-based Kinetics Equation with Time Dependent Fission Kernel for Reactor Transient Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Woo, Myeong Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a new balance equation to overcome the problems generated by the previous methods is proposed using source-based balance equation. And then, a simple problem is analyzed with the proposed method. In this study, a source-based balance equation with the time dependent fission kernel was derived to simplify the kinetics equation. To analyze the partial variations of reactor characteristics, two representative methods were introduced in previous studies; (1) quasi-statics method and (2) multipoint technique. The main idea of quasistatics method is to use a low-order approximation for large integration times. To realize the quasi-statics method, first, time dependent flux is separated into the shape and amplitude functions, and shape function is calculated. It is noted that the method has a good accuracy; however, it can be expensive as a calculation cost aspect because the shape function should be fully recalculated to obtain accurate results. To improve the calculation efficiency, multipoint method was proposed. The multipoint method is based on the classic kinetics equation with using Green's function to analyze the flight probability from region r' to r. Those previous methods have been used to analyze the reactor kinetics analysis; however, the previous methods can have some limitations. First, three group variables (r{sub g}, E{sub g}, t{sub g}) should be considered to solve the time dependent balance equation. This leads a big limitation to apply large system problem with good accuracy. Second, the energy group neutrons should be used to analyze reactor kinetics problems. In time dependent problem, neutron energy distribution can be changed at different time. It can affect the change of the group cross section; therefore, it can lead the accuracy problem. Third, the neutrons in a space-time region continually affect the other space-time regions; however, it is not properly considered in the previous method. Using birth history of the

  19. Scale Invariance in Rain Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, A.; Corral, A.

    2009-09-01

    In the last few years there have been pieces of evidence that rain events can be considered analogous to other nonequilibrium relaxation processes in Nature such as earthquakes, solar flares and avalanches. In this work we compare the probability densities of rain event size, duration, and recurrence times (i.e., drought periods) between one Mediterranean site and different sites worldwide. We test the existence of scale invariance in these distributions and the possibility of a universal scaling exponent, despite the different climatic characteristics of the different places.

  20. Emplacement time of the Loe-Shilman carbonatite from NW Pakistan: Constraints from fission-track dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, N.U. [National Centre of Excellence in Geology, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)], E-mail: nimat_khattak@yahoo.com; Akram, M. [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, M.A. [National Centre of Excellence in Geology, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Khan, H.A. [COMSATS Headquarters, 4th Floor, Shahrah-e-Jamhuriat, G-5/2 Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2008-08-15

    The Loe-Shilman carbonatite complex is situated in the extreme west of the Peshawar Plain Alkaline Igneous Province (PAIP), near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. It comprises sill-form bodies emplaced along an E-W trending and N dipping fault zone in Paleozoic to Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of Khyber Agency. Fission-track dating studies on the apatite crystals using the external detector method and age standard approach (the {zeta} method) yielded an age of 30.0{+-}1.5Ma for the Loe-Shilman carbonatite. Close agreement between the previously determined radiometric ages from the same as well as the neighboring carbonatite complexes of the PAIP and the fission-track apatite age of this study indicates that the Loe-Shilman carbonatite was emplaced at relatively shallow crustal level and quickly cooled to low temperatures (<60{sup 0}C) required for the complete retention of fission tracks in apatite and that the fission-track age of this study is the emplacement age of the Loe-Shilman carbonatite.

  1. Significance of time scale differences in psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowski, W

    2009-02-01

    We present modeling of both rational processes (thoughts) and emotional processes (feelings) on a two-dimensional lattice and on extremely simplified two-dimensional phase space of the brain. Our purpose is to analyze influence of differences in time-scales of various types of processes. In particular, we show that no 'central executive structure' between consciousness and unconsciousness, the existence of which was suggested by psychologists, is not needed.

  2. Scaling of light and dark time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, J

    1978-01-01

    Scaling of light and dark time intervals of 0.1 to 1.1 s is performed by the mehtod of magnitude estimation with respect to a given standard. The standards differ in duration and type (light and dark). The light intervals are subjectively estimated as longer than the dark ones. The relation between the mean interval estimations and their magnitude is linear for both light and dark intervals.

  3. Special Issue on Time Scale Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 IOP PUBLISHING METROLOGIA Metrologia 45 (2008) doi:10.1088/0026-1394/45/6/E01...special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the...Paris at the BIPM in 2002 (see Metrologia 40 (3), 2003) • 5th Symposium: in San Fernando, Spain at the ROA in 2008. The early symposia were concerned

  4. Intrinsic energy partition in fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirea M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic energy partition between two complementary fission fragments is investigated microscopically. The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time-dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the other separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The excitation energy in a wide distribution of fission fragments is calculated for the 234U parent nucleus.

  5. Liquidity crises on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Francesco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We present an empirical analysis of the microstructure of financial markets and, in particular, of the static and dynamic properties of liquidity. We find that on relatively large time scales (15 min) large price fluctuations are connected to the failure of the subtle mechanism of compensation between the flows of market and limit orders: in other words, the missed revelation of the latent order book breaks the dynamical equilibrium between the flows, triggering the large price jumps. On smaller time scales (30 s), instead, the static depletion of the limit order book is an indicator of an intrinsic fragility of the system, which is related to a strongly nonlinear enhancement of the response. In order to quantify this phenomenon we introduce a measure of the liquidity imbalance present in the book and we show that it is correlated to both the sign and the magnitude of the next price movement. These findings provide a quantitative definition of the effective liquidity, which proves to be strongly dependent on the considered time scales.

  6. Ideological Fission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    ; it is a materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However......, it is a being which is reminiscent of earlier monsters - from Godzilla to The Blob. It is evident that the Cloverfield monster is a paradoxical construction which attempts to articulate fear and loathing about terrorism, but ends up trapped in an ideological dead-end maze, unable to do anything other than...

  7. Fission yield studies at the IGISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penttilae, H.; Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.D.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rubchenya, V. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15

    Low-energy-particle-induced fission is a cost-effective way to produce neutron-rich nuclei for spectroscopic studies. Fission has been utilized at the IGISOL to produce isotopes for decay and nuclear structure studies, collinear laser spectroscopy and precision mass measurements. The ion guide technique is also very suitable for the fission yield measurements, which can be performed very efficiently by using the Penning trap for fission fragment identification and counting. The proton- and neutron-induced fission yield measurements at the IGISOL are reviewed, and the independent isotopic yields of Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd and In in 25MeV deuterium-induced fission are presented for the first time. Moving to a new location next to the high intensity MCC30/15 light-ion cyclotron will allow also the use of the neutron-induced fission to produce the neutron rich nuclei at the IGISOL in the future. (orig.)

  8. Multidimensional scaling of musical time estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocenas-Silva, Raquel; Bueno, José Lino Oliveira; Molin, Paul; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the psycho-musical factors that govern time evaluation in Western music from baroque, classic, romantic, and modern repertoires. The excerpts were previously found to represent variability in musical properties and to induce four main categories of emotions. 48 participants (musicians and nonmusicians) freely listened to 16 musical excerpts (lasting 20 sec. each) and grouped those that seemed to have the same duration. Then, participants associated each group of excerpts to one of a set of sine wave tones varying in duration from 16 to 24 sec. Multidimensional scaling analysis generated a two-dimensional solution for these time judgments. Musical excerpts with high arousal produced an overestimation of time, and affective valence had little influence on time perception. The duration was also overestimated when tempo and loudness were higher, and to a lesser extent, timbre density. In contrast, musical tension had little influence.

  9. uncertain dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lakshmikantham

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic feedback control problem is that of obtaining some desired stability property from a system which contains uncertainties due to unknown inputs into the system. Despite such imperfect knowledge in the selected mathematical model, we often seek to devise controllers that will steer the system in a certain required fashion. Various classes of controllers whose design is based on the method of Lyapunov are known for both discrete [4], [10], [15], and continuous [3–9], [11] models described by difference and differential equations, respectively. Recently, a theory for what is known as dynamic systems on time scales has been built which incorporates both continuous and discrete times, namely, time as an arbitrary closed sets of reals, and allows us to handle both systems simultaneously [1], [2], [12], [13]. This theory permits one to get some insight into and better understanding of the subtle differences between discrete and continuous systems. We shall, in this paper, utilize the framework of the theory of dynamic systems on time scales to investigate the stability properties of conditionally invariant sets which are then applied to discuss controlled systems with uncertain elements. For the notion of conditionally invariant set and its stability properties, see [14]. Our results offer a new approach to the problem in question.

  10. The partial fission of fast spinning asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivel, Simon; Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-10-01

    The spin rates of asteroids systematically change over time due the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. Above a certain spin rate that depends on the body's density, regions of an asteroid can enter in tension, with components held to the body by cohesive forces. When the body fails, deformation or fission can occur. Catastrophic fission leading to complete disruption has been directly observed in active asteroid P/2013 R3. Partial fission, the loss of only part of the body, has been proposed as a mechanism for the formation of binaries and is explored here.The equatorial cavities of (341843) 2008 EV5 and of (185851) 2000 DP107 (a binary system) are consistent with a localized partial fission of the body (LPSC 2016 #1036). The examination of the gravity field of these bodies reveals that a mass placed within these cavities could be shed. In this mechanism, the outward pull of inertial forces creates an average stress at the cavity interface of ≈1 Pa for 2008 EV5 and ≈3 Pa for 2000 DP107 at spin periods of ≈3.15 h for the assumed densities of 1.3 g/cm3.This work continues the study of this partial, localized fission. Specifically, it addresses the issue of the low cohesion necessary to the mechanism. These cohesion values are typically lower than global strength values inferred on other asteroids (10 - 200 Pa), meaning that partial fission may occur prior to larger-scale deformations. Yet, several processes can explain the discrepancy, as they can naturally segregate particles by size. For instance, landslides or granular convection (Brazil nut effect) could bring larger boulders to the equator of the body, while finer particles are left at higher latitudes or sink to the center. Conversely, failure of the interior could bring boulders to the surface. The peculiar profile shape of these asteroids, shared by many binaries (e.g. 1999 KW4, 1996 FG3) may also be a clue of this heterogeneity, as this "spin top" shape is obtained in simulations with

  11. Time-Scale Invariant Audio Data Embedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Mohamed F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel algorithm for high-quality data embedding in audio. The algorithm is based on changing the relative length of the middle segment between two successive maximum and minimum peaks to embed data. Spline interpolation is used to change the lengths. To ensure smooth monotonic behavior between peaks, a hybrid orthogonal and nonorthogonal wavelet decomposition is used prior to data embedding. The possible data embedding rates are between 20 and 30 bps. However, for practical purposes, we use repetition codes, and the effective embedding data rate is around 5 bps. The algorithm is invariant after time-scale modification, time shift, and time cropping. It gives high-quality output and is robust to mp3 compression.

  12. Discounting in Games across Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Chatterjee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two-level discounted games played by two players on a perfect-information stochastic game graph. The upper level game is a discounted game and the lower level game is an undiscounted reachability game. Two-level games model hierarchical and sequential decision making under uncertainty across different time scales. We show the existence of pure memoryless optimal strategies for both players and an ordered field property for such games. We show that if there is only one player (Markov decision processes, then the values can be computed in polynomial time. It follows that whether the value of a player is equal to a given rational constant in two-level discounted games can be decided in NP intersected coNP. We also give an alternate strategy improvement algorithm to compute the value.

  13. Discounting in Games across Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; 10.4204/EPTCS.25.6

    2010-01-01

    We introduce two-level discounted games played by two players on a perfect-information stochastic game graph. The upper level game is a discounted game and the lower level game is an undiscounted reachability game. Two-level games model hierarchical and sequential decision making under uncertainty across different time scales. We show the existence of pure memoryless optimal strategies for both players and an ordered field property for such games. We show that if there is only one player (Markov decision processes), then the values can be computed in polynomial time. It follows that whether the value of a player is equal to a given rational constant in two-level discounted games can be decided in NP intersected coNP. We also give an alternate strategy improvement algorithm to compute the value.

  14. Extension of gyrokinetics to transport time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Felix I

    2013-01-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations have greatly improved our theoretical understanding of turbulent transport in fusion devices. Most gyrokinetic models in use are delta-f simulations in which the slowly varying radial profiles of density and temperature are assumed to be constant for turbulence saturation times, and only the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations are calculated. New massive simulations are being built to self-consistently determine the radial profiles of density and temperature. However, these new codes have failed to realize that modern gyrokinetic formulations, composed of a gyrokinetic Fokker-Planck equation and a gyrokinetic quasineutrality equation, are only valid for delta-f simulations that do not reach the longer transport time scales necessary to evolve radial profiles. In tokamaks, due to axisymmetry, the evolution of the axisymmetric radial electric field is a challenging problem requiring substantial modifications to gyrokinetic treatments. In this thesis, I study the effect of turbulence o...

  15. Spur in pico-second time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinathan, C.; Girija, G. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Chemistry Div.)

    1983-01-01

    The spur diffusion model of aqueous radiation chemistry, proposed in 1953, had run into difficulties with the development of pico-second pulse radiolysis in the late 1960s and early seventies. Using the same values for spur parameters, it was impossible to get good agreement with e/sup -/sub(aq) and OH decay in pico and nano second time scales as well as the steady state molecular product yield measurements. This inconsistency was removed by us by assuming that for a given number of dissociations, a number of radii values for the spur are possible, these radii values being related in a gaussian manner. This new approach proved highly successful in getting agreement between the predictions of the spur diffusion model and the pulse radiolysis results as well as the steady state molecular product yield measurements. Our computations have been extended to cover the entire range of spurs from a single dissociation spur to a thirty dissociation spur. Here again agreement with experimental results is good. This approach also gives interesting insights about the spur formation processes in pico and possibly femto second time scales. We have calculated rate constants for the reactions involving the 'precursor' of the hydrated electron with a number of ions.

  16. Fission of super-heavy nuclei explored with Skyrme forces

    CERN Document Server

    Schindzielorz, N; Klüpfel, P; Reinhard, P -G; Hager, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a large scale survey of life-times for spontaneous fission in the regime of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z=104-122. This is done on the basis of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. The axially symmetric fission path is computed using a quadrupole constraint. Self-consistent cranking is used for the collective masses and associated quantum corrections. The actual tunneling probability is estimated by the WKB approximation. Three typical Skyrme forces are used to explore the sensitivity of the results. Benchmarks in the regime Z=104-108 show an acceptable agreement. The general systematics reflects nicely the islands of shell stabilization and the crossover from $\\alpha$-decay to fission for the decay chains from the region of Z/N=118/176.

  17. The Fission of thorium with Alpha Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, Amos S.

    1948-10-15

    Soon after the discovery of fission, Meitner, Bretscher and Cook found differences in the decay of various chemical fractions separated from uranium irradiated with slow neutrons and thorium irradiated with fast neutrons respectively and suggested that a difference existed in the distribution of fission products in the two cases. In 1940, Turner suggested that the distribution in various modes of fission should be investigated. The fact that elements such as tin, cadmium, palladium, and silver were found in fast neutron and deuteron fission of uranium and thorium before they were found in slow neutron fission of uranium suggested that the middle region of the distribution was raised as the energy of the incident particle was increased. Since the compound nucleus formed in the fission of thorium with alpha particles is U{sup 236}, the same compound nucleus formed in the fission of U{sup 235} with neutrons, it is of interest to study the fission of thorium with alphas and compare the resulting distribution of fission products with that found with uranium with slow and thorium with fast neutrons. Any difference between the various results where the same compound nucleus is formed must be due to differences in energy content and possible differences in distribution of the nucleons in the compound nucleus at the time of fission.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  19. Rapid Separation of Fission Product 141La

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; Wen; YE; Hong-sheng; LIN; Min; CHEN; Ke-sheng; XU; Li-jun; ZHANG; Wei-dong; CHEN; Yi-zhen

    2013-01-01

    141La was separated and purified from fission products in this work for physical measurements aimed at improving the accuracy of its decay parameters.As the impact of 142La and other fission products,cesium(141Cs,142Cs included)was rapid separated from the fission products,141Cs and 142Ba separation was prepared after a cooling time about 25 s when 142Cs decays to daughter 142Ba,141La purification then

  20. Time Horizon and Social Scale in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009 our center (CRED) published a first version of The Psychology of Climate Change Communication. In it, we attempted to summarize facts and concepts from psychological research that could help guide communication. While this work focused on climate change, most of the ideas are at least partly applicable for communication about a variety of natural hazards. Of the many examples in this guide, I mention three. Single-action bias is the human tendency to stop considering further actions that might be needed to deal with a given hazard, once a single action has been taken. Another example is the importance of group affiliation in motivating voluntary contributions to joint action. A third concerns the finding that group participation enhances understanding of probabilistic concepts and promotes action in the face of uncertainty. One current research direction, which goes beyond those included in the above publication, focuses on how time horizons arise in the thinking of individuals and groups, and how these time horizons might influence hazard preparedness. On the one hand, individuals sometimes appear impatient, organizations look for immediate results, and officials fail to look beyond the next election cycle. Yet under some laboratory conditions and in some subcultures, a longer time horizon is adopted. We are interested in how time horizon is influenced by group identity and by the very architecture of planning and decision making. Institutional changes, involving long-term contractual relationships among communities, developers, insurers, and governments, could greatly increase resilience in the face of natural hazards. Communication about hazards, in the context of such long-term contractual relationships might look very different from communication that is first initiated by immediate threat. Another new direction concerns the social scale of institutions and of communication about hazards. Traditionally, insurance contracts share risk among a large

  1. Scaling Fire Regimes in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability are important properties of the forest fire regimes of coniferous forests of southwestern North America. We use a variety of analytical techniques to examine scaling in a surface fire regime in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, USA, based on an original data set collected from Monument Canyon Research Natural Area (MCN). Spatio-temporal scale dependence in the fire regime can be analyzed quantitatively using statistical descriptors of the fire regime, such as fire frequency and mean fire interval. We describe a theory of the event-area (EA) relationship, an extension of the species-area relationship for events distributed in space and time; the interval-area (IA) relationship, is a related form for fire intervals. We use the EA and IA to demonstrate scale dependence in the MCN fire regime. The slope and intercept of these functions are influenced by fire size, frequency, and spatial distribution, and thus are potentially useful metrics of spatio-temporal synchrony of events in the paleofire record. Second, we outline a theory of fire interval probability, working from first principles in fire ecology and statistics. Fires are conditional events resulting from the interaction of multiple contingent factors that must be satisfied for an event to occur. Outcomes of this kind represent a multiplicative process for which a lognormal model is the limiting distribution. We examine the application of this framework to two probability models, the Weibull and lognormal distributions, which can be used to characterize the distribution of fire intervals over time. Lastly, we present a general model for the collector's curve, with application to the theory and effects of sample size in fire history. Sources of uncertainty in fire history can be partitioned into an error typology; analytical methods used in fire history (particularly the formation of composite fire records) are designed to minimize certain types of error in inference

  2. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, J Diaz; Knecht, A; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G

    2011-01-01

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on March 11, 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima nuclear reactor complex. On March 17-18, 2011 we detected the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. The highest detected activity to date is <~32 mBq/m^3 of 131-I.

  3. Some aspects of fission and quasifission processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Back

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of nuclear fission in 1938–1939 had a profound influence on the field of nuclear physics and it brought this branch of physics into the forefront as it was recognized for having the potential for its seminal influence on modern society. Although many of the basic features of actinide fission were described in a ground-breaking paper by Bohr and Wheeler only six months after the discovery, the fission process is very complex and it has been a challenge for both experimentalists and theorists to achieve a complete and satisfactory understanding of this phenomenon. Many aspects of nuclear physics are involved in fission and it continues to be a subject of intense study even three quarters of a century after its discovery. In this talk, I will review an incomplete subset of the major milestones in fission research, and briefly discuss some of the topics that I have been involved in during my career. These include studies of vibrational resonances and fission isomers that are caused by the second minimum in the fission barrier in actinide nuclei, studies of heavy-ion-induced fission in terms of the angular distributions and the mass–angle correlations of fission fragments. Some of these studies provided evidence for the importance of the quasifission process and the attendant suppression of the complete fusion process. Finally, some of the circumstances around the establishment of large-scale nuclear research in India will be discussed.

  4. Breakup time scale studied in the 8 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ + $^{197}Au$ reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pienkowski, L; Lefort, T; Hsi, W C; Beaulieu, L; Botvina, A; Back, B B; Breuer, H; Gushue, S; Korteling, R G; Laforest, R; Martin, E; Ramakrishnan, E; Remsberg, L P; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Viola, V E; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data from the reaction of an 8.0 GeV/c pi- beam incident on a 197Au target have been analyzed in order to investigate the integrated breakup time scale for hot residues. Alpha-particle energy spectra and particle angular distributions supported by a momentum tensor analysis suggest that at large excitation energy, above 3-5 MeV/nucleon, light-charged particles are emitted prior to or at the same time as the emission of the heavy fragments. Comparison with the SMM and GEMINI models is presented. A binary fission-like mechanism fits the experimental data at low excitation energies, but seems unable to reproduce the data at excitation energies above 3-5 MeV/nucleon.

  5. Research on Nuclear Reaction Network Equation for Fission Product Nuclides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Reaction Network Equation calculation system for fission product nuclides was developed. With the system, the number of the fission product nuclides at different time can be calculated in the different neutron field intensity and neutron energy spectra

  6. Fission fragment mass and angular distributions: Probes to study non-equilibrium fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R G Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis of heavy and superheavy elements is severely hindered by fission and fission-like processes. The probability of these fission-like, non-equilibrium processes strongly depends on the entrance channel parameters. This article attempts to summarize the recent experimental findings and classify the signatures of these non-equilibrium processes based on macroscopic variables. The importance of the sticking time of the dinuclear complex with respect to the equilibration times of various degrees of freedom is emphasized.

  7. Modeling and simulation of nuclear fuel in scenarios with long time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Carlos E.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: eduardo.espinosa@ufrgs.br, E-mail: bardo.bodmann@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DENUC/PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear reactors play a key role in defining the energy matrix. A study by the Fraunhofer Society shows in different time scales for long periods of time the distribution of energy sources. Regardless of scale, the use of nuclear energy is practically constant. In these scenarios, the nuclear fuel behavior over time is of interest. For kinetics of long-term scales, changing the chemical composition of fuel is significant. Thus, it is appropriate to consider fission products called neutron poisons. Such products are of interest in the nuclear reactor, since they become parasitic neutron absorbers and result in long thermal heat sources. The objective of this work is to solve the kinetics system coupled to neutron poison products. To solve this system, we use similar ideas to the method of Adomian decomposition. Initially, one separates the system of equations as the sum of a linear part and a non-linear part in order to solve a recursive system. The nonlinearity is treated as Adomian polynomial. We present numerical results of the effects of changing the power of a reactor, scenarios such as start-up and shut-down. For these results we consider time dependent reactivity, such as linear reactivity, quadratic polynomial and oscillatory. With these results one can simulate the chemical composition of the fuel due to the reuse of the spent fuel in subsequent cycles. (author)

  8. Complex fission phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  9. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  10. Noether theorem for Birkhoffian systems on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chuan-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Birkhoff equations on time scales and Noether theorem for Birkhoffian system on time scales are studied. First, some necessary knowledge of calculus on time scales are reviewed. Second, Birkhoff equations on time scales are obtained. Third, the conditions for invariance of Pfaff action and conserved quantities are presented under the special infinitesimal transformations and general infinitesimal transformations, respectively. Fourth, some special cases are given. And finally, an example is given to illustrate the method and results.

  11. To fission or not to fission

    CERN Document Server

    Pomorski, Krzysztof; Ivanyuk, Fedir A

    2016-01-01

    The fission-fragments mass-yield of 236U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and the mass-asymmetry mode. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using the Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within the cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining that final fragment mass distribution.

  12. Assessment of fissionable material behaviour in fission chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabellos, O., E-mail: oscar.cabellos@upm.e [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rapisarda, D. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Herranz, N. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-21

    A comprehensive study is performed in order to assess the pertinence of fission chambers coated with different fissile materials for high neutron flux detection. Three neutron scenarios are proposed to study the fast component of a high neutron flux: (i) high neutron flux with a significant thermal contribution such as BR2, (ii) DEMO magnetic fusion reactor, and (iii) IFMIF high flux test module. In this study, the inventory code ACAB is used to analyze the following questions: (i) impact of different deposits in fission chambers; (ii) effect of the irradiation time/burn-up on the concentration; (iii) impact of activation cross-section uncertainties on the composition of the deposit for all the range of burn-up/irradiation neutron fluences of interest. The complete set of nuclear data (decay, fission yield, activation cross-sections, and uncertainties) provided in the EAF2007 data library are used for this evaluation.

  13. SYMMETRICAL AND ASYMMETRIC TERNARY FISSION OF HOT NUCLEI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIWEKWILCZYNSKA, K; WILCZYNSKI, J; LEEGTE, HKW; SIEMSSEN, RH; WILSCHUT, HW; GROTOWSKI, K; PANASIEWICZ, A; SOSIN, Z; WIELOCH, A

    1993-01-01

    Emission of a particles accompanying fusion-fission processes in the Ar-40 + Th-232 reaction at E(Ar-40) = 365 MeV was studied in a wide range of in-fission-plane and out-of-plane angles. The exact determination of the emission angles of both fission fragments combined with the time-of-flight measur

  14. SYMMETRICAL AND ASYMMETRIC TERNARY FISSION OF HOT NUCLEI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIWEKWILCZYNSKA, K; WILCZYNSKI, J; LEEGTE, HKW; SIEMSSEN, RH; WILSCHUT, HW; GROTOWSKI, K; PANASIEWICZ, A; SOSIN, Z; WIELOCH, A

    1993-01-01

    Emission of a particles accompanying fusion-fission processes in the Ar-40 + Th-232 reaction at E(Ar-40) = 365 MeV was studied in a wide range of in-fission-plane and out-of-plane angles. The exact determination of the emission angles of both fission fragments combined with the time-of-flight measur

  15. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  16. Fusion-fission study at IUAC: Recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullanhiotan, Sugathan

    2016-10-01

    Several properties observed in heavy ion induced fission led to the conclusion that fission is not always originated from fully equilibrated compound nucleus. Soon after the collision of two nuclei, it forms a di-nuclear system than can fission before a compound nucleus is formed. This process termed quasi-fission is a major hurdle to the formation of heavier elements by fusion. Fission originated before complete equilibration showed anomalously large angular anisotropy and mass distribution wider than what is expected from compound nucleus fission. The standard statistical model fails to predict the outcome of quasi-fission and currently no dynamical model is fully developed to predict all the features of quasi-fission. Though much progress has been made in recent times, a full understanding of the fission dynamics is still missing. Experiments identifying the influence of entrance channel parameters on dynamics of fusion-fission showed contrasting results. At IUAC accelerator facility many experiments have been performed to make a systematic study of fission dynamics using mass distribution, angular distribution and neutron multiplicity measurements in mass region around A ∼ 200. Recent measurement on mass distribution of fission fragment from reaction 19 F +206,208 Pb around fusion barrier energy showed the influence of multi-mode fission in enhancing the mass variance at low excitation energy. In this talk I will present some of these results.

  17. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Borcea, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takác, K.

    2010-10-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments' heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  18. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  19. Dynamic treatment of ternary fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubchenya, V. A.; Yavshits, S. G.

    1988-06-01

    The new dynamic model of light charged particle (LCP) formation in ternary fission is presented. The model is based on the assumption that light particles are formed as a result of two random neck ruptures during the time interval about one single-particle period. The connection of the final stage of ternary fission and of the saddle point descent stage was obtained in the framework of the density moments method. The analysis of LCP formation has shown that LCP mass and charge distributions are strongly governed by statistical nucleon exchange in the LCP-light fragment double system. New semiclassical expressions for the calculations of LCP yields and relative ternary fission probability are given. The results of calculations are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  1. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    CERN Document Server

    Scamps, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including BCS dynamical pairing correlations. The fission modes of the 258Fm nucleus are studied. The resulting fission fragment characteristics show a good agreement with experimental data. Quantum shell effects are shown to play a crucial role in the dynamics and formation of the fragments. The importance of quantum fluctuations beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle picture is underlined and qualitatively studied.

  2. Seventy-five years of nuclear fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Kapoor

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear fission process is one of the most important discoveries of the twentieth century. In these 75 years since its discovery, the nuclear fission related research has not only provided new insights in the physics of large scale motion, deformation and subsequent division of a heavy nucleus, but has also opened several new frontiers of research in nuclear physics. This article is a narrative giving an overview of the landmarks of the progress in the field.

  3. Local Observability of Systems on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Bartosiewicz

    2013-01-01

    unified way using the language of real analytic geometry, ideals of germs of analytic functions, and their real radicals. It is shown that some properties related to observability are preserved under various discretizations of continuous-time systems.

  4. Towards a multiscale approach for assessing fission product behaviour in UN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipfel, M.; Di Marcello, V.; Schubert, A.; Laar, J. van de; Van Uffelen, P., E-mail: Paul.van-Uffelen@ec.europa.eu

    2013-11-15

    Ab initio modelling of fission products (i.e. Nb, Y, Gd, Nd, Zr, Sm, Eu, Ce, Ba, Mo, Sr, Rh, Pd, and Ru) in uranium nitride is carried out by assessing the incorporation, along with their contributions to local swelling of the fuel matrix. Fission products (FP's) in UN have shown to be preferably accommodated at U vacancies in bound [1 0 0]-Schottky defects, nevertheless, similar incorporation energies were found at a single U vacancy. From the investigated incorporation and migration mechanism, we found that FP's in UN predominately migrate along U–U vacancies, since the incorporation energies for all FP are lowest at single U vacancy or at the U vacancy in a Schottky defect. The energy required to induce a migration of a volatile FP from an N vacancy to U vacancy is about 4–5.5 eV. The local volume changes caused by the fission-product substitution have been assessed by means of DFT and combined with the fission-product concentrations obtained by means of neutron calculations (SCALE) to predict fission product swelling in UN. The linear swelling of nitride fuel resulting from these calculations, and the assumption that fission products do not interact and form secondary phases, leads to a reasonable estimation for the swelling rate as a function of burn-up (or time) when compared with empirical correlations in the open literature.

  5. Long-time data storage: relevant time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic processes relevant for long-time storage of information about human kind are discussed, ranging from biological and geological processes to the lifecycle of stars and the expansion of the universe. Major results are that life will end ultimately and the remaining time that the earth is habit

  6. Scale-dependent intrinsic entropies of complex time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E

    2016-04-13

    Multi-scale entropy (MSE) was developed as a measure of complexity for complex time series, and it has been applied widely in recent years. The MSE algorithm is based on the assumption that biological systems possess the ability to adapt and function in an ever-changing environment, and these systems need to operate across multiple temporal and spatial scales, such that their complexity is also multi-scale and hierarchical. Here, we present a systematic approach to apply the empirical mode decomposition algorithm, which can detrend time series on various time scales, prior to analysing a signal's complexity by measuring the irregularity of its dynamics on multiple time scales. Simulated time series of fractal Gaussian noise and human heartbeat time series were used to study the performance of this new approach. We show that our method can successfully quantify the fractal properties of the simulated time series and can accurately distinguish modulations in human heartbeat time series in health and disease.

  7. OSCILLATION FOR NONAUTONOMOUS NEUTRAL DYNAMIC DELAY EQUATIONS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The article is concerned with oscillation of nonautonomous neutral dynamic delay equations on time scales. Sufficient conditions are established for the existence of bounded positive solutions and for oscillation of all solutions of this equation. Some results extend known results for difference equations when the time scale is the set Z+ of positive integers and for differential equations when the time scale is the set R of real numbers.

  8. Angular momenta of fission fragments in the α-accompanied fission of 252Cf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Morháč, M.; Hamilton, J. H.; Kormicki, J.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Luo, Y. X.; Fong, D.; Gore, P.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Rodin, A. M.; Fomichev, A. S.; Popeko, G. S.; Daniel, A. V.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Stoyer, M. A.; Donangelo, R.; Cole, J. D.

    2005-06-01

    For the first time, average angular momenta of the ternary fission fragments 100, 102Zr, 106Mo, 144, 146Ba and 138, 140, 142Xe from the α-accompanied fission of 252Cf were obtained from relative intensities of prompt γ-ray transitions with the use of the statistical model calculation. Average values of the angular momenta were compared with the corresponding values for the same fission fragments from the binary fission of 252Cf. Results indicate the presence of a decreasing trend in the average values of angular momenta induced in ternary fission fragments compared to the same binary fission fragments. On the average, the total angular momentum extracted for ternary fission fragments is ˜1.4 ℏ lower than in binary fission. Consequently, results indicate that the mechanism of the ternary α-particles emission may directly effect an induction of angular momenta of fission fragments, and possible scenarios of such mechanisms are discussed. Further, the dependence of the angular momenta of 106Mo and 140Xe on the number of emitted neutrons from correlated pairs of primary fragments was obtained also showing a decreasing dependence of average angular momenta with increasing number of emitted neutrons. Consequences are briefly discussed.

  9. Nuclear disassembly time scales using space time correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.; Colin, J.; Lecolley, J.F.; Meslin, C.; Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Bilwes, B.; Cosmo, F. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France); Galin, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); and others

    1996-09-01

    The lifetime, {tau}, with respect to multifragmentation of highly excited nuclei is deduced from the analysis of strongly damped Pb+Au collisions at 29 MeV/u. The method is based on the study of space-time correlations induced by `proximity` effects between fragments emitted by the two primary products of the reaction and gives the time between the re-separation of the two primary products and the subsequent multifragment decay of one partner. (author). 2 refs.

  10. Complex fission phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined.

  11. Long-Time Data Storage: Relevant Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miko C. Elwenspoek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic processes relevant for long-time storage of information about human kind are discussed, ranging from biological and geological processes to the lifecycle of stars and the expansion of the universe. Major results are that life will end ultimately and the remaining time that the earth is habitable for complex life is about half a billion years. A system retrieved within the next million years will be read by beings very closely related to Homo sapiens. During this time the surface of the earth will change making it risky to place a small number of large memory systems on earth; the option to place it on the moon might be more favorable. For much longer timescales both options do not seem feasible because of geological processes on the earth and the flux of small meteorites to the moon.

  12. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Bryś, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Borcea, R.

    2013-12-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  13. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  14. Bounds of Certain Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study explicit bounds of certain dynamic integral inequalities on time scales. These estimates give the bounds on unknown functions which can be used in studying the qualitative aspects of certain dynamic equations. Using these inequalities we prove the uniqueness of some partial integro-differential equations on time scales.

  15. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo;

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  16. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  17. Crystal blocking measurements of the induced fission time in the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th+p and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th+ sup 3 He reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdov, V A; Fotina, O V; Giardina, G; Malaguti, F; Platonov, S Y; Tulinov, A F; Yuminov, O A

    2002-01-01

    The crystal blocking technique has been used to measure the induced fission lifetimes for the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 Pa and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 U nuclei produced in the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th+p and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th+ sup 3 He reactions at bombarding energies of protons and sup 3 He included in the 6.8-7.8 MeV and 20.8-23.4 MeV ranges, respectively. The experimental fission lifetimes observed in these reactions vary from 10 sup - sup 1 sup 6 to 10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 s, depending on the projectile energy. Experimental data have been compared with the statistical model calculations that take into account the existence of both classes of excited states of fissioning nucleus, realized in the first and second potential wells of the double-humped fission barrier. By the analysis of the measured decay times it is possible to determine the absolute values of the level density in the second well, type of shape symmetry in the second well, and also the unknown early values of the shell correction for th...

  18. Fission Measurements with Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R. A.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Angell, C. T.; Tonchev, A. P.; Baker, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on actinides are complicated by the presence of neutron-induced fission. An efficient fission tagging detector used in coincidence with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a powerful tool in undertaking simultaneous measurements of (n,γ) and (n,f) cross sections. Preliminary results on 235U(n,γ) and (n,f) and 242mAm(n,f) cross sections measured with DANCE and a custom fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) are presented. Additional measurements of γ-ray cluster multiplicity distributions for neutron-induced fission of 235U and 242mAm and spontaneous fission of 252Cf are shown, as well as γ-ray energy and average γ-ray energy distributions.

  19. The Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhle, A.; Hammerton, K.; Kohley, Z.; Yurkon, J.; Stiefel, K.

    2017-08-01

    A Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) based fission detector system, called the Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD), has been developed for the ReA3 re-accelerator facility of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Binary reaction kinematics are reconstructed based on position and time-of-flight measurements of fission fragments. Large area PPACs provide 1 ns level time resolution and mm level position resolution. The detectors allow measurements of fission product angular and mass distributions of heavy-ion induced fusion reactions. The 30 cm by 40 cm active area of each PPAC provides large solid angle coverage well suited for measurements of low intensity rare-isotope beams (RIBs).

  20. Forecasting Electrical Load Using a Multi-time-scale Approach

    OpenAIRE

    RINGWOOD John; Murray, F.T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a multi-time-scale technique to the modelling and forecasting of short-term electrical load. The multi-time-scale technique is based on adjusting the underlying short sampling period forecast time series with specific target points and possible aggregated demand. This allows not only improvement of the short sampling period forecast, but also focuses on weighting the accuracy of the forecast at certain critical points e.g. the ov...

  1. Isotopic fission fragment distributions as a deep probe to fusion-fission dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Farget, F; Delaune, O; Tarasov, O B; Derkx, X; Schmidt, K -H; Amthor, A M; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Barreau, G; Bastin, B; Bazin, D; Blank, B; Benlliure, J; Caceres, L; Casarejos, E; Chibihi, A; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Grevy, S; Jurado, B; Kamalou, O; Lemasson, A; Lukyanov, S; Mittig, W; Morrissey, D J; Navin, A; Pereira, J; Perrot, L; Rejmund, M; Roger, T; Saint-Laurent, M -G; Savajols, H; Schmitt, C; Sherill, B M; Stodel, C; Taieb, J; Thomas, J -C; Villari, A C

    2012-01-01

    During the fission process, the nucleus deforms and elongates up to the two fragments inception and their final separation at scission deformation. The evolution of the nucleus energy with deformation is determined by the macroscopic properties of the nucleus, and is also strongly influenced by the single-particle structure of the nucleus. The fission fragment distribution is a direct consequence of the deformation path the nucleus has encountered, and therefore is the most genuine experimental observation of the potential energy landscape of the deforming nucleus. Very asymmetric fusion-fission reactions at energy close to the Coulomb barrier, produce well-defined conditions of the compound nucleus formation, where processes such as quasi-fission, pre-equilibrium emission and incomplete fusion are negligible. In the same time, the excitation energy is sufficient to reduce significantly structural effects, and mostly the macroscopic part of the potential is responsible for the formation of the fission fragmen...

  2. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  3. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  4. Scaling of the Time Dependent SGEMP Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    constant in time or rises like any given power of time a single solution suffices for all fluxes. For a more realistic time history with a finite FWHM, the equations reduce to a single parameter family, the parameter being the ratio of the pulse FWHM to the characteristic plasma period. For the time behavior, the unit of time is taken as the FWHM. Both the scaled Boltzmann Equation and Newton’s Equations are

  5. AFSC/ABL: Ugashik sockeye salmon scale time series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A time series of scale samples (1956 b?? 2002) collected from adult sockeye salmon returning to Ugashik River were retrieved from the Alaska Department of Fish and...

  6. The limit order book on different time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Eisler, Zoltan; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    Financial markets can be described on several time scales. We use data from the limit order book of the London Stock Exchange (LSE) to compare how the fluctuation dominated microstructure crosses over to a more systematic global behavior.

  7. The limit order book on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Kertész, János; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2007-06-01

    Financial markets can be described on several time scales. We use data from the limit order book of the London Stock Exchange (LSE) to compare how the fluctuation dominated microstructure crosses over to a more systematic global behavior.

  8. BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM TO DYNAMIC EQUATION ON TIME SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a nonlinear first-order boundary value problem on a time scale. The existence results of three positive solutions are obtained using fixed point theorems. Finally,examples are presented to illustrate the main results.

  9. AFSC/ABL: Naknek sockeye salmon scale time series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A time series of scale samples (1956 2002) collected from adult sockeye salmon returning to Naknek River were retrieved from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game....

  10. A new approach to prompt fission neutron TOF data treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O. V.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach, applicable to single events, was developed for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-offlight distribution unfolding. The main goal was to understand the reasons of the long existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fission fragments (FF). Since the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data the understanding of the PFN emission mechanism is very important both for nuclear fission theory and nuclear data. The experimental data were taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to the well known work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter. About 2.5 × 105 coincidences between fission fragment (FF) and neutron detector response to prompt fission neutron detection have been registered (∼ 1.6 × 107 of total recorded fission events). Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12-bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The main goal of this work was a detailed description of the prompt fission neutron treatment.

  11. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  12. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    Self-similar systems are characterized by continuous scale invariance and, in response, the existence of power laws. However, a significant number of systems exhibits discrete scale invariance (DSI) which in turn leads to log-periodic corrections to scaling that decorate the pure power law. Here, we present the results of a search of log-periodic corrections to scaling in the squares of Dst index increments which are taken as proxies of the energy dissipation rate in the magnetosphere. We show that Dst time series exhibit DSI and discuss the consequence of this feature, as well as the possible implications of Dst DSI on space weather forecasting efforts.

  13. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  14. Fission dynamics in {sup 132}Ce composite nuclei: study within a stochastic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondi, A.; Di Nitto, A.; Fiorillo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Napoli (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    It is well known that nuclear viscosity plays a fundamental role in the fission process. Although much experimental and theoretical work has been devoted to this subject, many questions still remain open. They mainly refer to a precise determination of the fission time scale as well as to the nature of the dissipation. At issue is whether nuclear dissipation proceeds primarily by means of individual two-body collisions (two-body friction), as in the case of ordinary fluid, or by means of nucleons colliding with a moving potential wall (one-body friction). The modified statistical model as well as dynamical models based on the Lagrange, Fokker Planck and Langevin equations have been used in order to gain insight on these aspects of fission dynamics. The lack of constraints to the models appears to be, in several cases, the main source of controversies. In this framework, we are carrying on a research program with 8{pi}LP apparatus at LNL, aimed at studying the fission dynamics in systems of intermediate fissility. These systems, compared to the heavier ones, have larger prescission charged particle multiplicities as well as comparable fission and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections. Therefore, the measurements of the relevant quantities in both channels allow to put severe constraints on the models, providing more reliable estimates of fission delay and of viscosity parameter. We report on the system {sup 32}S + {sup 100}Mo at E{sub l}ab=200 MeV which produces the composite system {sup 132}Ce at E{sub x}=122 MeV. The analysis of the pre-scission charged particles was already described in a previous report. We have proceeded in the analysis of this system extracting the charged particle multiplicities in the ER channel as well as the ER and fission cross sections. The whole set of extracted quantities has been compared with the predictions of a dynamical model based on the Langevin equation.

  15. Enhanced trigger for the NIFFTE fissionTPC in presence of high-rate alpha backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear physics and nuclear energy communities call for new, high precision measurements to improve existing fission models and design next generation reactors. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unrivaled precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's TPC lab, where it measures spontaneous fission from radioactive sources to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. To measure 244Cm, we've developed a fission trigger to reduce the data rate from alpha tracks while maintaining a high fission detection efficiency. In beam, alphas from 239Pu are a large background when detecting fission fragments; implementing the fission trigger will greatly reduce this background. The implementation of the cathode fission trigger in the fissionTPC will be presented along with a detailed study of its efficiency.

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Clark, Jenny; Kumar, R Sai Santosh; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Friend, Richard H

    2011-08-10

    We use ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with sub-20 fs time resolution and broad spectral coverage to directly probe the process of exciton fission in polycrystalline thin films of pentacene. We observe that the overwhelming majority of initially photogenerated singlet excitons evolve into triplet excitons on an ∼80 fs time scale independent of the excitation wavelength. This implies that exciton fission occurs at a rate comparable to phonon-mediated exciton localization processes and may proceed directly from the initial, delocalized, state. The singlet population is identified due to the brief presence of stimulated emission, which is emitted at wavelengths which vary with the photon energy of the excitation pulse, a violation of Kasha's Rule that confirms that the lowest-lying singlet state is extremely short-lived. This direct demonstration that triplet generation is both rapid and efficient establishes multiple exciton generation by exciton fission as an attractive route to increased efficiency in organic solar cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Exponentials and Laplace transforms on nonuniform time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Torres, Delfim F. M.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a coherent approach to signals and systems theory on time scales. The two derivatives from the time-scale calculus are used, i.e., nabla (forward) and delta (backward), and the corresponding eigenfunctions, the so-called nabla and delta exponentials, computed. With these exponentials, two generalised discrete-time Laplace transforms are deduced and their properties studied. These transforms are compatible with the standard Laplace and Z transforms. They are used to study discrete-time linear systems defined by difference equations. These equations mimic the usual continuous-time equations that are uniformly approximated when the sampling interval becomes small. Impulse response and transfer function notions are introduced. This implies a unified mathematical framework that allows us to approximate the classic continuous-time case when the sampling rate is high or to obtain the standard discrete-time case, based on difference equations, when the time grid becomes uniform.

  18. Controllability of multiplex, multi-time-scale networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, Márton; Gao, Jianxi; Cornelius, Sean P.; Barabási, Albert-László; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2016-09-01

    The paradigm of layered networks is used to describe many real-world systems, from biological networks to social organizations and transportation systems. While recently there has been much progress in understanding the general properties of multilayer networks, our understanding of how to control such systems remains limited. One fundamental aspect that makes this endeavor challenging is that each layer can operate at a different time scale; thus, we cannot directly apply standard ideas from structural control theory of individual networks. Here we address the problem of controlling multilayer and multi-time-scale networks focusing on two-layer multiplex networks with one-to-one interlayer coupling. We investigate the practically relevant case when the control signal is applied to the nodes of one layer. We develop a theory based on disjoint path covers to determine the minimum number of inputs (Ni) necessary for full control. We show that if both layers operate on the same time scale, then the network structure of both layers equally affect controllability. In the presence of time-scale separation, controllability is enhanced if the controller interacts with the faster layer: Ni decreases as the time-scale difference increases up to a critical time-scale difference, above which Ni remains constant and is completely determined by the faster layer. We show that the critical time-scale difference is large if layer I is easy and layer II is hard to control in isolation. In contrast, control becomes increasingly difficult if the controller interacts with the layer operating on the slower time scale and increasing time-scale separation leads to increased Ni, again up to a critical value, above which Ni still depends on the structure of both layers. This critical value is largely determined by the longest path in the faster layer that does not involve cycles. By identifying the underlying mechanisms that connect time-scale difference and controllability for a simplified

  19. Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic: Time Scales and Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-21

    2014 Carnegie Mellon University Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic : Time Scales and Variation Soumyo Moitra smoitra@sei.cmu.edu...number. 1. REPORT DATE 21 OCT 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic : Time...method and metrics for Situational Awareness • SA  Monitoring trends and changes in traffic • Analysis over timeTime series data analysis • Metrics

  20. Time-Scale and Time-Frequency Analyses of Irregularly Sampled Astronomical Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roques

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the quality of spectral restoration in the case of irregular sampled signals in astronomy. We study in details a time-scale method leading to a global wavelet spectrum comparable to the Fourier period, and a time-frequency matching pursuit allowing us to identify the frequencies and to control the error propagation. In both cases, the signals are first resampled with a linear interpolation. Both results are compared with those obtained using Lomb's periodogram and using the weighted waveletZ-transform developed in astronomy for unevenly sampled variable stars observations. These approaches are applied to simulations and to light variations of four variable stars. This leads to the conclusion that the matching pursuit is more efficient for recovering the spectral contents of a pulsating star, even with a preliminary resampling. In particular, the results are almost independent of the quality of the initial irregular sampling.

  1. True ternary fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Balasubramaniam, M.; von Oertzen, W.

    2015-04-01

    The study of the ternary fission of nuclei has received new interest recently. It is of general interest for nuclear dynamics, although the process is very rare. In the present work, we discuss the possibilities of true ternary fission (fragment masses A >30 ) in 252Cf for different mass splits. These mass splits are strongly favored in a collinear geometry. Based on the three cluster model (TCM), it is shown that the true ternary fission into fragments with almost equal masses is one of the possible fission modes in 252Cf . For general decays it is shown that the formation of the lightest fragment at the center has the highest probability. Further the formation of tin isotopes and/or other closed shell fragments are favored. For the decay products the presence of closed shell nuclei among the three fragments enhances the decay probabilities.

  2. A new role for myosin II in vesicle fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Juan A; Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Cabeza, Jose M; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2014-01-01

    An endocytic vesicle is formed from a flat plasma membrane patch by a sequential process of invagination, bud formation and fission. The scission step requires the formation of a tubular membrane neck (the fission pore) that connects the endocytic vesicle with the plasma membrane. Progress in vesicle fission can be measured by the formation and closure of the fission pore. Live-cell imaging and sensitive biophysical measurements have provided various glimpses into the structure and behaviour of the fission pore. In the present study, the role of non-muscle myosin II (NM-2) in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the fission pore with perforated-patch clamp capacitance measurements to detect single vesicle endocytosis with millisecond time resolution in peritoneal mast cells. Blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of NM-2, dramatically increased the duration of the fission pore and also prevented closure during large endocytic events. Using the fluorescent markers FM1-43 and pHrodo Green dextran, we found that NM-2 inhibition greatly arrested vesicle fission in a late phase of the scission event when the pore reached a final diameter of ∼ 5 nm. Our results indicate that loss of the ATPase activity of myosin II drastically reduces the efficiency of membrane scission by making vesicle closure incomplete and suggest that NM-2 might be especially relevant in vesicle fission during compound endocytosis.

  3. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the 252Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the 252Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  4. Time scale bias in erosion rates of glaciated landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Vamsi; von Hagke, Christoph; Scherler, Dirk; Lamb, Michael P; Fischer, Woodward W; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Deciphering erosion rates over geologic time is fundamental for understanding the interplay between climate, tectonic, and erosional processes. Existing techniques integrate erosion over different time scales, and direct comparison of such rates is routinely done in earth science. On the basis of a global compilation, we show that erosion rate estimates in glaciated landscapes may be affected by a systematic averaging bias that produces higher estimated erosion rates toward the present, which do not reflect straightforward changes in erosion rates through time. This trend can result from a heavy-tailed distribution of erosional hiatuses (that is, time periods where no or relatively slow erosion occurs). We argue that such a distribution can result from the intermittency of erosional processes in glaciated landscapes that are tightly coupled to climate variability from decadal to millennial time scales. In contrast, we find no evidence for a time scale bias in spatially averaged erosion rates of landscapes dominated by river incision. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the proposed coupling between climate and tectonics, and interpreting erosion rate estimates with different averaging time scales through geologic time.

  5. Time scales and species coexistence in chaotic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galla, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Empirical observations in marine ecosystems have suggested a balance of biological and advection time scales as a possible explanation of species coexistence. To characterise this scenario, we measure the time to fixation in neutrally evolving populations in chaotic flows. Contrary to intuition the variation of time scales does not interpolate straightforwardly between the no-flow and well-mixed limits; instead we find that fixation is the slowest at intermediate Damk\\"ohler numbers, indicating long-lasting coexistence of species. Our analysis shows that this slowdown is due to spatial organisation on an increasingly modularised network. We also find that diffusion can either slow down or speed up fixation, depending on the relative time scales of flow and evolution.

  6. Grasping Deep Time with Scaled Space in Personal Environs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. H.

    2014-01-01

    the history of geology and evolution. The present project differs from these examples in that the scaling of time is fixed, and the scale is defined so that 1 mm represents the life expectancy of a young person, i.e. 100 years. At this scale, written history fits on a credit card, 1 m measures the time...... of modern man, the age of dinosaurs ended at 650 m and the Big Bang is 137 km away. This choice obviously makes mental calculations easy, and all of time fits inside a geographical area of moderate size and so helps the citizen gain ownership to this learning tool and hence to time. The idea was tested...

  7. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  8. Tunneling time scale of under-the-barrier forerunners

    CERN Document Server

    García-Calderón, G; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent analytical solutions to Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation with quantum shutter initial conditions are used to investigate the issue of the tunneling time of forerunners in rectangular potential barriers. By using a time-frequency analysis, we find the existence of a regime characterized by the opacity of the barrier, where the maximum peak of a forerunner in time domain corresponds to a genuine tunneling process. The corresponding time scale represents the tunneling time of the forerunner through the classically forbidden region.

  9. Thermodynamics constrains allometric scaling of optimal development time in insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Dillon

    Full Text Available Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1 the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2 numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the "hotter is better" hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of

  10. Common scaling patterns in intertrade times of U. S. stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Podobnik, Boris; Lee, Youngki

    2004-05-01

    We analyze the sequence of time intervals between consecutive stock trades of thirty companies representing eight sectors of the U.S. economy over a period of 4 yrs. For all companies we find that: (i) the probability density function of intertrade times may be fit by a Weibull distribution, (ii) when appropriately rescaled the probability densities of all companies collapse onto a single curve implying a universal functional form, (iii) the intertrade times exhibit power-law correlated behavior within a trading day and a consistently greater degree of correlation over larger time scales, in agreement with the correlation behavior of the absolute price returns for the corresponding company, and (iv) the magnitude series of intertrade time increments is characterized by long-range power-law correlations suggesting the presence of nonlinear features in the trading dynamics, while the sign series is anticorrelated at small scales. Our results suggest that independent of industry sector, market capitalization and average level of trading activity, the series of intertrade times exhibit possibly universal scaling patterns, which may relate to a common mechanism underlying the trading dynamics of diverse companies. Further, our observation of long-range power-law correlations and a parallel with the crossover in the scaling of absolute price returns for each individual stock, support the hypothesis that the dynamics of transaction times may play a role in the process of price formation.

  11. ON GLOBAL ROBUST STABILITY FOR COMPETITIVE NEURAL NETWORKS WITH TIME DELAYS AND DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, using the theory of topological degree and Liapunov functional methods, the authors study the competitive neural networks with time delays and different time scales and present some criteria of global robust stability for this neural network model.

  12. Physical time scale in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of continuous-time Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrinsky, Santiago A

    2011-03-01

    We rigorously establish a physical time scale for a general class of kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms for the simulation of continuous-time Markov chains. This class of algorithms encompasses rejection-free (or BKL) and rejection (or "standard") algorithms. For rejection algorithms, it was formerly considered that the availability of a physical time scale (instead of Monte Carlo steps) was empirical, at best. Use of Monte Carlo steps as a time unit now becomes completely unnecessary.

  13. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-14

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  14. First use of single-crystal diamonds as fission-fragment detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frégeau, M.O.; Oberstedt, S.; Brys, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Oberstedt, A. [OSSOLUTIONS Consulting, S-70353 Örebro (Sweden); Fundamental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Vidali, M. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2015-08-11

    Single-crystal chemical vapor-deposited diamond (sCVD) was investigated for its ability to act as fission-fragment detector. In particular we investigated timing and energy resolution for application in a simultaneous time-of-flight and energy measurement to determine the mass of the detected fission fragment. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapor deposited (pCVD) diamonds provide sufficient timing resolution, but their poor energy resolution did not allow complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, α-particles and noise. Our present investigations prove artificial sCVD diamonds to show similar timing resolution as pCVD diamonds close to 100 ps. Improved pulse-height resolution allows the unequivocal separation of fission fragments, and the detection efficiency reaches 100%, but remains with about a few percent behind requirements for fragment-mass identification. With high-speed digital electronics a timing resolution well below 100 ps is possible. However, the strongly varying quality of the presently available diamond material does not allow application on a sufficiently large scale within reasonable investments.

  15. Time-dependent scaling patterns in high frequency financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Noemi; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-10-01

    We measure the influence of different time-scales on the intraday dynamics of financial markets. This is obtained by decomposing financial time series into simple oscillations associated with distinct time-scales. We propose two new time-varying measures of complexity: 1) an amplitude scaling exponent and 2) an entropy-like measure. We apply these measures to intraday, 30-second sampled prices of various stock market indices. Our results reveal intraday trends where different time-horizons contribute with variable relative amplitudes over the course of the trading day. Our findings indicate that the time series we analysed have a non-stationary multifractal nature with predominantly persistent behaviour at the middle of the trading session and anti-persistent behaviour at the opening and at the closing of the session. We demonstrate that these patterns are statistically significant, robust, reproducible and characteristic of each stock market. We argue that any modelling, analytics or trading strategy must take into account these non-stationary intraday scaling patterns.

  16. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  17. Evaluation of scaling invariance embedded in short time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length ~10(2). Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of 0.2,0.3,...,0.9 show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias (≤0.03) and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ≤0.05). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records.

  18. Mixing Time Scales in a Supernova-Driven Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We study the mixing of chemical species in the interstellar medium (ISM). Recent observations suggest that the distribution of species such as deuterium in the ISM may be far from homogeneous. This raises the question of how long it takes for inhomogeneities to be erased in the ISM, and how this depends on the length scale of the inhomogeneities. We added a tracer field to the three-dimensional, supernova-driven ISM model of Avillez (2000) to study mixing and dispersal in kiloparsec-scale simulations of the ISM with different supernova (SN) rates and different inhomogeneity length scales. We find several surprising results. Classical mixing length theory fails to predict the very weak dependence of mixing time on length scale that we find on scales of 25--500 pc. Derived diffusion coefficients increase exponentially with time, rather than remaining constant. The variance of composition declines exponentially, with a time constant of tens of Myr, so that large differences fade faster than small ones. The time ...

  19. Modelling of UV radiation variations at different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Borkowski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar UV radiation variability in the period 1976–2006 is discussed with respect to the relative changes in the solar global radiation, ozone content, and cloudiness. All the variables were decomposed into separate components, representing variations of different time scales, using wavelet multi-resolution decomposition. The response of the UV radiation to the changes in the solar global radiation, ozone content, and cloudiness depends on the time scale, therefore, it seems reasonable to model separately the relation between UV and explanatory variables at different time scales. The wavelet components of the UV series are modelled and summed to obtain the fit of observed series. The results show that the coarser time scale components can be modelled with greater accuracy than fine scale components and the fitted values calculated by this method are in better agreement with observed values than values calculated by the regression method, in which variables were not decomposed. The residual standard error in the case of modelling with the use of wavelets is reduced by 14% in comparison to the regression method without decomposition.

  20. Evaluation of scaling invariance embedded in short time series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Pan

    Full Text Available Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length ~10(2. Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of 0.2,0.3,...,0.9 show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias (≤0.03 and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ≤0.05. Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records.

  1. Ternary fission yields of 241Pu(nth,f)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Ulli; Faust, Herbert; Fioni, Gabriele; Friedrichs, Thomas; Groß, Martin; Oberstedt, Stephan

    1998-10-01

    Ternary events in the thermal neutron induced fission of 241Pu were studied with the recoil separator LOHENGRIN at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble. Yields and energy distributions could be determined for most isotopes of the elements hydrogen to oxygen. Also several heavier nuclei up to 30Mg could be observed. Yields were measured for 42 isotopes, for further 17 isotopes upper limits could be deduced. For the first time the halo nuclei 11Li and 14Be were found in neutron induced fission with yields of some 10-10 per fission. This is orders of magnitude lower than predicted by most of the ternary fission models.

  2. Time scales of crystal mixing in magma mushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Jillian M.; Bergantz, George W.; Breidenthal, Robert E.; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized as a means of producing compositional diversity and preconditioning magmas for eruption. However, the processes and associated time scales that produce the commonly observed expressions of magma mixing are poorly understood, especially under crystal-rich conditions. Here we introduce and exemplify a parameterized method to predict the characteristic mixing time of crystals in a crystal-rich magma mush that is subject to open-system reintrusion events. Our approach includes novel numerical simulations that resolve multiphase particle-fluid interactions. It also quantifies the crystal mixing by calculating both the local and system-wide progressive loss of the spatial correlation of individual crystals throughout the mixing region. Both inertial and viscous time scales for bulk mixing are introduced. Estimated mixing times are compared to natural examples and the time for basaltic mush systems to become well mixed can be on the order of 10 days.

  3. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  4. Short—Time Scaling of Variable Ordering of OBDDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙望宁; 闵应骅; 等

    1997-01-01

    A short-time scaling criterion of variable ordering of OBDDs is proposed.By this criterion it is easy and fast to determine which one is better when several variable orders are given,especially when they differ 10% or more in resulted BDD size from each other.An adaptive variable order selection method,based on the short-time scaling criterion,is also presented.The experimental results show that this method is efficient and it makes the heuristic variable ordering methods more practical.

  5. Multiple time scales of fluvial processes—theory and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial processes comprise water flow,sediment transport and bed evolution,which normally feature distinct time scales.The time scales of sediment transport and bed deformation relative to the flow essentially measure how fast sediment transport adapts to capacity region in line with local flow scenario and the bed deforms in comparison with the flow,which literally dictates if a capacity based and/or decoupled model is justified.This paper synthesizes the recently developed multiscale theory for sediment-l...

  6. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Keke, E-mail: pengkeke88@126.com; Luo, Yiping, E-mail: zjstulyp@126.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  7. Nonlinear triple-point problems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Anderson

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We establish the existence of multiple positive solutions to the nonlinear second-order triple-point boundary-value problem on time scales, $$displaylines{ u^{Delta abla}(t+h(tf(t,u(t=0, cr u(a=alpha u(b+delta u^Delta(a,quad eta u(c+gamma u^Delta(c=0 }$$ for $tin[a,c]subsetmathbb{T}$, where $mathbb{T}$ is a time scale, $eta, gamma, deltage 0$ with $Beta+gamma>0$, $0

  8. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Keke; Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  9. Midfrontal theta tracks action monitoring over multiple interactive time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X

    2016-11-01

    Quickly detecting and correcting mistakes is a crucial brain function. EEG studies have identified an idiosyncratic electrophysiological signature of online error correction, termed midfrontal theta. Midfrontal theta has so far been investigated over the fast time-scale of a few hundred milliseconds. But several aspects of behavior and brain activity unfold over multiple time scales, displaying "scale-free" dynamics that have been linked to criticality and optimal flexibility when responding to changing environmental demands. Here we used a novel line-tracking task to demonstrate that midfrontal theta is a transient yet non-phase-locked response that is modulated by task performance over at least three time scales: a few hundred milliseconds at the onset of a mistake, task performance over a fixed window of the previous 5s, and scale-free-like fluctuations over many tens of seconds. These findings provide novel evidence for a role of midfrontal theta in online behavioral adaptation, and suggest new approaches for linking EEG signatures of human executive functioning to its neurobiological underpinnings.

  10. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  11. Modernizing the Fission Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, Anton; Henderson, Roger; Schunck, Nicolas; Sroyer, Mark; Vogt, Ramona

    2016-09-01

    In 1939, Niels Bohr and John Wheeler formulated a theory of neutron-induced nuclear fission based on the hypothesis of the compound nucleus. Their theory, the so-called ``Bohr hypothesis,'' is still at the heart of every theoretical fission model today and states that the decay of a compound nucleus for a given excitation energy, spin, and parity is independent of its formation. We propose the first experiment to validate to 1-2% absolute uncertainties the practical consequences of the Bohr hypothesis during induced nuclear fission. We will compare the fission product yields (FPYs) of the same 240Pu compound nucleus produced via two different reactions (i) n+239Pu and (ii) γ+240 Pu. These high-precision FPYs measurements will be extremely beneficial for our fundamental understanding of the nuclear fission process and nuclear reactions from first principles. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was provided via the LDRD-ERD-069 project.

  12. Nuclear fission problem and Langevin equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sakhaee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  A combined dynamical and statistical model for fission was employed in our calculation. There is no doubt that a Langevin description plus a Monte Carlo treatment of the evaporation processes provide the most adequate dynamical description. In this paper, we would consider a strongly shaped dependent friction force and we use the numerical method rather than the analytical one. The objective of this article is to calculate the time dependent fission widths of the 224Th nucleus. The fission widths were calculated with both chaos-weighted wall friction (CWWF and wall friction (WF dissipations. The calculations are repeated for 100000 trajectories. The result was compared to the others' work. We use nuclear elongation coordinate with time and it is necessary to repeat the small steps many times to improve the accuracy.

  13. Fission barrier, damping of shell correction and neutron emission in the fission of A$\\sim$200

    CERN Document Server

    Mahata, K; Kapoor, S S

    2015-01-01

    Decay of $^{210}$Po compound nucleus formed in light and heavy-ion induced fusion reactions has been analyzed simultaneously using a consistent prescription for fission barrier and nuclear level density incorporating shell correction and its damping with excitation energy. Good description of all the excitation functions have been achieved with a fission barrier of 21.9 $\\pm$ 0.2 MeV. For this barrier height, the predicted statistical pre-fission neutrons in heavy-ion fusion-fission are much smaller than the experimental values, implying the presence of dynamical neutrons due to dissipation even at these low excitation energies ($\\sim$ 50~MeV) in the mass region A $\\sim$ 200. When only heavy-ion induced fission excitation functions and the pre-fission neutron multiplicities are included in the fits, the deduced best fit fission barrier depends on the assumed fission delay time during which dynamical neutrons can be emitted. A fission delay of (0.8 $\\pm$ 0.1 )$\\times 10^{-19}$ s has been estimated correspondin...

  14. Separation of Time Scales in a Quantum Newton's Cradle

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, R.; Wouters, B.; Eliëns, S.; De Nardis, J.; Konik, R. M.; Caux, J.-S.

    2016-06-01

    We provide detailed modeling of the Bragg pulse used in quantum Newton's-cradle-like settings or in Bragg spectroscopy experiments for strongly repulsive bosons in one dimension. We reconstruct the postpulse time evolution and study the time-dependent local density profile and momentum distribution by a combination of exact techniques. We further provide a variety of results for finite interaction strengths using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock analysis and bosonization-refermionization techniques. Our results display a clear separation of time scales between rapid and trap-insensitive relaxation immediately after the pulse, followed by slow in-trap periodic behavior.

  15. Satellite attitude prediction by multiple time scales method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y. C.; Ramnath, R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made of the problem of predicting the attitude of satellites under the influence of external disturbing torques. The attitude dynamics are first expressed in a perturbation formulation which is then solved by the multiple scales approach. The independent variable, time, is extended into new scales, fast, slow, etc., and the integration is carried out separately in the new variables. The theory is applied to two different satellite configurations, rigid body and dual spin, each of which may have an asymmetric mass distribution. The disturbing torques considered are gravity gradient and geomagnetic. Finally, as multiple time scales approach separates slow and fast behaviors of satellite attitude motion, this property is used for the design of an attitude control device. A nutation damping control loop, using the geomagnetic torque for an earth pointing dual spin satellite, is designed in terms of the slow equation.

  16. Linear Scaling Real Time TDDFT in the CONQUEST Code

    CERN Document Server

    O'Rourke, Conn

    2014-01-01

    The real time formulation of Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (RT-TDDFT) is implemented in the linear scaling density functional theory code CONQEST. Proceeding through the propagation of the density matrix, as opposed to the Kohn-Sham orbitals, it is possible to reduced the computational workload. Imposing a cut-off on the density matrix the effort can be made to scale linearly with the size of the system under study. Propagation of the reduced density matrix in this manner provides direct access to the optical response of very large systems, which would be otherwise impractical to obtain using the standard formulations of TDDFT. We discuss our implementation and present several benchmark tests illustrating the validity of the method, and the factors affecting its accuracy. Finally we illustrate the effect of density matrix truncation on the optical response, and illustrate that computational load scales linearly with the system size.

  17. MULTISCALE HOMOGENIZATION OF NONLINEAR HYPERBOLIC EQUATIONS WITH SEVERAL TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean Louis Woukeng; David Dongo

    2011-01-01

    We study the multiscale homogenization of a nonlinear hyperbolic equation in a periodic setting. We obtain an accurate homogenization result. We also show that as the nonlinear term depends on the microscopic time variable, the global homogenized problem thus obtained is a system consisting of two hyperbolic equations. It is also shown that in spite of the presence of several time scales, the global homogenized problem is not a reiterated one.

  18. Improved jet noise modeling using a new acoustic time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarpeyvand, M.; Self, R.H.; Golliard, J.

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the noise emanating from a turbulent flow (such as a jet flow) using Lighthill's analogy, knowledge concerning the unsteady characteristics of the turbulence is required. Specifically, the form of the turbulent correlation tensor together with various time and length-scales and convecti

  19. Quadratic Lyapunov Function and Exponential Dichotomy on Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JI; LIU ZHEN-XIN

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between exponential dichotomy and quadratic Lyapunov function for the linear equation x△ = A(t)x on time scales.Moreover, for the nonlinear perturbed equation x△ = A(t)x + f(t,x) we give the instability of the zero solution when f is sufficiently small.

  20. Gott Time Machines, BTZ Black Hole Formation, and Choptuik Scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Birmingham, Daniel; Birmingham, Danny; Sen, Siddhartha

    2000-01-01

    We study the formation of BTZ black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  1. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  2. Wind power impacts and electricity storage - a time scale perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Karsten; Meibom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    technologies – batteries, flow batteries, compressed air energy storage, electrolysis combined with fuel cells, and electric vehicles – are moreover categorised with respect to the time scales at which they are suited to support wind power integration. While all of these technologies are assessed suitable...

  3. Gott time machines, BTZ black hole formation, and choptuik scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham; Sen

    2000-02-07

    We study the formation of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  4. Exponential stability of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffoul Youssef N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the exponential stability of the zero solution to a system of dynamic equations on time scales. We do this by defining appropriate Lyapunov-type functions and then formulate certain inequalities on these functions. Several examples are given.

  5. Increased Exploration Capacity Promotes Group Fission in Gregarious Foraging Herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, Sophie; Fortin, Daniel; Pays, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Many gregarious species display rapid fission-fusion dynamics with individuals frequently leaving their groups to reunite or to form new ones soon after. The adaptive value of such ephemeral associations might reflect a frequent tilt in the balance between the costs and benefits of maintaining group cohesion. The lack of information on the short-term advantages of group fission, however, hampers our understanding of group dynamics. We investigated the effect of group fission on area-restricted search, a search tactic that is commonly used when food distribution is spatially autocorrelated. Specifically, we determine if roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) improve key aspects of their extensive search mode immediately after fission. We found that groups indeed moved faster and farther over time immediately after than before fission. This gain was highest for the smallest group that resulted from fission, which was more likely to include the fission’s initiator. Sex of group members further mediated the immediate gain in search capacity, as post-fission groups moved away at farthest rate when they were only comprised of males. Our study suggests that social conflicts during the extensive search mode can promote group fission and, as such, can be a key determinant of group fission-fusion dynamics that are commonly observed in gregarious herbivores. PMID:27907143

  6. Dissipative effects in fission investigated in complete kinematics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Ramos, D.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2017-09-01

    The study of dissipative effects in fission has been carried out with fusion-fission reactions by using a limited number of observables, such as the fission probabilities, the mass distribution of the fission fragments, or the neutron multiplicities. However, the large angular momenta gained by the compound nucleus in this kind of reaction could affect the conclusions drawn from such experiments. In this work, we propose to investigate the fission dynamics by the use of spallation reactions on 208Pb because the fissioning systems are produced with low angular momentum, small deformations, and high excitation energies, enhancing the dissipative effects. The complete kinematics measurements of the fission fragments and light-charged particles were performed by the use of the SOFIA setup combined with the inverse kinematics technique, allowing us for the first time a full indentification in atomic and mass number of the two fission fragments. These measurements permit us to define new fission observables for the investigation of the temperature and deformation dependencies of the dissipation parameter.

  7. Fission Product Library and Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Padgett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Fission product yields can be extracted from an irradiated sample by performing gamma ray spectroscopy on the whole sample post irradiation. There are several pitfalls to avoid when trying to determine a specific isotope's fission product yield.

  8. Germanium-gated γ–γ fast timing of excited states in fission fragments using the EXILL and FATIMA spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Régis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Simpson, G.S., E-mail: Gary.Simpson@uws.ac.uk [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Blanc, A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, CS 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); France, G. de [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, CS 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Paziy, V. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, FAMN, Universidad Complutense, CEI Moncloa, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Saed-Samii, N. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Soldner, T. [Institut Laue-Langevin, CS 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ur, C.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Urban, W. [Institut Laue-Langevin, CS 20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Bruce, A.M. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Drouet, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); and others

    2014-11-01

    A high-granularity mixed spectrometer consisting of high-resolution Ge and very fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-scintillator detectors has been installed around a fission target at the cold-neutron guide PF1B of the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue–Langevin. Lifetimes of excited states in the range of 10 ps to 10 ns can be measured in around 100 exotic neutron-rich fission fragments using Ge-gated LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)–LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) or Ge–Ge–LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)–LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) coincidences. We report on various characteristics of the EXILL and FATIMA spectrometer for the energy range of 40 keV up to 6.8 MeV and present results of ps-lifetime test measurements in a fission fragment. The results are discussed with respect to possible systematic errors induced by background contributions.

  9. Human learning: Power laws or multiple characteristic time scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Mayer-Kress

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The central proposal of A. Newell and Rosenbloom (1981 was that the power law is the ubiquitous law of learning. This proposition is discussed in the context of the key factors that led to the acceptance of the power law as the function of learning. We then outline the principles of an epigenetic landscape framework for considering the role of the characteristic time scales of learning and an approach to system identification of the processes of performance dynamics. In this view, the change of performance over time is the product of a superposition of characteristic exponential time scales that reflect the influence of different processes. This theoretical approach can reproduce the traditional power law of practice – within the experimental resolution of performance data sets - but we hypothesize that this function may prove to be a special and perhaps idealized case of learning.

  10. Real-time simulation of large-scale floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Qin, Y.; Li, G. D.; Liu, Z.; Cheng, D. J.; Zhao, Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    According to the complex real-time water situation, the real-time simulation of large-scale floods is very important for flood prevention practice. Model robustness and running efficiency are two critical factors in successful real-time flood simulation. This paper proposed a robust, two-dimensional, shallow water model based on the unstructured Godunov- type finite volume method. A robust wet/dry front method is used to enhance the numerical stability. An adaptive method is proposed to improve the running efficiency. The proposed model is used for large-scale flood simulation on real topography. Results compared to those of MIKE21 show the strong performance of the proposed model.

  11. Time Scales and Tidal Effects in Minor Mergers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lu; Jian-Yan Wei

    2003-01-01

    We use controlled N-body simulation to investigate the dynamical processes (dynamical friction, tidal truncation, etc.) involved in the merging of small satellites into bigger halos. We confirm the validity of some analytic formulae proposed earlier based on simple arguments. For rigid satellites represented by softened point masses, the merging time scale depends on both the orbital shape and concentration of the satellite. The dependence on orbital ellipticity is roughly a power law, as suggested by Lacey & Cole, and the dependence on satellite concentration is similar to that proposed by White. When merging satellites are represented by non-rigid objects, Tidal effects must be considered. We found that material beyond the tidal radius are stripped off. The decrease in the satellite mass might mean an increase in the merging time scale, but in fact, the merging time is decreased,because the stripped-off material carries away a proportionately larger amount of of orbital energy and angular momentum.

  12. Cognitive componets of speech at different time scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive component analysis (COCA) is defined as unsupervised grouping of data leading to a group structure well aligned with that resulting from human cognitive activity. We focus here on speech at different time scales looking for possible hidden ‘cognitive structure’. Statistical regularities......, assumed to model the basic representation of the human auditory system. The basic features are aggregated in time to obtain features at longer time scales. Simple energy based filtering is used to achieve a sparse representation. Our hypothesis is now basically ecological: We hypothesize that features...... that are essentially independent in a reasonable ensemble can be efficiently coded using a sparse independent component representation. The representations are indeed shown to be very similar between supervised learning (invoking cognitive activity) and unsupervised learning (statistical regularities), hence lending...

  13. Multiple time scale based reduction scheme for nonlinear chemical dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D.; Ray, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    A chemical reaction is often characterized by multiple time scales governing the kinetics of reactants, products and intermediates. We eliminate the fast relaxing intermediates in autocatalytic reaction by transforming the original system into a new one in which the linearized part is diagonal. This allows us to reduce the dynamical system by identifying the associated time scales and subsequent adiabatic elimination of the fast modes. It has been shown that the reduced system sustains the robust qualitative signatures of the original system and at times the generic form of the return map for the chaotic system from which complex dynamics stems out in the original system can be identified. We illustrate the scheme for a three-variable cubic autocatalytic reaction and four-variable peroxidase-oxidase reaction.

  14. Nonlinear scale space with spatially varying stopping time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Guy

    2008-12-01

    A general scale space algorithm is presented for denoising signals and images with spatially varying dominant scales. The process is formulated as a partial differential equation with spatially varying time. The proposed adaptivity is semi-local and is in conjunction with the classical gradient-based diffusion coefficient, designed to preserve edges. The new algorithm aims at maximizing a local SNR measure of the denoised image. It is based on a generalization of a global stopping time criterion presented recently by the author and colleagues. Most notably, the method works well also for partially textured images and outperforms any selection of a global stopping time. Given an estimate of the noise variance, the procedure is automatic and can be applied well to most natural images.

  15. Terrestrial carbon-nitrogen interactions across time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Sickel, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Through its role in forming amino acids, nitrogen (N) plays a fundamental role in terrestrial biogeochemistry, affecting for instance the photosynthetic rate of a leaf, and the amount of leaf area of a plant; with further consequences for quasi instantaneous terrestrial biophysical properties and fluxes. Because of the high energy requirements of transforming atmospheric N2 to biologically available form, N is generally thought to be limiting terrestrial productivity. Experimental evidence and modelling studies suggest that in temperate and boreal ecosystems, this N-"limitation" affects plant production at scales from days to decades, and potentially beyond. Whether these interactions play a role at longer timescales, such as during the transition from the last glacial maximum to the holocene, is currently unclear. To address this question, we present results from a 22000 years long simulation with dynamic global vegetation model including a comprehensive treatment of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen balance and their interactions (using the OCN-DGVM) driven by monthly, transient climate forcing obtained from the CESM climate model (TRACE). OCN couples carbon and nitrogen processes at the time-scale of hours, but simulates a comprehensive nitrogen balance as well as vegetation dynamics with time-scales of centuries and beyond. We investigate in particular, whether (and at with time scale) carbon-nitrogen interactions cause important lags in the response of the terrestrial biosphere to changed climate, and which processes (such as altered N inputs from fixation or altered losses through leaching and denitrification) contribute to these lags.

  16. Energy and time determine scaling in biological and computer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Melanie; Bezerra, George; Edwards, Benjamin; Brown, James; Forrest, Stephanie

    2016-08-19

    Metabolic rate in animals and power consumption in computers are analogous quantities that scale similarly with size. We analyse vascular systems of mammals and on-chip networks of microprocessors, where natural selection and human engineering, respectively, have produced systems that minimize both energy dissipation and delivery times. Using a simple network model that simultaneously minimizes energy and time, our analysis explains empirically observed trends in the scaling of metabolic rate in mammals and power consumption and performance in microprocessors across several orders of magnitude in size. Just as the evolutionary transitions from unicellular to multicellular animals in biology are associated with shifts in metabolic scaling, our model suggests that the scaling of power and performance will change as computer designs transition to decentralized multi-core and distributed cyber-physical systems. More generally, a single energy-time minimization principle may govern the design of many complex systems that process energy, materials and information.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'.

  17. Dissipative dynamics in quasi-fission

    CERN Document Server

    Oberacker, V E; Simenel, C

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-fission is the primary reaction mechanism that prevents the formation of superheavy elements in heavy-ion fusion experiments. Employing the time-dependent density functional theory approach we study quasi-fission in the systems $^{40,48}$Ca+$^{238}$U. Results show that for $^{48}$Ca projectiles the quasi-fission is substantially reduced in comparison to the $^{40}$Ca case. This partly explains the success of superheavy element formation with $^{48}$Ca beams. For the first time, we also calculate the repartition of excitation energies of the two fragments in a dynamic microscopic theory. The system is found in quasi-thermal equilibrium only for reactions with $^{40}$Ca. The differences between both systems are interpreted in terms of initial neutron to proton asymmetry of the colliding partners.

  18. An Extensible Timing Infrastructure for Adaptive Large-scale Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Dylan; Goodale, Tom; Radke, Thomas; Schnetter, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Real-time access to accurate and reliable timing information is necessary to profile scientific applications, and crucial as simulations become increasingly complex, adaptive, and large-scale. The Cactus Framework provides flexible and extensible capabilities for timing information through a well designed infrastructure and timing API. Applications built with Cactus automatically gain access to built-in timers, such as gettimeofday and getrusage, system-specific hardware clocks, and high-level interfaces such as PAPI. We describe the Cactus timer interface, its motivation, and its implementation. We then demonstrate how this timing information can be used by an example scientific application to profile itself, and to dynamically adapt itself to a changing environment at run time.

  19. Anomalous multiphoton photoelectric effect in ultrashort time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersztych, J; Raynaud, M

    2005-09-30

    In a multiphoton photoelectric process, an electron needs to absorb a given number of photons to escape the surface of a metal. It is shown for the first time that this number is not a constant depending only on the characteristics of the metal and light, but varies with the interaction duration in ultrashort time scales. The phenomenon occurs when electromagnetic energy is transferred, via ultrafast excitation of electron collective modes, to conduction electrons in a duration less than the electron energy damping time. It manifests itself through a dramatic increase of electron production.

  20. Multi-Scale Dissemination of Time Series Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qingsong; Zhou, Yongluan; Su, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of continuous dissemination of time series data, such as sensor measurements, to a large number of subscribers. These subscribers fall into multiple subscription levels, where each subscription level is specified by the bandwidth constraint of a subscriber......, which is an abstract indicator for both the physical limits and the amount of data that the subscriber would like to handle. To handle this problem, we propose a system framework for multi-scale time series data dissemination that employs a typical tree-based dissemination network and existing time-series...

  1. The Available Time Scale: Measuring Foster Parents' Available Time to Foster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Donna J.; Orme, John G.; Rhodes, Kathryn W.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new measure of available time specific to fostering, the Available Time Scale (ATS). It was tested with a national sample of 304 foster mothers and is designed to measure the amount of time foster parents are able to devote to fostering activities. The ATS has excellent reliability, and good support exists for its validity.…

  2. QUALITATIVE BEHAVIORS OF LINEAR TIME-INVARIANT DYNAMIC EQUATIONS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the type of singularity and qualitative structure of solutions to a time-invariant linear dynamic system on time scales. The results truly unify the qualitative behaviors of the system on the continuous and discrete times with any step size.

  3. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  4. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Pal; Jhilam Sadhukhan

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicates that the fission of excited heavy nuclei involves a dissipative dynamical process. We shall briefly review the relevant dynamical model, namely the Langevin equations for fission. Statistical model predictions using the Kramers’ fission width will also be discussed.

  5. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  6. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noda, Shusaku [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chatillon, Audrey [CEA-FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA-FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA-FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA-FRANCE; Belier, Gilbert [CEA-FRANCE; Becker, John A [LLNL; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  7. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  8. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  9. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  10. Long-term variation time scales in OJ 287

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yi Liu; Bo-Chun Qian; Jun Tao; Zhi-Qiang Shen; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Yong Huang; Jin Wang

    2010-01-01

    The light curve data from 1894 to 2008 are compiled for the BL Lacertae object OJ 287 from the available literature. Periodicity analysis methods (the Discrete Correlation Function-DCE the Jurkevich method, the power spectral (Fourier) analysis, and the CLEANest method) are performed to search for possible periodicites in the light curve of OJ 287. Significance levels are given for the possible periods. The analysis results confirm the existence of the 12.2 ± 0.6 yr time scale and show a hint of a~53 yr time scale. The 12.2 ± 0.6 yr period is used as the orbital period to investigate the supermassive binary black hole system parameters.

  11. Seismic Interevent Time: A Spatial Scaling and Multifractality

    CERN Document Server

    Molchan, G

    2005-01-01

    The optimal scaling problem for the time t(LxL) between two successive events in a seismogenic cell of size L is considered. The quantity t(LxL) is defined for a random cell of a grid covering a seismic region G. We solve that problem in terms of a multifractal characteristic of epicenters in G known as the tau-function or generalized fractal dimensions; the solution depends on the type of cell randomization. Our theoretical deductions are corroborated by California seismicity with magnitude M>2. In other words, the population of waiting time distributions for L = 10-100 km provides positive information on the multifractal nature of seismicity, which impedes the population to be converted into a unified law by scaling. This study is a follow-up of our analysis of power/unified laws for seismicity (see PAGEOPH 162 (2005), 1135 and GJI 162 (2005), 899).

  12. Oligocene calibration of the magnetic polarity time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Denham, Charles R.; Farmer, Harlow G.

    1982-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphic studies of the Oligocene White River Group in Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, and the Dakotas yield a radiometrically dated polarity stratigraphy that provides mid-Tertiary calibration points for the magnetic polarity time scale. Anomaly 12 13 reversal is bracketed by dates of 32.4 and 34.6 m.y., in best agreement with the time scale of LaBrecque and colleagues. The magnetostratigraphy also helps calibrate the Oligocene North American land mammal “ages” and allows correlation with the European marine microfossil zonation. This correlation suggests that the age of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary is 37.0 m.y., contrary to younger dates obtained from glauconites and microtektites. *Present address: Department of Geology, Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois 61401

  13. HMC algorithm with multiple time scale integration and mass preconditioning

    CERN Document Server

    Urbach, C; Shindler, A; Wenger, U

    2006-01-01

    We present a variant of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning (Hasenbusch acceleration) and multiple time scale integration. We have tested this variant for standard Wilson fermions at beta=5.6 and at pion masses ranging from 380 MeV to 680 MeV. We show that in this situation its performance is comparable to the recently proposed HMC variant with domain decomposition as preconditioner. We give an update of the ``Berlin Wall'' figure, comparing the performance of our variant of the HMC algorithm to other published performance data. Advantages of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scale integration are that it is straightforward to implement and can be used in combination with a wide variety of lattice Dirac operators.

  14. HMC algorithm with multiple time scale integration and mass preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, C.; Jansen, K.; Shindler, A.; Wenger, U.

    2006-01-01

    We present a variant of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning (Hasenbusch acceleration) and multiple time scale integration. We have tested this variant for standard Wilson fermions at β=5.6 and at pion masses ranging from 380 to 680 MeV. We show that in this situation its performance is comparable to the recently proposed HMC variant with domain decomposition as preconditioner. We give an update of the "Berlin Wall" figure, comparing the performance of our variant of the HMC algorithm to other published performance data. Advantages of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scale integration are that it is straightforward to implement and can be used in combination with a wide variety of lattice Dirac operators.

  15. Entropy Production of Nanosystems with Time Scale Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Wen; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Tang, Lei-Han

    2016-08-01

    Energy flows in biomolecular motors and machines are vital to their function. Yet experimental observations are often limited to a small subset of variables that participate in energy transport and dissipation. Here we show, through a solvable Langevin model, that the seemingly hidden entropy production is measurable through the violation spectrum of the fluctuation-response relation of a slow observable. For general Markov systems with time scale separation, we prove that the violation spectrum exhibits a characteristic plateau in the intermediate frequency region. Despite its vanishing height, the plateau can account for energy dissipation over a broad time scale. Our findings suggest a general possibility to probe hidden entropy production in nanosystems without direct observation of fast variables.

  16. Algorithm of simulation time synchronization over large-scale nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO QinPing; ZHOU Zhong; Lü Fang

    2008-01-01

    In distributed simulation, there is no uniform physical clock. And delay cannot be estimated because of jitter. So simulation time synchronization is essential for the event consistency among nodes. This paper investigates time synchronization algorithms over large-scale distributed nodes, analyzes LBTS (lower bound time stamp) computation model described in IEEE HLA standard, and then presents a grouped LBTS model. In fact, there is a default premise for existing algorithms that control packets must be delivered via reliable transportation. Although, a theorem of time synchronization message's reliability is proposed, which proves that only those control messages that constrain time advance need reliability. It breaks out the default premise for reliability. Then multicast is introduced into the transmission of control messages, and algorithm MCTS (multi-node coordination time synchronization) is proposed based on multicast. MCTS not only promotes the time advance efficiency, but also reduces the occupied network bandwidth. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithm is better than others in both time advance speed and occupied network bandwidth. Its time advance speed is about 50 times per second when there are 1000 nodes, approximately equal to that of similar systems when there are 100 nodes.

  17. Isoperimetric problems on time scales with nabla derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Ricardo; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2008-01-01

    We prove a necessary optimality condition for isoperimetric problems under nabla-differentiable curves. As a consequence, the recent results of [M.R. Caputo, A unified view of ostensibly disparate isoperimetric variational problems, Appl. Math. Lett. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.aml.2008.04.004], that put together seemingly dissimilar optimal control problems in economics and physics, are extended to a generic time scale. We end with an illustrative example of application of our main result to a dyn...

  18. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  19. A stable Cenozoic geologic time scale is indispensable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amos Salvador

    2006-01-01

    @@ A stable, standard geologic time scale is indispensable for the clear and precise communication among geologists; it is a basic tool of geologic work. Considerable progress has been made to achieve such a stable time scale. However, during the last few years several proposals have been made to modify the Cenozoic section of the geologic time scale that threaten to destabilize it.Seven articles published in Episodes since 2000 that could contribute to this destabilization are discussed.They provide excellent examples of the profusion of different terminologies, hierarchies, and stratigraphic relationships that have been proposed: to eliminate the Tertiary and the Quaternary or to raise their rank to suberathems; to extend the Neogene to the present; to make the Quaternary a formal subsystem of the Neogene, or consider it an informal stratigraphic unit; to eliminate the Holocene, and to decouple the base of the Pleistocene from the base of the Quaternary. If adopted,these proposals would cause nothing but great confusion and controversy. They disregard the clear preferences of geologists the world over as reflected by the terminology they have been using for many decades. Common sense would dictate the continued use of this terminology in its current, widely accepted form.

  20. Evidence for two time scales in long SNS junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Aprili, M; Reulet, B

    2009-10-23

    We use microwave excitation to elucidate the dynamics of long superconductor-normal metal-superconductor Josephson junctions. By varying the excitation frequency in the range 10 MHz-40 GHz, we observe that the critical and retrapping currents, deduced from the dc voltage versus dc current characteristics of the junction, are set by two different time scales. The critical current increases when the ac frequency is larger than the inverse diffusion time in the normal metal, whereas the retrapping current is strongly modified when the excitation frequency is above the electron-phonon rate in the normal metal. Therefore the critical and retrapping currents are associated with elastic and inelastic scattering, respectively.

  1. Fine Scale Baleen Whale Behavior Observed Via Tagging Over Daily Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    cetacean behavior at intermediate daily time scales. Recent efforts to assess the impacts of sound on marine mammals and to estimate foraging...new dermal attachment for short-term tagging studies of baleen whales. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 6:289-297. Baumgartner, M.F., N.S.J

  2. Neutron angular distribution in plutonium-240 spontaneous fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcath, Matthew J., E-mail: mmarcath@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shin, Tony H.; Clarke, Shaun D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Peerani, Paolo [European Commission at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); Pozzi, Sara A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-09-11

    Nuclear safeguards applications require accurate fission models that exhibit prompt neutron anisotropy. In the laboratory reference frame, an anisotropic neutron angular distribution is observed because prompt fission neutrons carry momentum from fully accelerated fission fragments. A liquid organic scintillation detector array was used with pulse shape discrimination techniques to produce neutron-neutron cross-correlation time distributions and angular distributions from spontaneous fission in a {sup 252}Cf, a 0.84 g {sup 240}Pu{sub eff} metal, and a 1.63 g {sup 240}Pu{sub eff} metal sample. The effect of cross-talk, estimated with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, is removed from neutron-neutron coincidences as a function of the angle between detector pairs. Fewer coincidences were observed at detector angles near 90°, relative to higher and lower detector angles. As light output threshold increases, the observed anisotropy increases due to spectral effects arising from fission fragment momentum transfer to emitted neutrons. Stronger anisotropy was observed in Cf-252 spontaneous fission prompt neutrons than in Pu-240 neutrons. - Highlights: • Pu-240 prompt fission fast-neutron anisotropy was quantified for the first time. • MCNPX-PoliMi and MPPost codes were used to remove cross-talk neutron detections from experiment results. • Cf-252 spontaneous fission neutrons were found to be more anisotropic than Pu-240 neutrons.

  3. Energy partition in low energy fission

    CERN Document Server

    Mirea, M

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the another separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The fission path is obtained in the frame of the macroscopic-microscopic model. The single particle level schemes are obtained within the two center Woods-Saxon shell model. It is shown that the available intrinsic dissipated energy is not shared proportionally to the masses of the two fission fragments. If the heavy fragment possesses nucleon numbers close to the magic ones, the accumulated intrinsic excitation energy is lower than that of the light fragment.

  4. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  5. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  6. Two-time-scale population evolution on a singular landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Jiao, Shuyun; Jiang, Pengyao; Ao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Under the effect of strong genetic drift, it is highly probable to observe gene fixation or gene loss in a population, shown by singular peaks on a potential landscape. The genetic drift-induced noise gives rise to two-time-scale diffusion dynamics on the bipeaked landscape. We find that the logarithmically divergent (singular) peaks do not necessarily imply infinite escape times or biological fixations by iterating the Wright-Fisher model and approximating the average escape time. Our analytical results under weak mutation and weak selection extend Kramers's escape time formula to models with B (Beta) function-like equilibrium distributions and overcome constraints in previous methods. The constructed landscape provides a coherent description for the bistable system, supports the quantitative analysis of bipeaked dynamics, and generates mathematical insights for understanding the boundary behaviors of the diffusion model.

  7. Stability theory for dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martynyuk, Anatoly A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a first in the world to present three approaches for stability analysis of solutions of dynamic equations. The first approach is based on the application of dynamic integral inequalities and the fundamental matrix of solutions of linear approximation of dynamic equations. The second is based on the generalization of the direct Lyapunovs method for equations on time scales, using scalar, vector and matrix-valued auxiliary functions. The third approach is the application of auxiliary functions (scalar, vector, or matrix-valued ones) in combination with differential dynamic inequalities. This is an alternative comparison method, developed for time continuous and time discrete systems. In recent decades, automatic control theory in the study of air- and spacecraft dynamics and in other areas of modern applied mathematics has encountered problems in the analysis of the behavior of solutions of time continuous-discrete linear and/or nonlinear equations of perturbed motion. In the book “Men of Ma...

  8. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Pal

    2015-08-01

    It is now established that the transition-state theory of nuclear fission due to Bohr and Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions. Dissipative dynamical models employing either the Langevin equation or equivalently the Fokker–Planck equation have been developed for fission of heavy nuclei at high excitations (T ∼1 MeV or higher). Here, we first present the physical picture underlying the dissipative fission dynamics. We mainly concentrate upon the Kramers’ prescription for including dissipation in fission dynamics. We discuss, in some detail, the results of a statistical model analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicity data from the reactions 19F+194,196,198Pt using Kramers’ fission width. We also discuss the multi-dimensional Langevin equation in the context of kinetic energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments.

  9. Fission modes of mercury isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Warda, M; Nazarewicz, W

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments on beta-delayed fission in the mercury-lead region and the discovery of asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg [1] have stimulated renewed interest in the mechanism of fission in heavy nuclei. Here we study fission modes and fusion valleys in $^{180}$Hg and $^{198}$Hg using the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory employing Skyrme and Gogny energy density functionals. We show that the observed transition from asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg towards more symmetric distribution of fission fragments in $^{198}$Hg can be explained in terms of competing fission modes of different geometries that are governed by shell effects in pre-scission configurations. The density distributions at scission configurations are studied and related to the experimentally observed mass splits.

  10. Predation risk shapes social networks in fission-fusion populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Kelley

    Full Text Available Predation risk is often associated with group formation in prey, but recent advances in methods for analysing the social structure of animal societies make it possible to quantify the effects of risk on the complex dynamics of spatial and temporal organisation. In this paper we use social network analysis to investigate the impact of variation in predation risk on the social structure of guppy shoals and the frequency and duration of shoal splitting (fission and merging (fusion events. Our analyses revealed that variation in the level of predation risk was associated with divergent social dynamics, with fish in high-risk populations displaying a greater number of associations with overall greater strength and connectedness than those from low-risk sites. Temporal patterns of organisation also differed according to predation risk, with fission events more likely to occur over two short time periods (5 minutes and 20 minutes in low-predation fish and over longer time scales (>1.5 hours in high-predation fish. Our findings suggest that predation risk influences the fine-scale social structure of prey populations and that the temporal aspects of organisation play a key role in defining social systems.

  11. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  12. Scaling in non-stationary time series. (I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignaccolo, M.; Allegrini, P.; Grigolini, P.; Hamilton, P.; West, B. J.

    2004-05-01

    Most data processing techniques, applied to biomedical and sociological time series, are only valid for random fluctuations that are stationary in time. Unfortunately, these data are often non-stationary and the use of techniques of analysis resting on the stationary assumption can produce a wrong information on the scaling, and so on the complexity of the process under study. Herein, we test and compare two techniques for removing the non-stationary influences from computer generated time series, consisting of the superposition of a slow signal and a random fluctuation. The former is based on the method of wavelet decomposition, and the latter is a proposal of this paper, denoted by us as step detrending technique. We focus our attention on two cases, when the slow signal is a periodic function mimicking the influence of seasons, and when it is an aperiodic signal mimicking the influence of a population change (increase or decrease). For the purpose of computational simplicity the random fluctuation is taken to be uncorrelated. However, the detrending techniques here illustrated work also in the case when the random component is correlated. This expectation is fully confirmed by the sociological applications made in the companion paper. We also illustrate a new procedure to assess the existence of a genuine scaling, based on the adoption of diffusion entropy, multiscaling analysis and the direct assessment of scaling. Using artificial sequences, we show that the joint use of all these techniques yield the detection of the real scaling, and that this is independent of the technique used to detrend the original signal.

  13. Multiple time scale behaviors and network dynamics in liquid methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruchi; Chakravarty, Charusita; Milotti, Edoardo

    2008-07-31

    Canonical ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of liquid methanol, modeled using a rigid-body, pair-additive potential, are used to compute static distributions and temporal correlations of tagged molecule potential energies as a means of characterizing the liquid state dynamics. The static distribution of tagged molecule potential energies shows a clear multimodal structure with three distinct peaks, similar to those observed previously in water and liquid silica. The multimodality is shown to originate from electrostatic effects, but not from local, hydrogen bond interactions. An interesting outcome of this study is the remarkable similarity in the tagged potential energy power spectra of methanol, water, and silica, despite the differences in the underlying interactions and the dimensionality of the network. All three liquids show a distinct multiple time scale (MTS) regime with a 1/ f (alpha) dependence with a clear positive correlation between the scaling exponent alpha and the diffusivity. The low-frequency limit of the MTS regime is determined by the frequency of crossover to white noise behavior which occurs at approximately 0.1 cm (-1) in the case of methanol under standard temperature and pressure conditions. The power spectral regime above 200 cm (-1) in all three systems is dominated by resonances due to localized vibrations, such as librations. The correlation between alpha and the diffusivity in all three liquids appears to be related to the strength of the coupling between the localized motions and the larger length/time scale network reorganizations. Thus, the time scales associated with network reorganization dynamics appear to be qualitatively similar in these systems, despite the fact that water and silica both display diffusional anomalies but methanol does not.

  14. Time scaling with efficient time-propagation techniques for atoms and molecules in pulsed radiation fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hamido, Aliou; Madroñero, Javier; Mota-Furtado, Francisca; O'Mahony, Patrick; Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Piraux, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    We present an ab initio approach to solve the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation to treat electron and photon impact multiple ionization of atoms or molecules. It combines the already known time scaled coordinate method with a new high order time propagator based on a predictor-corrector scheme. In order to exploit in an optimal way the main advantage of the time scaled coordinate method namely that the scaled wave packet stays confined and evolves smoothly towards a stationary state the modulus square of which being directly proportional to the electron energy spectra in each ionization channel, we show that the scaled bound states should be subtracted from the total scaled wave packet. In addition, our detailed investigations suggest that multi-resolution techniques like for instance, wavelets are the most appropriate ones to represent spatially the scaled wave packet. The approach is illustrated in the case of the interaction of an one-dimensional model atom as well as atomic hydrogen with a strong osci...

  15. Transient time-domain resonances and the time scale for tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    García-Calderón, G; Garc\\'{\\i}a-Calder\\'on, Gast\\'on; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Transient {\\it time-domain resonances} found recently in time-dependent solutions to Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation are used to investigate the issue of the tunneling time in rectangular potential barriers. In general, a time frequency analysis shows that these transients have frequencies above the cutoff frequency associated with the barrier height, and hence correspond to non-tunneling processes. We find, however, a regime characterized by the barrier opacity, where the peak maximum $t_{max}$ of the {\\it time-domain resonance} corresponds to under-the-barrier tunneling. We argue that $t_{max}$ represents the relevant tunneling time scale through the classically forbidden region.

  16. Resource seasonality and reproduction predict fission-fusion dynamics in black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Andrea L; Webster, Timothy H; Kamilar, Jason M

    2016-02-01

    Ruffed lemurs (genus Varecia) are often described as having a flexible social organization, such that both cohesive (low fission-fusion dynamics) and fluid (high fission-fusion dynamics) grouping patterns have been observed. In ruffed lemur communities with high fission-fusion dynamics, group members vary in their temporal and spatial dispersion throughout a communally defended territory. These patterns have been likened to those observed in several haplorrhine species that exhibit the most fluid types of fission-fusion social organization (e.g., Pan and Ateles). To substantiate and further refine these claims, we describe the fission-fusion dynamics of a black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) community at Mangevo, an undisturbed primary rainforest site in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. We collected instantaneous group scan samples from August 2007-December 2008 (4,044 observation hours) to study and characterize patterns of subgroup size, composition, cohesion, and social association. In 16 consecutive months, we never found all members of the community together. In fact, individuals spent nearly half of their time alone. Subgroups were small, cohesive, and typically of mixed-sex composition. Mixed-sex subgroups were significantly larger, less cohesive, and more common than either male-only or female-only subgroups. Subgroup dynamics were related to shifts in climate, phenology of preferred fruit species, and female reproductive state. On average, association indices were low. Males and females were equally gregarious; however, adult male-male associations were significantly weaker than any other association type. Results presented herein document striking differences in fission-fusion dynamics between black-and-white ruffed lemurs and haplorrhines, while also demonstrating many broad-scale similarities to haplorrhine taxa that possess the most fluid fission-fusion societies.

  17. Time scale hierarchies in the functional organization of complex behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysios Perdikis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional approaches to cognitive modelling generally portray cognitive events in terms of 'discrete' states (point attractor dynamics rather than in terms of processes, thereby neglecting the time structure of cognition. In contrast, more recent approaches explicitly address this temporal dimension, but typically provide no entry points into cognitive categorization of events and experiences. With the aim to incorporate both these aspects, we propose a framework for functional architectures. Our approach is grounded in the notion that arbitrary complex (human behaviour is decomposable into functional modes (elementary units, which we conceptualize as low-dimensional dynamical objects (structured flows on manifolds. The ensemble of modes at an agent's disposal constitutes his/her functional repertoire. The modes may be subjected to additional dynamics (termed operational signals, in particular, instantaneous inputs, and a mechanism that sequentially selects a mode so that it temporarily dominates the functional dynamics. The inputs and selection mechanisms act on faster and slower time scales then that inherent to the modes, respectively. The dynamics across the three time scales are coupled via feedback, rendering the entire architecture autonomous. We illustrate the functional architecture in the context of serial behaviour, namely cursive handwriting. Subsequently, we investigate the possibility of recovering the contributions of functional modes and operational signals from the output, which appears to be possible only when examining the output phase flow (i.e., not from trajectories in phase space or time.

  18. The Role of Time-Scales in Socio-hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water. Water Resour. Res., 51, 6988-7022, doi:10.1002/2015WR017896.

  19. Terrestrial Waters and Sea Level Variations on Interannual Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; Alkama, R.; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B.

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multi-decadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost non-existent at global continental scale. However, global hydrological models developed for atmospheric and climatic studies can be used for estimating total water storage. For the recent years (since mid-2002), terrestrial water storage change can be directly estimated from observations of the GRACE space gravimetry mission. In this study, we analyse the interannual variability of total land water storage, and investigate its contribution to mean sea level variability at interannual time scale. We consider three different periods that, each, depend on data availability: (1) GRACE era (2003-2009), (2) 1993-2003 and (3) 1955-1995. For the GRACE era (period 1), change in land water storage is estimated using different GRACE products over the 33 largest river basins worldwide. For periods 2 and 3, we use outputs from the ISBA-TRIP (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere-Total Runoff Integrating Pathways) global hydrological model. For each time span, we compare change in land water storage (expressed in sea level equivalent) to observed mean sea level, either from satellite altimetry (periods 1 and 2) or tide gauge records (period 3). For each data set and each time span, a trend has been removed as we focus on the interannual variability. We show that whatever the period considered, interannual variability of the mean sea level is essentially explained by interannual fluctuations in land water storage, with the largest contributions arising from tropical river basins.

  20. Scale relativity and fractal space-time: theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nottale, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this contribution, we review the development of the theory of scale relativity and its geometric framework constructed in terms of a fractal and nondifferentiable continuous space-time. This theory leads (i) to a generalization of possible physically relevant fractal laws, written as partial differential equation acting in the space of scales, and (ii) to a new geometric foundation of quantum mechanics and gauge field theories and their possible generalisations. In the second part, we discuss some examples of application of the theory to various sciences, in particular in cases when the theoretical predictions have been validated by new or updated observational and experimental data. This includes predictions in physics and cosmology (value of the QCD coupling and of the cosmological constant), to astrophysics and gravitational structure formation (distances of extrasolar planets to their stars, of Kuiper belt objects, value of solar and solar-like star cycles), to sciences of life (log-p...

  1. Fission of highly excited nuclei investigated in complete kinematic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez J.L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fission is an extremely complex mechanism that requires a dynamical approach to describe the evolution of the process in terms of intrinsic and collective excitations of the nuclear constituents. In order to determine these effects a complex experimental setup was mounted at GSI, which allowed us for the first time the full identification in charge and mass of all fission fragments thanks to a magnetic separation and the use of the inverse kinematic technique. Moreover, we also measured the neutron multiplicities and the light-charged particles emitted in coincidence with fission. These complete kinematic measurements will be used to define sensitive observables to dissipative and transient effects in fission. In this manuscript we present the first results for the total fission cross sections.

  2. Simple estimate of fission rate during JCO criticality accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Faculty of Studies on Contemporary Society, Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The fission rate during JCO criticality accident is estimated from fission-product (FP) radioactivities in a uranium solution sample taken from the preparation basin 20 days after the accident. The FP radioactivity data are taken from a report by JAERI released in the Accident Investigation Committee. The total fission number is found quite dependent on the FP radioactivities and estimated to be about 4x10{sup 16} per liter, or 2x10{sup 18} per 16 kgU (assuming uranium concentration 278.9 g/liter). On the contrary, the time dependence of the fission rate is rather insensitive to the FP radioactivities. Hence, it is difficult to determine the fission number in the initial burst from the radioactivity data. (author)

  3. Characterization of the scission point from fission-fragment velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Schmitt, C; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Derkx, X; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Jurado, B; Lemasson, A; Ramos, D; Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Roger, T; Shrivastava, A

    2015-01-01

    The isotopic-yield distributions and kinematic properties of fragments produced in transfer-induced fission of 240Pu and fusion-induced fission of 250Cf, with 9 MeV and 45 MeV of excitation energy respectively, were measured in inverse kinematics with the spectrometer VAMOS. The kinematic properties of identified fission fragments allow to derive properties of the scission configuration such as the distance between fragments, the total kinetic energy, the neutron multiplicity, the total excitation energy, and, for the first time, the proton- and neutron-number sharing during the emergence of the fragments. These properties of the scission point are studied as functions of the fragment atomic number. The correlation between these observables, gathered in one single experiment and for two different fissioning systems at different excitation energies, give valuable information for the understanding and modeling of the fission process.

  4. Holographic Brownian motion and time scales in strongly coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaja, Ardian Nata [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Kompleks PUSPITEK Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Boer, Jan de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Shigemori, Masaki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hakubi Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiyacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    We study Brownian motion of a heavy quark in field theory plasma in the AdS/CFT setup and discuss the time scales characterizing the interaction between the Brownian particle and plasma constituents. Based on a simple kinetic theory, we first argue that the mean-free-path time is related to the connected 4-point function of the random force felt by the Brownian particle. Then, by holographically computing the 4-point function and regularizing the IR divergence appearing in the computation, we write down a general formula for the mean-free-path time, and apply it to the STU black hole which corresponds to plasma charged under three U(1)R-charges. The result indicates that the Brownian particle collides with many plasma constituents simultaneously.

  5. The role of time scales in extrinsic noise propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Pedraza, Juan Manuel; Jayaprakash, C.

    2009-03-01

    Cell-to cell variability in the number of proteins has been studied extensively experimentally. There are many sources of this stochastic variability or noise that can be classified as intrinsic, due to the stochasticity of chemical reactions and extrinsic, due to environmental differences. The different stages in the production of proteins in response to a stimulus, the signaling cascade before transcription, transcription, and translation are characterized by different time scales. We analyze how these time scales determine the effect of the reactions at each stage on different sources of noise. For example, even if intrinsic noise dominates the fluctuations in mRNA number, for typical degradation rates, extrinsic noise can dominate corresponding protein number fluctuations. Such results are important in determining the importance of intrinsic noise at earlier stages of a genetic network on the products of subsequent stages. We examine cases in which the dynamics of the extrinsic noise can lead to differences from cases in which extrinsic noise arises from static (in time) cell-to-cell variations. We will interpret the experiments of Pedraza et al*. in the light of these results. *J. M. Pedraza et al, Science 25 March 2005:Vol. 307. no. 5717, pp. 1965 - 1969.

  6. Formation processes and time scales for meteorite parent bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transition from small particles suspended in the solar nebula to the planetesimals (asteroids) that became the parent bodies of meteorites is examined. Planetesimals probably grew by coagulation of grain aggregates that collided due to different rates of settling and drag-induced orbital decay. Their growth was accompanied by radial transport of solids, possibly sufficient to deplete the primordial mass in the asteroid zone, but with relatively little mixing. The formation of asteroid-sized planetesimals was probably rapid, on a time scale less than 1 Myr.

  7. Time-Dependent Earthquake Forecasts on a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Graves, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We develop and implement a new type of global earthquake forecast. Our forecast is a perturbation on a smoothed seismicity (Relative Intensity) spatial forecast combined with a temporal time-averaged ("Poisson") forecast. A variety of statistical and fault-system models have been discussed for use in computing forecast probabilities. An example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, which has been using fault-based models to compute conditional probabilities in California since 1988. An example of a forecast is the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS), which is based on the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) magnitude-frequency law, the Omori aftershock law, and Poisson statistics. The method discussed in this talk is based on the observation that GR statistics characterize seismicity for all space and time. Small magnitude event counts (quake counts) are used as "markers" for the approach of large events. More specifically, if the GR b-value = 1, then for every 1000 M>3 earthquakes, one expects 1 M>6 earthquake. So if ~1000 M>3 events have occurred in a spatial region since the last M>6 earthquake, another M>6 earthquake should be expected soon. In physics, event count models have been called natural time models, since counts of small events represent a physical or natural time scale characterizing the system dynamics. In a previous research, we used conditional Weibull statistics to convert event counts into a temporal probability for a given fixed region. In the present paper, we move belyond a fixed region, and develop a method to compute these Natural Time Weibull (NTW) forecasts on a global scale, using an internally consistent method, in regions of arbitrary shape and size. We develop and implement these methods on a modern web-service computing platform, which can be found at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. We also discuss constraints on the User Interface (UI) that follow from practical considerations of site usability.

  8. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader...... foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we...... on or in the peak of the breeding season with the largest effect sizes observed in cooler parts of species' climatic ranges. Our results document the potential of combining time scales and integrating both species attributes and environmental variables for global change attribution. We suggest such an approach...

  9. A biologically plausible model of time-scale invariant interval timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rita; Ledberg, Anders

    2010-02-01

    The temporal durations between events often exert a strong influence over behavior. The details of this influence have been extensively characterized in behavioral experiments in different animal species. A remarkable feature of the data collected in these experiments is that they are often time-scale invariant. This means that response measurements obtained under intervals of different durations coincide when plotted as functions of relative time. Here we describe a biologically plausible model of an interval timing device and show that it is consistent with time-scale invariant behavior over a substantial range of interval durations. The model consists of a set of bistable units that switch from one state to the other at random times. We first use an abstract formulation of the model to derive exact expressions for some key quantities and to demonstrate time-scale invariance for any range of interval durations. We then show how the model could be implemented in the nervous system through a generic and biologically plausible mechanism. In particular, we show that any system that can display noise-driven transitions from one stable state to another can be used to implement the timing device. Our work demonstrates that a biologically plausible model can qualitatively account for a large body of data and thus provides a link between the biology and behavior of interval timing.

  10. A Review of Time-Scale Modification of Music Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Driedger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-scale modification (TSM is the task of speeding up or slowing down an audio signal’s playback speed without changing its pitch. In digital music production, TSM has become an indispensable tool, which is nowadays integrated in a wide range of music production software. Music signals are diverse—they comprise harmonic, percussive, and transient components, among others. Because of this wide range of acoustic and musical characteristics, there is no single TSM method that can cope with all kinds of audio signals equally well. Our main objective is to foster a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of TSM procedures. To this end, we review fundamental TSM methods, discuss typical challenges, and indicate potential solutions that combine different strategies. In particular, we discuss a fusion approach that involves recent techniques for harmonic-percussive separation along with time-domain and frequency-domain TSM procedures.

  11. Estimating ventilation time scales using overturning stream functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Nycander, Jonas; Nilsson, Johan; Jakobsson, Martin; Döös, Kristofer

    2014-06-01

    A simple method for estimating ventilation time scales from overturning stream functions is proposed. The stream function may be computed using either geometric coordinates or a generalized vertical coordinate, such as potential density (salinity in our study). The method is tested with a three-dimensional circulation model describing an idealized semi-enclosed ocean basin ventilated through a narrow strait over a sill, and the result is compared to age estimates obtained from a passive numerical age tracer. The best result is obtained when using the stream function in salinity coordinates. In this case, the reservoir-averaged advection time obtained from the overturning stream function in salinity coordinates agrees rather well with the mean age of the age tracer, and the corresponding maximum ages agree very well.

  12. Generalized dynamic scaling for quantum critical relaxation in imaginary time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyi; Yin, Shuai; Zhong, Fan

    2014-10-01

    We study the imaginary-time relaxation critical dynamics of a quantum system with a vanishing initial correlation length and an arbitrary initial order parameter M0. We find that in quantum critical dynamics, the behavior of M0 under scale transformations deviates from a simple power law, which was proposed for very small M0 previously. A universal characteristic function is then suggested to describe the rescaled initial magnetization, similar to classical critical dynamics. This characteristic function is shown to be able to describe the quantum critical dynamics in both short- and long-time stages of the evolution. The one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model is employed to numerically determine the specific form of the characteristic function. We demonstrate that it is applicable as long as the system is in the vicinity of the quantum critical point. The universality of the characteristic function is confirmed by numerical simulations of models belonging to the same universality class.

  13. MULTI SCALE TIME SERIES PREDICTION FOR INTRUSION DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Palanivel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an anomaly-based network intrusion detection system, which analyzes traffic features to detect anomalies. The proposed system can be used both in online as well as off-line mode for detecting deviations from the expected behavior. Although our approach uses network packet or flow data, it is general enough to be adaptable for use with any other network variable, which may be used as a signal for anomaly detection. It differs from most existing approaches in its use of wavelet transform for generating different time scales for a signal and using these scales as an input to a two-stage neural network predictor. The predictor predicts the expected signal value and labels considerable deviations from this value as anomalies. The primary contribution of our work would be to empirically evaluate the effectiveness of multi resolution analysis as an input to neural network prediction engine specifically for the purpose of intrusion detection. The role of Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs, as special-purpose devices to detect anomalies and attacks in a network, is becoming more important. First, anomaly-based methods cannot achieve an outstanding performance without a comprehensive labeled and up-to-date training set with all different attack types, which is very costly and time-consuming to create if not impossible. Second, efficient and effective fusion of several detection technologies becomes a big challenge for building an operational hybrid intrusion detection system.

  14. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  15. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due to the severe computational burden. Here we present such a unifying methodological and conceptual framework which detects assembly structure at many different time scales, levels of precision, and with arbitrary internal organization. Applying this methodology to multiple single unit recordings from various cortical areas, we find that there is no universal cortical coding scheme, but that assembly structure and precision significantly depends on the brain area recorded and ongoing task demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19428.001 PMID:28074777

  16. Designing for development: Across the scales of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael

    2016-11-01

    This essay traces the history of an activity designed to promote the intellectual and social development of elementary-age schoolchildren during the afterschool hours. Following in the footsteps of Urie Bronfenbrenner, I highlight his argument that just as all human development occurs in contexts of varying levels of inclusiveness and mutual interchange, human development occurs at intersecting scales of time that themselves vary in character and duration. The task of exploring Bronfenbrenner's idea confronts scholars interested in person-context coconstitutive processes with a difficult methodological requirement; they must study simultaneously the history of persons (at the microgenetic and ontogenetic time scales) as well the history of "the contexts of development" in which the persons participate. A project implementing such a study focused on the life course of the system of activity is described, followed by a discussion of the lessons to be learned from a temporally extensive study of persons developing in contexts that are themselves changing. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysios Perdikis

    Full Text Available The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes.

  18. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-02-10

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes.

  19. How noise contributes to time-scale invariance of interval timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Sorinel A.; Buhusi, Catalin V.

    2013-05-01

    Time perception in the suprasecond range is crucial for fundamental cognitive processes such as decision making, rate calculation, and planning. In the vast majority of species, behavioral manipulations, and neurophysiological manipulations, interval timing is scale invariant: the time-estimation errors are proportional to the estimated duration. The origin and mechanisms of this fundamental property are unknown. We discuss the computational properties of a circuit consisting of a large number of (input) neural oscillators projecting on a small number of (output) coincidence detector neurons, which allows time to be coded by the pattern of coincidental activation of its inputs. We show that time-scale invariance emerges from the neural noise, such as small fluctuations in the firing patterns of its input neurons and in the errors with which information is encoded and retrieved by its output neurons. In this architecture, time-scale invariance is resistant to manipulations as it depends neither on the details of the input population nor on the distribution probability of noise.

  20. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D N Poenaru; R A Gherghescu

    2015-09-01

    Fission theory is used to explain decay. Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster radioactivity. The macroscopic–microscopic method is illustrated for the superheavy nucleus 286Fl. Then a few results of the theoretical approach of decay (ASAF, UNIV and semFIS models), cluster decay (ASAF and UNIV) and spontaneous fission dynamics are described with Werner–Wheeler and cranking inertia. UNIV denotes universal curve and semFIS the fission-based semiempirical formula.

  1. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in the potential-energy landscape between the outer saddle and the scission configuration in the multi-channel fission model of Brosa. When the relative yields, the widths and the mean mass-asymmetry values of these components are fitted to experimental data, the mass distributions can be very well reproduced. Moreover, these fission channels are characterised by specific values of charge polarisation, total kinetic energy and prompt-neutron yields. The present contribution investigates the systematic variation of the characteristic fission-channel properties as a function of the composition and the excitation energy of the fissioning system. The mean position of the asymmetric fission channels in the heavy fragment is almost constant in atomic number. The deformation of the nascent fragments at scission, which is the main source of excitation energy of the separated fission fragments ending up in prompt-neutron emission, is found to be a unique function of Z for the light and the heavy fragment of the asymmetric fission channels. A variation of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system above the fission saddle is only seen in the neutron yield of the heavy fragment. The charge polarisation in the two most important asymmetric fission channels is found to be constant and to appreciably exceed the macroscopic value. The variation of the relative yields and of the positions of the fission channels as a function of the composition and excitation energy

  2. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  3. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  4. Modelling Time and Length Scales of Scour Around a Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.; Foster, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The scour and burial of submarine objects is an area of interest for engineers, oceanographers and military personnel. Given the limited availability of field observations, there exists a need to accurately describe the hydrodynamics and sediment response around an obstacle using numerical models. In this presentation, we will compare observations of submarine pipeline scour with model predictions. The research presented here uses the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model FLOW-3D. FLOW-3D, developed by Flow Science in Santa Fe, NM, is a 3-dimensional finite-difference model that solves the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. Using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique, FLOW-3D is able to resolve fluid-fluid and fluid-air interfaces. The FAVOR technique allows for complex geometry to be resolved with rectangular grids. FLOW-3D uses a bulk transport method to describe sediment transport and feedback to the hydrodynamic solver is accomplished by morphology evolution and fluid viscosity due to sediment suspension. Previous investigations by the authors have shown FLOW-3D to well-predict the hydrodynamics around five static scoured bed profiles and a stationary pipeline (``Modelling of Flow Around a Cylinder Over a Scoured Bed,'' submit to Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering). Following experiments performed by Mao (1986, Dissertation, Technical University of Denmark), we will be performing model-data comparisons of length and time scales for scour around a pipeline. Preliminary investigations with LES and k-ɛ closure schemes have shown that the model predicts shorter time scales in scour hole development than that observed by Mao. Predicted time and length scales of scour hole development are shown to be a function of turbulence closure scheme, grain size, and hydrodynamic forcing. Subsequent investigations consider variable wave-current flow regimes and object burial. This investigation will allow us to identify different regimes for the

  5. Dynamics of Rotationally Fissioned Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    We present a model for near-Earth asteroid (NEA) rotational fission that results in the evolution of all observed types of NEA systems: synchronous binaries, asteroid pairs, doubly synchronous binaries, high-e binaries, ternary systems, and contact binaries. The model consists of "rubble pile” asteroid geophysics, the YORP and binary YORP effects, and mutual gravitational interactions. An NEA can be modeled as a ``rubble pile"--a collection of gravitationally bound boulders with a distribution of size scales and very little tensile strength between them. The YORP effect torques a "rubble pile” asteroid until the asteroid reaches its disruption spin limit, and then two collections of boulders will enter into orbit about each other determined by the largest distance between mass centers. This binary system dynamically evolves under the effects of non-spherical gravitational potentials, solar gravitational perturbations, and mutual body tides. The coupling between the spin states and orbit state chaotically drives the system into the observed asteroid classes with mass ratio, q, distinguishing two evolutionary tracks. High mass ratio systems, q>0.2, evolve tidally into doubly synchronous binaries and then continued to be evolved by BYORP. Low mass ratio systems, qfission, creating a chaotic ternary system. We call this new process secondary fission. The resulting triple system may eject one body or, more often, send one into a slow speed impact with the primary. These processes tend to stabilize the initially chaotic binaries to create synchronous binaries. These results emphasize the importance of the initial component size distribution and configuration within the parent body. This work is supported by NASA's PGG and OPR programs through grants: NNX08AL51G and NNX09AU23G.

  6. Decay characteristics of fission products and summation calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tadashi [Faculty of Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    This paper reviews the decay characteristics of fission products on the viewpoint of summation calculation. The fission products (FPs) are accumulated in the operating power reactors. As they are neutron-rich at the time of scission, they undergo successive beta decays toward stable nuclides. To grasp the quantity of an arbitrary nuclide, fission yields, decay constants and blanching ratios of the nuclide in the same decay chain ( a mass chain of the fixed mass is sufficient) must be known. As a neutron capture increases the mass, and release of a delayed neutron decreases the mass, capture cross sections and delayed neutron emitting ratios are also required. If these values of all FP are known, the quantities such as time dependent decay heat and the delayed neutron fraction can be calculated by summation of the contribution of the nuclides. A computer code ORIGEN-2 is a typical example to compute these quantities. The more important than computer code is the data library for summation calculation which includes physical constants such as fission yields, decay constants, blanching ratio, beta and gamma energy emitted at a beta decay, delayed neutron emitting ratios, and neutron capture cross sections for more than 1000 FP nuclides. They are realized in JNDC FP Decay Data Library-Version 2 of Japan, JEF-2 by western European countries, and ENDF/B-VI of USA. The early versions (until early 80's) of these full-scale libraries showed worse agreement with experiment than the old libraries based on approximations and estimates. The application of the gross theory to beta-decay' to short-lived FPs could solve the problem. The above disagreement is explained by having dropped of high excitation levels of short lived daughter nuclides. This is called as Pandemonium Problem. The summation calculation for the gamma ray spectrum succeeded to predict the experimental value by correcting theoretical spectrum. However, there remains still an underestimate for cooling

  7. Time-Scale Domain Characterization of Time-Varying Ultrawideband Infostation Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.A.K. Chude-Okonkwo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The time-scale domain geometrical-based method for the characterization of the time varying ultrawideband (UWB channel typical of an infostation channel is presented. Compared to methods that use Doppler shift as a measure of time-variation in the channel this model provides a more reliable measure of frequency dispersion caused by terminal mobility in the UWB infostation channel. Particularly, it offers carrier frequency independent method of computing wideband channel responses and parameters which are important for ultrawideband systems. Results show that the frequency dispersion of the channel depends on the frequency and not on the choice of bandwidth. And time dispersion depends on bandwidth and not on the frequency. It is also shown that for time-varying UWB, frame length defined over the coherence time obtained with reference to the carrier frequency results in an error margin which can be reduced by using the coherence time defined with respect to the maximum frequency in a given frequency band. And the estimation of the frequency offset using the time-scale domain (wideband model presented here (especially in the case of multiband UWB frequency synchronization is more accurate than using frequency offset estimate obtained from narrowband models.

  8. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Fission and fusion processes of particles clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found which depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethora of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria.

  9. Scaling in Non-stationary time series I

    CERN Document Server

    Ignaccolo, M; Grigolini, P; Hamilton, P; West, B J

    2003-01-01

    Most data processing techniques, applied to biomedical and sociological time series, are only valid for random fluctuations that are stationary in time. Unfortunately, these data are often non stationary and the use of techniques of analysis resting on the stationary assumption can produce a wrong information on the scaling, and so on the complexity of the process under study. Herein, we test and compare two techniques for removing the non-stationary influences from computer generated time series, consisting of the superposition of a slow signal and a random fluctuation. The former is based on the method of wavelet decomposition, and the latter is a proposal of this paper, denoted by us as step detrending technique. We focus our attention on two cases, when the slow signal is a periodic function mimicking the influence of seasons, and when it is an aperiodic signal mimicking the influence of a population change (increase or decrease). For the purpose of computational simplicity the random fluctuation is taken...

  10. Multi-scale gravity field modeling in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, the GRACE satellite missions provide an unprecedented view of the gravity field spatial and temporal variations. Gravity models built from these satellite data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes (Tapley et al., 2004). Up to present, time variations of the gravity field are often modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we propose to model the gravity field using localized functions in space and time. For that, we build a model of the gravity field in space and time with a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time. First we design the 4D basis, then, we study the inverse problem to model the gravity field from the potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites, and its regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle. Our demonstration of surface water mass signals decomposition in time and space is based on the use of synthetic along-track gravitational potential data. We test the developed approach on one year of 4D gravity modeling and compare the reconstructed water heights to those of the input hydrological model. Perspectives of this work is to apply the approach on real GRACE data, addressing the challenge of a realistic noise, to better describe and understand physical processus with high temporal resolution/low spatial resolution or the contrary.

  11. The Fission-fragment Spectrometer VERDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Oberstedt, S.

    VERDI (VElocity foR Direct particle Identification) is a fission-fragment spectrometer presently under construction at the Joint Research Centre IRMM. It will allow measuring the kinetic energy and the velocity of both fission fragments simultaneously. The velocity information provide information about the pre-neutron mass of each fission fragment when isotropic prompt-neutron emission from the fragments is assumed. The kinetic energy, in complement of the velocity, will provide us with the post-neutron mass. From the difference between pre- and post-neutron masses the number of neutrons emitted by each fragment may be deter- mined. Knowledge of this quantity as a function of the total kinetic energy will contribute to the understanding of how the available excitation energy is shared between both fission fragments at scission. The contemplated pre-neutron mass resolving power, A/ΔA, of at least 126 requires a time-of-flight (TOF) resolution better than 200 ps (FWHM) and an energy resolution, ΔE/E of 0.3% for a post-neutron mass. The VERDI spectrometer provides the best compromise between geometrical efficiency and time of flight. It consists of an electron detector located very close to the fissionable target and a double array of silicon detectors located 50 cm away on both sides of the target. Each silicon detector has an area of 450 mm2 and is made from neutron transmutation-doped (NTD) silicon to reduce rise-time variation, to minimize pulse height defect and to reduce the plasma delay time. The intrinsic timing resolution of the electron detector was determined, using a 241Am alpha source (Eα = 5.49 MeV), against a previously characterized single-crystal diamond to σ = 140 ps. The timing resolution of the NTD silicon detectors was determined using the spontaneous fission of 252Cf in conjunction with Monte-Carlo simulations to σNTD = 150 ps. With the present timing resolution, σTOF VERDI is already close to the set goals. The excellent timing properties

  12. Scale-free networks emerging from multifractal time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, Marcello A.; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2017-05-01

    Methods connecting dynamical systems and graph theory have attracted increasing interest in the past few years, with applications ranging from a detailed comparison of different kinds of dynamics to the characterization of empirical data. Here we investigate the effects of the (multi)fractal properties of a signal, common in time series arising from chaotic dynamics or strange attractors, on the topology of a suitably projected network. Relying on the box-counting formalism, we map boxes into the nodes of a network and establish analytic expressions connecting the natural measure of a box with its degree in the graph representation. We single out the conditions yielding to the emergence of a scale-free topology and validate our findings with extensive numerical simulations. We finally present a numerical analysis on the properties of weighted and directed network projections.

  13. Scale-free networks emerging from multifractal time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, Marcello A; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2017-05-01

    Methods connecting dynamical systems and graph theory have attracted increasing interest in the past few years, with applications ranging from a detailed comparison of different kinds of dynamics to the characterization of empirical data. Here we investigate the effects of the (multi)fractal properties of a signal, common in time series arising from chaotic dynamics or strange attractors, on the topology of a suitably projected network. Relying on the box-counting formalism, we map boxes into the nodes of a network and establish analytic expressions connecting the natural measure of a box with its degree in the graph representation. We single out the conditions yielding to the emergence of a scale-free topology and validate our findings with extensive numerical simulations. We finally present a numerical analysis on the properties of weighted and directed network projections.

  14. Empirical mode decomposition using variable filtering with time scale calibrating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and efficient method for decomposing a signal into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a trend is proposed. Unlike the original empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which uses spline fits to extract variations from the signal by separating the local mean from the fluctuations in the decomposing process, this new method being proposed takes advantage of the theory of variable finite impulse response (FIR) filtering where filter coefficients and breakpoint frequencies can be adjusted to track any peak-to-peak time scale changes. The IMFs are results of a multiple variable frequency response FIR filtering when signals pass through the filters. Numerical examples validate that in contrast with the original EMD, the proposed method can fine-tune the frequency resolution and suppress the aliasing effectively.

  15. Dynamic Leidenfrost effect: relevant time- and length-scales

    CERN Document Server

    Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it as to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting/drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time- and length-scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  16. Nonoscillation for second order sublinear dynamic equations on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Lynn; Baoguo, Jia; Peterson, Allan

    2009-10-01

    Consider the Emden-Fowler sublinear dynamic equation x[Delta][Delta](t)+p(t)f(x([sigma](t)))=0, where , is a time scale, , where ai>0, 0researchers. In this paper, we allow the coefficient function p(t) to be negative for arbitrarily large values of t. We extend a nonoscillation result of Wong for the second order sublinear Emden-Fowler equation in the continuous case to the dynamic equation (0.1). As applications, we show that the sublinear difference equation has a nonoscillatory solution, for b>0, c>[alpha], and the sublinear q-difference equation has a nonoscillatory solution, for , q>1, b>0, c>1+[alpha].

  17. On the superposition of heterogeneous traffic at large time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney I. Resnick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various empirical and theoretical studies indicate that cumulative network traffic is a Gaussian process. However, depending on whether the intensity at which sessions are initiated is large or small relative to the session duration tail, [25] and [15] have shown that traffic at large time scales can be approximated by either fractional Brownian motion (fBm or stable Lévy motion. We study distributional properties of cumulative traffic that consists of a finite number of independent streams and give an explanation of why Gaussian examples abound in practice but not stable Lévy motion. We offer an explanation of how much vertical aggregation is needed for the Gaussian approximation to hold. Our results are expressed as limit theorems for a sequence of cumulative traffic processes whose session initiation intensities satisfy growth rates similar to those used in [25].

  18. Variation of atmospheric depth profile on different time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczynska, B; Homola, P; Pekala, J; Risse, M; Wilczynski, H

    2006-01-01

    The vertical profile of atmospheric depth is an important element in extensive air shower studies. The depth of shower maximum is one of the most important characteristics of the shower. In the fluorescence technique of shower detection, the geometrical reconstruction provides the altitude of shower maximum, so that an accurate profile of atmospheric depth is needed to convert this altitude to the depth of shower maximum. In this paper the temporal variation of experimentally measured profiles of atmospheric depth at different sites is studied and implications for shower reconstruction are shown. The atmospheric profiles vary on time scales from hours to years. It is shown that the daily variation of the profile is as important as its seasonal variation and should be accounted for in air shower studies. For precise shower reconstruction, the daily profiles determined locally at the site of the air shower detector are recommended.

  19. Large-scale structure of time evolving citation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, E. A.; Clarkson, G.; Shedden, K.; Newman, M. E. J.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we examine a number of methods for probing and understanding the large-scale structure of networks that evolve over time. We focus in particular on citation networks, networks of references between documents such as papers, patents, or court cases. We describe three different methods of analysis, one based on an expectation-maximization algorithm, one based on modularity optimization, and one based on eigenvector centrality. Using the network of citations between opinions of the United States Supreme Court as an example, we demonstrate how each of these methods can reveal significant structural divisions in the network and how, ultimately, the combination of all three can help us develop a coherent overall picture of the network's shape.

  20. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  1. Fission neutron output measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ullmann, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bredeweg, T A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, D J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL; Becker, J A [LLNL; Stoyer, M A [LLNL; Henderson, R [LLNL; Sutton, M [LLNL; Belier, Gilbert [BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Chatillon, A [BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE

    2010-01-01

    Accurate data for both physical properties and fission properties of materials are necessary to properly model dynamic fissioning systems. To address the need for accurate data on fission neutron energy spectra, especially at outgoing neutron energies below about 200 keV and at energies above 8 MeV, ongoing work at LANSCE involving collaborators from LANL, LLNL and CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel is extending the energy range, efficiency and accuracy beyond previous measurements. Initial work in the outgoing neutron energy range from 1 to 7 MeV is consistent with current evaluations and provides a foundation for extended measurements. As part of these efforts, a new fission fragment detector that reduces backgrounds and improves timing has been designed fabricated and tested, and new neutron detectors are being assessed for optimal characteristics. Simulations of experimental designs are in progress to ensure that accuracy goals are met. Results of these measurements will be incorporated into evaluations and data libraries as they become available.

  2. Decomposition of wind speed fluctuations at different time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qinmin Zheng; S Rehman; Md Mahbub Alam; L M Alhems; A Lashin

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the inherent features of wind speed (variability on different time scales) has become critical for assured wind power availability, grid stability, and effective power management. The study utilizes the wavelet, autocorrelation, and FFT (fast Fourier transform) techniques to analyze and assimilate the fluctuating nature of wind speed data collected over a period of 29–42 years at different locations in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The analyses extracted the intrinsic features of wind speed, including the long-term mean wind speed and fluctuations at different time scales (periods), which is critical for meteorological purposes including wind power resource assessment and weather forecasting. The longterm mean wind speed varied between 1.45 m/s at Mecca station and 3.73 m/s at Taif. The annual variation is the largest (±0.97 m/s) at Taif and the smallest (±0.25 m/s) at Mecca. Similarly, the wind speed fluctuation with different periods was also discussed in detail. The spectral characteristics obtained using FFT reveal that Al-Baha, Najran, Taif and Wadi-Al-Dawasser having a sharp peak at a frequency f = 0.00269 (1/day) retain a more regular annual repetition of wind speed than Bisha, Khamis-Mushait, Madinah, Mecca, and Sharourah. Based on the autocorrelation analysis and FFT results, the stations are divided into three groups: (i) having strong annual modulations (Al-Baha, Najran, Taif and Wadi-Al-Dawasser), (ii) having comparable annual and half-yearly modulations (Bisha, Khamis-Mushait, and Mecca) and (iii) having annual modulation moderately prominent (Madinah and Sharourah).

  3. Towards a stable numerical time scale for the early Paleogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgen, Frederik; Kuiper, Klaudia; Sierro, Francisco J.; Wotzlaw, Jorn; Schaltegger, Urs; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The construction of an astronomical time scale for the early Paleogene is hampered by ambiguities in the number, correlation and tuning of 405-kyr eccentricity related cycles in deep marine records from ODP cores and land-based sections. The two most competing age models result in astronomical ages for the K/Pg boundary that differ by ~750 kyr (~66.0 Ma of Vandenberghe et al. (2012) versus 65.25 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012); these ages in turn are consistent with proposed ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) that differ by ~300 kyr (28.201 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008) versus 27.89 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012)); an even older age of 28.294 Ma is proposed based on a statistical optimization model (Renne et al., 2011). The astronomically calibrated FCs age of 28.201 ± 0.046 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008), which is consistent with the astronomical age of ~66.0 Ma for the K/Pg boundary, is currently adopted in the standard geological time scale (GTS2012). Here we combine new and published data in an attempt to solve the controversy and arrive at a stable nuemrical time scale for the early Paleogene. Supporting their younger age model, Westerhold et al. (2012) argue that the tuning of Miocene sections in the Mediterranean, which underlie the older FCs age of Kuiper et al. (2008) and, hence, the coupled older early Paleogene age model of Vandenberghe et al. (2012), might be too old by three precession cycles. We thoroughly rechecked this tuning; distinctive cycle patterns related to eccentricity and precession-obliquity interference make a younger tuning that would be consistent with the younger astronomical age of 27.89 Ma for the FCs of Westerhold et al. (2012) challenging. Next we compared youngest U/Pb zircon and astronomical ages for a number of ash beds in the tuned Miocene section of Monte dei Corvi. These ages are indistinguishable, indicating that the two independent dating methods yield the same age when the same event is dated. This is consistent with results

  4. The stochastic background: scaling laws and time to detection for pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Siemens, Xavier; Jenet, Fredrick; Romano, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    We derive scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio of the optimal cross-correlation statistic, and show that the large power-law increase of the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the the observation time $T$ that is usually assumed holds only at early times. After enough time has elapsed, pulsar timing arrays enter a new regime where the signal to noise only scales as $\\sqrt{T}$. In addition, in this regime the quality of the pulsar timing data and the cadence become relatively un-important. This occurs because the lowest frequencies of the pulsar timing residuals become gravitational-wave dominated. Pulsar timing arrays enter this regime more quickly than one might naively suspect. For T=10 yr observations and typical stochastic background amplitudes, pulsars with residual RMSs of less than about $1\\,\\mu$s are already in that regime. The best strategy to increase the detectability of the background in this regime is to increase the number of pulsars in the array. We also perform realistic simulations ...

  5. Fission of actinides using a table-top laser

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, H; Sauerbrey, R; Galy, J; Magill, J; Rondinella, V; Schenkel, R; Butz, T

    2003-01-01

    Powerful table-top lasers are now available in the laboratory and can be used to induce nuclear reactions. We report the first demonstration of nuclear fission using a high repetition rate table-top laser with intensities of 10 sup 2 sup 0 W/cm sup 2. Actinide photo-fission has been achieved in both sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th from the high-energy Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by laser acceleration of electrons. The fission products were identified by time-resolved gamma-spectroscopy. (authors)

  6. Binary scission configurations in fission of light actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Lab. of Nuclear Science; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Tsukada, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Tanikawa, M.; Zhao, Y.L.; Sueki, K.; Nakahara, H.

    1997-07-01

    Mass and kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments have been accurately measured by a double velocity time-of-flight technique in the 13 MeV proton-induced fissions of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. A binary structure is observed in total kinetic energy distributions in the fragments with mass number around A=130 for both the fissions, indicating that there are at least two kinds of scission configurations. A correlation between the scission configurations and mass yield distributions reveals that elongated scission configurations are associated with the symmetric mass distribution and compact scission configurations with the asymmetric mass distribution. (author)

  7. Spectroscopy of fission fragments using prompt-delayed coincidence technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Palit; S Biswas

    2015-09-01

    The time-stamp structure of the digital data acquisition system of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) has been utilized to carry out prompt-delayed coincidence technique for the spectroscopic study of fission fragments. This technique was found to be useful to determine the states above the long-lived isomer (with half-life up to ∼5 s), present in the fission fragments. The angular correlation of -rays, emitted by the fission fragments, has also been used in the present INGA geometry to determine the spins of the de-exciting states.

  8. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scamps Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  9. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  10. The pace of aging: Intrinsic time scales in demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wrycza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pace of aging is a concept that captures the time-related aspect of aging. It formalizesthe idea of a characteristic life span or intrinsic population time scale. In the rapidly developing field of comparative biodemography, measures that account for inter-speciesdifferences in life span are needed to compare how species age. Objective: We aim to provide a mathematical foundation for the concept of pace. We derive desiredmathematical properties of pace measures and suggest candidates which satisfy these properties. Subsequently, we introduce the concept of pace-standardization, which reveals differences in demographic quantities that are not due to pace. Examples and consequences are discussed. Conclusions: Mean life span (i.e., life expectancy from birth or from maturity is intuitively appealing,theoretically justified, and the most appropriate measure of pace. Pace-standardizationprovides a serviceable method for comparative aging studies to explore differences indemographic patterns of aging across species, and it may considerably alter conclusionsabout the strength of aging.

  11. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features.

  12. Forecasting decadal and shorter time-scale solar cycle features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi

    2016-07-01

    Solar energetic particles and magnetic fields reach the Earth through the interplanetary medium and affect it in various ways, producing beautiful aurorae, but also electrical blackouts and damage to our technology-dependent economy. The root of energetic solar outputs is the solar activity cycle, which is most likely caused by dynamo processes inside the Sun. It is a formidable task to accurately predict the amplitude, onset and peak timings of a solar cycle. After reviewing all solar cycle prediction methods, including empirical as well as physical model-based schemes, I will describe what we have learned from both validation and nonvalidation of cycle 24 forecasts, and how to refine the model-based schemes for upcoming cycle 25 forecasts. Recent observations indicate that within a solar cycle there are shorter time-scale 'space weather' features, such as bursts of various forms of activity with approximately one year periodicity. I will demonstrate how global tachocline dynamics could play a crucial role in producing such space weather. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  13. The quenching time scale and quenching rate of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The average star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies has been declining since redshift of 2. A fraction of galaxies quench and become quiescent. We constrain two key properties of the quenching process: the quenching time scale and the quenching rate among galaxies. We achieve this by analyzing the galaxy number density profile in NUV-u color space and the distribution in NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram with a simple toy-model framework. We focus on galaxies in three mass bins between 10 to 10 and 10 to 10.6 solar mass. In the NUV-u v.s. u-i color-color diagram, the red u-i galaxies exhibit a different slope from the slope traced by the star-forming galaxies. This angled distribution and the number density profile of galaxies in NUV-u space strongly suggest that the decline of the SFR in galaxies has to accelerate before they turn quiescent. We model this color-color distribution with a two-phase exponential decline star formation history. The models with an e-folding time in the second phase (the quenching p...

  14. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  15. Membrane biology: fission behind BARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Volker

    2012-06-05

    Membrane bending is accomplished in part by amphipathic helix insertion into the bilayer and the assembly of BAR domain scaffolds preparing the membrane for fission. Two recent studies highlight the roles of amphipathic helices and BAR scaffolds in membrane fission and establish the structural basis of membrane bending by the N-BAR protein endophilin.

  16. Fission throughout the periodic table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs.

  17. Ternary fission and cluster radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W; Gherghescu, R A; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2002-01-01

    Ternary fission yield for different kinds of light particle accompanied fission processes is compared to the Q-values for the corresponding cold phenomena, showing a striking correlation. The experimental evidence for the existence of a quasimolecular state in sup 1 sup 0 Be accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf may be explained using a three-center phenomenological model which generates a third minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. This model is a natural extension of the unified approach to three groups of binary decay modes (cold fission, cluster radioactivities and alpha decay), illustrated by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 U decay modes, and the alpha valley on the potential energy surfaces of sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Te. New measurements of cluster decay modes, confirming earlier predictions within analytical superasymmetric fission model, are included in a comprehensive half-life systematics. (authors)

  18. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James

    2012-12-19

    The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

  19. An overview of the recent results on fission dynamics from the NAND facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B R Behera

    2015-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of some of the recent fusion–fission experiments carried out at the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) Phase-01 installed at the Pelletron+LINAC accelerator facility of Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Pre-scission neutron multiplicity excitation functions are measured for the 213,215,217Fr, 210,212,214,216Rn and 206,210Po compound nuclei populated through the fusion of the 19F+194,196,198Pt, 16,18O+194,198Pt and 12C+194,198Pt systems, respectively. Pre-scission neutron yields from these reactions are compared with the extensive statistical model calculations to look for the effects due to the compound nucleus shell closure, / ratio of the compound nucleus, magnitude of the saddle-point shell corerction and fission time-scale.

  20. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  1. Spontaneous fission properties of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessberger, F.P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Spontaneous fission properties of transuranium isotopes are reviewed. Specific emphasis was laid on brief historical overviews of theoretical descriptions and experimental determination of basic properties as spontaneous fission half-lives, fission barriers, or total kinetic energy release in fission. Experimental spontaneous fission half-lives are compared with the results of recent theoretical predictions. Hindrance factors for spontaneous fission of odd-mass nuclei are discussed in context with the configuration (spin, parity) of the fissioning states and the change in energy of single particle levels at deformation. Kinetic energy release and mass distributions are discussed in the context of different fission modes, as symmetric and asymmetric or fission from elongated or compact shapes of the nascent fission fragments. An overview of recent fission barrier calculations of superheavy elements on the basis of macroscopic-microscopic models or self-consistent calculations is given, and the results are compared for selected examples. (orig.)

  2. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene: from photophysics toward devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission is the process in conjugated organic molecules bywhich a photogenerated singlet exciton couples to a nearby chromophore in the ground state, creating a pair of triplet excitons. Researchers first reported this phenomenon in the 1960s, an event that sparked further studies in the following decade. These investigations used fluorescence spectroscopy to establish that exciton fission occurred in single crystals of several acenes. However, research interest has been recently rekindled by the possibility that singlet fission could be used as a carrier multiplication technique to enhance the efficiency of photovoltaic cells. The most successful architecture to-date involves sensitizing a red-absorbing photoactive layer with a blue-absorbing material that undergoes fission, thereby generating additional photocurrent from higher-energy photons. The quest for improved solar cells has spurred a drive to better understand the fission process, which has received timely aid from modern techniques for time-resolved spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and small-molecule device fabrication. However, the consensus interpretation of the initial studies using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was that exciton fission was suppressed in polycrystalline thin films of pentacene, a material that would be otherwise expected to be an ideal model system, as well as a viable candidate for fission-sensitized photovoltaic devices. In this Account, we review the results of our recent transient absorption and device-based studies of polycrystalline pentacene. We address the controversy surrounding the assignment of spectroscopic features in transient absorption data, and illustrate how a consistent interpretation is possible. This work underpins our conclusion that singlet fission in pentacene is extraordinarily rapid (∼80 fs) and is thus the dominant decay channel for the photoexcited singlet exciton. Further, we discuss our demonstration that triplet excitons

  3. Fission modes in charged-particle induced fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, A.; Kotte, R.; Seidel, W.; Stary, F.; Wohlfarth, D. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf bei Dresden (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-12-01

    The population of the three fission modes predicted by Brosa's multi-channel fission model for the uranium region was studied in different fissioning systems. They were produced bombarding {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U targets by light charged particles with energies slightly above the Coulomb barrier. Though the maximum excitation energy of the compound nucleus amounted to about 22 MeV, the influences of various spherical and deformed nuclear shells on the mass and total kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments are still pronounced. The larger variances of the total kinetic energy distributions compared to those of thermal neutron induced fission were explained by temperature dependent fluctuations of the amount and velocity of alteration of the scission point elongation of the fissioning system. From the ratio of these variances the portion of the potential energy dissipated among intrinsic degrees of freedom before scission was deduced for the different fission channels. It was found that the excitation remaining after pre-scission neutron emission is mainly transferred into intrinsic heat and less into pre-scission kinetic energy. (orig.).

  4. On the superimposition of heterogeneous traffic at large time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Oliveros, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Various empirical and theoretical studies indicate that cumulative network traffic is a Gaussian process. However, depending on whether the intensity at which sessions are initiated is large or small relative to the session duration tail, Mikosch et a. (Ann Appl Probab, 12:23-68, 2002) and Kaj and Taqqu (Progress Probab, 60:383-427, 2008) have shown that traffic at large time scales can be approximated by either fractional Brownian motion (fBm) or stable Levy motion. We study distributional properties of cumulative traffic that consists of a finite number of independent streams and give an explanation of why Gaussian examples abound in practice but not stable Levy motion. We offer an explanation of how much vertical aggregation is needed for the Gaussian approximation to hold. Our results are expressed as limit theorems for a sequence of cumulative traffic processes whose session initiation intensities satisfy growth rates similar to those used in Mikosch et a. (Ann Appl Probab, 12:23-68, 2002).

  5. Evaluating the uncertainty of predicting future climate time series at the hourly time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, E.; Fatichi, S.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2011-12-01

    A stochastic downscaling methodology is developed to generate hourly, point-scale time series for several meteorological variables, such as precipitation, cloud cover, shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and atmospheric pressure. The methodology uses multi-model General Circulation Model (GCM) realizations and an hourly weather generator, AWE-GEN. Probabilistic descriptions of factors of change (a measure of climate change with respect to historic conditions) are computed for several climate statistics and different aggregation times using a Bayesian approach that weights the individual GCM contributions. The Monte Carlo method is applied to sample the factors of change from their respective distributions thereby permitting the generation of time series in an ensemble fashion, which reflects the uncertainty of climate projections of future as well as the uncertainty of the downscaling procedure. Applications of the methodology and probabilistic expressions of certainty in reproducing future climates for the periods, 2000 - 2009, 2046 - 2065 and 2081 - 2100, using the 1962 - 1992 period as the baseline, are discussed for the location of Firenze (Italy). The climate predictions for the period of 2000 - 2009 are tested against observations permitting to assess the reliability and uncertainties of the methodology in reproducing statistics of meteorological variables at different time scales.

  6. Nuclear Fission Investigation with Twin Ionization Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to report the recent results, obtained in development of digital pulse processing mathematics for prompt fission neutron (PFN) investigation using twin ionization chamber (TIC) along with fast neutron time-of-flight detector (ND). Due to well known ambiguities in literature (see refs. [4, 6, 9 and 11]), concerning a pulse induction on TIC electrodes by FF ionization, we first presented detailed mathematical analysis of fission fragment (FF) signal formation on TIC anode. The analysis was done using Ramo-Shockley theorem, which gives relation between charged particle motion between TIC electrodes and so called weighting potential. Weighting potential was calculated by direct numerical solution of Laplace equation (neglecting space charge) for the TIC geometry and ionization, caused by FF. Formulae for grid inefficiency (GI) correction and digital pulse processing algorithms for PFN time-of-flight measurements and pulse shape analysis are presented and discussed.

  7. Probing Time-Dependent Molecular Dipoles on the Attosecond Time Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidel, Ch.; Klei, J.; Yang, C.-H.; Rouzée, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Klünder, K.; Miranda, M.; Arnold, C. L.; Fordell, T.; L'Huillier, A.; Gisselbrecht, M.; Johnsson, P.; Dinh, M. P.; Suraud, E.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Despré, V.; Marques, M. A. L.; Lépine, F.

    2013-07-01

    Photoinduced molecular processes start with the interaction of the instantaneous electric field of the incident light with the electronic degrees of freedom. This early attosecond electronic motion impacts the fate of the photoinduced reactions. We report the first observation of attosecond time scale electron dynamics in a series of small- and medium-sized neutral molecules (N2, CO2, and C2H4), monitoring time-dependent variations of the parent molecular ion yield in the ionization by an attosecond pulse, and thereby probing the time-dependent dipole induced by a moderately strong near-infrared laser field. This approach can be generalized to other molecular species and may be regarded as a first example of molecular attosecond Stark spectroscopy.

  8. Ternary fission of (_

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Naderi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Using three cluster model, the ternary fission of (_"98" ^"252" Cf is studied. We applied collinear and equatorial configurations to study the ternary fission of (_"98" ^"252" Cf when three fragments are Sn, Ni and Ca. The potential energy of collinear and equatorial configurations is calculated. We calculated the potential energy for odd and even values of A3. Also, we compared the potential energy for (_"50" ^(A_"1" Sn+(_"28" ^(A_"2" Ni+(_"20" ^(A_"3" Ca and (_"50" ^(A_"1" -"1" Sn+(_"28" ^(A_"2" +"1" Ni+(_"20" ^(A_"3" Ca to investigate the influence of neutron numbers of three fragments. Obtained results show that for (_"50" ^(A_"1" Sn+(_"28" ^(A_"2" Ni+(_"20" ^(A_"3" Ca reaction with even A3 in collinear and equatorial configurations, the potential energy and penetration probability have ,respectively, minimum and maximum values in A3=48 whereas for odd values of A3 the minimum value for the potential energy and the maximum value of penetration probability take place in A3=49. For (_"50" ^(A_"1" -"1" Sn+(_"28" ^(A_"2" +"1" Ni+(_"20" ^(A_"3" Ca reactions in collinear and equatorial cases, the minimum value of potential energy and maximum value of penetration probability take place in A3=49 and A3=50, respectively, for even and odd values of A3. Also, among all the possible reactions the lowest value of potential energy and highest value of penetration probability happen for (_"50" ^132Sn+(_"28" ^72Ni+(_"20" ^48Ca configuration.

  9. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  10. Reliable Dynamic Voltage Scaling for Real-Time Systems with Uncertain Execution Time and Resource Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. AZHAGUNILA,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work is to develop a Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS algorithm for real- time system with resource constraints and the system thus developed is fault tolerant as well. The system is assumed to contain independent periodic tasks. Earliest Deadline Firstscheduling algorithm is considered in this. The algorithm helps in meeting the deadlines of all the tasks and also ensures that the total power consumption is minimized. The other objective is to develop a fault tolerant system. The proposed system is designed to handle hardware faults. Thus the proposed system is energy efficient and reliable.

  11. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Dynamics of morphological changes for mitochondrial fission and fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria experience continuous fusion and fission in a living cell, but their dynamics remains poorly quantified. Here a theoretical model was developed, upon a simplified population balance equation (PBE), to predict the morphological changes induced by mitochondrial fission and fusion. Assuming that both fission and fusion events are statistically independent, the survival probability of mitochondria staying in the fission or fusion state was formulated as an exponentially-decayed function with time, which depended on the time-dependent distribution of the mitochondrial volume and the fission and fusion rates. Parametric analysis was done for two typical volume distributions. One was Gamma distribution and the other was Gaussian distribution, derived from the measurements of volume distribution for individual mitochondria in a living cell and purified mitochondria in vitro. The predictions indicated that the survival probability strongly depended on morphological changes of individual mitochondria and was inversely correlated to the fission and fusion rates. This work provided a new insight into quantifying the mitochondrial dynamics via monitoring the evolution of the mitochondrial volume.

  13. A conceptual framework for time and space scale interactions in the climate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehl, G.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States); Lukas, R. [University of Hawaii (United States); Kiladis, G.N. [NOAA Aeronomy Lab (United States); Weickmann, K.M. [NOAA Climate Diagnostics Center (United States); Matthews, A.J. [University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Wheeler, M. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (Australia)

    2001-07-01

    Interactions involving various time and space scales, both within the tropics and between the tropics and midlatitudes, are ubiquitous in the climate system. We propose a conceptual framework for understanding such interactions whereby longer time scales and larger space scales set the base state for processes on shorter time scales and smaller space scales, which in turn have an influence back on the longer time scales and larger space scales in a continuum of process-related interactions. Though not intended to be comprehensive, we do cite examples from the literature to provide evidence for the validity of this framework. Decadal time scale base states of the coupled climate system set the context for the manifestation of interannual time scales (El Nino/Southern Oscillation, ENSO and tropospheric biennial oscillation, TBO) which are influenced by and interact with the annual cycle and seasonal time scales. Those base states in turn influence the large-scale coupled processes involved with intraseasonal and submonthly time scales, tied to interactions within the tropics and extratropics, and tropical-midlatitude teleconnections. All of these set the base state for processes on the synoptic and mesoscale and regional/local space scales. Events at those relatively short time scales and small space scales may then affect the longer time scale and larger space scale processes in turn, reaching back out to submonthly, intraseasonal, seasonal, annual, TBO, ENSO and decadal. Global coupled models can capture some elements of the decadal, ENSO, TBO, annual and seasonal time scales with the associated global space scales. However, coupled models are less successful at simulating phenomena at subseasonal and shorter time scales with hemispheric and smaller space scales. In the context of the proposed conceptual framework, the synergistic interactions of the time and space scales suggest that a high priority must be placed on improved simulations of all of the time and

  14. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I. [Institute of Applied Physics of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  15. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V; Nekorkin, Vladimir I

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  16. Asymptotic Expansions of Backward Equations for Two-time-scale Markov Chains in Continuous Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G Yin; Dung Tien Nguyen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops asymptotic expansions for solutions of systems of backward equations of timeinhomogeneons Markov chains in continuous time. Owing to the rapid progress in technology and the increasing complexity in modeling, the underlying Markov chains often have large state spaces, which make the computational tasks infeasible. To reduce the complexity, two-time-scale formulations are used. By introducing a small parameter ε> 0 and using suitable decomposition and aggregation procedures, it is formulated as a singular perturbation problem. Both Markov chains having recurrent states only and Markov chains including also transient states are treated. Under certain weak irreducibility and smoothness conditions of the generators, the desired asymptotic expansions are constructed. Then error bounds are obtained.

  17. Time-resolved and time-scale adaptive measures of spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, Thomas; Greschner, Martin; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of approaches to estimate the degree of synchrony between two or more spike trains have been proposed. One of the most recent methods is the ISI-distance which extracts information from the interspike intervals (ISIs) by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous firing rates. In contrast to most previously proposed measures it is parameter free and time-scale independent. However, it is not well suited to track changes in synchrony that are based on spike coincidences. Here we propose the SPIKE-distance, a complementary measure which is sensitive to spike coincidences but still shares the fundamental advantages of the ISI-distance. In particular, it is easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner and can be extended to a method that is also applicable to larger sets of spike trains. We show the merit of the SPIKE-distance using both simulated and real data.

  18. Time-resolved and time-scale adaptive measures of spike train synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Greschner, Martin; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2011-01-30

    A wide variety of approaches to estimate the degree of synchrony between two or more spike trains have been proposed. One of the most recent methods is the ISI-distance which extracts information from the interspike intervals (ISIs) by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous firing rates. In contrast to most previously proposed measures it is parameter free and time-scale independent. However, it is not well suited to track changes in synchrony that are based on spike coincidences. Here we propose the SPIKE-distance, a complementary measure which is sensitive to spike coincidences but still shares the fundamental advantages of the ISI-distance. In particular, it is easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner and can be extended to a method that is also applicable to larger sets of spike trains. We show the merit of the SPIKE-distance using both simulated and real data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fission Fragment characterization with FALSTAFF at NFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pancin J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutrons for Science (NFS facility will be one of the first installations of the SPIRAL2 facility. NFS will be composed of a time-of-flight baseline and irradiation stations and will allow studying neutron-induced reactions for energies going from some hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Continuous and quasi-monoenergetic energy neutron beams will be available. Taking advantage of this new installation, the development of an experimental setup for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments in this energy domain has been undertaken. To achieve this goal a new detection system called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the STudy of Actinide Fission Fragments in under development. In this paper, the characteristics of the NFS facility will be exposed and the motivations for the FALSTAFF experiment will be presented. The experimental setup will be described and the expected resolutions based on realistic GEANT4 simulations will be discussed.

  20. FALSTAFF: A new tool for fission studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dore D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The future NFS installation will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Taking advantage of this facility, data of particular interest for the nuclear community in view of the development of the fast reactor technology will be measured. The development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments has been undertaken. Fission fragment isotopic yields and associated neutron multiplicities will be measured as a function of the neutron energy. Based on time-of-flight and residual energy technique, the setup will allow the simultaneous measurement of the complementary fragments velocity and energy. The performances of TOF detectors of FALSTAFF will be presented and expected resolutions for fragment masses and neutron multiplicities, based on realistic simulations, will be shown.

  1. Noether theorem for nonholonomic nonconservative mechanical systems in phase space on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qi-hang; Zhu, Jian-qing

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on studying the Noether theorem for nonholonomic nonconservative mechanical systems in phase space on time scales. First, the Hamilton equations of nonholonomic nonconservative systems on time scales are established, which is based on the Lagrange equations for nonholonomic systems on time scales. Then, based upon the quasi-invariance of Hamilton action of systems under the infinitesimal transformations with respect to the time and generalized coordinate on time scale, the Noether identity and the conserved quantity of nonholonomic nonconservative systems on time scales are obtained. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the application of the results.

  2. Multiple time scales and the lifetime coefficient of variation: engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordonsky, K B; Gertsbakh, I

    1997-01-01

    We consider linear combinations of "natural" time scales and choose the "best" one which provides the minimum coefficient of variation of the lifetime. Our time scale is in fact a generalized Miner time scale because the latter is based on an appropriate weighting of the times spent on low and high level loadings. The suggested modus operandi for finding the "best" time scale has many features in common with the approach suggested by Farewell and Cox (1979) and Oakes (1995) which is devoted to multiple time scales in survival analysis.

  3. An Evaporation-Based Model of Thermal Neutron Induced Ternary Fission of Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestone, J. P.

    Ternary fission probabilities for thermal neutron induced fission of plutonium are analyzed within the framework of an evaporation-based model where the complexity of time-varying potentials, associated with the neck collapse, are included in a simplistic fashion. If the nuclear temperature at scission and the fission-neck-collapse time are assumed to be ~1.2 MeV and ~10^-22 s, respectively, then calculated relative probabilities of ternary-fission light-charged-particle emission follow the trends seen in the experimental data. The ability of this model to reproduce ternary fission probabilities spanning seven orders of magnitude for a wide range of light-particle charges and masses implies that ternary fission is caused by the coupling of an evaporation-like process with the rapid re-arrangement of the nuclear fluid following scission.

  4. An evaporation-based model of thermal neutron induced ternary fission of plutonium

    CERN Document Server

    Lestone, J P

    2007-01-01

    Ternary fission probabilities for thermal neutron induced fission of plutonium are analyzed within the framework of an evaporation-based model where the complexity of time-varying potentials, associated with the neck collapse, are included in a simplistic fashion. If the nuclear temperature at scission and the fission-neck-collapse time are assumed to be ~1.2 MeV and ~10^-22 s, respectively, then calculated relative probabilities of ternary-fission light-charged-particle emission follow the trends seen in the experimental data. The ability of this model to reproduce ternary fission probabilities spanning seven orders of magnitude for a wide range of light-particle charges and masses implies that ternary fission is caused by the coupling of an evaporation-like process with the rapid re-arrangement of the nuclear fluid following scission.

  5. Two-phase micro- and macro-time scales in particle-laden turbulent channel flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Wang; Michael Manhart

    2012-01-01

    The micro- and macro-time scales in two-phase turbulent channel flows are investigated using the direct numerical simulation and the Lagrangian particle trajectory methods for the fluid- and the particle-phases,respectively.Lagrangian and Eulerian time scales of both phases are calculated using velocity correlation functions.Due to flow anisotropy,micro-time scales are not the same with the theoretical estimations in large Reynolds number (isotropic) turbulence.Lagrangian macro-time scales of particle-phase and of fluid-phase seen by particles are both dependent on particle Stokes number.The fluid-phase Lagrangian integral time scales increase with distance from the wall,longer than those time scales seen by particles.The Eulerian integral macro-time scales increase in near-wall regions but decrease in out-layer regions.The moving Eulerian time scales are also investigated and compared with Lagrangian integral time scales,and in good agreement with previous measurements and numerical predictions.For the fluid particles the micro Eulerian time scales are longer than the Lagrangian ones in the near wall regions,while away from the walls the micro Lagrangian time scales are longer.The Lagrangian integral time scales are longer than the Eulerian ones.The results are useful for further understanding two-phase flow physics and especially for constructing accurate prediction models of inertial particle dispersion.

  6. History and Actual State of Non-HEU Fission-Based Mo-99 Production with Low-Performance Research Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dittrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years ago, one of the worldwide first industrial production processes to produce fission-Mo-99 for medical use had been started at ZfK Rossendorf (now: HZDR, Germany. On the occasion of this anniversary, it is worth to mention that this original process (called LITEMOL now together with its target concept used at that time can still be applied. LITEMOL can be adapted very easily to various research reactors and applied at each site, which maybe still of interest for very small-scale producers. Besides this original process, two further and actually proven processes are suitable as well and recommended for small-scale LEU fission Mo-99 production also. They are known under the names KSA/KSS COMPACT and ROMOL LITE and will be described below.

  7. Simulating an Exploding Fission-Bomb Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent desktop-computer simulation of the core of an exploding fission bomb (nuclear weapon) has been developed. The simulation models a core comprising a mixture of two isotopes: a fissile one (such as U-235) and an inert one (such as U-238) that captures neutrons and removes them from circulation. The user sets the enrichment percentage and scattering and fission cross-sections of the fissile isotope, the capture cross-section of the inert isotope, the number of neutrons liberated per fission, the number of ``initiator'' neutrons, the radius of the core, and the neutron-reflection efficiency of a surrounding tamper. The simulation, which is predicated on ordinary kinematics, follows the three-dimensional motions and fates of neutrons as they travel through the core. Limitations of time and computer memory render it impossible to model a real-life core, but results of numerous runs clearly demonstrate the existence of a critical mass for a given set of parameters and the dramatic effects of enrichment and tamper efficiency on the growth (or decay) of the neutron population. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  8. Parity violation in ternary fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönnenwein, F.; Belozerov, A. V.; Beda, A. G.; Burov, S. I.; Danilyan, G. V.; Martem'yanov, A. N.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shchenev, V. A.; Bondarenko, L. N.; Mostovoĭ, Yu. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Last, J.; Schreckenbach, K.

    1994-01-01

    The parity-violating correlation between incoming neutron spin and fragment momentum has been measured simultaneously for binary and ternary fission of 233U(n, f) and 239Pu(n, f). The experiment has been performed with a polarized cold neutron beam of the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble/France. The ratios of the parity-violating asymmetry coefficients, α ternf and α binnf, for ternary and binary fission, respectively, are found to be {α ternf}/{α binnf = 1.05 ± 0.10 } and 1.12 ± 0.08 for the 233U and 239Pu target nucleus, respectively. Both experiments are compatible with {α ternf}/{α binnf = 1 }. The implications of this result for models of ternary fission are discussed. The conclusion drawn is that ternary particles are emitted at the very last stage of fission.

  9. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  10. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); Shaw et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 044612 (2000)] and argue that the nuclear viscosity parameter has no apparent dependence on temperature. However, it may depend upon the deformation of the nucleus.

  11. Kinematic Correlation of the Ternary Fission for the System 197Au + 197Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junlong; Li, Xian; Yan, Shiwei; Wu, Xizhen; Li, Zhuxia

    Collisions of very heavy nuclei 197Au + 197Au at the energy of 15A MeV has been studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The experimental mass distributions of ternary fission fragments for the system 197Au + 197 Au are reproduced well. The direct and sequential ternary fission modes are studied by the time dependent snapshots of typical ternary events. The analysis of deviation from Viola systematics indicates the nonstatistical feature of the ternary fission in these reactions.

  12. Neutron angular distribution in plutonium-240 spontaneous fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Shin, Tony H.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear safeguards applications require accurate fission models that exhibit prompt neutron anisotropy. In the laboratory reference frame, an anisotropic neutron angular distribution is observed because prompt fission neutrons carry momentum from fully accelerated fission fragments. A liquid organic scintillation detector array was used with pulse shape discrimination techniques to produce neutron-neutron cross-correlation time distributions and angular distributions from spontaneous fission in a 252Cf, a 0.84 g 240Pueff metal, and a 1.63 g 240Pueff metal sample. The effect of cross-talk, estimated with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, is removed from neutron-neutron coincidences as a function of the angle between detector pairs. Fewer coincidences were observed at detector angles near 90°, relative to higher and lower detector angles. As light output threshold increases, the observed anisotropy increases due to spectral effects arising from fission fragment momentum transfer to emitted neutrons. Stronger anisotropy was observed in Cf-252 spontaneous fission prompt neutrons than in Pu-240 neutrons.

  13. Study of Pre-equilibrium Fission Based on Diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In terms of numerical method of Smoluchowski equation the behavior of fission process in diffusion model has been described and analyzed, including the reliance upon time, as well as the deformation parameters at several nuclear temperatures in this paper. The fission rates and the residual probabilities inside the saddle point are calculated for fissile nucleus n+238 U reaction and un-fissile nucleus p+208 Pb reaction. The results indicate that there really exists a transient fission process, which means that the pre-equilibrium fission should be taken into account for the fissile nucleus at the high temperature. Oppositely, the pre-equilibrium fission could be neglected for the un-fissile nucleus. In the certain case the overshooting phenomenon of the fission rates will occur, which is mainly determined by the diffusive current at the saddle point. The higher the temperature is, the more obvious the overshooting phenomenon is. However, the emissions of the light particles accompanying the diffusion process may weaken or vanish the overshooting phenomenon.

  14. Changes in channel morphology over human time scales [Chapter 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Buffington

    2012-01-01

    Rivers are exposed to changing environmental conditions over multiple spatial and temporal scales, with the imposed environmental conditions and response potential of the river modulated to varying degrees by human activity and our exploitation of natural resources. Watershed features that control river morphology include topography (valley slope and channel...

  15. Mapping Playgrids for Learning across Space, Time, and Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollett, Ty; Kalir, Jeremiah H.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the production of learner-generated playgrids. Playgrids are produced when learners knit together social media tools to participate across settings and scales, accomplish their goals, pursue interests, and make their learning more enjoyable and personally meaningful. Through case study methodology we examine how two…

  16. Space-time modeling of catchment scale drought characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallaksen, L.; Hisdal, H.; Lanen, van H.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Drought may affect all components of the water cycle and covers commonly a large part of the catchment area. This paper examines drought propagation at the catchment scale using spatially aggregated drought characteristics and illustrates the importance of catchment processes in modifying the

  17. Input-output description of linear systems with multiple time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriz, R. S.; Sastry, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the study of systems evolving at multiple time-scales is simplified by studying reduced-order models of these systems valid at specific time-scales. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of results on the time-scale decomposition of autonomous systems to that of input-output systems. The results are employed to study conditions under which positive realness of a transfer function is preserved under singular perturbation. Attention is given to the perturbation theory for linear operators, the multiple time-scale structure of autonomous linear systems, the input-output description of two time-scale linear systems, the positive realness of two time-scale systems, and multiple time-scale linear systems.

  18. Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of 23Na and NatFe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Investigation of cosmic rays in very short time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, J.; Valtonen, E.; Torsti, J. J.; Arvela, H.; Lumme, M.; Nieminen, M.; Vainikka, E.

    1985-01-01

    A fast databuffer system, where cosmic ray events in the Turku hadron spectrometer, including particle arrival times are recorded with time resolution of 100 ns was constructed. The databuffer can be read continuously by a microprocessor, which preanalyzes the data and transfers it to the main computer. The time span, that can be analyzed in every detail, is a few seconds. The high time resolution enables a study of time correlated groups of high energy particles. In addition the operational characteristics of the spectrometer can be monitored in detail.

  20. Grasping Deep Time with Scaled Space in Personal Environs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Deep time comprises the deep past before written history all the way back to the Big Bang as well as the deep future from the time of our grandchildren and beyond the lifetime of our Sun. Numerous installations called time walks or geology paths have previously been designed to communicate...... of modern man, the age of dinosaurs ended at 650 m and the Big Bang is 137 km away. This choice obviously makes mental calculations easy, and all of time fits inside a geographical area of moderate size and so helps the citizen gain ownership to this learning tool and hence to time. The idea was tested...

  1. The quantum coherent mechanism for singlet fission: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai-Lun; Berkelbach, Timothy C; Provorse, Makenzie R; Monahan, Nicholas R; Tritsch, John R; Hybertsen, Mark S; Reichman, David R; Gao, Jiali; Zhu, X-Y

    2013-06-18

    The absorption of one photon by a semiconductor material usually creates one electron-hole pair. However, this general rule breaks down in a few organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene, where one photon absorption may result in two electron-hole pairs. This process, where a singlet exciton transforms to two triplet excitons, can have quantum yields as high as 200%. Singlet fission may be useful to solar cell technologies to increase the power conversion efficiency beyond the so-called Shockley-Queisser limit. Through time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy in crystalline pentacene and tetracene, our lab has recently provided the first spectroscopic signatures in singlet fission of a critical intermediate known as the multiexciton state (also called a correlated triplet pair). More importantly, we found that population of the multiexciton state rises at the same time as the singlet state on the ultrafast time scale upon photoexcitation. This observation does not fit with the traditional view of singlet fission involving the incoherent conversion of a singlet to a triplet pair. However, it provides an experimental foundation for a quantum coherent mechanism in which the electronic coupling creates a quantum superposition of the singlet and the multiexciton state immediately after optical excitation. In this Account, we review key experimental findings from TR-2PPE experiments and present a theoretical analysis of the quantum coherent mechanism based on electronic structural and density matrix calculations for crystalline tetracene lattices. Using multistate density functional theory, we find that the direct electronic coupling between singlet and multiexciton states is too weak to explain the experimental observation. Instead, indirect coupling via charge transfer intermediate states is two orders of magnitude stronger, and dominates the dynamics for ultrafast multiexciton formation. Density matrix calculation for the crystalline

  2. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  3. NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Possible Mechanisms of Ternary Fission in the 197Au+197 Au System at 15 AMeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Long; Li, Xian; Wu, Xi-Zhen; Li, Zhu-Xia; Yan, Shi-Wei

    2009-06-01

    Ternary fission in 197Au+197Au collisions at 15 A MeV is investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamical (ImQMD) model. The experimental mass distributions for each of the three fragments are reproduced for the first time without any freely adjusting parameters. The mechanisms of ternary fission in central and semi-central collisions are dynamically studied. In direct prolate ternary fission, two necks are found to be formed almost simultaneously and rupture sequentially in a very short time interval. Direct oblate ternary fission is a very rare fission event, in which three necks are formed and rupture simultaneously, forming three equally sized fragments along space-symmetric directions in the reaction plane. In sequential ternary fission a binary division is followed by another binary fission event after hundreds of fm/c.

  4. Possible Mechanisms of Ternary Fission in the 197Au+197Au System at 15 A MeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Jun-Long; LI Xian; WU Xi-Zhen; LI Zhu-Xia; YAN Shi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Ternary fission in 197Au+197Au collisions at 15A MeV is investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamical (ImQMD) model.The experimental mass distributions for each of the three fragments are reproduced for the first time without any freely adjusting parameters.The mechanisms of ternary fission in central and semicentral collisions are dynamically studied.In direct prolate ternary fission,two necks are found to be formed almost simultaneously and rupture sequentially in a very short time interval.Direct oblate ternary fission is a very rare fission event,in which three necks are formed and rupture simultaneously,forming three equally sized fragments along space-symmetric directions in the reaction plane.In sequential ternary fission a binary division is followed by another binary fission event after hundreds of fm/c.

  5. Exploring large scale time-series data using nested timelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zaixian; Ward, Matthew O.; Rundensteiner, Elke A.

    2013-01-01

    When data analysts study time-series data, an important task is to discover how data patterns change over time. If the dataset is very large, this task becomes challenging. Researchers have developed many visualization techniques to help address this problem. However, little work has been done regarding the changes of multivariate patterns, such as linear trends and clusters, on time-series data. In this paper, we describe a set of history views to fill this gap. This technique works under two modes: merge and non-merge. For the merge mode, merge algorithms were applied to selected time windows to generate a change-based hierarchy. Contiguous time windows having similar patterns are merged first. Users can choose different levels of merging with the tradeoff between more details in the data and less visual clutter in the visualizations. In the non-merge mode, the framework can use natural hierarchical time units or one defined by domain experts to represent timelines. This can help users navigate across long time periods. Gridbased views were designed to provide a compact overview for the history data. In addition, MDS pattern starfields and distance maps were developed to enable users to quickly investigate the degree of pattern similarity among different time periods. The usability evaluation demonstrated that most participants could understand the concepts of the history views correctly and finished assigned tasks with a high accuracy and relatively fast response time.

  6. Characteristic time-scales for macroscopic quantum tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Panciatichi 64, 50127 Florence (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Cacciari, I. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Sandri, P. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Ottica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Ranfagni, C. [Facolta di Scienze Matematiche, Fisiche e Naturali, Corso di Laurea in Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: r.ruggeri@ifac.cnr.it; Agresti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Florence (Italy)

    2005-08-22

    Tunneling time ({tau}{sub t}), in its real and imaginary parts, can be deduced from measurements of decay time ({tau}{sub d}) in Josephson junctions. It turns out that the real part of {tau}{sub t} is much shorter than the imaginary one, which can be identified with the semiclassical time. A third quantity is the Zeno-time ({tau}{sub Z}) which, in turn, can be estimated from the previous ones, since it is approximately given by their geometrical mean. The possibility of observing the Zeno-effect is then discussed.

  7. Some aspects of the nuclear fission process; Quelques aspects du processus de fission nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netter, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    In the following report one can find first a short general view on the present situation of our knowledge concerning the nuclear fission process, namely on the nucleus going through the saddle-point. Then there are some aspects connected with the excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus. The measurements made at Saclay on the fast neutron fission cross-section of U{sup 233}, U{sup 235}, Pu{sup 239}, U{sup 238} are described at the beginning of this work. It appears that for U{sup 233} there is some characteristic shape modulation of the cross-section curve, in relation with the collective excited state of the deformed nucleus at the saddle-point. Good evidence of this is also given by the study of the relative fission rate with emission of long-range particles; it appears also that this ternary fission rate does not change substantially for neutron between thermal energy and 2 MeV, but that is very lower for the compound nucleus U{sup 239} than for even-even compound nuclei. At the end there are some experiments on the strong 4,5 MeV gamma-ray originated by slow neutron absorption in U{sup 235}. Time-of-flight device is used to establish that this 4,5 MeV gamma-ray seems mostly connected with radiative capture. (author) [French] Le present travail debute par un apercu de l'etat actuel de nos connaissances sur le processus de fission nucleaire, notamment sur le passage par le point-seuil. Puis sont evoques des aspects lies au niveau d'energie d'excitation auquel est porte le noyau qui subit la fission. Les mesures de sections efficaces de fission induite dans {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu et {sup 238}U par des neutrons rapides effectuees a Saclay sont decrites en premier lieu; elles font apparaitre pour {sup 233}U une ondulation caracteristique du role des etats collectifs d'excitation du noyau deforme au point-seuil. Des experiences sur la fission avec emission de particules de long parcours confirment cet aspect tout en demontrant que

  8. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    Prompt fission neutrons are one of the strongest signatures of the fission process. Depending on the fission inducing radiation, their average number ranges from 2.5 to 4 neutrons per fission. They are more energetic and abundant, by about 2 orders of magnitude, than the delayed neutrons (≈3 vs. ≈0.01) that are commonly used as indicators for the presence of fissionable materials. The detection of fission prompt neutrons, however, has to be done in the presence of extremely intense probing radiation that stimulated them. During irradiation, the fission stimulation radiation, X-rays or neutrons, overwhelms the neutron detectors and temporarily incapacitate them. Consequently, by the time the detectors recover from the source radiation, fission prompt neutrons are no longer emitted. In order to measure the prompt fission signatures under these circumstances, special measures are usually taken with the detectors such as heavy shielding with collimation, use of inefficient geometries, high pulse height bias and gamma-neutron separation via pulse-shape discrimination with an appropriate organic scintillator. These attempts to shield the detector from the flash of radiation result in a major loss of sensitivity. It can lead to a complete inability to detect the fission prompt neutrons. In order to overcome the blinding induced background from the source radiation, the detection of prompt fission neutrons needs to occur long after the fission event and after the detector has fully recovered from the source overload. A new approach to achieve this is to detect the delayed activation induced by the fission neutrons. The approach demonstrates a good sensitivity in adverse overload situations (gamma and neutron "flash") where fission prompt neutrons could normally not be detected. The new approach achieves the required temporal separation between the detection of prompt neutrons and the detector overload by the neutron activation of the detector material. The technique

  9. Nuclear multifragmentation and fission: similarity and differences

    CERN Document Server

    Karnaukhov, V; Avdeyev, S; Rodionov, V; Kirakosyan, V; Simonenko, A; Rukoyatkin, P; Budzanowski, A; Karcz, W; Skwirczynska, I; Czech, B; Chulkov, L; Kuzmin, E; Norbeck, E; Botvina, A

    2006-01-01

    Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid--fog phase transition deep inside the spinodal region. The experimental data for p(8.1GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed. It is concluded that the decay process of hot nuclei is characterized by two size parameters: transition state and freeze-out volumes. The similarity between dynamics of fragmentation and ordinary fission is discussed. The IMF emission time is related to the mean rupture time at the multi-scission point, which corresponds to the kinetic freeze-out configuration.

  10. Time Evolution of Galaxy Scaling Relations in Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We predict the evolution of galaxy scaling relationships from cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations, that reproduce the scaling relations of present-day galaxies. Although we do not assume co-evolution between galaxies and black holes a priori, we are able to reproduce the black hole mass--velocity dispersion relation. This relation does not evolve, and black holes actually grow along the relation from significantly less massive seeds than have previously been used. AGN feedback does not very much affect the chemical evolution of our galaxies. In our predictions, the stellar mass--metallicity relation does not change its shape, but the metallicity significantly increases from $z\\sim2$ to $z\\sim1$, while the gas-phase mass-metallicity relation does change shape, having a steeper slope at higher redshifts ($z\\lesssim3$). Furthermore, AGN feedback is required to reproduce observations of the most massive galaxies at $z\\lesssim1$, specifically their positions on the star formation main sequence and galaxy mass...

  11. Fission gas in thoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Ghosh, Partha S.; Galvin, Conor O. T.; Arya, Ashok K.; Dutta, Bijon K.; Dey, Gautam K.; Grimes, Robin W.

    2017-03-01

    The fission gases Xe and Kr, formed during normal reactor operation, are known to degrade fuel performance, particularly at high burn-up. Using first-principles density functional theory together with a dispersion correction (DFT + D), in ThO2 we calculate the energetics of neutral and charged point defects, the di-vacancy (DV), different neutral tri-vacancies (NTV), the charged tetravacancy (CTV) defect cluster geometries and their interaction with Xe and Kr. The most favourable incorporation point defect site for Xe or Kr in defective ThO2 is the fully charged thorium vacancy. The lowest energy NTV in larger supercells of ThO2 is NTV3, however, a single Xe atom is most stable when accommodated within a NTV1. The di-vacancy (DV) is a significantly less favoured incorporation site than the NTV1 but the CTV offers about the same incorporation energy. Incorporation of a second gas atom in a NTV is a high energy process and more unfavourable than accommodation within an existing Th vacancy. The bi-NTV (BNTV) cluster geometry studied will accommodate one or two gas atoms with low incorporation energies but the addition of a third gas atom incurs a high energy penalty. The tri-NTV cluster (TNTV) forms a larger space which accommodates three gas atoms but again there is a penalty to accommodate a fourth gas atom. By considering the energy to form the defect sites, solution energies were generated showing that in ThO2-x the most favourable solution equilibrium site is the NTV1 while in ThO2 it is the DV.

  12. Implementation of Time-Scale Transformation Based on Continuous Wavelet Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The basic objective of time-scale transformation is to compress or expand the signal in time field while keeping the same spectral properties.This paper presents two methods to derive time-scale transformation formula based on continuous wavelet transform.For an arbitrary given square-integrable function f(t),g(t) = f(t/λ) is derived by continuous wavelet transform and its inverse transform.The result shows that time-scale transformation may be obtained through the modification of the time-scale of wavelet function filter using equivalent substitution. The paper demonstrates the result by theoretic derivations and experimental simulation.

  13. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  14. Weak microlensing effect and stability of pulsar time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, M S

    2006-01-01

    An influence of the weak microlensing effect on the pulsar timing is investigated for pulsar B1937+21. Average residuals of Time of Arrival (TOA) due to the effect would be as large as 10 ns in 20 years observation span. These residuals can be much greater (up to 1 ms in 20 years span) if pulsar is located in globular cluster (or behind it).

  15. Experimental approach to fission process of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    From experimental views, it seems likely that the mechanism of nuclear fission process remains unsolved even after the Bohr and Weeler`s study in 1939. Especially, it is marked in respect of mass distribution in unsymmetric nuclear fission. The energy dependency of mass distribution can be explained with an assumption of 2-mode nuclear fission. Further, it was demonstrated that the symmetrical fission components and the unsymmetrical ones have different saddle and fission points. Thus, the presence of the 2-mode fission mechanism was confirmed. Here, transition in the nuclear fission mechanism and its cause were investigated here. As the cause of such transition, plausible four causes; a contribution of multiple-chance fission, disappearance of shell effects, beginning of fission following collective excitation due to GDR and nuclear phase transition were examined in the condition of excitation energy of 14.0 MeV. And it was suggested that the transition in the nuclear fission concerned might be related to phase transition. In addition, the mechanism of nuclear fission at a low energy and multi-mode hypothesis were examined by determination of the energy for thermal neutron fission ({sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and spontaneous nuclear fission ({sup 252}Cf). (M.N.)

  16. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  17. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Catalin V.; Oprisan, Sorinel A.

    2013-01-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion (interval timing) based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher-order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively-connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. PMID:23518297

  18. Low-background detection of fission neutrons produced by pulsed neutron interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Flammang, Robert W.; Seidel, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements designed to detect shielded Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) have been carried out using a pulsed 8.5-MeV neutron source. Fission-neutron counts were detected as a function of time in the intervals between 100-μs neutron bursts at burst frequencies of 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. The pulse timing sequences were chosen to optimize detection of fission neutrons produced by thermal-neutron-induced fission in the SNM. Fission neutrons were detected directly as proton, carbon, and silicon recoils in silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor fast neutron detectors. SiC detectors recorded neutron counts during and immediately following the source neutron bursts, allowing detection of fission neutrons with short (120 μs) die-away times. The SiC detectors demonstrated excellent background discrimination with more than 2000 neutron counts observed in time intervals where zero background counts were detected.

  19. Radioactive wastes from {sup 99}Mo production by nuclear fission according to the irradiation time; Rejeitos radioativos gerados na producao de {sup 99}Mo por fissao nuclear, em funcao dos tempos de irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiromoto, Goro; Dellamano, Jose Claudio, E-mail: hiromoto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    One of the premises, provided for in Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor, is a {sup 99} Mo production facility by nuclear fission. In this study, it was verified the influence of tow parameters, the mass of {sup 235}U and the irradiation time of the target, in the total activity of radioactive wastes generated by the process. The simulation was performed using the computational code Origen S®, considering that the target would be composed of an alloy of UAl{sub x} with {sup 235}U enriched to 19.9% and irradiated in a flux of thermal neutrons of 1 x 10{sup 14} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} for the production of 185 TBq of {sup 99}Mo per week. The results obtained for 3 to 21 days of continuous irradiation targets with different masses of {sup 235}U show that the amount of radioactive waste generated in terms of activity, does not seem to be dominant aspect to be considered in the choice for the {sup 99}Mo production parameters, since it was observed an increase of a factor of at most 4 in the total activity of the wastes over the 100,000 years considered.

  20. Modelling financial markets with agents competing on different time scales and with different amount of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, Johannes; Andersen, Jørgen Vitting

    2006-05-01

    We use agent-based models to study the competition among investors who use trading strategies with different amount of information and with different time scales. We find that mixing agents that trade on the same time scale but with different amount of information has a stabilizing impact on the large and extreme fluctuations of the market. Traders with the most information are found to be more likely to arbitrage traders who use less information in the decision making. On the other hand, introducing investors who act on two different time scales has a destabilizing effect on the large and extreme price movements, increasing the volatility of the market. Closeness in time scale used in the decision making is found to facilitate the creation of local trends. The larger the overlap in commonly shared information the more the traders in a mixed system with different time scales are found to profit from the presence of traders acting at another time scale than themselves.

  1. Advanced model for the prediction of the neutron-rich fission product yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubchenya V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consistent models for the description of the independent fission product formation cross sections in the spontaneous fission and in the neutron and proton induced fission at the energies up to 100 MeV is developed. This model is a combination of new version of the two-component exciton model and a time-dependent statistical model for fusion-fission process with inclusion of dynamical effects for accurate calculations of nucleon composition and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus at the scission point. For each member of the compound nucleus ensemble at the scission point, the primary fission fragment characteristics: kinetic and excitation energies and their yields are calculated using the scission-point fission model with inclusion of the nuclear shell and pairing effects, and multimodal approach. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chains was considered as a result of the frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear matter density at the scission point with the finite neck radius. Model parameters were obtained from the comparison of the predicted independent product fission yields with the experimental results and with the neutron-rich fission product data measured with a Penning trap at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFLTRAP.

  2. Ternary fission of superheavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, M.; Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Manimaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ternary fission of superheavy nuclei is studied within the three-cluster model potential energy surfaces (PESs). Due to shell effects, the stability of superheavy nuclei has been predicted to be associated with Z =114 , 120, and 126 for protons and N =184 for neutrons. Taking some representative nuclei we have extended the ternary fission studies to superheavy nuclei. We adopted two minimization procedures to minimize the potential and considered different arrangements of the fragments. The PES from one-dimensional minimization reveals a strong cluster region favoring various ternary breakups for an arrangement in which the lightest fragment is kept at the center. The PES obtained from two-dimensional minimization reveals strong preference of ternary fragmentation in the true ternary fission region. Though the dominant decay mode of superheavy nuclei is α decay, the α -accompanied ternary breakup is found to be a nonfavorable one. Further, the prominent ternary combinations are found to be associated with the neutron magic number.

  3. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  4. Considering Time-Scale Requirements for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    to correct for the annual seasonal variation in the Earth’s rotational speed and is rarely used today. 4 20 " 15 .. Equation of Time 0 0 I 10 ID...York, 1960. R. Coutrez, ’Transactions of the International Astronomical Union." Ciel et Terre , Vol. 73, 1957, pp. 472. S. Newcomb, Tables of the

  5. Beach morphological variations over micro-time scales

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, C.S.; Veerayya, M.; Sastry, J.S.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    and down the beach face with breakers, locations of which alternately shift landward and seaward with the rise and fall of tide are observed. The ground water table shows an oscillation with tide with a time lag of about 1 hr. When the ground water table...

  6. Perception of short time scale intervals in a hypnotic virtuoso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Arstila, Valtteri; Wearden, John H.; Kallio, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hypnotized individuals underestimate temporal intervals in the range of several seconds to tens of minutes. However, no previous work has investigated whether duration perception is equally disorderly when shorter time intervals are probed. In this study, duration percep

  7. Coherent spectroscopies on ultrashort time and length scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Three spectroscopic techniques are presented that provide simultaneous spatial and temporal resolution: modified confocal microscopy with heterodyne detection, space-time-resolved spectroscopy using coherent control concepts, and coherent two-dimensional nano-spectroscopy. Latest experimental results are discussed.

  8. Time Scales in the JPL and CfA Ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past decades, the IAU has repeatedly attempted to correct its definition of the basic fundamental argument used in the emphemerides. Finally, they have defined a time system which is physically possible, according to the accepted standard theory of gravitation.

  9. Perception of short time scale intervals in a hypnotic virtuoso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noreika, Valdas; Falter, Christine M.; Arstila, Valtteri; Wearden, John H.; Kallio, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hypnotized individuals underestimate temporal intervals in the range of several seconds to tens of minutes. However, no previous work has investigated whether duration perception is equally disorderly when shorter time intervals are probed. In this study, duration

  10. Does expressive timing in music performance scale proportionally with tempo?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.; Honing, H.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence is presented that expressive timing in music is not relationally invariant with global tempo. Our results stem from an analysis of repeated performances of Beethoven's variations on a Paisiello theme. Recordings were made of two pianists playing the pieces at three tempi. In contrast with t

  11. Influence of the angular momentum on nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, Masashi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-03-01

    The effects of the angular momentum on the mechanism of nuclear fission are studied about the reaction systems of compound nucleus of {sup 210}P and {sup 239}Np by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The reaction systems in this work are {sup 209}Bi+P, {sup 206}Pb+{alpha}, {sup 206}Po+{alpha}, {sup 198}Pt+{sup 12}C, {sup 238}U+P and {sup 232}Th+{sup 7}Li. Target was prepared by vacuum evaporating of each about 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of {sup 209}Bi, {sup 206}Pb and {sup 198}Pt on 10 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of carbon film. On compound nucleus {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Po fissions at Ex=45McV but it fissions after 1 or 2 neutrons emission at higher excited energy (Ex=57 MeV). TKE shows almost the same values except higher value of {sup 209}Bi+P. The decreasing tendency of width of TKE distribution with increasing the angular momentum is found at the first time in this work. The effect of the angular momentum on the fission is small in the case of low angular momentum. On the compound nucleus {sup 239}Np, the effects are shown at the asymmetric fission part of the mass distribution. (S.Y.)

  12. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  13. Tagging fast neutrons from a 252Cf fission-fragment source

    CERN Document Server

    Scherzinger, Julius; Annand, John; Fissum, Kevin; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Mauritzson, Nicholai; Messi, Francesco; Perrey, Hanno; Rofors, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Coincidence and time-of-flight measurement techniques are employed to tag fission neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source. Fission fragments detected in a gaseous 4He scintillator detector supply the tag. Neutrons are detected in a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector. The resulting continuous polychromatic beam of tagged neutrons has an energy dependence that agrees qualitatively with expectations.

  14. Strong light fields coax intramolecular reactions on femtosecond time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Mathur, D

    2004-01-01

    Energetic H$_2^+$ ions are formed as a result of intra-molecular rearrangement during fragmentation of linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, and dodecanol) induced by intense optical fields produced by 100 fs long, infrared, laser pulses of peak intensity 8$\\times10^{15}$ W cm$^{-2}$. Polarization dependent measurements show, counterintuitively, that rearrangement is induced by the strong optical field within a single laser pulse, and that it occurs before Coulomb explosion of the field-ionized multiply charged alcohols.

  15. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  16. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  17. Simultaneous storm time equatorward and poleward large-scale TIDs on a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habarulema, John Bosco; Katamzi, Zama Thobeka; Yizengaw, Endawoke; Yamazaki, Yosuke; Seemala, Gopi

    2016-07-01

    We report on the first simultaneous observations of poleward and equatorward traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) during the same geomagnetic storm period on a global scale. While poleward propagating TIDs originate from the geomagnetic equator region, equatorward propagating TIDs are launched from the auroral regions. On a global scale, we use total electron content observations from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems to show that these TIDs existed over South American, African, and Asian sectors. The American and African sectors exhibited predominantly strong poleward TIDs, while the Asian sector recorded mostly equatorward TIDs which crossed the geomagnetic equator to either hemisphere on 9 March 2012. However, both poleward and equatorward TIDs are simultaneously present in all three sectors. Using a combination of ground-based magnetometer observations and available low-latitude radar (JULIA) data, we have established and confirmed that poleward TIDs of geomagnetic equator origin are due to ionospheric electrodynamics, specifically changes in E × B vertical drift after the storm onset.

  18. Global Exponential Stability of Delayed Cohen-Grossberg BAM Neural Networks with Impulses on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of calculus on time scales, the homeomorphism theory, Lyapunov functional method, and some analysis techniques, sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point of Cohen-Grossberg bidirectional associative memory (BAM neural networks with distributed delays and impulses on time scales. This is the first time applying the time-scale calculus theory to unify the discrete-time and continuous-time Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural network with impulses under the same framework.

  19. Statistics of bedload transport over steep slopes: Separation of time scales and collective motion

    CERN Document Server

    Heyman, J; Ma, H B; Ancey, C

    2016-01-01

    Steep slope streams show large fluctuations of sediment discharge across several time scales. These fluctuations may be inherent to the internal dynamics of the sediment transport process. A probabilistic framework thus seems appropriate to analyze such a process. In this letter, we present an experimental study of bedload transport over a steep slope flume for small to moderate Shields numbers. The sampling technique allows the acquisition of high-resolution time series of the solid discharge. The resolved time scales range from $10^{-2}$s up to $10^{5}$s. We show that two distinct time scales can be observed in the probability density function for the waiting time between moving particles. We make the point that the separation of time scales is related to collective dynamics. Proper statistics of a Markov process including collective entrainment are derived. The separation of time scales is recovered theoretically for low entrainment rates.

  20. First-passage times in multi-scale random walks: the impact of movement scales on search efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Daniel; Bartumeus, Frederic; Raposo, E. P.; Méndez, Vicenç

    2015-01-01

    An efficient searcher needs to balance properly the tradeoff between the exploration of new spatial areas and the exploitation of nearby resources, an idea which is at the core of scale-free L\\'evy search strategies. Here we study multi-scale random walks as an approximation to the scale- free case and derive the exact expressions for their mean-first passage times in a one-dimensional finite domain. This allows us to provide a complete analytical description of the dynamics driving the asymm...

  1. Global and Local Color Time Scales to Encode Timeline Events in Ion Trajectories for Glassies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sharif

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glassy compounds lead directly to high ionic conductivity. Ionic conductivity generates ion trajectories. However, these trajectories have been represented by two-dimensional graph in order to visualize the timeline events in ion trajectories. This study addresses this problem by encoding the timeline events in ion trajectories with global and local color scales. Two time scales have been introduced namely Global Color Time Scale and Local Color Time Scale. The rainbow color has been chosen to represent global time scale meanwhile solid color has been used to generate local time scale. Based on evaluation, these techniques are successful in representing timeline events in ion trajectories for understanding the complicated heterogeneous movement of ion trajectories.

  2. Continuous-wave laser particle conditioning: Thresholds and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew; Ogloza, Albert; Olson, Kyle; Talghader, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The optical absorption of contaminants on high reflectivity mirrors was measured using photo thermal common-path interferometry before and after exposure to high power continuous-wave laser light. The contaminants were micron-sized graphite flakes on hafnia-silica distributed Bragg reflectors illuminated by a ytterbium-doped fiber laser. After one-second periods of exposure, the mirrors demonstrated reduced absorption for irradiances as low as 11 kW cm-2 and had an obvious threshold near 20 kW cm-2. Final absorption values were reduced by up to 90% of their initial value for irradiances of 92 kW cm-2. For shorter pulses at 34 kW cm-2, a minimum exposure time required to begin absorption reduction was found between 100 μs and 200 μs, with particles reaching their final minimum absorption value within 300 ms. Microscope images of the surface showed agglomerated particles fragmenting with some being removed completely, probably by evaporation for exposures between 200 μs to 10 ms. Exposures of 100 ms and longer left behind a thin semi-transparent residue, covering much of the conditioned area. An order of magnitude estimate of the time necessary to begin altering the surface contaminants (also known as "conditioning") indicates about 200 μs seconds at 34 kW cm-2, based on heating an average carbon particle to its sublimation temperature including energy loss to thermal contact and radiation. This estimation is close to the observed exposure time required to begin absorption reduction.

  3. A Cool Business: Trapping Intermediates on the submillisecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2004-03-01

    The freeze-quenching technique is extremely useful for trapping meta-stable intermediates populated during fast chemical or biochemical reactions. The application of this technique, however, is limited by the long mixing time of conventional solution mixers and the slow freezing time of cryogenic fluids. To overcome these problems, we have designed and tested a novel microfluidic silicon mixer equipped with a new freeze-quenching device, with which reactions can be followed down to 50 microseconds. In the microfluidic silicon mixer, seven vertical pillars with 10 micrometer diameter are arranged perpendicular to the flow direction and in a staggered fashion in the 450 picoliter mixing chamber to enhance turbulent mixing. The mixed solution jet, with a cross-section of 10 micrometer by 100 micrometer, exits from the microfluidic silicon mixer with a linear flow velocity of 20 m/sec. It instantaneously freezes on one of two rotating copper wheels maintained at 77 K and is subsequently ground into an ultra-fine powder. The ultra-fine frozen powder exhibits excellent spectral quality, high packing factor and can be readily transferred between spectroscopic observation cells. The microfluidic mixer was tested by the reaction between azide and myoglobin at pH 5.0. It was found that complete mixing was achieved within the mixing dead-time of the mixer (20 microseconds) and the first observable point for this coupled device was determined to be 50 microseconds, which is approximately two orders of magnitude faster than commercially available instruments. Several new applications of this device in ultra-fast biological reactions will be presented. Acknowledgements: This work is done in collaboration with Dr. Denis Rousseau and is supported by the NIH Grants HL65465 to S.-R.Y. and GM67814 to D.L.R.

  4. Fission cross-sections, prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission in request for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Göök, A.; Billnert, R.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years JRC-IRMM has been investigating fission cross-sections of 240,242Pu in the fast-neutron energy range relevant for innovative reactor systems and requested in the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). In addition to that, prompt neutron multiplicities are being investigated for the major isotopes 235U, 239Pu in the neutron-resonance region using a newly developed scintillation detector array (SCINTIA) and an innovative modification of the Frisch-grid ionisation chamber for fission-fragment detection. These data are highly relevant for improved neutron data evaluation and requested by the OECD/Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). Thirdly, also prompt fission γ-ray emission is investigated using highly efficient lanthanide-halide detectors with superior timing resolution. Again, those data are requested in the HPRL for major actinides to solve open questions on an under-prediction of decay heat in nuclear reactors. The information on prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission is crucial for benchmarking nuclear models to study the de-excitation process of neutron-rich fission fragments. Information on γ-ray emission probabilities is also useful in decommissioning exercises on damaged nuclear power plants like Fukushima Daiichi to which JRC-IRMM is contributing. The results on the 240,242Pu fission cross section, 235U prompt neutron multiplicity in the resonance region and correlations with fission fragments and prompt γ-ray emission for several isotopes will be presented and put into perspective.

  5. Fission cross-sections, prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission in request for nuclear applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hambsch F.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years JRC-IRMM has been investigating fission cross-sections of 240,242Pu in the fast-neutron energy range relevant for innovative reactor systems and requested in the High Priority Request List (HPRL of the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA. In addition to that, prompt neutron multiplicities are being investigated for the major isotopes 235U, 239Pu in the neutron-resonance region using a newly developed scintillation detector array (SCINTIA and an innovative modification of the Frisch-grid ionisation chamber for fission-fragment detection. These data are highly relevant for improved neutron data evaluation and requested by the OECD/Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC. Thirdly, also prompt fission γ-ray emission is investigated using highly efficient lanthanide-halide detectors with superior timing resolution. Again, those data are requested in the HPRL for major actinides to solve open questions on an under-prediction of decay heat in nuclear reactors. The information on prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission is crucial for benchmarking nuclear models to study the de-excitation process of neutron-rich fission fragments. Information on γ-ray emission probabilities is also useful in decommissioning exercises on damaged nuclear power plants like Fukushima Daiichi to which JRC-IRMM is contributing. The results on the 240,242Pu fission cross section, 235U prompt neutron multiplicity in the resonance region and correlations with fission fragments and prompt γ-ray emission for several isotopes will be presented and put into perspective.

  6. Toward the Optimal Configuration of Dynamic Voltage Scaling Points in Real-Time Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Zhan Yi; Xue-Jun Yang

    2006-01-01

    In real-time applications, compiler-directed dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) could reduce energy consumption efficiently, where compiler put voltage scaling points in the proper places, and the supply voltage and clock frequency were adjusted to the relationship between the reduced time and the reduced workload. This paper presents the optimal configuration of dynamic voltage scaling points without voltage scaling overhead, which minimizes energy consumption. The conclusion is proved theoretically. Finally, it is confirmed by simulations with equally-spaced voltage scaling configuration.

  7. Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale 2008 (GITS-08) and dynamo processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.; Hoffman, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    During the past 2.6 million years Earth's outer core geodynamo has produced at least 18 geomagnetic excursions and 5 full polarity reversals. This record has been compiled from terrestrial volcanic rocks, including mainly basaltic lava flow sequences, but also two silicic ash beds, that have been analyzed using modern paleomagnetic techniques and dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. Several brief periods of field instability associated with excursions correlate with lows in paleointensity or directional changes recorded in marine sediments, for example in the SINT2000 or GLOPIS75 composite records, or the more detailed records found at ODP site 919, that are dated using astronomically-forced oxygen isotope signals or ice layer counting. However, the lack of correlation of several excursions between marine and terrestrial records indicates that neither sediments, nor lava flows, are ideal recording media. Another factor complicating correlation is that some excursions may be geographically localized and not expressed globally. Despite decades of observation, these records remain fragmentary, especially when periods of millions of years are considered. Recent 40Ar/39Ar dating in our laboratory, that includes age determinations for the Mono Lake, Laschamp, Blake, Pringle Falls, Big Lost, West Eifel, and Agua Nova excursions, as well as the Halawa (C2r.2r-1) cryptochron, prompt us to critically review the terrestrial record of geodynamo instability and propose a GITS for the entire Quaternary period. Both the ca. 4:1 ratio of excursions to reversals during the past 2.6 Ma as well as the temporal pattern of occurrence of these events provide fundamental input as to the long-term behavior and, possibly, the structure of the core dynamo. On the one hand, intervals of significant temporal clustering of excursions have highlighted a relatively stable period of high field strength lasting >250 ka in the middle of the Brunhes chron during which time few, or no, excursions took

  8. Are introspective reaction times affected by the method of time estimation? A comparison of visual analogue scales and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Donna; Bratzke, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the method of time estimation plays a role in the apparent limits of introspection in dual-task processing. Previous studies showed that when participants reported introspective reaction times after each trial of a dual task by clicking on a visual analogue scale, they appeared to be unaware of the dual-task costs in their performance. However, visual analogue scales have seldom been used in interval estimation, and they may be inappropriate. In the present study, after each dual-task trial, participants reported their introspective reaction times either via a visual analogue scale or via the method of reproduction. The results replicated the previous findings, irrespective of method. That is, even though responses to the second task slowed down with increasing task overlap, this slowing was only very weakly reflected in the introspective reaction times. Thus, the participants' failure to report the objective dual-task costs in their reaction times is a rather robust finding that cannot be attributed to the method employed. However, introspective reaction times reported via visual analogue scales were more closely related to the objective reaction times, suggesting that visual analogue scales are preferable to reproduction. We conclude that introspective reaction times represent the same information regardless of method, but whether that information is temporal in nature is as yet unsettled.

  9. Report on simulation of fission gas and fission product diffusion in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Perriot, Romain Thibault [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Cooper, Michael William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Goyal, Anuj [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-07-22

    In UO2 nuclear fuel, the retention and release of fission gas atoms such as xenon (Xe) are important for nuclear fuel performance by, for example, reducing the fuel thermal conductivity, causing fuel swelling that leads to mechanical interaction with the clad, increasing the plenum pressure and reducing the fuel–clad gap thermal conductivity. We use multi-­scale simulations to determine fission gas diffusion mechanisms as well as the corresponding rates in UO2 under both intrinsic and irradiation conditions. In addition to Xe and Kr, the fission products Zr, Ru, Ce, Y, La, Sr and Ba have been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to study formation, binding and migration energies of small clusters of Xe atoms and vacancies. Empirical potential calculations enable us to determine the corresponding entropies and attempt frequencies for migration as well as investigate the properties of large clusters or small fission gas bubbles. A continuum reaction-­diffusion model is developed for Xe and point defects based on the mechanisms and rates obtained from atomistic simulations. Effective fission gas diffusivities are then obtained by solving this set of equations for different chemical and irradiation conditions using the MARMOT phase field code. The predictions are compared to available experimental data. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and high binding energy. We find that the XeU3O cluster gives Xe diffusion coefficients that are higher for intrinsic conditions than under irradiation over a wide range of temperatures. Under irradiation the fast-­moving XeU3O cluster recombines quickly with irradiation induced interstitial U ions, while this mechanism is less important for intrinsic conditions. The net result is higher

  10. Report on simulation of fission gas and fission product diffusion in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Perriot, Romain Thibault [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Cooper, Michael William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Goyal, Anuj [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-07-22

    In UO2 nuclear fuel, the retention and release of fission gas atoms such as xenon (Xe) are important for nuclear fuel performance by, for example, reducing the fuel thermal conductivity, causing fuel swelling that leads to mechanical interaction with the clad, increasing the plenum pressure and reducing the fuel–clad gap thermal conductivity. We use multi-­scale simulations to determine fission gas diffusion mechanisms as well as the corresponding rates in UO2 under both intrinsic and irradiation conditions. In addition to Xe and Kr, the fission products Zr, Ru, Ce, Y, La, Sr and Ba have been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to study formation, binding and migration energies of small clusters of Xe atoms and vacancies. Empirical potential calculations enable us to determine the corresponding entropies and attempt frequencies for migration as well as investigate the properties of large clusters or small fission gas bubbles. A continuum reaction-­diffusion model is developed for Xe and point defects based on the mechanisms and rates obtained from atomistic simulations. Effective fission gas diffusivities are then obtained by solving this set of equations for different chemical and irradiation conditions using the MARMOT phase field code. The predictions are compared to available experimental data. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and high binding energy. We find that the XeU3O cluster gives Xe diffusion coefficients that are higher for intrinsic conditions than under irradiation over a wide range of temperatures. Under irradiation the fast-­moving XeU3O cluster recombines quickly with irradiation-induced interstitial U ions, while this mechanism is less important for intrinsic conditions. The net result is higher

  11. RECENT GEODYNAMICS OF FAULT ZONES: FAULTING IN REAL TIME SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. O. Kuzmin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent deformation processes taking place in real time are analyzed on the basis of data on fault zones which were collected by long-term detailed geodetic survey studies with application of field methods and satellite monitoring.A new category of recent crustal movements is described and termed as parametrically induced tectonic strain in fault zones. It is shown that in the fault zones located in seismically active and aseismic regions, super intensive displacements of the crust (5 to 7 cm per year, i.e. (5 to 7·10–5 per year occur due to very small external impacts of natural or technogenic / industrial origin.The spatial discreteness of anomalous deformation processes is established along the strike of the regional Rechitsky fault in the Pripyat basin. It is concluded that recent anomalous activity of the fault zones needs to be taken into account in defining regional regularities of geodynamic processes on the basis of real-time measurements.The paper presents results of analyses of data collected by long-term (20 to 50 years geodetic surveys in highly seismically active regions of Kopetdag, Kamchatka and California. It is evidenced by instrumental geodetic measurements of recent vertical and horizontal displacements in fault zones that deformations are ‘paradoxically’ deviating from the inherited movements of the past geological periods.In terms of the recent geodynamics, the ‘paradoxes’ of high and low strain velocities are related to a reliable empirical fact of the presence of extremely high local velocities of deformations in the fault zones (about 10–5 per year and above, which take place at the background of slow regional deformations which velocities are lower by the order of 2 to 3. Very low average annual velocities of horizontal deformation are recorded in the seismic regions of Kopetdag and Kamchatka and in the San Andreas fault zone; they amount to only 3 to 5 amplitudes of the earth tidal deformations per year.A

  12. I. Fission Probabilities, Fission Barriers, and Shell Effects. II. Particle Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Kexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    In Part I, fission excitation functions of osmium isotopes 185,186, 187, 189 Os produced in 3He +182,183, 184, 186W reactions, and of polonium isotopes 209,210, 211, 212Po produced in 3He/4He + 206, 207, 208Pb reactions, were measured with high precision. These excitation functions have been analyzed in detail based upon the transition state formalism. The fission barriers, and shell effects for the corresponding nuclei are extracted from the detailed analyses. A novel approach has been developed to determine upper limits of the transient time of the fission process. The upper limits are constrained by the fission probabilities of neighboring isotopes. The upper limits for the transient time set with this new method are 15x 10–21 sec and 25x 10–21 sec for 0s and Po compound nuclei, respectively. In Part II, we report on a search for evidence of the optical modulations in the energy spectra of alpha particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. The optical modulations are expected to arise from the ~-particle interaction with the rest of the nucleus as the particle prepares to exit. Some evidence for the modulations has been observed in the alpha spectra measured in the 3He-induced reactions, 3He + natAg in particular. The identification of the modulations involves a technique that subtracts the bulk statistical background from the measured alpha spectra, in order for the modulations to become visible in the residuals. Due to insufficient knowledge of the background spectra, however, the presented evidence should only be regarded as preliminary and tentative.

  13. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-23

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4].

  14. Modeling geomagnetic storms on prompt and diffusive time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao

    The discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in the 1958 was the first major discovery of the Space Age. There are two belts of energetic particles. The inner belt is very stable, but the outer belt is extremely variable, especially during geomagnetic storms. As the energetic particles are hazardous to spacecraft, understanding the source of these particles and their dynamic behavior driven by solar activity has great practical importance. In this thesis, the effects of magnetic storms on the evolution of the electron radiation belts, in particular the outer zone, is studied using two types of numerical simulation: radial diffusion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) test-particle simulation. A radial diffusion code has been developed at Dartmouth, applying satellite measurements to model flux as an outer boundary condition, exploring several options for the diffusion coefficient and electron loss time. Electron phase space density is analyzed for July 2004 coronal mass ejection (CME) driven storms and March-April 2008 co-rotating interaction region (CIR) driven storms, and compared with Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite measurements within 5 degrees of the magnetic equator at L=4.16. A case study of a month-long interval in the Van Allen Probes satellite era, March 2013, confirms that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant 0.6 MeV by an order of magnitude over 24 hours as observed.

  15. Marine Dispersal Scales Are Congruent over Evolutionary and Ecological Time

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsky, Malin L.

    2016-12-15

    The degree to which offspring remain near their parents or disperse widely is critical for understanding population dynamics, evolution, and biogeography, and for designing conservation actions. In the ocean, most estimates suggesting short-distance dispersal are based on direct ecological observations of dispersing individuals, while indirect evolutionary estimates often suggest substantially greater homogeneity among populations. Reconciling these two approaches and their seemingly competing perspectives on dispersal has been a major challenge. Here we show for the first time that evolutionary and ecological measures of larval dispersal can closely agree by using both to estimate the distribution of dispersal distances. In orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) populations in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, we found that evolutionary dispersal kernels were 17 km (95% confidence interval: 12–24 km) wide, while an exhaustive set of direct larval dispersal observations suggested kernel widths of 27 km (19–36 km) or 19 km (15–27 km) across two years. The similarity between these two approaches suggests that ecological and evolutionary dispersal kernels can be equivalent, and that the apparent disagreement between direct and indirect measurements can be overcome. Our results suggest that carefully applied evolutionary methods, which are often less expensive, can be broadly relevant for understanding ecological dispersal across the tree of life.

  16. On the time scale associated with Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kristof M; Neyts, Erik C

    2014-11-28

    Uniform-acceptance force-bias Monte Carlo (fbMC) methods have been shown to be a powerful technique to access longer timescales in atomistic simulations allowing, for example, phase transitions and growth. Recently, a new fbMC method, the time-stamped force-bias Monte Carlo (tfMC) method, was derived with inclusion of an estimated effective timescale; this timescale, however, does not seem able to explain some of the successes the method. In this contribution, we therefore explicitly quantify the effective timescale tfMC is able to access for a variety of systems, namely a simple single-particle, one-dimensional model system, the Lennard-Jones liquid, an adatom on the Cu(100) surface, a silicon crystal with point defects and a highly defected graphene sheet, in order to gain new insights into the mechanisms by which tfMC operates. It is found that considerable boosts, up to three orders of magnitude compared to molecular dynamics, can be achieved for solid state systems by lowering of the apparent activation barrier of occurring processes, while not requiring any system-specific input or modifications of the method. We furthermore address the pitfalls of using the method as a replacement or complement of molecular dynamics simulations, its ability to explicitly describe correct dynamics and reaction mechanisms, and the association of timescales to MC simulations in general.

  17. On the time scale associated with Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bal, Kristof M., E-mail: kristof.bal@uantwerpen.be; Neyts, Erik C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Research Group PLASMANT, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-11-28

    Uniform-acceptance force-bias Monte Carlo (fbMC) methods have been shown to be a powerful technique to access longer timescales in atomistic simulations allowing, for example, phase transitions and growth. Recently, a new fbMC method, the time-stamped force-bias Monte Carlo (tfMC) method, was derived with inclusion of an estimated effective timescale; this timescale, however, does not seem able to explain some of the successes the method. In this contribution, we therefore explicitly quantify the effective timescale tfMC is able to access for a variety of systems, namely a simple single-particle, one-dimensional model system, the Lennard-Jones liquid, an adatom on the Cu(100) surface, a silicon crystal with point defects and a highly defected graphene sheet, in order to gain new insights into the mechanisms by which tfMC operates. It is found that considerable boosts, up to three orders of magnitude compared to molecular dynamics, can be achieved for solid state systems by lowering of the apparent activation barrier of occurring processes, while not requiring any system-specific input or modifications of the method. We furthermore address the pitfalls of using the method as a replacement or complement of molecular dynamics simulations, its ability to explicitly describe correct dynamics and reaction mechanisms, and the association of timescales to MC simulations in general.

  18. Updating the planetary time scale: focus on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Quantin-Nataf, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Formal stratigraphic systems have been developed for the surface materials of the Moon, Mars, Mercury, and the Galilean satellite Ganymede. These systems are based on geologic mapping, which establishes relative ages of surfaces delineated by superposition, morphology, impact crater densities, and other relations and features. Referent units selected from the mapping determine time-stratigraphic bases and/or representative materials characteristic of events and periods for definition of chronologic units. Absolute ages of these units in some cases can be estimated using crater size-frequency data. For the Moon, the chronologic units and cratering record are calibrated by radiometric ages measured from samples collected from the lunar surface. Model ages for other cratered planetary surfaces are constructed primarily by estimating cratering rates relative to that of the Moon. Other cratered bodies with estimated surface ages include Venus and the Galilean satellites of Jupiter. New global geologic mapping and crater dating studies of Mars are resulting in more accurate and detailed reconstructions of its geologic history.

  19. Time-scaled scenario of low-energy heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoritaka

    2013-01-01

    The underlying scenario of low-energy heavy-ion collisions is presented based on time-dependent density-functional calculations. A classification of several types of reaction dynamics is given with respect to their time-scales.

  20. Freshwater flushing time scales of the Vashishti Estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sarma, R.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    Results are presented for the Vashishti estuary, Kerala, India to evaluate its freshwater flushing time scales based on 8 sets of observations of longitudinal salinity distributions. The results of the flushing time using the fraction of freshwater...

  1. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’ discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’s discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  2. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  3. Detecting abrupt climate changes on different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyasovszky, István

    2011-10-01

    Two concepts are introduced for detecting abrupt climate changes. In the first case, the sampling frequency of climate data is high as compared to the frequency of climate events examined. The method is based on a separation of trend and noise in the data and is applicable to any dataset that satisfies some mild smoothness and statistical dependence conditions for the trend and the noise, respectively. We say that an abrupt change occurs when the first derivative of the trend function has a discontinuity and the task is to identify such points. The technique is applied to Northern Hemisphere temperature data from 1850 to 2009, Northern Hemisphere temperature data from proxy data, a.d. 200-1995 and Holocene δ18O values going back to 11,700 years BP. Several abrupt changes are detected that are, among other things, beneficial for determining the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and Holocene Climate Optimum. In the second case, the sampling frequency is low relative to the frequency of climate events studied. A typical example includes Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The methodology used here is based on a refinement of autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic models. The key element of this approach is the volatility that characterises the time-varying variance, and abrupt changes are defined by high volatilities. The technique applied to δ18O values going back to 122,950 years BP is suitable for identifying DO events. These two approaches for the two cases are closely related despite the fact that at first glance, they seem quite different.

  4. Holder's and Hardy's Two Dimensional Diamond-alpha Inequalities on Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ammi, Moulay Rchid Sidi

    2010-01-01

    We prove a two dimensional Holder and reverse-Holder inequality on time scales via the diamond-alpha integral. Other integral inequalities are established as well, which have as corollaries some recent proved Hardy-type inequalities on time scales.

  5. Unique Existence Theorem of Solution of Almost Periodic Differential Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the theory of calculus on time scales and M-matrix theory, the unique existence theorem of solution of almost periodic differential equations on almost periodic time scales is established. The result can be used to a large of dynamic systems.

  6. Unique Existence Theorem of Solution of Almost Periodic Differential Equations on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Hu; Lili Wang

    2012-01-01

    By using the theory of calculus on time scales and M-matrix theory, the unique existence theorem of solution of almost periodic differential equations on almost periodic time scales is established. The result can be used to a large of dynamic systems.

  7. Error estimates for asymptotic solutions of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gro Hovhannisyan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We establish error estimates for first-order linear systems of equations and linear second-order dynamic equations on time scales by using calculus on a time scales [1,4,5] and Birkhoff-Levinson's method of asymptotic solutions [3,6,8,9].

  8. Fission fragments transport by gaseous flow with aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Gangrskij, Y P; Zhemenik, V I; Myshinskij, G V; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Selesh, O

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes a pilot facility for fission fragment transport by gaseous flow with aerosols. This facility designed for fragment transport consists of a reaction chamber with irradiated target, receipt chamber to collect fragments, aerosol generator, roughing pump to pump put gas and a capillary connecting these units of facility. Paper presents the results of facility testing with fragments of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U photofission by microtron Bremsstrahlung. The obtained parameters of facility (up to 70% efficiency of transport, up to 0.1 s time of transport at 1 m distance) enable to use it efficiently in experiments dealing with heavy nuclei fission and with investigation in properties of fission fragments

  9. Photoluminescence dynamics in singlet fission chromophore liquid melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piland, Geoffrey B.; Bardeen, Christopher J.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of high temperature melting on the photophysics of three prototypical singlet fission molecules is investigated. Time-resolved photoluminescence is used to look at the melt phase of the molecules tetracene, diphenylhexatriene and rubrene. Chemical decomposition of tetracene precluded any detailed measurements on this molecule. In the diphenylhexatriene melt, a rapid singlet state nonradiative relaxation process outcompetes singlet fission. In the rubrene melt, singlet fission occurs at a rate similar to that of the crystal, but the decay of the delayed fluorescence is much more rapid. The rapid decay of the delayed fluorescence suggests that either the triplet lifetime is shortened, or the fusion probability decreases, or that both factors are operative at higher temperatures.

  10. Study of spontaneous fission lifetimes using nuclear density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Jhilam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous fission lifetimes have been studied microscopically by minimizing the collective action integral in a two-dimensional collective space of quadrupole moments (Q20, Q22 representing elongation and triaxiality. The microscopic collective potential and inertia tensor are obtained by solving the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB equations with the Skyrme energy density functional and mixed pairing interaction. The mass tensor is computed within the perturbative Adiabatic Time-Dependent HFB (ATDHFB approach in the cranking approximation. The dynamic fission trajectories have been obtained by minimizing the collective action using two different numerical techniques. The values of spontaneous fission lifetimes obtained in this way are compared with the static results.

  11. Empirical study on structural properties in temporal networks under different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duanbing

    2015-12-01

    Many network analyzing methods are usually based on static networks. However, temporal networks should be considered so as to investigate real complex systems deeply since some dynamics on these systems cannot be described by static networks accurately. In this paper, four structural properties in temporal networks are empirically studied, including degree, clustering coefficient, adjacent correlation, and connected component. Three real temporal networks with different time scales are analyzed in this paper, including short message, telephone, and router networks. Moreover, structural properties of these temporal networks are compared with that of corresponding static aggregation networks in the whole time window. Some essential differences of structural properties between temporal and static networks are achieved through empirical analysis. Finally, the effect of structural properties on spreading dynamics under different time scales is investigated. Some interesting results such as turning point of structure evolving time scale corresponding to certain spreading dynamics time scale from the point of view of infected scale are achieved.

  12. A compact multi-plate fission chamber for the simultaneous measurement of 233U capture and fission cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacak M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 233U plays the essential role of fissile nucleus in the Th-U fuel cycle. A particularity of 233U is its small neutron capture cross-section which is about one order of magnitude lower than the fission cross-section on average. Therefore, the accuracy in the measurement of the 233U capture cross-section essentially relies on efficient capture-fission discrimination thus a combined setup of fission and γ-detectors is needed. At CERN n_TOF the Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC coupled with compact fission detectors is used. Previously used MicroMegas (MGAS detectors showed significant γ-background issues above 100 eV coming from the copper mesh. A new measurement campaign of the 233U capture cross-section and alpha ratio is planned at the CERN n_TOF facility. For this measurement, a novel cylindrical multi ionization cell chamber was developed in order to provide a compact solution for 14 active targets read out by 8 anodes. Due to the high specific activity of 233U fast timing properties are required and achieved with the use of customized electronics and the very fast ionizing gas CF4 together with a high electric field strength. This paper describes the new fission chamber and the results of the first tests with neutrons at GELINA proving that it is suitable for the 233U measurement.

  13. Sequential Detection of Fission Processes for Harbor Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Walston, S E; Chambers, D H

    2015-02-12

    With the large increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the timely and accurate detection of special nuclear material (SNM) has become an extremely high priority for many countries concerned with national security. The detection of radionuclide contraband based on their γ-ray emissions has been attacked vigorously with some interesting and feasible results; however, the fission process of SNM has not received as much attention due to its inherent complexity and required predictive nature. In this paper, on-line, sequential Bayesian detection and estimation (parameter) techniques to rapidly and reliably detect unknown fissioning sources with high statistical confidence are developed.

  14. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  15. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aritomo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibration in the oblate direction of fissioning fragments is essential for the fission process. According to this picture, fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup. This is expected to lead to a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  16. Modification of apparent fission yields by Chemical Fractionation following Fission (CFF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberg, Charles; Meshik, Alex

    2008-04-01

    Grain-by-grain studies of the 2 billion year old Oklo natural reactor, using laser micro-extraction^1,2, yield detailed information about Oklo, a water-moderated pulsed reactor, cycle times, total neutron fluence and duration, but it also demonstrates Chemical Fractionation following Fission. In the CFF process, members of an isobaric yield chain with long half-lives are subject to migration before decay can occur. Of particular interest is the 129 isobar where 17 million ^129I can migrate out of the host grain before decay, and iodine compounds are water soluble. This is amply demonstated by the variation of Xe spectra between micron-sized uranium-bearing minerals and adjacent uranium-free minerals. Fission 129 yields for the spontaneous fission of ^238U generally come from measured ^129Xe in pitchblend^2, ores emplaced by aqueous activity, and are incorrect due to the CFF process. ^238U yields for the 131 and 129 chains, reported in Hyde^3, as 0.455 +- .02 and < 0.012, respectively, the latter being anomalously low. ^1A Meshik, C Hohenberg and O Pravdivtesva, PRL 93, 182302 (2004); A Meshik Sci. Am. Nov (2005), 55; ^2E K Hyde, Nucl Prop of Heavy Elements III (1964).

  17. Linear-scaling computation of excited states in time-domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAM ChiYung; CHEN GuanHua

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of quantum mechanical methods is severely limited by their poor scaling.To circumvent the problem,linearscaling methods for quantum mechanical calculations had been developed.The physical basis of linear-scaling methods is the locality in quantum mechanics where the properties or observables of a system are weakly influenced by factors spatially far apart.Besides the substantial efforts spent on devising linear-scaling methods for ground state,there is also a growing interest in the development of linear-scaling methods for excited states.This review gives an overview of linear-scaling approaches for excited states solved in real time-domain.

  18. Tunneling process in heavy-ion fusion and fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kondratyev, V.; Bonasera, A.

    1998-10-01

    We present a model towards the many-body description of sub-barrier fusion and spontaneous fission based on the semiclassical Vlasov equation and the Feynman path integral method. We define suitable collective variables from the Vlasov solution and use the imaginary time technique for the dynamics below the Coulomb barrier. (author)

  19. Cluster fission from the standpoint of nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangmoo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    1996-03-01

    Atomic nucleus belongs to a quantal finite many body system. Nucleus shows great resemblance to cluster, above all metal cluster, although the strength of interaction is different. The works of Brechignac group, Saunder, Martin and P. Froeblich are explained by the critical size Nc as the central term. The differences between cluster and nucleus are investigated and a future view of cluster fission is explained. (S.Y.)

  20. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, S., E-mail: smosby@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tovesson, F.; Couture, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Duke, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Kleinrath, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States); Meharchand, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; O' Donnell, J.M.; Perdue, B.; Richman, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup.

  1. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  2. Fission product concentration evolution in sodium pool following a fuel subassembly failure in an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.; Bhoje, S. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2003-07-01

    During a fuel element failure in a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor, the fission products originating from the failed pins mix into the sodium pool. Delayed Neutron Detectors (DND) are provided in the sodium pool to detect such failures by way of detection of delayed neutrons emitted by the fission products. The transient evolution of fission product concentration is governed by the sodium flow distribution in the pool. Transient hydraulic analysis has been carried out using the CFD code PHOENICS to estimate fission product concentration evolution in hot pool. k- {epsilon} turbulence model and zero laminar diffusivity for the fission product concentration have been considered in the analysis. Times at which the failures of various fuel subassemblies (SA) are detected by the DND are obtained. It has been found that in order to effectively detect the failure of every fuel SA, a minimum of 8 DND in hot pool are essential.

  3. Fission-track analysis of meteorites: Dating of the Marjalahti pallasite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, Yu.V. [Institute of Environmental Geochemistry, 34a Palladin ave., Kiev 03142 (Ukraine)]. E-mail: juliavad@yahoo.com; Perelygin, V.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-15

    The results of the Marjalahti pallasite fission-track age determination are presented. Thorough examination of fossil tracks in the phosphate (whitlockite) crystals coupled with U-content determination in whitlockites can make it possible to estimate the contributions of all possible track sources to the total track density and to calculate a model fission-track age. It is found that whitlockite crystals of the Marjalahti pallasite contain fossil tracks due to galactic cosmic rays (VH, VVH nuclei); fission of U and Th induced by cosmic rays; spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U; and spontaneous fission of extinct, short-lived {sup 244}Pu present in significant quantities in the early solar system. A great track density attributed to the extinct {sup 244}Pu testifies to the high fission-track age. The model fission-track ages of (4.31+/-0.02)x10{sup 9}yr for the Marjalahti pallasite are calculated. Petrographic studies allow us to interpret the fission-track age as the time of the last shock/thermal event in the cosmic history of the pallasite.

  4. Simulated fissioning of uranium and testing of the fission-track dating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, V.E.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program (FTD-SIM) faithfully simulates the fissioning of 238U with time and 235U with neutron dose. The simulation is based on first principles of physics where the fissioning of 238U with the flux of time is described by Ns = ??f 238Ut and the fissioning of 235U with the fluence of neutrons is described by Ni = ??235U??. The Poisson law is used to set the stochastic variation of fissioning within the uranium population. The life history of a given crystal can thus be traced under an infinite variety of age and irradiation conditions. A single dating attempt or up to 500 dating attempts on a given crystal population can be simulated by specifying the age of the crystal population, the size and variation in the areas to be counted, the amount and distribution of uranium, the neutron dose to be used and its variation, and the desired ratio of 238U to 235U. A variety of probability distributions can be applied to uranium and counting-area. The Price and Walker age equation is used to estimate age. The output of FTD-SIM includes the tabulated results of each individual dating attempt (sample) on demand and/or the summary statistics and histograms for multiple dating attempts (samples) including the sampling age. An analysis of the results from FTD-SIM shows that: (1) The external detector method is intrinsically more precise than the population method. (2) For the external detector method a correlation between spontaneous track count, Ns, and induced track count, Ni, results when the population of grains has a stochastic uranium content and/or when the counting areas between grains are stochastic. For the population method no correlation can exist. (3) In the external detector method the sampling distribution of age is independent of the number of grains counted. In the population method the sampling distribution of age is highly dependent on the number of grains counted. (4) Grains with zero-track counts, either in Ns or Ni, are in integral part of

  5. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Belier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric [CEA DAM Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Arpajon (France); Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamano, Manuel; Fernandez Dominguez, Beatriz; Paradela, Carlos; Ramos, Diego; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose-Luis; Vargas, Jossitt [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, Laurent; Tassan-Got, Laurent [CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Aumann, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, Enrique [Universidad de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Farget, Fanny; Rodriguez-Tajes, Carme [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Heinz, Andreas [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurado, Beatriz [CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  7. Multi-time scale analysis of precipitation variation in Guyuan,China:1957-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Morlet wavelet transformation is used in this paper to analyze the multi-time scale characteristics of precipitation data series from 1957 to 2005 in Guyuan region.The results showed that (1) the annual precipitation evolution process had obvious multi-time scale variation characteristics of 15-25 years,7-12 years and 3-6 years,and different time scales had different oscillation energy densities;(2) the periods at smaller time scales changed more frequently,which often nested in a biggish quasi periodic oscillations,so the concrete time domain should be analyzed if necessary;(3) the precipitation had three main periods (22-year,9-year and 4-year) and the 22-year period was especially outstanding,and the analysis of this main period reveals that the precipitation would be in a relative high water period until about 2012.

  8. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  9. Scaling Behavior of the First Arrival Time of a Random-Walking Magnetic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, M.-Y.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2008-02-04

    We report a universal scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a traveling magnetic domain wall into a finite space-time observation window of a magneto-optical microscope enabling direct visualization of a Barkhausen avalanche in real time. The first arrival time of the traveling magnetic domain wall exhibits a nontrivial fluctuation and its statistical distribution is described by universal power-law scaling with scaling exponents of 1.34 {+-} 0.07 for CoCr and CoCrPt films, despite their quite different domain evolution patterns. Numerical simulation of the first arrival time with an assumption that the magnetic domain wall traveled as a random walker well matches our experimentally observed scaling behavior, providing an experimental support for the random-walking model of traveling magnetic domain walls.

  10. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  11. Fission properties for r-process nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, J; Loens, H P; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Reinhard, P -G

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z>100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the alpha-decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parameterizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. The computation of fission lifetimes takes care of the crucial ingredients of the large-amplitude collective dynamics along the fission path, as self-consistent collective mass and proper quantum corrections. We discuss the different topologies of fission landscapes which occur in the realm of SHE (symmetric versus asymmetric fission, regions of triaxial fission, bi-modal fission, and the impact of asymmetric ground states). The explored region is extended deep into the regime of very neutron-rich isotopes as they are expec...

  12. A wavelet based approach to measure and manage contagion at different time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Theo

    2015-10-01

    We decompose financial return series of US stocks into different time scales with respect to different market regimes. First, we examine dependence structure of decomposed financial return series and analyze the impact of the current financial crisis on contagion and changing interdependencies as well as upper and lower tail dependence for different time scales. Second, we demonstrate to which extent the information of different time scales can be used in the context of portfolio management. As a result, minimizing the variance of short-run noise outperforms a portfolio that minimizes the variance of the return series.

  13. Uniformly Almost Periodic Functions and Almost Periodic Solutions to Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, we propose a concept of uniformly almost periodic functions on almost periodic time scales and investigate some basic properties of them. When time scale T=ℝ or ℤ, our definition of the uniformly almost periodic functions is equivalent to the classical definitions of uniformly almost periodic functions and the uniformly almost periodic sequences, respectively. Then, based on these, we study the existence and uniqueness of almost periodic solutions and derive some fundamental conditions of admitting an exponential dichotomy to linear dynamic equations. Finally, as an application of our results, we study the existence of almost periodic solutions for an almost periodic nonlinear dynamic equations on time scales.

  14. Application of Time Scale to Parameters Tuning of Active Disturbance Rejection Controller for Induction Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Li-wei; LIAO Xiao-zhong; ZHANG Yu-he

    2007-01-01

    Active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) has good performance in induction motor (IM) control system, but controller parameter is difficult to tune. A method of tuning ADRC parameter by time scale is analyzed. The IM time scale is obtained by theoretical analysis. Combining the relations between scale time and ADRC parameters, ADRC parameter tuning in IM vector control based stator flux oriented is obtained. This parameter tuning method is validated by simulations and it provides a new technique for tuning of ADRC parameters of IM.

  15. A simple scaling for the minimum instability time-scale of two widely spaced planets

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Long-term instability in multi-planet exosystems is a crucial consideration when confirming putative candidates, analyzing exoplanet populations, constraining the age of exosystems, and identifying the sources of white dwarf pollution. Two planets which are Hill stable are separated by a wide-enough distance to ensure that they will never collide. However, Hill stable planetary systems may eventually manifest Lagrange instability when the outer planet escapes or the inner planet collides with the star. We show empirically that for two nearly coplanar Hill stable planets with eccentricities less than about 0.3, instability can manifest itself only after a time corresponding to X initial orbits of the inner planet, where log_{10}(X) is of the order of 5.2 mu^{-0.18} and mu is the planet-star mass ratio measured in (Jupiter mass/Solar mass). This relation applies to any type of equal-mass secondaries, and suggests that two low-eccentricity Hill stable terrestrial-mass or smaller-mass planets should be Lagrange s...

  16. A time-scale analysis of systematic risk: wavelet-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Khalfaoui Rabeh, K; Boutahar Mohamed, B

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of different time-scales on the market risk of individual stock market returns and of a given portfolio in Paris Stock Market by applying the wavelet analysis. To investigate the scaling properties of stock market returns and the lead/lag relationship between them at different scales, wavelet variance and crosscorrelations analyses are used. According to wavelet variance, stock returns exhibit long memory dynamics. The wavelet cross-correlation analysis shows that...

  17. Separation of time-scales and model reduction for stochastic reaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hye-Won

    2010-01-01

    A stochastic model for a chemical reaction network is embedded in a one-parameter family of models with species numbers and rate constants scaled by powers of the parameter. A systematic approach is developed for determining appropriate choices of the exponents that can be applied to large complex networks. When the scaling implies subnetworks have different time-scales, the subnetworks can be approximated separately providing insight into the behavior of the full network through the analysis of these lower dimensional approximations.

  18. Estimating the distribution of rest-frame time-scales for blazar jets: a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, I.; Blinov, D.; Papadakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.

    2017-03-01

    In any flux-density limited sample of blazars, the distribution of the time-scale modulation factor Δt΄/Δt, which quantifies the change in observed time-scales compared to the rest-frame ones due to redshift and relativistic compression follows an exponential distribution with a mean depending on the flux limit of the sample. In this work, we produce the mathematical formalism that allows us to use this information in order to uncover the underlining rest-frame probability density function of measurable time-scales of blazar jets. We extensively test our proposed methodology using a simulated Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar population with a 1.5 Jy flux-density limit in the simple case (where all blazars share the same intrinsic time-scale), in order to identify limits of applicability and potential biases due to observational systematics and sample selection. We find that for monitoring with time intervals between observations longer than ∼30 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale under investigation the method loses its ability to produce robust results. For time intervals of ∼3 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale, the error of the method is as low as 1 per cent in recovering the intrinsic rest-frame time-scale. We applied our method to rotations of the optical polarization angle of blazars observed by RoboPol. We found that the intrinsic time-scales of the longest duration rotation event in each blazar follows a narrow distribution, well described by a normal distribution with mean 87 d and standard deviation 5 d. We discuss possible interpretations of this result.

  19. Fission: statistical nucleon pair breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M. (Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru))

    1984-06-01

    In order to explain the odd-even effect observed in low energy fission fragment distributions it has been recently required a double mechanism of nucleon pair breaking: before scission (early pair breaking) and at scission (late pair breaking), respectively. In the present work we show that, using the same formulae but considering only the early pair breaking mechanism, one can reproduce fairly well all the available experimental data on the odd-even effects.

  20. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  1. Principles of 5D modeling, full integration of 3D space, time and scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, P.; Stoter, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for data modelling in five dimensions. Apart from three dimensions for geometrical representation and a fourth dimension for time, we identify scale as fifth dimensional characteristic. Considering scale as an extra dimension of geographic information, fully integrate

  2. Multi-Scale Gaussian Processes: a Novel Model for Chaotic Time Series Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ya-Tong; ZHANG Tai-Yi; SUN Jian-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the classical Gaussian process (GP) model, we propose a multi-scale Gaussian process (MGP) model to predict the existence of chaotic time series. The MGP employs a covariance function that is constructed by a scaling function with its different dilations and translations, ensuring that the optimal hyperparameter is easy to determine.

  3. Technical Application of Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    The chapter is devoted to the practical application of the fission process, mainly in nuclear reactors. After a historical discussion covering the natural reactors at Oklo and the first attempts to build artificial reactors, the fundamental principles of chain reactions are discussed. In this context chain reactions with fast and thermal neutrons are covered as well as the process of neutron moderation. Criticality concepts (fission factor η, criticality factor k) are discussed as well as reactor kinetics and the role of delayed neutrons. Examples of specific nuclear reactor types are presented briefly: research reactors (TRIGA and ILL High Flux Reactor), and some reactor types used to drive nuclear power stations (pressurized water reactor [PWR], boiling water reactor [BWR], Reaktor Bolshoi Moshchnosti Kanalny [RBMK], fast breeder reactor [FBR]). The new concept of the accelerator-driven systems (ADS) is presented. The principle of fission weapons is outlined. Finally, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly covered from mining, chemical isolation of the fuel and preparation of the fuel elements to reprocessing the spent fuel and conditioning for deposit in a final repository.

  4. Time scales of porphyry Cu deposit formation: insights from titanium diffusion in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Reed, Mark H.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyry dikes and hydrothermal veins from the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit at Butte, Montana, contain multiple generations of quartz that are distinct in scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images and in Ti concentrations. A comparison of microprobe trace element profiles and maps to SEM-CL images shows that the concentration of Ti in quartz correlates positively with CL brightness but Al, K, and Fe do not. After calibrating CL brightness in relation to Ti concentration, we use the brightness gradient between different quartz generations as a proxy for Ti gradients that we model to determine time scales of quartz formation and cooling. Model results indicate that time scales of porphyry magma residence are ~1,000s of years and time scales from porphyry quartz phenocryst rim formation to porphyry dike injection and cooling are ~10s of years. Time scales for the formation and cooling of various generations of hydrothermal vein quartz range from 10s to 10,000s of years. These time scales are considerably shorter than the ~0.6 m.y. overall time frame for each porphyry-style mineralization pulse determined from isotopic studies at Butte, Montana. Simple heat conduction models provide a temporal reference point to compare chemical diffusion time scales, and we find that they support short dike and vein formation time scales. We interpret these relatively short time scales to indicate that the Butte porphyry deposit formed by short-lived episodes of hydrofracturing, dike injection, and vein formation, each with discrete thermal pulses, which repeated over the ~3 m.y. generation of the deposit.

  5. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1 /2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit.

  6. A Small-Scale, Feasibility Study of Academic Language Time in Primary Grade Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskos, Kathleen A.; Zuzolo, Nicole; Primm, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    A small-scale feasibility study was conducted to explore the implementation of academic language time (ALT) in primary grade classrooms with and without access to digital devices. Academic language time is a structural change that dedicates a portion of language arts instructional time to direct vocabulary instruction using evidence-based…

  7. Design of turbulent tangential micro-mixers that mix liquids on the nanosecond time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitic, Sandra; Nieuwkasteele, van Jan W.; Berg, van den Albert; Vries, de Simon

    2015-01-01

    Unravelling (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms and macromolecular folding pathways on the (sub)microsecond time scale is limited by the time resolution of kinetic instruments for mixing reactants and observation of the progress of the reaction. To improve the mixing time resolution, turbulent four- a

  8. Driving forces of Indian summer monsoon on Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch time scales: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and deep water circulation changes drive the variability of southwest (SW) monsoon in the Indian subcontinent. Different forcing factors act on different time scales. Arabian Sea sediments consist of distinct fauna that are endemic to areas of upwelling...

  9. A Study on Time-Scales Ratio and Turbulent Prandtl Number in Ducts of Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    This investigation concerns numerical time-scales ratio and turbulent Prandtl number in fully developed turbulent flows in ducts of various cross-sections. The low Reynolds number version of a non-linear eddy viscosity model is proposed to predict the Reynolds stresses and the temperature field...... is solved using a two-equation heat flux model. The computed results compare satisfactory with the available experimental data. The time-scale ratio R is defined as the ratio between the dynamic time-scale (k/ε) and the scalar time-scale(0.5θθ/εθ). Based on existing DNS data and calculations in this work...

  10. Oscillation Criteria for Fourth-Order Nonlinear Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish some new oscillation criteria for nonlinear dynamic equation of the form on an arbitrary time scale with , where are positive rd-continuous functions. An example illustrating the importance of our result is included.

  11. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  12. Multiple time scales in modeling the incidence of infections acquired in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolkewitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU their risk of getting an infection will be highly depend on the length of stay at-risk in the ICU. In addition, risk of infection is likely to vary over calendar time as a result of fluctuations in the prevalence of the pathogen on the ward. Hence risk of infection is expected to depend on two time scales (time in ICU and calendar time as well as competing events (discharge or death and their spatial location. The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply appropriate statistical models for the risk of ICU-acquired infection accounting for multiple time scales, competing risks and the spatial clustering of the data. Methods A multi-center data base from a Spanish surveillance network was used to study the occurrence of an infection due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The analysis included 84,843 patient admissions between January 2006 and December 2011 from 81 ICUs. Stratified Cox models were used to study multiple time scales while accounting for spatial clustering of the data (patients within ICUs and for death or discharge as competing events for MRSA infection. Results Both time scales, time in ICU and calendar time, are highly associated with the MRSA hazard rate and cumulative risk. When using only one basic time scale, the interpretation and magnitude of several patient-individual risk factors differed. Risk factors concerning the severity of illness were more pronounced when using only calendar time. These differences disappeared when using both time scales simultaneously. Conclusions The time-dependent dynamics of infections is complex and should be studied with models allowing for multiple time scales. For patient individual risk-factors we recommend stratified Cox regression models for competing events with ICU time as the basic time scale and calendar time as a covariate. The inclusion of calendar time and stratification by ICU

  13. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  14. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asok Goswami

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the year 1939, both physical and radiochemical techniques have been adopted for the study of various aspects of the phenomenon. Due to the ability to separate individual elements from a complex reaction mixture with a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity, a chemist plays a significant role in the measurements of mass, charge, kinetic energy, angular momentum and angular distribution of fission products in various fissioning systems. At Trombay, a small group of radiochemists initiated the work on radiochemical studies of mass distribution in the early sixties. Since then, radiochemical investigations on various fission observables have been carried out at Trombay in , , and heavy-ion-induced fissions. An attempt has been made to highlight the important findings of such studies in this paper, with an emphasis on medium energy and heavy-ion-induced fission.

  15. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigni M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission barriers (Bohr transition states and in the intermediate wells (superdeformed and hyperdeformed states play a key role in the calculation of fission cross sections. A theoretical evaluation of the collective parts of the spectra is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two–cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of upper–shell nucleons between clusters. The impact of theoretical spectra on neutron–induced fission cross sections and, in combination with an improved version of the scission–point model, on angular distribution of fission fragments is evaluated for plutonium isotopes of interest to nuclear energy applications.

  16. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n,f) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Regnier, D; Schunck, N; Verriere, M

    2016-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r-process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data is available is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically using the time dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in tw...

  17. Global Uniform Asymptotic Stability of Competitive Neural Networks with Different-Time Scales and Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; L(U) Shu; ZHONG Shou-ming

    2005-01-01

    The global uniform asymptotic stability of competitive neural networks with different time scales and delay is investigated. By the method of variation of parameters and the method of inequality analysis, the condition for global uniformly asymptotically stable are given. A strict Lyapunov function for the flow of a competitive neural system with different time scales and delay is presented. Based on the function, the global uniform asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point can be proved.

  18. Combined use of meteorological drought indices at multi-time scales for improving hydrological drought detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Singh, Vijay P; Liu, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Prediction of hydrological drought in the absence of hydrological records is of great significance for water resources management and risk assessment. In this study, two meteorological drought indices, including standardized precipitation index (SPI) and standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) calculated at different time scales (1 to 12months), were analyzed for their capabilities in detecting hydrological droughts. The predictive skills of meteorological drought indices were assessed through correlation analysis, and two skill scores, i.e. probability of detection (POD) and false alarm rate (FAR). When used independently, indices of short time scales generally performed better than did those of long time scales. However, at least 31% of hydrological droughts were still missed in view of the peak POD score (0.69) of a single meteorological drought index. Considering the distinguished roles of different time scales in explaining hydrological droughts with disparate features, an optimization approach of blending SPI/SPEI at multiple time scales was proposed. To examine the robustness of the proposed method, data of 1964-1990 was used to establish the multiscalar index, then validate during 2000-2010. Results showed that POD exhibited a significant increase when more than two time scales were used, and the best performances were found when blending 8 time scales of SPI and 9 for SPEI, with the corresponding values of 0.82 and 0.85 for POD, 0.205 and 0.21 for FAR, in the calibration period, and even better performance in the validation period. These results far exceeded the performance of any single meteorological drought index. This suggests that when there is lack of streamflow measurements, blending climatic information of multiple time scales to jointly monitor hydrological droughts could be an alternative solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oscillation of Second-order Nonlinear Dynamic Equation on Time Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-shan

    2013-01-01

    The oscillation for a class of second order nonlinear variable delay dynamic equation on time scales with nonlinear neutral term and damping term was discussed in this article.By using the generalized Riccati technique,integral averaging technique and the time scales theory,some new sufficient conditions for oscillation of the equation are proposed.These results generalize and extend many known results for second order dynamic equations.Some examples are given to illustrate the main results of this article.

  20. REGION QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEMS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We first investigate some basic properties of dynamic equations on time scales,and propose contained curves to describe the jump direction of the discrete points.Then we perform qualitative analysis regarding the planar predator-prey systems on time scales,thereby obtain two theorems of this system.At last,we emulate application examples to discuss the parameters of the system.