WorldWideScience

Sample records for fission surface power

  1. Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; Van Dyke, Melissa; Martin, Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on the surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized, however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems. (authors)

  2. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  3. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to these seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought fro earth should be less than 1000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  4. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to those seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought from earth should be less than 1,000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield

  5. Fission Surface Power System Initial Concept Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) and in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE), NASA has embarked on a project to develop Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology. The primary goals of the project are to 1) develop FSP concepts that meet expected surface power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options, 2) establish a hardwarebased technical foundation for FSP design concepts and reduce overall development risk, 3) reduce the cost uncertainties for FSP and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates, and 4) generate the key products to allow NASA decision-makers to consider FSP as a preferred option for flight development. The FSP project was initiated in 2006 as the Prometheus Program and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission were phased-out. As a first step, NASA Headquarters commissioned the Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study to evaluate the potential for an affordable FSP development approach. With a cost-effective FSP strategy identified, the FSP team evaluated design options and selected a Preliminary Reference Concept to guide technology development. Since then, the FSP Preliminary Reference Concept has served as a point-of-departure for several NASA mission architecture studies examining the use of nuclear power and has provided the foundation for a series of "Pathfinder" hardware tests. The long-term technology goal is a Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) integrated system test using full-scale components and a non-nuclear reactor simulator. The FSP team consists of Glenn Research Center (GRC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the DOE National Laboratories at Los Alamos (LANL), Idaho (INL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), and Sandia (SNL). The project is organized into two main elements: Concept Definition and Risk Reduction. Under Concept Definition, the team performs trade studies, develops analytical tools, and formulates system concepts. Under Risk

  6. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Werner, James; Qualls, Louis; Radel, Ross

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO 2 -fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  7. Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Geng, Steven M.; Sanzi, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The Fission Surface Power (FSP) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is a system-level demonstration of fission power technology intended for use on manned missions to Mars. The Baseline FSP systems consists of a 190 kWt UO2 fast-spectrum reactor cooled by a primary pumped liquid metal loop. This liquid metal loop transfers heat to two intermediate liquid metal loops designed to isolate fission products in the primary loop from the balance of plant. The intermediate liquid metal loops transfer heat to four Stirling Power Conversion Units (PCU), each of which produce 12 kWe (48 kW total) and reject waste heat to two pumped water loops, which transfer the waste heat to titanium-water heat pipe radiators. The FSP TDU simulates a single leg of the baseline FSP system using an electrically heater core simulator, a single liquid metal loop, a single PCU, and a pumped water loop which rejects the waste heat to a Facility Cooling System (FCS). When operated at the nominal operating conditions (modified for low liquid metal flow) during TDU testing the PCU produced 8.9 kW of power at an efficiency of 21.7 percent resulting in a net system power of 8.1 kW and a system level efficiency of 17.2 percent. The reduction in PCU power from levels seen during electrically heated testing is the result of insufficient heat transfer from the NaK heater head to the Stirling acceptor, which could not be tested at Sunpower prior to delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The maximum PCU power of 10.4 kW was achieved at the maximum liquid metal temperature of 875 K, minimum water temperature of 350 K, 1.1 kg/s liquid metal flow, 0.39 kg/s water flow, and 15.0 mm amplitude at an efficiency of 23.3 percent. This resulted in a system net power of 9.7 kW and a system efficiency of 18.7 percent.

  8. A Practical Approach to Starting Fission Surface Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The Prometheus Power and Propulsion Program has been reformulated to address NASA needs relative to lunar and Mars exploration. Emphasis has switched from the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) flight system development to more generalized technology development addressing Fission Surface Power (FSP) and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Current NASA budget priorities and the deferred mission need date for nuclear systems prohibit a fully funded reactor Flight Development Program. However, a modestly funded Advanced Technology Program can and should be conducted to reduce the risk and cost of future flight systems. A potential road-map for FSP technology development leading to possible flight applications could include three elements: 1) Conceptual Design Studies, 2) Advanced Component Technology, and 3) Non-Nuclear System Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies would expand on recent NASA and DOE analyses while increasing the depth of study in areas of greatest uncertainty such as reactor integration and human-rated shielding. The Advanced Component Technology element would address the major technology risks through development and testing of reactor fuels, structural materials, primary loop components, shielding, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). The Non-Nuclear System Testing would provide a modular, technology test-bed to investigate and resolve system integration issues. (author)

  9. A Two-Phase Cooling Loop for Fission Surface Power Waste Heat Transport, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current lunar-based Fission Surface Power (FSP) Systems that will support sustained surface outposts consist of a nuclear reactor with power converters, whose waste...

  10. High Efficiency, High Temperature Foam Core Heat Exchanger for Fission Surface Power Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fission-based power systems with power levels of 30 to ≥100 kWe will be needed for planetary surface bases. Development of high temperature, high efficiency heat...

  11. Reference reactor module for NASA's lunar surface fission power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapernick, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werner, James [INL; Qualls, Louis [ORNL; Radel, Ross [SNL

    2009-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. The AFSPS concept is now being further developed within the Fission Surface Power (FSP) Project, which is a near-term technology program to demonstrate system-level TRL-6 by 2013. This paper describes the reference FSP reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based. UO{sub 2}-fueled, pumped-NaK fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a 'workhorse' power system that NASA can utilize in near-term and future Lunar and Martian mission architectures, with the eventual capability to evolve to very high power, low mass systems, for either surface, deep space, and/or orbital missions.

  12. Closed Brayton Cycle Power Conversion Unit for Fission Surface Power Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    A Closed Brayton cycle power conversion system has been developed to support the NASA fission surface power program. The goal is to provide electricity from a small nuclear reactor heat source for surface power production for lunar and Mars environments. The selected media for a heat source is NaK 78 with water as a cooling source. The closed Brayton cycle power was selected to be 12 kWe output from the generator terminals. A heat source NaK temperature of 850 K plus or minus 25 K was selected. The cold source water was selected at 375 K plus or minus 25 K. A vacuum radiation environment of 200 K is specified for environmental operation. The major components of the system are the power converter, the power controller, and the top level data acquisition and control unit. The power converter with associated sensors resides in the vacuum radiation environment. The power controller and data acquisition system reside in an ambient laboratory environment. Signals and power are supplied across the pressure boundary electrically with hermetic connectors installed on the vacuum vessel. System level analyses were performed on working fluids, cycle design parameters, heater and cooling temperatures, and heat exchanger options that best meet the needs of the power converter specification. The goal is to provide a cost effective system that has high thermal-to-electric efficiency in a compact, lightweight package.

  13. Planetary Surface Power and Interstellar Propulsion Using Fission Fragment Magnetic Collimator Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; Hart, Ron R.; King, Don B.; Rochau, Gary E.

    2006-01-01

    Fission energy can be used directly if the kinetic energy of fission fragments is converted to electricity and/or thrust before turning into heat. The completed US DOE NERI Direct Energy Conversion (DEC) Power Production project indicates that viable DEC systems are possible. The US DOE NERI DEC Proof of Principle project began in October of 2002 with the goal to demonstrate performance principles of DEC systems. One of the emerging DEC concepts is represented by fission fragment magnetic collimator reactors (FFMCR). Safety, simplicity, and high conversion efficiency are the unique advantages offered by these systems. In the FFMCR, the basic energy source is the kinetic energy of fission fragments. Following escape from thin fuel layers, they are captured on magnetic field lines and are directed out of the core and through magnetic collimators to produce electricity and thrust. The exiting flow of energetic fission fragments has a very high specific impulse that allows efficient planetary surface power and interstellar propulsion without carrying any conventional propellant onboard. The objective of this work was to determine technological feasibility of the concept. This objective was accomplished by producing the FFMCR design and by analysis of its performance characteristics. The paper presents the FFMCR concept, describes its development to a technologically feasible level and discusses obtained results. Performed studies offer efficiencies up to 90% and velocities approaching speed of light as potentially achievable. The unmanned 10-tons probe with 1000 MW FFMCR propulsion unit would attain mission velocity of about 2% of the speed of light. If the unit is designed for 4000 MW, then in 10 years the unmanned 10-tons probe would attain mission velocity of about 10% of the speed of light

  14. Radar Men on the Moon: A Brief Survey of Fission Surface Power Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the salient fission surface power studies, including those dating back to the early SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) program. Particular attention will be focused on the more recent Space Exploration Initiative (including the related Synthesis Group report) and Vision for Space Exploration. Commonalties in these studies will be noted; for example, many studies have shown that powers in the range of 100 kWe are required for human-tended bases on the Moon and Mars. Just as advanced human civilizations depend upon electrical power so will advanced, human-occupied lunar and Mars bases with powers rising into the megawatt level for bases with manufacturing and resource utilization capabilities. The role of radioisotope power sources will also be noted

  15. Radar Men on the Moon: A Brief Survey of Fission Surface Power Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the salient fission surface power studies, including those dating back to the early SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) program. Particular attention will be focused on the more recent Space Exploration Initiative (including the related Synthesis Group report) and Vision for Space Exploration. Commonalties in these studies will be noted; for example, many studies have shown that powers in the range of 100 kWe are required for human-tended bases on the Moon and Mars. Just as advanced human civilizations depend upon electrical power so will advanced, human-occupied lunar and Mars bases with powers rising into the megawatt level for bases with manufacturing and resource utilization capabilities. The role of radioisotope power sources will also be noted.

  16. Testing of an Annular Linear Induction Pump for the Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Webster, K.; Godfoy, T. J.; Bossard, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Results of performance testing of an annular linear induction pump that has been designed for integration into a fission surface power technology demonstration unit are presented. The pump electromagnetically pushes liquid metal (NaK) through a specially-designed apparatus that permits quantification of pump performance over a range of operating conditions. Testing was conducted for frequencies of 40, 55, and 70 Hz, liquid metal temperatures of 125, 325, and 525 C, and input voltages from 30 to 120 V. Pump performance spanned a range of flow rates from roughly 0.3 to 3.1 L/s (4.8 to 49 gpm), and pressure heads of <1 to 104 kPa (<0.15 to 15 psi). The maximum efficiency measured during testing was 5.4%. At the technology demonstration unit operating temperature of 525 C the pump operated over a narrower envelope, with flow rates from 0.3 to 2.75 L/s (4.8 to 43.6 gpm), developed pressure heads from <1 to 55 kPa (<0.15 to 8 psi), and a maximum efficiency of 3.5%. The pump was supplied with three-phase power at 40 and 55 Hz using a variable-frequency motor drive, while power at 55 and 70 Hz was supplied using a variable-frequency power supply. Measured performance of the pump at 55 Hz using either supply exhibited good quantitative agreement. For a given temperature, the peak in efficiency occurred at different flow rates as the frequency was changed, but the maximum value of efficiency was relative insensitive within 0.3% over the frequency range tested, including a scan from 45 to 78 Hz. The objectives of the FSP technology project are as follows:5 • Develop FSP concepts that meet expected surface power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options. • Establish a nonnuclear hardware-based technical foundation for FSP design concepts to reduce overall development risk. • Reduce the cost uncertainties for FSP and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates. • Generate the key nonnuclear products to allow Agency

  17. Status of the Development of Low Cost Radiator for Surface Fission Power - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Maxwell, Taylor; Anderson, William G.; Wagner, Corey; Wrosch, Matthew; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar and Martian surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kWe range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kWe non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. The paper reports on the development of the heat pipe radiator to reject the waste heat from the Stirling convertors. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water Variable Conductance Heat Pipes (VCHPs). By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POCO"TM" foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. As mentioned in previous papers by the authors, the final design of the waste heat radiator is described as being modular with independent GFRC panels for each heat pipe. The present paper reports on test results for a single radiator module as well as a radiator cluster consisting of eight integral modules. These tests were carried out in both ambient and vacuum conditions. While the vacuum testing of the single radiator module was performed in the ACT's vacuum chamber, the vacuum testing of the eight heat pipe radiator cluster took place in NASA GRC's vacuum chamber to accommodate the larger size of the cluster. The results for both articles show good agreement

  18. Status of fission power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenson, M.

    1977-01-01

    Fission energy is reviewed from the viewpoints of technology, economics, politics, manufacturers, consumers, and foreign countries. Technically, the reactor program is operating and the light water reactor industry shows signs of maturing, although recent business has been disappointing. Marketing of gas-cooled reactors depends, not on technical, but economic and political issues. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors have been demonstrated worldwide, while the gas-cooled fast breeder remains an undemonstrated option. Nuclear plants, currently costing the same as coal plants with scrubbers, are the cheapest option for utilities because most of the cost is imbedded. The defeat of nuclear initiatives in seven states indicates that public feeling is not as anti-nuclear as opponents to nuclear power claim. The harshness of last winter demonstrated the advantages of a power source that is not so sensitive to the weather for reliable operation and transport, as well as low cost energy. Other nations are proceeding to build a nuclear capability, which the U.S. may jeopardize because of concerns about the fuel cycle, nuclear waste disposal, uranium reserves, and nuclear proliferation

  19. Materials-of-Construction Radiation Sensitivity for a Fission Surface Power Convertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Geng, Steven M.; Niedra, Janis M.; Sayir, Ali; Shin, Eugene E.; Sutter, James K.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2007-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with a free-piston Stirling convertor is one of many credible approaches for producing electrical power in space applications. This study assumes dual-opposed free-piston Stirling engines/linear alternators that will operate nominally at 825 K hot-end and 425 K cold-end temperatures. The baseline design options, temperature profiles, and materials of construction discussed here are based on historical designs as well as modern convertors operating at lower power levels. This notional design indicates convertors primarily made of metallic components that experience minimal change in mechanical properties for fast neutron fluences less than 10(sup 20) neutrons per square centimeter. However, these radiation effects can impact the magnetic and electrical properties of metals at much lower fluences than are crucial for mechanical property integrity. Moreover, a variety of polymeric materials are also used in common free-piston Stirling designs for bonding, seals, lubrication, insulation and others. Polymers can be affected adversely by radiation doses as low as 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 10) rad. Additionally, the absorbing dose rate, radiation hardness, and the resulting effect (either hardening or softening) varies depending on the nature of the particular polymer. The classes of polymers currently used in convertor fabrication are discussed along possible substitution options. Thus, the materials of construction of prototypic Stirling convertor engines have been considered and the component materials susceptible to damage at the lowest neutron fluences have been identified.

  20. Summary of the Manufacture, Testing and Model Validation of a Full-Scale Radiator for Fission Surface Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.; Calder, James; Siamidis, John

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale radiator for a lunar fission surface power application was manufactured by Material innovations, Inc., for the NASA Glenn Research Center. The radiator was designed to reject 6 kWt with an inlet water temperature of 400 K and a water mass flow rate of 0.5 kg/s. While not flight hardware, the radiator incorporated many potential design features and manufacturing techniques for future flight hardware. The radiator was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center for heat rejection performance. The results showed that the radiator design was capable of rejecting over 6 kWt when operating at the design conditions. The actual performance of the radiator as a function of operational manifolds, inlet water temperature and facility sink temperature was compared to the predictive model developed by NASA Glenn Research Center. The results showed excellent agreement with the model with the actual average face sheet temperature being within 1% of the predicted value. The results will be used in the design and production of NASA s next generation fission power heat rejection systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center s Technology Demonstration Unit will be the first project to take advantage of the newly developed manufacturing techniques and analytical models.

  1. A Comparison of Fission Power System Options for Lunar and Mars Surface Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of reactor and power conversion design options for 50 kWe class lunar and Mars surface power applications with scaling from 25 to 200 kWe. Design concepts and integration approaches are provided for three reactor-converter combinations: gas-cooled Brayton, liquid-metal Stirling, and liquid-metal thermoelectric. The study examines the mass and performance of low temperature, stainless steel based reactors and higher temperature refractory reactors. The preferred system implementation approach uses crew-assisted assembly and in-situ radiation shielding via installation of the reactor in an excavated hole. As an alternative, self-deployable system concepts that use earth-delivered, on-board radiation shielding are evaluated. The analyses indicate that among the 50 kWe stainless steel reactor options, the liquid-metal Stirling system provides the lowest mass at about 5300 kg followed by the gas-cooled Brayton at 5700 kg and the liquid-metal thermoelectric at 8400 kg. The use of a higher temperature, refractory reactor favors the gas-cooled Brayton option with a system mass of about 4200 kg as compared to the Stirling and thermoelectric options at 4700 kg and 5600 kg, respectively. The self-deployed concepts with on-board shielding result in a factor of two system mass increase as compared to the in-situ shielded concepts

  2. Low Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future space transportation and surface power applications. The early systems are...

  3. Low Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GRC is developing fission power system technology for future space transportation and surface power applications. The early systems are envisioned in the 10 to...

  4. The future of fission-electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morowski, J.V.

    1983-06-01

    Future worldwide electricity supply needs dictate the necessity of maintaining a sound capability for electricity and electric power generating facilities, including nuclear, as viable export commodities. A survey of fission-power plant types and the status of worldwide nuclear electric power illustrates the primary emphasis on LWR's and HWR's as two leading types in the export market. This survey examines the factors affecting the market prospects for the next five to fifteen years and provides a discussion on some possible improvements to current market circumstances. A comparative description is provided for some of the types of LWR and CANDU characteristics such as quantities, schedules, constructability factors, and equipment and system. Important factors in the selection process for future nuclear power plants are discussed. Some factors included are seismic design requirements; plant design description and possible site layout; plant protection, control and instrumentation; thermal cycle design and arrangement; and special construction and rigging requirements

  5. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  6. Regulatory aspects of fusion power-lessons from fission plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalizio, A.; Brunnader, H.; Sood, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    Experience from fission reactors has shown the regulatory process for licensing a nuclear facility to be legalistic, lengthy, unpredictable, and costly. This experience also indicates that much of the regulatory debate is focused on safety margins, that is, the smaller the safety margins the bigger the regulatory debate and the greater the amount of proof required to satisfy the regulatory. Such experience suggests that caution and prudence guide the development of a regulatory regime for fusion reactors. Fusion has intrinsic safety and environmental advantages over fission, which should alleviate significantly, or even eliminate, the regulatory problems associated with fission. The absence of a criticality concern and the absence of fission products preclude a Chernobyl type accident from occurring in a fusion reactor. Although in a fusion reactor there are large inventories of radioactive products that can be mobilized, the total quantity is orders of magnitude smaller than in fission power reactors. The bulk of the radioactivity in a fusion reactor is either activation products in steel structures, or tritium fuel supplies safely stored in the form of a metal tritide in storage beds. The quantity of tritium that can be mobilized under accident conditions is much less than ten million curies. This compares very favorably with a fission product inventory greater than ten billion curies in a fission power reactor. Furthermore, in a fission reactor, all of the reactivity is contained in a steel vessel that is pressurized to about 150 atmospheres, whereas in a fusion reactor, the inventory of radioactive material is dispersed in different areas of the plant, such that it is improbable that a single event could give rise to the release of the entire inventory to the environment. With such significant intrinsic safety advantages there is no a priori need to make fusion requirements/regulations more demanding and more stringent than fission

  7. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it

  8. Evaluation of axial fission gas transport in power ramping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Motoyasu

    1986-01-01

    The LINUS code calculates advective and diffusional transport of fission gas towards an upper plenum through the pellet-cladding gap. The basic equations were modified for analyzing a multi-component gas mixture in the gap and also for dealing with opening and/or closing of the gap, which induces additional axial gas flow. Analysis of the Petten ramp experiment shows that helium pressurization is effective in suppressing an ascending rate of fission gas concentration. After the maximum concentration is achieved through power ramping, the gas concentration could be described by a steady state analytical solution which does not depend on the filling gas pressure. (author)

  9. Design of pellet surface grooves for fission gas plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Jones, L.R.; Macici, N.; Miller, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    In the Canada deuterium uranium pressurized heavy water reactor, short (50-cm) Zircaloy-4 clad bundles are fueled on-power. Although internal void volume within the fuel rods is adequate for the present once-through natural uranium cycle, the authors have investigated methods for increasing the internal gas storage volume needed in high-power, high-burnup, experimental ceramic fuels. This present work sought to prove the methodology for design of gas storage volume within the fuel pellets - specifically the use of grooves pressed or machined into the relatively cool pellet/cladding interface. Preanalysis and design of pellet groove shape and volume was accomplished using the TRUMP heat transfer code. Postirradiation examination (PIE) was used to check the initial design and heat transfer assumptions. Fission gas release was found to be higher for the grooved pellet rods than for the comparison rods with hollow or unmodified pellets. This had been expected from the initial TRUMP thermal analyses. The ELESIM fuel modeling code was used to check in-reactor performance, but some modifications were necessary to accommodate the loss of heat transfer surface to the grooves. It was concluded that for plenum design purposes, circumferential pellet grooves could be adequately modeled by the codes TRUMP and ELESIM

  10. Experimental survey of the potential energy surfaces associated with fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the experimental determination of the properties of the potential energy surface associated with fission is reviewed. The importance of nuclear symmetry effects on the calculation of fission widths is demonstrated. Evidence is presented for the fragmentation of the mass-asymmetric second barrier in the thorium region and the axial asymmetric first barrier in the californium region. Detailed analyses of experimental data suggest the presence of two parallel second barriers; the normal mass-asymmetric, axial-symmetric barrier and a slightly higher mass-symmetric, axial-asymmetric barrier. Experimental barrier parameters are determined systematically and compared with calculations from various theoretical models. Techniques for expanding fission probability measurements to higher energies are discussed. (author)

  11. Low-Cost Radiator for Fission Power Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Taylor; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William; Hartenstine, John; Stern, Theodore; Walmsley, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing fission power system technology for future Lunar surface power applications. The systems are envisioned in the 10 to 100kW(sub e) range and have an anticipated design life of 8 to 15 years with no maintenance. NASA GRC is currently setting up a 55 kW(sub e) non-nuclear system ground test in thermal-vacuum to validate technologies required to transfer reactor heat, convert the heat into electricity, reject waste heat, process the electrical output, and demonstrate overall system performance. Reducing the radiator mass, size, and cost is essential to the success of the program. To meet these goals, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) and Vanguard Space Technologies, Inc. (VST) are developing a single facesheet radiator with heat pipes directly bonded to the facesheet. The facesheet material is a graphite fiber reinforced composite (GFRC) and the heat pipes are titanium/water. By directly bonding a single facesheet to the heat pipes, several heavy and expensive components can be eliminated from the traditional radiator design such as, POC(TradeMark) foam saddles, aluminum honeycomb, and a second facesheet. A two-heat pipe radiator prototype, based on the single facesheet direct-bond concept, was fabricated and tested to verify the ability of the direct-bond joint to withstand coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) induced stresses during thermal cycling. The thermal gradients along the bonds were measured before and after thermal cycle tests to determine if the performance degraded. Overall, the results indicated that the initial uniformity of the adhesive was poor along one of the heat pipes. However, both direct bond joints showed no measureable amount of degradation after being thermally cycled at both moderate and aggressive conditions.

  12. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  13. The Power Makers' Challenge And the Need for Fission Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Power Makers - the producers of our electricity - must meet the demands of their customers while also addressing the threat of climate change. There are widely differing views about solutions to electricity generation in an emission constrained world. Some see the problem as relatively straight forward, requiring deep cuts in emissions now by improving energy efficiency, energy conservation and using only renewable resources. Many electricity industry engineers and scientists see the problem as being much more involved.   The Power Makers ’ Challenge: and the need for Fission Energy looks at why using only conventional renewable energy sources is not quite as simple as it seems. Following a general introduction to electricity and its distribution, the author quantifies the reductions needed in greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector in the face of ever increasing world demands for electricity. It provides some much needed background on the many energy sources available for producing electricity ...

  14. Fission Power System Technology for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee; Houts, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program, and in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE), NASA is conducting a project to mature Fission Power System (FPS) technology. A primary project goal is to develop viable system options to support future NASA mission needs for nuclear power. The main FPS project objectives are as follows: 1) Develop FPS concepts that meet expected NASA mission power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options. 2) Establish a hardware-based technical foundation for FPS design concepts and reduce overall development risk. 3) Reduce the cost uncertainties for FPS and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates. 4) Generate the key products to allow NASA decisionmakers to consider FPS as a preferred option for flight development. In order to achieve these goals, the FPS project has two main thrusts: concept definition and risk reduction. Under concept definition, NASA and DOE are performing trade studies, defining requirements, developing analytical tools, and formulating system concepts. A typical FPS consists of the reactor, shield, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). Studies are performed to identify the desired design parameters for each subsystem that allow the system to meet the requirements with reasonable cost and development risk. Risk reduction provides the means to evaluate technologies in a laboratory test environment. Non-nuclear hardware prototypes are built and tested to verify performance expectations, gain operating experience, and resolve design uncertainties.

  15. Calculation of burnup and power dependence on fission gas released from PWR type reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy-Sulistyono

    1996-01-01

    Burn up dependence of fission gas released and variation power analysis have been conducted using FEMXI-IV computer code program for Pressure Water Reactor Fuel During steady-state condition. The analysis result shows that the fission gas release is sensitive to the fuel temperature, the increasing of burn up and power in the fuel element under irradiation experiment

  16. Human Mars Surface Mission Nuclear Power Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2018-01-01

    A key decision facing Mars mission designers is how to power a crewed surface field station. Unlike the solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) that could retreat to a very low power state during a Martian dust storm, human Mars surface missions are estimated to need at least 15 kilowatts of electrical (kWe) power simply to maintain critical life support and spacecraft functions. 'Hotel' loads alone for a pressurized crew rover approach two kWe; driving requires another five kWe-well beyond what the Curiosity rover’s Radioisotope Power System (RPS) was designed to deliver. Full operation of a four-crew Mars field station is estimated at about 40 kWe. Clearly, a crewed Mars field station will require a substantial and reliable power source, beyond the scale of robotic mission experience. This paper explores the applications for both fission and RPS nuclear options for Mars.

  17. Power-balance analysis of muon-catalyzed fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A power-balance model of a muon-catalyzed fusion system in the context of a fission-fuel factory is developed and exercised to predict the required physics performance of systems competitive with either pure muon-catalyzed fusion systems or thermonuclear fusion-fission fuel factory hybrid systems

  18. Advantages of Production of New Fissionable Nuclides for the Nuclear Power Industry in Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Andrianova, E. A.; Davidenko, V. D.; Rodionova, E. V.; Tsibulskiy, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    A concept of a large-scale nuclear power engineering system equipped with fusion and fission reactors is presented. The reactors have a joint fuel cycle, which imposes the lowest risk of the radiation impact on the environment. The formation of such a system is considered within the framework of the evolution of the current nuclear power industry with the dominance of thermal reactors, gradual transition to the thorium fuel cycle, and integration into the system of the hybrid fusion-fission reactors for breeding nuclear fuel for fission reactors. Such evolution of the nuclear power engineering system will allow preservation of the existing structure with the dominance of thermal reactors, enable the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with low burnup, and prevent the dangerous accumulation of minor actinides. The proposed structure of the nuclear power engineering system minimizes the risk of radioactive contamination of the environment and the SNF reprocessing facilities, decreasing it by more than one order of magnitude in comparison with the proposed scheme of closing the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle based on the reprocessing of SNF with high burnup from fast reactors.

  19. Metrology for New Generation Nuclear Power Plants - MetroFission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Lena; Dinsdale, Alan; Keightley, John; Filtz, Jean-Remy; Hay, Bruno; DeFelice, Pierino; Sadli, Mohamed; Plompen, Arjan; Heyse, Jan; Pomme, Stefaan; Cassette, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    MetroFission project has been looking at solving metrological problems related to a new generation of NPPs. The proposed Gen. IV NPPs are designed to run safely, make efficient use of natural resources, minimize the waste and maintain proliferation resistance. In order to reach these goals, the reactor operation involves higher temperatures, high-energy neutron fluence, different types of fuel where the minor actinides are included etc. The work has focused on improved temperature measurements, investigation of thermal properties of advanced materials, determination of new and relevant nuclear data and development of measurement techniques for radionuclides suitable for Gen. IV NPPs. The improved temperature measurement for nuclear power plant applications includes the development of a new Fe-C fixed point. Robust, repeatable and versatile cells have been constructed and compared with success among the project participants and their melting temperatures have been determined. Methodology of self-validating thermocouples has proven efficient at several fixed point temperatures using different designs. A practical acoustic thermometer has been tested at 1000 deg. C with success thanks to the use of innovative signal processing methods. Mo/Nb thermocouples have been obtained with different sheath materials and tested with the aim to achieve for the first time a reference function determined with the best possible uncertainties. Following reviews of designs and technology proposed for fourth generation nuclear plants effort within this project, with regards to thermal properties of advanced materials for nuclear design, has concentrated on provision of thermodynamic data to support the development of the sodium cooled fast reactor. Data has been critically assessed to represent the potential interaction between the Na coolant and the nuclear fuel taken to be based on (U, Pu)O 2 but incorporating minor actinides such as Np and Am. Data for the fission products and

  20. Comparison of environmental impact of waste disposal from fusion, fission and coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Bruno [Fichtner GmbH und Co. KG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The radiotoxic hazard of waste from fusion power plants has been compared with that of fission power and radioactive trace elements in coal ash within some research programs such as SEAFP and SEIF. Within another program, in 2005 a Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been finalized investigating 4 fusion power plant models A to D. In this paper, the radiotoxicity of model B is compared with a fission power plant, concentrating on the production of wastes. The hazard of the respective masses of enriched uranium before use in a fission power plant and coal ash of a power plant generating the same amount of electricity are used as benchmarks. It is evident that the development of ingestion and inhalation hazard of the PPCS model B is different from the results of earlier studies because of different assumptions on material impurities and other constraints. An important aspect is the presence of actinides in fusion power plant waste. (orig.)

  1. Kilowatt-Class Fission Power Systems for Science and Human Precursor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.; Gibson, Marc Andrew; Poston, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power provides an enabling capability for NASA missions that might otherwise be constrained by power availability, mission duration, or operational robustness. NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing fission power technology to serve a wide range of future space uses. Advantages include lower mass, longer life, and greater mission flexibility than competing power system options. Kilowatt-class fission systems, designated "Kilopower," were conceived to address the need for systems to fill the gap above the current 100-W-class radioisotope power systems being developed for science missions and below the typical 100-k We-class reactor power systems being developed for human exploration missions. This paper reviews the current fission technology project and examines some Kilopower concepts that could be used to support future science missions or human precursors.

  2. Fission gas behaviour modelling in plate fuel during a power transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, S.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the identification and modelization of the phenomena which are at the origin of the release of the fission gas formed in UO 2 plate fuels during the irradiation in a power transient. In the first experimental part, samples of plate fuels, irradiated at 36 GWj/tU, have been annealed to temperatures from 1100 C to 1500 C in a device that enabled the measurement of gas release in real time. At 1300 C, post-annealing observations demonstrated a link between the measured gas releases to a rapid formation of labyrinths at the grain surface. These labyrinths, which were formed by intergranular bubble interconnection, create release paths for the gas atoms which reach the grain surface. At this stage, the available experimental results (annealing and observations) were interpreted considering that it is the spreading of the gas atoms from the grains to the grain boundaries that is at the origin of the observed releases. This interpretation generates the hypothesis that a) at the end of the basic irradiation, the gas is at the atomic state and b) during the annealing, the spreading is reduced by the intragranular bubbles of the gas atoms. The last part of the work is dedicated to the modelization of the main phenomena at the origin of the gas release. The model developed, based on the model of the gas behaviour in MARGARET PWR, highlighted the great influence of the irradiation conditions on the gas distribution at the end of the irradiation and also its influence on the fission gas release during the power transient. (author) [fr

  3. Fission gas release during power change by means of re-irradiation of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Jinichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refabricated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40kW/m, power cycling and daily load follow operations between 20 and 40kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The width of the rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling decreased gradually as the power cycling was repeated continuously. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from FP gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. (author)

  4. Fission power: a search for a ''second-generation'' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report touches on the history of US fission reactors and explores the current technical status of such reactors around the world, including experimental reactors. Its purpose is to identify, evaluate, and rank the most promising concepts among existing reactors, proposed but unadopted designs, and what can be described as ''new'' concepts. Also discussed are such related concerns as utility requirements and design considerations. The report concludes with some recommendations for possible future LLNL involvement

  5. Improving the safety of future nuclear fission power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Gros, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main objectives and principles in nuclear fission reactor safety are presented, e.g. the defence in depth strategy and technical principles such as redundancy, diversity and physical separation. After a brief historical review of the continuous development of safety improvement, the most recent international discussion is presented. This includes mainly the international activities within IAEA and its International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). The safety improvement, presented in recommendations of IAEA and INSAG is expressed as an improvement of all elements and all levels of the defence in depth concept. Special emphasis is put on improvement of the highest level, which requires the implementation of means to mitigate consequences of accidents with severe core damage. The different future concepts are briefly characterised. Some examples from the French-German safety approach are taken to demonstrate how requirements for safety improvement by means of an enhancement of the defence in depth principle are developed

  6. Study of advanced fission power reactor development for the United States. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This volume summarizes the results and conclusions of an assessment of five advanced fission power reactor concepts in the context of potential nuclear power economies developed over the time period 1975 to 2020. The study was based on the premise that the LMFBR program has been determined to be the highest priority fission reactor program and it will proceed essentially as planned. Accepting this fact, the overall objective of the study was to provide evaluations of advanced fission reactor systems for input to evaluating the levels of research and development funding for fission power. Evaluation of the reactor systems included the following categories: (1) power plant performance, (2) fuel resource utilization; (3) fuel-cycle requirements; (4) economics; (5) environmental impact; (6) risk to the public; and (7) R and D requirements to achieve commercial status. The specific major objectives of the study were twofold: (1) to parametrically assess the impact of various reactor types for various levels of power demand through the year 2020 on fissile fuel utilization, economics, and the environment, based on varying but reasonable assumptions on the rates of installation; and (2) to qualitatively assess the practicality of the advanced reactor concepts, and their research and development. The reactor concepts examined were limited to the following: advanced high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) systems including the thorium/U-233 fuel cycle, gas turbine, and binary cycle (BIHTGR); gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR); molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR); light water breeder reactor (LWBR); and CANDU heavy water reactor

  7. Fission nuclear power prospects and its role in meeting global energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golan, S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power currently makes an important contribution to world's energy requirements providing 17% of its electricity. But as global warming becomes of greater concern, many ask whether nuclear power can and should contribute more. The author, who is involved in the nuclear power enterprise for 35 years, tries to answer this question affirmative. He holds the view that: a) nuclear fission power is essential to meeting world's energy needs without unduly impairing the global environment; b) by possessing the required attributes discussed in this paper, nuclear fission power can be made societally acceptable; c) the industrialized world should accelerate LMFR deployment while fostering more convenient energy alternatives for the developing world; and d) the HTGR is unique in its ability to augment non-electricity energy needs and could become the technology choice of developing countries for nuclear electricity production. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  8. A method of surface area measurement of fuel materials by fission gas release at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimal, K.N.G.; Naik, M.C.; Paul, A.R.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present report deals with the development of a method for surface area measurement of nuclear fuel as well as fissile doped materials by fission gas release study at low temperature. The method is based on the evaluation of knock-out release rate of fission 133 Xe from irradiated fuel after sufficient cooling to decay the short lived activity. The report also describes the fabrication of an ampoule breaker unit for such study. Knock-out release rate of 133 Xe has been studied from UO 2 powders having varying surface area 'S' ranging from 270 cm 2 /gm to 4100 cm 2 /gm at two fissioning rates 10 12 f/cm 3 . sec. and 3.2x10 10 f/cm.sec. A relation between K and A has been established and discussed in this report. (author). 6 refs

  9. A method for measuring power signal background and source strength in a fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Kall, L.; Visuri, P.

    1977-01-01

    Theory and experimental verification of a novel method for measuring power signal bias and source strength in a fission reactor are reported. A minicomputer was applied in the measurements. The method is an extension of the inverse kinetics method presented by Mogilner et al. (Auth.)

  10. Transfer parameters of fission and activation products present in effluents of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Menossi, C.A.; Ciallella, N.R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents results of research carried out in Argentina on transfer parameters of fission and activation products which may be present in the effluents of nuclear power reactors. For some nuclides, as Sr-90, Co-137 and I-131, the parameters were obtained by studies of the fallout, from measurements of integrated levels in the environment and in the food chains. Other values are concentration factors derived from laboratory and field experiments. They refer to fish, molluscs, crustaces and fresh water plants, for several fission and activation nuclides. Transfer parameters obtained have been of significant importance for environmental assessments, relating to nuclear installations in Argentina. (author)

  11. An assessment of fission product data for decay power calculation in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, M.S.; Murthy, K.P.N.

    1987-01-01

    A review of our present capability at IGC, Kalpakkam to predict fission product decay power in fast reactors is presented. This is accomplished by comparing our summation calculations with the calculations of others and the reported experimental measurements. Our calculations are based on Chandy code developed at our Centre. The fission product data base of Chandy is essentially drawn from the yield data compiled by Crouch (1977) and the data on halflives etc. compiled by Tobias (1973). In general, we find good agreement amongst the different calculations (within ±5%) and our calculations also compare well with experimental measurements of AKIAMA et al and MURPHY et al

  12. Heat Pipe Powered Stirling Conversion for the Demonstration Using Flattop Fission (DUFF) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Sanzi, James L.; Brace, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Design concepts for small Fission Power Systems (FPS) have shown that heat pipe cooled reactors provide a passive, redundant, and lower mass option to transfer heat from the fuel to the power conversion system, as opposed to pumped loop designs typically associated with larger FPS. Although many systems have been conceptually designed and a few making it to electrically heated testing, none have been coupled to a real nuclear reactor. A demonstration test named DUFF Demonstration Using Flattop Fission, was planned by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) to use an existing criticality experiment named Flattop to provide the nuclear heat source. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center designed, built, and tested a heat pipe and power conversion system to couple to Flattop with the end goal of making electrical power. This paper will focus on the design and testing performed in preparation for the DUFF test.

  13. Control of a laser inertial confinement fusion-fission power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.; Latkowski, Jeffery F.; Kramer, Kevin J.

    2015-10-27

    A laser inertial-confinement fusion-fission energy power plant is described. The fusion-fission hybrid system uses inertial confinement fusion to produce neutrons from a fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium. The fusion neutrons drive a sub-critical blanket of fissile or fertile fuel. A coolant circulated through the fuel extracts heat from the fuel that is used to generate electricity. The inertial confinement fusion reaction can be implemented using central hot spot or fast ignition fusion, and direct or indirect drive. The fusion neutrons result in ultra-deep burn-up of the fuel in the fission blanket, thus enabling the burning of nuclear waste. Fuels include depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, spent nuclear fuel, thorium, and weapons grade plutonium. LIFE engines can meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the highly undesirable stockpiles of depleted uranium, spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials.

  14. Fission-powered in-core thermoacoustic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Steven L. [Graduate Program in Acoustics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Smith, James A. [Fundamental Fuel Properties, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Smith, Robert W. M. [Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania 16804 (United States); Heidrich, Brenden J. [Nuclear Science User Facilities, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Heibel, Michael D. [Global Technology Development, Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania 16066 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    A thermoacoustic engine is operated within the core of a nuclear reactor to acoustically telemeter coolant temperature (frequency-encoded) and reactor power level (amplitude-encoded) outside the reactor, thus providing the values of these important parameters without external electrical power or wiring. We present data from two hydrophones in the coolant (far from the core) and an accelerometer attached to a structure outside the reactor. These signals have been detected even in the presence of substantial background noise generated by the reactor's fluid pumps.

  15. Application of Campbell's MSV method in monitoring of reactor's fission power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, S.J.; Vukcevic, M.; Loncar, B.; Vasic, A.; Osmokrovic, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents some possibilities of Campbell's MSV (Mean Square Value) method in monitoring the reactor's fission power. Investigation of gamma discrimination compared to neutron component of signal along with change of variance and mean value the detector output signal for a specified range of reactor's fission power (10mW-22W) was carried out. The uncompensated ionization chamber for mixed n- gamma fields was used as detector element. Experimental measurements were performed using digitized MSV method, and obtained results were compared to those obtained by classical measuring chain. The final conclusion is that the order of discrimination in MSV signal processing is about fifty times larger than for classical measuring method (author)

  16. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Burnout and gate rupture of power MOS transistors with fission fragments of 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Benqi; Wang Yanping; Geng Bin; Chen Xiaohua; He Chaohui; Yang Hailiang

    2000-01-01

    A study to determine the single event burnout (SEB) and single event gate rupture (SEGR) sensitivities of power MOSFET devices is carried out by exposure to fission fragments from 252 Cf source. The test method, test results, a description of observed burnout current waveforms and a discussion of a possible failure mechanism are presented. The test results include the observed dependence upon applied drain or gate to source bias and effect of external capacitors and limited resistors

  18. Industrial development of neutron detectors, fission chambers, self powered detectors, ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constans, H.; Coville, P.; Guerre, J.

    1975-01-01

    Reactor control requires the determination of neutron flux at all times. The needed characteristics lead to use of several types of detectors: boron lined counters, boron lined ionization chambers, fission ionization chambers and self powered detectors. The principle of the reaction involved the fabrication requirements, the different modes of utilization and the characteristics obtained are examined for each detector. The problem of electric connections in the active area has been solved by developing ''integrated cables'' [fr

  19. Calculation of high-dimensional fission-fusion potential-energy surfaces in the SHE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    We calculate in a macroscopic-microscopic model fission-fusion potential-energy surfaces relevant to the analysis of heavy-ion reactions employed to form heavy-element evaporation residues. We study these multidimensional potential-energy surfaces both inside and outside the touching point.Inside the point of contact we define the potential on a multi-million-point grid in 5D deformation space where elongation, merging projectile and target spheroidal shapes, neck radius and projectile/target mass asymmetry are independent shape variables. The same deformation space and the corresponding potential-energy surface also describe the shape evolution from the nuclear ground-state to separating fragments in fission, and the fast-fission trajectories in incomplete fusion.For separated nuclei we study the macroscopic-microscopic potential energy, that is the ''collision surface'' between a spheroidally deformed target and a spheroidally deformed projectile as a function of three coordinates which are: the relative location of the projectile center-of-mass with respect to the target center-of-mass and the spheroidal deformations of the target and the projectile. We limit our study to the most favorable relative positions of target and projectile, namely that the symmetry axes of the target and projectile are collinear

  20. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  1. Systems Modeling For The Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Abbott, R.; Beach, R.; Blink, J.; Caird, J.; Erlandson, A.; Farmer, J.; Halsey, W.; Ladran, T.; Latkowski, J.; MacIntyre, A.; Miles, R.; Storm, E.

    2008-01-01

    A systems model has been developed for the Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) power plant. It combines cost-performance scaling models for the major subsystems of the plant including the laser, inertial fusion target factory, engine (i.e., the chamber including the fission and tritium breeding blankets), energy conversion systems and balance of plant. The LIFE plant model is being used to evaluate design trade-offs and to identify high-leverage R and D. At this point, we are focused more on doing self consistent design trades and optimization as opposed to trying to predict a cost of electricity with a high degree of certainty. Key results show the advantage of large scale (>1000 MWe) plants and the importance of minimizing the cost of diodes and balance of plant cost

  2. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, K.; Schmitt, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Ademard, G.; Nadtochy, P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of power change on fission gas release. Re-irradiation tests of spent fuel at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Jinichi; Shimizu, Michio; Ishii, Tadahiko; Endo, Yasuichi; Ohwada, Isao; Nabeya, Hideaki; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refabricated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at the JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40 kW/m and power cycling operations between 20 and 40 kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from fission gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40 kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. (author)

  4. Highly efficient power system based on direct fission fragment energy conversion utilizing magnetic collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; Hart, Ron R.; Parish, Theodore A.

    2003-01-01

    The present study was focused on developing a technologically feasible power system that is based on direct fission fragment energy conversion utilizing magnetic collimation. The new concept is an attempt to combine several advantageous design solutions, which have been proposed for application in both fission and fusion reactors, into one innovative system that can offer exceptional energy conversion efficiency. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of operational aspects including fission fragment escape from the fuel, collimation, collection, criticality, long-term performance, energy conversion efficiency, heat removal, and safety characteristics. Specific characteristics of the individual system components and the entire system are evaluated. Consistent analysis and evaluation of the technological feasibility of the concept were achieved using state-of-the-art computer codes that allowed realistic and consistent modeling. The calculated energy conversion efficiencies for the presented designs without a thermodynamic cycle and with the heavy water cycle are 52% and 62%, respectively. The analysis indicates that efficiencies up to 90% are potentially achievable. (author)

  5. Design of a Mechanical NaK Pump for Fission Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Bradley, David; Godfroy, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Alkali liquid metal cooled fission reactor concepts are under development for mid-range spaceflight power requirements. One such concept utilizes a sodium-potassium eutectic (NaK) as the primary loop working fluid. Traditionally, linear induction pumps have been used to provide the required flow and head conditions for liquid metal systems but can be limited in performance. This paper details the design, build, and check-out test of a mechanical NaK pump. The pump was designed to meet reactor cooling requirements using commercially available components modified for high temperature NaK service.

  6. In-reactor testing of self-powered neutron detectors and miniature fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, J.; LeMeur, R.; Verdant, R.

    1975-01-01

    The CEA has tested a variety of ''slow'' self-powered neutron detectors with rhodium, silver and vanadium emitters. Currently there are 120 vanadium detectors in the EL4 heavy water reactor. In addition, ''fast'' detectors with cobalt emitters have been tested at Saclay and 50 of these are in reactor. Other studies are concerned with 6 mm diameter miniature fission chambers. Two fast response chambers with argon-nitrogen filling gas became slow during irradiation, but operated to 600 deg C. An argon filled chamber of 4.7 mm diameter, for traversing in core system in pressurized water reactor, has shown satisfactory test results. (author)

  7. HPS: A space fission power system suitable for near-term, low-cost lunar and planetary bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.; Ranken, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Near-term, low-cost space fission power systems can enhance the feasibility and utility of lunar and planetary bases. One such system, the Heatpipe Power System (HPS), is described in this paper. The HPS draws on 40 yr of United States and international experience to enable a system that can be developed in <5 yr at a cost of <$100M. Total HPS mass is <600 kg at 5 kWe and <2000 kg at 50 kWe, assuming that thermoelectric power conversion is used. More advanced power conversion systems could reduce system mass significantly. System mass for planetary surface systems also may be reduced (1) if indigenous material is used for radiation shielding and (2) because of the positive effect of the gravitational field on heatpipe operation. The HPS is virtually non-radioactive at launch and is passively subcritical during all credible launch accidents. Full-system electrically heated testing is possible, and a ground nuclear power test is not needed for flight qualification. Fuel burnup limits are not reached for several decades, thus giving the system long-life potential

  8. Nuclear power plant with improved arrangements for the removal of post fission and emergency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, E.; Vinzens, K.

    1977-01-01

    This is concerned with additional equipment for emergency heat removal in a sodium cooled reactor, which operates on failure of the post fission heat removal system. The space for pressure relieving spaces and concrete masses as heat sinks within the reactor cell is no longer required. In this nuclear power plant, a heat exchanger chain transmits heat and power: There is a first sodium circuit between pressure vessel and the first heat exchanger, a second one between the first and second heat excahngers, and a third (Steam) circuit with turbine, condenser and return pump. A fourth circuit connects the secondary side of the condenser with a cooling tower. There is a threee component heat excahgner in the primary circuit after the first heat exchanger, which is built around the first heat exchanger, and is sealed into an unloading space. This space is situated next to the reactor cell and is above the operating level of the sodium in the pressure vessel. It is connected to the cell by an upper duct, normally closed by a bursting disc, and by a lower duct. In the three comopnent heat exchanger, a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic mixture transmits the heat from sodium pipes to water pipes. In normal operation it is used for steam superheating or feedwater preheating. The three component heat exchanger bridges the first and second heat exchangers as an emergency heat exchanger. If in such a case the post fission heat removal has failed, the sodium evaporating in the pressure vessel flows into the unloading space and condenses on the ribs of the emergency heat exchanger. The post fission heat is fed by the water secondary medium directly into the tertiary circuit. The sodium condensate flows back from the unloading space via the lower duct into the reactor cell and maintains the emergency level there. (RW) 891 RW [de

  9. Tokamak hybrid thermonuclear reactor for the production of fissionable fuel and electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.; Glukhikh, V.A.; Gur'ev, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The results of feasibility studies of a tokamak- based hybrid reactor concept are presented. The system selected has a D-T plasma volume of 575 m 3 with additional plasma heating by injection of fast neutral particles. The method of heating makes it possible to achieve an economical two-component tokamak regime at ntau=(4-6)x10 13 sxcm -3 , i e. far below the Lawson criterion. Plasma and vacuum chamber are surrounded by a blanket where fissionable plutonium is produced and heat transformed into electric power is generated. Major plasma-neutron-physical characteristics of the 6905 MWth (2500 MWe) reactor and its electromagnetic system are presented. Evaluations show that the hybrid reactor can produce about 800 kg of Pu per 1GWth/yr as compared to 70-150 kg of Pu for fast breeder reactors. The increased Pu production rate is the major merit of the concept promising for both power generation and fuelling thermal fission reactions

  10. Source driven breeding fission power reactors and the nuclear energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    The nuclear energy economy is facing severe difficulties associated with low utilization of uranium resources, safety, non-proliferation and environmental issues. Energy policy makers face the dilemma: commercialize LMFBRs immediately with the risk of negative economical, proliferation or other consequences, or continue with R and D programs that will provide the information needed for sounder decisions, but now taking the risk of running out of economically exploitable uranium ore resources. The development of hybrid reactors can provide an assurance against the latter risk and offers many interesting new options for the nuclear energy strategy. Being based on the technology of LWRs and HWRs, Light Water Hybrid Reactors (LWHR) provide a most natural link between the fission reactor technology of the present and the fusion power technology of the future. The investment in their development in excess of that required for the development of fusion power reactors is expected to be relatively small, thus making the development of LWHRs potentially a high benefit-to-cost ratio program. It is recommended that the fission and fusion communities will cooperate in hybrids R and D programs aimed at assessing the technological and economical viability of hybrid reactors as reliably and soon as possible. (author)

  11. Challenging fission cross section simulation with long standing macro-microscopic model of nucleus potential energy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagno, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The work presented here aims to improve models used in the fission cross section evaluation. The results give insights for a significant breakthrough in this field and yielded large extensions of the evaluation code CONRAD. Partial cross sections are inherently strongly correlated together as of the competition of the related reactions must yield the total cross section. Therefore improving fission cross section benefits to all partial cross sections. A sound framework for the simulation of competitive reactions had to be settled in order to further investigate on the fission reaction; this was implemented using the TALYS reference code as guideline. After ensuring consistency and consistency of the framework, focus was made on fission. Perspective resulting from the use of macroscopic-microscopic models such as the FRDM and FRLDM were analyzed; these models have been implemented and validated on experimental data and benchmarks. To comply with evaluation requirements in terms of computation time, several specific numerical methods have been used and parts of the program were written to run on GPU. These macroscopic-microscopic models yield potential energy surfaces that can be used to extract a one-dimensional fission barrier. This latter can then be used to obtained fission transmission coefficients that can be used in a Hauser-Feshbach model. This method has been finally tested for the calculation of the average fission cross section for 239 Pu(n,f). (author) [fr

  12. A fundamental study of fission product deposition on the wall surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sugiyama, K.

    1987-01-01

    Deposition of soluble matters on wall surfaces is studied in the present report for the purpose to understand a mechanism of fission product deposition on the wall surface in a molten salt reactor. Calcium carbonate solution is used to observe the fundamental mechanism of deposition. The experiments are performed under conditions of turbulent flow of the solution over a heated wall. According to the experimental results a model is proposed to estimate deposition rate. The model consists of two parts, one is the initial nucleus formation on a clean wall surface and the other is the constant increase of deposition succeeding to the first stage. The model is assessed by comparing it with the experimental results. Both results coincide well in some parameters, but not so well in others. (author)

  13. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  14. Local Fission Gas Release and Swelling in Water Reactor Fuel during Slow Power Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Walker, C.T.; Ray, I.L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Gas release and fuel swelling caused by a power increase in a water reactor fuel (burn-up 2.7–4.5% FIMA) is described. At a bump terminal level of about 400 W/cm (local value) gas release was 25–40%. The formation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries and their degree of interlinkage are the two...... factors that determine the level of fission gas release during a power bump. Release begins when gas bubbles on grain boundaries start o interlink. This occurred at r/r0 ~ 0.75. Release tunnels were fully developed at r/r0 ~ 0.55 with the result that gas release was 60–70% at this position....

  15. Ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1946, light (charged) particle accompanied fission (ternary fission) has been extensively studied, for spontaneous as well as for induced fission reactions. The reason for this interest was twofold: the ternary particles being emitted in space and time close to the scission point were expected to supply information on the scission point configuration and the ternary fission process was an important source of helium, tritium, and hydrogen production in nuclear reactors, for which data were requested by the nuclear industry. Significant experimental progress has been realized with the advent of high-resolution detectors, powerful multiparameter data acquisition systems, and intense neutron and photon beams. As far as theory is concerned, the trajectory calculations (in which scission point parameters are deduced from the experimental observations) have been very much improved. An attempt was made to explain ternary particle emission in terms of a Plateau-Rayleigh hydrodynamical instability of a relatively long cylindrical neck or cylindrical nucleus. New results have also been obtained on the so-called open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission (fission in three about-equal fragments). The spontaneous emission of charged particles has also clearly been demonstrated in recent years. This chapter discusses the main characteristics of ternary fission, theoretical models, light particle emission probabilities, the dependence of the emission probabilities on experimental variables, light particle energy distributions, light particle angular distributions, correlations between light particle accompanied fission observables, open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission, and spontaneous emission of heavy ions. 143 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Micelle fission through surface instability and formation of an interdigitating stalk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammalkorpi, M.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Haataja, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first detailed atomic-scale studies of micelle fission in micellar systems consisting of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate with explicit solvent. We demonstrate a new micelle fission pathway for ionic surfactants and show how micelle fission can be induced by varying the ionic

  17. Development of NASA's Small Fission Power System for Science and Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Mason, Lee S.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Poston, David I.; McClure, Patrick R.; Creasy, John; Robinson, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system has brought many exciting challenges to our nations scientific and engineering community over the past several decades. As we expand our visions to explore new, more challenging destinations, we must also expand our technology base to support these new missions. NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate is tasked with developing these technologies for future mission infusion and continues to seek answers to many existing technology gaps. One such technology gap is related to compact power systems (1 kWe) that provide abundant power for several years where solar energy is unavailable or inadequate. Below 1 kWe, Radioisotope Power Systems have been the workhorse for NASA and will continue to be used for lower power applications similar to the successful missions of Voyager, Ulysses, New Horizons, Cassini, and Curiosity. Above 1 kWe, fission power systems become an attractive technology offering a scalable modular design of the reactor, shield, power conversion, and heat transport subsystems. Near term emphasis has been placed in the 1-10kWe range that lies outside realistic radioisotope power levels and fills a promising technology gap capable of enabling both science and human exploration missions. History has shown that development of space reactors is technically, politically, and financially challenging and requires a new approach to their design and development. A small team of NASA and DOE experts are providing a solution to these enabling FPS technologies starting with the lowest power and most cost effective reactor series named Kilopower that is scalable from approximately 1-10 kWe.

  18. Monitoring and diagnostic system of fission product transport and release in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, H.; Kondo, S.; Togo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A monitoring and diagnostic system (MADS) of fission product (FP) transport and release in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is proposed and the conceptual design for MADS is studied. A MADS can be described in the most general way as a computer-based information processing system which takes in plant data, processes it and displays the results to the NPP's operating crew. A major concern for MADS is, however, not to evaluate general plant dynamics, but to monitor the distribution of whole radioactive materials such as FP, and to diagnose the plant state in the view of FP transport during the NPP's lifetime. Several functions demanded of MADS are: (a) during normal operation, to certify the fuel integrity and the effectiveness of the purification systems, (b) in an unusual event, to identify the event and to monitor the amount of FP release with accuracy, and (c) in case of a rare occurrence, to estimate the maximum potential release

  19. Design of a Mechanical NaK Pump for Fission Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Bradley, David E.; Godfroy, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Alkali liquid metal cooled fission reactor concepts are under development for spaceflight power requirements. One such concept utilizes a sodium-potassium eutectic (NaK) as the primary loop working fluid, which has specific pumping requirements. Traditionally, electromagnetic linear induction pumps have been used to provide the required flow and pressure head conditions for NaK systems but they can be limited in performance, efficiency, and number of available vendors. The objective of the project was to develop a mechanical NaK centrifugal pump that takes advantages of technology advances not available in previous liquid metal mechanical pump designs. This paper details the design, build, and performance test of a mechanical NaK pump developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The pump was designed to meet reactor cooling requirements using commercially available components modified for high temperature NaK service.

  20. Research problems of fission product behaviour in fuels of nuclear power plants and ways of their solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaberidze, V.Sh.

    1988-01-01

    The most important problems of studying behaviour of fission products in fuel elements of maneouvrable nuclear power plants units are formulated. In-pile and out-of-pile investigation methods solving these problems are characterized in brief. 12 refs.; 2 figs

  1. Design and Test Plans for a Non-Nuclear Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee; Palac, Donald; Gibson, Marc; Houts, Michael; Warren, John; Werner, James; Poston, David; Qualls, Arthur Lou; Radel, Ross; Harlow, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) team is developing concepts and technologies for affordable nuclear Fission Power Systems (FPSs) to support future exploration missions. A key deliverable is the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The TDU will assemble the major elements of a notional FPS with a non-nuclear reactor simulator (Rx Sim) and demonstrate system-level performance in thermal vacuum. The Rx Sim includes an electrical resistance heat source and a liquid metal heat transport loop that simulates the reactor thermal interface and expected dynamic response. A power conversion unit (PCU) generates electric power utilizing the liquid metal heat source and rejects waste heat to a heat rejection system (HRS). The HRS includes a pumped water heat removal loop coupled to radiator panels suspended in the thermal-vacuum facility. The basic test plan is to subject the system to realistic operating conditions and gather data to evaluate performance sensitivity, control stability, and response characteristics. Upon completion of the testing, the technology is expected to satisfy the requirements for Technology Readiness Level 6 (System Demonstration in an Operational and Relevant Environment) based on the use of high-fidelity hardware and prototypic software tested under realistic conditions and correlated with analytical predictions.

  2. Fission products collecting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fission products trap with no contamination to coolants and cover gas by the provision of a fission products trap above the upper part of a nuclear power plant. Constitution: Upon fuel failures in a reactor core, nuclear fission products leak into coolants and move along the flow of the coolants to the coolants above the reactor core. The fission products are collected in a trap container and guided along a pipeline into fission products detector. The fission products detector monitors the concentration of the fission products and opens the downstream valve of the detector when a predetermined concentration of the fission products is detected to introduce the fission products into a waste gas processing device and release them through the exhaust pipe. (Seki, T.)

  3. Needs and accuracy requirements for fission product nuclear data in the physics design of power reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The fission product nuclear data accuracy requirements for fast and thermal reactor core performance predictions were reviewed by Tyror at the Bologna FPND Meeting. The status of the data was assessed at the Meeting and it was concluded that the requirements of thermal reactors were largely met, and the yield data requirements of fast reactors, but not the cross section requirements, were met. However, the World Request List for Nuclear Data (WRENDA) contains a number of requests for fission product capture cross sections in the energy range of interest for thermal reactors. Recent reports indicate that the fast reactor reactivity requirements might have been met by integral measurements made in zero power critical assemblies. However, there are requests for the differential cross sections of the individual isotopes to be determined in addition to the integral data requirements. The fast reactor requirements are reviewed, taking into account some more recent studies of the effects of fission products. The sodium void reactivity effect depends on the fission product cross sections in a different way to the fission product reactivity effect in a normal core. This requirement might call for different types of measurement. There is currently an interest in high burnup fuel cycles and alternative fuel cycles. These might require more accurate fission product data, data for individual isotopes and data for capture products. Recent calculations of the time dependence of fission product reactivity effects show that this is dependent upon the data set used and there are significant uncertainties. Some recent thermal reactor studies on approximations in the treatment of decay chains and the importance of xenon and samarium poisoning are also summarized. (author)

  4. Detection alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with track solid detectors and with surface barrier detectors: efficiency determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.R.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The technique of particle detection by solid track detectors, types of developing and analysis of results are presented. Efficiency measurements of alpha particle detection with Makrofol e and surface barrier detector are made. Detection of Cf-252 fission fragments is shown. (L.C.)

  5. Detection of alpha particles and Cf-252 fission fragments with solid track detectors and surface barrier detector. Efficiency calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.; Koskinas, M.F.; Andrade, C. de; Vilela, E.C.; Hinostroza, H.; Kaschiny, J.E.A.; Costa, M.S. da; Rizzo, P.; Santos, W.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for particle detection by using track solid detector and also types of revealing and result analysis are presented concerned to Cf-252 fission fragments detection. Measurements of alpha particles detection efficiency using Makrofol E and surface barrier detector are performed. (L.C.J.A.)

  6. Feasibility study of a small, thorium-based fission power system for space and terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Michael Jason

    One of the current challenges facing space exploration is the creation of a power source capable of providing useful energy for the entire duration of a mission. Historically, radioisotope batteries have been used to provide load power, but this conventional system may not be capable of sustaining continuous power for longer duration missions. To remedy this, many forays into nuclear powered spacecraft have been investigated, but no robust system for long-term power generation has been found. In this study, a novel spin on the traditional fission power system that represents a potential optimum solution is presented. By utilizing mature High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology in conjunction with the capabilities of the thorium fuel cycle, we have created a light-weight, long-term power source capable of a continuous electric power output of up to 70kW for over 15 years. This system relies upon a combination of fissile, highly-enriched uranium dioxide and fertile thorium carbide Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in a hexagonal beryllium oxide matrix. As the primary fissile material is consumed, the fertile material breeds new fissile material leading to more steady fuel loading over the lifetime of the core. Reactor control is achieved through an innovative approach to the conventional boron carbide neutron absorber by utilizing sections of borated aluminum placed in rotating control drums within the reflector. Borated aluminum allows for much smaller boron concentrations, thus eliminating the potential for 10B(n,alpha)6Li heating issues that are common in boron carbide systems. A wide range of other reactivity control systems are also investigated, such as a radially-split rotating reflector. Lastly, an extension of the design to a terrestrial based system is investigated. In this system, uranium enrichment is dropped to 20 percent in order to meet current regulations, a solid uranium-zirconium hydride fissile driver replaces the

  7. Performance Analysis of Fission and Surface Source Iteration Method for Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Whole-Core Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yu Gwon; Oh, Yoo Min; Park, Hyang Kyu; Park, Kang Soon; Cho, Nam Zin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two issues in the FSS iteration method, i.e., the waiting time for surface source data and the variance biases in local tallies are investigated for the domain decomposed, 3-D continuous-energy whole-core calculation. The fission sources are provided as usual, while the surface sources are provided by banking MC particles crossing local domain boundaries. The surface sources serve as boundary conditions for nonoverlapping local problems, so that each local problem can be solved independently. In this paper, two issues in the FSS iteration are investigated. One is quantifying the waiting time of processors to receive surface source data. By using nonblocking communication, 'time penalty' to wait for the arrival of the surface source data is reduced. The other important issue is underestimation of the sample variance of the tally because of additional inter-iteration correlations in surface sources. From the numerical results on a 3-D whole-core test problem, it is observed that the time penalty is negligible in the FSS iteration method and that the real variances of both pin powers and assembly powers are estimated by the HB method. For those purposes, three cases; Case 1 (1 local domain), Case 2 (4 local domains), Case 3 (16 local domains) are tested. For both Cases 2 and 3, the time penalties for waiting are negligible compared to the source-tracking times. However, for finer divisions of local domains, the loss of parallel efficiency caused by the different number of sources for local domains in symmetric locations becomes larger due to the stochastic errors in source distributions. For all test cases, the HB method very well estimates the real variances of local tallies. However, it is also noted that the real variances of local tallies estimated by the HB method show slightly smaller than the real variances obtained from 30 independent batch runs and the deviations become larger for finer divisions of local domains. The batch size used for the HB

  8. Studies of Fission-Induced Surface Damage in Actinides Using Ultracold Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broussard, Leah J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-05

    This report describes the results of the fission-induced actinide studies at LANL. Previously, there was no fission data at these energies though there were initial characterizations of UCN energy dependence and material thickness. The proof of principle was demonstrated and the initial characterizations of sputtered rates, angular and size distribution are underway.

  9. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  10. Preliminary assessment of a symbiotic fusion--fission power system using the TH/U refresh fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Moir, R.W.

    1977-10-01

    Studies of the mirror hybrid reactor by LLL/GA have concluded that the most promising role for this reactor concept is that of a producer of fissile fuel for fission reactors. Studies to date have examined primarily the U/Pu fuel cycle with light-water reactors serving as the consumers of the hybrid-bred fissile fuel; the specific scenarios examined required reprocessing and refabrication of the bred fuel before introduction into the fission reactor. This combination of technologies was chosen to illustrate the manner in which the hybrid reactor concept could serve the needs of, and use the technology of, the fission reactor industry as it now exists (and as it was thought it would evolve). However, the current U.S. Administration has expressed strong concerns about proliferation of nuclear weapons capability and terrorist diversion of weapons-grade nuclear materials. These concerns are based on the projected technology for the light-water reactor/fast breeder reactor using the U/Pu fuel cycle and extensive reprocessing/refabrication. A symbiotic nuclear power generation concept (hybrid fissile producer plus fission burner reactors) is described which eliminates those aspects of the present nuclear fuel cycle that (may) represent significant proliferation/diversion risks. Specifically, the proposed concept incorporates the following features: (1)Th/U 233 fuel cycle, (2) no reprocessing or fabrication of fissile material, and (3) no fissile material in a weapons-grade state

  11. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  12. Polarographic determination of Iodide and Iodate, in Solutions Coming from Aerosols in Fission Products Containment Studies in Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Ballesteros, O.; Fernandez, M.; Clavero, M.A.; Gonzalez, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A polarographic method is described for the iodine species determination, iodide and iodate in water solutions. the iodate can be determined by differential pulse polarography. Calibration curves and the detection and determination limits have been obtained. Iodides is oxidized to iodate with sodium hypochlorite and the excess of oxidizing agent is destroyed with sodium sulphide. The concentration of iodide is calculated as the difference between the concentration of iodate in the sample before and after the oxidation. As an application, species of iodine in samples coming from the experimental plants GIRS (Gaseous Iodine Removal by Sprays) of Nuclear Fission Department of the CIEMAT, dedicated to fission products containment studies in nuclear power station, were determined. (Author) 10 refs

  13. Fission product release measured during fuel damage tests at the Power Burst Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetek, D.J.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of fission product release behavior observed during four severe fuel damage tests on bundles of UO 2 fuel rods. Transient temperatures up to fuel melting were obtained in the tests that included both rapid quench and slow cooldown, low and high (36 GWd/t) burnup fuel and the addition of Ag-In-Cd control rods. Release fractions of major fission product species and release rates of noble gas species are reported. Significant differences in release behavior are discussed between heatup and cooldown periods, low and high burnup fuel and long- and short-lived fission products. Explanations are offered for the probable reasons for the observed differences and recommendations for further studies are given

  14. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's commission on the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis

  15. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's Commission at Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1979-10-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis.

  16. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's Commission at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1979-10-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis

  17. Comparison of Thermal Neutron Flux Measured by Uranium 235 Fission Chamber and Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector in MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lyoussi, A.; Geslot, B.; Malo, J.-Y.; Carcreff, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal neutron flux is one of the most important nuclear parameter to be measured on-line in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). In particular two types of sensors with different physical operating principles are commonly used: self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) and fission chambers with uranium 235 coating. This work aims to compare on one hand the thermal neutron flux evaluation given by these two types of sensors and on the other hand to compare these evaluations with activation dosimeter measurements, which are considered as the reference for absolute neutron flux assessment. This study was conducted in an irradiation experiment, called CARMEN-1, performed during 2012 in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France). The CARMEN-1 experiment aims to improve the neutron and photon flux and nuclear heating measurements in MTRs. In this paper we focus on the thermal neutron flux measurements performed in CARMEN-1 experiment. The use of fission chambers to measure the absolute thermal neutron flux in MTRs is not very usual. An innovative calibration method for fission chambers operated in Campbell mode has been developed at the CEA Cadarache (France) and tested for the first time in the CARMEN-1 experiment. The results of these measurements are discussed, with the objective to measure with the best accuracy the thermal neutron flux in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor. (authors)

  18. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  19. Future developments of power supply from nuclear fission and fusion until the middle of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study made by General Technology Systems (Netherlands) is to provide information about nuclear fission and fusion as methods for power generation, with which, in the framework of a study into the possibilities of durable energy sources, choices may be made from the various possibilities for future energy supply. The physical processes upon which the power generation relies are treated briefly. The technologies employed are discussed together with their changes and improvements, now and in the future, and the economic factors by which they are accompanied. How much of this energy will be used in the Netherlands, is discussed. In order to know the opinion of others about these subjects the dealers of the current nuclear power stations were asked to give their opinions which are collected in a supplement. 166 refs.; 18 figs.; 19 tabs

  20. Fission gas detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by failed fuel rods which device uses a filter adapted to pass coolant but to block passage of fission gas bubbles due to the surface tension of the bubbles. The coolant may be liquid metal. (author)

  1. Uranium content of coal ashes from Southern Brazil coal fueled power stations, by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the application of the fission track registration technique for the determination of uranium in coal ashes was shown. The wet method was employed using as detector the Makrofol KG=10 μm, manufactured by Bayer. The coal ashes were originated from coal-fueled power stations localized in Southern Brazil. The results obtained ranged from 10 to 27 mg U/kg. Since the total error variation was from 18,4% to 23,8%, the method used was considered excellent. The determination of the uranium content in coal ashes is of considerable interest in environmental control in power stations, in their vicinity and wherever these ashes are used or stored. The technique used is the work proved to be very appropriate for the purpose aimed at. (Author) [pt

  2. Overview on international experimental programmes on power ramping and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaab, H.; Lang, P.M.; Mogard, H.

    1983-01-01

    During the last years a number of internationally sponsored experimental programmes were initiated to study the LWR fuel behaviour during ramping and fission gas release at higher burnup levels. Common interest and the limited availability of experimental facilities and appropriate test fuel rods have led to valuable cooperation of many organizations throughout the nuclear community. These programmes are performed by the experimental staff from research centers with their experimental facilities. Fuel vendors and several utilities contribute by supply and irradiation of test fuel rods. The aim of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the following programmes: Studsvik Projects: Interramp, Overramp, Superramp, Demoramp I and II; Petten, High Burnup PWR Ramp Test Programme; Mol, Tribulation Programme; BNWL, High Burnup Effects Programme; Risoe Fission Gas Project; Related tasks within the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The objectives of the programme, their work scope and main results will be summarized on the basis of presently available information. An outlook to future proposed programmes will be given. (author)

  3. Overview on international experimental programmes on power ramping and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaab, H.; Lang, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the last few years a number of internationally sponsored experimental programmes have been initiated to study LWR fuel behaviour during ramping and fission gas release at high burnup levels. Common interest and the limited availability of experimental facilities and appropriate test fuel rods have led to valuable cooperation between many organizations throughout the nuclear community. These programmes are carried out by experienced staff from research centres using the centres' experimental facilities. Fuel vendors and several utilities contribute by supplying and irradiating the test fuel rods. The aim of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the following programmes: (a) Studsvik Projects: Interramp, Demoramp I and II, Overramp, Superramp; (b) Petten, High Burnup PWR Ramp Test Programme; (c) Mol, Tribulation Programme; (d) BNWL, High Burnup Effects Programme; (e) Riso Fission Gas Project; and (f) related tasks within the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The objectives of the programmes, their scope and the main results will be summarized. An overview of proposed future programmes will be given. (author)

  4. Uncertainties on decay heat power due to fission product data uncertainties; Incertitudes sur la puissance residuelle dues aux incertitudes sur les donnees de produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebah, J

    1998-08-01

    Following a reactor shutdown, after the fission process has completely faded out, a significant quantity of energy known as 'decay heat' continues to be generated in the core. The knowledge with a good precision of the decay heat released in a fuel after reactor shutdown is necessary for: residual heat removal for normal operation or emergency shutdown condition, the design of cooling systems and spent fuel handling. By the summation calculations method, the decay heat is equal to the sum of the energies released by individual fission products. Under taking into account all nuclides that contribute significantly to the total decay heat, the results from summation method are comparable with the measured ones. Without the complete covariance information of nuclear data, the published uncertainty analyses of fission products decay heat summation calculation give underestimated errors through the variance/covariance analysis in consideration of correlation between the basic nuclear data, we calculate in this work the uncertainties on the decay heat associated with the summation calculations. Contribution to the total error of decay heat comes from uncertainties in three terms: fission yields, half-lives and average beta and gamma decay energy. (author)

  5. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylten, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  6. Photonic surfaces for designable nonlinear power shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Roshni, E-mail: rbiswas@usc.edu; Povinelli, Michelle L. [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    We propose a method for designing nonlinear input-output power response based on absorptive resonances of nanostructured surfaces. We show that various power transmission trends can be obtained by placing a photonic resonance mode at the appropriate detuning from the laser wavelength. We demonstrate our results in a silicon photonic crystal slab at a laser wavelength of 808 nm. We quantify the overall spectral red shift as a function of laser power. The shift results from absorptive heating and the thermo-optic effect. We then demonstrate devices with increasing, decreasing, and non-monotonic transmission as a function of laser power. The transmission changes are up to 7.5 times larger than in unpatterned silicon. The strong nonlinear transmission is due to a combination of resonantly enhanced absorption, reduced thermal conductivity, and the resonant transmission lineshape. Our results illustrate the possibility of designing different nonlinear power trends within a single materials platform at a given wavelength of interest.

  7. Photonic surfaces for designable nonlinear power shaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Roshni; Povinelli, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for designing nonlinear input-output power response based on absorptive resonances of nanostructured surfaces. We show that various power transmission trends can be obtained by placing a photonic resonance mode at the appropriate detuning from the laser wavelength. We demonstrate our results in a silicon photonic crystal slab at a laser wavelength of 808 nm. We quantify the overall spectral red shift as a function of laser power. The shift results from absorptive heating and the thermo-optic effect. We then demonstrate devices with increasing, decreasing, and non-monotonic transmission as a function of laser power. The transmission changes are up to 7.5 times larger than in unpatterned silicon. The strong nonlinear transmission is due to a combination of resonantly enhanced absorption, reduced thermal conductivity, and the resonant transmission lineshape. Our results illustrate the possibility of designing different nonlinear power trends within a single materials platform at a given wavelength of interest

  8. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Surface Power, Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Buffalino, Andrew; Holliday, Ezekiel; Penswick, Barry; Gedeon, David

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the design of a 12 kW dual opposed free-piston Stirling convertor and controller for potential future use in space missions. The convertor is heated via a pumped NaK loop and cooling is provided by a pumped water circuit. Convertor efficiency is projected at 27 percent (AC electrical out/heat in). The controller converts the AC electrical output to 120 Vdc and is projected at 91 percent efficiency. A mechanically simple arrangement, based on proven technology, was selected in which the piston is resonated almost entirely by the working space pressure swing, while the displacer is resonated by planar mechanical springs in the bounce space.

  9. On the frequency distributions per unit area of the projected and etchable lengths of surface-intersecting fission tracks: influences of track revelation, observation and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Haute, P. van den

    1999-01-01

    In addition to the statistical bounds discussed, thermal history analysis based on the projected and etchable length distributions of surface intersecting fission tracks is limited by systematic factors related to track revelation, observation and measurement. The effects of track revelation, in particular, distort these distributions in the length intervals of interest. An observation threshold poses a problem if it is described by a critical angle θ c , but not if it is described by other criteria proposed in the literature. Measurement imprecisions, predictably, blur the thermal history information contained in these distributions. Measurements of semi-confined tracks, added as a result of surface etching, are a more promising alternative to confined track length measurements for accessing the thermal history record in the fission track length distribution. On the other hand, measurements of the projected lengths of surface intersecting tracks offer the theoretical possibility of determining the true volumetric density N and true mean length m of an arbitrary population of fission tracks, thus allowing direct determination of the corrected age of samples with complex thermal histories. On a methodical level, knowledge of N and m allows to determine the efficiency with which fission tracks are counted under the optical microscope under exactly the same conditions as those under which fission track counts for routine dating purposes are performed

  10. The gamma spectrometry a powerful tool for irradiated fuel and fission products release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontillon, Y.; Roure, C.; Lacroix, B.; Martella, T.; Ducros, G.; Ravel, S.; Gleizes, B.

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decades, due to the potentially severe consequences of a nuclear incident and/or accident for surrounding populations as well as the environment, international safety authorities launched R and D programs in support of general policy on exploitation of nuclear energy. This increasing interest enabled starting of many research programs in CEA and particularly in Nuclear Energy Directorate (DEN). Most of them are devoted to (i) the source term of fission products (including gas) and actinides released from PWR fuel samples in normal or accident conditions, (ii) burn-up determination, (iii) isotopic repartition... by quantitative gamma spectrometry. In this context, the Department of Fuel Studies (DEC), part of the DEN, has acquired considerable experience in this field of research. In order to attain the required capabilities, specific technical facilities set up in shielded hot cells at the CEA-Grenoble and CEA-Cadarache have been developed. In particular, the researchers of the Department have developed several gamma scanning benches and a set of two thermal treatment devices, including the so-called 'VERCORS facility'. These devices are associated to on line quantitative gamma spectrometry, in order to measure emitted gas and fission products (FPs). The greatest asset of such installations is to ensure a high analytical experiments rate, and as a consequence to make parametrical approach of planned studies easier. The first part of the present communication focuses, on the one hand, on the peculiar aspects of the gamma spectrometry applied on irradiated fuel, mad on the other hand, on the technical aspect of the different facilities (i.e. quantitative gamma spectrometry apparatus and corresponding 'home made' software). The last part is devoted to the results which can be obtained with such installation. In particular, it will be explained how experimental programs on FPs and gas release in normal and/or accidental conditions can be conducted

  11. Nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.) [pt

  12. Investigation of applications for high-power, self-critical fissioning uranium plasma reactors. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.J.; Latham, T.S.; Krascella, N.L.

    1976-09-01

    Analytical studies were conducted to investigate potentially attractive applications for gaseous nuclear cavity reactors fueled by uranium hexafluoride and its decomposition products at temperatures of 2000 to 6000 K and total pressures of a few hundred atmospheres. Approximate operating conditions and performance levels for a class of nuclear reactors in which fission energy removal is accomplished principally by radiant heat transfer from the high temperature gaseous nuclear fuel to surrounding absorbing media were determined. The results show the radiant energy deposited in the absorbing media may be efficiently utilized in energy conversion system applications which include (1) a primary energy source for high thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) an energy source for highly efficient generation of electricity, and (3) a source of high intensity photon flux for heating working fluid gases for hydrogen production or MHD power extraction. (Author)

  13. Fission barriers within the liquid drop model with the surface-curvature term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, K.; Dudek, J.

    2004-01-01

    The recently revised liquid drop model (PRC 67(2003) 044316) containing the curvature term reproduces the masses of 2766 experimentally known isotopes having Z≥8 and N≥8 with the r.m.s. deviation equal to 0.698 MeV when the microscopic corrections of Moeller et al. is used. The influence of the congruence energy as well as the compression term on the barrier heights is discussed within this new macroscopic model. The r.m.s. deviation of the fission barrier heights of 40 isotopes with Z≥34 is 1.73 MeV only when deformation-dependent congruence energy is included. The effect of the compression term in the liquid drop energy has rather weak influence on the barrier heights. (author)

  14. Gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of fission rate ratios between fresh and burnt fuel following irradiation in a zero-power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kröhnert, H., E-mail: hanna.kroehnert@ensi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Perret, G.; Murphy, M.F. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-01-11

    The gamma-ray activity from short-lived fission products has been measured in fresh and burnt UO{sub 2} fuel samples after irradiation in a zero-power reactor. For the first time, short-lived gamma-ray activity from fresh and burnt fuel has been compared and fresh-to-burnt fuel fission rate ratios have been derived. For the measurements, well characterized fresh and burnt fuel samples, with burn-ups up to 46 GWd/t, were irradiated in the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. Fission rate ratios were derived based on the counting of high-energy gamma-rays above 2200 keV, in order to discriminate against the high intrinsic activity of the burnt fuel. This paper presents the measured fresh-to-burnt fuel fission rate ratios based on the {sup 142}La (2542 keV), {sup 89}Rb (2570 keV), {sup 138}Cs (2640 keV) and {sup 95}Y (3576 keV) high-energy gamma-ray lines. Comparisons are made with the results of Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental configuration, carried out using the MCNPX code. The measured fission rate ratios have 1σ uncertainties of 1.7–3.4%. The comparisons with calculated predictions show an agreement within 1–3σ, although there appears to be a slight bias (∼3%).

  15. Volatilization and reaction of fission products in flowing steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, I.; Steidl, D.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The principal risk to the public from nuclear power plants derives from the highly radioactive atoms (fission products) generated as energy is produced in the nuclear fuel. The revolatilization of fission products from reactor system surfaces due to self-heating by radioactive decay has become a complicating factor in the source-term redefinition effort. It has had a major impact on calculations of fission product distributions in accident safety analyses. The focus of this research effort was to investigate the volatilization and transport of fission products and control rod materials in a flowing gaseous steam-hydrogen mixture. Fission product and control rod materials in various combinations were studied including CsI, CsOH, TeO 2 , SrO, Ag, In, Cd and Mn. The vaporization behavior of the deposits were characterized with respect to vaporization rates, chemical species and downstream transport behavior

  16. Innovative High Temperature Heat Pipes for Spacecraft Nuclear Fission Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Glenn is examining small fission reactors for future space transportation and surface power applications. The reactors would have an 8 to 15 year design life...

  17. Low-cost space fission power systems utilizing US and former Soviet Union experience and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Britt, E.J.; Koester, J.K.; Gunther, N.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Nikolaev, Y.V.; Nikitin, V.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the author close-quote s approach to space power total economics. In the past 40 years of U.S. government sponsored space nuclear power developments, total economics has received only token consideration. In the real world, nuclear power has had limited acceptance where it provided the enabling capability i.e. isotopes for low power, long life, deep space missions, or reactor power for underwater nuclear submarines. It was also accepted where it was perceived to be more economic. Examples are nuclear reactor powered aircraft carriers, escort vessels and central station power stations. In any case, real and perceived public and environmental safety must always be included into the economic equation. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1964-04-01

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might he reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  19. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1964-04-15

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might be reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  20. Development of a fission product transport module predicting the behavior of radiological materials during sever accidents in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyung Seok; Rhee, Bo Wook; Kim, Dong Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is developing a fission product transport module for predicting the behavior of radioactive materials in the primary cooling system of a nuclear power plant as a separate module, which will be connected to a severe accident analysis code, Core Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software (COMPASS). This fission product transport (COMPASS-FP) module consists of a fission product release model, an aerosol generation model, and an aerosol transport model. In the fission product release model there are three submodels based on empirical correlations, and they are used to simulate the fission product gases release from the reactor core. In the aerosol generation model, the mass conservation law and Raoult's law are applied to the mixture of vapors and droplets of the fission products in a specified control volume to find the generation of the aerosol droplet. In the aerosol transport model, empirical correlations available from the open literature are used to simulate the aerosol removal processes owing to the gravitational settling, inertia impaction, diffusiophoresis, and thermophoresis. The COMPASS-FP module was validated against Aerosol Behavior Code Validation and Evaluation (ABCOVE-5) test performed by Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory for comparing the prediction and test data. The comparison results assuming a non-spherical aerosol shape for the suspended aerosol mass concentration showed a good agreement with an error range of about ±6%. It was found that the COMPASS-FP module produced the reasonable results of the fission product gases release, the aerosol generation, and the gravitational settling in the aerosol removal processes for ABCOVE-5. However, more validation for other aerosol removal models needs to be performed.

  1. Study of advanced fission power reactor development for the United States. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of a multi-phase research study which had as its objective the comparative study of various advanced fission reactors and evaluation of alternate strategies for their development in the USA through the year 2020. By direction from NSF, ''advanced'' reactors were defined as those which met the dual requirements of (1) offering a significant improvement in fissile fuel utilization as compared to light-water reactors and (2) currently receiving U.S. Government funding. (A detailed study of the LMFBR was specifically excluded, but cursory baseline data were obtained from ERDA sources.) Included initially were the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Subsequently, the CANDU Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) was included for comparison due to increased interest in its potential. This volume presents the reasoning process and analytical methods utilized to arrive at the conclusions for the overall study

  2. The concentration of fission products and other radionuclides in the surface air between 1971 and 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, W.

    1974-01-01

    The aerosols collected with high-efficiency portable dust samplers in Brunswick and Tromsoe are analyzed in a Ge(Li) spectrometer. The mean monthly activity concentrations are given for a number of cosmogenic and induced radionuclides from nuclear weapons tests as well as for some cosmogenic and natural radionuclides. The annual curve exhibits marked seasonal variations with a pronounced peak - caused by an influx from the stratospheric reservoir - in late spring for all radionuclides studied except for 35 S, 210 Pb and 226 Ra. This peak decreases continuously from 1971 - 1973 for the fission products and induced radionuclides which for the most part had been produced in Chinese nuclear weapons tests. In contrast to 7 Be and 22 Na, the behaviour of 35 S suggests that it is partly anthropogenic in origin. The activity concentration of 226 Ra in air has been measured directly for the first time. The findings are discussed and finally compared with the maximum permissible concentration for the population. (orig./AK) [de

  3. A simple method to evaluate the fission gas release at fuel grain boundary including the grain growth both at constant and at transient power histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, M.; Paraschiv, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method to rewrite Fick's second law for a region with a moving boundary when the moving law in time of this boundary is known, has been proposed. This method was applied to Booth's sphere model for radioactive and stable fission product diffusion from the oxide fuel grain in order to take into account the grain growth. The solution of this new equation was presented in the mathematical formulation for power histories from ANS 5.4 model for the stable species. It is very simple to apply and very accurate. The results obtained with this solution for constant and transient temperatures show that the fission gas release (FGR) at grain boundary is strongly dependent on kinetics of grain growth. The utilization of two semiempirical grain growth laws, from published information, shows that the fuel microstructural properties need to be multicitly considered in the fission gas release for every manufacturer of fuel. (orig.)

  4. The nuclear fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Fifty years after its discovery, the nuclear fission phenomenon is of recurring interest. When its fundamental physics aspects are considered, fission is viewed in a very positive way, which is reflected in the great interest generated by the meetings and large conferences organized for the 50th anniversary of its discovery. From a purely scientific and practical point of view, a new book devoted to the (low energy) nuclear fission phenomenon was highly desirable considering the tremendous amount of new results obtained since the publication of the book Nuclear Fission by Vandenbosch and Huizenga in 1973 (Academic Press). These new results could be obtained thanks to the growth of technology, which enabled the construction of powerful new neutron sources, particle and heavy ion accelerators, and very performant data-acquisition and computer systems. The re-invention of the ionization chamber, the development of large fission fragment spectrometers and sophisticated multiparameter devices, and the production of exotic isotopes also contributed significantly to an improved understanding of nuclear fission. This book is written at a level to introduce graduate students to the exciting subject of nuclear fission. The very complete list of references following each chapter also makes the book very useful for scientists, especially nuclear physicists. The book has 12 chapters covering the fission barrier and the various processes leading to fission as well as the characteristics of the various fission reaction products. In order to guarantee adequate treatment of the very specialized research fields covered, several distinguished scientists actively involved in some of these fields were invited to contribute their expertise as authors or co-authors of the different chapters

  5. Photovoltaic array for Martian surface power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, J.; Landis, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Missions to Mars will require electric power. A leading candidate for providing power is solar power produced by photovoltaic arrays. To design such a power system, detailed information on solar-radiation availability on the Martian surface is necessary. The variation of the solar radiation on the Martian surface is governed by three factors: (1) variation in Mars-Sun distance; (2) variation in solar zenith angle due to Martian season and time of day; and (3) dust in the Martian atmosphere. A major concern is the dust storms, which occur on both local and global scales. However, there is still appreciable diffuse sunlight available even at high opacity, so that solar array operation is still possible. Typical results for tracking solar collectors are also shown and compared to the fixed collectors. During the Northern Hemisphere spring and summer the isolation is relatively high, 2-5 kW-hr/sq m-day, due to the low optical depth of the Martian atmosphere. These seasons, totalling a full terrestrial year, are the likely ones during which manned mission will be carried out.

  6. Calculation of neutron interior source distribution within subcritical fission-chain reacting systems for a prescribed power density generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Leonardo R.C.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are sub-critical systems stabilized by stationary external sources of neutrons. A system is subcritical when the removal by absorption and leakage exceeds the production by fission and tends to shut down. On the other hand, any subcritical system can be stabilized by including time-independent external sources of neutrons. The goal of this work is to determine the intensity of uniform and isotropic sources of neutrons that must be added inside all fuel regions of a subcritical system so that it becomes stabilized, generating a prescribed distribution of electric power. A computer program has been developed in Java language to estimate the intensity of stationary sources of neutrons that must be included in the fuel regions to drive the subcritical system with a fixed power distribution prescribed by the user. The mathematical model used to achieve this goal was the energy multigroup, slab-geometry neutron transport equation in the discrete ordinates (S N ) formulation and the response matrix method was applied to solve the forward and the adjoint S N problems. Numerical results are given to verify the present. (author)

  7. Calculation of neutron interior source distribution within subcritical fission-chain reacting systems for a prescribed power density generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Leonardo R.C.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: lrcmoraes@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: ricardob@iprj.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Modelagem Computacional

    2017-07-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are sub-critical systems stabilized by stationary external sources of neutrons. A system is subcritical when the removal by absorption and leakage exceeds the production by fission and tends to shut down. On the other hand, any subcritical system can be stabilized by including time-independent external sources of neutrons. The goal of this work is to determine the intensity of uniform and isotropic sources of neutrons that must be added inside all fuel regions of a subcritical system so that it becomes stabilized, generating a prescribed distribution of electric power. A computer program has been developed in Java language to estimate the intensity of stationary sources of neutrons that must be included in the fuel regions to drive the subcritical system with a fixed power distribution prescribed by the user. The mathematical model used to achieve this goal was the energy multigroup, slab-geometry neutron transport equation in the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) formulation and the response matrix method was applied to solve the forward and the adjoint S{sub N} problems. Numerical results are given to verify the present. (author)

  8. Two-Step Multi-Physics Analysis of an Annular Linear Induction Pump for Fission Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Steven M.; Reid, Terry V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key technologies associated with fission power systems (FPS) is the annular linear induction pump (ALIP). ALIPs are used to circulate liquid-metal fluid for transporting thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the power conversion device. ALIPs designed and built to date for FPS project applications have not performed up to expectations. A unique, two-step approach was taken toward the multi-physics examination of an ALIP using ANSYS Maxwell 3D and Fluent. This multi-physics approach was developed so that engineers could investigate design variations that might improve pump performance. Of interest was to determine if simple geometric modifications could be made to the ALIP components with the goal of increasing the Lorentz forces acting on the liquid-metal fluid, which in turn would increase pumping capacity. The multi-physics model first calculates the Lorentz forces acting on the liquid metal fluid in the ALIP annulus. These forces are then used in a computational fluid dynamics simulation as (a) internal boundary conditions and (b) source functions in the momentum equations within the Navier-Stokes equations. The end result of the two-step analysis is a predicted pump pressure rise that can be compared with experimental data.

  9. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  10. Calculation of multidimensional potential energy surfaces for even-even transuranium nuclei: systematic investigation of the triaxiality effect on the fission barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wei-Juan; Liu, Min-Liang; Wang, Hua-Lei

    2018-05-01

    Static fission barriers for 95 even-even transuranium nuclei with charge number Z = 94–118 have been systematically investigated by means of pairing self-consistent Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky calculations using the potential energy surface approach in multidimensional (β 2, γ, β 4) deformation space. Taking the heavier 252Cf nucleus (with the available fission barrier from experiment) as an example, the formation of the fission barrier and the influence of macroscopic, shell and pairing correction energies on it are analyzed. The results of the present calculated β 2 values and barrier heights are compared with previous calculations and available experiments. The role of triaxiality in the region of the first saddle is discussed. It is found that the second fission barrier is also considerably affected by the triaxial deformation degree of freedom in some nuclei (e.g., the Z=112–118 isotopes). Based on the potential energy curves, general trends of the evolution of the fission barrier heights and widths as a function of the nucleon numbers are investigated. In addition, the effects of Woods-Saxon potential parameter modifications (e.g., the strength of the spin-orbit coupling and the nuclear surface diffuseness) on the fission barrier are briefly discussed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11675148, 11505157), the Project of Youth Backbone Teachers of Colleges and Universities of Henan Province (2017GGJS008), the Foundation and Advanced Technology Research Program of Henan Province (162300410222), the Outstanding Young Talent Research Fund of Zhengzhou University (1521317002) and the Physics Research and Development Program of Zhengzhou University (32410017)

  11. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  12. Next generation laser optics for a hybrid fusion-fission power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, C J; Latkowski, J T; Schaffers, K I

    2009-09-10

    The successful completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), followed by a campaign to achieve ignition, creates the proper conditions to begin exploring what development work remains to construct a power plant based on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) technology. Fundamentally, two distinct NIF laser properties must be overcome. The repetition rate must increase from a shot every four hours to several shots per second. Additionally, the efficiency of converting electricity to laser light must increase by 20x to roughly 10 percent. Solid state diode pumped lasers, commercially available for table top applications, have adequate repetition rates and power conversion efficiencies, however, they operate at a tiny fraction of the required energy for an ICF power plant so would need to be scaled in energy and aperture. This paper describes the optics and coatings that would be needed to support this type of laser architecture.

  13. Fission products in the spent nuclear fuel from czech nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.; Mikisek, M.; Marek, T.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear power is expected to become a supply able to cover a significant part of the world energetic demand in future. But its big disadvantage, the risk of the spent nuclear fuel, has to be solved. The aim of this paper is to make simple estimates of the upper limits of amounts of the most dangerous spent fuel components and their compounds produced in Czech Republic until 2040. Our estimates are independent on particular type reactor (only on its power) and so they can be carried out for any nuclear fuel cycle. (Authors)

  14. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  15. Radioactive contamination of some rubber or plastic surfaces by fission products. Decontamination tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.; Sautiez, N.

    1957-10-01

    With the objective of notably addressing the contamination and decontamination of gloves and floor covering, this report first presents some characteristics of contaminating radioactive materials (nature, physical and chemical condition), of contaminated surfaces (surface condition, surface nature), and of decontamination processes (physical, chemical or mechanical action). It describes the operational modality implemented to test decontamination processes on various glove or flooring materials: sample preparation, counting, decontamination, reproducibility of decontamination tests, results in terms of activity reduction. It more precisely describes the tested samples: short gloves, gloves from glove boxes, floor and wall coverings. Results are presented and discussed in terms of sample susceptibility to contamination, and of decontamination, but also for re-contamination tests after a Nab-based decontamination (susceptibility to contamination, decontamination gain)

  16. Estimation, comparison, and evaluation of advanced fission power reactor generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddell, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The study compares the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR), the molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR), the light water breeder reactor (LWBR), and the heavy water reactor (HWR) with proposed light water reactors (LWR) and liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The relative electrical generation costs, including the effects of the introduction of advanced reactor fuel cycles into the U.S. nuclear power economy, were projected through the year 2030. The study utilized the NEEDS computer code which is a simulation of the U.S. nuclear power economy. The future potential electrical generation costs and cumulative consumption of uranium ore were developed using characterizations of the advanced systems. The reactor-fuel cycle characterizations were developed from literature reviews and personal discussions with the proponents of the various systems. The study developed a ranking of the concepts based on generation costs and uranium consumption

  17. High-safety and economical small molten-salt fission power stations and their developmental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, K.; Mitachi, K.; Minami, K.; Kato, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is not settled yet as one of the sound economical industries. Its establishment should obviously depend on the solution of the following problems: ''natural'' safety (depending on inherent natures), nuclear proliferation resistance - nearly non-production and effective incineration of Pu, Am and Om, universal resource, flexible power-size and excellent economy - wide applicability including Developing Countries. Therefore, some essentially new principles have to introduce in the nuclear energy system design. These are thorium utilization, fluid-fuel concepts, especially molten-fluoride technology, and separation of fissile-breeding and power-generation. This philosophy is named Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics [THOMSNES]. Its practical development program is presented

  18. Siting of Nuclear Power Plants in Metropolitan Areas. Estimation of Population Doses due to Accidental Release of Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresser, H. [Technischer Ueberwachungs-Verein Rheinland E.V., Cologne (Germany); Schwarzer, W. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit der Technischen Ueberwachungs-Vereine E.V., Cologne (Germany)

    1967-09-15

    The safety of large nuclear power plants in heavily populated areas depends entirely on engineered safeguards. An assessment of their reliability and effectiveness will have to play a major role in any safety analysis of such a plant, and this assessment will have to be made on the basis of the radiological burden to the environment - in terms of individual dose and a population dose - which can be accepted as tolerable in case of a severe accident. The calculation of the dispersion of fission products in the atmosphere, which links the radiological burden to the release of radioactivity, should be modified. The fact that distance factors, aside from a comparably small exclusion area, can no longer be taken into account suggests the introduction of the parameter ''population density'' and an extensive use of the man-rem concept. In this connection the time history of the release and the influence of variations of wind directions lose their importance. The authors have carried out calculations of the population dose, which could be received in a metropolitan area as a consequence of a severe reactor accident, using population densities, height of release above ground and generalized meteorological data as the main parameters. The results of these calculations are used as a basis for an assessment of the performance requirements of the engineered safeguards system, and the relative importance of different components of this system is discussed. (author)

  19. Assessments of sheath strain and fission gas release data from 20 years of power reactor fuel irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, P.L.; Manzer, A.M.; Hu, R.H.; Gibb, R.A.; Kohn, E.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, many fuel elements or bundles discharged from Canadian CANDU power reactors have been examined in the AECL hot cells. The post-irradiation examination (PIE) database covers a wide range of operating conditions, from which fuel performance characteristics can be assessed. In the present analysis, a PIE database was compiled representing elements from a total of 129 fuel bundles, of which 26% (34 bundles) were confirmed to have one or more defective elements. This comprehensive database was assessed in terms of measured sheath strain and fission gas release (FGR) for intact elements, in an attempt to identify any changes in these parameters over the history of CANDU reactor operation. Results from this assessment indicate that, for the data that are typical of normal CANDU operating conditions, tensile sheath strain and FGR have remained within 0.5% and 8%, respectively. Those data beyond these ranges are from fuel operated under abnormal conditions, not representative of normal operation, and thus do not indicate a trend toward unexpected fuel behaviour. The distributions of the PIE measurements indicate that maximum expected sheath strains and FGR for normally operated fuel are 0.7% and 13%, respectively. (author)

  20. Conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor. 12-month progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Baxi, C.B.; Rao, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual design and preliminary feasibility assessment for the hybrid blanket and power conversion system of the Mirror Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor. Existing gas-cooled fission reactor technology is directly applicable to the Mirror Hybrid Reactor. There are a number of aspects of the present conceptual design that require further design and analysis effort. The blanket and power conversion system operating parameters have not been optimized. The method of supporting the blanket modules and the interface between these modules and the primary loop helium ducting will require further design work. The means of support and containment of the primary loop components must be studied. Nevertheless, in general, the conceptual design appears quite feasible

  1. On the selfacting safe limitation of fission power and fuel temperature in innovative nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, W.; Brockmann, H.; Drecker, S.; Gerwin, H.; Haas, K.A.; Kugeler, K.; Ohlig, U.; Ruetten, H.J.; Teuchert, E.; Werner, H.; Wolf, L.

    1994-08-01

    Nuclear energy probably will not contribute significantly to the future worldwide energy supply until it can be made catastrophe-free. Therefore it has to be shown, that the consequences of even largest accidents will have no major impact to the environment of a power plant. In this paper one of the basic conditions for such a nuclear technology is discussed. Using mainly the modular pebble-bed high-temperature reactor as an example, the design principles, analytical methods and the level of knowledge as given today in controlling reactivity accidents by inherent safety features of innovative nuclear reactors are described. Complementary possibilities are shown to reach this goal with systems of different types of construction. Questions open today and resulting requirements for future activities are discussed. Today's knowledge credibly supports the possibility of a catastrophe-free nuclear technology with respect to reactivity events. (orig.)

  2. Study of the temperature effect on the surface of stainless steel using fission track technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhawan, M M; Nagpaul, K K [Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-01-01

    Solid state track technique has been used to determine trace amounts of uranium in steel. Steel samples of the size 1 cm x 1 cm x 0.6 cm were ground, polished, heated to various temperatures ranging from room temperature to 900 deg C and then packed alternately with lexan detectors in an aluminium capsule for thermal neutron irradiation. After irradiation, lexan discs were removed and etched. Their surfaces were scanned under an optical microscope for measurement of track density. Uranium contents of the samples was found to vary from 6 ppm to 9 ppm.

  3. Surface processing by high power excimer laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, M [SOPRA, 92 - Bois-Colombes (France)

    1995-03-01

    Surface processing with lasers is a promising field of research and applications because lasers bring substantial advantages : laser beams work at distance, laser treatments are clean in respect of environment consideration and they offer innovative capabilities for surface treatment which cannot be reached by other way. Excimer lasers are pulsed, gaseous lasers which emit in UV spectral range - the most common are XeCl (308 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm). From 1980 up to 1994, many of them have been used for research, medical and industrial applications such as spectroscopy, PRK (photo-refractive keratotomy) and micro-machining. In the last six years, from 1987 up to 1993, efforts have been done in order to jump from 100 W average power up to 1 kW for XeCl laser at {lambda} = 308 nm. It was the aim of AMMTRA project in Japan as EU205 and EU213 Eureka projects in Europe. In this framework, SOPRA developed VEL (Very large Excimer Laser). In 1992, 1 kW (10 J x 100 Hz) millstone has been reached for the first time, this technology is based on X-Ray preionization and large laser medium (5 liters). Surface treatments based on this laser source are the main purpose of VEL Lasers. Some of them are given for instance : (a) Turbine blades made with metallic substrate and ceramic coatings on the top, are glazed in order to increase corrosion resistance of ceramic and metal sandwich. (b) Selective ablation of organic coatings deposited on fragile composite material is investigated in Aerospace industry. (c) Chock hardening of bulk metallic materials or alloys are investigated for automotive industry in order to increase wear resistance. (d) Ablation of thin surface oxides of polluted steels are under investigation in nuclear industry for decontamination. (J.P.N.).

  4. Surface processing by high power excimer laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface processing with lasers is a promising field of research and applications because lasers bring substantial advantages : laser beams work at distance, laser treatments are clean in respect of environment consideration and they offer innovative capabilities for surface treatment which cannot be reached by other way. Excimer lasers are pulsed, gaseous lasers which emit in UV spectral range - the most common are XeCl (308 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm). From 1980 up to 1994, many of them have been used for research, medical and industrial applications such as spectroscopy, PRK (photo-refractive keratotomy) and micro-machining. In the last six years, from 1987 up to 1993, efforts have been done in order to jump from 100 W average power up to 1 kW for XeCl laser at λ = 308 nm. It was the aim of AMMTRA project in Japan as EU205 and EU213 Eureka projects in Europe. In this framework, SOPRA developed VEL (Very large Excimer Laser). In 1992, 1 kW (10 J x 100 Hz) millstone has been reached for the first time, this technology is based on X-Ray preionization and large laser medium (5 liters). Surface treatments based on this laser source are the main purpose of VEL Lasers. Some of them are given for instance : a) Turbine blades made with metallic substrate and ceramic coatings on the top, are glazed in order to increase corrosion resistance of ceramic and metal sandwich. b) Selective ablation of organic coatings deposited on fragile composite material is investigated in Aerospace industry. c) Chock hardening of bulk metallic materials or alloys are investigated for automotive industry in order to increase wear resistance. d) Ablation of thin surface oxides of polluted steels are under investigation in nuclear industry for decontamination. (J.P.N.)

  5. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  6. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  7. Mathematical model for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grey, J.; Chow, S.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. Such a concept could be particularly useful for missions which require both relatively high acceleration (e.g., for planetocentric maneuvers) and high performance at low acceleration (e.g., on heliocentric trajectories or for trajectory shaping). The first volume develops the mathematical model of the system.

  8. Birth to death analysis of the energy payback ratio and CO2 gas emission rates from coal, fission, wind, and DT-fusion electrical power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Scott W.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    The amount of electrical energy produced over the lifetime of coal, LWR fission, UP fusion, and wind power plants is compared to the total amount of energy required to procure the fuel, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The energy payback ratio varies from a low of 11 for coal plants to a high of 27 for DT-fusion plants. The magnitude of the energy investment and the source of the various energy inputs determine the CO 2 emission factor. This number varies from a low of 9 to a high of 974 tonnes of CO 2 per GW e h for DT-fusion and coal plants, respectively

  9. The etching property of the surface of CR-39 and the track core radius of fission fragment

    CERN Document Server

    Mineyama, D; Yamauchi, T; Oda, K; El-Rahman, A

    2002-01-01

    The etch pits of fission fragments in CR-39 detector have been observed carefully using an atomic force microscope (AFM) after extremely short chemical etching in stirred 6N KOH solution kept at 70degC. It was found that there existed a thin layer where the bulk etch rate is relativity from large the etch-pit growth curve for the etching duration between 10 and 1800 seconds. The track core radius of fission fragment was evaluated to be about 6 nm from the extrapolation of the growth curve in a thinner region. (author)

  10. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  11. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  12. Implementation of a Sage-Based Stirling Model Into a System-Level Numerical Model of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Power System (FPS) project is developing a Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) to verify the performance and functionality of a subscale version of the FPS reference concept in a relevant environment, and to verify component and system models. As hardware is developed for the TDU, component and system models must be refined to include the details of specific component designs. This paper describes the development of a Sage-based pseudo-steady-state Stirling convertor model and its implementation into a system-level model of the TDU.

  13. Review of some problems encountered with In-Core Fission chambers and Self-Powered Neutron Detectors in PWR's. Tests - Present use - Outlook on the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1979-01-01

    The working conditions of in-core detectors are investigated as well as some reliability problems which depend on nuclear environment (such as decrease of sensibility, loss of insulation...). Then we review the long-term irradiation tests in experimental reactor that have been carried out by the CEA these last years, with fission chambers (FC) and Self-Powered Detectors (SPD). The travelling probe system with moveable FC used in the 900 MWe PWR is briefly described. Finally an outlook on future possibilities is given; for instance the use of fixed SPD and a moveable FC in the same thimble, allowing recalibration of the fixed detectors [fr

  14. Ternary fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the energy minimization of all possible ternary breakups of a heavy radioactive nucleus. Further, within the TCM we have analysed the competition between different geometries as well as different positioning of the fragments. Also, an attempt was made to calculate the mass distribution of ternary fission process within the ...

  15. Measurements of fission product concentrations in surface air at Bombay, India, during the period 1975-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eapen, C.D.; Rangarajan, C.; Menon, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements on airborne fallout radioactivity for the period 1975 up to the middle of 1981 are given. Normally, these measurements are confined to Bombay, but after nuclear tests, some of the other stations where these measurements were carried out in previous years are operated for some time to study the levels of fresh activity. The levels of the long-lived fission products 144 Ce, 106 Ru and 137 Cs, and the short-lived fission products 95 Zr and 140 Ba, were measured, whenever they could be detected following nuclear tests, and tabulated. The data indicate that the activity varies by large factors from tests of similar yield, depending on the meteorological and other conditions. It was determined that the travel time for the Chinese test debris from Lop Nor, China to the West-coast of India is 14 to 16 days

  16. Computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. The second volume describes the computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of the system.

  17. A Basic LEGO Reactor Design for the Provision of Lunar Surface Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Darrell Bess

    2008-01-01

    A final design has been established for a basic Lunar Evolutionary Growth-Optimized (LEGO) Reactor using current and near-term technologies. The LEGO Reactor is a modular, fast-fission, heatpipe-cooled, clustered-reactor system for lunar-surface power generation. The reactor is divided into subcritical units that can be safely launched with lunar shipments from Earth, and then emplaced directly into holes drilled into the lunar regolith to form a critical reactor assembly. The regolith would not just provide radiation shielding, but serve as neutron-reflector material as well. The reactor subunits are to be manufactured using proven and tested materials for use in radiation environments, such as uranium-dioxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and structural support, and liquid-sodium heatpipes. The LEGO Reactor system promotes reliability, safety, and ease of manufacture and testing at the cost of an increase in launch mass per overall rated power level and a reduction in neutron economy when compared to a single-reactor system. A single unshielded LEGO Reactor subunit has an estimated mass of approximately 448 kg and provides approximately 5 kWe. The overall envelope for a single subunit with fully extended radiator panels has a height of 8.77 m and a diameter of 0.50 m. Six subunits could provide sufficient power generation throughout the initial stages of establishing a lunar outpost. Portions of the reactor may be neutronically decoupled to allow for reduced power production during unmanned periods of base operations. During later stages of lunar-base development, additional subunits may be emplaced and coupled into the existing LEGO Reactor network, subject to lunar base power demand. Improvements in reactor control methods, fuel form and matrix, shielding, as well as power conversion and heat rejection techniques can help generate an even more competitive LEGO Reactor design. Further modifications in the design could provide power generative opportunities for

  18. High Temperature Surface Parameters for Solar Power

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, C. F; Jenkins, R. J; Rudkin, R. L; Laughridge, F. I

    1960-01-01

    ... at a given distance from the sun. Thermal conversion efficiencies with a concentration ratio of 50 have been computed for each surface when exposed to solar radiation at the Earth's mean orbital radius...

  19. Fission meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  20. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  1. International handling of fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The opinion of the ministry for foreign affairs on international handling of fissionable materials is given. As an introduction a survey is given of the possibilities to produce nuclear weapons from materials used in or produced by power reactors. Principles for international control of fissionable materials are given. International agreements against proliferation of nuclear weapons are surveyed and methods to improve them are proposed. (K.K.)

  2. On fission product retention in the core of the low powered high temperature reactor under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastek, H.

    1984-01-01

    In the core of the high temperature reactor the fuel element and the coated particles contained herein provide the safest enclosure for fission products. The complex process of fission product transport out of the particle kernel, through the particle coating and within the fuel element graphite is described in a simplified form by the Fick's diffusion. The effective diffusion coefficient is used for calculation. Starting from the existing ideas of fission product transport five burn-up and temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients for Cesium in (Th,U)O 2 -kernels are derived in this study. The results have been gained from several fuel element radiation experiments in recent years, which showed extreme variation in regard to burn-up, temperature cycle, neutron flux and operation time. Cs-137 release measurements from single particle kernels were present from all the experiments. Furthermore, annealing tests of AVR-fuel elements were analyzed. Heat-temperatur and heating-time, the fuel element burn-up in the AVR-reactor, as well as the measured Cs-137 inventory of the fuel elements before and after annealing, are included in the investigation as essential parameters. With the aid of the derived diffusion coeffizients and already present data sets the Cs-137 release of fuel elements into a small reactor core is investigated under unrestricted core heat-up. While the released Cs-137 is derived mainly from defective particles at accident temperatures up to 1600 0 C, the main part diffuses through the particle coating at higher accident temperatures. (orig./HP) [de

  3. FREVAP-6, Metal Fission Products Release from HTGR Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, V.H.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The FREVAP type of code for estimating the release of longer-lived metallic fission products from HTGR fuel elements has been developed to take into account the combined effects of the retention of metallic fission products by fuel particles and the rather strong absorption of these fission products by the graphite of the fuel elements. Release calculations are made on the basis that the loss of fission product nuclides such as strontium, cesium, and barium is determined by their evaporation from the graphite surfaces and their transpiration induced by the flowing helium coolant. The code is devised so that changes of fission rate (fuel element power), fuel temperature, and graphite temperature may be incorporated into the calculation. Temperature is quite important in determining release because, in general, both release from fuel particles and loss by evaporation (transpiration) vary exponentially with the reciprocal of the absolute temperature. NESC0301/02: This version differs from the previous one in the following points: The source and output files were converted from BCD to ASCII coding. 2 - Method of solution: A problem is defined as having a one-dimensional segment made up of three parts - (1) the fission product source (fuel particles) in series with, (2) a non-source and absorption part (element graphite) and (3) a surface for evaporation to the coolant (graphite-helium interface). More than one segment may be connected (possibly segments stacked axially) by way of the coolant. At any given segment, a continuity equation is solved assuming equilibrium between the source term, absorption term, evaporation at coolant interface and the partial pressure of the fission product isotope in the coolant. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 5 isotopes; 10 time intervals for time-dependent variable; 49 segments (times number of isotopes); 5 different output print time-steps

  4. Ideological Fission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    ; it is a materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However......, it is a being which is reminiscent of earlier monsters - from Godzilla to The Blob. It is evident that the Cloverfield monster is a paradoxical construction which attempts to articulate fear and loathing about terrorism, but ends up trapped in an ideological dead-end maze, unable to do anything other than...

  5. Automated analysis for large amount gaseous fission product gamma-scanning spectra from nuclear power plant and its data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihua Zhang; Kurt Ungar; Ian Hoffman; Ryan Lawrie; Jarmo Ala-Heikkila

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Linssi database and UniSampo/Shaman software, an automated analysis platform has been setup for the analysis of large amounts of gamma-spectra from the primary coolant monitoring systems of a CANDU reactor. Thus, a database inventory of gaseous and volatile fission products in the primary coolant of a CANDU reactor has been established. This database is comprised of 15,000 spectra of radioisotope analysis records. Records from the database inventory were retrieved by a specifically designed data-mining module and subjected to further analysis. Results from the analysis were subsequently used to identify the reactor coolant half-life of 135 Xe and 133 Xe, as well as the correlations of 135 Xe and 88 Kr activities. (author)

  6. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  7. IFPE/NFIR-1, Clad creep-down, power history effect on fission product distribution (6 PWR rods 40-64 MWd/kg in BR-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Description: The NFIR-1 programme was designed to investigate factors likely to affect the fission gas release behaviour of fuel rods operating under normal commercial conditions. The factors which were investigated were: - the effect of fuel/rod design parameters, e.g., wet versus dry route pellet manufacture, fuel-clad gap size and rod pressurization; - the effect of power history i.e., In/Out fuel management strategy; - the effect of burn-up extension. This was accomplished by an extensive PIE campaign on 6 fuel rods irradiated to 40-64 MWd/kg under different prescribed conditions in the BR3 PWR. The examination involved non destructive mensuration and destructive examination using optical, SEM, TEM and EPMA techniques. The dataset is unique in demonstrating the effect of these variables on fuel performance

  8. Chemical effects of fission recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisels, G.G.; Freeman, J.P.; Gregory, J.P.; Richardson, W.C.; Sroka, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The production of nitrogen from nitrous oxide at high density was employed to investigate the energy deposition efficiency of fission recoils produced from fission of U 235 in uranium-palladium foils clad with platinum. Nitrogen production varied linearly with fission recoil dose from 1.1 x 10 20 to 9.0 x 10 20 eV, and was independent of density between 12.5 and 127.5 g l -1 N 2 O. 16.2 +- 0.8% of the fission recoil energy was deposited external to the foil. Electron microprobe analysis showed some unevenness of new foil and polymer buildup on the surface after irradiation of ethylene-oxygen mixtures. Subsequent irradiation in the presence of nitrous oxide restored some of the original efficiency. This is ascribed to chemical oxidation of the polymer induced by reactive intermediates produced from nitrous oxide. (author)

  9. Pulsed discharges produced by high-power surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhle, A.; Ivanov, O.; Kolisko, A.; Kortshagen, U.; Schlüter, H.; Vikharev, A.

    1996-02-01

    The mechanisms of the ionization front advance in surface-wave-produced discharges are investigated using two experimental set-ups. The high-power surface waves are excited in a 3 cm wavelength band by a surfaguide and a novel type of launcher (an E-plane junction). The ionization front velocity of the surface wave is measured for a wide range of gas pressures, incident microwave power and initial pre-ionization. The experimental results are compared with theoretical ones based on three different models. The comparison between theory and experiment allows one to suggest a new interpretation of the ionization front's advance. The ionization front velocity is determined by a breakdown wave or an ionization wave in the electric field of a high-power surface wave in the zone near the ionization front.

  10. Physics and chemistry of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: In the pleasant and hospitable atmosphere of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich in the Federal Republic of Germany, the IAEA symposium on the Physics and Chemistry of Fission took place. Almost 200 scientists attended, 154 abstracts were submitted, and 57 papers presented, but more important than the numbers was the quality of the contributions and the progress reported at the symposium. The neutron was discovered almost 50 years ago; 40 years ago the idea of nuclear fission was born. Since then, a number of laboratories have worked hard to explain the phenomenon of fission One would expect that by now scientists would know exactly what happens in a nucleus before and during the process of fission, particularly as there are hundreds of power and research reactors in operation, and fission of uranium isotopes is the basis of their functioning. At first glance, fission seems a simple process: a neutron hits and penetrates the uranium nucleus which becomes excited, i.e. has a surplus of energy. One way to get rid of this energy is for the nucleus to split into two parts; additional products of this process are energy and more neutrons. Nature, however, seems to dislike such straightforward explanations. In the case of fission, scientists have observed a number of phenomena which disagree with a simple model. Sometimes, a nucleus will split into two parts without being 'attacked' by a neutron; this spontaneous fission opens up a new line of fission research and several contributions at the symposium reported on sophisticated experiments designed to unravel some of its specific details. Sometimes, a fissioning nucleus will emit another particle: ternary fission has become a powerful tool for studying the properties of nuclei during the fission process. For the scientist, it is fascinating to observe how the nucleus behaves during fission. They invent models which are supposed to reproduce the most probable course of events leading to fission. In one of these

  11. Modelling isothermal fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffelen, P. van

    2002-01-01

    The present paper presents a new fission gas release model consisting of two coupled modules. The first module treats the behaviour of the fission gas atoms in spherical grains with a distribution of grain sizes. This module considers single atom diffusion, trapping and fission induced re-solution of gas atoms associated with intragranular bubbles, and re-solution from the grain boundary into a few layers adjacent to the grain face. The second module considers the transport of the fission gas atoms along the grain boundaries. Four mechanisms are incorporated: diffusion controlled precipitation of gas atoms into bubbles, grain boundary bubble sweeping, re-solution of gas atoms into the adjacent grains and gas flow through open porosity when grain boundary bubbles are interconnected. The interconnection of the intergranular bubbles is affected both by the fraction of the grain face occupied by the cavities and by the balance between the bubble internal pressure and the hydrostatic pressure surrounding the bubbles. The model is under validation. In a first step, some numerical routines have been tested by means of analytic solutions. In a second step, the fission gas release model has been coupled with the FTEMP2 code of the Halden Reactor Project for the temperature distribution in the pellets. A parametric study of some steady-state irradiations and one power ramp have been simulated successfully. In particular, the Halden threshold for fission gas release and two simplified FUMEX cases have been computed and are summarised. (author)

  12. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  13. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options

  14. Fission theory and actinide fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1975-06-01

    The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and γ rays emitted in the resonances of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and γ-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n,γf) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for {sup 240}Pu.

  15. Tests to determine the release of short-lived fission products from UO2 fuel operating at linear powers of 45 and 60 kW/m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Lipsett, J.J.; MacDonald, R.D.

    1985-09-01

    Experiments have been carried out using a 'sweep gas' technique to determine the behaviour of short-lived fission products within operating, intact UO 2 fuel elements. The Zircaloy-4-clad elements were 600 mm long and contained fuel of density 10.65 - 10.71 Mg/m 3 . A He-2% H 2 carrier gas swept gaseous or volatile fission products out of the operating fuel element past a gamma spectrometer for measurement. We outline our loop model and give full details of calculational procedures. In tests at linear powers of 45 (FIO-122) and 60 kW/m (FIO-124) to a maximum burnup of 80 MW.h/kg U, the species measured directly at the spectrometer during normal operation were generally the short-lived xenons and kryptons. Iodines were not observed during normal operation. The behaviour of I-133 and I-135 was deduced from the decay of Xe-133 and Xe-135 during reactor shutdowns. Plots of R/B (released/born) against λ (decay constant) or effective λ for all isotopes observed at 45 and 60 kW/m show that a line of slope -0.5, corresponding with diffusion kinetics, is a good fit to the measured xenon and krypton data. The inferred release of iodine fits the same line. From this we can extrapolate to an R/B for I-131 of about 5 x 10 -4 at 45 kW/m, and 3 x 10 -3 at 60 kW/m. Both tests were terminated by defects. Under defect conditions, R/B dependence on λ was about 0.6. I-131 release under defect conditions was 5 Ci and 60 mCi for FIO-122 and FI0-124, respectively. 22 refs

  16. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He dating of teschenite intrusions gives time constraints on accretionary processes and development of planation surfaces in the Outer Western Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danisik, Martin; Frisch, Wolfgang [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences; Panek, Tomas [Ostrava Univ. (Czech Republic). Dept. of Physical Geography and Geoecology; Matysek, Dalibor [Technical Univ. of Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Geological Engineering; Dunkl, Istvan [Geoscience Center Goettingen (Germany). Sedimentology and Environmental Geology

    2008-09-15

    The age of planation surfaces in the Podbeskydska pahorkatina Upland in the Outer Western Carpathians (OWC, Czech Republic) is constrained by low-temperature thermochronological dating methods for the first time. Our apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He data measured on teschenite intrusions show that planation surfaces in the study area formed in post-Pannonian time (>7.1 Ma) and are therefore younger than traditionally believed. This contradicts the classical concepts, which stipulate that a large regional planation surface of Pannonian age (the so-called ''midmountain level'') developed in the whole Western Carpathians. Geodynamic implications of our data are the following: (i) the investigated Tesin and Godula nappes of the OWC were buried and thermally overprinted in the accretionary wedge in different ways, and consequently experienced different cooling histories. This indicates a dynamic basin setting with an active accretionary process in a subduction zone; (ii) accretionary processes in the OWC were active already during Late Eocene times. (orig.)

  17. Options for development of space fission propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana

    2001-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include high specific power continuous impulse propulsion systems and bimodal nuclear thermal rockets. Despite their tremendous potential for enhancing or enabling deep space and planetary missions, to date space fission systems have only been used in Earth orbit. The first step towards utilizing advanced fission propulsion systems is development of a safe, near-term, affordable fission system that can enhance or enable near-term missions of interest. An evolutionary approach for developing space fission propulsion systems is proposed

  18. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  19. Power Spectral Density Evaluation of Laser Milled Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul-Amadeus Lorbeer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ablating surfaces with a pulsed laser system in milling processes often leads to surface changes depending on the milling depth. Especially if a constant surface roughness and evenness is essential to the process, structural degradation may advance until the process fails. The process investigated is the generation of precise thrust by laser ablation. Here, it is essential to predict or rather control the evolution of the surfaces roughness. Laser ablative milling with a short pulse laser system in vacuum (≈1 Pa were performed over depths of several 10 µm documenting the evolution of surface roughness and unevenness with a white light interference microscope. Power spectral density analysis of the generated surface data reveals a strong influence of the crystalline structure of the solid. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate that this effect could be suppressed for gold.

  20. Energy from nuclear fission()

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripani, M.

    2015-08-01

    The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  1. Measurements of fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    2000-01-01

    After some historical introductory remarks on the discovery of nuclear fission and early fission yield determinations, the present status of knowledge on fission yields is briefly reviewed. Practical and fundamental reasons motivating the pursuit of fission yield measurements in the coming century are pointed out. Recent results and novel techniques are described that promise to provide new interesting insights into the fission process during the next century. (author)

  2. Radiochemical studies on fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on nuclear chemistry; topics considered include: recoil range and kinetic energy distribution in the thermal neutron ftssion of /sup 245/Cm; mass distribution and recoil range measurements in the reactor neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U; fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of /sup 241/PU highly asymmetric binary fission of uranium induced by reactor neutrons; and nuclear charge distribution in low energy fission. ( DHM)

  3. The evaluation of failure stress and released amount of fission product gas of power ramped rod by fuel behaviour analysis code 'FEMAXI-III'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujita, Misao

    1984-01-01

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction(PCI) related in-pile failure of Zircaloy sheathed fuel rod is in general considered to be caused by combination of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction(PCMI) with fuel-cladding chemical interaction(FCCI). An understanding of a basic mechanism of PCI-related fuel failure is therefore necessary to get actual cladding hoop stress from mechanical interaction and released amounts of fission product(FP) gas of aggressive environmental agency from chemical interaction. This paper describes results of code analysis performed on fuel failure to cladding hoop stress and amounts of FP gas released under the condition associated with power ramping. Data from Halden(HBWR) and from Studsvik(R2) are used for code analysis. The fuel behaviour analysis code ''FEMAXI-III'' is used as an analytical tool. The followings are revealed from the study: (1) PCI-related fuel failure is dependent upon cladding hoop stress and released amounts of FP gas at power ramping. (2) Preliminary calculated threshold values of hoop stress and of released amounts of FP gas to PCI failure are respectively 330MPa, 10% under the Halden condition, 190MPa, 5% under the Inter ramp(BWR) condition, and 270MPa, 14% under the Over ramp(PWR) condition. The values of hoop stress calculated are almost in the similar range of those obtained from ex-reactor PCI simulated tests searched from references published. (3) The FEMAXI-III code verification is made in mechanical manner by using in-pile deformation data(diametral strain) obtained from power ramping test undertaken by JAERI. While, the code verification is made in thermal manner by using punctured FP gas data obtained from post irradiation examination performed on non-defected power ramped fuel rods. The calculations are resulted in good agreements to both, mechanical and thermal experimental data suggesting the validity of the code evaluation. (J.P.N.)

  4. Muon induced fission and fission track dating of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of muon induced fission on geological dating of samples by the fission track method are evaluated for the case of muscovite minerals. It is found a small but significant effect, greater for the longer ages. Since calculations are developped under the hypothesis of constant atmosphere and primary cosmic ray flux it is suggested that any discrepancy found in ages of very old material that cannot be accounted for by well known environmental influences, be taken as an indication of variation on either the atmospheric stopping power or the intensity of cosmic radiation along the ages. (author) [pt

  5. Nuclear fission with inertial confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Koshkarev, D G

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of initiating the explosive fission reaction in a small quantity of fissile material through the heavy ions beam from the powerful accelerator-driver, developed for realization of the thermonuclear synthesis in the deuterium-tritium cylindrical targets with the direct ignition, is considered. The consequences of applying this method in the nuclear engineering are discussed

  6. Radioactive contamination of some rubber or plastic surfaces by fission products. Decontamination tests; Contamination radioactive de quelques surfaces en caoutchouc ou en matiere plastique par des produits de fission. Essais de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E.; Sautiez, N.

    1957-10-15

    With the objective of notably addressing the contamination and decontamination of gloves and floor covering, this report first presents some characteristics of contaminating radioactive materials (nature, physical and chemical condition), of contaminated surfaces (surface condition, surface nature), and of decontamination processes (physical, chemical or mechanical action). It describes the operational modality implemented to test decontamination processes on various glove or flooring materials: sample preparation, counting, decontamination, reproducibility of decontamination tests, results in terms of activity reduction. It more precisely describes the tested samples: short gloves, gloves from glove boxes, floor and wall coverings. Results are presented and discussed in terms of sample susceptibility to contamination, and of decontamination, but also for re-contamination tests after a Nab-based decontamination (susceptibility to contamination, decontamination gain)

  7. Modelling of thermal mechanical behaviour of high burn-Up VVER fuel at power transients with special emphasis on the impact of fission gas induced swelling of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.; Medvedev, A.; Khvostov, G.; Bogatyr, S.; Kuzetsov, V.; Korystin, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the modelling of unsteady state mechanical and thermo-physical behaviour of high burn-up VVER fuel at a power ramp. The contribution of the processes related to the kinetics of fission gas to the consequences of pellet-clad mechanical interaction is analysed by the example of integral VVER-440 rod 9 from the R7 experimental series, with a pellet burn-up in the active part at around 60 MWd/kgU. This fuel rod incurred ramp testing with a ramp value ΔW 1 ∼ 250 W/cm in the MIR research reactor. The experimentally revealed residual deformation of the clad by 30-40 microns in the 'hottest' portion of the rod, reaching a maximum linear power of up to 430 W/cm, is numerically justified on the basis of accounting for the unsteady state swelling and additional degradation of fuel thermal conductivity due to temperature-induced formation and development of gaseous porosity within the grains and on the grain boundaries. The good prediction capability of the START-3 code, coupled with the advanced model of fission gas related processes, with regard to the important mechanical (residual deformation of clad, pellet-clad gap size, central hole filling), thermal physical (fission gas release) and micro-structural (profiles of intra-granular concentration of the retained fission gas and fuel porosity across a pellet) consequences of the R7 test is shown. (authors)

  8. Total surface area change of Uranium dioxide fuel in function of burn-up and its impact on fission gas release during neutron irradiation for small, intermediate and high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the early published papers it was observed that the fractional fission gas release from the specimen have a tendency to increase with the total surface area of the specimen - a fairy linear relationship was indicated. Moreover it was observed that the increase of total surface area during irradiation occurs in the result of connection the closed porosity with the open porosity what in turn causes the increase of fission gas release. These observations let us surmise that the process of knock-out release is the most significant process of fission gas release since its quantity is proportional to the total surface area. Review of the experiments related to the increase of total surface area in function of burn-up is presented in the paper. For very high burn-up the process of grain sub-division (polygonization) occurs under condition that the temperature of irradiated fuel lies below the temperature of grain re-crystallization. Simultaneously with the process of polygonization, the increase in local porosity and the decrease in local density in function of burn-up occurs, which leads to the increase of total surface area. It is suggested that the same processes take place in the transformed fuel as in the original fuel, with the difference that the total surface area is so big that the whole fuel can be treated as that affected by the knock-out process. This leads to explanation of the experimental data that for very high burn-up (>120 MWd/kgU) the concentration of xenon is constant. An explanation of the grain subdivision process in function of burn-up in the 'athermal' rim region in terms of total surface area, initial grain size and knock-out release is undertaken. Correlation of the threshold burn-up, the local fission gas concentration, local total surface area, initial and local grain size and burn-up in the rim region is expected. (author)

  9. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  10. A compound refining system for separation of gaseous fission products incorporated in a reprocessing pilot plant for spent fuel from neclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, a gas treatment experimental apparatus was installed to the SU-2 type experimental facility. The purpose is to solve variety of problems in the separation, collection and subsequent treatment for gaseous fission products and highly volatile fission products in spent fuel reprocessing. The experimental apparatus has the functions as follows: the measurement of air flow such as flow rate, pressure, total γ activity and krypton-85 content, preliminary air flow cleaning and drying removing aerosol, hydrogen fluoride and nitrogen oxide, and the trapping and analysis of gaseous fission products and highly volatile fission products in air flow. For the collection of these two types of fission products, a liquid absorbent and a solid adsorbent are used in series arrangement. (J.P.N.)

  11. Potassium Rankine cycle power conversion systems for lunar-Mars surface power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The potassium Rankine cycle has good potential for application to nuclear power systems for surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of the power conversion system was carried out in the 1960's which demonstrated successful operation of components made of stainless steel at moderate temperatures. This technology could be applied in the near term to produce a 360 kW(e) power system by coupling a stainless steel power conversion system to the SP-100 reactor. Improved performance could be realized in later systems by utilizing niobium or tantalum refractory metal alloys in the reactor and power conversion system. The design characteristics and estimated mass of power systems for each of three technology levels are presented in the paper

  12. Pratt and Whitney ESCORT derivative for mars surface power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feller, Gerald J.; Joyner, Russell

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the applicability of a common reactor system design from the Pratt and Whitney ESCORT nuclear thermal rocket engine concept to support current NASA mars surface-based power requirements. The ESCORT is a bimodal engine capable of supporting a wide range of propulsive thermal and vehicle electrical power requirements. The ESCORT engine is powered by a fast-spectrum beryllium-reflected CERMET-fueled nuclear reactor. In addition to an expander cycle propulsive mode, the ESCORT is capable of operating in an electrical power mode. In this mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. Recent Design Reference Mission requirements (DRM) from NASA Johnson Space Center and NASA Lewis Research Center studies in 1997 and 1998 have detailed upgraded requirements for potential mars transfer missions. The current NASA DRM requires a nuclear thermal propulsion system capable of delivering total mission requirements of 200170 N (45000 lbf) thrust and 50 kWe of spacecraft electrical power. Additionally, these requirements detailed a surface power system capable of providing approximately 160 kW of electrical energy over an approximate 10 year period within a given weight and volume envelope. Current NASA studies use a SP-100 reactor (0.8 MT) and a NERVA derivative (1.6 MT) as baseline systems. A mobile power cart of approximate dimensions 1.7 mx4.5 mx4.4 m has been conceptualized to transport the reactor power system on the Mars Surface. The 63.25 cm diameter and 80.25 cm height of the ESCORT and its 1.3 MT of weight fit well within the current weight and volume target range of the NASA DRM requirements. The modifications required to the ESCORT reactor system to support this upgraded electrical power requirements along with operation in the Martian atmospheric conditions are addressed in this paper. Sufficient excess reactivity and burnup capability

  13. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  14. Advances on fission chamber modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Geslot, Benoit; Veenhof, Rob

    2013-06-01

    In-vessel, online neutron flux measurements are routinely performed in mock-up and material testing reactors by fission chambers. Those measurements have a wide range of applications, including characterization of experimental conditions, reactor monitoring and safety. Depending on the application, detectors may experience a wide range of constraints, of several magnitudes, in term of neutron flux, gamma-ray flux, temperature. Hence, designing a specific fission chamber and measuring chain for a given application is a demanding task. It can be achieved by a combination of experimental feedback and simulating tools, the latter being based on a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics. A computation route that simulates fission chambers, named CHESTER, is presented. The retrieved quantities of interest are the neutron-induced charge spectrum, the electronic and ionic pulses, the mean current and variance, the power spectrum. It relies on the GARFIELD suite, originally developed for drift chambers, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ code to assess the drift parameters of electrons within the filling gas, and the SRIM code to evaluate the stopping range of fission products. The effect of the gamma flux is also estimated. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the experimental data available to date. In a near future, a comprehensive experimental programme will be undertaken to qualify the route using the known neutron sources, mock-up reactors and wide choice of fission chambers, with a stress on the predictiveness of the Campbelling mode. Depending on the results, a refinement of the modelling and an effort on the accuracy of input data are also to be considered. CHESTER will then make it possible to predict the overall sensitivity of a chamber, and to optimize the design for a given application. Another benefit will be to increase the

  15. JNDC nuclear data library of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Ihara, Hitoshi; Akiyama, Masatsugu; Yoshida, Tadashi; Matumoto, Zyun-itiro; Nakasima, Ryuzo

    1983-10-01

    The JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) FP (Fission Product) nuclear data library for 1172 fission products is described in this report. The gross theory of beta decay has been used extensively for estimating unknown decay data and also some of known decay data with poor accuracy. The calculated decay powers of fission products using the present library show excellent agreement with the latest measurements at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and UTT (University of Tokyo, Tokai) for cooling times shorter than 10 3 s after irradiation. The calculated decay powers by the existing libraries showed systematic deviations at short cooling times; the calculated beta and gamma decay powers after burst fission were smaller than the experimental results for cooling times shorter than 10 s, and in the cooling time range 10 to 10 3 s the beta-decay power was larger than the measured values and the gamma decay power smaller than the measured results. The present JNDC FP nuclear data library resolved these discrepancies in the short cooling time ranges. The decay power of fission products has been calculated for ten fission types and the results have been fitted by an analytical function with 31 exponentials. This permits the easy application of the present results of decay power calculations to a LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) analysis of a light water reactor and so on. (author)

  16. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  17. The potential of fission nuclear power in resolving global climate change under the constraints of nuclear fuel resources and once-through fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Vladimir; Pevec, Dubravko; Matijevic, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fission is receiving new attention as a developed source of carbon-free energy. A much larger number of nuclear reactors would be needed for a major impact on carbon emission. The crucial question is whether it can be done without increasing the risk of nuclear proliferation. Specifically, can a larger nuclear share in world energy production, well above the present 6%, be achieved in the next few decades without adding the proliferation-sensitive technologies of reprocessing spent fuel and recycling plutonium to the problems of the unavoidable use of enrichment technology? The answer depends on the available uranium resources. We first looked for the maximum possible nuclear build-up in the 2025-2065 period under the constraints of the estimated uranium resources and the use of once-through nuclear fuel technology. Our results show that nuclear energy without reprocessing could reduce carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 deg. C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission by 26.1%.

  18. Possible emission of radioactive fission products during off-design accidents at a nuclear power plant with VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubkov, A.P.; Kozlov, V.F.; Luzanova, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that eight nuclear power plants with VVER-1000 reactors have been constructed in Russia, Ukraine, and in the Republic of Belarus and they have been operating successfully without any serious accidents since 1980. These facilities have been analyzed for various accident scenarios, and measures have been incorporated which will prevent core damage during these possible events. However, an off-design accident can occur, and in such a case, the radiological consequences would exceed the worst design accidents. This paper reviews a number of potential off-design accidents in order to develop an accident plan to mitigate the consequences of such an accident

  19. Dynamical chaos and induced nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotin, Yu L; Krivoshej, I V

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the exponential instability of trajectories, which arises at negative curvature of the potential energy surface, leads to diffusion of the image point through the barrier and determines real time delays in induced nuclear fission.

  20. Fission - track age of the Marjalahti Pallasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, Yu.V.; Perelygin, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Investigation of fossil charged-particle tracks in various mineral phases of extraterrestrial samples is a powerful method for research the early stages of the solar system. Over geological time, meteorites crystals have accumulated a record of tracks produced by heavily charged energetic particles from both internal (spontaneous fission of 238U and some other extinct isotopes) and external sources (galactic cosmic rays with Z>20). The fortunate fact that meteorite grains can accumulate latent and very long-lived tracks since soon after the end of nucleosynthesis in the solar nebula enables one to decode their radiation history and to detect any thermal events in the meteorite cosmic history by revealing these tracks through suitable etching procedures. Only a few minerals in meteorites (mainly phosphates) contain small amount of uranium; the fact that 238 U undergoes fission with fission-decay constant λ f ∼ 8.2x10 -17 yr -1 allows one to use this isotope as a chronometer. By measuring the U concentration in the crystals (by reactor irradiation) and the density of the spontaneous-fission tracks it is relatively easy to calculate the 'fission-track age' if 238 U is the main source of fission tracks. However the fission-track dating of extraterrestrial samples compared with the terrestrial ones has some peculiar features due to presence of a number of other potential track sources except the spontaneous fission of 238 U, such as the spontaneous fission of presently extinct 244 Pu, heavy nuclei of cosmic rays and induced fission by cosmic ray primaries. Only tracks from the spontaneous fission of U and Pu are suitable for fission-track dating. The competing effects of these fissioning elements, whose half-lives differ by a factor of ∼50, form a basis for a fission-track chronology for samples older than ∼ 4.0 Gyr. Over small intervals in time (∼ few x10 8 yr ) the track density from spontaneous fission of 238 U is nearly constant. However, the

  1. Interplanetary and lunar surface SP-100 nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Shepard, N.F.; Smith, M.; Stephen, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes how the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System (SRPS) can be tailored to meet the specific requirements for a lunar surface power system to meet the needs of the consolidation and utilization phases outlined in the 90-day NASA SEI study report. This same basic power system can also be configured to obtain the low specific masses needed to enable robotic interplanetary science missions employing Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). In both cases it is shown that the SP-100 SRPS can meet the specific requirements. For interplanetary NEP missions, performance upgrades currently being developed in the area of light weight radiators and improved thermoelectric material are assumed to be technology ready in the year 2000 time frame. For lunar applications, some system rearrangement and enclosure of critical components are necessary modifications to the present baseline design

  2. A radioisotope-powered surface acoustic wave transponder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, S; Lal, A

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a 63 Ni radioisotope-powered pulse transponder that has a SAW (surface acoustic wave) device as the frequency transmission frequency selector. Because the frequency is determined by a SAW device, narrowband detection with an identical SAW device enables the possibility for a long-distance RF-link. The SAW transponders can be buried deep into structural constructs such as steel and concrete, where changing batteries or harvesting vibration or EM energy is not a reliable option. RF-released power to radioisotope- released power amplification is 10 8 , even when regulatory safe amounts of 63 Ni are used. Here we have achieved an 800 µW pulse (315 MHz, 10 µs pause) across a 50 Ω load every 3 min, using a 1.5 milli-Ci 63 Ni source

  3. Fission Research at IRMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  4. Equilibrium fission model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.; Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to aid in understanding the systematics of heavy ion fission and fission-like reactions in terms of the target-projectile system, bombarding energy and angular momentum, fission widths are calculated using an angular momentum dependent extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory and particle emission widths using angular momentum coupling

  5. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  6. Surface treatments for material protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper highlights some of the surface treatment methods used in nuclear power plants to improve their performance. The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys results from the formation of an adherent and protective film of ZrO 2 . Graphite coating of zircaloy-2 cladding minimizes the susceptibility to environmental induced cracking. Magnetite formation during the hot conditioning operation improves the corrosion resistance of carbon steel as well as controls the spread of radioactivity. It has been illustrated how the surface treatment is helpful for redistributing residual stress to facilitate conversion of tensile stress to compressive stress to mitigate failures due to stress corrosion and fatigue corrosion. Inhibitors and passivators can modify the surface conditions (in situ) of condenser tubes and cooling water systems. These aspects have been dealt in the text of the paper. (author). 8 refs., 3 figures

  7. Floor surface decontaminating device for use in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomiji; Ue, Tatsuyuki; Omori, Nobuya; Okuzawa, Tsutomu.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for decontaminating the floor surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials in nuclear power plants or the likes, mechanically, automatically and effectively. Constitution: During running of the device by means of running wheels and castors, a decontaminating head is always applied with vibrations by a vibrator. In this state, wiping members are sent from a delivery roll, applied with vibrations at the decontaminating head. The members wipe off contamination products while in frictional contact with the floor surface and are then taken up to a winding roll with the contamination products deposited thereto. In this case, since the vibrations from the decontaminating head are transmitted by way of a resilient portion thereof to the wiping members, the vibrations transmitted from the wiping members to the floor surface are somewhat buffered. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  9. 14. International workshop on nuclear fission physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The meetings on nuclear fission took place 12-15 October 1998 and was organized by Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. The aim of the workshop was to present and discuss main new both theoretical and experimental results obtained in the area of nuclear fission, dynamical feature, properties of fission fragments and complementary radiation. As usual the program of the workshop was designed to cover a wide range of physical phenomena - from low energy and spontaneous fission to fission of hot rotating nuclei and multifragmentation at intermediate and high energies. Reaction induced by slow and fast neutron, light and heavy ions were discussed [ru

  10. Fission products in National Atmospheric Deposition Program—Wet deposition samples prior to and following the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant incident, March 8?April 5, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Debey, Timothy M.; Nilles, Mark A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Gay, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive isotopes I-131, Cs-134, or Cs-137, products of uranium fission, were measured at approximately 20 percent of 167 sampled National Atmospheric Deposition Program monitoring sites in North America (primarily in the contiguous United States and Alaska) after the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant incident on March 12, 2011. Samples from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program were analyzed for the period of March 8-April 5, 2011. Calculated 1- or 2-week radionuclide deposition fluxes at 35 sites from Alaska to Vermont ranged from 0.47 to 5,100 Becquerels per square meter during the sampling period of March 15-April 5, 2011. No fission-product isotopes were measured in National Atmospheric Deposition Program samples obtained during March 8-15, 2011, prior to the arrival of contaminated air in North America.

  11. Fission mass yields of excited medium heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Depta, K.; Herrmann, R.; Greiner, W.; Scheid, W.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distributions resulting from the fission of excited medium mass nuclei are discussed on the basis of the fragmentation theory. It is shown that very asymmetric fission events can be expected with rates which are only a few orders of magnitude smaller than the rates for symmetric fission. As an example a calculation of the fission mass distribution of the excited 172 Yb compound nucleus is presented. This mass distribution reveals observable structures over the entire range of the mass asymmetry due to valleys in the potential energy surface for fission fragments with closed proton and neutron shells

  12. K-correlation power spectral density and surface scatter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The K-Correlation or ABC model for surface power spectral density (PSD) and BRDF has been around for years. Eugene Church and John Stover, in particular, have published descriptions of its use in describing smooth surfaces. The model has, however, remained underused in the optical analysis community partially due to the lack of a clear summary tailored toward that application. This paper provides the K-Correlation PSD normalized to σ(λ) and BRDF normalized to TIS(σ,λ) in a format intended to be used by stray light analysts. It is hoped that this paper will promote use of the model by analysts and its incorporation as a standard tool into stray light modeling software.

  13. Surface analytical investigations of the release behaviour of volatile fission products during simulated core meltdown accidents and of the reaction behaviour of iodine with silver surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.

    1986-07-01

    The report presents the results of the analysis of aerosol particles formed in simulated laboratory scale core meltdown experiments. In addition the interaction of silver surfaces with gaseous molecular iodine and with iodide and molecular iodine in aqueous solution was investigated. The composition of the aerosol samples and the progress of the reactions mentioned were determined by use of surface analytical techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy). The major information can be evaluated from X-ray photoelectron spectra which exhibit chemical shifts of the photoelectron lines which allowing a discrimination between different chemical species of the same element. The analyses showed that iodine is present in the aerosol particles mainly as caesium iodide and, to a smaller fraction, as silver iodide. During the adsorption of gaseous molecular iodine at metallic silver surfaces a closed silver iodide overlayer is formed. In aqueous iodide solutions one observes chemisorption of the iodide anions up to a coverage of the metallic silver surface of about half a monolayer. Molecular iodine in aqueous solution is completely converted to silver iodide which covers the substrate irregularly. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Fission level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fission level densities (or fissioning nucleus level densities at fission saddle deformations) are required for statistical model calculations of actinide fission cross sections. Back-shifted Fermi-Gas Model, Constant Temperature Model and Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM) are widely used for the description of level densities at stable deformations. These models provide approximately identical level density description at excitations close to the neutron binding energy. It is at low excitation energies that they are discrepant, while this energy region is crucial for fission cross section calculations. A drawback of back-shifted Fermi gas model and traditional constant temperature model approaches is that it is difficult to include in a consistent way pair correlations, collective effects and shell effects. Pair, shell and collective properties of nucleus do not reduce just to the renormalization of level density parameter a, but influence the energy dependence of level densities. These effects turn out to be important because they seem to depend upon deformation of either equilibrium or saddle-point. These effects are easily introduced within GSM approach. Fission barriers are another key ingredients involved in the fission cross section calculations. Fission level density and barrier parameters are strongly interdependent. This is the reason for including fission barrier parameters along with the fission level densities in the Starter File. The recommended file is maslov.dat - fission barrier parameters. Recent version of actinide fission barrier data obtained in Obninsk (obninsk.dat) should only be considered as a guide for selection of initial parameters. These data are included in the Starter File, together with the fission barrier parameters recommended by CNDC (beijing.dat), for completeness. (author)

  15. Investigation of exotic fission modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A.; Greiner, W.; Nagame, Y.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.

    2002-01-01

    Fission approach to the cluster radioactivities and α-decay has been systematically developed during the last two decades. A more complex process, the ternary fission, was observed since 1946 both in neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. We obtained interesting results concerning the binary fission saddle-point reflection asymmetric nuclear shapes, and we can explain how a possible nuclear quasimolecular state is formed during the 10 Be accompanied cold fission of 252 Cf. The equilibrium nuclear shapes in fission theory are usually determined by minimizing the deformation energy for a given surface equation. We developed a method allowing to obtain a very general saddle-point shape as a solution of a differential equation without an a priori introduction of a shape parametrization. In the approach based on a liquid drop model (LDM), saddle-point shapes are always reflection symmetric: the deformation energy increases with the mass-asymmetry parameter η = (A 1 - A 2 )/(A 1 + A 2 ). By adding the shell corrections to the LDM deformation energy, we obtained minima at a finite mass asymmetry for parent nuclei 238 U, 232,228 Th in agreement with experiments. This correction was calculated phenomenologically. A technique based on the fragment identification by using triple γ coincidences in the large arrays of Ge-detectors, like GAMMASPHERE, was employed at Vanderbilt University to discover new characteristics of the fission process, and new decay modes. The possibility of a whole family of new decay modes, the multicluster accompanied fission, was envisaged. Besides the fission into two or three fragments, a heavy or superheavy nucleus spontaneously breaks into four, five or six nuclei of which two are asymmetric or symmetric heavy fragments and the others are light clusters, e.g. α-particles, 10 Be, 14 C, or combinations of them. Examples were presented for the two-, three- and four cluster accompanied cold fission of 252 Cf and 262 Rf, in which the emitted

  16. Fast fission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Christian.

    1982-03-01

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted [fr

  17. Fission product yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V.; Hep, J.

    1978-01-01

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  18. Fission neutron multiplicity calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.; Ruben, A.; Seeliger, D.

    1991-01-01

    A model for calculating neutron multiplicities in nuclear fission is presented. It is based on the solution of the energy partition problem as function of mass asymmetry within a phenomenological approach including temperature-dependent microscopic energies. Nuclear structure effects on fragment de-excitation, which influence neutron multiplicities, are discussed. Temperature effects on microscopic energy play an important role in induced fission reactions. Calculated results are presented for various fission reactions induced by neutrons. Data cover the incident energy range 0-20 MeV, i.e. multiple chance fission is considered. (author). 28 refs, 13 figs

  19. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  20. Fusion-fission hybrid studies in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Berwald, D.H.; Cheng, E.T.; Delene, J.G.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Systems and conceptual design studies have been carried out on the following three hybrid types: (1) The fission-suppressed hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced (Pu or 233 U) per unit of total nuclear power by suppressing the fission process and multiplying neutrons by (n,2n) reactions in materials like beryllium. (2) The fast-fission hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced per unit of fusion power by maximizing fission of 238 U (Pu is produced) in which twice the fissile atoms per unit of fusion power (but only a third per unit of nuclear power) are made. (3) The power hybrid, which amplifies power in the blanket for power production but does not produce fuel to sell. All three types must sell electrical power to be economical

  1. Energy from nuclear fission an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, Enzo; Ripani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview on nuclear physics and energy production from nuclear fission. It serves as a readable and reliable source of information for anyone who wants to have a well-balanced opinion about exploitation of nuclear fission in power plants. The text is divided into two parts; the first covers the basics of nuclear forces and properties of nuclei, nuclear collisions, nuclear stability, radioactivity, and provides a detailed discussion of nuclear fission and relevant topics in its application to energy production. The second part covers the basic technical aspects of nuclear fission reactors, nuclear fuel cycle and resources, safety, safeguards, and radioactive waste management. The book also contains a discussion of the biological effects of nuclear radiation and of radiation protection, and a summary of the ten most relevant nuclear accidents. The book is suitable for undergraduates in physics, nuclear engineering and other science subjects. However, the mathematics is kept at a level that...

  2. Combustion-based power source for Venus surface missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy F.; Paul, Michael V.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2016-10-01

    The National Research Council has identified in situ exploration of Venus as an important mission for the coming decade of NASA's exploration of our solar system (Squyers, 2013 [1]). Heavy cloud cover makes the use of solar photovoltaics extremely problematic for power generation for Venus surface missions. In this paper, we propose a class of planetary exploration missions (for use on Venus and elsewhere) in solar-deprived situations where photovoltaics cannot be used, batteries do not provide sufficient specific energy and mission duration, and nuclear systems may be too costly or complex to justify or simply unavailable. Metal-fueled, combustion-based powerplants have been demonstrated for application in the terrestrial undersea environment. Modified or extended versions of the undersea-based systems may be appropriate for these sunless missions. We describe systems carrying lithium fuel and sulfur-hexafluoride oxidizer that have the potential for many days of operation in the sunless craters of the moon. On Venus a system level specific energy of 240 to 370 We-hr/kg should be possible if the oxidizer is brought from earth. By using either lithium or a magnesium-based alloy fuel, it may be possible to operate a similar system with CO2 derived directly from the Venus atmosphere, thus providing an estimated system specific energy of 1100 We+PV-hr/kg (the subscript refers to both electrical and mechanical power), thereby providing mission durations that enable useful scientific investigation. The results of an analysis performed by the NASA Glenn COMPASS team describe a mission operating at 2.3 kWe+PV for 5 days (120 h), with less than 260 kg power/energy system mass total. This lander would be of a size and cost suitable for a New Frontiers class of mission.

  3. The Cyrano program. 1 - description and operation of an irradiation device 'Cyrano'. 2 - results of the experiments Cyrano 1 and 2 (study of the EL 4 first-bach pencil); measurement of the thermal conductivity integral for UO2 sintered up to 2300 deg C; evolution of fission gases at constant power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, J.P.; Chenebault, P.

    1968-01-01

    Two rods of the type 'EL 4 first score' have been irradiated in 'Cyrano' capsules which are suited for continuous measurement of the nuclear power evolved and equipped with thermocouples. The variations of the integral of conductivity of sintered 96 per cent theoretical dense UO 2 has been established until 2300 deg. C; these variations are coherent with those previously measured out-of-pile. The released fission gases have been recovered at different times during the irradiation: the kinetics of release of stable gases is such that, in the experimental conditions (T surface = 610 deg. C, ∫ T s T c kdT = 34.7 W cm -1 ) the fraction of released gases is still widely increasing after 12 days of irradiation. Numerous observations have been made on concentrations of rare gases locally present in the irradiated fuel. (authors) [fr

  4. The nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, J.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear fission process considering initially the formation of compound nucleus and finishing with radioactive decay of fission products is studied. The process is divided in three parts which consist of the events associated to the nucleus of intermediate transitional state, the scission configuration, and the phenomenum of post scission. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Muon-induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikanov, S.

    1980-01-01

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238 U and 232 Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238 U. (author)

  6. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  7. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  8. Study of hypernuclei fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, F.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about PS177 experience made on LEAR machine at CERN in 1988. The annihilation reaction of anti protons on a target of Bismuth or Uranium is studied. Lambda particles are produced by this reaction, in the nucleus in 2% of cases 7.1 10 -3 hypernuclei by stopped antiproton in the target are produced. The prompt hypernucleus fission probability of uranium is 75% and that of Bismuth 10%. The mass distribution of fission fragments is symmetrical ((≡ the excitation energy of the nucleus is very high). If the nucleus hasn't fissioned, the non-mesonic lambda decay, gives it an energy of 100 MeV, what allows to fission later. This fission is delayed because the hypernucleus lifetime is 1.3 +0.25 -0.21 10 -10 sec for Bismuth [fr

  9. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  10. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talou, P.; Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.; Rising, M. E.; Pozzi, S. A.; Verbeke, J.; Andrews, M. T.; Clarke, S. D.; Jaffke, P.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Marcath, M. J.; Meierbachtol, K.; Nakae, L.; Rusev, G.; Sood, A.; Stetcu, I.; Walker, C.

    2018-01-01

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n - n, n - γ, and γ - γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ rays from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX - PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in

  11. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talou, P.; Jaffke, P.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Physics Group, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis, CA (United States); Randrup, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rising, M.E.; Andrews, M.T.; Sood, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pozzi, S.A.; Clarke, S.D.; Marcath, M.J. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Verbeke, J.; Nakae, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Livermore, CA (United States); Jandel, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States); University of Massachusetts, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Lowell, MA (United States); Meierbachtol, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rusev, G.; Walker, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n-n, n-γ, and γ-γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ rays from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in nonproliferation

  12. Unmanned Surface Sea Vehicle Power System Design and Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritpal, Singh

    2005-01-01

    .... The power system of the USV is chosen to be a hybrid power source comprising a diesel generator and a lithium-ion battery pack Optimal sizing of the diesel generator and battery pack is important...

  13. Fission barriers of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burvenich, T.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Self consistent microscopic mean-field models are powerful tools for the description of nuclear structure phenomena in the region of known elements, where they have reached a good quality. Especially the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) method and the Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) model will be considered in the discussion of the properties of these models. When it comes to extrapolation to the region of superheavy elements, though there is agreement concerning the global trends, these model exhibit significant differences in their predictions concerning fission barrier heights and structures. (Author)

  14. Fission in a Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A three-year theory project was undertaken to study the fission process in extreme astrophysical environments, such as the crust of neutron stars. In the first part of the project, the effect of electron screening on the fission process was explored using a microscopic approach. For the first time, these calculations were carried out to the breaking point of the nucleus. In the second part of the project, the population of the fissioning nucleus was calculated within the same microscopic framework. These types of calculations are extremely computer-intensive and have seldom been applied to heavy deformed nuclei, such as fissioning actinides. The results, tools and methodologies produced in this work will be of interest to both the basic-science and nuclear-data communities.

  15. Investigation of delayed fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayet, Nicolas

    1996-05-01

    The study of the fission gas release process in the high burnup rig IFA-562 has revealed a particular fuel behaviour: a delay in the fission gas release process. It appeared that an important release of gas was measured by the pressure transducers once the power had decreased, whereas, during steady-state operation, the pressure did not increase very much. After examinations, the gap size has been concluded to be the main parameter involving this delay. However the burnup could have been a potential factor, its role is mainly to close the gap by swelling. The observations of low burnup rods have shown the same delayed fission gas release, the gap being small by design and closed essentially by thermal expansion. The study of the kinetics has demonstrated the time-independency of the phenomenon. Thus the proposed mechanism driving this delayed fission gas release would involve three consecutives stages. During steady-state, the gas is released into the interlinkage network of grain boundary bubbles and cracks. Due to the closed gap, the gas is trapped in some void volumes, unable to escape the pellet. During power reduction, the gap and some old/new cracks open, immediately providing a path for the gas to the pressure transducers and explaining this delay in the fission gas release. (author)

  16. Application of pulse shape discrimination in Si detector for fission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) with totally depleted transmission type Si surface barrier detector in reverse mount has been investigated to identify fission fragments in the presence of elastic background in heavy ion-induced fission reactions by both numerical simulation and experimental studies. The PSD method is ...

  17. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented

  18. Fusion-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Grotowski, K.

    1992-01-01

    Classical dynamical calculations of the heavy ion induced fission processes have been performed for the reactions 40 Ar+ 141 Pr, 20 Ne+ 165 Ho and 12 C+ 175 Lu leading to the iridium like nucleus. As a result prescission lifetimes were obtained and compared with the experimental values. The comparison between the calculated and experimental lifetimes indicates that the one-body dissipation picture is much more relevant in describing the fusion-fission dynamics than the two-body one. (orig.)

  19. A Model to Reproduce the Response of the Gaseous Fission Product Monitor (GFPM) in a CANDU{sup R} 6 Reactor (An Estimate of Tramp Uranium Mass in a Candu Core)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofian, Sara; Boss, Charles [AECL Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga Ontario L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In a Canada Deuterium Uranium (Candu) reactor, the fuel bundles produce gaseous and volatile fission products that are contained within the fuel matrix and the welded zircaloy sheath. Sometimes a fuel sheath can develop a defect and release the fission products into the circulating coolant. To detect fuel defects, a Gaseous Fission Product Monitoring (GFPM) system is provided in Candu reactors. The (GFPM) is a gamma ray spectrometer that measures fission products in the coolant and alerts the operator to the presence of defected fuel through an increase in measured fission product concentration. A background fission product concentration in the coolant also arises from tramp uranium. The sources of the tramp uranium are small quantities of uranium contamination on the surfaces of fuel bundles and traces of uranium on the pressure tubes, arising from the rare defected fuel element that released uranium into the core. This paper presents a dynamic model that reproduces the behaviour of a GFPM in a Candu 6 plant. The model predicts the fission product concentrations in the coolant from the chronic concentration of tramp uranium on the inner surface of the pressure tubes (PT) and the surface of the fuel bundles (FB) taking into account the on-power refuelling system. (authors)

  20. Laser driven fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    The role of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) as a fissile fuel and/or power producer is discussed. As long range options to supply the world energy needs, hybrid-fueled thermal-burner reactors are compared to liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). A discussion of different fuel cycles (thorium, depleted uranium, and spent fuel) is presented in order to compare the energy multiplication, the production of fissile fuel, the laser efficiency and pellet gain requirements of the hybrid reactor. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has collaborated with Bechtel Corporation and with Westinghouse in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering operational parameters, such as energy multiplication, power density, burn-up and plutonium production as a function time

  1. Fission-gas-bubble mobility in oxide fuel: a critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1983-08-01

    The available volatile fission product release data has confirmed the general viability of the scaling model of volatile fission product release in which the fractional release rates of the volatile fission products scale as that of the fission gas. The question of whether fission gas bubbles can move sufficiently fast to be a significant mechanism responsible for fission gas release from the fuel is considered. The mean jump distance per jump of the hopping process in gas bubble motion is analyzed. Surface roughness is also considered

  2. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la face d'incidence et sur la face d'emergence des fragments de

  3. Study on the calculation method of source term from fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jing; Gong Quan; Qiu Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    As a major part of radioactive nuclides, fission products play an important role in nuclear power plant design. The paper analyzes the calculation model of core activity inventory, the model of fission products releasing from the pellets to RCS, the balance model of fission products in RCS, and then proves them by calculation of the typical pressurized water reactor. The model is proved applicable for calculating fission products of pressurized water reactors. (authors)

  4. Extraction of potential energy in charge asymmetry coordinate from experimental fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasca, H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); ' ' Babes-Bolyai' ' Univ., Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Andreev, A.V.; Adamian, G.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Antonenko, N.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic Univ. (Russian Federation). Mathematical Physics Dept.

    2016-12-15

    For fissioning isotopes of Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, and U, the potential energies as a function of the charge asymmetry coordinate are extracted from the experimental charge distributions of the fission fragment and compared with the calculated scission-point driving potentials. The role of the potential energy surfaces in the description of the fission charge distribution is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Fission product behavior in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, E.L.; Kirslis, S.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.; Blankenship, F.F.; Grimes, W.R.

    1975-10-01

    Essentially all the fission product data for numerous and varied samples taken during operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment or as part of the examination of specimens removed after particular phases of operation are reported, together with the appropriate inventory or other basis of comparison, and relevant reactor parameters and conditions. Fission product behavior fell into distinct chemical groups. Evidence for fission product behavior during operation over a period of 26 months with 235 U fuel (more than 9000 effective full-power hours) was consistent with behavior during operation using 233 U fuel over a period of about 15 months (more than 5100 effective full-power hours)

  6. Opimization of fusion-driven fissioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapin, D.L.; Mills, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential advantages of hybrid or fusion/fission systems can be exploited in different ways. With selection of the 238 U-- 239 Pu fuel cycle, we show that the system has greatest value as a power producer. Numerical examples of relative revenue from power production vs. 239 Pu production are discussed, and possible plant characteristics described. The analysis tends to show that the hybrid may be more economically attractive than pure fusion systems

  7. Fission, fusion and the energy crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, S E [Aston Univ., Birmingham (UK)

    1980-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: living on capital (energy reserves and consumption forecasts); the atom and its nucleus, mass and energy; fission and the bomb; the natural uranium reactor; enriched reactors; control and safety; long-term economics (the breeder reactions and nuclear fuel reserves); short-term economics (cost per kilowatt hour); national nuclear power programmes; nuclear power and the environment (including reprocessing, radioactive waste management, public relations); renewable energy sources; the fusion programme; summary and comment.

  8. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.D.; Lynn, J.E.; Michaudon, A.; Rowlands, J.; de Saussure, G.

    1981-01-01

    A general presentation of current knowledge of the fission process is given with emphasis on the low energy fission of actinide nuclei and neutron induced fission. The need for and the required accuracy of fission cross section data in nuclear energy programs are discussed. A summary is given of the steps involved in fission cross section measurement and the range of available techniques. Methods of fission detection are described with emphasis on energy dependent changed and detector efficiency. Examples of cross section measurements are given and data reduction is discussed. The calculation of fission cross sections is discussed and relevant nuclear theory including the formation and decay of compound nuclei and energy level density is introduced. A description of a practical computation of fission cross sections is given.

  9. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  10. An improved technique for fission track dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yunlong; Wu Zhaohui; Xia Yuliang

    1996-01-01

    The necessity of improving the fission track dating (FTD) technique both at home and abroad is illustrated. The ways of making such improvement are also proposed. It is suggested to calibrate the constant b value of the uranium standard glass by using the method of fission products activity. The 3 kinds of uranium standard glass which have been calibrated are NBS SRM962a, UB 1 and UB 2 . An established new method σ·Φ ρ d /b, to measure neutron fluence, avoids the influence of the varying neutron spectrum on measuring neutron fluence. The improved etching technique for fission tracks in zircon adopted a two-step method which includes the molten alkali system etching using NaOH + KOH and the mixed acid system etching using HNO 3 + HF; this technique results in adequate track etching, increased track clarity and less interference. In this way the intensity of tracks is authentically reflected. Dividing angular zone in accordance with the angular distribution of spontaneous fission track on the crystal surface of minerals to count the tracks and using the improved etching technique to remove the non-uniform angular distribution of spontaneous fission tracks in zircon, ensure the accuracy of tracks count. The improved FTD techniques were used to finish Laboratory Standardized Calibration. The tests using international FTD age standards samples have proved that above mentioned techniques are reliable and practical in obtaining the accurate FTD data. (8 tabs.; 3 figs.)

  11. The evaluation for reference fission yield of 238U fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Qichang; Liu Tingjin

    1998-01-01

    In the fission yield data evaluation and measurement, the reference yield is very important, good or poor recommended or measurement values depend upon the reference data to a great extent. According to the CRP's requirement, the evaluation of reference fission yields have been and will be carried out in CNDC, as a part of the whole work (contract No.9504/R 0 /Regular Budget Fund), the evaluation for 29 reference fission yields of 15 product nuclides from 238 U fission have been completed

  12. Insights into nuclear structure and the fission process from spontaneous fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.H.; Butler-Moore, K.; Ramayya, A.V. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The {gamma}-rays emitted following spontaneous and induced fission are rich sources of information about the structure of neutron-rich nuclei and about the fission process itself. The study of spontaneous fissioning isotopes with large Ge detector arrays are providing a wealth of such information as seen, for example, in recent reports. In this paper we present some of our most recent results on nuclear structure studies and conclusions on the fission process itself. In our work, we have employed in spontaneous fission, a triple gamma coincidence study for the first time and a high resolution, X-ray detector-{gamma}-coincidence study. These data provide powerful ways of separating the gamma rays which belong to a particular nucleus. The triple coincidence technique was used to uniquely identify the levels in {sup 136}Te and higher spin states in its N=84 isotones, {sup 138}Xe and {sup 140}Ba{sup 171}. Some other examples of the level structures observed in the low and high mass partners are presented, including a detailed analysis of the backbending of the moment of inertia in {sup 112,114,116}Pd. Finally, we present the first examples of how our analysis allows one to extract a detailed picture of the dependence of the angular momentum on the mass and atomic numbers of the fission fragments and of the long-sought neutron multiplicity distribution from zero-n to ten-n as a function of the charge and mass asymmetry.

  13. Fission gas release in LWR fuel measured during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Skattum, E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A series of fuel behavior experiments are being conducted in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway, to measure the release of Xe, Kr, and I fission products from typical light water reactor design fuel pellets. Helium gas is used to sweep the Xe and Kr fission gases out of two of the Instrumented Fuel Assembly 430 fuel rods and to a gamma spectrometer. The measurements of Xe and Kr are made during nuclear operation at steady state power, and for 135 I following reactor scram. The first experiments were conducted at a burnup of 3000 MWd/t UO 2 , at bulk average fuel temperatures of approx. 850 K and approx. 23 kW/m rod power. The measured release-to-birth ratios (R/B) of Xe and Kr are of the same magnitude as those observed in small UO 2 specimen experiments, when normalized to the estimated fuel surface-to-volume ratio. Preliminary analysis indicates that the release-to-birth ratios can be calculated, using diffusion coefficients determined from small specimen data, to within a factor of approx. 2 for the IFA-430 fuel. The release rate of 135 I is shown to be approximately equal to that of 135 Xe

  14. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  16. Fission product detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liatard, E.; Akrouf, S.; Bruandet, J.F

    1987-01-01

    The response of photovoltaic cells to heavy ions and fission products have been tested on beam. Their main advantages are their extremely low price, their low sensitivity to energetic light ions with respect to fission products, and the possibility to cut and fit them together to any shape without dead zone. The time output signals of a charge sensitive preamplifier connected to these cells allows fast coincidences. A resolution of 12ns (F.W.H.M.) have been measured between two cells [fr

  17. Low energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1982-02-01

    In these lectures we present the liquid drop model of fission and compare some of its prediction with experiment. The liquid drop analogy allows to define in a rather simple and intuitive way a number of useful concepts and possible observables. We then discuss, using the example of the oscillator model, the generality of shell effects. We show how a synthesis of the liquid drop model and of the shell model can be made using the Strutinsky shell averaging procedure. Some experimental data related to the existence of shape isomers are presented and discussed. We conclude by discussing some aspects, both experimental and theoretical, of fission dynamics

  18. Fission of heavy hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1993-01-01

    The results on delayed and prompt fission of heavy hypernuclei obtained by the LEAR PS177 collaboration are recalled and discussed. It is shown that the hypernuclei life-times can be explained in term of a weak strangeness violating lambda-nucleon interaction with a cross section close to 6.0 10 -15 barns. The lambda attachment function is shown to be sensitive to the scission configuration, just before fission, and to the neck dynamics. This function provides a new way to study the nuclear scission process. (author)

  19. Fission gas measuring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Eun Ka; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Eun Pyo; Chun, Yong Bum; Seo, Ki Seog; Park, Dea Gyu; Chu, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok.

    1998-02-01

    Safety and economy of nuclear plant are greatly affected by the integrity of nuclear fuels during irradiation reactor core. A series of post-irradiation examination (PIE) including non-destructive and destructive test is to be conducted to evaluate and characterize the nuclear performance. In this report, a principle of the examination equipment to measure and analyse fission gases existing nuclear fuels were described and features of the component and device consisting the fission gas measuring equipment are investigated. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  20. Fission gas measuring technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Eun Ka; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Eun Pyo; Chun, Yong Bum; Seo, Ki Seog; Park, Dea Gyu; Chu, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok

    1998-02-01

    Safety and economy of nuclear plant are greatly affected by the integrity of nuclear fuels during irradiation reactor core. A series of post-irradiation examination (PIE) including non-destructive and destructive test is to be conducted to evaluate and characterize the nuclear performance. In this report, a principle of the examination equipment to measure and analyse fission gases existing nuclear fuels were described and features of the component and device consisting the fission gas measuring equipment are investigated. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  1. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e - ). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  2. Low energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    1980-08-01

    In these lectures the liquid drop model of fission is presented and some of its predictions compared with experiment. The liquid drop analogy allows to define in a rather simple and intuitive way a number of useful concepts and possible observables. It is shown how a synthesis of the liquid drop model and of the shell model can be made using the Strutinsky shell averaging procedure. Some experimental data related to the existence of shape isomers are presented and discussed. We conclude by discussing some aspects, both experimental and theoretical, of fission dynamics

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy: A powerful tool for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walle, G.F.A. van de; Nelissen, B.J.; Soethout, L.L.; Kempen, H. van

    1987-01-01

    The invention of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) has opened a new area of surface analysis. A description of the principle of operation is given in this paper. Also the technical problems encountered and their solution are described. Two examples demonstrating the possibilities of the STM are presented: topographic and spectroscopic measurements on a stepped Ni (111) surface and photoconductive measurements on GaAs. (orig.)

  4. Effect of fission dynamics on the spectra and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Madland, D.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    With the goal of examining their effect on the spectra and multiplicities of the prompt neutrons emitted in fission, we discuss recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear dynamics. The conversion of collective energy into single-particle excitation energy is calculated for a new surface-plus-window dissipation mechanism. By solving the Hamilton equations of motion for initial conditions appropriate to fission, we obtain the average fission-fragment translational kinetic energy and excitation energy. The spectra and multiplicities of the emitted neutrons, which depend critically upon the average excitation energy, are then calculated on the basis of standard nuclear evaporation theory, taking into account the average motion of the fission fragments, the distribution of fission-fragment residual nuclear temperature, the energy dependence of the cross section for the inverse process of compound-nucleus formation, and the possibility of multiple-chance fission. Some illustrative comparisons of our calculations with experimental data are shown

  5. Fission Product Library and Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Padgett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Fission product yields can be extracted from an irradiated sample by performing gamma ray spectroscopy on the whole sample post irradiation. There are several pitfalls to avoid when trying to determine a specific isotope's fission product yield.

  6. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fission-like configurations are used for the total deformation energy calculations. A ... oscillator potential for the two fission fragment regions reads as ... Beyond this limit, the contribution of more remote levels is negligible. Once the density ...

  7. Mirror fusion--fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fusion-fission concept and the mirror fusion-fission hybrid program are outlined. Magnetic mirror fusion drivers and blankets for hybrid reactors are discussed. Results of system analyses are presented and a reference design is described

  8. Solid-State Thermionic Nuclear Power for Megawatt Propulsion, Planetary Surface and Commercial Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermionic (TI) power conversion is a promising technology first investigated for power conversion in the 1960’s, and of renewed interest due to modern...

  9. Microwave power coupling in a surface wave excited plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyananda Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, different types of plasma sources have been used for various types of plasma processing, such as, etching and thin film deposition. The critical parameter for effective plasma processing is high plasma density. One type of high density plasma source is Microwave sheath-Voltage combination Plasma (MVP. In the present investigation, a better design of MVP source is reported, in which over-dense plasma is generated for low input microwave powers. The results indicate that the length of plasma column increases significantly with increase in input microwave power.

  10. ISOLDE experiment explores new territory in nuclear fission

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    An international collaboration led by the University of Leuven, Belgium, exploiting ISOLDE’s radioactive beams, has recently discovered an unexpected new type of asymmetric nuclear fission, which challenges current theories. The surprising result opens the way for new nuclear structure models and further theories to elucidate the question.   Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) in action at ISOLDE. RILIS was instrumental in providing the pure beam necessary for the successful nuclear fission experiment. In nuclear fission, the nucleus splits into two fragments (daughter nuclei), releasing a huge amount of energy. Nuclear fission is exploited in power plants to produce energy. From the fundamental research point of view, fission is not yet fully understood decades after its discovery and its properties can still surprise nuclear physicists. The way the process occurs can tell us a lot about the internal structure of the nucleus and the interactions taking place inside the com...

  11. Fission barrier theory and its application to the calculation of actinide neutron cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lectures discuss the possibilities and realisations of applying nuclear fission theory to the calculation of unknown nuclear data required for applications, principally in the nuclear power field. A brief description of the fundamentals of fission theory, the nature of the potential energy surface in the deformation plane, and of the inertial tensor, is given, and the accuracy of the theoretical calculations is discussed. It is concluded that it is impracticable to obtain required quantities such as neutron cross-sections from such fundamental calculations at present. On the other hand the fundamental theory reveals a wealth of phenomenological aspects of the fission process which can be incorporated into nuclear reaction theory. It is then shown how reaction theory thus extended to take correct account of the structured (''double-humped'') fission barrier can be used to parametrise the barrier by analysis of experimental data, and subsequently to calculate new data. Descriptions of computer programmes and illustrations of the application of the methods to actual physical examples are included in this account. (author)

  12. Process for treating fission waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste

  13. A new mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model for a uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geun

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model (MEGA) for uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel was developed. It was based upon the diffusional release of fission gases from inside the grain to the grain boundary and the release of fission gases from the grain boundary to the external surface by the interconnection of the fission gas bubbles in the grain boundary. The capability of the MEGA model was validated by a comparison with the fission gas release data base and the sensitivity analyses of the parameters. It was found that the MEGA model correctly predicts the fission gas release in the broad range of fuel burnups up to 98 MWd/kgU. Especially, the enhancement of fission gas release in a high-burnup fuel, and the reduction of fission gas release at a high burnup by increasing the UO 2 grain size were found to be correctly predicted by the MEGA model without using any artificial factor. (author)

  14. 50 years of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilscher, D.

    1989-01-01

    The article tells the story of the discovery of nuclear fission in Berlin 50 years ago by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in cooperation with Lise Meitner. 50 years later nuclear fission is still a subject of research. Some question remain unanswered. Selected new research results are used to discuss the dynamics of the collective movement of the elementary nuclear fission process. (orig.) [de

  15. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... across the fission barrier is very small or in other words, the fission barrier is much ... of this shape evolution, the gross features of the fissioning nucleus can be described ..... [7] Y Abe, C Gregoire and H Delagrange, J. Phys.

  16. Status of fission yield measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeck, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  17. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  18. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars

  19. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  20. The fission products palladium and rhodium: Their state in solutions, their behavior in the regeneration of fuel of atomic power stations, and the search for selective extraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arseenkov, L.V.; Zakharkin, B.S.; Lunichkina, K.P.; Renard, E.V.; Rogozhkin, V.Yu.; Shorokhov, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    At the present time many research centers are working on the extraction of noble metals in the form of fission fragments. Consistent data has been obtained on the mass accumulation of noble metals in various forms of processed nuclear fuel. Requirements are noted that must be met for obtaining industrial and economic efficiency in the extraction of noble metals by the Purex process. Presently there is a lack of information on the extraction of noble metals from spent fuel, particularly as far as the nitric acid media of the Purex process are concerned. The authors will discuss individual test observations on simulating systems and real systems with noble metals. The investigations focused on the noble metals of lowest radioactivity, namely palladium and rhodium. The complexity of the chemistry of ruthenium, on the one hand, and the possible selective, clearing distillation of ruthenium tetroxide from nitric acid solutions, on the other hand, make it necessary to focus the attention on the unresolved problems of the extraction of palladium and rhodium. The article further includes discussion on the following topics: noble metals in solutions of purex process, electrochemical operations involving noble metals, extraction systems for rhodium and palladium, separation of palladium from real solutions

  1. The discovery of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.A.C.

    1978-01-01

    In this article by the retired head of the Separation Processes Group of the Chemistry Division, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, U.K., the author recalls what he terms 'an exciting drama, the unravelling of the nature of the atomic nucleus' in the years before the Second World War, including the discovery of fission. 12 references. (author)

  2. Surface temperature and distortion of optical elements exposed to high power synchrotron radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourikis, S.; Jark, W.; Koch, E.E.; Saile, V.

    1989-01-01

    Mirrors made of various materials have been investigated under surface power densities of approximately 1--2 W/mm 2 emitted by a powerful hybrid wiggler installed in the 5.3-GeV DORIS storage ring. Thermal inhomogeneities and deformations at surfaces with a height resolution of 50 nm have been determined quantitatively. The only material withstanding these power levels without a significant deformation is SiC. Conventional cooling geometries are found to be useless for a reduction of the surface distortion

  3. Behavior of solid fission products in irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ung Sup; Jung, Yang Hong; Kim, Hee Moon; Yoo, Byun Gok; Kim, Do Sik; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2004-01-01

    Many fission products are generated by fission events in UO 2 fuel under irradiation in nuclear reactor. Concentration of each fission product is changed by conditions of neutron energy spectrum, fissile material, critical thermal power, irradiation period and cooling time. Volatile materials such as Cs and I, the fission products, degrade nuclear fuel rod by the decrease of thermal conductivity in pellet and the stress corrosion cracking in cladding. Metal fission products (white inclusion) make pellet be swelled and decrease volume of pellet by densification. It seems that metal fission products are filled in the pore in pellet and placed between UO 2 lattices as interstitial. In addition, metal oxide state may change structural lattice volume. Considering behavior of fission products mentioned above, concentration of them is important. Fission products could be classified as bellows; solid solution in matrix : Sr, Zr, Nb, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm - metal precipitates : Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sb, Te - oxide precipitates : Ba, Zr, Nb, Mo, (Rb, Cs, Te) - volatile and gases : Kr, Xe, Br, I, (Rb, Cs, Te)

  4. Contained fissionly vaporized imploded fission explosive breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwick, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor system which produces useful thermal power and breeds fissile isotopes wherein large spherical complex slugs containing fissile and fertile isotopes as well as vaporizing and tamping materials are exploded seriatim in a large containing chamber having walls protected from the effects of the explosion by about two thousand tons of slurry of fissile and fertile isotopes in molten alkali metal. The slug which is slightly sub-critical prior to its entry into the centroid portion of the chamber, then becomes slightly more than prompt-critical because of the near proximity of neutron-reflecting atoms and of fissioning atoms within the slurry. The slurry is heated by explosion of the slugs and serves as a working fluid for extraction of heat energy from the reactor. Explosive debris is precipitated from the slurry and used for the fabrication of new slugs

  5. Joint ICFRM-14 (14. international conference on fusion reactor materials) and IAEA satellite meeting on cross-cutting issues of structural materials for fusion and fission applications. PowerPoint presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Conference was devoted to the challenges in the development of new materials for advanced fission, fusion and hybrid reactors. The topics discussed include fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence; post-irradiation examination; development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors; core materials development for the advanced fuel cycle initiative; qualification of structural materials for fission and fusion reactor systems; application of charged particle accelerators for radiation resistance investigations of fission and fusion structural materials; microstructure evolution in structural materials under irradiation; ion beams and ion accelerators

  6. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  7. A threshold for dissipative fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and γ-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T thresh to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E Bar (T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T thresh /E Bar (T) thresh /E Bar (T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems

  8. Holograms for power-efficient excitation of optical surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, Anton I.; Merzlikin, Alexander M.

    2018-02-01

    A method for effective excitation of optical surface waves based on holography principles has been proposed. For a particular example of excitation of a plasmonic wave in a dielectric layer on metal the efficiency of proposed volume holograms in the dielectric layer has been analyzed in comparison with optimized periodic gratings in the dielectric layer. Conditions when the holograms are considerably more efficient than the gratings have been found out. In addition, holograms recorded in two iterations have been proposed and studied. Such holograms are substantially more efficient than the optimized periodic gratings for all incidence angles of an exciting Gaussian beam. The proposed method is universal: it can be extended for efficient excitation of different types of optical surface waves and optical waveguide modes.

  9. Calculated fission properties of the heaviest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    A quantitative calculation is presented that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. For the macroscopic part a Yukawa-plus-exponential model is used and for the microscopic part a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential is used. The three-quadratic-surface parameterization generates shapes for which the potential-energy surfaces are calculated. The use of this parameterization and the use of the finite-range macroscopic model allows for the study of two touching spheres and similar shapes. The results of the calculations in terms of potential-energy surfaces and fission half-lives are presented for heavy even nuclei. The surfaces are displayed in the form of contour diagrams as functions of two moments of the shape. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  10. Barium 139 as Fission Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1943-07-01

    This report is based on a measurement performed at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) by E. Broda in December 1943 where a technique has been worked out for measuring the fission density in a uranium containing medium in relative units by determining the amount of a suitable fission product formed. Generally a given fission product will be formed in natural uranium by slow neutron fission of U235 or by fast neutron fission of either U235 or U238. It is intended to translate the relative units into absolute units by comparison of the Ba yield with the indication of UF6 fission chamber in the same medium. This has to be done separately for fast and slow neutron fission as the yields may be different. Another application of the technique developed is the measurement of thermal neutron density in an uraniferous medium without using a detector subject to variations of sensitivity according to the properties of the medium. (nowak)

  11. Geology behind nuclear fission technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhana Raju, R.

    2005-01-01

    Geology appears to have played an important role of a precursor to Nuclear Fission Technology (NFT), in the latter's both birth from the nucleus of an atom of and most important application as nuclear power extracted from Uranium (U), present in its minerals. NFT critically depends upon the availability of its basic raw material, viz., nuclear fuel as U and/ or Th, extracted from U-Th minerals of specific rock types in the earth's crust. Research and Development of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) depends heavily on 'Geology'. In this paper, a brief review of the major branches of geology and their contributions during different stages of NFC, in the Indian scenario, is presented so as to demonstrate the important role played by 'Geology' behind the development of NFT, in general, and NFC, in particular. (author)

  12. Matching of dense plasma focus devices with fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Heindler, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential role of dense plasma focus devices as compact neutron sources for fissile fuel breeding in conjunction with existing fission reactors is considered. It is found that advanced plasma focus devices can be used effectively in conjunction with neutronically efficient fission reactors to constitute ''self-sufficient'' breeders. Correlations among the various parameters such as the power output and conversion ratio of the fission reactor with the neutron yield and capacitor bank energy of the dense plasma focus device are presented and discussed

  13. Two dimensional simulation of high power laser-surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Wilke, M.D.; Green, R.E.L.; Johnson, R.P.; Busch, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    For laser intensities in the range of 10 8 --10 9 W/cm 2 , and pulse lengths of order 10 microsec or longer, the authors have modified the inertial confinement fusion code Lasnex to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects of the laser-matter interaction. The unique aspect of their treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material-vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model treats the dense material as a rigid two-dimensional mass and heat reservoir suppressing all hydrodynamic motion in the dense material. The computer simulations and additional post-processors provide predictions for measurements including impulse given to the target, pressures at the target interface, electron temperatures and densities in the vapor-plasma plume region, and emission of radiation from the target. The authors will present an analysis of some relatively well diagnosed experiments which have been useful in developing their modeling. The simulations match experimentally obtained target impulses, pressures at the target surface inside the laser spot, and radiation emission from the target to within about 20%. Hence their simulational technique appears to form a useful basis for further investigation of laser-surface interaction in this intensity, pulse-width range. This work is useful in many technical areas such as materials processing

  14. True ternary fission of 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K.R.; Balasubramaniam, M.; Oertzen, W. von

    2014-01-01

    Splitting of heavy radioactive nucleus into three fragments is known as ternary fission. If the size of the fragments are almost equal it is referred to as true ternary fission. Recently, Yu. V. Pyatkov et al observed/reported the experimental observation of true ternary fission in 252 Cf. In this work, the possibilities of different true ternary fission modes of 252 Cf through potential energy surface (PES) calculations based on three cluster model (TCM) are discussed. In TCM a condition on the mass numbers of the fission fragments is implied as A 1 ≥ A 2 ≥ A 3 in order to avoid repetition of combinations. Due to this condition, the values of Z 3 vary from 0 to 36 and Z 2 vary from 16 to 51. Of the different pairs having similar (Z 2 , Z 3 ) with different potential energy, a pair possessing minimum potential energy is chosen. Thus identified favourable combinations are plotted. For the PES calculations the arrangement of the fragments is considered in the order of A 1 +A 2 +A 3 . i.e. the heavy and the lightest fragments are kept at the ends. It is seen that the deepest minimum in the PES occurs for Z 3 =2 labelled as (Z 2 ; 2) indicating He accompanied breakup as the most favourable one. Of which, the breakup with Z 2 around 46 to 48 is the least (shown by dashed (Z 1 = 50) and dotted (Z 1 = 52) lines indicating a constant Z 1 value). The other notable minima in the PES are labelled and they correspond to the (Z 2 , Z 3 ) pairs viz., (20, 20), (28, 20), (28, 28) and (32, 32). Of these four minima, the first three are associated with the magic numbers 20 and 28. For Z 3 =20, there are two minimums at (20,20) and (28,20) among them (28,20) is the lowest minimum through which the minimum-path passes, and it is the ternary decay observed by Yu. V. Pyatkov et al. The fourth minima is the most interesting due to the fact that it corresponds to true ternary fission mode with Z 2 =32, Z 3 =32 and Z 1 =34. The minimum potential energy path also goes through this true

  15. Fusion-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Grotowski, K.

    1991-04-01

    Classical dynamical calculations of the heavy ion induced fission process for the reactions 40 Ar+ 141 Pr, 20 Ne+ 165 Ho and 12 C+ 175 Lu leading to the iridium like nucleus have been performed. As a result prescission lifetimes were obtained and compared with the experimental values. The agreement between the calculated and experimental lifetimes indicates that the one-body dissipation picture is much more relevant in describing the fusion-fission dynamics than the two-body one. Somewhat bigger calculated times than the experimental ones in case of the C+Lu reaction at 16 MeV/nucleon may be a signal on the energy range applicability of the one-body dissipation model. (author)

  16. A Pulse Power Modulator System for Commercial High Power Ion Beam Surface Treatment Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, D.M.; Cockreham, B.D.; Dragt, A.J.; Ives, H.C.; Neau, E.L.; Reed, K.W.; White, F.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (lBESTrM) process utilizes high energy pulsed ion beams to deposit energy onto the surface of a material allowing near instantaneous melting of the surface layer. The melted layer typically re-solidifies at a very rapid rate which forms a homogeneous, fine- grained structure on the surface of the material resulting in significantly improved surface characteristics. In order to commercialize the IBESTTM process, a reliable and easy-to-operate modulator system has been developed. The QM-I modulator is a thyratron-switched five-stage magnetic pulse compression network which drives a two-stage linear induction adder. The adder provides 400 kV, 150 ns FWHM pulses at a maximum repetition rate of 10 pps for the acceleration of the ion beam. Special emphasis has been placed upon developing the modulator system to be consistent with long-life commercial service

  17. The fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    1990-01-01

    During the last decade fission track (FT) analysis has evolved as an important tool in exploration for hydrocarbon resources. Most important is this method's ability to yield information about temperatures at different times (history), and thus relate oil generation and time independently of other maturity parameters. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the basics of the method and give an example from the author's studies. (AB) (14 refs.)

  18. The world of Mad Men: power, surface and passion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Mary-Joan

    2011-12-01

    Mad Men is disturbing to post-millennium viewers, particularly those of a "certain" age, on three counts. First, it invokes a particular historical context of gender oppression; second it captures the prevailing post-War injunction that emotional distress is unseemly and distasteful; and third, it captures the zeitgeist's celebration of surface over substance in relationship. However, just as disturbing as these historically situated interpersonal premises is the niggling question that each relationship pairing and each episode leaves with the viewer. To wit: How much of the disconnection and the unrequited longings are reflective of a particular historical era, and to what degree do they reflect timeless aspects of character and relationship? Thus Mad Men provides an exquisitely rendered sociocultural tableau in which the viewer struggles, however articulated or not, with one of the essential knots of psychoanalytic as well as couples treatment: the complicated interpenetration of culture and character, of time and timelessness.

  19. Fundamentals of the double-humped fission barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, M.

    1980-01-01

    We review the development of the theory of the fission barrier over the past forty years. Special emphasis is put on the shell-correction method of Strutinsky and its foundation and numerical verification from microscopical Hartree-Fock calculations. The different practical realisations of the method and its applications to the calculation of deformation energy surfaces are reviewed. The influence of the different shape degrees of freedom of the nucleus on the form of the fission barrier is discussed. Finally, we summarize some more recent developments concerning both experimental and theoretical aspects of the double-humped fission barrier. (author)

  20. [Fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions]. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    In keeping with the statement of work, I have examined the fission product yields of 60 fissioning reactions. In co-authorship with the UTR (University Technical Representative) Talmadge R. England ''Evaluation and Compilation of Fission Product Yields 1993,'' LA-UR-94-3106(ENDF-349) October, (1994) was published. This is an evaluated set of fission product Yields for use in calculation of decay heat curves with improved accuracy has been prepared. These evaluated yields are based on all known experimental data through 1992. Unmeasured fission product yields are calculated from charge distribution, pairing effects, and isomeric state models developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The current evaluation has been distributed as the ENDF/B-VI fission product yield data set

  1. Influence of the cosmic-ray induced fission tracks on the fission track of extraterrestric minerals via the 238U spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Thiel, K.

    1977-01-01

    The age determined by counting fission tracks of lunar and meteorite materials is obviously falsified by additional fission track parts not to be accounted for by the spontaneous fission of uranium 238. For this p and n induced fissions of U, Th and other hreavy elements through the cosmic radiation come into consideration. In order to determine the possible part of such interference factors, a simulation experiment at the proton synchrocycloton (CERN, Geneva) has been carried out and independently of this, the production rates for the p and n induced U, Th, Bi, Pb and Au in the surface-near regolith layers of the moon were calculated. It could be seen that the irradiation age as well as the spacial distribution of the heavy metals in the samples to be dated must be considered. (RB) [de

  2. Fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions of spontaneously fissioning plutonium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) distributions are evaluated in a quantum mechanical framework using elongation, mass asymmetry, neck degree of freedom as the relevant collective parameters in the Fourier shape parametrization recently developed by us. The potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic model based on the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD), the Yukawa-folded (YF) single-particle potential and a monopole pairing force. The PES are presented and analysed in detail for even-even Plutonium isotopes with A = 236-246. They reveal deep asymmetric valleys. The fission-fragment mass and TKE distributions are obtained from the ground state of a collective Hamiltonian computed within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the WKB approach by introducing a neck-dependent fission probability. The calculated mass and total kinetic energy distributions are found in good agreement with the data.

  3. Enhancing Plasma Surface Modification using high Intensity and high Power Ultrasonic Acoustic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic wave generator (101 ), wherein the ultrasonic acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said surface (314) of the object (100) so that a laminar boundary layer (313) of a gas...... or a mixture of gases (500) flow in contact with said solid object (100) is thinned or destructed for at least a part of said surface (314). In this way, the plasma can more efficiently access and influence the surface of the solid object to be treated by the plasma, which speeds the process time up...

  4. Fission Evaluation on Th-232

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong-Deok; Lee, Young-Ouk; Park, Joo-Hwan

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, several studies of neutron induced reaction on thorium were carried out in the framework of an IAEA coordinate research project involving a US contribution. The importance of Th-232 is for an innovative fuel cycle concept based on thorium fuel. Thorium fuels are also considered in accelerator driven system (ADS) to produce the power and radioactive waste transmutation. Therefore, the accurate neutron cross section for fission is crucially important for the design of various reactor systems. On December 2006, the ENDF/B-VII involving the new evaluation of actinides for Th-U fuel cycle was released. From the current environmental change, increasing oil price, air pollution by carbon dioxide, drain of oil resource, increasing demand of electricity, and energy independence, nuclear power is slowly to start to be reconsidered recently and it might be an alternative proposal as a production facility of energy and a reuse of resources. Even though it produces the nuclear wastes, it has an advantage in the emission of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new concept of nuclear technology to be developed for power production is subject to the condition of increased safety, reduction of nuclear wastes, resistance to nuclear material proliferation, Thorium fuel cycle is the most feasible option to satisfy the condition. Specially, thorium reserves are much larger than those of uranium

  5. Coulomb fission and transfer fission at heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmele, G.

    1981-01-01

    In the present thesis the first direct evidence of nuclear fission after inelastic scattering of heavy ions (sup(183,184)W, 152 Sm → 238 U; 184 W → 232 Th; 184 W, 232 Th → 248 Cm) is reported. Experiments which were performed at the UNILAC of the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt show the observed heavy ion induced fission possesses significant properties of the Coulomb fission. The observed dependence of the fission probability for inelastic scattering on the projectile charge proves that the nuclear fission is mediated by the electromagnetic interaction between heavy ions. This result suggests moreover a multiple Coulomb-excitation preceding the fission. Model calculations give a first indication, that the Coulomb fission proceeds mainly from the higher β phonons. In the irradiation with 184 W the fission probability of 232 Th is for all incident energies about 40% smaller that at 238 U. The target dependence of the Coulomb fission however doesn't allow, to give quantitative statements about the position and B(E2)-values of higher lying β phonons. (orig./HSI) [de

  6. Post-irradiation studies on knock-out and pseudo-recoil releases of fission products from fissioning UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, S.; Tanifuji, T.

    1976-01-01

    By using post-irradiation techniques, in-pile releases of 133 Xe, sup(85m)Kr, 88 Kr, 87 Kr and 138 Xe from UO 2 fissioning at low temperatures below about 200 0 C are studied: these are analyzed into a time-dependent knock-out and time-independent pseudo-recoil releases. For the latter, a 'self knock-out' mechanism is proposed: when a fission fragment loses thoroughly its energy near the UO 2 surface and stops there, it will knock out the surface substances and accordingly the fragment (i.e. the fission product) will be released. The effective thickness of the layer where the self knock-out occurs is found to be approximately 7A. As for the knock-out release, the following is estimated from its dependence on various factors: the knock-out release of fission products occurs from the surface layer with the effective thickness of approximately 20A: the shape of UO 2 matrix knocked out by one fission fragment passing through the surface is equivalent to a cylinder approximately 32A diameter by approximately 27A thick, (i.e. the knock-out coefficient for UO 2 is approximately 660 uranium atoms per knock-out event). On the basis of the above estimations, the conclusions derived from the past in-pile studies of fission gas releases are evaluated. (Auth.)

  7. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems

  8. Fission fragment angular distributions in proton-induced fission of 209Bi (p,f) and 197Au (p,f)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soheily, S.; Noshad, H.; Lamehi-Rashti, M.

    2002-01-01

    The fission fragment angular distributions have been measured for proton-induced fission of 209 B i and 197 A u nuclei using surface barrier detectors at several energies between 25 MeV and 30 MeV. The experimental anisotropies are found to be in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Saddle-Point Statistical Model. The fission cross sections of 209 B i and 197 A u nuclei were also measured and compared with the previous works

  9. Behavior of fission products released from severely damaged fuel during the PBF severe fuel damage tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetek, D.J.; Cronenberg, A.W.; Hagrman, D.L.; Broughton, J.M.; Rest, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of fission product release behavior during the first two Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage tests are presented. Measured fission product release is compared with calculated release using temperature dependent release rate correlations and FASTGRASS analysis. The test results indicate that release from fuel of the high volatility fission products (Xe, Kr, I, Cs, and Te) is strongly influenced by parameters other than fuel temperature; namely fuel/fission product morphology, fuel and cladding oxidation state, extent of fuel liquefaction, and quench induced fuel shattering. Fission product transport from the test fuel through the sample system was strongly influenced by chemical effects. Holdup of I and Cs was affected by fission product chemistry, and transport time while Te release was primarily influenced by the extent of zircaloy oxidation. Analysis demonstrates that such integral test data can be used to confirm physical, chemical, and mechanistic models of fission product behavior for severe accident conditions

  10. Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martovetsky, N. N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Molvik, A. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simonen, T. C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-13

    The achieved performance of the gas dynamic trap version of magnetic mirrors and today’s technology we believe are sufficient with modest further efforts for a neutron source for material testing (Q=Pfusion/Pinput~0.1). The performance needed for commercial power production requires considerable further advances to achieve the necessary high Q>>10. An early application of the mirror, requiring intermediate performance and intermediate values of Q~1 are the hybrid applications. The Axisymmetric Mirror has a number of attractive features as a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid system: geometrical simplicity, inherently steady-state operation, and the presence of the natural divertors in the form of end tanks. This level of physics performance has the virtue of low risk and only modest R&D needed and its simplicity promises economy advantages. Operation at Q~1 allows for relatively low electron temperatures, in the range of 4 keV, for the DT injection energy ~ 80 keV. A simple mirror with the plasma diameter of 1 m and mirror-to-mirror length of 35 m is discussed. Simple circular superconducting coils are based on today’s technology. The positive ion neutral beams are similar to existing units but designed for steady state. A brief qualitative discussion of three groups of physics issues is presented: axial heat loss, MHD stability in the axisymmetric geometry, microstability of sloshing ions. Burning fission reactor wastes by fissioning actinides (transuranics: Pu, Np, Am, Cm, .. or just minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm, …) in the hybrid will multiply fusion’s energy by a factor of ~10 or more and diminish the Q needed to less than 1 to overcome the cost of recirculating power for good economics. The economic value of destroying actinides by fissioning is rather low based on either the cost of long-term storage or even deep geologic disposal so most of the revenues of hybrids will come from electrical power. Hybrids that obtain revenues from

  11. Contribution of inner shell electrons to position-dependent stopping powers of a crystal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumi, Kazumasa; Fujii, Yoshikazu; Kishine, Keiji; Kurakake, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kenji; Mannami, Michi-hiko

    1994-01-01

    Position-dependent stopping powers of the (001) surface of SnTe single crystal for specularly reflected 15 - 200 keV H + ions are studied. The position dependence of the experimental stopping powers varies with the energy of ions. From the comparison with the theoretical stopping powers based on both the single ion-electron collision and the collective excitation of the valence electrons, it is concluded that the observed change in the position-dependent stopping powers with energy of H + is due to the variation of contribution of inner shell electrons to stopping. (author)

  12. A small flat fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yijun; Wang Dalun; Chen Suhe

    1999-01-01

    With fission materials of depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, 239 Pu, and 237 Np, the authors have designed and made a series of small flat fission chamber. The authors narrated the construction of the fission chamber and its technological process of manufacture, and furthermore, the authors have measured and discussed the follow correct factor, self-absorption, boundary effect, threshold loss factor, bottom scatter and or so

  13. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Blann, M.; Komoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems

  14. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’ discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution.

  15. Micro plate fission chamber development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Wen Zhongwei; Lin Jufang; Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun

    2014-01-01

    To conduct the measurement of neutron flux and the fission rate distribution at several position in assemblies, the micro plate fission chamber was designed and fabricated. Since the requirement of smaller volume and less structure material was taken into consideration, it is convinient, commercial and practical to use fission chamber to measure neutron flux in specific condition. In this paper, the structure of fission chamber and process of fabrication were introduced and performance test result was presented. The detection efficiency is 91.7%. (authors)

  16. Fusion-fission type collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeschler, H.

    1980-01-01

    Three examples of fusion-fission type collisions on medium-mass nuclei are investigated whether the fragment properties are consistent with fission from equilibrated compound nuclei. Only in a very narrow band of angular momenta the data fulfill the necessary criteria for this process. Continuous evolutions of this mechnism into fusion fission and into a deep-inelastic process and particle emission prior to fusion have been observed. Based on the widths of the fragment-mass distributions of a great variety of data, a further criterion for the compound-nucleus-fission process is tentatively proposed. (orig.)

  17. Fission product behaviour during operation of the second Peach Bottom core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Nordwall, H.J. de; Dyer, F.F.; Wichner, R.P.; Martin, W.J.; Kolb, J.O.

    1976-01-01

    The Peach Bottom high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor began operation on 1 June 1967 and continued power production until 9 October 1969, accumulating 452 equivalent full power days (EFPD) operation. After reload, power production with Core 2 began 14 July 1970 and terminated 31 October 1974 after 897 EFPD operation. Surveillance of fission product release and behaviour was intensified during Core 2 operation to permit a wider range of measurements to be made. In addition to monitoring the noble gas content of the fuel element purge system and the coolant circuit, the programme was extended to include measurements of radioactive and other condensible species (including dust) entering or exiting the core and steam generator, and of surface concentrations of gamma-emitting nuclides deposited on the primary coolant surfaces. These data, which were obtained over the operating period April 1971 - October 1974, are summarized and discussed. The data demonstrate that caesium behaviour in the coolant circuit during the first two-thirds of Core 2 life was primarily governed by caesium released during Core 1 operation. The data also indicate that whereas the steam generator surfaces attenuate molecular caesium concentrations in the coolant, the dust-borne component is remarkably persistent. Driver fuel elements were removed from the reactor after 385 EFPD, 701 EFPD, and at end-of-life. These fuel elements are at various stages of an intensive post-irradiation examination. Some of the axial and radial concentration profiles of fission products which have been obtained are likewise presented. Although these profiles indicate varied fission product behaviour, the observations can in general be qualitatively described on the basis of the operational histories of the fuel elements. (author)

  18. New fission valley for 258Fm and nuclei beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on the fission properties of nuclei close to 264 Fm show sudden and large changes with a change of only one or two neutrons or protons. The nucleus 258 Fm, for instance, undergoes symmetric fission with a half-life of about 0.4 ms and a kinetic energy peaked at about 235 MeV whereas 256 Fm undergoes asymmetric fission with a half-life of about 3 h and a kinetic energy peaked at about 200 MeV. Qualitatively, these sudden changes hve been postulated to be due to the emergence of fragment shells in symmetric fission products close to 132 Sn. A quantitative calculation that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. The implications of the new fission valley on the stability of the heaviest elements is discussed. 33 refs., 12 figs

  19. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206 Pb and 238 U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.0 +- 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 +- 5.7 and 92.4 +- 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 +- 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.9 +- 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 +- 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 +- 59.6 and 705.5 +- 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. (orig.)

  20. Effects of rf power on chemical composition and surface roughness of glow discharge polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; He, Xiaoshan; Chen, Guo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Yongjian; He, Zhibing, E-mail: hezhibing802@163.com

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The growth mechanism of defects in GDP films was studied upon plasma diagnosis. • Increasing rf power enhanced the etching effects of smaller-mass species. • The “void” defect was caused by high energy hydrocarbons bombardment on the surface. • The surface roughness was only 12.76 nm, and no “void” defect was observed at 30 W. - Abstract: The glow discharge polymer (GDP) films for laser fusion targets were successfully fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at different radio frequency (rf) powers. The films were deposited using trans-2-butene (T{sub 2}B) mixed with hydrogen as gas sources. The composition and state of plasma were diagnosed by quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and Langmuir probe during the deposition process. The composition, surface morphology and roughness were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and white-light interferometer (WLI), respectively. Based on these observation and analyses, the growth mechanism of defects in GDP films were studied. The results show that, at low rf power, there is a larger probability for secondary polymerization and formation of multi-carbon C-H species in the plasma. In this case, the surface of GDP film turns to be cauliflower-like. With the increase of rf power, the degree of ionization is high, the relative concentration of smaller-mass hydrocarbon species increases, while the relative concentration of larger-mass hydrocarbon species decreases. At higher rf power, the energy of smaller-mass species are high and the etching effects are strong correspondingly. The GDP film's surface roughness shows a trend of decrease firstly and then increase with the increasing rf power. At rf power of 30 W, the surface root-mean-square roughness (Rq) drops to the lowest value of 12.8 nm, and no “void” defect was observed.

  1. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun; Wang Mei; Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural of the fission chamber, etc

  2. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  3. Interstellar rendezvous missions employing fission propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    There has been a conventionally held nostrum that fission system specific power and energy content is insufficient to provide the requisite high accelerations and velocities to enable interstellar rendezvous missions within a reasonable fraction of a human lifetime. As a consequence, all forms of alternative mechanisms that are not yet, and may never be technologically feasible, have been proposed, including laser light sails, fusion and antimatter propulsion systems. In previous efforts, [Lenard and Lipinski, 1999] the authors developed an architecture that employs fission power to propel two different concepts: one, an unmanned probe, the other a crewed vehicle to Alpha Centauri within mission times of 47 to 60 years. The first portion of this paper discusses employing a variant of the ''Forward Resupply Runway'' utilizing fission systems to enable both high accelerations and high final velocities necessary for this type of travel. The authors argue that such an architecture, while expensive, is considerably less expensive and technologically risky than other technologically advanced concepts, and, further, provides the ability to explore near-Earth stellar systems out to distances of 8 light years or so. This enables the ability to establish independent human societies which can later expand the domain of human exploration in roughly eight light-year increments even presuming that no further physics or technology breakthroughs or advances occur. In the second portion of the paper, a technology requirement assessment is performed. The authors argue that reasonable to extensive extensions to known technology could enable this revolutionary capability

  4. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  5. On fusion/fission chain reactions in the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Froelich, P.; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of fusion/fission chain reactions following d-d source reactions in electrochemical cold fusion experiments have been investigated. The recycling factors for the charged particles in fusion reactions with consumable nuclei deuteron, 6 Li nd 7 Li, are estimated. It is concluded that, based on the established nuclear fusion cross sections and electronic stopping power, the recycling factor is four to five orders of magnitude less than required for close to critical conditions. It is argued that the cross generation of charged particles by neutrons does not play a significant role in this process, even if increased densities at the surface of electrodes do occur

  6. Considerations in modeling fission gas release during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumble, E.T.; Lim, E.Y.; Stuart, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The EPRI LWR fuel rod modeling code evaluation program analyzed seven fuel rods with experimental fission gas release data. In these cases, rod-averged burnups are less than 20,000 MWD/MTM, while the fission gas release fractions range roughly from 2 to 27%. Code results demonstrate the complexities in calculating fission gas release in certain operating regimes. Beyond this work, the behavior of a pre-pressurized PWR rod is simulated to average burnups of 40,000 MWD/MTM using GAPCON-THERMAL-2. Analysis of the sensitivity of fission gas release to power histories and release correlations indicate the strong impact that LMFBR type release correlations induce at high burnup. 15 refs

  7. Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Tanaka, Toru; Nitta, Shinnosuke; Itosu, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Shun; Oki, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Various characteristics such as size distribution, chemical component and radioactivity have been analyzed for radioactive aerosols released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Measured results for radioactive aerosols suggest that the potential transport medium for radioactive cesium was non-sea-salt sulfate. This result indicates that cesium isotopes would preferentially attach with sulfate compounds. In the present work the attachment behavior of fission products to aqueous solution aerosols of sodium salts has been studied using a generation system of solution aerosols and spontaneous fission source of {sup 248}Cm. Attachment ratios of fission products to the solution aerosols were compared among the aerosols generated by different solutions of sodium salt. A significant difference according as a solute of solution aerosols was found in the attachment behavior. The present results suggest the existence of chemical effects in the attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols.

  8. Isotopic composition of fission gases in LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Many fuel rods from power reactors and test reactors have been punctured during past years for determination of fission gas release. In many cases the released gas was also analysed by mass spectrometry. The isotopic composition shows systematic variations between different rods, which are much larger than the uncertainties in the analysis. This paper discusses some possibilities and problems with use of the isotopic composition to decide from which part of the fuel the gas was released. In high burnup fuel from thermal reactors loaded with uranium fuel a significant part of the fissions occur in plutonium isotopes. The ratio Xe/Kr generated in the fuel is strongly dependent on the fissioning species. In addition, the isotopic composition of Kr and Xe shows a well detectable difference between fissions in different fissile nuclides. (author)

  9. Post-scission fission theory: Neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of theoretical representations of two of the observables in neutron emission in fission is given, namely, the prompt fission neutron spectrum N (E) and the average prompt neutron multiplicity bar ν p . Early representations of the two observables are presented and their deficiencies are discussed. This is followed by summaries and examples of recent theoretical models for the calculation of these quantities. Emphasis is placed upon the predictability and accuracy of the recent models. In particular, the dependencies of N (E) and bar ν p upon the fissioning nucleus and its excitation energy are treated. Recent work in the calculation of the prompt fission neutron spectrum matrix N (E, E n ), where E n is the energy of the neutron inducing fission, is then discussed. Concluding remarks address the current status of our ability to calculate these observables with confidence, the direction of future theoretical efforts, and limitations to current (and future) approaches

  10. 60 years controlled nuclear fission: CP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    On December 2, 1942, the Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical for the first time. In this way, the scientists and engineers involved in the project under the leadership of Enrico Fermi succeeded in demonstrating that a self-sustaining nuclear reaction with nuclear fission processes was technically feasible. Only four years after the discovery and proof of nuclear fission by Otto Hahn, Fritz Strassmann, and Lise Meitner, the experiment consisting of graphite blocks as the moderator and uranium dioxide pellets as the fuel, as well as instrumentation and control devices, had been set up in the former squash court of the field and track stadium of the University of Chicago. Precisely at 3.36 a.m. Chicago time, after control rods had been withdrawn, the instruments showed the chain reaction by the neutron flux they indicated. An important cornerstone in the use of nuclear power had thus been laid. (orig.)

  11. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Carter, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential; however, near-term customers must be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and operated. Studies conducted in fiscal year 2001 (IISTP, 2001) show that fission electric propulsion (FEP) systems operating at 80 kWe or above could enhance or enable numerous robotic outer solar system missions of interest. At these power levels it is possible to develop safe, affordable systems that meet mission performance requirements. In selecting the system design to pursue, seven evaluation criteria were identified: safety, reliability, testability, specific mass, cost, schedule, and programmatic risk. A top-level comparison of three potential concepts was performed: an SP-100 based pumped liquid lithium system, a direct gas cooled system, and a heatpipe cooled system. For power levels up to at least 500 kWt (enabling electric power levels of 125-175 kWe, given 25-35% power conversion efficiency) the heatpipe system has advantages related to several criteria and is competitive with respect to all. Hardware-based research and development has further increased confidence in the heatpipe approach. Successful development and utilization of a 'Phase 1' fission electric propulsion system will enable advanced Phase 2 and Phase 3 systems capable of providing rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system

  12. Fission properties of superheavy nuclei for r -process calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Samuel A.; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Robledo, Luis M.

    2018-03-01

    We computed a new set of static fission properties suited for r -process calculations. The potential energy surfaces and collective inertias of 3640 nuclei in the superheavy region are obtained from self-consistent mean-field calculations using the Barcelona-Catania-Paris-Madrid energy density functional. The fission path is computed as a function of the quadrupole moment by minimizing the potential energy and exploring octupole and hexadecapole deformations. The spontaneous fission lifetimes are evaluated employing different schemes for the collective inertias and vibrational energy corrections. This allows us to explore the sensitivity of the lifetimes to those quantities together with the collective ground-state energy along the superheavy landscape. We computed neutron-induced stellar reaction rates relevant for r -process nucleosynthesis using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical approach and study the impact of collective inertias. The competition between different reaction channels including neutron-induced rates, spontaneous fission, and α decay is discussed for typical r -process conditions.

  13. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  14. Neutron multiplicity of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Y S [Physics department, mu` rah university Al-Karak, (Jordan)

    1995-10-01

    The total average neutron multiplicity of the fission fragments produced by the spontaneous fission of {sup 248} Cm has been measured. This measurement has been done by using a new experimental technique. This technique mainly depends on {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence using a very high resolution high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. 2 figs.

  15. Fission throughout the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs

  16. Power reactors and sub-critical blanket systems with lead and lead-bismuth as coolant and/or target material. Utilization and transmutation of actinides and long lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    High level radioactive waste disposal is an issue of great importance in the discussion of the sustainability of nuclear power generation. The main contributors to the high radioactivity are the fission products and the minor actinides. The long lived fission products and minor actinides set severe demands on the arrangements for safe waste disposal. Fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS) are under development in Member States to reduce the long term hazard of spent fuel and radioactive waste, taking advantage of their incineration and transmutation capability. Important R and D programmes are being undertaken in many Member States to substantiate this option and advance the basic knowledge in this innovative area of nuclear energy development. The conceptual design of the lead cooled fast reactor concept BREST-OD-300, as well as various other conceptual designs of lead/lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors have been developed to meet enhanced safety and non-proliferation requirements, aiming at both energy production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Some R and D studies indicate that the use of lead and lead-bismuth coolant has some advantages in comparison with existing sodium cooled fast reactor systems, e.g.: simplified design of fast reactor core and BOP, enhanced inherent safety, and easier radwaste management in related fuel cycles. Moreover, various ADS conceptual designs with lead and lead-bismuth as target material and coolant also have been pursued. The results to date are encouraging, indicating that the ADS has the potential to offer an option for meeting the challenges of the back end fuel cycle. During the last decade, there have been substantial advances in several countries with their own R and D programme in the fields of lead/lead-bismuth cooled critical and sub-critical concepts. coolant technology, and experimental validation. In this context, international exchange of information and experience, as well as international

  17. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, M.

    1984-09-01

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  18. The Cyrano program. 1 - description and operation of an irradiation device 'Cyrano'. 2 - results of the experiments Cyrano 1 and 2 (study of the EL 4 first-bach pencil); measurement of the thermal conductivity integral for UO{sub 2} sintered up to 2300 deg C; evolution of fission gases at constant power; Programme Cyrano. 1 - description et exploitation d'un dispositif d'irradiation ''cyrano''. 2 - resultats des experiences cyrano 1 et 2 (etude du crayon EL4 1. jeu). Mesure de l'integrale de conductibilite thermique d'UO{sub 2} fritte jusqu'a 2300 deg C. Evolution des gaz de fission a puissance constante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stora, J P; Chenebault, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Two rods of the type 'EL 4 first score' have been irradiated in 'Cyrano' capsules which are suited for continuous measurement of the nuclear power evolved and equipped with thermocouples. The variations of the integral of conductivity of sintered 96 per cent theoretical dense UO{sub 2} has been established until 2300 deg. C; these variations are coherent with those previously measured out-of-pile. The released fission gases have been recovered at different times during the irradiation: the kinetics of release of stable gases is such that, in the experimental conditions (T{sub surface} = 610 deg. C, {integral}{sub T{sub s}}{sup T{sub c}} kdT = 34.7 W cm{sup -1}) the fraction of released gases is still widely increasing after 12 days of irradiation. Numerous observations have been made on concentrations of rare gases locally present in the irradiated fuel. (authors) [French] L'irradiation de deux crayons combustibles type EL 4, 1er jeu, a ete menee a bien dans des capsules 'Cyrano' equipees de dispositifs de mesure continue de la puissance nucleaire et de plusieurs reperes de temperatures; la variation de l'integrale de conductibilite thermique de l'oxyde d'uranium fritte (96 pour cent d. th.) a ete tracee jusqu'a 2300 deg. C; la courbe representative de ces variations est coherente avec celle obtenue precedemment hors pile. Les gaz de fission apparus hors du combustible ont ete extraits du crayon a plusieurs reprises pendant l'experience: la cinetique d'accumulation des gaz stables est telle que dans les conditions etudiees (T{sub surface} = 610 deg. C, {integral}{sub T{sub s}}{sup T{sub c}} kdT = 34.7 W cm{sup -1}) la fraction des gaz degages est encore largement croissante apres 12 jours d'irradiation. De nombreuses observations ont ete recueillies sur la nature et la concentration des gaz rares presents en differents points du combustible irradie. (auteurs)

  19. Mechanisms of fission neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerten, H.

    1991-01-01

    The time evolution in fission is the starting point for discussing not only the main mechanism of fission neutron emission, the evaporation from fully accelerated fragments, but also possible secondary ones connected with dynamical features of nuclear fission. ''Asymptotic'' conditions as relevant for describing the particle release from highly excited, rapidly moving fragments are defined. Corresponding statistical model approaches to fission neutron emission, based on the adequate consideration of the intricate fragment occurrence probability, reproduce most of the experimental data. The remarkable influence of fission modes on neutron observables is analyzed in the framework of a macroscopic-microscopic scission point model consistent with energy conservation. Finally, chances and deficiencies for solving the mechanism puzzle are summarized. (author). 87 refs, 21 figs

  20. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene: from photophysics toward devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H

    2013-06-18

    generated via singlet fission in pentacene can be dissociated at an interface with a suitable electron acceptor, such as fullerenes and infrared-absorbing inorganic semiconducting quantum dots. We highlight our recent reports of a pentacene/PbSe hybrid solar cell with a power conversion efficiency of 4.7% and of a pentacene/PbSe/amorphous silicon photovoltaic device. Although substantive challenges remain, both to better our understanding of the mechanism of singlet exciton fission and to optimize device performance, this realization of a solar cell where photocurrent is simultaneously contributed from a blue-absorbing fission-capable material and an infrared-absorbing conventional cell is an important step towards a dual-bandgap, single-junction, fission-enhanced photovoltaic device, which could one day surpass the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  1. Isotopic signature and nano-texture of cesium-rich micro-particles: Release of uranium and fission products from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Junpei; Ochiai, Asumi; Furuki, Genki; Suetake, Mizuki; Ikehara, Ryohei; Horie, Kenji; Takehara, Mami; Yamasaki, Shinya; Nanba, Kenji; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Law, Gareth T W; Grambow, Bernd; Ewing, Rodney C; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2017-07-14

    Highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles (CsMPs) released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) provide nano-scale chemical fingerprints of the 2011 tragedy. U, Cs, Ba, Rb, K, and Ca isotopic ratios were determined on three CsMPs (3.79-780 Bq) collected within ~10 km from the FDNPP to determine the CsMPs' origin and mechanism of formation. Apart from crystalline Fe-pollucite, CsFeSi 2 O 6  · nH 2 O, CsMPs are comprised mainly of Zn-Fe-oxide nanoparticles in a SiO 2 glass matrix (up to ~30 wt% of Cs and ~1 wt% of U mainly associated with Zn-Fe-oxide). The 235 U/ 238 U values in two CsMPs: 0.030 (±0.005) and 0.029 (±0.003), are consistent with that of enriched nuclear fuel. The values are higher than the average burnup estimated by the ORIGEN code and lower than non-irradiated fuel, suggesting non-uniform volatilization of U from melted fuels with different levels of burnup, followed by sorption onto Zn-Fe-oxides. The nano-scale texture and isotopic analyses provide a partial record of the chemical reactions that occurred in the fuel during meltdown. Also, the CsMPs were an important medium of transport for the released radionuclides in a respirable form.

  2. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  3. A fission gas release model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, A; Piotrkowski, R [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The hypothesis contained in the model developed in this work are as follows. The UO{sub 2} is considered as a collection of spherical grains. Nuclear reactions produce fission gases, mainly Xe and Kr, within the grains. Due to the very low solubility of these gases in UO{sub 2}, intragranular bubbles are formed, of a few nanometers is size. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and to act as traps which capture gas atoms. Free atoms diffuse towards the grain boundaries, where they give origin to intergranular, lenticular bubbles, of the order of microns. The gas atoms in bubbles, either inter or intragranular, can re-enter the matrix through the mechanism of resolution induced by fission fragment impact. The amount of gas stored in intergranular bubbles grows up to a saturation value. Once saturation is reached, intergranular bubbles inter-connect and the gas in excess is released through different channels to the external surface of the fuel. The resolution of intergranular bubbles particularly affects the region of the grain adjacent to the grain boundary. During grain growth, the grain boundary traps the gas atoms, either free or in intragranular bubbles, contained in the swept volume. The grain boundary is considered as a perfect sink, i.e. the gas concentration is zero at that surface of the grain. Due to the spherical symmetry of the problem, the concentration gradient is null at the centre of the grain. The diffusion equation was solved using the implicit finite difference method. The initial solution was analytically obtained by the Laplace transform. The calculations were performed at different constant temperatures and were compared with experimental results. They show the asymptotic growth of the grain radius as a function of burnup, the gas distribution within the grain at every instant, the growth of the gas content at the grain boundary up to the saturation value and the fraction of gas released by the fuel element referred to the total gas generated

  4. Experimental study on surface properties of the PMMA used in high power spark gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruoyu; Wu, Jiawei; Ding, Weidong; Liu, Yunfei; Gou, Yang

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies the surface properties of the Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) insulator samples used in high power spark gaps. Experiments on surface morphology, surface profile, surface chemical composition and surface leakage current were performed. Metal particles ejected in tangent direction of discharge spots were researched on the sample surface. Three kinds of distinct bands were found on the surface after 1500 shots: colorless and transparent sinking band, black band, and grey powdered coating band. The thickness of the coating band was tens of microns and the maximum radial erosion rate was about 10 μm/C. Surface content analysis indicated that the powdered coating was a mixture of decomposed insulator material and electrode material oxides. In addition, leakage current significantly depended on water content in the chamber and presented an U-shape curve distribution along the insulator surface, in keeping with the amount of powdered coating due to shock waves. Possible reasons of the surface property changes were discussed. Electroconductive oxides of low valence states of Cu and W produced by the reactions between electrode materials and arc plasmas were considered to be the cause of dielectric performance degradation.

  5. Study of Dynamic Features of Surface Plasma in High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Teng; Gao Xiangdong; Seiji, Katayama; Jin, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic changes in the surface plasma during a high-power disk laser welding process. A color space clustering algorithm to extract the edge information of the surface plasma region was developed in order to improve the accuracy of image processing. With a comparative analysis of the plasma features, i.e., area and height, and the characteristics of the welded seam, the relationship between the surface plasma and the stability of the laser welding process was characterized, which provides a basic understanding for the real-time monitoring of laser welding.

  6. Leaching behavior of gamma-emitting fission products and Np from neutron-irradiated UO_2-ZrO_2 solid solutions in non-filtered surface seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Takeno, Yuu; Kobayashi, Taishi; Kirishima, Akira; Sato, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    The gamma ray radionuclides Cs-137, Ba-140, I-131, Ce-141, Ru-103, Zr-95, and Np-239 were produced by neutron irradiation of UO_2-ZrO_2 solid solutions that were synthesized as simulated fuel debris under reducing and oxidizing conditions. The leaching ratio of radionuclides was investigated under atmospheric conditions at 25°C for non-filtered natural surface seawater, as well as deionized water after filtration with a membrane of 0.45-μm pore size or that of nominal molecular weight limit of 3 kDa. The uranium molar concentration was affected by the oxidation state in the solid solution samples. The congruent dissolution of Cs, I, and Ba with the hexavalent uranium of U_3O_8 was facilitated in the seawater samples, whereas a lower leaching ratio of nuclides was observed in the deionized water samples. Neptunium-239, originally produced from uranium-238 in U_3O_8, showed behavior that was similar to that of Cs, I, and Ba. However, the dissolution of Np (as a parent nuclide of Pu-239) in the debris of UO_2 and UO_2-ZrO_2 was suppressed in the same manner as Zr(IV) and Ce(IV). The concentration exhibited no filtration dependence after 15 d, which shows that most of the leached nuclides can exist in their ionic form in seawater. (author)

  7. How fission was discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, S.

    1989-01-01

    After the great survey of neutron induced radioactivity by Fermi and co-workers, the laboratories in Paris and Berlin-Dahlen tried to disentangle the complex results found in uranium. At that time neutron sources were small, activities low, and equipment very simple. Chemistry beyond uranium still was unknown. Hahn and Meitner believed to have observed three transuranic isomeric chains, a doubtful result even then. Early in 1938, Curie and Savic in Paris found an activity interpreted to be actinium, and Hahn and Meitner another to be radium. Both interpretations seemed impossible from energy considerations. Hahn and Strassmann, therefore, continued this work and succeeded to separate the new activity from radium. There remained no doubt that a barium isotope had been produced, the uranium nucleus splitting in the yet-unknown process we now call fission

  8. Radioisotope Stirling Engine Powered Airship for Atmospheric and Surface Exploration of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Cataldo, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced Stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG) powered airship for the near surface exploration of Titan was evaluated. The analysis did not consider the complete mission only the operation of the airship within the atmosphere of Titan. The baseline airship utilized two ASRG systems with a total of four general-purpose heat source (GPHS) blocks. Hydrogen gas was used to provide lift. The ASRG systems, airship electronics and controls and the science payload were contained in a payload enclosure. This enclosure was separated into two sections, one for the ASRG systems and the other for the electronics and payload. Each section operated at atmospheric pressure but at different temperatures. The propulsion system consisted of an electric motor driving a propeller. An analysis was set up to size the airship that could operate near the surface of Titan based on the available power from the ASRGs. The atmospheric conditions on Titan were modeled and used in the analysis. The analysis was an iterative process between sizing the airship to carry a specified payload and the power required to operate the electronics, payload and cooling system as well as provide power to the propulsion system to overcome the drag on the airship. A baseline configuration was determined that could meet the power requirements and operate near the Titan surface. From this baseline design additional trades were made to see how other factors affected the design such as the flight altitude and payload mass and volume.

  9. A dynamic isotope power system for Space Exploration Initiative surface transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, M.E.; Harty, R.B.; Cataldo, R.

    1992-03-01

    The Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) Demonstration Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy with support funding from NASA, is currently focused on the development of a standardized 2.5-kWe portable generator for multiple applications on the lunar or Martian surface. A variety of remote and mobile potential applications have been identified by NASA, including surface rovers for both short- and extended-duration missions, remote power to science packages, and backup to central base power. Recent work focused on refining the 2.5-kWe design and emphasizing the compatibility of the system with potential surface transport systems. Work included an evaluation of the design to ensure compatibility with the Martian atmosphere while imposing only a minor mass penalty on lunar operations. Additional work included a study performed to compare the DIPS with regenerative fuel cell systems for lunar mobile and remote power systems. Power requirements were reviewed and a modular system chosen for the comparison. 4 refs

  10. Mass distribution of fission fragments using SSNTDs based image analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolekar, R.V.; Sharma, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Lexan polycarbonate track detector was used to obtain mass distribution of fission fragments from 252 Cf planchette source, Normally, if the fission fragments are incident perpendicular to the lexan surface, the diameter of heavy fragment is greater than that of lighter fragment. In practical problems fission fragments are incident on the detector at all angles. So, in the present experiment, lexan detector was exposed to 252 Cf planchette source in 2π geometry. Fission fragments were incident on the detector with various angles. So the projected fission track length for fission fragment of same energy is different because of different angle of incidence. Image analysis software was used to measure the projected track length. But the problem is that for fission fragment having greater angle of incidence the entire track length is not focused on the surface. So reduced track length is measured. This problem is solved by taking two images, one at the surface and one at the tip of track and then overlapping both the images using image analysis software. The projected track length and the depth of the track were used to get the angle of incidence. Fission track lengths were measured for same angle of incidence. In all 500 track lengths were measured and plot for mass distribution for fission fragment was obtained.(author)

  11. Fission gas release behaviour in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Anantharaman, S.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of plutonium recycling programme MOX (U,Pu)O 2 fuels will be used in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). Based on successful test irradiation of MOX fuel in CIRUS reactor, 10 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded in the BWR of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Some of these MOX fuel assemblies have successfully completed the initial target average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T. Enhancing the burnup target of the MOX fuels and increasing loading of MOX fuels in TAPS core will depend on the feedback information generated from the measurement of released fission gases. Fission gas release behaviour has been studied in the experimental MOX fuel elements (UO 2 - 4% PuO 2 ) irradiated in pressurised water loop (PWL) of CIRUS. Eight (8) MOX fuel elements irradiated to an average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T have been examined. Some of these fuel elements contained controlled porosity pellets and chamfered pellets. This paper presents the design details of the experimental set up for studying fission gas release behaviour including measurement of gas pressure, void volume and gas composition. The experimental data generated is compared with the prediction of fuel performance modeling codes of PROFESS and GAPCON THERMAL-3. (author)

  12. Nuclear or conventional power for surface combatant ships: Department of the Navy. Report to the Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    GAO reviewed the controversy over whether the Navy's major surface combatant ships should be all nuclear powered, all conventionally powered, or a mix of both. Nuclear ships are more capable but cost more and their relative cost-effectiveness cannot be measured because Navy analysts cannot quantify many benefits of nuclear power. The Congress, in reviewing Navy shipbuilding plans for surface combatant ships, should be cognizant that buying only conventional ships will maximize naval firepower; buying only nuclear ships will provide mobility and greater freedom from logistics support; and buying a mix is a third option providing, to varying degrees, the advantages and disadvantages of the all-nuclear and all-conventional options

  13. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  14. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  15. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  16. Comparative energetics of three fusion-fission symbiotic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.W.; Harms, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The energetics of three symbiotic fusion-fission nuclear reactor concepts are investigated. The fuel and power balances are considered for various values of systems parameters. The results from this analysis suggest that symbiotic fusion-fission systems are advantageous from the standpoint of economy and resource utilization. (Auth.)

  17. Polarographic determination of Iodide and Iodate, in Solutions Coming from Aerosols in Fission Products Containment Studies in Nuclear Power Stations; Determinacion Polarografica de Especies de Iodo (Ioduro y Iodato) en Soluciones Procedentes de Aerosoles, para Estudios de Contencion de Productos de Fision en Centrales Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, M.; Ballesteros, O.; Fernandez, M.; Clavero, M.; Gonzalez, A. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    A polarographic method is described for the iodine species determination, iodide and iodate in water solutions. the iodate can be determined by differential pulse polarography. Calibration curves and the detection and determination limits have been obtained. Iodides is oxidized to iodate with sodium hypochlorite and the excess of oxidizing agent is destroyed with sodium sulphide. The concentration of iodide is calculated as the difference between the concentration of iodate in the sample before and after the oxidation. As an application, species of iodine in samples coming from the experimental plants GIRS (Gaseous Iodine Removal by Sprays) of Nuclear Fission Department of the CIEMAT, dedicated to fission products containment studies in nuclear power station, were determined. (Author) 10 refs.

  18. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-01

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of 235 U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10 -10 sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass

  19. Energy partition in nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, A.; Maerten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1990-01-01

    A scission point model (two spheroid model TSM) including semi-empirical temperature-dependent shell correction energies for deformed fragments at scission is presented. It has been used to describe the mass-asymmetry-dependent partition of the total energy release on both fragments from spontaneous and induced fission. Characteristic trends of experimental fragment energy and neutron multiplicity data as function of incidence energy in the Th-Cf region of fissioning nuclei are well reproduced. Based on model applications, information on the energy dissipated during the descent from second saddle of fission barrier to scission point have been deduced. (author). 39 refs, 13 figs

  20. Gamma Radiation from Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbie, Jack

    1969-10-15

    The gamma radiation from the fragments of the thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U has been investigated, and the preliminary data are presented here with suggestions for further lines of research and some possible interpretations of the data. The data have direct bearing on the fission process and the mode of fragment de-excitation. The parameters measured are the radiation decay curve for the time interval (1 - 7) x 10{sup -10} sec after fission, the photon yield, the total gamma ray energy yield, and the average photon energy. The last three quantities are measured as a function of the fragment mass.

  1. Fission-product source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    This presentation consists of a review of fission-product source terms for light water reactor (LWR) fuel. A source term is the quantity of fission products released under specified conditions that can be used to calculate the consequences of the release. The source term usually defines release from breached fuel-rod cladding but could also describe release from the primary coolant system, the reactor containment shell, or the site boundary. The source term would be different for each locality, and the chemical and physical forms of the fission products could also differ

  2. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  4. Study of electron-capture delayed fission in Am-232

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Hoffman, D.C.; Strellis, D.; Gregorich, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    An automated x-ray-fission coincidence system was designed and constructed by LLNL and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for use inside the Gammasphere high efficiency gamma-ray detector array at LBNL. The x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus detection station consists of two surface barrier detectors (for detection of fission fragments) and two high-purity Ge (HPGe) planar x-ray detectors (for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gamma rays). The detection station is placed inside Gammasphere at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL and used in conjunction with Gammasphere to measure the x-rays, low-energy gamma-rays and fission fragments resulting from the ECDF process. A series of collaborative experiment between LLNL, LBNL, and LANL utilizing various components of the x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus to measure x-rays and gamma-rays in the decay of a stationary 252 Cf source were performed to test the various components of the x-ray-fission coincidence apparatus. The test experiments have been completed and the data is currently being analyzed by LBNL. Preliminary test results indicate that the system performed better than expected (e.g., the x-ray detectors performed better than expected with no evidence of microphonic noise that would reduce the photon energy resolution)

  5. Systems study of tokamak fusion--fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.; Bathke, C.G.; Price, W.G. Jr.; Bohlke, W.H.; Mills, R.G.; Johnson, E.F.; Todd, A.M.M.; Buchanan, C.H.; Gralnick, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    This publication reports the results of a two to three year effort at a systematic analysis of a wide variety of tokamak-driven fissioning blanket reactors, i.e., fusion--fission hybrids. It addresses the quantitative problems of determining the economically most desirable mix of the two products: electric power and fissionable fuel and shows how the price of electric power can be minimized when subject to a variety of constraints. An attempt has been made to avoid restricting assumptions, and the result is an optimizing algorithm that operates in a six-dimensional parameter space. Comparisons are made on sets of as many as 100,000 distinct machine models, and the principal results of the study have been derived from the examination of several hundred thousand possible reactor configurations

  6. Fission track imaging of the Australian continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleadow, A.; Kohn, B.; O'Sullivan, P.; Brown, R.; Gallagher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Techniques to reconstruct the thermal histories of rocks in the low-temperature environment of the upper crust have previously found important applications in such areas as sedimentary basin analysis, the evolution of convergent orogenic belts and studies of extensional tectonic environments. Increasingly large sets of thermochronology data are now becoming available on an even larger scale from the apatite fission-track system (for temperatures <∼110 deg C). Additional information is also now starting to emerge at even lower temperatures (<∼75 deg C) from the apatite (U-Th)/He system. The results from such systems can be used in novel ways to examine and visualise the evolution of the upper part of the continental crust. Quantitative modelling has brought a new dimension to this work and forward-modelling procedures are now well established which give 'best fit' thermal histories for temperatures less than about 110 deg C. In many cases the modelled thermal histories provide a proxy for rock transport towards the surface as overlying material is removed by denudation. Such information allows a reconstruction of the denudation history of the land surface. Applying these modelling procedures to large regional arrays of fission-track data means that the thermal history information can now be integrated with other regional data sets to provide an important new perspective on crustal and surface evolution. Apatite fission track analysis has now been completed on nearly 3000 surface outcrop samples across Australia under an AGCRC project to image the thermotectonic evolution of the exposed basement rocks of the continent. The samples analysed are mostly from rocks of broadly granitic composition and the apatites separated from these are overwhelmingly fluorapatites, which are consistent in their fission-track annealing properties with those on which the numerical annealing models are based. By interpolating the calculated thermal histories a series of

  7. Powerful highly efficient KrF lamps excited by surface and barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, V M; Vodchits, V A; El'tsov, A V; Khristoforov, O B

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was made of the characteristics of KrF lamps with different types of excitation by surface and barrier discharges in which the dielectric material was sapphire. The conditions were determined for the attainment of an extremely high yield of the KrF* fluorescence with the internal efficiency η in ∼30 % and 22% for pulsed surface and barrier discharges, respectively. A homogeneous surface discharge was maintained without gas circulation when the pulse repetition rate was 5 x 10 4 Hz. Quasicontinuous excitation of a surface discharge at near-atmospheric pressure made it possible to reach a KrF* fluorescence power density of about 80 W cm -3 , which was close to the limit set by the kinetics of the gaseous medium. Under prolonged excitation conditions the intensity of the UV output radiation was limited by the permissible heating of the gas to a temperature above which the operating life of the gaseous mixture containing fluorine fell steeply. This was the reason for the advantage of surface over barrier discharges: the former were characterised by a high thermal conductivity of a thin (∼0.2 mm) plasma layer on the surface of the cooled dielectric, which made it possible to construct powerful highly efficient KrF and ArF lamps emitting UV radiation of up to 1 W cm -2 intensity. (laser system components)

  8. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular ... alent to the assumption that fission is delayed, namely, that the fission probability is not .... parameters to be adjusted on the experimental data. ..... (b) Time distribution of all fission events for the 132Ce nucleus.

  9. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  10. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  11. Fission gas in thoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah, E-mail: n.kuganathan@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ghosh, Partha S. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Galvin, Conor O.T. [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arya, Ashok K. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Dutta, Bijon K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Trombay, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Dey, Gautam K. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Grimes, Robin W. [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The fission gases Xe and Kr, formed during normal reactor operation, are known to degrade fuel performance, particularly at high burn-up. Using first-principles density functional theory together with a dispersion correction (DFT + D), in ThO{sub 2} we calculate the energetics of neutral and charged point defects, the di-vacancy (DV), different neutral tri-vacancies (NTV), the charged tetravacancy (CTV) defect cluster geometries and their interaction with Xe and Kr. The most favourable incorporation point defect site for Xe or Kr in defective ThO{sub 2} is the fully charged thorium vacancy. The lowest energy NTV in larger supercells of ThO{sub 2} is NTV3, however, a single Xe atom is most stable when accommodated within a NTV1. The di-vacancy (DV) is a significantly less favoured incorporation site than the NTV1 but the CTV offers about the same incorporation energy. Incorporation of a second gas atom in a NTV is a high energy process and more unfavourable than accommodation within an existing Th vacancy. The bi-NTV (BNTV) cluster geometry studied will accommodate one or two gas atoms with low incorporation energies but the addition of a third gas atom incurs a high energy penalty. The tri-NTV cluster (TNTV) forms a larger space which accommodates three gas atoms but again there is a penalty to accommodate a fourth gas atom. By considering the energy to form the defect sites, solution energies were generated showing that in ThO{sub 2−x} the most favourable solution equilibrium site is the NTV1 while in ThO{sub 2} it is the DV. - Highlights: • We have considered Xe and Kr in point defects and defect clusters (neutral and charged) using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with a dispersion correction. • The most favourable charge state for a point defect (vacancy or interstitial) is that with full ionic charge and we have found that in all cases gas atoms occupy the fully charged vacancy sites. • The number of fission gas atoms accommodated in ThO{sub 2} is

  12. Extraction chromatography of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevie-Svendsen, M.; Goon, K.

    1978-01-01

    Various cases of using extraction chromatography during analysis of fission products are reviewed. The use of the extraction chromatography method is considered while analysing reprocessed products of nuclear fuel for quantitative radiochemical analysis and control of fission product and actinoide separation during extraction and their chemical state in production solutions. The method is used to obtain pure fractions of typical burnup monitors (neodymium, molybdenum, cerium, cesium, europium, lanthanides) during determination of nuclear fuel burnup degree. While studying the nature of nuclear reactions the method is used to separate quickly short-life isotopes, to purify β-radiator fractions before measuring their half-life periods, to enrich isotopes forming with low output during fission. Examples of using extraction chromatography are given to separate long half-life or stable fission products from spent solutions, to control environment object contamination

  13. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J. K.; Moseley, F.

    1960-01-01

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author) [fr

  14. Perspective on the fusion-fission energy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liikala, R.C.; Perry, R.T.; Teofilo, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    A concept which has potential for near-term application in the electric power sector of our energy economy is combining fusion and fission technology. The fusion-fission system, called a hybrid, is distinguished from its pure fusion counterpart by incorporation of fertile materials (uranium or thorium) in the blanket region of a fusion machine. The neutrons produced by the fusion process can be used to generate energy through fission events in the blanket or produce fuel for fission reactors through capture events in the fertile material. The performance requirements of the fusion component of hybrids is perceived as being less stringent than those for pure fusion electric power plants. The performance requirements for the fission component of hybrids is perceived as having been demonstrated or could be demonstrated with a modest investment of research and development funds. This paper presents our insights and observations of this concept in the context of why and where it might fit into the picture of meeting our future energy needs. A bibliography of hybrid research is given

  15. Comparison of dynamic isotope power systems for distributed planet surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Mckissock, Barbara I.; Hanlon, James C.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Rodriguez, Carlos D.; Withrow, Colleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) alternatives were investigated and characterized for the surface mission elements associated with a lunar base and subsequent manned Mars expedition. System designs based on two convertor types were studied. These systems were characterized parametrically and compared over the steady-state electrical output power range 0.2 to 20 kWe. Three methods of thermally integrating the heat source and the Stirling heater head were considered, depending on unit size. Figures of merit were derived from the characterizations and compared over the parametric range. Design impacts of mission environmental factors are discussed and quantitatively assessed.

  16. Theory of nuclear fission: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosel, U.

    1976-01-01

    General properties of nuclear fission are reviewed and related to our present knowledge of fission theory. For this purpose the basic reasons for the shape of the fission barriers are discussed and their consequences compared with experimental results on barrier shapes and structures. Special emphasis is put on the asymmetry of the fission barriers and mass-distributions and its relation to the shells of the nascent fragment shells. Finally the problem of calculating fission cross sections is discussed

  17. Fission gas release and grain growth in THO2-UO2 fuel irradiated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.; Waldman, L.A.; Giovengo, J.F.; Campbell, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on fission gas release and grain growth in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuels irradiated as part of the LWBR fuel element development program. These data for rods that experienced peak linear power outputs ranging from 15 to 22 KW/ft supplement fission gas release data previously reported for 51 rods containing ThO 2 and ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel irradiated at peak linear powers predominantly below 14 KW/ft. Fission gas release was relatively high (up to 15.0 percent) for the rods operated at high power in contrast to the relatively low fission gas release (0.1 to 5.2 percent) measured for the rods operated at lower power. Metallographic examination revealed extensive equiaxed grain growth in the fuel at the high power axial locations of the three rods

  18. Spontaneous fission of 259Md

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Landrum, J.H.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.; Ghiorso, A.; Nitschke, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distributions of fission fragments from the spontaneous fission of th newly discovered nuclide 259 Md were obtained. 259 Md was identified as the E. C. daughter of 259 No, and was found to decay entirely (> 95%) by spontaneous fission with a 95-min half-life. From the kinetic energies measured for 397 pairs of coincident fragments, a mass distribution was derived that is symmetric with sigma = 13 amu. 259 Md, together with 258 Fm and 259 Fm, form a select group of three nuclides whose mass division in spontaneous fission is highly symmetric. Unlike the total-kinetic-energy (TKE) distributions of 258 Fm and 259 Fm, which peak at approx. = to 240 MeV, this distribution for 259 Md is broad and is 50 MeV lower in energy. Analysis of the mass and energy distributions shows that events near mass symmetry also exhibit a broad TKE distribution, with one-third of the symmetric events having TKEs less than 200 MeV. The associated of low TKEs with symmetric mass division in the fission of very heavy actinides is anomalous and inconsistent with theories based upon the emergence of fragment shells near the scission point. Either three-body fragmentation or peculiar fragment shapes are assumed as the cause for the large consumption of Coulomb energy observed for a significant fraction of symmetric fissions in 259 Md. 6 figures

  19. A stochastic approach to fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out. A strong friction coefficient, calculated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. Fission was described as a diffusion over a barrier of a collective variable, and a Langevin Equation (LE) was used to study the phenomenon. A study of the stationary flow over the saddle point with a Fokker-Planck Equation (FPE), equivalent to the LE was used to give formula for the stationary fission rate (or reaction rate for the chemistry applications). More recently, a complete study of the fission process was performed numerically with both FPE and LE. A long transient time, that could allow more pre-scission neutrons to evaporate, was pointed out. The derivation of this new LE is recalled, followed by the description of the memory dependence and by the effect of a large friction coefficient on the fission rate. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, T., E-mail: Naito.Teruki@bc.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp [Advanced Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Yamaura, S. [Information Technology R& D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-8501 (Japan); Fukuma, Y. [Communication System Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan); Sakai, O. [Department of Electronic System Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  1. Radiation characteristics of input power from surface wave sustained plasma antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamaura, S.; Fukuma, Y.; Sakai, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports radiation characteristics of input power from a surface wave sustained plasma antenna investigated theoretically and experimentally, especially focusing on the power consumption balance between the plasma generation and the radiation. The plasma antenna is a dielectric tube filled with argon and small amount of mercury, and the structure is a basic quarter wavelength monopole antenna at 2.45 GHz. Microwave power at 2.45 GHz is supplied to the plasma antenna. The input power is partially consumed to sustain the plasma, and the remaining part is radiated as a signal. The relationship between the antenna gain and the input power is obtained by an analytical derivation and numerical simulations. As a result, the antenna gain is kept at low values, and most of the input power is consumed to increase the plasma volume until the tube is filled with the plasma whose electron density is higher than the critical electron density required for sustaining the surface wave. On the other hand, the input power is consumed to increase the electron density after the tube is fully filled with the plasma, and the antenna gain increases with increasing the electron density. The dependence of the antenna gain on the electron density is the same as that of a plasma antenna sustained by a DC glow discharge. These results are confirmed by experimental results of the antenna gain and radiation patterns. The antenna gain of the plasma is a few dB smaller than that of the identical metal antenna. The antenna gain of the plasma antenna is sufficient for the wireless communication, although it is difficult to substitute the plasma antenna for metal antennas completely. The plasma antenna is suitable for applications having high affinity with the plasma characteristics such as low interference and dynamic controllability.

  2. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Lou Sai

    2013-01-01

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238 U and 232 Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides ( 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U, 234 U, 237 Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232 Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232 Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237 Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237 Np. This

  3. High-power, format-flexible, 885-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chad; Talantov, Fedor; Garrett, Henry; Berdin, Glen; Cardellino, Terri; Millenheft, David; Geske, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    High-power, format flexible, 885 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays have been developed for solid-state pumping and illumination applications. In this approach, a common VCSEL size format was designed to enable tiling into flexible formats and operating configurations. The fabrication of a common chip size on ceramic submount enables low-cost volume manufacturing of high-power VCSEL arrays. This base VCSEL chip was designed to be 5x3.33 mm2, and produced up to 50 Watts of peak continuous wave (CW) power. To scale to higher powers, multiple chips can be tiled into a combination of series or parallel configurations tailored to the application driver conditions. In actively cooled CW operation, the VCSEL array chips were packaged onto a single water channel cooler, and we have demonstrated 0.5x1, 1x1, and 1x3 cm2 formats, producing 150, 250, and 500 Watts of peak power, respectively, in under 130 A operating current. In QCW operation, the 1x3 cm2 VCSEL module, which contains 18 VCSEL array chips packaged on a single water cooler, produced over 1.3 kW of peak power. In passively cooled packages, multiple chip configurations have been developed for illumination applications, producing over 300 Watts of peak power in QCW operating conditions. These VCSEL chips use a substrate-removed structure to allow for efficient thermal heatsinking to enable high-power operation. This scalable, format flexible VCSEL architecture can be applied to wavelengths ranging from 800 to 1100 nm, and can be used to tailor emission spectral widths and build high-power hyperspectral sources.

  4. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  5. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered: In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.

  6. Performance Evaluation Criterion at Equal Pumping Power for Enhanced Performance Heat Transfer Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Karwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing equations for the thermal performance evaluation, at equal pumping power for the artificially roughened and smooth surfaced multitube and rectangular duct heat exchangers, have been critically reviewed because the literature survey indicates that a large number of researchers have not interpreted these equations correctly. Three of the most widely used equations have been restated with clearly defined constraints and conditions for their application. Two new equations have been developed for the design constraints not covered earlier.

  7. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Solar Power on Navy Surface Combatants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Delivering boost acceleration to automobiles in a process known as regenerative braking . • Serving as an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to data...exchange membrane fuel cell, showing major components. From [12] .........................45 Figure 23. Depiction of a generic regenerative fuel cell...the highest three categories of annual sunlight. The majority of forward navy bases, as well as many ports that surface combatants pull into, are

  8. Mass spectrometry with ionization induced by 252Cf fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sysoev, A.A.; Artaev, V.B.

    1991-01-01

    The review deals with mass-spectrometry with ionization induced by 252 Cf fission fragments. Equipment and technique of the analysis, analytic possibilities of the method are considered. The method permits to determine molecular masses of large nonvolatile biological molecules. The method is practically nondestructive, it possesses a high resolution over the depth and surface, which permits to use it for the analysis of surface of semiconductors, dielectrics, catalysts, for the study of formation kinetics of complex unstable molecules on the surface

  9. Conceptual design of the blanket and power conversion system for a mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor. Addendum 1. Alternate concepts. 12-month progress report addendum, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Dee, J.B.; Backus, G.A.; Culver, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    During the course of the Mirror Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor study several alternate concepts were considered for various reactor components. Several of the alternate concepts do appear to exhibit features with potential advantage for use in the mirror hybrid reactor. These are described and should possibly be investigated further in the future

  10. Power Prediction Model for Turning EN-31 Steel Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hameedullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Power consumption in turning EN-31 steel (a material that is most extensively used in automotive industry with tungstencarbide tool under different cutting conditions was experimentally investigated. The experimental runs were planned accordingto 24+8 added centre point factorial design of experiments, replicated thrice. The data collected was statisticallyanalyzed using Analysis of Variance technique and first order and second order power consumption prediction models weredeveloped by using response surface methodology (RSM. It is concluded that second-order model is more accurate than thefirst-order model and fit well with the experimental data. The model can be used in the automotive industries for decidingthe cutting parameters for minimum power consumption and hence maximum productivity

  11. Evaluations of fusion-fission (hybrid) concepts: market penetration analysis for fusion-fission hybrids. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.L.; Deonigi, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes findings of the fusion-fission studies conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This particular study focused on the evaluation of fissile material producing hybrids. Technical results of the evaluation of actinide burning are presented in a companion volume, Part B

  12. Lambda attachment in fission: a probe of the necking dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Malek, F.

    1991-02-01

    A schematic scission model is applied to the lambda attachment function recently obtained by the LEAR PS177 collaboration, in their measurement of the prompt fission of hypernuclei. The relationship between the slope parameter and the fission dynamics was examined in a more quantitative way. It is shown that the attachment function is sensitive to the scission configuration, necking dynamics and nuclear temperature at scission. It provides a new and powerful way to study the nuclear scission process. (R.P.) 19 refs., 9 figs

  13. Method for controlling a coolant liquid surface of cooling system instruments in an atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, Kazuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To prevent coolant inventory within a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant from being varied depending on loads thereby relieving restriction of varied speed of coolant flow rate to lowering of a liquid surface due to short in coolant. Structure: Instruments such as a superheater, an evaporator, and the like, which constitute a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant, have a plurality of free liquid surface of coolant. Portions whose liquid surface is controlled and portions whose liquid surface is varied are adjusted in cross-sectional area so that the sum total of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as a superheater provided with an annulus portion in the center thereof and an inner cylindrical portion and a down-comer in the side thereof comes equal to that of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as an evaporator similar to the superheater. which is provided with an overflow pipe in its inner cylindrical portion or down-comer, thereby minimizing variation in coolant inventory of the entire coolant due to loads thus minimizing variation in varied speed of the coolant. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Problems to be Expected in Disposing of Fission Products from a Possible Nuclear Power Programme; Problemes Eventuels d'Elimination des Produits de Fission dans les Futures Centrales Nucleaires; 0412 0415 0420 041e 042f 0414 ; Problemas que Puede Plantear la Evacuacion de Productos de Fision Resultantes de la Ejecucion de un Programa de Produccion de Energia de Origen Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, G. K. [Cenral Technical Services, Engineering and Development Group, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1960-07-01

    typical British nuclear power programme covering the next few decades is examined. The types of reactor to be erected and the types of fuel to be initially used in them are well appreciated but of course the author's conclusions will necessarily become less certain with the passage of time. The chemical processes which must be applied to irradiated fuels will depend on the type of fuel, its burn-up etc., and so will change during the period under review. Consideration is therefore given to the quantities of fission products and heavy isotopes which may be produced, the forms in which they may leave the chemical processing streams and the methods available for handling them safely, either by storage or by disposal. (author) [French] L'auteur examine un programme d'energie nucleaire caracteristique pour la Grande-Bretagne et s'etendant sur les prochaines decennies. Il donne une evaluation fort judicieuse des types de reacteurs dont la construction est envisagee et des genres de combustibles qu'il est question d'y utiliser pendant la periode initiale; toutefois, ses conclusions auront avec le temps de moins en moins de valeur. En effet, le traitement chimique auquel on devra soumettre le combustible irradie depend du genre de ce dernier, de son taux de combustion, etc.; il subira inevitablement des modifications au cours de la periode consideree. L'auteur tient donc compte des quantites de produits fissiles et d'isotopes lourds qu'il sera possible de produire, des formes sous lesquelles ils pourront se presenter a la fin du traitement chimique et des methodes existantes permettant d'assurer leur manipulation sans danger en vue de leur stockage ou de leur elimination. (author) [Spanish] Esta memoria estudia un programa britanico caracteristico de produccion de energia nuclear que cubre las proximas decadas. Se sabe con bastante certeza que tipos de reactores se construiran y el tipo de combustible que se empleara en ellos en un principio, pero estos conocimientos son

  15. Dry Etch Black Silicon with Low Surface Damage: Effect of Low Capacitively Coupled Plasma Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iandolo, Beniamino; Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Gaudig, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Black silicon fabricated by reactive ion etch (RIE) is promising for integration into silicon solar cells thanks to its excellent light trapping ability. However, intensive ion bombardment during the RIE induces surface damage, which results in enhanced surface recombination velocity. Here, we pr...... carrier lifetime thanks to reduced ion energy. Surface passivation using atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 improves the effective lifetime to 7.5 ms and 0.8 ms for black silicon n- and p-type wafers, respectively.......Black silicon fabricated by reactive ion etch (RIE) is promising for integration into silicon solar cells thanks to its excellent light trapping ability. However, intensive ion bombardment during the RIE induces surface damage, which results in enhanced surface recombination velocity. Here, we...... present a RIE optimization leading to reduced surface damage while retaining excellent light trapping and low reflectivity. In particular, we demonstrate that the reduction of the capacitively coupled power during reactive ion etching preserves a reflectance below 1% and improves the effective minority...

  16. Theoretical analysis of knock-out release of fission products from nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, S.

    1975-01-01

    The knock-out release of fission products is studied theoretically. The general equations of knock-out release are derived, assuming that a fission fragment passing through the surface of nuclear fuels knocks out a local region of the surface with an effective thickness and an effective cross-sectional area. Using these equations, the knock-out release of fission gases is calculated for various cases. The conditions under which the knock-out coefficients (the average number of uranium atoms knocked out by one fission fragment) is obtainable are clarified by experiments on the knock-out release of fission gases. A method of determining the effective thickness and the effective cross-sectional area of a knock-out region is proposed. (Auth.)

  17. Model of thermal fatigue of a copper surface under the action of high-power microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Plotkin, M. E.

    2007-10-01

    The accelerating structures of modern supercolliders, as well as the components of high-power microwave electron devices operated in strong cyclic electromagnetic fields should have long lifetimes. Along with the electric breakdown, the surfaces of these microwave components deteriorate and their lifetimes decrease due to thermal strains and subsequent mechanical loads on the surface metal layer. The elementary theory of thermal fatigue was developed in the 1970s. In particular, a model of metal as a continuous medium was considered. Within the framework of this model, thermal fatigue is caused by the strains arising between the hot surface layer and the cold internal layer of the metal. However, this theory does not describe all the currently available experimental data. In particular, the notion of “safe temperature” of the heating, i.e., temperature at which the surface is not destroyed during an arbitrarily long series of pulses, which was proposed in the theoretical model, is in poor agreement with the experiment performed in the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC, USA). In this work, the thermal-fatigue theory is developed on the basis of consideration of the copper polycrystalline structure. The necessity to take it into account was demonstrated by the results of the SLAC experiment, in which a change in the mutual orientation of copper grains and the formation of cracks at their boundaries was recorded for the first time. The developed theory makes it possible to use the experimental data to refine the coefficients in the obtained formulas for the lifetime of the metal surface and to predict the number of microwave pulses before its destruction as a function of the radiation power, the surface-temperature increase at the pulse peak, and the pulse duration.

  18. The LANL C-NR counting room and fission product yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Kevin Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-21

    This PowerPoint presentation focused on the following areas: LANL C-NR counting room; Fission product yields; Los Alamos Neutron wheel experiments; Recent experiments ad NCERC; and Post-detonation nuclear forensics

  19. Study and characterization of noble metal deposits on similar rusty surfaces to those of the reactor U-1 type BWR of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores S, V. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation work, were determined the parameters to simulate the conditions of internal oxidation reactor circulation pipes of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz. We used 304l stainless steel cylinders with two faces prepared with abrasive paper of No. 600, with the finality to obtain similar surface to the internal circulation piping nuclear reactor. Oxides was formed within an autoclave (Autoclave MEX-02 unit B), which is a device that simulates the working conditions of the nuclear reactor, but without radiation generated by the fission reaction within the reactor. The oxidation conditions were a temperature of 280 C and pressure of 8 MPa, similar conditions to the reactor operating in nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Mexico (BWR conditions), with an average conductivity of 4.58 ms / cm and 2352 ppb oxygen to simulate normal water chemistry NWC. Were obtained deposits of noble metal oxides formed on 304l stainless steel samples, in a 250 ml autoclave at a temperature range of 180 to 200 C. The elements that were used to deposit platinum-rhodium (Pt-Rh) with aqueous Na 2 Pt (OH) 6 and Na 3 Rh (NO 2 ) 6 , Silver (Ag) with an aqueous solution of AgNO 3 , zirconium (Zr) with aqueous Zr O (NO 3 ) and ZrO 2 , and zinc (Zn) in aqueous solution of Zn (NO 3 ) 2 under conditions of normal water chemistry. Also there was the oxidation of 304l stainless steel specimens in normal water chemistry with a solution of Zinc (Zn) (NWC + Zn). Oxidation of the specimens in water chemistry with a solution of zinc (Zn + NWC) was prepared in two ways: within the MEX-02 autoclave unit A in a solution of zinc and a flask at constant temperature in zinc solution. The oxides formed and deposits were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, elemental field analysis and X-ray diffraction. By other hand was evaluated the electrochemical behavior of the oxides formed on the surface of 304l stainless steel

  20. A comparison of two systems for lunar surface remote and mobile power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, W.R.; Otting, W.D.; Hunt, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The free piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is now being developed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) and NASA-LeRC for space power applications. Some conceptualizations of an isotope powered FPSE have been proposed. The performance characteristics of the proposed 2.5-kWe Stirling Isotope Power (STIP) system were developed for lunar surface remote and mobile applications. The Stirling system configuration uses a nonredundant power conversion system coupled to an annular heat source assembly (HSA) using an array of sodium heat pipes which transfer energy from the annular general-purpose heat source (GPHS) stack within the HSA to the Stirling heater head. The Stirling engine uses a dual-opposed piston design with heater head coupling. The engine coolers are connected to a single-pumped coolant loop, which rejects the cycle's waste heat to a radiator. Quantitative information, such as mass, area, and efficiency, are reported for the system. The results of a qualitative evaluation of the proposed STIP system against the desirable attributes of a lunar-based isotope power system are presented. Alternate configurations are also presented

  1. Prompt Gamma Radiation from Fragments in the Thermal Fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinsson, H.; Lindow, L.

    1970-06-01

    Measurements were made on the gamma radiation emitted from fission fragments in slow neutron induced fission of 235 U. The fragments were detected with solid state detectors of the surface barrier type and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. Mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. In this way a decay curve was obtained from which the life-time of one of the gamma-emitting states could be estimated. The relative yield of the gamma-rays was determined as a function of mass for different gamma-ray energy portions and two specific time intervals after the fission events. Comparisons were made with data obtained from 252 Cf-fission. Attention is drawn to some features which seem to be the same in 235 U and 252 Cf-fission

  2. Prompt Gamma Radiation from Fragments in the Thermal Fission of {sup 235}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albinsson, H [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden); Lindow, L [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1970-06-15

    Measurements were made on the gamma radiation emitted from fission fragments in slow neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U. The fragments were detected with solid state detectors of the surface barrier type and the gamma radiation with a Nal(Tl) scintillator. Mass selection was used so that the gamma radiation could be measured as a function of fragment mass. Time discrimination between the fission gammas and the prompt neutrons released in the fission process was employed to reduce the background. The gamma radiation emitted during different time intervals after the fission event was studied with the help of a collimator, the position of which was changed along the path of the fission fragments. In this way a decay curve was obtained from which the life-time of one of the gamma-emitting states could be estimated. The relative yield of the gamma-rays was determined as a function of mass for different gamma-ray energy portions and two specific time intervals after the fission events. Comparisons were made with data obtained from {sup 252} Cf-fission. Attention is drawn to some features which seem to be the same in {sup 235}U and {sup 252} Cf-fission.

  3. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  4. Micro fission chamber for the ITER neutron monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the fabrication of a prototype micro-fission chamber and test results under ITER relevant conditions including wide neutron spectrum and intense gamma-rays, and the performance as a ITER power monitor is discussed. A micro-fission chamber with 12 mg UO 2 and a dummy chamber without uranium were designed and fabricated for the in-vessel neutron flux monitoring of ITER. The measurement ability was tested with the FNS facility for 14 MeV neutrons and the 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation facility at JAERI-Takasaki. Employing the Campbelling mode in the electronics, the ITER requirement for the temporal resolution was satisfied. The excellent linearity of the detector output versus the neutron flux was confirmed in the temperature range from 20degC to 250degC. As a result, it was concluded that the developed micro-fission chamber is applicable for ITER. (author)

  5. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  6. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Contribution to the study of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serot, O.

    2009-09-01

    The author proposes an overview of his research activity during the past fifteen years and more particularly that dealing with nuclear fission. The first part reports works on nucleus physics at the scission via the investigation of ternary fission (experimental procedure, influence of fission modes, influence of resonance spin, influence of excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus, emission probabilities, energy spectra of ternary alphas and tritons, emission mechanism). The second part reports measurements and assessments of neutron-induced fission cross sections. The third part reports the investigation of some properties of fission products (efficiencies, branching ratios of the main delayed neutron precursors)

  8. An Evaluation of a Fission Product Inventory for CANDU Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jong Yeob; Park, Joo Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Fission products are released by two processes when a single channel accident occurs. One is a 'prompt release' and the other is a 'delayed release'. Prompt release assumes that the gap inventory of the fuel elements is released by a fuel element failure at the time of an accident. Delayed release assumes that the inventories within the grain or at the grain boundary are released after a accident due to a diffusion through grains, an oxidation of the fuel and an interaction between the fuel and the Zircaloy sheath. Therefore, the calculation of a fission product inventory and its distribution in a fuel during a normal operating is the starting point for the assessment of a fission product release for single channel accidents. In this report, the fission product inventories and their distributions within s fuel under a normal operating condition are evaluated for three types of CANDU fuels such as the 37 element fuel, CANFLEX-NU and CANFLEX-RU fuel bundles in the 'limiting channel'. To accomplish the above mentioned purposes, the basic power histories for each type of CANDU fuel were produced and the fission product inventories were calculated by using the ELESTRES code

  9. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  10. ITO-MgF2 Film Development for PowerSphere Polymer Surface Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    Multi-kilogram class microsatellites with a PowerSphere electric power system are attractive for fulfilling a variety of potential NASA missions. However, PowerSphere polymer surfaces must be coated with a film that has suitable electrical sheet resistivity for electrostatic discharge control, be resistant to atomic oxygen attack, be transparent to ultraviolet light for composite structure curing and resist ultraviolet light induced darkening for efficient photovoltaic cell operation. In addition, the film must be tolerant of polymer layer folding associated with launch stowage of PowerSphere inflatable structures. An excellent film material candidate to meet these requirements is co-sputtered, indium oxide (In2O3) - tin oxide (SnO2), known as 'ITO', and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). While basic ITO-MgF2 film properties have been the subject of research over the last decade, further research is required in the areas of film durability for space-inflatable applications and precise film property control for large scale commercial production. In this paper, the authors present film durability results for a folded polymer substrate and film resistance to vacuum UV darkening. The authors discuss methods and results in the area of film sheet resistivity measurement and active control, particularly dual-channel, plasma emission line measurement of ITO and MgF2 plasma sources. ITO-MgF2 film polymer coupon preparation is described as well as film deposition equipment, procedures and film characterization. Durability testing methods are also described. The pre- and post-test condition of the films is assessed microscopically and electrically. Results show that an approx. 500A ITO-18vol% MgF2 film is a promising candidate to protect PowerSphere polymer surfaces for Earth orbit missions. Preliminary data also indicate that in situ film measurement methods are promising for active film resistivity control in future large scale production. Future film research plans are also

  11. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  12. Polyphase diffusion of fission products in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, V.

    1989-05-01

    The report attempts to give an introduction into the subject of fission product transport in nuclear graphite and results in an extended proposal of a transport-model. Beginning with a rough description of the graphite in question, an idea about the physical transport-phenomena in graphite is developed. Some of the basic experimental methods, especially techniques of porosimetry, determination of sorption-isotherms and of course several transport-experiments, are briefly described and their results are discussed. Some of the most frequent transport models are introduced and assessed with the criteria emphasized in this report. An extended model is proposed including the following main ideas: The transport of the fission-products is regarded as a two-phase-diffusion process through the open pores of the graphite. The two phases are: surface-diffusion and gas-diffusion. A time-dependent coupling of the two diffusion-phases by sorption-isotherms and a concentration-dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient, also related to the physical behaviour of the sorption-isotherms, are the basic properties of the proposed model. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Implementation of a Thermodynamic Solver within a Computer Program for Calculating Fission-Product Release Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Duncan Henry

    During some postulated accidents at nuclear power stations, fuel cooling may be impaired. In such cases, the fuel heats up and the subsequent increased fission-gas release from the fuel to the gap may result in fuel sheath failure. After fuel sheath failure, the barrier between the coolant and the fuel pellets is lost or impaired, gases and vapours from the fuel-to-sheath gap and other open voids in the fuel pellets can be vented. Gases and steam from the coolant can enter the broken fuel sheath and interact with the fuel pellet surfaces and the fission-product inclusion on the fuel surface (including material at the surface of the fuel matrix). The chemistry of this interaction is an important mechanism to model in order to assess fission-product releases from fuel. Starting in 1995, the computer program SOURCE 2.0 was developed by the Canadian nuclear industry to model fission-product release from fuel during such accidents. SOURCE 2.0 has employed an early thermochemical model of irradiated uranium dioxide fuel developed at the Royal Military College of Canada. To overcome the limitations of computers of that time, the implementation of the RMC model employed lookup tables to pre-calculated equilibrium conditions. In the intervening years, the RMC model has been improved, the power of computers has increased significantly, and thermodynamic subroutine libraries have become available. This thesis is the result of extensive work based on these three factors. A prototype computer program (referred to as SC11) has been developed that uses a thermodynamic subroutine library to calculate thermodynamic equilibria using Gibbs energy minimization. The Gibbs energy minimization requires the system temperature (T) and pressure (P), and the inventory of chemical elements (n) in the system. In order to calculate the inventory of chemical elements in the fuel, the list of nuclides and nuclear isomers modelled in SC11 had to be expanded from the list used by SOURCE 2.0. A

  14. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  15. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z. [Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il; Tessler, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  16. Fission-fragment and neutron data traced back to the macroscopic and microscopic properties of the fissioning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model description of fission-fragment yields and prompt neutron emission is developed. The yields of the different fission channels and their properties are attributed to the number of relevant states above the potential-energy landscape on the fission path at the moment of dynamical freeze-out, which is specific to the collective coordinate considered. The model combines well established ideas with novel concepts. The separability principle of macroscopic properties of the compound nucleus and microscopic properties of the fragments strongly reduces the number of model parameters and assures a high predictive power. The recently discovered energy-sorting mechanism in superfluid nuclear dynamics determines the sharing of intrinsic excitation energy at scission and the enhancement of even-odd structure in asymmetric splits.

  17. Fusion and fission of atomic clusters: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We review recent advances made by our group in finding optimized geometries of atomic clusters as well as in description of fission of charged small metal clusters. We base our approach to these problems on analysis of multidimensional potential energy surface. For the fusion process we have...... developed an effective scheme of adding new atoms to stable cluster geometries of larger clusters in an efficient way. We apply this algorithm to finding geometries of metal and noble gas clusters. For the fission process the analysis of the potential energy landscape calculated on the ab initio level...... of theory allowed us to obtain very detailed information on energetics and pathways of the different fission channels for the Na^2+_10 clusters....

  18. Report of fission study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  19. Status of fission yield data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Blachot, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Experimental approach to fission process of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-07-01

    From experimental views, it seems likely that the mechanism of nuclear fission process remains unsolved even after the Bohr and Weeler`s study in 1939. Especially, it is marked in respect of mass distribution in unsymmetric nuclear fission. The energy dependency of mass distribution can be explained with an assumption of 2-mode nuclear fission. Further, it was demonstrated that the symmetrical fission components and the unsymmetrical ones have different saddle and fission points. Thus, the presence of the 2-mode fission mechanism was confirmed. Here, transition in the nuclear fission mechanism and its cause were investigated here. As the cause of such transition, plausible four causes; a contribution of multiple-chance fission, disappearance of shell effects, beginning of fission following collective excitation due to GDR and nuclear phase transition were examined in the condition of excitation energy of 14.0 MeV. And it was suggested that the transition in the nuclear fission concerned might be related to phase transition. In addition, the mechanism of nuclear fission at a low energy and multi-mode hypothesis were examined by determination of the energy for thermal neutron fission ({sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu) and spontaneous nuclear fission ({sup 252}Cf). (M.N.)

  1. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Bosie; Stewart, Eric T.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield

  4. Fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus based on fission reaction models in high energy regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of projects of new generation nuclear power plants requires the solving of material science and technological issues in developing of reactor materials. Melts of heavy metals (Pb, Bi and Pb-Bi due to their nuclear and thermophysical properties, are the candidate coolants for fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADS. In this study, α, γ, p, n and 3He induced fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus at high-energy regions for (α,f, (γ,f, (p,f, (n,f and (3He,f reactions have been investigated using different fission reaction models. Mamdouh Table, Sierk, Rotating Liquid Drop and Fission Path models of theoretical fission barriers of TALYS 1.6 code have been used for the fission cross section calculations. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the EXFOR database. TALYS 1.6 Sierk model calculations exhibit generally good agreement with the experimental measurements for all reactions used in this study.

  5. NEACRP thermal fission product benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.; Taubman, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the thermal fission product benchmark was to compare the range of fission product data in use at the present time. A simple homogeneous problem was set with 200 atoms H/1 atom U235, to be burnt up to 1000 days and then decay for 1000 days. The problem was repeated with 200 atoms H/1 atom Pu239, 20 atoms H/1 atom U235 and 20 atoms H/1 atom Pu239. There were ten participants and the submissions received are detailed in this report. (author)

  6. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  7. Fission 99Mo production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Zengxing; Luo Zhifu; Ma Huimin; Liang Yufu; Yu Ningwen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a production technology of fission 99 Mo in the Department Isotope, CIAE. The irradiation target is tubular U-Al alloy containing highly enriched uranium. The target is irradiated in the swimming pool reactor core. The neutron flux is about 4x10 13 /cm 2 .sec. The production scale is 3.7-7.4 TBq (100-200Ci) of fission 99 Mo per batch. Total recovery of 99 Mo is more than 70%. The production practice proves that the process and equipment are safe and reliable. (author)

  8. The wastes of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubre, H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the problems of the radioactive wastes generated by the nuclear fission. The first part devoted to the fission phenomenon explains the incident neutron energy and the target nuclei role. The second part devoted to the nuclear wastes sources presents the production of wastes upstream of the reactors, in the reactors and why these wastes are dangerous. The third part discusses the radioactive wastes management in France (classification, laws). The last part details the associated research programs: the radionuclides separation, the disposal, the underground storage, the transmutation and the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  9. 40 years of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.

    1979-01-01

    On the occasion of both the 100th birthday of the discoverer of nuclear fission, Otto Hahn, and the 40th anniversary of this outstanding scientific discovery the historical development is described, which led to nuclear fission. Aspects of scientific life in Berlin and in the whole world at that time are presented, and relations between scientists are characterized by quotations. In particular, stress is laid on the life and activities of Otto Hahn as a human being and as a scientist, and his outstanding scientific achievements are appreciated. (author)

  10. Fission barriers in the quasi-molecular shape path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Bonilla, C.; Zbiri, K.; Gherghescu, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    New observed phenomena like asymmetric fission of intermediate mass nuclei, nuclear molecules in light nuclei, super and hyperdeformations, cluster radioactivity, fast-fission of heavy systems and fragmentation have renewed interest in investigating the fusion-like fission valley which leads rapidly to two touching spherical fragments and quasi-molecular shapes. Furthermore, rotating super and hyperdeformed nuclear states and superheavy nuclei can be formed only in heavy-ion collisions for which the initial configuration is two close quasi-spherical nuclei. For these shapes the balance between the Coulomb forces and surface tension forces does not allow to link the sheets of the potential energy surface corresponding to one-body shapes and to two separated fragments, respectively. It is necessary to add another term called proximity energy reproducing the finite-range effects of the nuclear force in the neck or the gap between the nascent fission fragments. A generalized liquid drop model has been developed to take into account this nuclear proximity energy, the mass and charge asymmetry, an accurate nuclear radius and the temperature effects. The initial value of the surface energy coefficient has been kept. Microscopic corrections have been determined within the asymmetric two center shell model or simpler algebraic approximations. With this model and deformation valley first studies had led to the following results: (i) good agreement between the potential barrier heights and the experimental fission barrier heights in the whole mass range; (ii) saddle-point corresponding to two separated fragments maintained in unstable equilibrium by the balance between the repulsive Coulomb forces and the attractive proximity forces; (iii) strong enhancement of the maximal angular momentum against fission; (iv) reasonable agreement with experimental data on the double-humped barriers of actinides. Within this same approach we have recently shown that the calculated potential

  11. Sommerfeld-Watson transformation for nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandru, G.

    1978-01-01

    It is proved that the fission matrix element can be written like a Sommerfeld-Watson relation. This leads to a dispersion relation for the fission process in which the substraction term is uniquely determined. (author)

  12. Fission properties of the heaviest elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moller, P.; Nix, R.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss fission properties of the heaviest elements. In particular they focus on stability with respect to spontaneous fission and on the prospects of extending the region of known nuclei beyond the peninsula of currently known nuclides

  13. Fission fragment distributions within dynamical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, K. [Institute of Nuclear, Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Nadtochy, P.N. [Omsk State Technical University, Omsk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Physics Department, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The review covers recent developments and achievements in the dynamical description of fission process at high excitation energy. It is shown that the dynamical approach based on multidimensional Langevin equations combined with the statistical description of nuclear decay by particles evaporation is capable of fairly well describing the formation of fission fragment mass-energy, charge, and angular distributions of fission fragments in coincidence with the pre- and post-scission particle emission. The final yields of fission and evaporation residues channels products could be obtained. The detailed description of fission dynamics allows studying different stages of fission process, indicating the most important ingredients governing fission process and studying in detail such fundamental nuclear properties as nuclear viscosity and fission timescale. The tasks and perspectives of multidimensional dynamical approach are also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Karpf, E.

    1984-01-01

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  15. Origin of Power Laws for Reactions at Metal Surfaces Mediated by Hot Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of experiments have established that certain chemical reactions at metal surfaces can be driven by multiple hot-electron-mediated excitations of adsorbates. A high transient density of hot electrons is obtained by means of femtosecond laser pulses and a characteristic feature of such...... density functional theory and the delta self-consistent field method. With a simplifying assumption, the power law becomes exact and we obtain a simple physical interpretation of the exponent n, which represents the number of adsorbate vibrational states participating in the reaction....

  16. Chemical effluents in surface waters from nuclear power plants. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this research project are threefold: to obtain data on the behavior of potentially toxic substances introduced into surface waters from nuclear power plants; to determine the magnitude of the impact of these substances on representative and economically important aquatic species; and to develop models with which to predict the partitioning of these substances among the abiotic aquatic compartments. To fulfill these objectives in our investigation of copper, we are determining copper partitioning in marine and freshwater systems, evaluating the toxicity of copper to representative aquatic organisms, and developing a mathematical model to predict copper partitioning

  17. Engineering bacterial efflux pumps for solar-powered bioremediation of surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vikram; Wendell, David

    2013-05-08

    Antibiotics are difficult to selectively remove from surface waters by present treatment methods. Bacterial efflux pumps have evolved the ability to discriminately expel antibiotics and other noxious agents via proton and ATP driven pathways. Here, we describe light-dependent removal of antibiotics by engineering the bacterial efflux pump AcrB into a proteovesicle system. We have created a chimeric protein with the requisite proton motive force by coupling AcrB to the light-driven proton pump Delta-rhodopsin (dR) via a glycophorin A transmembrane domain. This creates a solar powered protein material capable of selectively capturing antibiotics from bulk solutions. Using environmental water and direct sunlight, our AcrB-dR vesicles removed almost twice as much antibiotic as the treatment standard, activated carbon. Altogether, the AcrB-dR system provides an effective means of extracting antibiotics from surface waters as well as potential antibiotic recovery through vesicle solubilization.

  18. User's manual for computer code RIBD-II, a fission product inventory code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The computer code RIBD-II is used to calculate inventories, activities, decay powers, and energy releases for the fission products generated in a fuel irradiation. Changes from the earlier RIBD code are: the expansion to include up to 850 fission product isotopes, input in the user-oriented NAMELIST format, and run-time choice of fuels from an extensively enlarged library of nuclear data. The library that is included in the code package contains yield data for 818 fission product isotopes for each of fourteen different fissionable isotopes, together with fission product transmutation cross sections for fast and thermal systems. Calculational algorithms are little changed from those in RIBD. (U.S.)

  19. Status of the general description of fission observables by the GEF code

    CERN Document Server

    Jurado, B

    2014-01-01

    The GEneral Fission (GEF) model treats spontaneous fission and fission up to an excitation energy of about 100 MeV of a wide range of heavy nuclei. GEF makes use of general laws of statistical and quantum mechanics, assuring a high predictive power. It is unique in providing a general description of essentially all fission observables in a consistent way while preserving the correlations between all of them. In this contribution we present some of the physical aspects on which the model is based, give an overview on the results that can be obtained with the code and show an example that illustrates how the GEF code can serve as a framework for revealing the sensitivity of the fission observables to some basic nuclear properties.

  20. Finite element simulation of fission gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.

    1999-01-01

    A fission gas release model is presented, which solves the atomic diffusion problem with xenon and krypton elements tramps produced by uranium fission during UO 2 nuclear fuel irradiation. The model considers intra and intergranular precipitation bubbles, its re dissolution owing to highly energetic fission products impact, interconnection of intergranular bubbles and gas sweeping by grain border in movement because of grain growth. In the model, the existence of a thermal gradient in the fuel pellet is considered, as well as temporal variations of fission rate owing to changes in the operation lineal power. The diffusion equation is solved by the finite element method and results of gas release and swelling calculation owing to gas fission are compared with experimental data. (author)

  1. Nuclear fission as a macroscopic quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, N.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss nuclear fission from the point of view of a macroscopic quantum tunneling, one of whose major interests is to study the effects of environments on the tunneling rate of a macroscopic variable. We show that a vibrational excitation of the fissioning nucleus significantly enhances the fission rate. We show this effect by two different methods. The one is to treat the vibrational excitation as an environmental degree of freedom, the other treats the fission as a two dimensional quantum tunneling. (author)

  2. Measurement of fission product release during LWR fuel failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetek, D.J.; King, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The PBF is a specialized test reactor consisting of an annular core and a central test space 21 cm in diameter and 91 cm high. A test loop circulates coolant through the central experimental section at typical power reactor conditions. Light-water-reactor-type fuel rods are exposed to power bursts simulating reactivity insertion transients, and to power-cooling-mismatch conditions during which the rods are allowed to operate in film boiling. Fission product concentrations in the test loop coolant are continuously monitored during these transients by a Ge(Li) detector based gamma spectrometer. Automatic batch processing of pulse height spectra results in a list of radionuclide concentrations present in the loop coolant as a function of time during the test. Fission product behavior is then correlated to test parameters and posttest examination of the fuel rods. Data are presented from Test PCM-1

  3. Fission: An object lesson for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a new, and possibly hazardous, long-range energy source is beset with two political problems (as well as the many technical ones): survival and public acceptance. By survival I mean continuing support, year after year, of a very expensive enterprise whose promise always seems greater than its achievement: can this support continue long enough to allow the promised goal to be achieved. By survival I mean continuing support, year after year, of a very expensive enterprise whose promise always seems greater than its achievement: can this support continue long enough to allow the promised goal to be achieved. By public acceptance, I mean the reaction the reaction of the public to the new energy source, assuming that it achieves its technological goals. Both of these problems have been faced by fission power : I propose to describe the experiences of fission in confronting these issues in the hope that they might be dealt with more deftly by fusion. My account will be anecdotal and personal

  4. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  5. Neutron gamma competition in fast fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frehaut, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we analyse the data we have obtained on the distribution of the gamma-ray energy per fission, as well as on the average energy E-barγ released per fission for the neutron induced fission of several isotopes, in the energy range up to 15 MeV. 6 refs, 9 figs

  6. Fission yield data evaluation system FYDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tingjin

    1998-01-01

    Taking account of some features of fission yield data, to do the fission yield data evaluation conveniently, a fission yield data evaluation system FYDES has been developed for last two years. Outline of the system, data retrieval and data table standardization, data correction codes, data averaging code, simultaneous evaluation code and data fit programs were introduced

  7. Fission fragment mass and angular distributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... Synthesis of heavy and superheavy elements is severely hindered by fission and fission-like processes. The probability of these fission-like, non-equilibrium processes strongly depends on the entrance channel parameters. This article attempts to summarize the recent experimental findings and classify the ...

  8. Some aspects of fission and quasifission processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... In this talk, I will review an incomplete subset of the major milestones in fission research, and briefly discuss some of the topics that I have been involved in during my career. These include studies of vibrational resonances and fission isomers that are caused by the second minimum in the fission barrier in ...

  9. Charged particle-induced nuclear fission reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nuclear fission phenomenon continues to be an enigma, even after nearly 75 years of its discovery. Considerable progress has been made towards understanding the fission process. Both light projectiles and heavy ions have been employed to investigate nuclear fission. An extensive database of the properties of ...

  10. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster ... those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'. Thus ...

  11. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Nuclei in the actinide chain and beyond are prone to fission owing to ... mass nuclei are typically more difficult, because the intensity is .... j15/2 neutron alignments in a region where shell stablization effects are crucial.

  12. Space Fission System Test Effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Schmidt, Glen L.; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Harper, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Space fission technology has the potential to enable rapid access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential, however, near-term customers need to be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and utilized. One key to successful utilization is to develop reactor designs that are highly testable. Testable reactor designs have a much higher probability of being successfully converted from paper concepts to working space hardware than do designs which are difficult or impossible to realistically test. ''Test Effectiveness'' is one measure of the ability to realistically test a space reactor system. The objective of this paper is to discuss test effectiveness as applied to the design, development, flight qualification, and acceptance testing of space fission systems. The ability to perform highly effective testing would be particularly important to the success of any near-term mission, such as NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, the first mission under study within NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program

  13. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced ... excitation energies, there may not be sufficient nuclei near the fission barrier after the .... Dissipation in nuclear dynamics in the mean-field regime accounts for the coupling of the .... barrier for different isotopes of Fr. The lines are drawn to guide the eye.

  14. Mass distribution of fission fragments within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B. [M.C.S. University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Lublin (Poland); Ivanyuk, F.A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    The fission fragments mass-yield of {sup 236} U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and mass-asymmetry modes. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using a Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four-dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within a cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining the final fragment mass distribution. (orig.)

  15. Inverse kinematics technique for the study of fission-fragment isotopic yields at GANIL energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaune, O.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of the fission-products distributions result of dynamical and quantum properties of the deformation process of the fissioning nucleus. These distributions have also an interest for the conception of new nuclear power plants or for the transmutation of the nuclear wastes. Up to now, our understanding of the nuclear fission remains restricted because of experimental limitations. In particular, yields of the heavy fission products are difficult to get with precision. In this work, an innovative experimental technique is presented. It is based on the use of inverse kinematics coupled to the use of a spectrometer, in which a 238 U beam at 6 or 24 A MeV impinges on light targets. Several actinides, from 238 U to 250 Cf, are produced by transfer or fusion reactions, with an excitation energy ranges from ten to few hundreds MeV depending on the reaction and the beam energy. The fission fragments of these actinides are detected by the VAMOS spectrometer or the LISE separator. The isotopic yields of fission products are completely measured for different fissioning systems. The neutron excess of the fragments is used to characterise the isotopic distributions. Its evolution with excitation energy gives important insights on the mechanisms of the compound-nucleus formation and its deexcitation. Neutron excess is also used to determine the multiplicity of neutrons evaporated by the fragments. The role of the proton and neutron shell effects into the formation of fission fragments is also discussed. (author) [fr

  16. Alkaline glass as induced fission fragment detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The slide glass, registered trade marks INLAB, INVICT and PERFECTA were compared. For the three kinds of glasses the following studies were done: chemical composition; general dissolution rate for hydrofluoric acid solutions of concentrations between 1 and 10M, at 30 0 C and ultrasound shaking; relative efficiency for recording fission fragment tracks from 252 Cf. The INLAB glass was selected due to the better quality of its surface after chemical etching. The HF concentration 2.5M was determined for chemical etching of INLAB glass, and the optimum etching time was chosen between 8 and 10 minutes. The thermal attenuation of latent tracks in the environmental temperature was observed for intervals uo to 31 days between the detector exposure to the fission fragment source and etching of tracks. Several methods were used for determining the detector parameters, such as: critical angle, angle of the cone and efficiency of etching. The effects of gamma irradiation from 60 Co and reactor neutrons in material properties as track detector were studied. Attenuation of latent tracks and saturation of color centers were observed for doses over 100M Rad. Since this kind of material contains uranium as impurity, uniformely distributed, slide glass were calibrated to be applied as a monitor of thermal neutron flux in nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  17. The potential for large scale uses for fission product xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrmann, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Of all fission products in spent, low enrichment, uranium, power reactor fuels xenon is produced in the highest yield - nearly one cubic meter, STP, per metric ton. In aged fuels which may be considered for processing in the U.S. radioactive xenon isotopes approach the lowest limits of detection. The separation from accompanying radioactive 85 Kr is the essential problem; however, this is state of the art technology which has been demonstrated on the pilot scale to yield xenon with pico-curie levels of 85 Kr contamination. If needed for special applications, such levels could be further reduced. Environmental considerations require the isolation of essentially all fission product krypton during fuel processing. Economic restraints assure that the bulk of this krypton will need to be separated from the much more voluminous xenon fraction of the total amount of fission gas. Xenon may thus be discarded or made available for uses at probably very low cost. In contrast with many other fission products which have unique radioactive characteristics which make them useful as sources of heat, gamma and x-rays and luminescence as well as for medicinal diagnostics and therapeutics fission product xenon differs from naturally occurring xenon only in its isotopic composition which gives it a slightly higher atomic weight, because of the much higher concentrations of the 134 X and 136 Xe isotopes. Therefore, fission product xenon can most likely find uses in applications which already exist but which can not be exploited most beneficially because of the high cost and scarcity of natural xenon. Unique uses would probably include applications in improved incandescent light illumination in place of krypton and in human anesthesia

  18. Influence of power supply on the generation of ozone and degradation of phenol in a surface discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yan; Shang, Kefeng; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Yue; An, Jiutao; Zhang, Chunyang; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Li, Jie

    2013-01-01

    A surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor was utilized to degrade phenol in water. Different power supplies applied to the DBD reactor affect the discharge modes, the formation of chemically active species and thus the removal efficiency of pollutants. It is thus important to select an optimized power supply for the DBD reactor. In this paper, the influence of the types of power supplies including alternate current (AC) and bipolar pulsed power supply on the ozone generation in a surface discharge reactor was measured. It was found that compared with bipolar pulsed power supply, higher energy efficiency of O 3 generation was obtained when DBD reactor was supplied with 50Hz AC power supply. The highest O 3 generation was approximate 4 mg kJ −1 ; moreover, COD removal efficiency of phenol wastewater reached 52.3% after 3 h treatment under an AC peak voltage of 2.6 kV.

  19. Influence of power supply on the generation of ozone and degradation of phenol in a surface discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Shang, Kefeng; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Yue; An, Jiutao; Zhang, Chunyang; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    A surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor was utilized to degrade phenol in water. Different power supplies applied to the DBD reactor affect the discharge modes, the formation of chemically active species and thus the removal efficiency of pollutants. It is thus important to select an optimized power supply for the DBD reactor. In this paper, the influence of the types of power supplies including alternate current (AC) and bipolar pulsed power supply on the ozone generation in a surface discharge reactor was measured. It was found that compared with bipolar pulsed power supply, higher energy efficiency of O3 generation was obtained when DBD reactor was supplied with 50Hz AC power supply. The highest O3 generation was approximate 4 mg kJ-1 moreover, COD removal efficiency of phenol wastewater reached 52.3% after 3 h treatment under an AC peak voltage of 2.6 kV.

  20. The use of large surface area for particle and power deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigneur, A.; Guilhem, D.; Hogan, J.

    1993-01-01

    Since the parallel heat flux passing through the LCFS has increased dramatically with the size of machines one has to cope with very large particle and power fluxes on the limiters. Thus the size of the limiters has been increased by the use of inner bumper limiters (for example in JET, TFTR, TORE-SUPRA and JT60). The 'exponential-sine' model is widely used to estimate the heat flux (Q) to a wall for a plasma flux surface with incident angle θ. The model predict Q = q || (0) sinθ e -ρ/λ q + q(0) cosθ e -ρ/λ q , (where θ=0 o when the flux surface is exactly tangential to the limiting surface), ρ is the minor radius measured from the last closed flux surface (LCFS), λ q is the SOL decay length of the heat flux density and q(0) is the heat flux density at the last closed surface. If we approximate the heat flux as Q = q || (0) e -ρ/λ q sin(θ+α), with α ≡ tan -1 [q(0)/q || (0)], then α can be interpreted as an effective 'minimum angle of incidence'. Under conditions where the geometric angle θ has been made almost grazing (below 5 o ) the predictions of the simplest model (with α=0 o ) is not adequate to represent the observation made in TORE-SUPRA; a similar result is found in TFTR. Experimental observations of heat and particle deposition on the large area limiter on the inner wall of TORE-SUPRA are presented. These results have been analyzed with a Monte Carlo code (THOR) describing the diffusion of hydrogenic particles across the LCFS to the limiting objects in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL), and by impurity generation calculations using the full 'exponential-sine' model (α ≠ 0) used as input to an impurity (carbon) Monte Carlo code (BBQ). (author) 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Analysis of Stationary, Photovoltaic-based Surface Power System Designs at the Lunar South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeh, Joshua E.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of solar arrays and either batteries or regenerative fuel cells are analyzed for a surface power system module at the lunar south pole. The systems are required to produce 5 kW of net electrical power in sunlight and 2 kW of net electrical power during lunar night periods for a 10-year period between 2020 and 2030. Systems-level models for energy conservation, performance, degradation, and mass are used to compare to various systems. The sensitivities of important and/or uncertain variables including battery specific energy, fuel cell operating voltage, and DC-DC converter efficiency are compared to better understand the system. Switching unit efficiency, battery specific energy, and fuel cell operating voltage appear to be important system-level variables for this system. With reasonably sized solar arrays, the regenerative fuel cell system has significantly lower mass than the battery system based on the requirements and assumptions made herein. The total operational time is estimated at about 10,000 hours in battery discharge/fuel cell mode and about 4,000 and 8,000 hours for the battery charge and electrolyzer modes, respectively. The estimated number of significant depth-of-discharge cycles for either energy storage system is less than 100 for the 10-year period.

  2. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, G.

    1976-05-01

    The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on Fission Product Nuclear Data, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. This report consists of reproductions of essentially unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields; neutron cross-section data of fission products; data related to β-, γ-decay of fission products; delayed neutron data; and fission product decay-heat

  3. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  4. Discharge Characteristics of Series Surface/Packed-Bed Discharge Reactor Diven by Bipolar Pulsed Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jian; Jiang Nan; Li Jie; Shang Kefeng; Lu Na; Wu Yan; Mizuno Akira

    2016-01-01

    The discharge characteristics of the series surface/packed-bed discharge (SSPBD) reactor driven by bipolar pulse power were systemically investigated in this study. In order to evaluate the advantages of the SSPBD reactor, it was compared with traditional surface discharge (SD) reactor and packed-bed discharge (PBD) reactor in terms of the discharge voltage, discharge current, and ozone formation. The SSPBD reactor exhibited a faster rising time and lower tail voltage than the SD and PBD reactors. The distribution of the active species generated in different discharge regions of the SSPBD reactor was analyzed by optical emission spectra and ozone analysis. It was found that the packed-bed discharge region (3.5 mg/L), rather than the surface discharge region (1.3 mg/L) in the SSPBD reactor played a more important role in ozone generation. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis indicated that more intense peaks of the active species (e.g. N2 and OI) in the optical emission spectra were observed in the packed-bed region. (paper)

  5. Discharge Characteristics of Series Surface/Packed-Bed Discharge Reactor Diven by Bipolar Pulsed Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jie; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The discharge characteristics of the series surface/packed-bed discharge (SSPBD) reactor driven by bipolar pulse power were systemically investigated in this study. In order to evaluate the advantages of the SSPBD reactor, it was compared with traditional surface discharge (SD) reactor and packed-bed discharge (PBD) reactor in terms of the discharge voltage, discharge current, and ozone formation. The SSPBD reactor exhibited a faster rising time and lower tail voltage than the SD and PBD reactors. The distribution of the active species generated in different discharge regions of the SSPBD reactor was analyzed by optical emission spectra and ozone analysis. It was found that the packed-bed discharge region (3.5 mg/L), rather than the surface discharge region (1.3 mg/L) in the SSPBD reactor played a more important role in ozone generation. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis indicated that more intense peaks of the active species (e.g. N2 and OI) in the optical emission spectra were observed in the packed-bed region. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177007), the Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. U1462105), and Dalian University of Technology Fundamental Research Fund of China (No. DUT15RC(3)030)

  6. Investigation of the delay time distribution of high power microwave surface flashover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Krompholz, H.; Neuber, A.

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing and modeling the statistics associated with the initiation of gas breakdown has proven to be difficult due to a variety of rather unexplored phenomena involved. Experimental conditions for high power microwave window breakdown for pressures on the order of 100 to several 100 torr are complex: there are little to no naturally occurring free electrons in the breakdown region. The initial electron generation rate, from an external source, for example, is time dependent and so is the charge carrier amplification in the increasing radio frequency (RF) field amplitude with a rise time of 50 ns, which can be on the same order as the breakdown delay time. The probability of reaching a critical electron density within a given time period is composed of the statistical waiting time for the appearance of initiating electrons in the high-field region and the build-up of an avalanche with an inherent statistical distribution of the electron number. High power microwave breakdown and its delay time is of critical importance, since it limits the transmission through necessary windows, especially for high power, high altitude, low pressure applications. The delay time distribution of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover has been examined for nitrogen and argon as test gases for pressures ranging from 60 to 400 torr, with and without external UV illumination. A model has been developed for predicting the discharge delay time for these conditions. The results provide indications that field induced electron generation, other than standard field emission, plays a dominant role, which might be valid for other gas discharge types as well.

  7. Fission dynamics in the proton induced fission of heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubchenya, V.A. E-mail: rubchen@phys.jyu.fi; Trzaska, W.H.; Itkis, I.M.; Itkis, M.G.; Kliman, J.; Kniajeva, G.N.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Krupa, L.; Pokrovski, I.V.; Voskressenski, V.M.; Hanappe, F.; Materna, T.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.; Chubarian, G.; Khlebnikov, S.V.; Vakhtin, D.N.; Lyapin, V.G

    2004-04-05

    Multi-parameter correlation study of the reaction {sup 242}Pu(p, f) at E{sub p} 13, 20 and 55 MeV has been carried out. Fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions and the double differential neutron spectra have been measured. It was observed that the two-humped shape of mass distributions prevailed up to highest proton energy. Manifestation of the nuclear shell Z 28 near fragment mass A{sub fr} = 70 has been detected. The experimental results were analyzed in the framework of a time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of nuclear friction effects in the fission process. The multi-parameter correlation study of the reaction.

  8. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokiniemi, J.; Auvinen, A.; Maekynen, J.; Valmari, T.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  9. Transmutation of Tc-99 in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Li, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Transmutation of Tc-99 in three different types of fission reactors is considered: A heavy water reactor, a fast reactor and a light water reactor. For the first type a CANDU reactor was chosen, for the second one the Superphenix reactor, and for the third one a PWR. The three most promising Tc-99 transmuters are the fast reactor with a moderated subassembly in the inner core, a fast reactor with a non-moderated subassembly in the inner core, and a heavy water reactor with Tc-99 target pins in the moderator between the fuel bundles. Transmutation half lives of 15 to 25 years can be achieved, with yearly transmuted Tc-99 masses of about 100 kg at a thermal reactor power of about 3000 MW. (orig.)

  10. Nondestructive fission gas release measurement and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, P.M.; Packard, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) has performed reactor poolside gamma scanning measurements of fuel rods for fission gas release (FGR) detection for more than 10 yr. The measurement system has been previously described. Over the years, the data acquisition system, the method of spectrum analysis, and the means of reducing spectrum interference have been significantly improved. A personal computer (PC)-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) package is used to collect, display, and store high-resolution gamma-ray spectra measured in the fuel rod plenum. A PC spread sheet is used to fit the measured spectra and compute sample count rates after Compton background subtraction. A Zircaloy plenum spacer is often used to reduce positron annihilation interference that can arise from the INCONEL reg-sign plenum spring used in SPC-manufactured fuel rods

  11. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs

  12. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Material synergism fusion-fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankara Rao, K.B.; Raj, B.; Cook, I.; Kohyama, A.; Dudarev, S.

    2007-01-01

    In fission and fusion reactors the common features such as operating temperatures and neutron exposures will have the greatest impact on materials performance and component lifetimes. Developing fast neutron irradiation resisting materials is a common issue for both fission and fusion reactors. The high neutron flux levels in both these systems lead to unique materials problems like void swelling, irradiation creep and helium embitterment. Both fission and fusion rely on ferritic-martensitic steels based on 9%Cr compositions for achieving the highest swelling resistance but their creep strength sharply decreases above ∝ 823K. The use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys is envisaged to increase the operating temperature of blanket systems in the fusion reactors and fuel clad tubes in fast breeder reactors. In view of high operating temperatures, cyclic and steady load conditions and the long service life, properties like creep, low cycle fatigue,fracture toughness and creepfatigue interaction are major considerations in the selection of structural materials and design of components for fission and fusion reactors. Currently, materials selection for fusion systems has to be based upon incomplete experimental database on mechanical properties. The usage of fairly well developed databases, in fission programmes on similar materials, is of great help in the initial design of fusion reactor components. Significant opportunities exist for sharing information on technology of irradiation testing, specimen miniaturization, advanced methods of property measurement, safe windows for metal forming, and development of common materials property data base system. Both fusion and fission programs are being directed to development of clean steels with very low trace and tramp elements, characterization of microstructure and phase stability under irradiation, assessment of irradiation creep and swelling behaviour, studies on compatibility with helium and developing

  14. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  15. 1978 source book for fusion--fission hybrid systems. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.H.; Pavlenco, G.F.; Kaminski, R.S.

    1978-12-01

    The 1978 Source Book for Fusion--Fission Hybrid Systems was prepared by United Engineers and Constructors Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute. It reviews the current status of fusion--fission hybrid reactors, and presents the prevailing views of members of the fusion community on the RD and D timetable required for the development and commercialization of fusion--fission hybrids. The results presented are based on a review of related references as well as interviews with recognized experts in the field. Contributors from the academic and industrial communities are listed

  16. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Power Consumption in Machining FCD 450 Cast Iron using Coated and Uncoated Irregular Milling Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Ahmad Razlan; Arsyad, Fitriyanti

    2016-01-01

    In this project, the effects of different cutting parameters on surface roughness and power consumption when machining FCD450 cast iron were studied using coated and uncoated irregular milling tool geometry of variable helix and pitch. Their responses on roughness and power consumption were evaluated based on the spindle speed, feed rate, and depth of cut, machining length and machining time. Results showed that except spindle speed and machining length, other parameters such as feed rate, axial and radial depth of cut and also machining time proportionate with surface roughness. The power consumption proportionately increase for all cutting parameters except feedrate. It is showed that the average decrement 27.92 percent for surface roughness and average decrement 9.32 percent for power consumption by using coated compared to uncoated tool. Optimum cutting parameters for both minimum surface roughness and power consumption can be determined. The coated tools performed better than uncoated milling tools for responses of surface roughness and power consumption to increase machining productivity and profit. (paper)

  17. Surface electric fields and geomagnetically induced currents in the Scottish Power grid during the 30 October 2003 geomagnetic storm

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Alan W.P.; McKay, Allan J.; Clarke, Ellen; Reay, Sarah J.

    2005-01-01

    A surface electric field model is used to estimate the UK surface E field during the 30 October 2003 severe geomagnetic storm. This model is coupled with a power grid model to determine the flow of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) through the Scottish part of the UK grid. Model data are compared with GIC measurements at four sites in the power network. During this storm, measured and modeled GIC levels exceeded 40 A, and the surface electric field reached 5 V/km at sites in ...

  18. Mechanistic prediction of fission product release under normal and accident conditions: key uncertainties that need better resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1983-09-01

    A theoretical model has been used for predicting the behavior of fission gas and volatile fission products (VFPs) in UO 2 -base fuels during steady-state and transient conditions. This model represents an attempt to develop an efficient predictive capability for the full range of possible reactor operating conditions. Fission products released from the fuel are assumed to reach the fuel surface by successively diffusing (via atomic and gas-bubble mobility) from the grains to grain faces and then to the grain edges, where the fission products are released through a network of interconnected tunnels of fission-gas induced and fabricated porosity. The model provides for a multi-region calculation and uses only one size class to characterize a distribution of fission gas bubbles

  19. R and D in Ciemat Nuclear Fission Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, J. L.; Diaz Arocas, P.; Gomez Briceno, D.; Gonzalez de la Huebra Gordo, A.; Gonzalez Romero, E.; Herranz Puebla, L. E.; Sola Farre, R.

    2000-01-01

    The technologically developed countries count on nuclear fission as a durable energy resource to produce electricity, facing the future by establishing research programmes to enhance the safety and extend the lifetime of the current power plants and to achieve the adequate management of radioactive waste. At the same time, the progress in the development of a new generation of reactors based in innovative safety concepts. The Nuclear fission Department has the ultimate objective of providing technical support to the Spanish nuclear reactors through applied research and development focused on improving the safety and performance of the operating power plants, and cooperating in the activities related to radioactive waste. In this context, the Departament has been organised in four R and D project covering the areas of Safety, Materials, Radioactive. (Author)

  20. Advanced fission and fossil plant economics-implications for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    In order for fusion energy to be a viable option for electric power generation, it must either directly compete with future alternatives or serve as a reasonable backup if the alternatives become unacceptable. This paper discusses projected costs for the most likely competitors with fusion power for baseload electric capacity and what these costs imply for fusion economics. The competitors examined include advanced nuclear fission and advanced fossil-fired plants. The projected costs and their basis are discussed. The estimates for these technologies are compared with cost estimates for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion plants. The conclusion of the analysis is that fusion faces formidable economic competition. Although the cost level for fusion appears greater than that for fission or fossil, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion's potential competitiveness

  1. Fission product transport at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; Cox, T.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three Mile Island Unit 2 radionuclide analyses are reviewed and summarized in order to determine how fission products moved to various parts of the reactor system at the time of the accident. Despite high fuel temperatures and major core damage, the core retained a very large fraction of most radionuclides. Reactor coolant, either remaining in the primary system or released to various sumps and tanks, retained significant quantities of cesium and iodine. Noble gases were effectively retained within the containment building with the exception of small releases to the environment. Long-term deposition and retention on vessel, piping, and bulding surfaces were insignificant for all isotopes examined. The measured partitioning of radionuclides within these systems is tabulated and recommendations for additional analyses are presented

  2. Substantial difference in target surface chemistry between reactive dc and high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M.; Hultman, L.

    2018-02-01

    The nitride layer formed in the target race track during the deposition of stoichiometric TiN thin films is a factor 2.5 thicker for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), compared to conventional dc processing (DCMS). The phenomenon is explained using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the as-operated Ti target surface chemistry supported by sputter depth profiles, dynamic Monte Carlo simulations employing the TRIDYN code, and plasma chemical investigations by ion mass spectrometry. The target chemistry and the thickness of the nitride layer are found to be determined by the implantation of nitrogen ions, predominantly N+ and N2+ for HIPIMS and DCMS, respectively. Knowledge of this method-inherent difference enables robust processing of high quality functional coatings.

  3. Fission fragment spins and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durell, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Prompt γ-ray coincidence experiments have been carried out on γ-rays emitted from post-neutron emission fission fragments produced by the aup 19F + 197 Au and 18 O + 232 Th reactions. Decay schemes have been established for even-even nuclei ranging from 78 Se to 148 Nd. Many new states with spin up to ∼ 12h have been observed. Apart from providing a wealth of new information on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, the data have been analyzed to determine the average spin of primary fission fragments as a function of fragment mass. The results suggest that the fragment spins are determined by the temperature and shape of the primary fragments at or near to scission

  4. Radiation shielding for fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation shielding aspects relating fission reactors have been reviewed. Domestic activities in the past five years have been mainly described concerning nuclear data, calculation methods, shielding and skyshine experiments, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR), Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR), High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), Experimental and Prototype Fast Reactors (JOYO, MONJU), Demonstration FBR, core shroud replacement of BWR, and spent fuel transportation cask and vessel. These studies have valuable information in safety and cost reduction issues of fission reactor design for not only existing reactors but also new reactor concepts in the next century. It has been concluded that we should maintain existing shielding technologies and improve these data and methods for coming generations in the next millennium. (author)

  5. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission γ-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T ∼ 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k red ∼ 0.45 ± 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  6. The fusion-fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    As the history of the development of fusion energy shows, a sustained controlled fusion reaction is much more difficult to produce than rapid uncontrolled release of fusion energy. Currently, the ''magnetic bottle'' technique shows sufficient progress that it might applied for the commercial fuel production of /sup 233/U, suitable for use in fission reactors, by developing a fusion-fission hybrid. Such a device would consist of a fusion chamber core surrounded by a region containing cladded uranium pellets cooled by helium, with lithium salts also present to produce tritium to refuel the fusion process. Successful development of this hybrid might be possible within 10 y, and would provide both experience and funds for further development of controlled fusion energy

  7. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  8. Reactivity effects of fission product decay in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones, J.M.; Ahnert, C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the work reported in this paper is to analyze the effects of fission product chains with radioactive decay on the reactivity in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, calculating their accumulation and absorption rates along fuel burnup at continuous operation and after shutdown periods extending from 1 day to a few months. The authors PWR version of the WIMS-D4 code is first used to obtain the individual number densities, absorption rates, and averaged cross sections for every nuclide of the fission product chains with significant decay rates, as a function of fuel burnup at continuous irradiation. Next, by an auxiliary ad hoc code, these data, have been processed together with the required one for fissile nuclides and boron, also taken from WIMS at each burnup step, to calculate the average or effective values relevant for the analysis and the decay and change in overall absorption after several shutdown times. (1) The reactivity effect of fission product decay changes significantly with the shutdown time. The maximum absorption increase by decay is reached in ∼ 10 days' shutdown. (2) The dependence with fuel type, enrichment, and burnup is slight, but the change with previous power density is nearly linear, which might be significant after coast-down in previous cycles. (3) For long shutdown periods, the overall reactivity effect of decay in the three fission product chains considered is much less than if only the samarium peak due to 149 Nd is considered

  9. JEFF-3T. Decay data and fission yield libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersillon, O.; Blachot, J.; Dean, C.J.; Mills, R.W.; Nichols, A.L.; Nouri, A.

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive decay-data and fission-yield libraries provide important input to a wide range of nuclear physics codes for nuclear applications. A new initiative has begun under the auspices of the NEA/OECD to generate improved data sets that will constitute the JEFF-3 libraries in ENDF-6 format, primarily for nuclear power, fuel reprocessing and waste management needs. Various sources of decay data have been accessed in order to assemble these files: NUBASE, ENSDF, UKPADD-6 and UKHEDD-2. Efforts have also focused on the evaluation of decay data for a number of important short-lived fission products, so that artificial adjustments to some of the relevant decay data and fission yields are not required to accommodate a previous lack of such data. Fission yields were adopted from UK evaluations recently undertaken to create the UKFY3 library. Decay-data files for 3 755 nuclides have been prepared, including sets of data for the stable nuclides (i.e. mass, natural abundance, spin and parity). Problems in the assignment of ENDF material numbers were addressed, while format and consistency tests were made using CHECKR and FIZCON, respectively. The assembly processes are discussed and reviewed, and the contents of the JEFF-3T starter libraries are described. (author)

  10. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  11. Theories of fission gas behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J W.C. [Companhia Brasileira de Tecnologia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Diretoria de Tecnologia e Desenvolvimento; Merckx, K R

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of the theoretical developments and experimental evidence that have helped to evolve current models used to describe the behavior of inert fission gases created during the irradiation of reactor fuel materials. The phenomena which are stressed relate primarily to steady state behavior of fuel elements but are also relevant to an understanding of transient behavior. The processes considered include gas atom solubility; gas atom diffusivity; bubble nucleation; and bubble growth by bubble coalescence.

  12. Fission tracks dating for obsidian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picon, C.

    1991-01-01

    Obsidian from South America are dated by fission tracks methods. Samples are irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a flux of 10 15 n/cm 2 . Results, corrected by 'Plateau' methods, are the following: obsidian from Bolivia: 4.14 x 10 6 yr., Ecuador: 8.79 x 10 5 yr., Colombia: 3.52 x 10 6 yr., Peru: 6.55 x 10 6 yr., Chile: 1.13 x 10 6 yr. (MMZ). 5 refs., 3 tabs

  13. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  14. High temperature fission chambers. Fast breeder reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, C.; Perrigueur, J.C.

    1984-04-01

    Development of a high temperature fission chamber and experimentations of measuring channels (detectors and electronic devices) in similar conditions as those of power plants: development of measuring channels (impulses and current) of the Super Phenix neutronic measures auxiliary system, development of a measuring channel with impulses for the surveillance system of the clad failures, based on integrated detectors, and development of a fission chamber for experimentations in similar conditions as in Superphenix [fr

  15. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of 233 U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490 0 C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year)

  16. Safe affordable fission engine (SAFE 30) module conductivity test thermal model correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Jose

    2001-01-01

    The SAFE 30 is a simple, robust space fission power system that is comprised of several independent modules. Each module contains 4 fuel tubes bonded to a central heatpipe. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel tubes to the heatpipe, which in turn transfers the energy to a power conversion system. This paper benchmarks a thermal model of the SAFE 30 with actual test data from simulated SAFE 30 module tests. Two 'dummy' SAFE 30 modules were fabricated - each consisted of 4 1-inch dia. tubes (simulating the fuel tubes) bonded to a central '1' dia. tube (simulating the heatpipe). In the first module the fuel tubes were simply brazed to the heatpipe along the line of contact (leaving void space in the interstices), and in the second module the tubes and heatpipe were brazed via tri-cusps that completely fill the interstices between the tubes. In these tests, fission energy is simulated by placing resistance heaters within each of the 4 fuel tubes. The tests were conducted in a vacuum chamber in 4 configurations: tri-cusps filled with and without an outer insulation wrap, and no tri-cusps with and without an outer insulation wrap. The baseline SAFE 30 configuration uses the brazed tri-cusps. During the tests, the power applied to the heaters was varied in a stepwise fashion, until a steady-state temperature profile was reached. These temperature levels varied between 773 K and 1073 K. To benchmark the thermal model, the input energy and chamber surface temperature were used as boundary conditions for the model. The analytical results from the nodes at the same location as the test thermocouples were plotted again test data to determinate the accuracy of the analysis. The unknown variables on the analysis are the radiation emissivity of the pipe and chamber and the radiation view factor between the module and the chamber. A correlation was determined using a parametric analysis by varying the surface emissivity and view factor until a good match was reached. This

  17. Fission chamber simulator for data acquisition performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyunin, A.V.; Vorobev, V.A.; Obudovsky, S.Yu.; Kaschuck, Yu.A.; Shvikin, S.A.

    2013-06-01

    Divertor neutron flux monitor (DNFM) is a diagnostic system to be used for measurement of the total neutron yield and fusion power in the experimental fusion tokamak-reactor ITER. The diagnostic consists of the 18 fission chambers (FC), front-end electronics and data acquisition system to process, collect and archive data. The system should provide neutron flux measurements in dynamic range 7 orders of magnitude with a time resolution 1 ms and an error less 10%. (authors)

  18. US industry optimistic on fission's 50th anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The United States (US) nuclear industry is looking to the future even as it prepares to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first fission chain reaction - that momentous event which took place on a cold 2 December 1942 morning below the stands of a football field at the University of Chicago. Plans to incorporate nuclear power into US energy policy are well advanced. (Author)

  19. The discovery of uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, P.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  20. Dual-purpose self-deliverable lunar surface PV electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jack H.; Harris, David W.; Cross, Eldon R.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1991-01-01

    A safe haven and work supported PV power systems on the lunar surface will likely be required by NASA in support of the manned outpost scheduled for the post-2000 lunar/Mars exploration and colonization initiative. Initial system modeling and computer analysis shows that the concept is workable and contains no major high risk technology issues which cannot be resolved in the circa 2000 to 2025 timeframe. A specific selection of the best suited type of electric thruster has not been done; the initial modeling was done using an ion thruster, but Rocketdyne must also evaluate arc and resisto-jets before a final design can be formulated. As a general observation, it appears that such a system can deliver itself to the Moon using many system elements that must be transported as dead payload mass in more conventional delivery modes. It further appears that a larger power system providing a much higher safe haven power level is feasible if this delivery system is implemented, perhaps even sufficient to permit resource prospecting and/or lab experimentation. The concept permits growth and can be expanded to include cargo transport such as habitat and working modules. In short, the combined payload could be manned soon after landing and checkout. NASA has expended substantial resources in the development of electric propulsion concepts and hardware that can be applied to a lunar transport system such as described herein. In short, the paper may represent a viable mission on which previous investments play an invaluable role. A more comprehensive technical paper which embodies second generation analysis and system size will be prepared for near-term presentation.