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Sample records for fissile isotopes partial

  1. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Sinev, V V

    2009-01-01

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  2. DESIGN OF LSDS FOR ISOTOPIC FISSILE ASSAY IN SPENT FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGDEOK LEE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A future nuclear energy system is being developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, the system involves a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR linked with the pyro-process. The pyro-process produces a source material to fabricate a SFR fuel rod. Therefore, an isotopic fissile content assay is very important for fuel rod safety and SFR economics. A new technology for an analysis of isotopic fissile content has been proposed using a lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS. The new technology has several features for a fissile analysis from spent fuel: direct isotopic fissile assay, no background interference, and no requirement from burnup history information. Several calculations were done on the designed spectrometer geometry: detection sensitivity, neutron energy spectrum analysis, neutron fission characteristics, self shielding analysis, and neutron production mechanism. The spectrum was well organized even at low neutron energy and the threshold fission chamber was a proper choice to get prompt fast fission neutrons. The characteristic fission signature was obtained in slowing down neutron energy from each fissile isotope. Another application of LSDS is for an optimum design of the spent fuel storage, maximization of the burnup credit and provision of the burnup code correction factor. Additionally, an isotopic fissile content assay will contribute to an increase in transparency and credibility for the utilization of spent fuel nuclear material, as internationally demanded.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF LEAD SLOWING DOWN SPECTROMETER FOR ISOTOPIC FISSILE ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANG JOON AHN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS is under development for analysis of isotopic fissile material contents in pyro-processed material, or spent fuel. Many current commercial fissile assay technologies have a limitation in accurate and direct assay of fissile content. However, LSDS is very sensitive in distinguishing fissile fission signals from each isotope. A neutron spectrum analysis was conducted in the spectrometer and the energy resolution was investigated from 0.1eV to 100keV. The spectrum was well shaped in the slowing down energy. The resolution was enough to obtain each fissile from 0.2eV to 1keV. The detector existence in the lead will disturb the source neutron spectrum. It causes a change in resolution and peak amplitude. The intense source neutron production was designed for ∼E12 n's/sec to overcome spent fuel background. The detection sensitivity of U238 and Th232 fission chamber was investigated. The first and second layer detectors increase detection efficiency. Thorium also has a threshold property to detect the fast fission neutrons from fissile fission. However, the detection of Th232 is about 76% of that of U238. A linear detection model was set up over the slowing down neutron energy to obtain each fissile material content. The isotopic fissile assay using LSDS is applicable for the optimum design of spent fuel storage to maximize burnup credit and quality assurance of the recycled nuclear material for safety and economics. LSDS technology will contribute to the transparency and credibility of pyro-process using spent fuel, as internationally demanded.

  4. Examining the stability of thermally fissile Th and U isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bharat; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of recently predicted thermally fissile Th and U isotopes are studied within the framework of the relativistic mean-field approach using the axially deformed basis. We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited state for highly neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes. The possible modes of decay such as α decay and β decay are analyzed. We found that neutron-rich isotopes are stable against α decay, however, they are very unstable against β decay. The lifetime of these nuclei is predicted to be tens of seconds against β decay. If these nuclei are utilized before their decay time, a lot of energy can be produced with the help of multifragmentation fission. Also, these nuclei have great implications from the astrophysical point of view. In some cases, we found that the isomeric states with energy range from 2 to 3 MeV and three maxima in the potential energy surface of Th-230228 and U-234228 isotopes.

  5. Examining the stability of thermally fissile Th and U isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Bharat; Singh, S K; Patra, S K

    2015-01-01

    The properties of recently predicted thermally fissile Th and U isotopes are studied within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. We calculated the ground, first intrinsic excited state and matter density for highly neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes. The possible modes of decay like $\\alpha$-decay and $\\beta$-decay are analyzed. We found that the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against $\\alpha$-decay, however they are very much unstable against $\\beta$-decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against $\\beta$-decay. If these nuclei utilize before their decay time, a lots of energy can be produced within the help of multi-fragmentation fission. Also, these nuclei have a great implication in astrophysical point of view. The total nucleonic densities distribution are calculated, from which the clusters inside the parent nuclei are determined. %Most of the thorium isotopes are $\\alpha$ emitters, where as some %of them have short ha...

  6. Neutron multiplication method for measuring the amount of fissile isotopes in the spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Pytel, K. [Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Abou-Zaid, A.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-07-01

    A nondestructive assay method for determination the amount of fissile materials content along the vertical axis of irradiated fuel is presented. The method, called neutron multiplication method, can be realized as passive measurement technique and the active one. The Monte Carlo code has been used for the neutron transport simulation and optimization of the measuring equipment geometry. On the basis of these results, a preliminary experimental stand for MARIA reactor fuel investigation has been designed and the measurements have been performed for the fresh fuel and the fuel mock-up. Based upon both numerical and experimental simulations, an ultimate measuring stand has been designed and the measurements for MARIA spent fuel assemblies as well as for the fresh fuel and mock-up of the fuel have been carried out. The results showed that the active neutron technique does not provide sufficient resolution of the distribution of the amount of fissile materials. But rather can be applied for measurement of the absolute value. The passive one can be used to restore the distribution of the bum-up and the amount of fissile materials along the axial length of the spent fuel assembly. (author)

  7. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of the fissile isotope $^{235}$U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a fission tagging based on micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, E; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Becvár, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Actual and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on the (n, $\\gamma$) cross sections and $\\alpha$-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission $\\gamma$-ray background competing with the weaker $\\gamma$-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n, $\\gamma$) process. A specific setup has been used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,$\\gamma$ ) cross section and $\\alpha$- ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the $^{235}$U isotope. The setup consists in a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding $^{235}$U samples and placed inside the segmented BaF$_2$ Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  8. Measurement of the Neutron Capture Cross Section of the Fissile Isotope 235U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a Fission Tagging Based on Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balibrea, J; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    Current and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on (n,γ) cross sections and the α-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission γ-ray background competing with the weaker γ-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n,γ) process. A specific setup was used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,γ) cross section and α-ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the 235U isotope. The setup consists of a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding the 235U samples all placed inside a segmented BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  9. 49 CFR 173.420 - Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted and non-fissile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted....420 Uranium hexafluoride (fissile, fissile excepted and non-fissile). (a) In addition to any other... non-fissile uranium hexafluoride must be offered for transportation as follows: (1) Before...

  10. Quantitative Fissile Assay In Used Fuel Using LSDS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YongDeok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative assay of isotopic fissile materials (U235, Pu239, Pu241 was done at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, using lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS. The optimum design of LSDS was performed based on economics, easy maintenance and assay effectiveness. LSDS system consists of spectrometer, neutron source, detection and control. LSDS system induces fissile fission and fast neutrons are collected at fission chamber. The detected signal has a direct relation to the mass of existing fissile isotopes. Many current commercial assay technologies have a limitation in direct application on isotopic fissile assay of spent fuel, except chemical analysis. In the designed system, the fissile assay model was setup and the correction factor for self-shield was obtained. The isotopic fissile content assay was performed by changing the content of Pu239. Based on the fuel rod, the isotopic content was consistent with ~2% uncertainty for Pu239. By applying the covering (neutron absorber, the effective shielding was obtained and the activation was calculated on the target. From the assay evaluation, LSDS technique is very powerful and direct to analyze the isotopic fissile content. LSDS is applicable for nuclear fuel cycle and spent fuel management for safety and economics. Additionally, an accurate fissile content will contribute to the international transparency and credibility on spent fuel.

  11. Quantitative Fissile Assay In Used Fuel Using LSDS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, YongDeok; Jeon, Ju Young; Park, Chang-Je

    2017-09-01

    A quantitative assay of isotopic fissile materials (U235, Pu239, Pu241) was done at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), using lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS). The optimum design of LSDS was performed based on economics, easy maintenance and assay effectiveness. LSDS system consists of spectrometer, neutron source, detection and control. LSDS system induces fissile fission and fast neutrons are collected at fission chamber. The detected signal has a direct relation to the mass of existing fissile isotopes. Many current commercial assay technologies have a limitation in direct application on isotopic fissile assay of spent fuel, except chemical analysis. In the designed system, the fissile assay model was setup and the correction factor for self-shield was obtained. The isotopic fissile content assay was performed by changing the content of Pu239. Based on the fuel rod, the isotopic content was consistent with 2% uncertainty for Pu239. By applying the covering (neutron absorber), the effective shielding was obtained and the activation was calculated on the target. From the assay evaluation, LSDS technique is very powerful and direct to analyze the isotopic fissile content. LSDS is applicable for nuclear fuel cycle and spent fuel management for safety and economics. Additionally, an accurate fissile content will contribute to the international transparency and credibility on spent fuel.

  12. Unbiased isotope equilibrium factors from partial isotope exchange experiments in 3-exchange site systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Two methods are available in order to evaluate the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between exchange sites or phases from partial isotope exchange experiments. The first one developed by Northrop and Clayton (1966) is designed for isotope exchanges between two exchange sites (hereafter, the N&C method), the second one from Zheng et al. (1994) is a refinement of the first one to account for a third isotope exchanging site (hereafter, the Z method). In this paper, we use a simple model of isotope kinetic exchange for a 3-exchange site system (such as hydroxysilicates where oxygen occurs as OH and non-OH groups like in muscovite, chlorite, serpentine, or water or calcite) to explore the behavior of the N&C and Z methods. We show that these two methods lead to significant biases that cannot be detected with the usual graphical tests proposed by the authors. Our model shows that biases originate because isotopes are fractionated between all these exchanging sites. Actually, we point out that the variable mobility (or exchangeability) of isotopes in and between the exchange sites only controls the amplitude of the bias, but is not essential to the production of this bias as previously suggested. Setting a priori two of the three exchange sites at isotopic equilibrium remove the bias and thus is required for future partial exchange experiments to produce accurate and unbiased extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors. Our modeling applied to published partial oxygen isotope exchange experiments for 3-exchange site systems (the muscovite-calcite (Chacko et al., 1996), the chlorite-water (Cole and Ripley, 1998) and the serpentine-water (Saccocia et al., 2009)) shows that the extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors (reported as 1000 ln(α)) using either the N&C or the Z methods lead to bias that may reach several δ per mil in a few cases. These problematic cases, may be because experiments were conducted at low temperature and did not reach high

  13. Total and partial photoneutron cross sections for Pb isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Iwamoto, C.; Akimune, H.; Okamoto, A.; Yamagata, T.; Kamata, M.; Itoh, O.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    Using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ rays, total photoneutron cross sections were measured for 206,207,208Pb near neutron threshold with a high-efficiency 4π neutron detector. Partial E1 and M1 photoneutron cross sections along with total cross sections were determined for 207,208Pb at four energies near threshold by measuring anisotropies in photoneutron emission with linearly polarized γ rays. The E1 strength dominates over the M1 strength in the neutron channel where E1 photoneutron cross sections show extra strength of the pygmy dipole resonance in 207,208Pb near the neutron threshold corresponding to 0.32%-0.42% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Several μN2 units of B(M1)↑ strength were observed in 207,208Pb just above neutron threshold, which correspond to an M1 cross section less than 10% of the total photoneutron cross section.

  14. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  15. Feasibility study of fissile mass quantification by photofission delayed gamma rays in radioactive waste packages using MCNPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric; Jallu, Fanny; Pérot, Bertrand; Plumeri, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The feasibility of fissile mass quantification in large, long-lived medium activity radioactive waste packages using photofission delayed gamma rays has been assessed with MCNPX. The detection limit achievable is lower than the expected uranium mass in these waste packages, but the important sensibility to the waste matrix density and sample localization imposes to get an accurate measurement of these parameters. An isotope discrimination method based on gamma-ray ratios has been evaluated showing that photofission delayed gamma rays can be used to measure the fissile mass as well as the total uranium mass.

  16. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    the critical reactors. This combination consumes about 20% of the thorium initially loaded in the hybrid reactor ({approx}200 GWd/tHM), partially during hybrid operation, but mostly during operation in the critical reactor. The plant support ratio is low compared to the one attainable using continuous fuel chemical reprocessing, which can yield a plant support ratio of about 20, but the resulting fuel cycle offers better proliferation resistance as fissile material is never separated from the other fuel components.

  17. Technologies for Fissile Material Detection and Prevention of Fissile Material Introduction into International Shipping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J

    2003-07-01

    Prevention of the introduction of fissile materials into international shipping, and hence into a given country, is a complex problem. Some pieces of the solution to the puzzle are conceptually well defined, but lack definition of a technical pathway and/or operational implementation. Other elements are a little more fuzzy, and some elements are probably undefined at this point in time. This paper reviews the status of the more well-defined elements, and suggests needed additional measures to enhance the probability that fissile materials are not illicitly introduced into distant countries. International commerce proceeds through a number of steps from point of origin to final destination. Each step offers the possibility of a well-defined choke point to monitor and interdict the illicit shipment of fissile materials. However, because there are so many potential points and venues of entry into a large country such as the United States (e.g., air cargo, shipping containers, truck and rail transport, private vehicles, boats and planes, commercial passenger travel), it behooves the world to ensure that fissile material does not illicitly leave its point of origin.

  18. Extreme heterogeneity in Sr isotope systematic in the Himalayan leucogranites: A possible mechanism of partial melting based on thermal modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dilip K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-06-01

    The small leucogranite plutons occurring in linear belts in the Higher Himalayas have formed due to post-collision partial melting within the Himalayan crust. Several studies have documented that the Sr isotopic ratios in the granite bodies show chaotic variation and meaningful Rb-Sr isochron ages are difficult, if not impossible, to obtain. In tectonically overthickened crust, the depth-temperature profile (geotherm) remains strongly transient for the first tens of millions of years. It is proposed here that the intersecting relations between the transient geotherms and activity-dependent solidus/melting curves may generate small pods of magma at di erent depths and at di erent times. Each of these pods will have its unique Sr isotopic ratios. Coalescence of these small pods of magma without any e ective homogenization due to deformation-induced fast segregation, ascent and emplacement may lead to pluton-wide extreme heterogeneity in Sr isotopic ratios.

  19. New data on cross sections for partial and total photoneutron reactions on the isotopes {sup 91,94}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamov, V. V., E-mail: Varlamov@depni.sinp.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Makarov, M. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Peskov, N. N.; Stepanov, M. E. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Experimental data on {sup 91,94}Zr photodisintegration that were obtained in a beam of quasimonoenergetic annihilation photons by the method of neutron multiplicity sorting are analyzed. It is found that the cross sections for the (γ, 1n), (γ, 2n), and (γ, 3n) reactions on both isotopes do not meet the objective data-reliability criteria formulated earlier. Within the experimental–theoretical method for evaluating partial-reaction cross sections that satisfy these criteria, new data on the cross sections for the aforementioned partial reactions, as well as for the (γ, sn) = (γ, 1n) + (γ, 2n) + (γ, 3n) +... total photoneutron reaction, are obtained for the isotopes {sup 91,94}Zr.

  20. 49 CFR 173.477 - Approval of packagings containing greater than 0.1 kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... kg of non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. 173.477 Section 173.477 Transportation... non-fissile or fissile-excepted uranium hexafluoride. (a) Each offeror of a package containing more than 0.1 kg of uranium hexafluoride must maintain on file for at least one year after the...

  1. Fissile and non-fissile element separation in concrete radioactive waste drums using the SIMPHONIE method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jallu, F. E-mail: fanny.jallu@cea.fr; Lyoussi, A.; Passard, C.; Payan, E.; Recroix, H.; Nurdin, G.; Buisson, A.; Allano, J

    2001-07-01

    The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method, applied to radioactive waste drum characterization, has already been treated in [F. Jallu, A. Lyoussi, C. Passard, E. Payan, H. Recroix, G. Nurdin, A. Buisson, J. Allano, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 170 (2000) 489]. First experimental results carried out with U and Pu bare samples were presented, that showed the feasibility of quantifying fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239,241}Pu, ...) and non-fissile ({sup 234,236,238}U, {sup 238,240}Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement, using both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. This paper presents new experimental results carried out with U samples embedded in a concrete matrix. These results have been obtained using the DGA/ETCA MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerator located at Arcueil, France. Mass detection limits of less than 2 g of matter have been obtained with the preliminary setup used in these experiments.

  2. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-08

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

  3. The neutron emission method for determination of fissile materials within the spent fuel equipment optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Zaid, A. [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759- Cairo (Ethiopia); Pytel, K. [Atomic Energy Institute, Research Reactor Center, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1998-07-01

    A nondestructive assay method using neutron technique for determination of the fissile isotopes content along the irradiated fuel rods of MARIA reactor is presented. This method is based on detection of the fission neutrons emitted from external neutron source and multiplied by the fissile isotopes U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 within the fuel rod. Neutrons emitted from the spent fuel originate mainly from induced fission in the fissile material and source neutrons penetrating the fuel rod without interaction. Additionally, the neutrons from ({alpha}, n) reaction and spontaneous fission of actinide isotopes contribute in the total population of emitted ones. The method gives a chance to perform an experimental calibration of the equipment using two points: fresh fuel rod (maximum signal plus background) and its mock-up (background). The Monte Carlo code has been used for the geometrical simulation and optimization of the measuring equipment: neutron source, moderating container, collimator, and the neutron detector. The results of the calculation show that the moderating container of 30 cm length and 32 cm diameter and a collimator of 26 cm length, 6.8 cm width, and 2 cm height are the optimal configuration. With respect to the fission chamber position, the number of neutrons has been calculated as a function of distance from the fuel rod surface in the case of fresh fuel and its mock-up. The distance, at which the ratio of the signal to background has its maximum, has been found at 4.5 cm far from the outer surface of the fuel. (author)

  4. Fission dynamics with systems of intermediate fissility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Vardaci; A Di Nitto; P N Nadtochy; A Brondi; G La Rana; R Moro; M Cinausero; G Prete; N Gelli; E M Kozulin; G N Knyazheva; I M Itkis

    2015-08-01

    A 4 light charged particle spectrometer, called 8 LP, is in operation at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, for studying reaction mechanisms in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Besides about 300 telescopes to detect light charged particles, the spectrometer is also equipped with an anular PPAC system to detect evaporation residues and a two-arm time-of-flight spectrometer to detect fission fragments. The spectrometer has been used in several fission dynamics studies using as a probe light charged particles in the fission and evaporation residues (ER) channels. This paper proposes a journey within some open questions about the fission dynamics and a review of the main results concerning nuclear dissipation and fission time-scale obtained from several of these studies. In particular, the advantages of using systems of intermediate fissility will be discussed.

  5. Constraining dolomitization by Mg isotopes: A case study from partially dolomitized limestones of the middle Cambrian Xuzhuang Formation, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yang; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Huang, Kang-Jun; Chen, Ji-Tao; Yan, Zhen; Tang, Wen-bo; Ke, Shan; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2016-03-01

    The "dolomite problem" refers to the rare dolomite formation in modern oceans that is in sharp contrast to the widespread ancient dolostone in rock record, as well as failure of laboratory inorganic dolomite precipitation at near Earth-surface temperature. Novel Mg isotope systematics provides a promising tool in resolving the "dolomite problem". Here, we develop a protocol to place constraints on the dolomitization process by using Mg isotopes. In this study, we measured Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg) of two batches of partially dolomitized limestone samples from the middle Cambrian Xuzhuang Formation in North China. δ26Mg varies between -0.55‰ and -3.18‰, and shows a negative linear correlation with 1>/[Mg>], suggesting that δ26Mg can be described by a binary mixing between the calcite and dolomite components. Mg isotopic composition of the dolomite component (δ26Mgdol) for the lower sample set that is collected from a 4 m stratigraphic interval containing three high-frequency ribbon rock-packstone cycles is -1.6‰, while δ26Mgdol for the upper sample set (from a thick sequence of ribbon rock) is significantly higher (-0.3‰). However, neither mineralogical and elemental compositions, carbon and oxygen isotopes, nor crystal morphologies of dolomite provides diagnostic criteria to differentiate these two batches of samples. δ26Mgdol of the Xuzhuang limestone is simulated by the Advective Flow (AF) and the Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (DAR) models. The AF model assumes that Mg is transported by advective fluid flows, while the DAR model simulates a contemporaneous seawater dolomitization process, in which Mg is delivered by diffusion. The AF modeling result indicates that δ26Mg of the dolomitization fluid is +0.4‰ and +1.7‰ for the lower and upper sample sets, respectively. These values are significantly higher than modern and Cenozoic seawater Mg isotopic composition, suggesting that the dolomitization fluid is not contemporaneous seawater. The

  6. γ-ray self-absorption of cylindrical fissile material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Yi; CHENG Yi-Ying; TIAN Dong-Feng; LU Fu-Quan; YANG Fu-Jia

    2005-01-01

    The self-absorption of γ-ray emitted from cylindrical fissile materials, such as 235U and 239Pu, does not possess spherical symmetry. The analytical formulae of self-absorption for γ-ray throughout the cylinder have been obtained. The intensity of γ-ray is a function of γ-ray outgoing directions and cylindrical configurations, accordingly one can acquire the information about geometrical configuration of cylindrical fissile materials through multi-location measurements. Further more, the method is given in this article. The result can be applied to the fissile material safeguard, such as nuclear monitoring and verifying.

  7. Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

  8. Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

  9. Leo Szilard Lectureship Award: Fissile Materials: A Global Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Ramamurti

    2014-03-01

    The world has built up a huge glut of Fissile Materials, posing a potentially devastating threat. While specialists in the field have been aware of this danger for a long time, it was only after President Obama organized the Nuclear Security Summit in 2010 that the attention of the world's political leadership was drawn to it. We will present here an introductory overview of Fissile materials - their definition, significance and their production facilities and stocks in different parts of the world. We will also mention some of the efforts being made to verifiably cap and reduce their stocks as well as the technical and political complications involved in the process.

  10. Lead isotopic signatures in Antarctic marine sediment cores: a comparison between 1M HCl partial extraction and HF total digestion pre-treatments for discerning anthropogenic inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, A T; Snape, I; Palmer, A S; Seen, A J

    2009-12-20

    Sensitive analytical techniques are typically required when dealing with samples from Antarctica as even low concentrations of contaminants can have detrimental environmental effects. Magnetic Sector ICP-MS is an ideal technique for environmental assessment as it offers high sensitivity, multi-element capability and the opportunity to determine isotope ratios. Here we consider the Pb isotope record of five marine sediment cores collected from three sites in the Windmill Islands area of East Antarctica: Brown Bay adjacent to the current Australian station Casey, Wilkes near the abandoned US/Australian Station and McGrady Cove lying midway between the two. Two sediment pre-treatment approaches were considered, namely partial extraction with 1M HCl and total dissolution involving HF. Lead isotope ratio measurements made following sediment partial extraction provided a more sensitive indication of Pb contamination than either Pb concentrations alone (irrespective of sample pre-treatment method) or isotope ratios made after HF digestion, offering greater opportunity for discrimination between impacted and natural/geogenic samples and sites. Over 90% of the easily extractable Pb from sediments near Casey was anthropogenic in origin, consisting of Pb from major Australian deposits. At Wilkes impact from discarded batteries with a unique isotopic signature was found to be a key source of Pb contamination to the marine environment with ~70-80% of Pb being anthropogenic in origin. The country and source of origin of these batteries remain unknown. Little evidence was found suggesting contamination at Wilkes by Pb originating from the major US source, Missouri. No definitive assessment could be made regarding Pb impact at McGrady Cove as the collected sediment core was of insufficient depth. Although Pb isotope ratio signatures may indicate anthropogenic input, spatial concentration gradients at nearby Brown Bay suggest contamination at McGrady Cove is unlikely. We recommend

  11. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israelashvili, I., E-mail: israelashvili@gmail.com [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Pedersen, B. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Beck, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J.M. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel)

    2015-06-11

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  12. 49 CFR 173.453 - Fissile materials-exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exceeding 0.002 percent of the mass of uranium, and with a minimum nitrogen to uranium atomic ratio (N/U) of... determining the required mass for solid nonfissile material. (c) Low concentrations of solid fissile material... required mass of solid nonfissile material. (d) Uranium enriched in uranium-235 to a maximum of 1...

  13. Gamma ray absorption of cylindrical fissile material with dual shields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chen-Yan; TIAN Dong-Feng; CHENG Yi-Ying; HUANG Yong-Yi; LU Fu-Quan; YANG Fu-Jia

    2005-01-01

    This work analyzed the gamma ray attenuation effect from the self-absorption and shield attenuation perspectively. An exact mathematical equation was given for the geometric factor of the cylindrical fissile material with dual shields. In addition, several approximation approaches suitable for real situation were discussed, especially in the radial and axial directions of the cylinders, since the G-factors have simple forms. Then the space distribution patterns of the G-factor were analyzed based on numerical result and effective ways to solve the geometric information of the cylindrical fissile material, the radii and the heights, were deduced. This method was checked and verified by numerical calculation. Because of the efficiency of the method, it is ideal for application in real situations, such as nuclear safeguards, which demands speed of detection and accuracy of geometric analysis.

  14. Fissile material storage in the Oak Ridge Radiochemical Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, R.T. III

    1993-08-01

    As a part of a Department of Energy review of Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities, nuclear safety documentation for the Radiochemical Development Facility (Building 3019) was found to be inadequate. While calculations existed which established safe limits for the storage of fissile material, these calculations were not performed with verified/validated software nor were the results reported in the manner prescribed by applicable DOE orders and ORNL procedures. To address this deficiency, the operations conducted in Building 3019 were reviewed and conditions were compared to available critical experiment data. Applicable critical experiments were selected and multiplication factors were calculated. Subcritical limits were derived for each of three fissile materials (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239). One application of these limits was to certify the safety of a storage array which could contain any or all of the above nuclides at varying degrees of moderation. The studies presented are believed to fulfill most of the applicable regulatory requirements.

  15. Minimizing the fissile inventory of the molten salt fast reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Doligez, X.; Ghetta, V.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Molten salt reactors in the configurations presented here, called Molten Salt Fast Reactors (MSFR), have been selected for further studies by the Generation IV International Forum. These reactors may be operated in simplified and safe conditions in the Th/233U fuel cycle with fluoride salts. We present here the concept, before focusing on a possible optimization in term of minimization of the initial fissile inventory. Our studies demonstrate that an inventory of 233U ...

  16. Development of an Air Transport Type A Fissile Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, P.; Ebert, K.

    2011-07-13

    This paper presents the summary of testing by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support development of a light weight (<140 lbs) air transport qualified Type A Fissile Packaging. The package design incorporates features and materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight. The light weight package is being designed to provide confinement to the contents when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of an air transportable Type A Fissile radioactive material shipping package. The objective of these tests was to provide design input to the final design for the LORX Type A Fissile Air Transport Packaging when subjected to the performance requirements of the drop, crush and puncture probe test of 10CFR71. The post test evaluation of the prototype packages indicates that all of the tested designs would satisfactorily confine the content within the packaging. The differences in the performance of the prototypes varied significantly depending on the core materials and their relative densities. Information gathered from these tests is being used to develop the final design for the Department of Homeland Security.

  17. The simultaneous neutron and photon interrogation method for fissile and non-fissile element separation in radioactive waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jallu, F. E-mail: fanny.jallu@cea.fr; Lyoussi, A.; Passard, C.; Payan, E.; Recroix, H.; Nurdin, G.; Buisson, A.; Allano, J

    2000-10-01

    Measuring {alpha}-emitters such as ({sup 234,235,236,238}U, {sup 238,239,240,242,244}Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241,243}Am, ...), in solid radioactive waste allows us to quantify the {alpha}-activity in a drum and then to classify it. The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method dealt with in this paper, combines both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239,241}Pu, ...) and non-fissile ({sup 236,238}U, {sup 238,240}Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement. This paper presents the principle of the method, the experimental setup, and the first experimental results obtained using the DGA/ETCA Linac and MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerators located at Arcueil, France. First studies were carried out with U and Pu bare samples.

  18. Canyon transfer neutron absorber to fissile material ratio analysis. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemmons, J.S.

    1994-03-04

    Waste tank fissile material and non-fissile material estimates are used to evaluate criticality safety for the existing sludge inventory and batches of sludge sent to Extended Sludge Processing (ESP). This report documents the weight ratios of several non-fissile waste constituents to fissile waste constituents from canyon reprocessing waste streams. Weight ratios of Fe, Mn, Al, Mi, and U-238 to fissile material are calculated from monthly loss estimates from the F and H Canyon Low Heat Waste (LHW) and High Heat Waste (HHW) streams. The monthly weight ratios for Fe, Mn and U-238 are then compared to calculated minimum safe weight ratios. Documented minimum safe weight ratios for Al and Ni to fissile material are currently not available. Total mass data for the subject sludge constituents is provided along with scatter plots of the monthly weight ratios for each waste stream.

  19. Determination of fission gas yields from isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a method of calculating the actual fission yield of Kr and Xe in nuclear fuel including the effect of neutron capture reactions and decay. The bases for this calculation are the cumulative yields (ref. 1) of Kr and Xe isotopes (or pairs of isotopes) which are unaffected...... by neutron capture reactions, and measured Kr and Xe isotope ratios. Also the burnup contribution from the different fissile heavy isotopes must be known in order to get accurate fission gas yields....

  20. Determination of fission gas yields from isotope ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a method of calculating the actual fission yield of Kr and Xe in nuclear fuel including the effect of neutron capture reactions and decay. The bases for this calculation are the cumulative yields (ref. 1) of Kr and Xe isotopes (or pairs of isotopes) which are unaffected...... by neutron capture reactions, and measured Kr and Xe isotope ratios. Also the burnup contribution from the different fissile heavy isotopes must be known in order to get accurate fission gas yields....

  1. Reduction of spectral interferences and noise effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry with partial least square regression - a computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianglei; Chan, George C.-Y.; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    The fundamental analytical accuracies and precisions attainable by laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS), with emphasis on the impacts from spectral interferences and measurement noise, were investigated by means of computer simulation. The study focused on the analysis of a minor isotope at sub- to single-percentage abundance level. With a natural abundance about 1.1% for 13C, the C2 Swan band (d3Πg-a3Πu) with Δν = + 1 was selected as a representative system. The characteristics (e.g., noise amplitude and distribution, signal strength, and signal-to-background ratio) of the simulated spectra were experimentally characterized. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used to extract isotopic information from the simulated molecular spectra. In the absence of any spectral interference and with the use of a calibration set consisting of eleven isotopic standards, the theoretical accuracies and precisions with signal accumulation from 100 laser shots are about 0.002% and 0.001%, respectively, in absolute percentage abundance of 13C. The theoretical analytical accuracies slightly degrade, but are adequate for many applications, to 0.004% and 0.008% respectively, for calibrations involving only three and two isotopic standards. It was found that PLS regression is not only immune to both source-flicker and photon-shot noise, but is also effective in differentiating the spectral patterns from the analyte against those from spectral interferences. The influences of spectral interference from single or multiple atomic emission lines were simulated, and new ways to minimize their impacts were formulated and demonstrated. It was found that the wavelength range selected for the computation of the normalization factor should not contain any spectral-interfering peak, and a properly chosen wavelength range increases the tolerance of spectral interference by at least one order of magnitude. With matrix-matched calibration standards, the precisions (expressed

  2. TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGING FOR AIR TRANSPORT PROJECT OVERVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, K.; Blanton, P.

    2013-10-11

    This paper presents the project status of the Model 9980, a new Type A fissile packaging for use in air transport. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed this new packaging to be a light weight (<150-lb), drum-style package and prepared a Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) for submission to the DOE/EM. The package design incorporates unique features and engineered materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight and to be in compliance with 10CFR71 requirements. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to evaluate the design when subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). An overview of the design details, results of the regulatory testing, and lessons learned from the prototype fabrication for the 9980 will be presented.

  3. R&D plan for immobilization technologies: fissile materials disposition program. Revision 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long- term fissile material management options, the Department of Energy`s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is conducting studies of options for the storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One set of alternatives for disposition involve immobilization. The immobilization alternatives provide for fixing surplus fissile materials in a host matrix in order to create a solid disposal form that is nuclear criticality-safe, proliferation-resistant and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal.

  4. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems require the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a “generic” Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be illustrated, and key system

  5. The Future of Nuclear Archaeology: Reducing Legacy Risks of Weapons Fissile Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Reid, Bruce D.; Toomey, Christopher M.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Burns, Kimberly A.; Casazza, Larry O.; S. Daly, Don; L. Duckworth, Leesa

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the value proposition for a "nuclear archeological" technical capability and applications program, targeted at resolving uncertainties regarding fissile materials production and use. At its heart, this proposition is that we can never be sure that all fissile material is adequately secure without a clear idea of what "all" means, and that uncertainty in this matter carries risk. We argue that this proposition is as valid today, under emerging state and possible non-state nuclear threats, as it was in an immediate post-Cold-War context, and describe how nuclear archeological methods can be used to verify fissile materials declarations, or estimate and characterize historical fissile materials production independently of declarations.

  6. Non-proliferation, safeguards, and security for the fissile materials disposition program immobilization alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Tolk, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is analyzing long-term storage and disposition alternatives for surplus weapons-usable fissile materials. A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered. These include facilities for storage, conversion and stabilization of fissile materials, immobilization in glass or ceramic material, fabrication of fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use of reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and disposal of fissile material using geologic alternatives. This paper will focus on how the objectives of reducing security and proliferation risks are being considered, and the possible facility impacts. Some of the areas discussed in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threats, and (4) potential proliferation, safeguards, and security issues and impacts on the facilities. Issues applicable to all of the possible disposition alternatives will be discussed in this paper. However, particular attention is given to the plutonium immobilization alternatives.

  7. Oxygen isotopes reveal crustal contamination and a large, still partially molten magma chamber in Chaîne des Puys (French Massif Central)

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Lydéric; Demacon, Mickael; Gurenko, Andrey A.; Briot, Danielle

    2016-09-01

    The two main magmatic properties associated with explosive eruptions are high viscosity of silica-rich magmas and/or high volatile contents. Magmatic processes responsible for the genesis of such magmas are differentiation through crystallization, and crustal contamination (or assimilation) as this process has the potential to enhance crystallization and add volatiles to the initial budget. In the Chaîne des Puy series (French Massif Central), silica- and H2O-rich magmas were only emitted during the most recent eruptions (ca. 6-15 ka). Here, we use in situ measurements of oxygen isotopes in zircons from two of the main trachytic eruptions from the Chaîne des Puys to track the crustal contamination component in a sequence that was previously presented as an archetypal fractional crystallization series. Zircons from Sarcoui volcano and Puy de Dôme display homogeneous oxygen isotope compositions with δ18O = 5.6 ± 0.25‰ and 5.6 ± 0.3‰, respectively, and have therefore crystallized from homogeneous melts with δ18Omelt = 7.1 ± 0.3‰. Compared to mantle derived melts resulting from pure fractional crystallization (δ18Odif.mant. = 6.4 ± 0.4‰), those δ18Omelt values are enriched in 18O and support a significant role of crustal contamination in the genesis of silica-rich melts in the Chaîne des Puys. Assimilation-fractional-crystallization models highlight that the degree of contamination was probably restricted to 5.5-9.5% with Rcrystallization/Rassimilation varying between 8 and 14. The very strong intra-site homogeneity of the isotopic data highlights that magmas were well homogenized before eruption, and consequently that crustal contamination was not the trigger of silica-rich eruptions in the Chaîne des Puys. The exceptionally strong inter-site homogeneity of the isotopic data brings to light that Sarcoui volcano and Puy de Dôme were fed by a single large magma chamber. Our results, together with recent thermo-kinetic models and an experimental

  8. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  9. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Day, Christy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  10. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Day, Christy M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  11. Statistics vs. dynamics: hints from systems of intermediate fissility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; Rana, G La; Moro, R [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , 80126 Napoli (Italy); Nadtochy, P; Ordine, A; Boiano, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Cinausero, M; Prete, G; Rizzi, V [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Gelli, N; Lucarelli, F [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Firenze (Italy); Knyazheva, G N; Kozulin, E M; Loktev, T A; Smirnov, S, E-mail: Emanuele.Vardaci@na.infn.it [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, 141980, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-01

    Systems of intermediate fissility are characterized by an evaporation residues cross section comparable or larger than the fission cross section, and by a relatively higher probability for charged particle emission in the pre-scission channel. In a theoretical framework in which time scale estimates of the fission process rely on statistical model calculations, the analysis of particle emission in the evaporation residues channel is the source of additional constraints on statistical and dynamical models. This contribution will focus on our statistical and dynamical analysis of a more complete set of data from the system {sup 32}S + {sup 100}Mo at E{sub Lab} = 200 MeV. Statistical model fails in reproducing the whole set of data and no convincing estimate is possible of the fission time scale. In particular, while pre-scission multiplicities can be reproduced without delay, the model strongly overestimates proton and alpha particle multiplicities in the evaporation residues channel irrespective of the statistical model input parameters and prescriptions used for the level density and the transmission coefficients. The analysis of the same set of data with a dynamical model produces a very good agreement with the full set of data and indicates that one-body dissipation plays a dominant role in the fission process, implying a fission delay of 23-25x10{sup -21}s.

  12. Negligible sulfur isotope fractionation during partial melting: Evidence from Garrett transform fault basalts, implications for the late-veneer and the hadean matte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the quadruple sulfur isotope compositions, sulfur contents and speciation major and trace elements (including copper and chlorine abundances) of eleven basalts collected in the Garrett transform fault. We combine these data to discuss the absence of S isotopic fractionation along both partial melting and low-pressure fractional crystallization. The variations of K2O/TiO2 and La/SmN-ratios (respectively between 0.017 and 0.067, and between 0.31 and 0.59) suggest a range of depletion in Garrett lavas that includes ultra depleted samples (K2O/TiO2 8%) are ∼80 ppm, indistinguishable from MORBs. This requires their mantle sources, variably depleted in incompatible element, to host residual sulfide buffering the Cu content of all erupted melts. We calculate a minimum S content for the source of ultra-depleted Garrett lavas of 100 ± 40ppmS, i.e. roughly a factor of 2 below the MORB mantle source. After exclusion of a single sample with Cl/K ratio >0.1 that likely experienced hydrothermal sulfide assimilation, Garrett ITLs display homogeneous δ34 S, Δ33 S and Δ36 S values with averages of - 0.68 ± 0.08 ‰, + 0.010 ± 0.005 ‰ and - 0.04 ± 0.04 ‰, respectively (all 1σ, n = 10). The δ34 S values display no relationship with either K2O/TiO2 variations or extent sulfide fractionation. From these observations, we derive a 34S/32S fractionation factor between exsolved sulfides and sulfide dissolved in silicate melts of 1.0000 ± 0.0003. The S isotopic fractionation during partial melting can thus be considered as negligible, and both MORBs and ITLs record the 34S/32S ratio of their mantle source. The concept of sulfide melts segregating from the mantle, sinking and being added to the core during planetary differentiation was termed the 'Hadean Matte'. The segregation of sulfides from the mantle to the core during planetary differentiation could account for various geochemical features of the Earth's mantle. Based on S isotopic mass balance, we derive a

  13. Isotopic Ratios of Samarium by TIMS for Nuclear Forensic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis Jean, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inglis, Jeremy David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The isotopic ratio of Nd, Sm, and Gd can provide important information regarding fissile material (nuclear devices, reactors), neutron environment, and device yield. These studies require precise measurement of Sm isotope ratios, by either TIMS or MC-ICP-MS. There has been an increasing trend to measure smaller and smaller quantities of Sm bearing samples. In nuclear forensics 10-100 ng of Sm are needed for precise measurement. To measure sub-ng Sm samples using TIMS for nuclear forensic analysis.

  14. A Graphical Examination of Uranium and Plutonium Fissility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The issue of why only particular isotopes of uranium and plutonium are suitable for use in nuclear weapons is analyzed with the aid of graphs and semiquantitative discussions of parameters such as excitation energies, fission barriers, reaction cross-sections, and the role of processes such as [alpha]-decay and spontaneous fission. The goal is to…

  15. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  16. Influence of asymmetry and fissility on even-odd effect in fission-fragment yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejmund F.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on a wide systematics of fragment distributions measured in thermal-neutron induced fission, the even-odd staggering in the fission-fragment element yields is investigated. The asymmetry evolution of the element yield distribution with the fissility of the fissioning nucleus is shown to be for an important part responsible for the decrease of the even-odd staggering with the fissility. The even-odd staggering close to symmetry is shown to be a small contribution to the global even-odd effect, and seems to vary little with the fissility of the nucleus. These experimental observations show that the established interpretation in which the intrinsic excitation energy at scission is accountable for the even-odd staggering amplitude has to be reconsidered.

  17. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Determan, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  18. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand accident conditions in transportation. Each Type B packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  19. Tank 40 final sludge batch 9 chemical and fissile radionuclide characterization results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kubilius, W. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-26

    A sample of Sludge Batch (SB) 9 was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS)i. The SB9 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB9. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the 3-L Tank 40 SB9 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 547 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO3/HCl (aqua regiaii) in sealed Teflon® vessels and four with NaOH/Na2O2 (alkali or peroxide fusioniii) using Zr crucibles. Three Analytical Reference Glass – 1iv (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB9 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic

  20. A neutron booster for spallation sources--application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Galy, J; Van Dam, H; Valko, J

    2002-01-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the mu m-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology--for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and 'fast' islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module cou...

  1. Repackaging of High Fissile TRU Waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center - 13240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakley, Brian; Heacker, Fred [WAI, TRU Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States); McMillan, Bill [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Bldg. 2714, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Twenty-six drums of high fissile transuranic (TRU) waste from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations were declared waste in the mid-1980's and placed in storage with the legacy TRU waste inventory for future treatment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Repackaging and treatment of the waste at the TRU Waste Packaging Center (TWPC) will require the installation of additional equipment and capabilities to address the hazards for handling and repackaging the waste compared to typical Contact Handled (CH) TRU waste that is processed at the TWPC, including potential hydrogen accumulation in legacy 6M/2R packaging configurations, potential presence of reactive plutonium hydrides, and significant low energy gamma radiation dose rates. All of the waste is anticipated to be repackaged at the TWPC and certified for disposal at WIPP. The waste is currently packaged in multiple layers of containers which presents additional challenges for repackaging activities due to the potential for the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the container headspace in quantities than could exceed the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL). The outer container for each waste package is a stainless steel 0.21 m{sup 3} (55-gal) drum which contains either a 0.04 m{sup 3} or 0.06 m{sup 3} (10-gal or 15-gal) 6M drum. The inner 2R container in each 6M drum is ∼12 cm (5 in) outside diameter x 30-36 cm (12-14 in) long and is considered to be a > 4 liter sealed container relative to TRU waste packaging criteria. Inside the 2R containers are multiple configurations of food pack cans, pipe nipples, and welded capsules. The waste contains significant quantities of high burn-up plutonium oxides and metals with a heavy weight percentage of higher atomic mass isotopes and the subsequent in-growth of significant quantities of americium. Significant low energy gamma radiation is expected to be present due to the americium in-growth. Radiation dose rates on inner containers are estimated

  2. Assessment and recommendations for fissile-material packaging exemptions and general licenses within 10 CFR Part 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Hopper, C.M.; Lichtenwalter, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a technical and regulatory assessment of the fissile material general licenses and fissile material exemptions within Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. The assessment included literature studies and calculational analyses to evaluate the technical criteria; review of current industry practice and concerns; and a detailed evaluation of the regulatory text for clarity, consistency and relevance. Recommendations for potential consideration by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff are provided. The recommendations call for a simplification and consolidation of the general licenses and a change in the technical criteria for the first fissile material exemptions.

  3. Fissile materials in solution concentration measured by active neutron interrogation; Mesure de concentration en matiere fissile dans les liquides par interrogation neutronique active

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeyer Dherbey, J.; Passard, Ch.; Cloue, J.; Bignan, G.

    1993-12-31

    The use of the active neutron interrogation to measure the concentration of plutonium contained in flow solutions is particularly interesting for fuel reprocessing plants. Indeed, this method gives a signal which is in a direct relation with the fissile materials concentration. Moreover, it is less sensitive to the gamma dose rate than the other nondestructive methods. Two measure methods have been evolved in CEA. Their principles are given into details in this work. The first one consists to detect fission delayed neutrons induced by a {sup 252} Cf source. In the second one fission prompt neutrons induced by a neutron generator of 14 MeV are detected. (O.M.). 6 refs.

  4. Observation of the Isotopic Evolution of PWR Fuel Using an Antineutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2008-01-01

    By operating an antineutrino detector of simple design during several fuel cycles, we have observed long term changes in antineutrino flux that result from the isotopic evolution of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Measurements made with simple antineutrino detectors of this kind offer an alternative means for verifying fissile inventories at reactors, as part of IAEA and other reactor safeguards regimes.

  5. Fissile Nuclei Rotation Effect in 235U(n,γf) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilyan, Gevorg; Granz, Peter; Klenke, Jens; Krakhotin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Valery; Mezei, Ferenz; Novitsky, Vadim; Pavlov, Valery; Russina, Margarita; Shatalov, Pavel; Wilpert, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A small shift of an angular distribution of prompt γ-rays relative to the fission axis of 236U* 235U(n,γf) process is presented. This effect has been observed in the experiment at BER-II reactor of BENSC/HMI (Berlin). The sign of the shift depends on the direction of the incident neutron beam polarization. This phenomena can be explained by the rotation of fissile nucleus 236U*, like the effect that has been observed recently at ILL in ternary fission of 235U by cold polarized neutrons. The main surprise of this result is the detection of scission gamma-rays radiated by a fissile nucleus during the time interval of the order of 10-21 s before or after the moment of the neck rupture. Detailed measurements of trigger γ-rays energy dependence are in progress at the neutron beam "MEPHISTO" of FRM-II reactor (Garching).

  6. Basic Research on Remote Sensing of Fissile Materials utilizing Gamma rays and Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-15-56 Basic Research on Remote Sensing of Fissile Materials...2017 HDTRA1-09-1-0059 David C. Ingram Prepared by: Ohio University 105 Research and Technology Center Athens, OH...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  7. LANL's Role in the U.S. Fissile Material Disposition Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kay, Virginia [NA-233

    2015-02-18

    The process of Fissile Material Disposition is in part a result of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), which is an agreement between the U.S. and Russia to dispose of excess plutonium used to make weapons. LANL is one sight that aides in the process of dismantling, storage and repurposing of the plutonium gathered from dismantled weapons. Some uses for the repurposed plutonium is fuel for commercial nuclear reactors which will provide energy for citizens.

  8. Verification of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT): The Potential Role of the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of a future verification of a FMCT(Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty) is to deter and detect non-compliance with treaty obligations in a timely and non-discriminatory manner with regard to banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear devices. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has already established the IAEA safeguards as a verification system mainly for Non -Nuclear Weapon States (NNWSs), it is expected that the IAEA's experience and expertise in this field will make a significant contribution to setting up a future treaty's verification regime. This paper is designed to explore the potential role of the IAEA in verifying the future treaty by analyzing verification abilities of the Agency in terms of treaty verification and expected challenges. Furthermore, the concept of multilateral verification that could be facilitated by the IAEA will be examined as a measure of providing a credible assurance of compliance with a future treaty. In this circumstance, it is necessary for the IAEA to be prepared for playing a leading role in FMCT verifications as a form of multilateral verification by taking advantage of its existing verification concepts, methods, and tools. Also, several challenges that the Agency faces today need to be overcome, including dealing with sensitive and proliferative information, attribution of fissile materials, lack of verification experience in military fuel cycle facilities, and different attitude and culture towards verification between NWSs and NNWSs.

  9. Fissile material holdup measurement systems: an historical review of hardware and software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Steven E [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rowe, Nathan C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fissile material holdup is accomplished by passively measuring the energy-dependent photon flux and/or passive neutron flux emitted from the fissile material deposited within an engineered process system. Both measurement modalities--photon and neutron--require the implementation of portable, battery-operated systems that are transported, by hand, from one measurement location to another. Because of this portability requirement, gamma-ray spectrometers are typically limited to inorganic scintillators, coupled to photomultiplier tubes, a small multi-channel analyzer, and a handheld computer for data logging. For neutron detection, polyethylene-moderated, cadmium-back-shielded He-3 thermal neutron detectors are used, coupled to nuclear electronics for supplying high voltage to the detector, and amplifying the signal chain to the scaler for counting. Holdup measurement methods, including the concept of Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH), are well presented by T. Douglas Reilly in LA-UR-07-5149 and P. Russo in LA-14206, yet both publications leave much of the evolutionary hardware and software to the imagination of the reader. This paper presents an historical review of systems that have been developed and implemented since the mid-1980s for the nondestructive assay of fissile material, in situ. Specifications for the next-generation holdup measurements systems are conjectured.

  10. Implementation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Source Verification and Confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, Taner [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Nelson, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Radev, Radoslav [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the verification procedure for neutron sources installed in U.S. Department of Energy equipment used to measure fissile material flow. The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment determines the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow of UF{sub 6} gas streams by using {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas and by measuring the fission products in the flow. The {sup 252}Cf sources in each FMFM are typically replaced every 2 to 3 years due to their relatively short half-life ({approx} 2.65 years). During installation of the new FMFM sources, the source identity and neutronic characteristics provided by the manufacturer are verified with the following equipment: (1) a remote-control video television (RCTV) camera monitoring system is used to confirm the source identity, and (2) a neutron detection system (NDS) is used for source-strength confirmation. Use of the RCTV and NDS permits remote monitoring of the source replacement process and eliminates unnecessary radiation exposure. The RCTV, NDS, and the confirmation process are described in detail in this report.

  11. DOE NCSP Review of TRUPACT-II/HalfPACT Fissile Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2002-03-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Nuclear Material & Spent Fuel, EM-21, tasked the CSSG to perform a scoping study to determine the feasibility of increasing the fissile mass loading limits for specified TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. The results of the scoping study may provide insights and technical guidance for establishing fissile mass loading limits at waste generator sites and at the waste repository. The goal is to reduce costs of transporting fissile material to the WIPP from EM's various closure sites. This report documents the results of the scoping study and demonstrates that it is feasible to significantly increase the fissile mass loading limits in the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. Depending upon the particular payload containers used, the number of shipments to WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as a factor of 16 and the number of total payload containers required ''down-hole'' at WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as about 6. These cost savings result simply from applying a more realistic criticality analysis model rather than the very conservative, hypothetical, bounding analysis used to support the existing fissile mass loading limits. However, the applications of existing and developmental computational tools, nuclear data, and experiments from the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program have the potential to further reduce transportation and disposal container costs on the order of 7% to 17%. It is suggested that EM proceed with an effort to do the required formal analyses and pursue SARP supplements to take advantage of these savings. The success of these analyses are dependent upon the availability of the majority of the infrastructure supported by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as defined in the Five-Year Plan for the program. Finally, it should be noted that these potential cost

  12. Evaluation of Glass Density to Support the Estimation of Fissile Mass Loadings from Iron Concentrations in SB6 Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

    2010-12-15

    The Department of Energy - Savannah River (DOE-SR) previously provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of the guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 glass based on the Fe concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that SRNL provide the necessary information to allow SRR to update the Excel spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes a bounding density for SB6-based glasses. Based on the measured density data of select SB6 variability study glasses, SRNL recommends that SRR utilize the 99/99 Upper Tolerance Limit (UTL) density value at 38% WL (2.823 g/cm{sup 3}) as a bounding density for SB6 glasses to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. That is, the 2.823 g/cm{sup 3} is recommended as a key (and fixed) input into the fissile concentration spreadsheet for SB6 processing. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB6. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample. The purpose of this technical report is to present the density measurements that were determined for the SB6 variability study glasses and to conduct a statistical evaluation of these measurements to provide a bounding density value that may be used as input to the Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet to be employed by SRR to maintain the

  13. FMDP Reactor Alternative Summary Report: Volume 3 - partially complete LWR alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, S.R.; Fisher, S.E.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) initiated a detailed analysis activity to evaluate each of ten plutonium disposition alternatives that survived an initial screening process. This document, Volume 3 of a four volume report summarizes the results of these analyses for the partially complete LWR (PCLWR) reactor based plutonium disposition alternative.

  14. Comparative analysis of non-destructive methods to control fissile materials in large-size containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batyaev V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of various non-destructive methods to control fissile materials (FM in large-size containers filled with radioactive waste (RAW has been carried out. The difficulty of applying passive gamma-neutron monitoring FM in large containers filled with concreted RAW is shown. Selection of an active non-destructive assay technique depends on the container contents; and in case of a concrete or iron matrix with very low activity and low activity RAW the neutron radiation method appears to be more preferable as compared with the photonuclear one.

  15. Identification of hidden fissile materials using high-pressure xenon gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Sokolov, D. V.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2001-12-01

    The description of the High Pressure Xenon Gamma-Ray Detector (HPXeD) and its main characteristics are considered in the context of the search for hidden fissile materials. The results of HPXeD measurements of gamma-radiation from radioactive sources, which are covered by lead, iron and aluminium shields, are analyzed and discussed. The use of special software for processing data is shown to improve the potential of radioactive material detection, including the identification and estimation of the main protective shield parameters.

  16. Development of a new simulation code for evaluation of criticality transients involving fissile solution boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basoglu, Benan; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a new computer code named TRACE for predicting the excursion characteristics of criticality excursions involving fissile solutions. TRACE employs point neutronics coupled with simple thermal-hydraulics. The temperature, the radiolytic gas effects, and the boiling phenomena are estimated using the transient heat conduction equation, a lumped-parameter energy model, and a simple boiling model, respectively. To evaluate the model, we compared our results with the results of CRAC experiments. The agreement in these comparisons is quite satisfactory. (author)

  17. Prompt neutron fission spectrum mean energies for the fissile nuclides and /sup 252/Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. The average neutron energies of these spectra are tabulated. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Also tabulated are the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. 75 refs., 9 tabs. (LEW)

  18. Development of a new simulation code for evaluation of criticality transients involving fissile solution boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basoglu, Benan; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a new computer code named TRACE for predicting the excursion characteristics of criticality excursions involving fissile solutions. TRACE employs point neutronics coupled with simple thermal-hydraulics. The temperature, the radiolytic gas effects, and the boiling phenomena are estimated using the transient heat conduction equation, a lumped-parameter energy model, and a simple boiling model, respectively. To evaluate the model, we compared our results with the results of CRAC experiments. The agreement in these comparisons is quite satisfactory. (author)

  19. Nuclear dissipation effects on fission and evaporation in systems of intermediate fissility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelli N.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The systems of intermediate fissility 132Ce and 158Er have been studied experimentally and theoretically in order to investigate the dissipation properties of nuclear matter. Cross sections of fusion-fission and evaporation residues channels together with charged particles multiplicities in both channels, their spectra, angular correlations and mass-energy distribution of fission fragments have been measured. Theoretical analysis has been performed using multi-dimensional stochastic approach with realistic treatment of particle evaporation. The results of analysis show that full one-body or unusually strong two-body dissipation allows to reproduce experimental data. No temperature dependent dissipation was needed.

  20. A single-shot nanosecond neutron pulsed technique for the detection of fissile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Scholz, M.; Prokopovicz, R.; Tomaszewski, K.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Gabanska, B.; Dworak, D.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.

    2012-07-01

    A novel technique with the potential of detecting hidden fissile materials is presented utilizing the interaction of a single powerful and nanosecond wide neutron pulse with matter. The experimental system is based on a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device as a neutron source generating pulses of almost mono-energetic 2.45 MeV and/or 14.0 MeV neutrons, a few nanoseconds in width. Fissile materials, consisting of heavy nuclei, are detected utilizing two signatures: firstly by measuring those secondary fission neutrons which are faster than the elastically scattered 2.45 MeV neutrons of the D-D reaction in the DPF; secondly by measuring the pulses of the slower secondary fission neutrons following the pulse of the fast 14 MeV neutrons from the D-T reaction. In both cases it is important to compare the measured spectrum of the fission neutrons induced by the 2.45 MeV or 14 MeV neutron pulse of the DPF with theoretical spectra obtained by mathematical simulation. Therefore, results of numerical modelling of the proposed system, using the MCNP5 and the FLUKA codes are presented and compared with experimental data.

  1. Monte Carlo Modeling of Minor Actinide Burning in Fissile Spallation Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-06-01

    Minor actinides (MA) present a harmful part of spent nuclear fuel due to their long half-lives and high radio-toxicity. Neutrons produced in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) can be used to transmute and burn MA. Non-fissile targets are commonly considered in ADS design. However, additional neutrons from fission reactions can be used in targets made of fissile materials. We developed a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems) for simulating neutron production and transport in different spallation targets. MCADS is suitable for calculating spatial distributions of neutron flux and energy deposition, neutron multiplication factors and other characteristics of produced neutrons and residual nuclei. Several modifications of the Geant4 source code described in this work were made in order to simulate targets containing MA. Results of MCADS simulations are reported for several cylindrical targets made of U+Am, Am or Am2O3 including more complicated design options with a neutron booster and a reflector. Estimations of Am burning rates are given for the considered cases.

  2. Ultraslow Wave Nuclear Burning of Uranium-Plutonium Fissile Medium on Epithermal Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Eingorn, M V; Chernezhenko, S A; Kakaev, A A

    2014-01-01

    For a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238, the investigation of fulfillment of the wave burning criterion in a wide range of neutron energies is conducted for the first time, and a possibility of wave nuclear burning not only in the region of fast neutrons, but also for cold, epithermal and resonance ones is discovered for the first time. For the first time the results of the investigation of the Feoktistov criterion fulfillment for a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238 dioxide with enrichments 4.38%, 2.00%, 1.00%, 0.71% and 0.50% with respect to uranium-235, in the region of neutron energies 0.015-10.0eV are presented. These results indicate a possibility of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning mode realization in the uranium-plutonium media, originally (before the wave initiation by external neutron source) having enrichments with respect to uranium-235, corresponding to the subcritical state, in the regions of cold, thermal, epithermal and resonance neutrons. In order to...

  3. Proceedings from the Fissile Material Cut-off seminar in Stockholm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbman, G. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    The Swedish Defence Research Establishment hosted an international expert seminar on the subject of verifying a prohibition of the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons purpose (cut-off) in Stockholm, June 3-5 1998. The objective of the seminar was to provide an opportunity for informal discussions among scientific and technical experts on various technical matters relating to the verification of a future Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT). A stated aim of the seminar was to keep issues of scope to a minimum. Invited speakers and commentators were given an opportunity to present their views as written contributions. The present seminar proceedings are essentially the result of these views. In addition, short summaries of the discussions following each session are included. Although an attempt was made to be as complete and accurate as possible in reproducing these discussions, the editors apologise if some important points or statements have been omitted. If so, the main reason is that the documentation of the discussions were based on written notes, not taped recordings. Eight longer contributions have been separately indexed.

  4. Hydrogen isotope dynamic effects on partially reduced paramagnetic six-atom Ag clusters in low-symmetry cage of zeolite A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amgalanbaatar Baldansuren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A well-defined, monodisperse Ag6+ cluster was prepared by mild chemical treatments including aqueous ion-exchange, dehydration, oxygen calcination at 673 K and hydrogen reduction 293 K, rather than autoreduction and irradiations with γ-ray and X-ray. H2 reduction was proved as a crucial step to form the nanosize cluster with six equivalent silver atoms. Hydrogen isotope exchange and dynamics were probed by EPR and HYSCORE to provide information relevant to the cluster geometry, size, charge state and spin state. Desorption experiments result in the deuterium desorption energy of 0.78 eV from the cluster, exceeding the experimental value of 0.38 eV for the single crystal Ag(111 surface. These experiments indicate that the EPR-active clusters are in delicate equilibrium with EPR-silent clusters.

  5. A treaty on the cutoff of fissile material for nuclear weapons - What to cover? How to verify?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaper, A. [Peace Research Inst., Frankfurt (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Since 1946, a cutoff has been proposed. In 1993, the topic was placed on the agenda of the CD. The establishment of an Ad Hoc Committee in the CD with a mandate to negotiate a fissile material cutoff treaty struggled with difficulties for more than a year. The central dispute was whether the mandate should refer to existing un-safeguarded stockpiles. The underlying conflict of the CTBT negotiations can be summarized as nuclear disarmament versus nuclear nonproliferation The same conflict is now blocking progress with FMCT negotiations in the CD. At the center of technical proliferation concerns is direct use material that can be used for nuclear warheads without any further enrichment or reprocessing. Those materials are plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU). A broader category of materials is defined as all those containing any fissile isotopes, called special fissionable materials. In order ta verify that no direct use materials are abused for military purposes, also special fissionable materials must be controlled. An even broader category is simply called nuclear materials. Pu and HEU can be distinguished into the following categories of utilisation: 1. military direct use material in operational nuclear weapons and their logistics pipeline, 2. military direct use material held in reserve for military purposes, in assembled weapons or in other forms, 3. military direct use material withdrawn from dismantled weapons, 4. military direct use material considered excess and designated for transfer into civilian use, 5. military direct use material considered excess and declared for transfer into civilian use, 6. direct use material currently in reactors or their logistics pipelines and storages, and 7. irradiated Pu and HEU in spent fuel from reactors, or in vitrified form for final disposal. Large quantities of materials are neither inside weapons nor declared excess. So far, there are no legal obligations for NWS for limitations, declarations, or

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HS99 AIR TRANSPORT TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2012-07-10

    An air-transport Type A Fissile radioactive shipping package for the transport of special form uranium sources has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Homeland Security. The Package model number is HS99 for Homeland Security Model 99. This paper presents the major design features of the HS99 and highlights engineered materials necessary for meeting the design requirements for this light-weight Type AF packaging. A discussion is provided demonstrating how the HS99 complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper summarizes the results of structural testing to specified in 10 CFR 71 for Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and proposed future missions for this packaging are also addressed.

  7. A comparative study between transport and criticality safety indexes for fissile uranium nuclearly pure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes da Silva, T. de; Sordi, G.M.A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN (Brazil)]. e-mail: tmsilva@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The international and national standards determine that during the transport of radioactive materials the package to be sent should be identified by labels of risks specifying content, activity and the transport index. The result of the monitoring of the package to 1 meter identifies the transport index, TI, which represents the dose rate to 1 meter of this. The transport index is, by definition, a number that represents a gamma radiation that crosses the superficial layer the radioactive material of the package to 1 meter of distance. For the fissile radioactive material that is the one in which a neutron causes the division of the atom, the international standards specify criticality safety index CSI, which is related with the safe mass of the fissile element. In this work it was determined the respective safe mass for each considered enrichment for the compounds of uranium oxides UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. In the study of CSI it was observed that the value 50 of the expression 50/N being N the number of packages be transported in subcriticality conditions it represents a fifth part of the safe mass of the element uranium or 9% of the smallest mass critical for a transport not under exclusive use. As conclusion of the accomplished study was observed that the transport index starting from 7% of enrichment doesn't present contribution and that criticality safety index is always greater than the transport index. Therefore what the standards demand to specify, the largest value between both indexes, was clearly identified in this study as being the criticality safety index. (Author)

  8. In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W> Stockman; S. LeStrange

    2000-09-28

    The objective of this calculation is to provide estimates of the amount of fissile material flowing out of the waste package (source term) and the accumulation of fissile elements (U and Pu) in a crushed-tuff invert. These calculations provide input for the analysis of repository impacts of the Pu-ceramic waste forms. In particular, the source term results are used as input to the far-field accumulation calculation reported in Ref. 51, and the in-drift accumulation results are used as inputs for the criticality calculations reported in Ref. 2. The results are also summarized and interpreted in Ref. 52. The scope of this calculation is the waste package (WP) Viability Assessment (VA) design, which consists of an outer corrosion-allowance material (CAM) and an inner corrosion-resistant material (CRM). This design is used in this calculation in order to be consistent with earlier Pu-ceramic degradation calculations (Ref. 15). The impact of the new Enhanced Design Alternative-I1 (EDA-11) design on the results will be addressed in a subsequent report. The design of the invert (a leveling foundation, which creates a level surface of the drift floor and supports the WP mounting structure) is consistent with the EDA-I1 design. The invert will be composed of crushed stone and a steel support structure (Ref. 17). The scope of this calculation is also defined by the nominal degradation scenario, which involves the breach of the WP (Section 10.5.1.2, Ref. 48), followed by the influx of water. Water in the WP may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the ceramic waste forms. Thus, the water in the WP may become laden with dissolved actinides (e.g., Pu and U), and may eventually overflow or leak from the WP. Once the water leaves the WP, it may encounter the invert, in which the actinides may reprecipitate. Several factors could induce reprecipitation; these factors include: the high surface area of the crushed stone, and the presence of

  9. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Satpathy; S K Patra; R K Choudhury

    2008-01-01

    The fission decay of highly neutron-rich uranium isotopes is investigated which shows interesting new features in the barrier properties and neutron emission characteristics in the fission process. 233U and 235U are the nuclei in the actinide region in the beta stability valley which are thermally fissile and have been mainly used in reactors for power generation. The possibility of occurrence of thermally fissile members in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron number = 162 or 164 has been predicted to be magic in numerous theoretical studies carried out over the years. The series of uranium isotopes around it with = 154-172 are identified to be thermally fissile on the basis of the fission barrier and neutron separation energy systematics; a manifestation of the close shell nature of = 162 (or 164). We consider here the thermal neutron fission of a typical representative 249U nucleus in the highly neutron-rich region. Semiempirical study of fission barrier height and width shows that 250U nucleus is stable against spontaneous fission due to increase in barrier width arising out of excess neutrons. On the basis of the calculation of the probability of fragment mass yields and the microscopic study in relativistic mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neutron fission (multi-fragmentation fission) whereby a number of prompt scission neutrons are expected to be simultaneously released along with the two heavy fission fragments. Such properties will have important implications in stellar evolution involving -process nucleosynthesis.

  10. Toward a comprehensive description of decay properties for uranium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-12-01

    Within the enhanced density dependent cluster model, with specific concern for density distributions in related nuclei, we investigate α decay and cluster radioactivity in uranium isotopes in the range 217 ≤A ≤243 . The available experimental data are found to be well reproduced, especially including the very recently measured values of new neutron-deficient isotopes. The half-lives of possible cluster emissions are consequently predicted as well, and will be somewhat valuable for future detection. Moreover, β decay half-lives of these nuclei are also evaluated with respect to all kinds of β processes, while their spontaneous fission lifetimes are provided via an effective relationship between the half-life and crucial quantities, namely the fissility parameter and fission barriers. In this sense, a full understanding of decay properties in uranium isotopes is expected to be achieved by combining their various radioactive features.

  11. Measurement of fissile mass in large-size containers with a transportable linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyer Dherbey, Jacques; Lyoussi, A.; Buisson, A.

    1997-02-01

    The quantification of transuranic material (TRU) in waste packages is a common problem of countries working in the field of nuclear nondestructive inspection. The direct measurement of TRU mass inside large size closed containers is difficult due to several effects, mainly the matrix attenuation and uncertainty on the localization of the radioactive mass. The present document describes the method being developed to assay conditioned waste packages using a transportable linear accelerator which is called Mini- Linatron. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from the Mini-Linatron to produce high energy bremsstrahlung photon bursts from thin metallic converter. The transportable linear accelerator operates at 6, 9 and 11 MeV with a repetition rate between 10 to 300 Hz and a 4.5 microsecond(s) pulse duration. The maximum gamma dose rate is about 23 Gy/mn at 1 m. The photons induce fission in fissile and fertile nuclei. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse by using Sequential Photon Interrogation and Neutron Counting Signatures technique which has ben developed in this framework. Results of measurements on an experimental active gamma interrogation facility for embedded intermediate and low level wastes are presented. Finally, the advantages and performances of the photofission interrogation technique, the use of a transportable electron linear accelerator as a particle source, and the experimental and electronic details will be discussed.

  12. The use of a transportable linear accelerator for fissile mass measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyer Dherbey, J.; Lyoussi, A.; Buisson, A.

    1997-02-01

    The quantification of transuranic material (TRU) in waste packages is a common care of countries working in the field of nuclear nondestructive prospecting. The direct control of TRU mass inside large size closed containers is difficult due to several effects, mainly the matrix attenuation and uncertainty on the localization of the radioactive mass. The present document describes the method being developed to assay conditioned waste packages using a transportable linear accelerator which is called Mini-Linatron. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from the Mini-Linatron to produce high energy bremsstrahlung photon bursts from thin metallic converter. The transportable linear accelerator operates at 6, 9 and 11 MeV with a repetition rate between 10 to 300 Hz and a 4.5 μs pulse duration. The maximum gamma dose rate is about 23 Gy/mn at 1 m. The photons induce fission in fissile and fertile nuclei. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse. Results of measurements on an experimental active gamma interrogation facility for embedded intermediate and low level wastes are presented.

  13. Analysis of triso packing fraction and fissile material to DB-MHR using LWR reprocessed fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Clarysson A.M. da; Pereira, Claubia; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: clarysson@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Gas-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor is being considered the next generation of nuclear power plants because of its characteristic to operate with reprocessed fuel. The typical fuel element consists of a hexagonal block with coolant and fuel channels. The fuel pin is manufactured into compacted ceramic-coated particles (TRISO) which are used to achieve both a high burnup and a high degree of passive safety. This work uses the MCNPX 2.6.0 to simulate the active core of Deep Burn Modular Helium Reactor (DB-MHR) employing PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reprocessed fuel. However, before a complete study of DB-MHR fuel cycle and recharge, it is necessary to evaluate the neutronic parameters to some values of TRISO Packing Fractions (PF) and Fissile Material (FM). Each PF and FM combination would generate the best behaviour of neutronic parameters. Therefore, this study configures several PF and FM combinations considering the heterogeneity of TRISO layers and lattice. The results present the best combination of PF and FM values according with the more appropriated behaviour of the neutronic parameters during the burnup. In this way, the optimized combination can be used to future works of MHR fuel cycle and recharge. (author)

  14. Far-Field Accumulation of Fissile Material From Waste Packages Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.P. Nicot

    2000-09-29

    The objective of this calculation is to estimate the quantity of fissile material that could accumulate in fractures in the rock beneath plutonium-ceramic (Pu-ceramic) and Mixed-Oxide (MOX) waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This calculation is to feed another calculation (Ref. 31) computing the probability of criticality in the systems described in Section 6 and then ultimately to a more general report on the impact of plutonium on the performance of the proposed repository (Ref. 32), both developed concurrently to this work. This calculation is done in accordance with the development plan TDP-DDC-MD-000001 (Ref. 9), item 5. The original document described in item 5 has been split into two documents: this calculation and Ref. 4. The scope of the calculation is limited to only very low flow rates because they lead to the most conservative cases for Pu accumulation and more generally are consistent with the way the effluent from the WP (called source term in this calculation) was calculated (Ref. 4). Ref. 4 (''In-Drift Accumulation of Fissile Material from WPs Containing Plutonium Disposition Waste Forms'') details the evolution through time (breach time is initial time) of the chemical composition of the solution inside the WP as degradation of the fuel and other materials proceed. It is the chemical solution used as a source term in this calculation. Ref. 4 takes that same source term and reacts it with the invert; this calculation reacts it with the rock. In addition to reactions with the rock minerals (that release Si and Ca), the basic mechanisms for actinide precipitation are dilution and mixing with resident water as explained in Section 2.1.4. No other potential mechanism such as flow through a reducing zone is investigated in this calculation. No attempt was made to use the effluent water from the bottom of the invert instead of using directly the effluent water from the

  15. Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2005-06-01

    This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty.

  16. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Zier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  17. Partial priapism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyerup, Peter; Dahl, Claus; Azawi, Nessn Htum

    2014-01-01

    Partial priapism, also called partial segmental thrombosis of the corpus cavernosum, is a rare urological condition. Factors such as bicycle riding, drug usage, penile trauma and haematological diseases have been associated with the condition. Medical treatment with low molecular weight heparin (...... (LMWH) or acetylsalicylic acid is first choice treatment, and surgery is preserved for patients unresponsive to analgesics. In this report we describe the case of a 70-year-old man with partial priapism after blood transfusions treated successfully with LMWH....

  18. Effect of transverse vibrations of fissile nuclei on the angular and spin distributions of low-energy fission fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that A. Bohr's classic theory of angular distributions of fragments originating from low-energy fission should be supplemented with quantum corrections based on the involvement of a superposition of a very large number of angular momenta L m in the description of the relative motion of fragments flying apart along the straight line coincidentwith the symmetry axis. It is revealed that quantum zero-point wriggling-type vibrations of the fissile system in the vicinity of its scission point are a source of these angular momenta and of high fragment spins observed experimentally.

  19. Technical evaluation panel summary report. Ceramic and glass immobilization options fissile materials disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brummond, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armantrout, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jantzen, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jostons, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKibben, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strachan, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vienna, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1997-12-23

    This report documents the results of a technical evaluation of the merits of ceramic and glass immobilization forms for the disposition of surplus weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluation was conducted by a Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP), whose members were selected to cover a relevant range of scientific and technical expertise and represented each of the technical organizations involved in the Plutonium Immobilization Program. The TEP held a formal review at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory (LLNL) from July 2%August 1, 1997. Following this review, the TEP documented the review and its evaluation of the two immobilization technologies in this report to provide a technical basis for a recommendation by LLNL to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the preferred immobilization form. The comparison of the glass and ceramic forms and manufacturing processes was a tremendous challenge to the TEP. The two forms and their processes are similar in many ways. The TEP went to great effort to accurately assess what were, in many cases, fine details of the processes, unit operations, and the glass and ceramic forms themselves. The set of criteria used by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) in past screenings and down-selections was used to measure-the two options. One exception is that the TEP did not consider criteria that were largely nontechnical (namely international impact, public acceptance, and effects on other : DOE programs). The TEP' s measures and assessments are documented in detail. Care was taken to ensure that the data used were well documented and traceable to their source. Although no final conclusion regarding the preferred form was reached or explicitly stated in this report (this was not within the TEP' s charter), no "show stoppers" were identified for either form. Both forms appear capable of satisfying all the criteria, as interpreted by the TEP. The TEP identified a number of distinct and quantifiable differences between

  20. Analyse of the potential of the high temperature reactor with respect to the use of fissile materials; Analyse des capacites des reacteurs a haute temperature sous l'aspect de l'utilisation des matieres fissiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, F

    2001-07-01

    The high temperature reactors fuel is made of micro-particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. This configuration makes it possible to reach high burnup, higher than 700 GWj/t. Thanks to the decoupling between the thermal and the neutronic behaviors in the core many types of fuels can be used. These characteristics give to HTR reactor very good capacities to burn fissile materials. This work was done in the frame of the evaluation of HTR capacities to enhance the value of the plutonium stocks. These stocks are currently composed of the irradiated fuels discharged from classical PWR or the dismantling of the nuclear weapons and represent a significant energy potential. These studies concluded that high cycles length can be reached whatever the plutonium quality is (from 50 % to 94 % of fissile plutonium). In addition, it was demonstrated that the moderator temperature coefficient becomes locally positive for highly burn fuel while the core global moderator temperature coefficient remained negative in the operation range of the reactor. A significant share of this work was first devoted to the setting of a modeling of the fuel element but also of the reactor's core with the codes of system SAPHYR. The whole of modeling was validated by reference calculations. This work of code assessment is justified by a preliminary work that showed that the classical calculation scheme used for PWR could not be transposed directly to HTR core. (author)

  1. Fissility of actinide nuclei induced by 60-130 MeV photons; Fissionabilidade de nucleos actnideos induzida por fotons de energia 60-130 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcelle, Viviane; Tavares, Odilon A.P

    2004-06-15

    Nuclear fissilities obtained from recent photofission reaction cross section measurements carried out at Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (Saskatoon, Canada) in the energy range 60-130 MeV for {sup 232} Th, {sup 233} U, {sup 235} U, {sup 238} U, and {sup 237} Np nuclei have been analysed in a systematic way. To this aim, a semiempirical approach has been developed based on the quasi-deuteron nuclear photoabsorption model followed by the process of competition between neutron evaporation and fission for the excited nucleus. The study reproduces satisfactorily well the increasing trend of nuclear fissility with parameter Z{sup 2}=A. (author)

  2. Mineralogy and microstructure of roofing slate: thermo-optical behaviour and fissility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Guinea, J.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogy and microstructure, which affect the slaty cleavage, are linked with the strong preferred orientation of phyllosilicates and this enables the rock to be split into large, thin, flat sheets. Roofing slate samples with different commercial fissilities have been analyzed by radioluminescence (RL, thermoluminescence (3DTL, by X-ray diffraction (XRD, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM using the back-scattered mode (BSEI and by electron microprobe (EMP. They are made up of white micas, chlorite, quartz, detrital feldspars, ilmenite, pyrite, rutile apatite and tourmaline. Texturally, all consist of silt-sized clasts of detrital quartz, feldspars, chlorite-mica stacks, muscovite and ilmenite in a recrystalline, lepidoblastic matrix of white micas and chlorite with quartz lenses, all showing a very strong preferred orientation. The luminescence emission centers are a low broad blue band around the 400 nm spectra positions linked with alkali losses and formation of [AlO4]º defects; a peak at 473 nm interpreted as a the first thermal step (150-300ºC of a non-isothermal dehydroxylation of the slate phyllosilicates; and a 568 nm peak which agrees with Mn2+ point defects in aluminosilicate lattices. The studies on the slaty cleavage could be significant because Spain is the largest producer of roofing slate tiles in the world (87% of world production.

    La exfoliación de las pizarras depende fundamentalmente de su mineralogía y microestructura, especialmente de la fuerte orientación de los filosilicatos. Esta propiedad permite hendir o abrir las pizarras de techar en láminas muy grandes, delgadas y planas. Se han analizado varias pizarras de techar con diferentes calidades comerciales, correspondientes a diferentes grados de físibilidad, por radioluminiscencia (RL, termoluminiscencia espectral (TL3D, difracción de rayos X (DRX, microscopía electrónica de barrido (MEB utilizando el modo backscattered (BSEI

  3. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  4. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  5. FATE OF FISSILE MATERIAL BOUND TO MONOSODIUM TITANATE DURING COOPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), Tank 48H currently holds approximately 240,000 gallons of slurry which contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (TPB). A copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) reaction is currently being examined as a method for destroying the TPB present in Tank 48H. Part of the development of that process includes an examination of the fate of the Tank 48H fissile material which is adsorbed onto monosodium titanate (MST) particles. This report details results from experiments designed to examine the potential degradation of MST during CCPO processing and the subsequent fate of the adsorbed fissile material. Experiments were conducted to simulate the CCPO process on MST solids loaded with sorbates in a simplified Tank 48H simulant. Loaded MST solids were placed into the Tank 48H simplified simulant without TPB, and the experiments were then carried through acid addition (pH adjustment to 11), peroxide addition, holding at temperature (50 C) for one week, and finally NaOH addition to bring the free hydroxide concentration to a target concentration of 1 M. Testing was conducted without TPB to show the maximum possible impact on MST since the competing oxidation of TPB with peroxide was absent. In addition, the Cu catalyst was also omitted, which will maximize the interaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the MST; however, the results may be non-conservative assuming the Cu-peroxide active intermediate is more reactive than the peroxide radical itself. The study found that both U and Pu desorb from the MST when the peroxide addition begins, although to different extents. Virtually all of the U goes into solution at the beginning of the peroxide addition, whereas Pu reaches a maximum of {approx}34% leached during the peroxide addition. Ti from the MST was also found to come into solution during the peroxide addition. Therefore, Ti is present with the fissile in solution. After the peroxide addition is complete, the Pu and Ti are found to

  6. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  7. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation at the ElectroChemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T.

    2005-11-11

    The implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the ElectroChemical Plant (ECP), Zelenogorsk, Russia, are presented in this report. The FMFM, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS), developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower-assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (P-LEU) to the United States from down-blended weapons-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU Purchase Agreement, signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999 and is successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The second BDMS was installed at ECP in February 2003. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) spontaneous neutron sources for a modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments. The FMFM provides unattended, nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow in the HEU, LEU blend stock, and P-LEU process legs. The FMFM also provides the traceability of the HEU flow to the product process leg. This report documents the technical installation requirements and the expected operational characteristics of the ECP FMFM.

  8. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  9. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  10. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mishustin, Igor; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-reach super-heavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to Bk-249 can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector will turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  11. Robust Medical Isotope Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The success of this theoretical undertaking provided confidence that the behavior of new and evolving designs of fissile solution systems may be accurately estimated. Scaled up versions of SUPO, subcritical acceleratordriven systems, and other evolutionary designs have been examined.

  12. Robust Medical Isotope Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The success of this theoretical undertaking provided confidence that the behavior of new and evolving designs of fissile solution systems may be accurately estimated. Scaled up versions of SUPO, subcritical acceleratordriven systems, and other evolutionary designs have been examined.

  13. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  14. The therapy of gefitinib towards breast cancer partially through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The therapy of gefitinib towards breast cancer partially through reversing ... Department of Medical Oncology, Affiliated Yuhuangding Hospital, Medical College of Qingdao University, ... solution containing isotope labeled amino acid internal.

  15. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor and its Implementation at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise, Seversk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T

    2005-07-28

    In this paper the implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE), Seversk, Russia, are presented. The FMFM, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (PLEU) to the United States from down-blended weapon-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU purchase agreement signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999. The second BDMS has been operational at Electro Chemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, since March 2003. These systems are successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The third BDMS was successfully installed on the HEU down-blending tee in the SChE Enrichment Plant in October 2004. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized {sup 252}Cf spontaneous neutron sources for modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments retained in the flow. The FMFM provides unattended nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow of the UF{sub 6} gas in the blending tee legs of HEU, the LEU blend stock, and the resulting P-LEU. The FMFM also confirms that highly enriched UF{sub 6} gas identified in the HEU leg flows through the blending tee into the P-LEU leg. This report contains details of

  16. Photofission cross section and fissility of pre-actinide and intermediate-mass nuclei by 120- and 145-MeV Compton backscattered photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terranova, M.L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Kezerashvili, G. Ya.; Milov, A.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics] [and others

    1997-09-01

    Cross section measurements for photofission induced in {sup 209} Bi, {sup natP}b, {sup 197} Au, {sup nat} Pt, nat{sub w}, {sup 181} Ta, {sup 51} V and {sup nat} Ti by 120- and 145-MeV quasi-monochromatic photon beams have been performed at the ROKK-1M facility (BINP, Novosibirsk). The fission yields have been obtained using Makrofol sheets as solid-state fission track detectors. Nuclear fissility values have been deduced on the basis of Levinger`s modified quasi-deuteron model of photonuclear interaction, and compared with available literature data. The trend of fissility in the 60-145 MeV energy range has been analysed for various target nuclei as function of energy and of parameter Z{sup 2}/A. (author) 30 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Analysis of Electron and Antineutrino Energy Spectra from Fissile Samples under Irradiation based on Gross Theory of Beta-decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T.; Tachibana, T.; Chiba, S.

    2016-06-01

    We applied the gross theory of β-decay to calculate the reactor electron and antineutrino ({{{bar ν }}{e}}) spectra emitted from 235,238U and 239,241Pu by summing up all the contributions from a large number of decaying fission-products (FPs). We make it clear what kinds of transition types and FP nuclides are important to shape the lepton spectra. After taking the ambiguity in the current data for fission yields and Qβ-values into account, we suggested a possibility that the high-energy part of the widely referred electron-spectra by Schreckenbach et al., almost only one experimental data set available now, might possibly be too low. Arguments on a special role of the odd(Z)-odd(N) nuclides and on the consistency between U-238 and other fissiles in the experimental data lead to the importance of a new and independent measurement of electron energy spectra which could be converted into the reactor {{{bar ν }}{e}} spectra.

  18. Production of Medical isotope Technecium-99 from DT Fusion neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguski, John; Gentile, Charles; Ascione, George

    2011-10-01

    High energy neutrons produced in DT fusion reactors have a secondary application for use in the synthesis of valuable man-made isotopes utilized in industry today. One such isotope is metastable Technecium-99 (Tc99m), a low energy gamma emitter used in ~ 85% of all medical imaging diagnostics. Tc99m is created through beta decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo99), which itself has only a 66 hour half-life and must be created from a neutron capture by the widely available and stable isotope Molydenum-98. Current worldwide production of Tc99m occurs in just five locations and relies on obtaining the fission byproduct Mo99 from highly enriched Uranium reactors. A Tc99m generator using DT fusion neutrons, however, could potentially be operated at individual hospitals and medical facilities without the use of any fissile material. The neutron interaction of the DT neutrons with Molybdenum in a potential device geometry was modeled using Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. Trial experiments were also performed to test the viability of using DT neutrons to create ample quantities of Tc99m. Modeling and test results will follow.

  19. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzátko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Révay, Zs.; Molnár, G. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2003-12-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122 Te , 124 Te , 125 Te , 126 Te , 128 Te , and 130 Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial γ -ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and γ intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  20. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-03-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  1. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  2. Control of radioactive wastes and coupling of neutron/gamma measurements: use of radiative capture for the correction of matrix effects that penalize the fissile mass measurement by active neutron interrogation; Controle des dechets radioactifs et couplage de mesures neutron/gamma: exploitation de la capture radiative pour corriger les effets de matrice penalisant la mesure de la masse fissile par interrogation neutronique active

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loche, F

    2006-10-15

    In the framework of radioactive waste drums control, difficulties arise in the nondestructive measurement of fissile mass ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu..) by Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI), when dealing with matrices containing materials (Cl, H...) influencing the neutron flux. The idea is to use the neutron capture reaction (n,{gamma}) to determine the matrix composition to adjust the ANI calibration coefficient value. This study, dealing with 118 litres, homogeneous drums of density less than 0,4 and composed of chlorinated and/or hydrogenated materials, leads to build abacus linking the {gamma} ray peak areas to the ANI calibration coefficient. Validation assays of these abacus show a very good agreement between the corrected and true fissile masses for hydrogenated matrices (max. relative standard deviation: 23 %) and quite good for chlorinated and hydrogenated matrices (58 %). The developed correction method improves the measured values. It may be extended to 0,45 density, heterogeneous drums. (author)

  3. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  4. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep borehole disposal Facility PEIS date input report for immobilized disposal. Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout with canisters. Version 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-15

    Following President Clinton`s Non-Proliferation Initiative, launched in September, 1993, an Interagency Working Group (IWG) was established to conduct a comprehensive review of the options for the disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials from nuclear weapons dismantlement activities in the United States and the former Soviet Union. The IWG review process will consider technical, nonproliferation, environmental budgetary, and economic considerations in the disposal of plutonium. The IWG is co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Security Council. The Department of Energy (DOE) is directly responsible for the management, storage, and disposition of all weapons-usable fissile material. The Department of Energy has been directed to prepare a comprehensive review of long-term options for Surplus Fissile Material (SFM) disposition, taking into account technical, nonproliferation, environmental, budgetary, and economic considerations.

  5. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  6. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  7. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  8. The behaviour of copper isotopes during igneous processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. S.; Moynier, F.; Harvey, J.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Application of Cu isotopes to high temperature systems has recently gained momentum and has the potential for probing sulphide fractionation during planetary differentiation [1]. This requires robust estimates for planetary reservoirs, and a fundamental understanding of how igneous processes affect Cu isotopes; this study aims to tackle the latter. Cogenetic suites affected by both fractionation crystallisation and cumulate formation were analysed to study such effects on Cu isotopes. In S-undersatured systems, Cu behaves incompatibly during melt evolution and the Cu isotope composition of such melt is invariant over the differentiation sequence. In contrast, S-saturated systems show resolvable Cu isotope variations relative to primitive melt. Such variations are minor but imply a slightly heavy Cu isotope composition for continental crust compared to BSE, consistent with granite data [2]. Although olivine accumulation does not affect Cu isotopes, spinel-hosted Cu is isotopically light relative to the bulk. Analysis of variably melt-depleted cratonic peridotites shows that partial melting can affect Cu isotope composition in restite, with the depleted samples isotopically light compared to BSE. This could be due to residual spinel and/or incongruent melting of sulphides - individual sulphides picked from a single xenolith reveal a range of Cu isotope compositions, dependent on composition. Although partial melting may fractionate Cu isotopes, models suggest most mantle-derived melt will have δ65Cu ≈ BSE, as most source Cu will be transferred to the melt. Small degree melts such as ocean island basalts are predicted to be isotopically heavier than MORB, if derived from a primitive mantle source. OIBs have a range of Cu isotope compositions: some are heavier than MORB as predicted; however, some have much lighter compositions. Since Cu isotopes can be significantly fractionated in the surface environment [e.g. 3] OIB Cu isotopic variations may be linked to

  9. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  10. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  11. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  12. Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Özden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with renal tumors <7 cm and those at risk for a significant loss of renal function should be managed with a partial nephrectomy if it is technically feasible. Partial nephrectomy (PN results in similar oncologic outcomes with radical nephrectomy. With advent of the technology and increase utilization of laparoscopic surgery, laparoscopic approach is considered as one of the option for partial nephrectomy. However laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is technically very difficult procedure and should be performed only by physicians with extensive experience using this approach. In this section, we aimed to present the technical steps of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

  13. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    significantly heavier than bulk crust and hydrothermal iron imply partial oxidation of a ferrous seawater iron reservoir. In contrast, mean δ 56Fe values closer to that of hydrothermal iron in post-Sturtian shales reflects oxidation of a larger proportion of the ferrous seawater iron reservoir, and by inference, higher environmental oxygen levels. Nevertheless, significant iron isotopic variation in post-Sturtian shales suggest redox heterogeneity and possibly a dominantly anoxic deep ocean, consistent with results from recent studies using iron speciation and redox sensitive trace metals. However, the interpretation of generally increasing environmental oxygen levels after the Sturtian glaciation highlights the need to better understand the sensitivity of different redox proxies to incremental changes in oxygen levels to enable us to reconcile results from different paleoredox proxies.

  14. Magnesium isotope fractionation during differentiation of Harney Peak granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, S.; Teng, F.; Walker, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Although numerous studies have sought to constrain the Mg isotopic composition of mantle rocks, few studies have focused on the Mg isotopic compositions of crustal rocks, particularly evolved igneous rocks, such as granites. Granites are a major component of the upper continental crust and can be produced by partial melting of the deep continental crust. Studies of granites, therefore, can potentially provide important constraints on Mg isotopic composition variations in the continental crust as related to sources and petrogenetic processes. In order to explore the behavior of Mg isotopes during partial melting of continental crust, as well as granite differentiation, we have begun a study of a set of well-characterized samples from S-type Harney Peak granite, its potential source rocks and associated Tin Mountain pegmatite from Black Hills, South Dakota, USA. δ26Mg values of Harney Peak granites and Tin Mountain pegmatite vary significantly (from -0.69 to +0.11), well beyond the range of their potential source rocks (from -0.40 to +0.15) — early Proterozoic schists and late Archean metagranites. The large Mg isotopic variations within the granite suite likely, in part, reflect heterogeneities in source rocks, as previously shown for oxygen and Nd isotopes. A greater cause of the variations may be fractionations that occur during partial melting and subsequent differentiation of granitic melts, as suggested by the correlations between δ26Mg with SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O and Sr.

  15. Calcium isotopic compositions of mid-ocean ridge basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, Z.; Sun, W.; Wang, G. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Earth's mantle has heterogeneous calcium isotopic compositions. But the reason why mantle has its heterogeneity remains uncertain. In general, δ44/40Ca values of mantle xenolith samples have a variation of >0.45‰. While ultramafic rocks, especially dunites, have higher δ44/40Ca values than volcanic rocks, and there is a positive correlation between δ44/40Ca and Ca/Mg. These phenomena imply that the heterogeneity of Ca isotopic compositions of mantle xenolith samples might result from different degrees of melt extraction, as indicated by large Ca isotopic fractionation between co-existing clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. However, because ancient marine carbonate has its own unique calcium isotopic characteristics, recycling of even a small amount of ancient marine carbonates into the mantle could also cause the heterogeneity of Ca isotopes in Earth's mantle. This could be the reason why oceanic island basalts (OIB) have lighter Ca isotopic compositions than the mantle xenolith. Thus, the lighter Ca isotopic compositions in the mantle source cannot only be ascribed to magmatic processes. Therefore, it is more important to know calcium isotopic characteristics during partial melting and oceanic crust contamination.Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are formed from the partial melts of the upper mantle and are rarely affected by crustal contamination. Different types of MORB, including D-MORB, N-MORB and E-MORB, have experienced different degrees of partial melting and contamination of enriched end-members. Here we report calcium isotopic characteristic of different types of MORB, we believe it will be very helpful to understand the behaviors of Ca isotopes during partial melting and it is possible to provide further information to discover the reason why calcium isotopic compositions is heterogeneous in Earth's mantle. This work was supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41373007, No. 41490632 and No. 91328204

  16. The Partial Fuzzy Set

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Pranita Goswami

    2011-01-01

    The Partial Fuzzy Set is a portion of the Fuzzy Set which is again a Fuzzy Set. In the Partial Fuzzy Set the baseline is shifted from 0 to 1 to any of its α cuts . In this paper we have fuzzified a portion of the Fuzzy Set by transformation

  17. The three-isotope method for equilibrium isotope fractionation factor determination: Unfounded optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.; Hayles, J. A.; Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium isotope fractionation factor α is a fundamental parameter in stable isotope geochemistry. Although equilibrium α can be determined by theoretical calculation or by measurement of natural samples, direct laboratory experiments are ultimately required to verify those results. The attainment of a true exchange equilibrium in experiments is often difficult, but three methods have been devised and used to ensure that an equilibrium α has been obtained in an isotope exchange experiment. These are the two-directional method, partial-exchange method, and three-isotope method. Of these, the three-isotope method is thought to be the most rigorous. Using water-water exchange as a basic unit, we have developed a set of complex exchange models to study when and why the three-isotope method may work well or not. We found that the method cannot promise to lead to an equilibrium α before the kinetic complexity of the specific exchange experiment is known. An equilibrium point in δ17O-δ18O space can be reached only when all of the isotope exchange pathways are fully reversible, i.e. there is no mass loss at any instant, and the forward and backward reactions share the same pathway. If the exchange pathways are not fully reversible, steady state may be reached, but a steady state α can be very different from the equilibrium α. Our results validated the earlier warning that the trajectory for three-isotope evolution in δ17O-δ18O space may be a distinctly curved line or contain more than one straight line due to the non-fully reversible isotope exchange reactions. The three-isotope method for equilibrium α determination is not as rigorous or as promising as it may seem. Instead, the trajectory of three-isotope evolution provides detailed insights into the kinetics of isotope exchange between compounds. If multiple components exist in the exchange system, the δ17O-δ18O evolving trajectory would be more complex.

  18. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  19. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  1. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  2. Benchmark of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions of depletion analyses for San Onofre PWR MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-02-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, fabricated with both uranium and plutonium, after discharge from reactors is of significant interest to the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The validation of the SCALE (SAS2H) depletion code for use in the prediction of isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to previous validation studies on uranium-only fueled reactors, has corresponding significance. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program examined the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit 1, during cycles 2 and 3. Isotopic analyses of the MOX spent fuel were conducted on 13 actinides and {sup 148}Nd by either mass or alpha spectrometry. Six fuel pellet samples were taken from four different fuel pins of an irradiated MOX assembly. The measured actinide inventories from those samples has been used to benchmark SAS2H for MOX fuel applications. The average percentage differences in the code results compared with the measurement were {minus}0.9% for {sup 235}U and 5.2% for {sup 239}Pu. The differences for most of the isotopes were significantly larger than in the cases for uranium-only fueled reactors. In general, comparisons of code results with alpha spectrometer data had extreme differences, although the differences in the calculations compared with mass spectrometer analyses were not extremely larger than that of uranium-only fueled reactors. This benchmark study should be useful in estimating uncertainties of inventory, criticality and dose calculations of MOX spent fuel.

  3. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect...

  4. Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K. T.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2013-10-01

    Predictive capabilities for simulating irradiated nuclear fuel behavior are enhanced in the current work by coupling thermochemistry, isotopic evolution and heat transfer. Thermodynamic models that are incorporated into this framework not only predict the departure from stoichiometry of UO2, but also consider dissolved fission and activation products in the fluorite oxide phase, noble metal inclusions, secondary oxides including uranates, zirconates, molybdates and the gas phase. Thermochemical computations utilize the spatial and temporal evolution of the fission and activation product inventory in the pellet, which is typically neglected in nuclear fuel performance simulations. Isotopic computations encompass the depletion, decay and transmutation of more than 2000 isotopes that are calculated at every point in space and time. These computations take into consideration neutron flux depression and the increased production of fissile plutonium near the fuel pellet periphery (i.e., the so-called “rim effect”). Thermochemical and isotopic predictions are in very good agreement with reported experimental measurements of highly irradiated UO2 fuel with an average burnup of 102 GW d t(U)-1. Simulation results demonstrate that predictions are considerably enhanced when coupling thermochemical and isotopic computations in comparison to empirical correlations. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  5. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous, yet accessible, introduction to partial differential equations-updated in a valuable new edition Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) with a special focus on the significance of characteristics, solutions by Fourier series, integrals and transforms, properties and physical interpretations of solutions, and a transition to the modern function space approach to PDEs. With its breadth of coverage, this new edition continues to present a broad introduction to the field, while also addres

  6. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations III is a refereed journal issue that explores the applications, theory, and/or applied methods related to hyperbolic partial differential equations, or problems arising out of hyperbolic partial differential equations, in any area of research. This journal issue is interested in all types of articles in terms of review, mini-monograph, standard study, or short communication. Some studies presented in this journal include discretization of ideal fluid dynamics in the Eulerian representation; a Riemann problem in gas dynamics with bifurcation; periodic M

  7. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify...

  8. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  9. Muon Tomography Algorithms for Fissile Nuclear Materials Detection%宇宙射线μ子探测裂变核材料的成像算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王烈铭; 王红艳; 刘志英; 杨宏伟; 庞洪超

    2011-01-01

    宇宙射线μ子探测作为一种清洁源、深穿透、真正识别裂变核材料的新方法正在世界范围内日益受到重视,我国也在反恐领域开展此项研究,论文介绍了研究工作中图像重建算法(PoCA算法、期望最大化算法)以及算法模拟实验结果和分析,模拟结果初步证明了宇宙线μ子进行特殊核材料检测的可行性以及图像重建算法的有效性.%Muon Tomography is a novel technique which exploits the multiple coulomb scattering of these particles for nondestructive inspection without the use of artificial radiation. It describes the concept and theory of cosmic - ray muon tomography, and discuss preliminary and advanced reconstruction algorithms ( PoCA algorithm and MLS - EM algorithm) .which take advantage of the scattering angle. Our algorithms are validated with simulation experimental demonstrations. Based upon the results from simulations, we conclude that muon radiography can be useful for detecting fissile nuclear materials.

  10. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  11. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    A broad introduction to PDEs with an emphasis on specialized topics and applications occurring in a variety of fields Featuring a thoroughly revised presentation of topics, Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition provides a challenging, yet accessible,combination of techniques, applications, and introductory theory on the subjectof partial differential equations. The new edition offers nonstandard coverageon material including Burger's equation, the telegraph equation, damped wavemotion, and the use of characteristics to solve nonhomogeneous problems. The Third Edition is or

  12. Generalized Partial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV). Their theoret......Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV...

  13. Developmental Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Duteil, Nastassia Pouradier; Rossi, Francesco; Boscain, Ugo; Piccoli, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of Developmental Partial Differential Equation (DPDE), which consists of a Partial Differential Equation (PDE) on a time-varying manifold with complete coupling between the PDE and the manifold's evolution. In other words, the manifold's evolution depends on the solution to the PDE, and vice versa the differential operator of the PDE depends on the manifold's geometry. DPDE is used to study a diffusion equation with source on a growing surface whose gro...

  14. Iron isotope systematics in planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; Nebel, Oliver; Foden, John

    2016-10-01

    Iron is the only polyvalent major element, and controls reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions in a host of geologic processes and reservoirs, from the mineral- to planetary-scale, on Earth and in space. Mass transfer of Fe is often accompanied by changes in bonding environment, meaning the resultant variation in bond-strength in crystals, liquids and gases induces stable isotope fractionation, even at high temperatures. In the absence of iron exchange, electron transfer can also affect iron's valence state and calculated oxygen fugacity (fO2), however its isotope composition remains unchanged. Thus, iron isotopes are a powerful tool to investigate processes that involve mass transfer, redox reactions and changes in bonding environment in planetary systems. Primitive chondritic meteorites show remarkable isotopic homogeneity, δ57 Fe = - 0.01 ± 0.01 ‰ (2SE), over a wide range of Fe/Mg vs Ni/Mg, a proxy for fO2 in the solar nebula. In chondrites, there are iron isotope differences between metal and silicates that become more pronounced at higher metamorphic grades. However, on a planetary scale, Mars and Vesta overlap with chondrites, preserving no trace of core formation or volatile depletion on these bodies. Upon assessment of pristine lherzolites, the Bulk Silicate Earth is heavier than chondrites (δ57 Fe = + 0.05 ± 0.01 ‰; 2SE), and similar to or slightly lighter than the Moon. That the mantles of some differentiated inner solar system bodies extend to heavier compositions (+ 0.2 ‰) than chondrites may principally result from volatile depletion either at a nebular or late accretion stage. Within terrestrial silicate reservoirs, iron isotopes provide insight into petrogenetic and geodynamic processes. Partial melting of the upper mantle produces basalts that are heavier than their sources, scaling with degree of melting and driving the increasingly refractory peridotite to lighter compositions. Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (MORBs) are homogeneous to δ57 Fe

  15. Measurement system analysis (MSA) of the isotopic ratio for uranium isotope enrichment process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Josue C. de; Barbosa, Rodrigo A.; Carnaval, Joao Paulo R., E-mail: josue@inb.gov.br, E-mail: rodrigobarbosa@inb.gov.br, E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rezende, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, one of the stages in nuclear fuel cycle development is the process of uranium isotope enrichment, which will provide the amount of low enriched uranium for the nuclear fuel production to supply 100% Angra 1 and 20% Angra 2 demands. Determination of isotopic ration n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6} - used as process gas) is essential in order to control of enrichment process of isotopic separation by gaseous centrifugation cascades. The uranium hexafluoride process is performed by gas continuous feeding in separation unit which uses the centrifuge force principle, establishing a density gradient in a gas containing components of different molecular weights. The elemental separation effect occurs in a single ultracentrifuge that results in a partial separation of the feed in two fractions: an enriched on (product) and another depleted (waste) in the desired isotope ({sup 235}UF{sub 6}). Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) has used quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) by electron impact (EI) to perform isotopic ratio n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) analysis in the process. The decision of adjustments and change te input variables are based on the results presented in these analysis. A study of stability, bias and linearity determination has been performed in order to evaluate the applied method, variations and systematic errors in the measurement system. The software used to analyze the techniques above was the Minitab 15. (author)

  16. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  17. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lawrence C

    2010-01-01

    This text gives a comprehensive survey of modern techniques in the theoretical study of partial differential equations (PDEs) with particular emphasis on nonlinear equations. The exposition is divided into three parts: representation formulas for solutions; theory for linear partial differential equations; and theory for nonlinear partial differential equations. Included are complete treatments of the method of characteristics; energy methods within Sobolev spaces; regularity for second-order elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations; maximum principles; the multidimensional calculus of variations; viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations; shock waves and entropy criteria for conservation laws; and, much more.The author summarizes the relevant mathematics required to understand current research in PDEs, especially nonlinear PDEs. While he has reworked and simplified much of the classical theory (particularly the method of characteristics), he primarily emphasizes the modern interplay between funct...

  18. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    the Arctic Ocean. A comprehensive database is created based on ice core and weather station data from Greenland within the period 1890-2014. Present day annual and seasonal mean values are computed for 326 locations in Greenland. Parameterization of the spatial distribution of temperature and δ18O are used...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  19. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  20. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  1. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  2. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  3. Isotopes through the looking glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson Pendrill, Ann Marie

    2000-08-01

    Nuclear distributions affect many aspects of atomic spectra. As an example, recent experimental results for the hyperfine anomaly in Fr isotopes are considered. These depend on nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. The variations in charge radii for these isotopes were studied earlier by measuring optical isotope shifts. The hyperfine anomalies for the odd-odd isotopes involve the neutron distributions, of interest for studies of parity nonconserving effects along a chain of isotopes.

  4. Methods of isotopic geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, I. M.; Levchenkov, O. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the age of the chemical elements; the age of meteorites, the moon, and the earth; isotopic ages of the most ancient terrestrial formations; and the Archean evolution of Enderby Land in the Antarctic as evidenced by isotopic dating. Consideration is also given to a uranium-lead geochronology technique for investigating Precambrian ore deposits, a Pb-Pb technique of zircon dating, and the potentials and limitations of Sm-Nd geochronology.

  5. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  6. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (shielding in the UV photodissociation of CO (van Dishoeck and Black, 1988). This process results from the large differences in abundance between C16O, on the one hand, and C17O and C18O on the other. Photolysis of CO occurs by absorption of stellar UV radiation in the

  7. Partially Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Rissanen, Jorma

    1996-01-01

    Partially Hidden Markov Models (PHMM) are introduced. They differ from the ordinary HMM's in that both the transition probabilities of the hidden states and the output probabilities are conditioned on past observations. As an illustration they are applied to black and white image compression wher...

  8. Fundamental partial compositeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Strumia, Alessandro; Tesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We construct renormalizable Standard Model extensions, valid up to the Planck scale, that give a composite Higgs from a new fundamental strong force acting on fermions and scalars. Yukawa interactions of these particles with Standard Model fermions realize the partial compositeness scenario. Unde...

  9. Partial Ileal Bypass Undone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Schouten, J.A.; Hoitsma, H.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Partial ileal bypass (PIB) for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia was introduced 20 years ago. About 110 cases have been described. We know of only 1 case of restoration of intestinal continuity; no details were given. We report here the second case of PIB in the Netherlands; the operation was r

  10. Dilemmas of partial cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    Related to the often applied cooperation models of social dilemmas, we deal with scenarios in which defection dominates cooperation, but an intermediate fraction of cooperators, that is, "partial cooperation," would maximize the overall performance of a group of individuals. Of course, such a solution comes at the expense of cooperators that do not profit from the overall maximum. However, because there are mechanisms accounting for mutual benefits after repeated interactions or through evolutionary mechanisms, such situations can constitute "dilemmas" of partial cooperation. Among the 12 ordinally distinct, symmetrical 2 x 2 games, three (barely considered) variants are correspondents of such dilemmas. Whereas some previous studies investigated particular instances of such games, we here provide the unifying framework and concisely relate it to the broad literature on cooperation in social dilemmas. Complementing our argumentation, we study the evolution of partial cooperation by deriving the respective conditions under which coexistence of cooperators and defectors, that is, partial cooperation, can be a stable outcome of evolutionary dynamics in these scenarios. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such models for research on the large biodiversity and variation in cooperative efforts both in biological and social systems.

  11. Algebraic partial Boolean algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Derek [Math Department, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States)

    2003-04-04

    Partial Boolean algebras, first studied by Kochen and Specker in the 1960s, provide the structure for Bell-Kochen-Specker theorems which deny the existence of non-contextual hidden variable theories. In this paper, we study partial Boolean algebras which are 'algebraic' in the sense that their elements have coordinates in an algebraic number field. Several of these algebras have been discussed recently in a debate on the validity of Bell-Kochen-Specker theorems in the context of finite precision measurements. The main result of this paper is that every algebraic finitely-generated partial Boolean algebra B(T) is finite when the underlying space H is three-dimensional, answering a question of Kochen and showing that Conway and Kochen's infinite algebraic partial Boolean algebra has minimum dimension. This result contrasts the existence of an infinite (non-algebraic) B(T) generated by eight elements in an abstract orthomodular lattice of height 3. We then initiate a study of higher-dimensional algebraic partial Boolean algebras. First, we describe a restriction on the determinants of the elements of B(T) that are generated by a given set T. We then show that when the generating set T consists of the rays spanning the minimal vectors in a real irreducible root lattice, B(T) is infinite just if that root lattice has an A{sub 5} sublattice. Finally, we characterize the rays of B(T) when T consists of the rays spanning the minimal vectors of the root lattice E{sub 8}.

  12. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  13. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C; Couprie, M-E

    2015-03-06

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  14. Partially predictable chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Wernecke, Hendrik; Gros, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    For a chaotic system pairs of initially close-by trajectories become eventually fully uncorrelated on the attracting set. This process of decorrelation is split into an initial decrease characterized by the maximal Lyapunov exponent and a subsequent diffusive process on the chaotic attractor causing the final loss of predictability. The time scales of both processes can be either of the same or of very different orders of magnitude. In the latter case the two trajectories linger within a finite but small distance (with respect to the overall size of the attractor) for exceedingly long times and therefore remain partially predictable. We introduce a 0-1 indicator for chaos capable of describing this scenario, arguing, in addition, that the chaotic closed braids found close to a period-doubling transition are generically partially predictable.

  15. Partial Remission Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Hougaard, Philip; Pörksen, Sven

    2014-01-01

    of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of IDAA1c and age on partial C-peptide remission (stimulated C-peptide, SCP > 300 pmol/L). RESULTS: PR (IDAA1c ≤ 9) in the Danish and Hvidoere cohorts occurred in 62 vs. 61% (3 months......OBJECTIVE: To validate the partial remission (PR) definition based on insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The IDAA1c was developed using data in 251 children from the European Hvidoere cohort. For validation, 129 children from a Danish cohort were followed from the onset...

  16. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  17. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  18. Unanticipated Partial Behavioral Reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Roethlisberger, David; Denker, Marcus; Tanter, Éric

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Dynamic, unanticipated adaptation of running systems is of interest in a variety of situations, ranging from functional upgrades to on-the-fly debugging or monitoring of critical applications. In this paper we study a particular form of computational reflection, called unanticipated partial behavioral reflection, which is particularly well-suited for unanticipated adaptation of real-world systems. Our proposal combines the dynamicity of unanticipated reflection, i.e., ...

  19. Renormalizing Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Bricmont, J.; Kupiainen, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this review paper, we explain how to apply Renormalization Group ideas to the analysis of the long-time asymptotics of solutions of partial differential equations. We illustrate the method on several examples of nonlinear parabolic equations. We discuss many applications, including the stability of profiles and fronts in the Ginzburg-Landau equation, anomalous scaling laws in reaction-diffusion equations, and the shape of a solution near a blow-up point.

  20. Arithmetic partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Buium, Alexandru; Simanca, Santiago R.

    2006-01-01

    We develop an arithmetic analogue of linear partial differential equations in two independent ``space-time'' variables. The spatial derivative is a Fermat quotient operator, while the time derivative is the usual derivation. This allows us to ``flow'' integers or, more generally, points on algebraic groups with coordinates in rings with arithmetic flavor. In particular, we show that elliptic curves have certain canonical ``flows'' on them that are the arithmetic analogues of the heat and wave...

  1. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  2. Deformation of C isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kanada-Enyo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Systematic analysis of the deformations of proton and neutron densities in even-even C isotopes was done based on the method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The $E2$ transition strength was discussed in relation to the deformation. We analyze the $B(E2;2^+_1\\to 0^+_1)$ in $^{16}$C, which has been recently measured to be abnormally small. The results suggest the difference of the deformations between proton and neutron densities in the neutron-rich C isotopes. It was found that stable proton structure in C isotopes plays an important role in the enhancement the neutron skin structure as well as in the systematics of $B(E2)$ in the neutron-rich C.

  3. Isotopes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe  in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed.  The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  4. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  5. Isotopic Fingerprint for Phosphorus in Drinking Water Supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooddy, Daren C; Lapworth, Dan J; Ascott, Matthew J; Bennett, Sarah A; Heaton, Timothy H E; Surridge, Ben W J

    2015-08-01

    Phosphate dosing of drinking water supplies, coupled with leakage from distribution networks, represents a significant input of phosphorus to the environment. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate (δ(18)OPO4), a novel stable isotope tracer for phosphorus, offers new opportunities to understand the importance of phosphorus derived from sources such as drinking water. We report the first assessment of δ(18)OPO4 within drinking water supplies. A total of 40 samples from phosphate-dosed distribution networks were analyzed from across England and Wales. In addition, samples of the source orthophosphoric acid used for dosing were also analyzed. Two distinct isotopic signatures for drinking water were identified (average = +13.2 or +19.7‰), primarily determined by δ(18)OPO4 of the source acid (average = +12.4 or +19.7‰). Dependent upon the source acid used, drinking water δ(18)OPO4 appears isotopically distinct from a number of other phosphorus sources. Isotopic offsets from the source acid ranging from -0.9 to +2.8‰ were observed. There was little evidence that equilibrium isotope fractionation dominated within the networks, with offsets from temperature-dependent equilibrium ranging from -4.8 to +4.2‰. While partial equilibrium fractionation may have occurred, kinetic effects associated with microbial uptake of phosphorus or abiotic sorption and dissolution reactions may also contribute to δ(18)OPO4 within drinking water supplies.

  6. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  7. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  8. Partial Splenic Artery Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Shadmani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Hypersplenism often accompanies chronic liver disease and splenomegaly is one of the four cardinal signs of hypersplenism, the other three being cytopenia, normal or hyperplastic bone marrow and response splenectomy. Surgical splenectomy is the traditional treatment."nIn the recent years, partial splenic embolization has been widely used in patients with hypersplenism and cirrhosis.This study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of partial splenic embolization using PVA (poly vinyl alcohol and steel coil in the management of hypersplenism."nPatients and Methods: Between Aban 1387 and Aban 1388, ten patients with hypersplenism related hematologic abnormalities (leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, variceal hemorrhage or other sequels underwent partial splenic embolization with PVA and coil. A comparison between pre-procedure and post-procedure lab data, endoscopy and splenic volumetery was done."nResults: All patients showed dramatic improvement in platelet and leukocyte counts. Platelet and leukocyte counts remained at an appropriate level during the follow up period. In one patient after one year progressive decline in the platelet count was noted, however the values remained significantly higher than before PSE (70000 vs 15000."nAlmost all patients had problems related to post embolization syndrome. In one patient severe pain was noted that lasted nearly ten days, in the other patients, pain was less severe. No significant complication (splenic abscess, pancreatitis, portal vein thrombosis developed in this study."nConclusion: The efficacy of PSE observed in our study confirms the results of previous studies in pa-tients with hypersplenism. This safe, fast method can be used bridging therapy for cirrhotic patients waiting for liver transplantation. Hematological response is related to the extension of embolization.

  9. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, D; Süli, E

    2001-01-01

    /homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html7-Volume Set now available at special set price ! Over the second half of the 20th century the subject area loosely referred to as numerical analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs) has undergone unprecedented development. At its practical end, the vigorous growth and steady diversification of the field were stimulated by the demand for accurate and reliable tools for computational modelling in physical sciences and engineering, and by the rapid development of computer hardware and architecture. At the more theoretical end, the analytical insight in

  10. Partial Dynamical Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2010-01-01

    This overview focuses on the notion of partial dynamical symmetry (PDS), for which a prescribed symmetry is obeyed by a subset of solvable eigenstates, but is not shared by the Hamiltonian. General algorithms are presented to identify interactions, of a given order, with such intermediate-symmetry structure. Explicit bosonic and fermionic Hamiltonians with PDS are constructed in the framework of models based on spectrum generating algebras. PDSs of various types are shown to be relevant to nuclear spectroscopy, quantum phase transitions and systems with mixed chaotic and regular dynamics.

  11. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2008-01-01

    This three-part treatment of partial differential equations focuses on elliptic and evolution equations. Largely self-contained, it concludes with a series of independent topics directly related to the methods and results of the preceding sections that helps introduce readers to advanced topics for further study. Geared toward graduate and postgraduate students of mathematics, this volume also constitutes a valuable reference for mathematicians and mathematical theorists.Starting with the theory of elliptic equations and the solution of the Dirichlet problem, the text develops the theory of we

  12. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Harold

    1997-01-01

    The subject matter, partial differential equations (PDEs), has a long history (dating from the 18th century) and an active contemporary phase. An early phase (with a separate focus on taut string vibrations and heat flow through solid bodies) stimulated developments of great importance for mathematical analysis, such as a wider concept of functions and integration and the existence of trigonometric or Fourier series representations. The direct relevance of PDEs to all manner of mathematical, physical and technical problems continues. This book presents a reasonably broad introductory account of the subject, with due regard for analytical detail, applications and historical matters.

  13. Partially ordered algebraic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Originally published in an important series of books on pure and applied mathematics, this monograph by a distinguished mathematician explores a high-level area in algebra. It constitutes the first systematic summary of research concerning partially ordered groups, semigroups, rings, and fields. The self-contained treatment features numerous problems, complete proofs, a detailed bibliography, and indexes. It presumes some knowledge of abstract algebra, providing necessary background and references where appropriate. This inexpensive edition of a hard-to-find systematic survey will fill a gap i

  14. Paschen is Partially Back

    CERN Document Server

    Stift, M J

    2008-01-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden ``ghost lines'' appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeII 6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB regime opens exciting new diagnostics.

  15. Paschen is Partially Back

    OpenAIRE

    Stift, M. J.; Leone, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden ``ghost lines'' appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeII 6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB reg...

  16. Paschen is partially Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stift, M. J.; Leone, F.

    2008-04-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden "ghost lines" appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeI λ6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB regime opens exciting new diagnostics.

  17. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  18. GEOCHRONOMETRY ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20040631 Chen Jiangfeng (School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui) ; Xie Zhi Relationships Between Rb-Sr, Ar - Ar Geochronometers and Oxygen Isotopic Equilibrium of Intrusions from Eastern Anhui Province, China (Geological Journal of China Universities, ISSN 1006 - 7493, CN 32 -

  19. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090432 Zhou Shuqing (School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences Beijing 100083, China); Huang Haiping Stable Isotopic Records vs. Important Events in Life Evolution and the Concurrent Environment (Geological Review, ISSN0371-5736, CN11-1952, 54(2), 2008, p.225-231, 3 illus., 1 table, 77 refs.)

  20. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141014Wang Hairan(State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics,Department of Geology,Northwest University,Xi’an710069,China);Zhao Hongge Theory and Application of Zircon U-Pb Isotope Dating Technique(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671-1947,CN21-1458/P,22(3),2013,p.229

  1. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072750 Huang Sijing(State Key Laboratory of Oil/Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Pei Changrong Age Calibration for the Boundary between Lower and Middle Triassic by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy in Eastern Sichuan Province

  2. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070454 Bao Zengkuan (Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049, China); Yuan Wanming Apatite (U-Th)/He Dating and Its Application (Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica, ISSN1000-6524, CN11-1966/P, 24(2), 2005, p.126-132, 2 illus., 25 refs.) Key words: isotopic geochronology

  3. Isotopic Implicit Surface Meshing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boissonnat, Jean-Daniel; Cohen-Steiner, David; Vegter, Gert

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of piecewise linear approximation of implicit surfaces. We first give a criterion ensuring that the zero-set of a smooth function and the one of a piecewise linear approximation of it are isotopic. Then, we deduce from this criterion an implicit surface meshing algor

  4. Isotope hydrograph separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum, Centre of Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Storm-runoff thus reflects the complex hydraulic behaviour of drainage basins and water-links of such systems. Water of different origin may participate in the events and in this lecture, the application of isotope techniques to separate storm hydrographs into different components will be presented.

  5. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  6. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  8. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobos, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  9. Cadmium isotope fractionation during adsorption to Mn-oxyhydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L. E.; Swihart, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The heavy metal cadmium is of interest both as a toxic contaminant in groundwater and as a critical nutrient for some marine diatoms [1], yet little is known about the biogeochemistry of this element. Horner et al. [2] suggested that Cd stable isotopes could potentially enable reconstruction of biological use of Cd in the marine realm: since cultured diatoms fractionate Cd isotopes [3], and ferromanganese crusts appear to incorporate a faithful record of deepwater Cd isotopes [2], depth profiles in such crusts may yield information about the extent of Cd assimilation of isotopically light Cd by diatoms over time. Although no work has yet been published regarding the use of stable isotopes to track reactive transport of Cd in contaminated aquifers, others have recently demonstrated the potential of isotopes to track reactions affecting the mobility of other toxic metals (e.g., [4]). With both of these potential applications in mind, we conducted two sets of experiments, at low and high ionic strength, in which Cd partially adsorbed to potassium birnessite. Our goals are to quantify the fractionations and to constrain the mechanisms governing Cd isotope behavior during adsorption to an environmentally abundant scavenger of Cd. Suspensions of synthetic birnessite were doped with various amounts of dissolved Cd2+ at pH ~8.3. Following reaction, the dissolved and adsorbed pools of Cd were separated by filtration, purified by anion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by multicollector ICP-MS using a double-spike routine. In all cases, lighter isotopes preferentially adsorbed to the birnessite particles. At low ionic strength (ILacan et al. (2006) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 70, 5104. [4] Berna et al. (2010) Env. Sci. & Tech. 44, 1043.

  10. Zn isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle: A melting control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Luc S.; Mattielli, Nadine; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Debouge, Wendy; Golovin, Alexander V.

    2016-10-01

    We present new Zn elemental and isotope data on seventeen fertile and refractory mantle peridotite xenoliths. Eleven fertile peridotites are garnet and spinel lherzolites from Vitim and Tariat (Siberia and Mongolia) and represent some of the most pristine fertile peridotites available. Six refractory peridotites are spinel harzburgites from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberian craton) that are nearly pristine residues of high-degree polybaric melting at high pressure (7-4 GPa). Geochemical data suggest that Zn isotopic compositions in the peridotites have not been affected by post-melting processes such as metasomatism, contamination by the host-magmas or alteration. The fertile peridotites have uniform Zn concentrations (59 ± 2 ppm) and Zn isotopic compositions with δ66Zn (relative to JMC-Lyon-03-0749l) = +0.30 ± 0.03‰ consistent with the Bulk Silicate Earth estimates of δ66Zn = +0.28 ± 0.05‰ (Chen et al., 2013). The refractory peridotites have Zn concentrations ranging from 30 to 48 ppm and δ66Zn from + 0.10 ± 0.01 ‰ to + 0.18 ± 0.01 ‰ with an average of + 0.14 ± 0.03 ‰. Our data suggest that the lithospheric mantle has a heterogeneous Zn isotopic composition. Modeling of Zn isotope partitioning during partial melting of fertile mantle suggests that high degrees of melt extraction (>30%) may significantly fractionate Zn isotopes (up to 0.16‰) and that during mantle melting, Zn concentrations and isotopic compositions are mainly controlled by the stability of clinopyroxene and garnet within the melting residue. Because the stability of clinopyroxene and garnet is mainly pressure dependent we suggest that both the depth and the degrees of melt extraction may control Zn isotope fractionation during mantle melting.

  11. Tutorial on Online Partial Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Cook

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short tutorial introduction to online partial evaluation. We show how to write a simple online partial evaluator for a simple, pure, first-order, functional programming language. In particular, we show that the partial evaluator can be derived as a variation on a compositionally defined interpreter. We demonstrate the use of the resulting partial evaluator for program optimization in the context of model-driven development.

  12. Tutorial on Online Partial Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, William R; 10.4204/EPTCS.66.8

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a short tutorial introduction to online partial evaluation. We show how to write a simple online partial evaluator for a simple, pure, first-order, functional programming language. In particular, we show that the partial evaluator can be derived as a variation on a compositionally defined interpreter. We demonstrate the use of the resulting partial evaluator for program optimization in the context of model-driven development.

  13. s-Process Os isotope enrichment in ureilites by planetary processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, S.; Brandon, A. D.; Mayer, B.; Humayun, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitous nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies relative to the terrestrial isotopic composition in Mo, Ru, and other elements are known from both bulk chondrites and differentiated meteorites, but Os isotope ratios reported from such meteorites have been found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial value. The carriers of s- and r-process Os must thus have been homogeneously distributed in the solar nebula. As large Os isotope anomalies are known from acid leachates and residues of primitive chondrites, the constant relative proportions of presolar s- and r-process carriers in such chondrites must have been maintained during nebular processes. It has long been assumed that partial melting of primitive chondrites would homogenize the isotopic heterogeneity carried by presolar grains. Here, ureilites, carbon-rich ultramafic achondrites dominantly composed of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene, are shown to be the first differentiated bulk Solar System materials for which nucleosynthetic Os isotope anomalies have been identified. These anomalies consist of enrichment in s-process Os heterogeneously distributed in different ureilites. Given the observed homogeneity of Os isotopes in all types of primitive chondrites, this Os isotope variability among ureilites must have been caused by selective removal of s-process-poor Os host phases, probably metal, during rapid localized melting on the ureilite parent body. While Mo and Ru isotope anomalies for all meteorites measured so far exhibit s-process deficits relative to the Earth, the opposite holds for the Os isotope anomalies in ureilites reported here. This might indicate that the Earth preferentially accreted olivine-rich restites and inherited a s-process excess relative to smaller meteorite bodies, consistent with Earth's high Mg/Si ratio and enrichment of s-process nuclides in Mo, Ru, and Nd isotopes. Our new Os isotope results imply that caution must be used when applying nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies as provenance

  14. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML...

  15. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML of ...

  16. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  17. Modes of planetary-scale Fe isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2006-12-01

    A comprehensive set of high-precision Fe isotope data for the principle meteorite types and silicate reservoirs of the Earth is used to investigate iron isotope fractionation at inter- and intra-planetary scales. 14 chondrite analyses yield a homogeneous Fe isotope composition with an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of - 0.015 ± 0.020‰ (2 SE) relative to the international iron standard IRMM-014. Eight non-cumulate and polymict eucrite meteorites that sample the silicate portion of the HED (howardite-eucrite-diogenite) parent body yield an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of - 0.001 ± 0.017‰, indistinguishable to the chondritic Fe isotope composition. Fe isotope ratios that are indistinguishable to the chondritic value have also been published for SNC meteorites. This inner-solar system homogeneity in Fe isotopes suggests that planetary accretion itself did not significantly fractionate iron. Nine mantle xenoliths yield a 2 σ envelope of - 0.13‰ to + 0.09‰ in δ56Fe/ 54Fe. Using this range as proxy for the bulk silicate Earth in a mass balance model places the Fe isotope composition of the outer liquid core that contains ca. 83% of Earth's total iron to within ± 0.020‰ of the chondritic δ56Fe/ 54Fe value. These calculations allow to interprete magmatic iron meteorites ( δ56Fe/ 54Fe = + 0.047 ± 0.016‰; N = 8) to be representative for the Earth's inner metallic core. Eight terrestrial basalt samples yield a homogeneous Fe isotope composition with an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of + 0.072 ± 0.016‰. The observation that terrestrial basalts appear to be slightly heavier than mantle xenoliths and that thus partial mantle melting preferentially transfers heavy iron into the melt [S. Weyer, A.D. Anbar, G.P. Brey, C. Munker, K. Mezger and A.B. Woodland, Iron isotope fractionation during planetary differentiation, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 240(2), 251-264, 2005.] is intriguing, but also raises some important questions: first it is questionable whether the

  18. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2004-01-01

    This primer on elementary partial differential equations presents the standard material usually covered in a one-semester, undergraduate course on boundary value problems and PDEs. What makes this book unique is that it is a brief treatment, yet it covers all the major ideas: the wave equation, the diffusion equation, the Laplace equation, and the advection equation on bounded and unbounded domains. Methods include eigenfunction expansions, integral transforms, and characteristics. Mathematical ideas are motivated from physical problems, and the exposition is presented in a concise style accessible to science and engineering students; emphasis is on motivation, concepts, methods, and interpretation, rather than formal theory. This second edition contains new and additional exercises, and it includes a new chapter on the applications of PDEs to biology: age structured models, pattern formation; epidemic wave fronts, and advection-diffusion processes. The student who reads through this book and solves many of t...

  19. Fundamental partial compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We construct renormalizable Standard Model extensions, valid up to the Planck scale, that give a composite Higgs from a new fundamental strong force acting on fermions and scalars. Yukawa interactions of these particles with Standard Model fermions realize the partial compositeness scenario. Successful models exist because gauge quantum numbers of Standard Model fermions admit a minimal enough 'square root'. Furthermore, right-handed SM fermions have an SU(2)$_R$-like structure, yielding a custodially-protected composite Higgs. Baryon and lepton numbers arise accidentally. Standard Model fermions acquire mass at tree level, while the Higgs potential and flavor violations are generated by quantum corrections. We further discuss accidental symmetries and other dynamical features stemming from the new strongly interacting scalars. If the same phenomenology can be obtained from models without our elementary scalars, they would reappear as composite states.

  20. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  1. Partial model checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif

    1995-01-01

    A major obstacle in applying finite-state model checking to the verification of large systems is the combinatorial explosion of the state space arising when many loosely coupled parallel processes are considered. The problem also known as the state-explosion problem has been attacked from various...... sides. This paper presents a new approach based on partial model checking where parts of the concurrent system are gradually removed while transforming the specification accordingly. When the intermediate specifications constructed in this manner can be kept small, the state-explosion problem is avoided....... Experimental results with a prototype implemented in Standard ML, shows that for Milner's Scheduler-an often used benchmark-this approach improves on the published results on binary decision diagrams and is comparable to results obtained using generalized decision diagrams. Specifications are expressed...

  2. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  3. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface...... deposited during the Early Ordovician — a time of known redox instability in ancient oceans – exhibit a significant positive Cr isotope excursion of +0.5‰. This excursion is interpreted as the reductive drawn down of dissolved Cr in seawater in response to the development of a proximal anoxic sink...... of ancient marine sediments can be a useful tool for understanding the cycling of redox sensitive elements on a local scale....

  4. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  5. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050934 Chen Zhihong (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China); Lu Songnian Age of the Fushui Intermediate-Mafic Intrusive Complex in the Qinling Orogen, New Zircon U - Pb and Whole -Rock Sm and Nd Isotope Chronological Evidence (Geological Bulletin of China, ISSN 1671-2552, CN11-4648/P, 23(4), 2004, p. 322-328, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 10 refs. )

  6. GEOCHRONOMETRY &ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131727 Huang Xiaowen(State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry,Institute of Geochemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guiyang 550002,China);Qi Liang Preliminary Study on Sample-Preparation for Re-Os Isotopic Dating of Pyrite(Geochimica,ISSN0379-1726,CN44-1398/P,41(4),2012,p.380-386,3illus.,2tables,25refs)Key words:pyrite,Re-Os dating

  7. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132601 Cui Yurong(Tianjin Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Zhou Hongying In Situ LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb Isotopic Dating of Monazite(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN0375-5444,CN11-1856/P,33(6),2012,p.865-876,6illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:monazite,U-Pb dating

  8. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  9. Stable isotopes in tree rings: towards a mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation and mixing processes from the leaves to the wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Hommel, Robert; Treydte, Kerstin; Werner, Roland A; Monson, Russell K

    2014-08-01

    The mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation processes is increasing but we still lack detailed knowledge of the processes that determine the isotopic composition of the tree-ring archive over the long term. Especially with regard to the path from leaf photosynthate production to wood formation, post-assimilation fractionations/processes might cause at least a partial decoupling between the leaf isotope signals that record processes such as stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis, and the wood or cellulose signals that are stored in the paleophysiological record. In this review, we start from the rather well understood processes at the leaf level such as photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation, leaf water evaporative isotope enrichment and the issue of the isotopic composition of inorganic sources (CO2 and H2O), though we focus on the less explored 'downstream' processes related to metabolism and transport. We further summarize the roles of cellulose and lignin as important chemical constituents of wood, and the processes that determine the transfer of photosynthate (sucrose) and associated isotopic signals to wood production. We cover the broad topics of post-carboxylation carbon isotope fractionation and of the exchange of organic oxygen with water within the tree. In two case studies, we assess the transfer of carbon and oxygen isotopic signals from leaves to tree rings. Finally we address the issue of different temporal scales and link isotope fractionation at the shorter time scale for processes in the leaf to the isotopic ratio as recorded across longer time scales of the tree-ring archive.

  10. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the Partial Derivative Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Roundy, David; Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne A; Weber, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Most notably, thermodynamics uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find confusing. As part of a collaboration with mathematics faculty, we are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. As a part of this project, we have performed a pilot study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering and mathematics. Our interviews made use of the Partial Derivative Machine (PDM), which is a mechanical system featuring four observable and controllable properties, of which any two are independent. Using the PDM, we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context in which there is not a known functional form. Through these three interviews, we found that the mathematicians exhibited a striking difference in their underst...

  11. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  12. Retracing diagenetic processes in marine porewaters using Ca isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, C.; Teichert, B. M.; Kaufhold, S.; Gussone, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) isotope ratios of marine organic and inorganic mineral precipitates are used to monitor changes in the oceanic Ca-budget and in paleo-temperature, and serve as a proxy for the trophic level of organisms in the food chain (c.f. Skulan et al., 1997; Zhu et al., 1998). However, during interaction between sediments and porewater, the Ca isotopic composition of marine porewaters might be shifted, bearing the potential to alter the Ca isotope proxy records. While processes, such as partial dissolution of calcareous shells and carbonate recrystallization have been studied (Fantle and DePaolo, 2007; Turchyn and DePaolo 2011), other diagenetic processes such as ion exchange with clay minerals have not been taken into account while studying Ca isotope profiles of porewaters. Nevertheless, first experiments and the investigation of natural porewaters indicate that this process has a significant effect on the Ca isotope composition in marine porewaters. Laboratory experiments aimed to determine if Ca isotope fractionation occurs during Ca adsorption and exchange with ammonium on clay minerals. The results show that Ca adsorption in a seawater environment is associated with fractionation, where light Ca is preferably adorbed. The addition of ammonium to the experimental set up caused partial release of Ca accompanied by isotope fractionation. Based on the results of the experiments, model calculations tested the impact of varying clay mineral type, content and sediment porosity, revealing that ion exchange processes with clay minerals predominantly shift the porewater signal to lighter values. This is in agreement with observations by Teichert et al. (2009), who found a correlation of ammonium-concentration and δ44/40Ca ratios in the porewater of drill core samples from the Cascadia accretionary margin (ODP Leg 204). Calcium isotope ratios of natural marine porewaters of three sites in the North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 303) show that the correlation between

  13. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  14. Removable partial denture occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanhoe, John R; Plummer, Kevin D

    2004-07-01

    No single occlusal morphology, scheme, or material will successfully treat all patients. Many patients have been treated, both successfully and unsuccessfully, using widely varying theories of occlusion, choices of posterior tooth form, and restorative materials. Therefore, experience has demonstrated that there is no one righ r way to restore the occlusion of all patients. Partially edentulous patients have many and varied needs. Clinicians must understand the healthy physiologic gnathostomatic system and properly diagnose what is or may become pathologic. Henderson [3] stated that the occlusion of the successfully treated patient allows the masticating mechanism to carry out its physiologic functions while the temporomandibular joints, the neuromuscular mechanism, the teeth and their supporting structures remain in a good state of health. Skills in diagnosis and treatment planning are of utmost importance in treating these patients, for whom the clinician's goals are not only an esthetic and functional restoration but also a lasting harmonious state. Perhaps this was best state by DeVan [55] more than 60 years ago in his often-quoted objective. "The patient's fundamental need is the continued meticulous restoration of what is missing, since what is lost is in a sense irretrievably lost." Because it is clear that there is no one method, no one occlusal scheme, or one material that guarantees success for all patients, recommendations for consideration when establishing or reestablishing occlusal schemes have been presented. These recommendations must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic and technical skills.

  15. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  16. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the {sup 13}C content of soil CO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The {sup 13}C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: decreasing {sup 13}C content with depth (due mainly to increased importance of respired CO{sub 2}), decreasing {sup 13}C with altitude (partially due to relatively more C-3 vegetation), and reduced {sup 13}C during spring (due again to higher rates of respiration, and reduced gas permeability of wet soils). These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO{sub 2} loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids.

  17. Lithium isotope separation by laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; Maruyama, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shiba, K.

    1982-01-01

    A lithium isotope separation was performed using a laser isotope separation method. It was found that the lithium atoms with a natural isotopic abundance enhanced its /sup 6/Li concentration up to over 90% by tuning the laser wavelength to the /sup 2/Psub(1/2) of /sup 6/Li. Too high power, however, leads to a loss of enrichment due to the power broadening effect which was analysed by the equation of motion of density matrices.

  18. Partial Actions and Power Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Ávila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a partial action (X,α with enveloping action (T,β. In this work we extend α to a partial action on the ring (P(X,Δ,∩ and find its enveloping action (E,β. Finally, we introduce the concept of partial action of finite type to investigate the relationship between (E,β and (P(T,β.

  19. Algorithms over partially ordered sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Robert M.; Østerby, Ole

    1969-01-01

    in partially ordered sets, answer the combinatorial question of how many maximal chains might exist in a partially ordered set withn elements, and we give an algorithm for enumerating all maximal chains. We give (in § 3) algorithms which decide whether a partially ordered set is a (lower or upper) semi......-lattice, and whether a lattice has distributive, modular, and Boolean properties. Finally (in § 4) we give Algol realizations of the various algorithms....

  20. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  1. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  2. Scale-dependent linkages between nitrate isotopes and denitrification in surface soils: implications for isotope measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven J; Weintraub, Samantha R; Bowling, David R

    2016-08-01

    Natural abundance nitrate (NO3 (-)) isotopes represent a powerful tool for assessing denitrification, yet the scale and context dependence of relationships between isotopes and denitrification have received little attention, especially in surface soils. We measured the NO3 (-) isotope compositions in soil extractions and lysimeter water from a semi-arid meadow and lawn during snowmelt, along with the denitrification potential, bulk O2, and a proxy for anaerobic microsites. Denitrification potential varied by three orders of magnitude and the slope of δ(18)O/δ(15)N in soil-extracted NO3 (-) from all samples measured 1.04 ± 0.12 (R (2) = 0.64, p < 0.0001), consistent with fractionation from denitrification. However, δ(15)N of extracted NO3 (-) was often lower than bulk soil δ(15)N (by up to 24 ‰), indicative of fractionation during nitrification that was partially overprinted by denitrification. Mean NO3 (-) isotopes in lysimeter water differed from soil extractions by up to 19 ‰ in δ(18)O and 12 ‰ in δ(15)N, indicating distinct biogeochemical processing in relatively mobile water versus soil microsites. This implies that NO3 (-) isotopes in streams, which are predominantly fed by mobile water, do not fully reflect terrestrial soil N cycling. Relationships between potential denitrification and δ(15)N of extracted NO3 (-) showed a strong threshold effect culminating in a null relationship at high denitrification rates. Our observations of (1) competing fractionation from nitrification and denitrification in redox-heterogeneous surface soils, (2) large NO3 (-) isotopic differences between relatively immobile and mobile water pools, (3) and the spatial dependence of δ(18)O/δ(15)N relationships suggest caution in using NO3 (-) isotopes to infer site or watershed-scale patterns in denitrification.

  3. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  4. Controls on the stable isotope compositions of travertine from hyperalkaline springs in Oman: Insights from clumped isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, E. S.; Guo, W.; Paukert, A. N.; Matter, J. M.; Mervine, E. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonate formation at hyperalkaline springs is typical of serpentinization in peridotite massifs worldwide. These travertines have long been known to exhibit large variations in their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, extending from apparent equilibrium values to highly depleted values. However, the exact causes of these variations are not well constrained. We analyzed a suite of well-characterized fresh carbonate precipitates and travertines associated with hyperalkaline springs in the peridotite section of the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman, and found their clumped isotope compositions vary systematically with formation environments. Based on these findings, we identified four main processes controlling the stable isotope compositions of these carbonates. These include hydroxylation of CO2, partial isotope equilibration of dissolved inorganic carbon, mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end-members, and post-depositional recrystallization. Most notably, in fresh crystalline films on the surface of hyperalkaline springs and in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools, we observed large enrichments in Δ47 (up to ∼0.2‰ above expected equilibrium values) which accompany depletions in δ18O and δ13C, yielding about 0.01‰ increase in Δ47 and 1.1‰ decrease in δ13C for every 1‰ decrease in δ18O, relative to expected equilibrium values. This disequilibrium trend, also reflected in preserved travertines ranging in age from modern to ∼40,000 years old, is interpreted to arise mainly from the isotope effects associated with the hydroxylation of CO2 in high-pH fluids and agrees with our first-order theoretical estimation. In addition, in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools and in subsamples of one preserved travertine terrace, we observed additional enrichments in Δ47 at intermediate δ13C and δ18O, consistent with mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end

  5. Lexicographic Shellability of Partial Involutions

    CERN Document Server

    Can, Mahir Bilen

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript we study inclusion posets of Borel orbit closures on (symmetric) matrices. In particular, we show that the Bruhat poset of partial involutions is a lexicographiically shellable poset. Also, studying the embeddings of symmetric groups and involutions into rooks and partial involutions, respectively, we find new $EL$-labelings on permutations as well as on involutions.

  6. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  7. On Degenerate Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2010-01-01

    Some of recent developments, including recent results, ideas, techniques, and approaches, in the study of degenerate partial differential equations are surveyed and analyzed. Several examples of nonlinear degenerate, even mixed, partial differential equations, are presented, which arise naturally in some longstanding, fundamental problems in fluid mechanics and differential geometry. The solution to these fundamental problems greatly requires a deep understanding of nonlinear degenerate parti...

  8. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  9. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  10. Permutation and Its Partial Transpose

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y; Werner, R F; Zhang, Yong; Kauffman, Louis H.; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2006-01-01

    Permutation and its partial transpose play important roles in quantum information theory. The Werner state is recognized as a rational solution of the Yang--Baxter equation, and the isotropic state with an adjustable parameter is found to form a braid representation. The set of permutation's partial transposes is an algebra called the "PPT" algebra which guides the construction of multipartite symmetric states. The virtual knot theory having permutation as a virtual crossing provides a topological language describing quantum computation having permutation as a swap gate. In this paper, permutation's partial transpose is identified with an idempotent of the Temperley--Lieb algebra. The algebra generated by permutation and its partial transpose is found to be the Brauer algebra. The linear combinations of identity, permutation and its partial transpose can form various projectors describing tangles; braid representations; virtual braid representations underlying common solutions of the braid relation and Yang--...

  11. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  12. Calcium isotopes in wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  13. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  14. Individual variation of isotopic niches in grazing and browsing desert ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, D; Mfune, J K E; Gewers, E; Brain, C; Voigt, C C

    2015-09-01

    Ungulates often adjust their diet when food availability varies over time. However, it is poorly understood when and to what extent individuals change their diet and, if they do so, if all individuals of a population occupy distinct or similar dietary niches. In the arid Namibian Kunene Region, we studied temporal variations of individual niches in grazing gemsbok (Oryx gazella gazella) and predominantly browsing springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis). We used variation in stable C and N isotope ratios of tail hair increments as proxies to estimate individual isotopic dietary niches and their temporal plasticity. Isotopic dietary niches of populations of the two species were mutually exclusive, but similar in breadth. Isotopic niche breadth of gemsbok was better explained by within-individual variation than by between-individual variation of stable isotope ratios, indicating that gemsbok individuals were facultative specialists in using isotopically distinct local food resources. In contrast, inter- and intra-individual variations contributed similarly to the isotopic niche breadth of the springbok population, suggesting a higher degree of individual isotopic segregation in a more generalist ungulate. In both species, between-individual variation was neither explained by changes in plant primary productivity, sex, geographical position nor by group size. Within species, individual dietary niches overlapped partially, suggesting that both populations included individuals with distinct isotopic dietary niches. Our study provides the first evidence for isotopic dietary niche segregation in individuals of two distinct desert ungulates. Similar, yet isotopically distinct dietary niches of individuals may facilitate partitioning of food resources and thus individual survival in desert ecosystems.

  15. Cast Partial Denture versus Acrylic Partial Denture for Replacement of Missing Teeth in Partially Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramita Suwal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effects of cast partial denture with conventional all acrylic denture in respect to retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort and periodontal health of abutments. Methods: 50 adult partially edentulous patient seeking for replacement of missing teeth having Kennedy class I and II arches with or without modification areas were selected for the study. Group-A was treated with cast partial denture and Group-B with acrylic partial denture. Data collected during follow-up visit of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by evaluating retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort, periodontal health of abutment. Results: Chi-square test was applied to find out differences between the groups at 95% confidence interval where p = 0.05. One year comparison shows that cast partial denture maintained retention and stability better than acrylic partial denture (p< 0.05. The masticatory efficiency was significantly compromising from 3rd month to 1 year in all acrylic partial denture groups (p< 0.05. The comfort of patient with cast partial denture was maintained better during the observation period (p< 0.05. Periodontal health of abutment was gradually deteriorated in all acrylic denture group (p

  16. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous ferrous iron and goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Brian L.; Handler, Robert M.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Wu, Lingling; Czaja, Andrew D.; Heimann, Adriana; Johnson, Clark M.

    2010-06-01

    The equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factor between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite has been experimentally measured to be - 1.05 ± 0.08‰ in 56Fe/54Fe (2σ) at 22 °C, using the three-isotope method. Experiments were done using two sizes of goethite (81 × 11 nm and 590 × 42 nm), and the experimental products were subjected to serial extraction using acid partial dissolution techniques to determine if surface Fe(III) atoms have different isotopic properties than the bulk goethite. These experiments indicate that the interaction of Fe(II)aq and goethite is dynamic and results in complete or near-complete Fe isotope exchange over 30 days, involving at least four components: Fe(II)aq, goethite, sorbed Fe(II), and Fe(III)surface. The equilibrium fractionation factor between Fe(II)aq and Fe(II)sorb is the same for both sizes of goethite, at Δ56FeFe(II)aq-Fe(II)sorb = - 1.24 ± 0.14‰; this fractionation factor is significantly different than the results of previous studies on Fe(II) sorption to goethite. The proportion of the Fe(III)surface component is greatest in the experiments that used the smallest goethite, and the Fe(III)surface-Fe(II)aq fractionation is estimated to be at least + 2.1‰. The high Fe(III)surface-Fe(II)aq fractionation may exert a significant influence on the Fe isotope compositions of aqueous Fe(II) in natural systems that contain nanoparticulate goethite, including those involving bacterial iron reduction. These results demonstrate that the isotopic properties of nano-scale minerals may be distinct from micron-scale or larger minerals, as is the case for other thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles.

  17. PARTIAL SYNCHRONIZATION BETWEEN DIFFERENT SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun; LIU Zeng-rong

    2005-01-01

    A new method for partial synchronization between different systems was obtained. The definition of partial synchronization under which the problem works is given. The stability of the method is analyzed by the Liapunov function method and the condition of choosing the control term is derived. The reliability of this method is proved by some numerical examples, in which the dynamical behaviors of the synchronized systems are observed and it is found that whatever state the response system is partial synchronization can be always achieved by adding some proper control term.

  18. Competition from Isotopic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Fabre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During later MOIS3, in Europe two populations were present, autochthonous Neanderthals and modern humans. Ecological competition between these two populations has often been evoked but never demonstrated. Our aim is to establish whether resource competition occurred. In this paper, in order to examine the possibility of ecological competition between these two populations, 599 isotopic data were subjected to rigorous statistical treatment and analysis through mixing models. The aim of this paper was to compare dietary strategies of Neanderthals and modern humans over time. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans shared dietary habits in the particular environmental context of MOIS3 characterised in Europe by climatic deterioration. In this environmental context, the resource competition between Neanderthals and modern humans may have accelerated the disappearance of the Neanderthal population.

  19. Isotopic perspectives on the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argles, T. W.; Foster, G. L.; Whittington, A. G.; George, M. T.

    2003-04-01

    The western syntaxis has been characterised as a structural and metamorphic anomaly within the Himalaya, resulting from extreme Neogene exhumation and associated partial melting. However, an integration of detailed fieldwork with whole-rock isotopic data indicates that all the major tectonic units observed along the arc of the orogen also occur in the syntaxis. Most of the rocks exposed by the extreme exhumation have very different characteristics to their correlatives in the rest of the Himalayan mountain belt, because they represent very different crustal levels. The generally higher metamorphic grade of most syntaxial units obscures their affinities, while high strain throughout the syntaxis also conspires to mask the major tectonic faults that form boundaries to the units in the rest of the orogen. The Lesser Himalayan affinity of the gneissic core of the Nanga Parbat massif has been revealed previously using Nd isotopes. This study confirms the distinction between Lesser (E(Nd) = -20 to -29) and High (E(Nd) = -12 to -19) Himalayan rocks, but further subdivides those units with a High Himalayan Nd signature using Sr isotopic data. Some low-grade schists within the syntaxis have a relatively low 87Sr/86Sr ratio (<0.720) that distinguishes them from the High Himalayan rocks, and suggests they are metamorphic equivalents of the Tethyan sediments exposed in the main Himalayan orogen. The tectonic contact between the Lesser and High Himalayan units in the central Himalaya is the Main Central Thrust, a zone characterised by inverted metamorphism and high strain, but in the uniformly high-strain syntaxis this thrust is difficult to locate except by isotopic signatures. Extensive thermobarometric studies in the syntaxis, however, show two things. The first is the varying intensity of Neogene metamorphic overprint, whose strength is closely related to the degree of deformation (and rheology). The second is a zone of distinctly lower temperature mineral assemblages

  20. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  1. Causes and Consequences of Partial Migration in a Passerine Bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegemann, Arne; Marra, Peter P; Tieleman, B Irene

    2015-10-01

    Many animal species have populations in which some individuals migrate and others remain on the breeding grounds. This phenomenon is called partial migration. Despite substantial theoretical work, empirical data on causes and consequences of partial migration remain scarce, mainly because of difficulties associated with tracking individuals over large spatial scales. We used stable hydrogen isotopes in claw material to determine whether skylarks Alauda arvensis from a single breeding population in the Netherlands had migrated or remained resident in the previous winter and investigated whether there were causes or consequences of either strategy. Age and sex had no influence on the propensity to migrate, but larger individuals were more likely to be residents. The wintering strategy was not fixed within individuals. Up to 45% of individuals measured in multiple years switched strategies. Reproductive parameters were not related to the wintering strategy, but individuals that wintered locally experienced lower future return rates, and this was directly correlated with two independent measures of immune function. Our results suggest that partial migration in skylarks is based neither on genetic dimorphism nor on an age- and sex-dependent condition. Instead, the wintering strategy is related to structural size and immune function. These new insights on causes and consequences of partial migration advance our understanding of the ecology, evolution, and coexistence of different life-history strategies.

  2. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenspan, Donald

    2000-01-01

    Designed for use in a one-semester course by seniors and beginning graduate students, this rigorous presentation explores practical methods of solving differential equations, plus the unifying theory underlying the mathematical superstructure. Topics include basic concepts, Fourier series, second-order partial differential equations, wave equation, potential equation, heat equation, approximate solution of partial differential equations, and more. Exercises appear at the ends of most chapters. 1961 edition.

  3. Symmetries of partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Gaussier, Hervé; Merker, Joël

    2004-01-01

    We establish a link between the study of completely integrable systems of partial differential equations and the study of generic submanifolds in C^n. Using the recent developments of Cauchy-Riemann geometry we provide the set of symmetries of such a system with a Lie group structure. Finally we determine the precise upper bound of the dimension of this Lie group for some specific systems of partial differential equations.

  4. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, M.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Eberlein, T.; Reichart, G.-J.; Rost, B.; Sluijs, A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  5. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotope-edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying structural and dynamical properties of peptides and proteins with site-specific resolution. Labeling of selected amide carbonyls with (13)C results in detectable sidebands of amide I' vibrations, which provide information about local conformation and/or solvent exposure without structural perturbation to the protein. Incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at specific positions is achieved by the chemical synthesis of the studied proteins. We describe the basic procedures for synthesis of (13)C isotopically edited protein samples, experimental IR spectroscopic measurements, and analysis of the site-specific structural changes from the thermal unfolding IR data.

  6. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  7. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  8. Pb isotopic geochemical study on the crustal structure of Tongbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Pb isotopic composition of the Tongbai complex, distributed in the Tongbaishan to the west of the Dabieshan, ranges between the Dabie core complex and the Dabie ultral-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic complex, the latter having more radiogenic Pb isotopic composition than the former. Granites from the Jigongshan pluton, which intruded mainly into the Tongbai complex, are distinct from the Tongbai complex but similar to the Dabie core complex in Pb isotopic composition, showing that the magma of the Jigongshan granites was derived from the partial melting of the Dabie core complex. According to Pb isotopic compositional variation model in the vertical crustal section and magma source from the Jigongshan pluton, it is suggested that the Tongbai complex was an upper rock serial of the Dabie core complex, which is beneath the Dabie UHP metamorphic complex in the crustal structure of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt. The Tongbai complex was not well preserved in the Dabie area due to the high exhumed crustal section. However, the crustal section in the Tongbai area was exhumed less than that in the Dabie area, and the deep crust in the Tongbai area still contains the basement composition similar to the Dabie core complex. Therefore, the crustal basements from the Dabie to Tongbai areas are united. The present distribution of the basement blocks in different locations of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt reflects different exposure of the crustal section.

  9. Transmutation of Isotopes --- Ecological and Energy Production Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowski, Waclaw

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes principles of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation of Nuclear Wastes (ATW) and gives some flavour of the most important topics which are today under investigations in many countries. An assessment of the potential impact of ATW on a future of nuclear energy is also given. Nuclear reactors based on self-sustained fission reactions --- after spectacular development in fifties and sixties, that resulted in deployment of over 400 power reactors --- are wrestling today more with public acceptance than with irresolvable technological problems. In a whole spectrum of reasons which resulted in today's opposition against nuclear power few of them are very relevant for the nuclear physics community and they arose from the fact that development of nuclear power had been handed over to the nuclear engineers and technicians with some generically unresolved problems, which should have been solved properly by nuclear scientists. In a certain degree of simplification one can say, that most of the problems originate from very specific features of a fission phenomenon: self-sustained chain reaction in fissile materials and very strong radioactivity of fission products and very long half-life of some of the fission and activation products. And just this enormous concentration of radioactive fission products in the reactor core is the main problem of managing nuclear reactors: it requires unconditional guarantee for the reactor core integrity in order to avoid radioactive contamination of the environment; it creates problems to handle decay heat in the reactor core and finally it makes handling and/or disposal of spent fuel almost a philosophical issue, due to unimaginable long time scales of radioactive decay of some isotopes. A lot can be done to improve the design of conventional nuclear reactors (like Light Water Reactors); new, better reactors can be designed but it seems today very improbable to expect any radical change in the public perception of conventional

  10. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  11. Oxygen isotopes as a tracer of phosphate sources and cycling in aquatic systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate can provide valuable information about sources and processes affecting phosphorus as it moves through hydrologic systems. Applications of this technique in soil and water have become more common in recent years due to improvements in extraction methods and instrument capabilities, and studies in multiple aquatic environments have demonstrated that some phosphorus sources may have distinct isotopic compositions within a given system. Under normal environmental conditions, the oxygen-phosphorus bonds in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) can only be broken by enzymatic activity. Biological cycling of DIP will bring the phosphate oxygen into a temperature-dependent equilibrium with the surrounding water, overprinting any existing isotopic source signals. However, studies conducted in a wide range of estuarine, freshwater, and groundwater systems have found that the phosphate oxygen is often out of biological equilibrium with the water, suggesting that it is common for at least a partial isotopic source signal to be retained in aquatic systems. Oxygen isotope analysis on various potential phosphate sources such as synthetic and organic fertilizers, animal waste, detergents, and septic/wastewater treatment plant effluents show that these sources span a wide range of isotopic compositions, and although there is considerable overlap between the source groups, sources may be isotopically distinct within a given study area. Recent soil studies have shown that isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen is also useful for understanding microbial cycling across different phosphorus pools, and may provide insights into controls on phosphorus leaching. Combining stable isotope information from soil and water studies will greatly improve our understanding of complex phosphate cycling, and the increasing use of this isotopic technique across different environments will provide new information regarding anthropogenic phosphate inputs and

  12. Tags for the stable isotopic labeling of carbohydrates and quantitative analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Michael J; Zaia, Joseph

    2007-08-01

    Although stable isotopic labeling has found widespread use in the proteomics field, its application to carbohydrate quantification has been limited. Herein we report the design, synthesis, and application of a novel series of compounds that allow for the incorporation of isotopic variation within glycan structures. The novel feature of the compounds is the ability to incorporate the isotopes in a controlled manner, allowing for the generation of four tags that vary only in their isotopic content. This allows for the direct comparisons of three samples or triplicate measurements with an internal standard within one mass spectral analysis. Quantitation of partially depolymerized glycosaminoglycan mixtures, as well as N-linked glycans released from fetuin, is used to demonstrate the utility of the tetraplex tagging strategy.

  13. Alignments in the nobelium isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Zie; XU Fu-Rong; YUAN Cen-Xi; QI Chong

    2009-01-01

    Total-Routhian-Surface calculations have been performed to investigate the deformation and align-ment properties of the No isotopes. It is found that normal deformed and superdeformed states in these nuclei can coexist at low excitation energies. In neutron-deficient No isotopes, the superdeformed shapes can even become the ground states. Moreover, we plotted the kinematic moments of inertia of the No isotopes, which follow very nicely available experimental data. It is noted that, as the rotational frequency increases, align-ments develop at hω=0.2-0.3 MeV. Our calculations show that the occupation of the vj orbital plays an important role in the alignments of the No isotopes.

  14. Isotope-based quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial...

  15. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  16. Accelerating fissile fuel breeding in FBR with natural safety features%加速增产核燃料的天然安全“核热泉”快中子增殖堆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕应中

    2012-01-01

    为保证21世纪中国经济的持续稳定地高速增长,必须充分发挥核能的巨大潜力,使之配合其他可再生能源同步增长,及早大规模替代煤炭等化石能源.由于目前国内大量兴建的核电站以压水堆为主,需要消费大量天然铀资源,倚靠廉价铀供应难于维持长期增长,必须依靠快中子增殖生产人造裂变燃料——钚,才能摆脱天然铀原料短缺的束缚.然而,传统的快中子增殖堆的核燃料增产速度较慢,难于配合中国核电的高速增长.本文介绍一种先进快中于增殖堆(AFBR)方案,其中利用在线连续换料的空心球形燃料元件,依靠载热剂的出人口之间的温度差实现满功率自然循环,可以成倍地提高燃料比功率与核燃料增殖速度.本快中子增殖堆改进了俄罗斯称为“天然安全”的BREST铅冷快堆设计方案,成为无须人为控制的“核热泉”,它能在不设置加压泵及高位铅池的情况下,自动按外部负荷需要供应必要的热量,完全依靠自然循环将全部裂变热能及停堆后堆芯余热散出,不至对环境产生放射性污染.%To guarantee the rapid growth of the Chinese economy in 21" century, nuclear energy should be fully exploited, together with other renewable energies to replace coal and other depletive fossil fuels. Unfortunately, the major Chinese nuclear power plants under construction are mostly PWRs that would consume a lot of natural uranium during their operations. The availability of cheap natural uranium could seriously constraint the Chinese nuclear power development, unless artificial fissile fuel-plutonium is supplied from fast breeder reactors. The fissile nuclei production rate in the traditional fast breeders, however, seems too slow to match the rapid growth of nuclear power. A concept of the advanced fast breeder (AFBR) is introduced, therefore, to greatly accelerating the fissile fuel breeding process. In said breeder, the spherical hollow

  17. Reasonable partiality in professional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Brenda

    2005-04-01

    First, two aspects of the partiality issue are identified: (1) Is it right/reasonable for professionals to favour their clients' interests over either those of other individuals or those of society in general? (2) Are special non-universalisable obligations attached to certain professional roles? Second, some comments are made on the notions of partiality and reasonableness. On partiality, the assumption that only two positions are possible--a detached universalism or a partialist egoism--is challenged and it is suggested that partiality, e.g. to family members, lies between these two positions, being neither a form of egoism, nor of impersonal detachment. On reasonableness, it is pointed out that 'reasonable' is an ambiguous concept, eliding the notions of the 'morally right' and the 'rational.' Third, a series of practical examples are taken from counselling, medicine, law, education and religious practice and some common principles are abstracted from the cases and discussed. These include truth-telling, confidentiality, conflicts of interest between clients and particular others and between clients and society. It is concluded that while partiality can be justified as a useful tool in standard cases, particular circumstances can affect the final verdict.

  18. Parachute technique for partial penectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Korkes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Penile carcinoma is a rare but mutilating malignancy. In this context, partial penectomy is the most commonly applied approach for best oncological results. We herein propose a simple modification of the classic technique of partial penectomy, for better cosmetic and functional results. TECHNIQUE: If partial penectomy is indicated, the present technique can bring additional benefits. Different from classical technique, the urethra is spatulated only ventrally. An inverted "V" skin flap with 0.5 cm of extension is sectioned ventrally. The suture is performed with vicryl 4-0 in a "parachute" fashion, beginning from the ventral portion of the urethra and the "V" flap, followed by the "V" flap angles and than by the dorsal portion of the penis. After completion of the suture, a Foley catheter and light dressing are placed for 24 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Several complex reconstructive techniques have been previously proposed, but normally require specific surgical abilities, adequate patient selection and staged procedures. We believe that these reconstructive techniques are very useful in some specific subsets of patients. However, the technique herein proposed is a simple alternative that can be applied to all men after a partial penectomy, and takes the same amount of time as that in the classic technique. In conclusion, the "parachute" technique for penile reconstruction after partial amputation not only improves the appearance of the penis, but also maintains an adequate function.

  19. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  20. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Hsuan; Halliday, Alex N.; Siebert, Chris; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Burton, Kevin W.; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Harvey, Jason

    2017-02-01

    We report double-spike molybdenum (Mo) isotope data for forty-two mafic and fifteen ultramafic rocks from diverse locations and compare these with results for five chondrites. The δ98/95Mo values (normalized to NIST SRM 3134) range from -0.59 ± 0.04 to +0.10 ± 0.08‰. The compositions of one carbonaceous (CI) and four ordinary chondrites are relatively uniform (-0.14 ± 0.01‰, 95% ci (confidence interval)) in excellent agreement with previous data. These values are just resolvable from the mean of 10 mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) (0.00 ± 0.02‰, 95% ci). The compositions of 13 mantle-derived ultramafic xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole, Tariat and Vitim are more diverse (-0.39 to -0.07‰) with a mean of -0.22 ± 0.06‰ (95% ci). On this basis, the isotopic composition of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE or Primitive Mantle) is within error identical to chondrites. The mean Mo concentration of the ultramafic xenoliths (0.19 ± 0.07 ppm, 95% ci) is similar in magnitude to that of MORB (0.48 ± 0.13 ppm, 95% ci), providing evidence, either for a more compatible behaviour than previously thought or for selective Mo enrichment of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Intraplate and ocean island basalts (OIBs) display significant isotopic variability within a single locality from MORB-like to strongly negative (-0.59 ± 0.04‰). The most extreme values measured are for nephelinites from the Cameroon Line and Trinidade, which also have anomalously high Ce/Pb and low Mo/Ce relative to normal oceanic basalts. δ98/95Mo correlates negatively with Ce/Pb and U/Pb, and positively with Mo/Ce, explicable if a phase such as an oxide or a sulphide liquid selectively retains isotopically heavy Mo in the mantle and fractionates its isotopic composition in low degree partial melts. If residual phases retain Mo during partial melting, it is possible that the [Mo] for the BSE may be misrepresented by values estimated from basalts. This would be consistent with the high Mo

  1. Isotopic analyses and calculation by use of JENDL-3.2 for high burn-up UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.; Walker, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) were carried out for high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel (3.8%U235, average burn-up:60GWd/t) and mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel (5.07%Pu, average burn-up:45GWd/t). The PIE includes, (a) isotopic analysis, (b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in pellet cross section and so on. The results of isotopic analyses and EPMA were compared with ORIGEN2/82 and VIM-BURN calculation results. In VIM-BURN calculation, the nuclear data of actinides were proceeded from new data file, JENDL-3.2. The sensitivities of power history and moderator density to nuclides composition were investigated by VIM-BURN calculation and consequently power history mainly effected on Am241 and Am242m and moderator density effected on fissile nuclides. From EPMA results of U and Pu distribution in pellet, VIM-BURN calculation showed reasonable distribution in pellet cross section. (author)

  2. Triple oxygen isotope composition of the Campi Flegrei magma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Wörner, Gerhard; Pack, Andreas; Sengupta, Sukanya; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Arienzo, Ilenia; D'Antonio, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    together form one vertical trend in Sr-O isotope space that deviates profoundly from all other subduction-related magmas. These results suggest that magmas could be derived from (a) a mantle source variably modified by pelagic sediments and later (b) assimilated high δ18O crustal material that did not significantly affect the Sr-isotope composition. In addition, Δ17O variations in hand-picked minerals and some possible contaminants (contact metamorphic skarns, altered Campi Flegrei pyroclastic rocks, marine pelagic shales and cherts) have been analyzed in order to identify the endmembers/contaminants for the Campi Flegrei volcanic complex. Δ17O, calculated as (1000*LN(δ17O/1000+1))-0.5305*(1000*LN(δ18O/1000+1)), vary between -0.03 and -0.1‰ in minerals, and between -0.07 and -0.2‰ in contaminants. Limestone assimilation is a possibility but can be ruled out by the absence of a positive correlation between δ18O and CaO. Assimilation of altered high δ18O older volcanic deposits of similar Sr-isotope composition or, alternatively, shallow assimilation of Sr-poor partial melts derived at low pressure from crustal silicate rocks are possible explanations for the observed trends and need to be further tested.

  3. Partial Priapism Treated with Pentoxifylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Meghan A.; Carrion, Rafael E.; Yang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Main findings: A 26-year-old man suffering from partial priapism was successfully treated with a regimen including pentoxifylline, a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor that is often used to conservatively treat Peyronie's disease. Case hypothesis: Partial priapism is an extremely rare urological condition that is characterized by thrombosis within the proximal segment of a single corpus cavernosum. There have only been 36 reported cases to date. Although several factors have been associated with this unusual disorder, such as trauma or bicycle riding, the etiology is still not completely understood. Treatment is usually conservative and consists of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic. Promising future implications: This case report supports the utilization of pentoxifylline in patients with partial priapism due to its anti-fibrogenic and anti-thrombotic properties. PMID:26401875

  4. Partial metrizability in value quantales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph D. Kopperman

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Partial metrics are metrics except that the distance from a point to itself need not be 0. These are useful in modelling partially defined information, which often appears in computer science. We generalize this notion to study “partial metrics” whose values lie in a value quantale which may be other than the reals. Then each topology arises from such a generalized metric, and for each continuous poset, there is such a generalized metric whose topology is the Scott topology, and whose dual topology is the lower topology. These are both corollaries to our result that a bitopological space is pairwise completely regular if and only if there is such a generalized metric whose topology is the first topology, and whose dual topology is the second.

  5. Partial Transposition on Bipartite System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xi-Jun; HAN Yong-Jian; WU Yu-Chun; GUO Guang-Can

    2008-01-01

    Many properties of partial transposition are unclear as yet.Here we carefully consider the number of the negative eigenvalues of ρT(ρ's partial transposition)when ρ is a two-partite state.There is strong evidence to show that the number of negative eigenvalues of ρT is N(N-1)/2 at most when ρ is a state in Hilbert space CM(×)CN.For the special case,the 2×2 system,we use this result to give a partial proof of the conjecture |ρT|T≥0.We find that this conjecture is strongly connected with the entanglement of the state corresponding to the negative eigenvalue of ρT or the negative entropy of ρ.

  6. Timed Testing under Partial Observability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Li, Shuhao

    2009-01-01

    To steer model-based conformance testing of real-time systems towards certain test purposes or test coverage, many testing methods need (to be enhanced with) the assumption of full observability of the System Under Test (SUT), which means that the tester can observe precisely what state...... precision sensors that we use to measure the SUT. This paper studies the problem of testing timed systems that are only partially observable. We model the SUT using Timed Game Automata (TGA) which has internal actions, uncontrollable outputs and timing uncertainty of outputs. We define the partial...... observability of SUT using a set of predicates over the TGA state space, and specify the test purposes in Computation Tree Logic (CTL) formulas. A recently developed partially observable timed game solver is used to generate winning strategies, which are used as test cases. We propose a conformance testing...

  7. A case for partial patellectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal V

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of fractures of the the patella is a subject of controversy. Partial patellectomy with retention of a major fragment and suture of the quadriceps to it, seems reasonable. 18 cases of patella fracture underwent such a procedure. The average age of the patients was 47 years. Maximum recovery took an average of 5 months. There were 6 excellent results, 9 good, 3 fair. Results were assessed on the basis of pain, muscle wasting, quadriceps power, and range of knee motion. Total patellectomy and patella fixation as alternative modes of treatment are discussed. Partial patellectomy, whenever possible, is a good choice.

  8. Yet another partial wave calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Daniel; Rauch, Johannes [TUM, Munich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We will present a new C++ library for partial wave analysis: YAP - yet another partial wave calculator. YAP is intended for amplitude analyses of the decays of spin-0 heavy mesons (principally B and D) to multiple (3, 4, etc.) pseudoscalar mesons but is not hard coded for such situations and is flexible enough to handle other decay scenarios. The library allows for both model dependent and model independent analysis methods. We introduce the software, and demonstrate examples for generating Monte Carlo data efficiently, and for analyzing data (both with the aid of the Bayesian Analysis Toolkit).

  9. Basic linear partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Treves, Francois

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on the archetypes of linear partial differential equations, this text for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students features most of the basic classical results. The methods, however, are decidedly nontraditional: in practically every instance, they tend toward a high level of abstraction. This approach recalls classical material to contemporary analysts in a language they can understand, as well as exploiting the field's wealth of examples as an introduction to modern theories.The four-part treatment covers the basic examples of linear partial differential equations and their

  10. Elements of partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, Ian N

    2006-01-01

    Geared toward students of applied rather than pure mathematics, this volume introduces elements of partial differential equations. Its focus is primarily upon finding solutions to particular equations rather than general theory.Topics include ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differential equations of the first and second orders, Laplace's equation, the wave equation, and the diffusion equation. A helpful Appendix offers information on systems of surfaces, and solutions to the odd-numbered problems appear at the end of the book. Readers pursuing independent st

  11. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  12. Zinc isotope fractionation during mantle melting and constraints on the Zn isotope composition of Earth's upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Zhou; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Liu, Jingao; Huang, Jian; Xiao, Yan; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Zhao, Xin-Miao; Tang, Limei

    2017-02-01

    The zinc (Zn) stable isotope system has great potential for tracing planetary formation and differentiation processes due to its chalcophile, lithophile and moderately volatile character. As an initial approach, the terrestrial mantle, and by inference, the bulk silicate Earth (BSE), have previously been suggested to have an average δ66Zn value of ∼+0.28‰ (relative to JMC 3-0749L) primarily based on oceanic basalts. Nevertheless, data for mantle peridotites are relatively scarce and it remains unclear whether Zn isotopes are fractionated during mantle melting. To address this issue, we report high-precision (±0.04‰; 2SD) Zn isotope data for well-characterized peridotites (n = 47) from cratonic and orogenic settings, as well as their mineral separates. Basalts including mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB) were also measured to avoid inter-laboratory bias. The MORB analyzed have homogeneous δ66Zn values of +0.28 ± 0.03‰ (here and throughout the text, errors are given as 2SD), similar to those of OIB obtained in this study and in the literature (+0.31 ± 0.09‰). Excluding the metasomatized peridotites that exhibit a wide δ66Zn range of -0.44‰ to +0.42‰, the non-metasomatized peridotites have relatively uniform δ66Zn value of +0.18 ± 0.06‰, which is lighter than both MORB and OIB. This difference suggests a small but detectable Zn isotope fractionation (∼0.1‰) during mantle partial melting. The magnitude of inter-mineral fractionation between olivine and pyroxene is, on average, close to zero, but spinels are always isotopically heavier than coexisting olivines (Δ66ZnSpl-Ol = +0.12 ± 0.07‰) due to the stiffer Zn-O bonds in spinel than silicate minerals (Ol, Opx and Cpx). Zinc concentrations in spinels are 11-88 times higher than those in silicate minerals, and our modelling suggests that spinel consumption during mantle melting plays a key role in generating high Zn concentrations and heavy Zn isotopic

  13. On partially entanglement breaking channels

    CERN Document Server

    Chruscinski, D; Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    Using well known duality between quantum maps and states of composite systems we introduce the notion of Schmidt number of a quantum channel. It enables one to define classes of quantum channels which partially break quantum entanglement. These classes generalize the well known class of entanglement breaking channels.

  14. Partial Dynamical Symmetries in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2000-01-01

    Partial dynamical symmetries (PDS) are shown to be relevant to the interpretation of the $K=0_2$ band and to the occurrence of F-spin multiplets of ground and scissors bands in deformed nuclei. Hamiltonians with bosonic and fermionic PDS are presented.

  15. Explanation Based Generalisation = Partial Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmelen, van F.A.H.; Bundy, A.

    1988-01-01

    We argue that explanation-based generalisation as recently proposed in the machine learning literature is essentially equivalent to partial evaluation, a well known technique in the functional and logic programming literature. We show this equivalence by analysing the definitions and underlying algo

  16. Bayesian Sparse Partial Least Squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidaurre, D.; Gerven, M.A.J. van; Bielza, C.; Larrañaga, P.; Heskes, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Partial least squares (PLS) is a class of methods that makes use of a set of latent or unobserved variables to model the relation between (typically) two sets of input and output variables, respectively. Several flavors, depending on how the latent variables or components are computed, have been dev

  17. Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A national surveillance study in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Unit was undertaken to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI, a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis.

  18. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  19. Abyssal peridotites reveal the near-chondritic Fe isotopic composition of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Paul R.; Warren, Jessica M.; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Terrestrial oceanic and continental basalts are enriched by approximately +0.1‰ in 56Fe/54Fe ratio relative to primitive, undifferentiated meteorites (chondrites). The δ56Fe values of terrestrial basalts are also distinct from those of basalts from Mars and asteroid Vesta, which have chondritic Fe isotopic compositions. The processes responsible for the isotopic enrichment of terrestrial basalts are debated, in part because the Fe isotopic composition of the mantle source of terrestrial basalts is unknown. Here we report Fe isotopic measurements of abyssal peridotites, which are the residues of limited melting at oceanic ridges and are thus the best proxies for the composition of the convective portion of the mantle. Our data show that abyssal peridotites have a mean δ56Fe value of +0.010±0.007‰ (relative to IRMM-014), which is indistinguishable from chondrites. After correcting this data for seafloor weathering and mantle melting, we estimate the average Fe isotopic composition of the terrestrial mantle to be δ56Fe=+0.025±0.025‰, which is also indistinguishable from chondrites, within current analytical precision. We determine that the maximum shift in δ56Fe for peridotite residues during partial mantle melting is 0.01‰. Our results argue against isotopic fractionation during core-mantle differentiation or iron vaporization during the Moon-forming giant impact, because both processes would yield a bulk mantle δ56Fe value that is non-chondritic. In addition, our results suggest that disproportionation of mantle Fe2+-Fe3+ in perovskite and Fe0 metal and segregation of metal to the core could not have been a driver for Fe isotopic fractionation in the silicate mantle. Instead, the different iron isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites and MORBs support mounting evidence for iron isotopic fractionation of melts but not residues during the formation of oceanic and continental crust.

  20. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    differentiation processes, such as partial mantle melting and crystal fractionation, can cause stable Cr isotopic fractionation on Earth and other planetary bodies.

  1. Isotopes a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ellam, Rob

    2016-01-01

    An isotope is a variant form of a chemical element, containing a different number of neutrons in its nucleus. Most elements exist as several isotopes. Many are stable while others are radioactive, and some may only exist fleetingly before decaying into other elements. In this Very Short Introduction, Rob Ellam explains how isotopes have proved enormously important across all the sciences and in archaeology. Radioactive isotopes may be familiar from their use in nuclear weapons, nuclear power, and in medicine, as well as in carbon dating. They have been central to establishing the age of the Earth and the origins of the solar system. Combining previous and new research, Ellam provides an overview of the nature of stable and radioactive isotopes, and considers their wide range of modern applications. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subjec...

  2. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  3. Handbook of environmental isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Mark (ed.) [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. Geology

    2011-07-01

    Applications of radioactive and stable isotopes have revolutionized our understanding of the Earth and near-earth surface processes. The utility of the isotopes are ever-increasing and our sole focus is to bring out the applications of these isotopes as tracers and chronometers to a wider audience so that they can be used as powerful tools to solve environmental problems. New developments in this field remain mostly in peer-reviewed journal articles and hence our goal is to synthesize these findings for easy reference for students, faculty, regulators in governmental and non-governmental agencies, and environmental companies. While this volume maintains its rigor in terms of its depth of knowledge and quantitative information, it contains the breadth needed for wide variety problems and applications in the environmental sciences. This volume presents all of the newer and older applications of isotopes pertaining to the environmental problems in one place that is readily accessible to readers. This book not only has the depth and rigor that is needed for academia, but it has the breadth and case studies to illustrate the utility of the isotopes in a wide variety of environments (atmosphere, oceans, lakes, rivers and streams, terrestrial environments, and sub-surface environments) and serves a large audience, from students and researchers, regulators in federal, state and local governments, and environmental companies. (orig.)

  4. Photodisintegration of the isotopes {sup 186,188,189,190,192}Os: Similarities and distinctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamov, V. V., E-mail: Varlamov@depni.sinp.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Makarov, M. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Peskov, N. N.; Stepanov, M. E. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    In addition to the results obtained earlier for the isotopes {sup 188,189}Os, experimental data on the photodisintegration of the isotopes {sup 186,190,192}Os are analyzed on the basis of specially introduced objective criteria of reliability of data on the cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions. It is found that the (γ, 1n), (γ, 2n), and (γ, 3n) cross sections for each isotope satisfy differently or, on the contrary, do not satisfy the data-reliability criteria. In many cases, the multiplicity transition functions specified as the ratios F{sub i} = σ(γ, in)/σ(γ, xn) of the cross sections for the (γ, in) partial reactions to the neutron-yield reaction cross section σ(γ, xn) = σ(γ, 1n) + 2σ(γ, 2n) + 3σ(γ, 3n) +... have values that are physically unreliable by definition. It is shown that ambiguities in the dependence of significant systematic uncertainties in experimentally determined neutron multiplicities on the measured kinetic energies is the reason for this. The dependence of these uncertainties on the energy spectra of neutrons is analyzed. For the isotopes {sup 186,190,192}Os, new evaluated data satisfying the data-reliability criteria are obtained for the cross sections for partial and total photoneutron reactions.

  5. Isotope evidence for N2-fixation in Sphagnum peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Martin; Jackova, Ivana; Buzek, Frantisek; Stepanova, Marketa; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Curik, Jan; Prechova, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Waterlogged organic soils store as much as 30 % of the world's soil carbon (C), and 15 % of the world's soil nitrogen (N). In the era of climate change, wetlands are vulnerable to increasing temperatures and prolonged periods of low rainfall. Higher rates of microbial processes and/or changing availability of oxygen may lead to peat thinning and elevated emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2, but also CH4 and N2O). Biogeochemical cycling of C and N in peat bogs is coupled. Under low levels of pollution by reactive nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+), increasing N inputs may positively affect C storage in peat. Recent studies in North America and Scandinavia have suggested that pristine bogs are characterized by significant rates of microbial N2 fixation that augments C storage in the peat substrate. We present a nitrogen isotope study aimed at corroborating these findings. We conducted an isotope inventory of N fluxes and pools at two Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe). For the first time, we present a time-series of del15N values of atmospheric input at the same locations as del15N values of living Sphagnum and peat. The mean del15N values systematically increased in the order: input NH4+ (-10.0 ‰) < input NO3- (-7.9 ‰) < peat porewater (-5.6 ‰) < Sphagnum (-5.0 ‰) < shallow peat (-4.2 ‰) < deep peat (-2.2 ‰) < runoff (-1.4 ‰) < porewater N2O (1.4 ‰). Importantly, N of Sphagnum was isotopically heavier than N of the atmospheric input (p < 0.001). If partial incorporation of reactive N from the atmosphere into Sphagnum was isotopically selective, the residual N would have to be isotopically extremely light. Such N, however, was not identified anywhere in the ecosystem. Alternatively, Sphagnum may have contained an admixture of isotopically heavier N from atmospheric N2 (del15N N2 = 0 ‰). We conlude that the N isotope systematics at the two Czech sites is consistent with the concept of significant N2 fixation

  6. Response to 'A comment on 'Signatures of fissile materials:High-energy gamma rays following fission,' by Zeev B. Alfassi'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.; Larimer, Ruth-Mary; Shugart, Howard; Browne, Edgardo; Smith, Alan R.; McDonald, Richard J.; Nitsche, Heino; Gupta, Puja; Frank, Michael I.; Gosnell, Thomas B.

    2004-06-03

    Prof. Alfassi has pointed out that radionuclides that are not fission products, but which emit {gamma} rays with energies E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV, can be produced by neutron irradiation. He suggested that the decays of such activation products would interfere with the identification of fissionable materials. However, the combination of the energy spectrum and the temporal variation of the fission product gamma rays can be used to distinguish fissionable material from other nuclides. The activation of nuclides that could produce interferences will depend upon the specifics of the cargo and, possibly, the local surroundings. As discussed in our original publication, in addition to the steel that Prof. Alfassi referred to in his Comment, we studied the activation of wood, polyethylene, aluminum, and sandstone. Activation by thermal neutrons will always occur, and Prof. Alfassi correctly points out that nuclides such as {sup 49}Ca and {sup 37}S can be formed in this way. These nuclides are representative of most potential interferences. Both {sup 48}Ca and {sup 36}S have very low isotopic abundances (0.187% and 0.02%, respectively) and small thermal neutron capture cross sections (0.20 barns and 0.98 barns, respectively). In addition, their half lives are more than an order of magnitude longer than the gross average observed from the fission products, and more than two orders of magnitude longer than the lifetimes of the shorter-lived fission products that contribute significantly to the total intensity in the energy range of interest. These differences make it possible to distinguish between fission products and thermal neutron activation products. Prof. Alfassi also pointed out that interferences, of which {sup 16}N is likely to be the most important, can be produced by fast neutron reactions. (As described in our original publication, we did not use a 14 MeV generator in our work.) Fortunately, a judicious choice of the source neutron energy can limit the extent of

  7. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, W.D. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Koropecki, R.R. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.ar; Arce, R.D. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Busso, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina)

    2008-04-30

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium.

  8. Partial spectral multipliers and partial Riesz transforms for degenerate operators

    CERN Document Server

    ter Elst, A F M

    2012-01-01

    We consider degenerate differential operators $A = \\displaystyle{\\sum_{k,j=1}^d \\partial_k (a_{kj} \\partial_j)}$ on $L^2(\\mathbb{R}^d)$ with real symmetric bounded measurable coefficients. Given a function $\\chi \\in C_b^\\infty(\\mathbb{R}^d)$ (respectively, $\\Omega$ a bounded Lipschitz domain) and suppose that $(a_{kj}) \\ge \\mu > 0$ a.e.\\ on $ \\supp \\chi$ (resp., a.e.\\ on $\\Omega$). We prove a spectral multiplier type result: if $F\\colon [0, \\infty) \\to \\mathbb{C}$ is such that $\\sup_{t > 0} \\| \\varphi(.) F(t .) \\|_{C^s} d/2$ then $M_\\chi F(I+A) M_\\chi$ is weak type $(1,1)$ (resp.\\ $P_\\Omega F(I+A) P_\\Omega$ is weak type $(1,1)$). We also prove boundedness on $L^p$ for all $p \\in (1,2]$ of the partial Riesz transforms $M_\\chi \

  9. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyshev, S. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dzhilavyan, L. Z. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A. A., E-mail: kuznets@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  10. Sulfur isotopic composition of modern seafloor hydrothermal sediment and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾志刚; 李军; 蒋富清; 秦蕴珊; 翟世奎

    2002-01-01

    A total of 1 264 sulfur isotopic values for modem seafloor hydrothermel sediments from different hydrothermal fidds have been collected. On this basis, combining our sulfur isotpic data for surface hydrothermal sediments from the Jade hydrohtermal field in the Okinawa Trough and the TAG hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, respectively, and comparing the sulfur isotopic compositions and analyzing their sources of sulfur in seafloor hydrothermal sediments from different geologic-tectonic setting, the results show that: ( 1 ) sulfur isotopic values of sulfides and sulfates in modern seafloor hydrothermal sediments are concentrated in a narrow range, δ34S values of sulfides vary from l × 10-3 to 9 × 10- 3, with a mean of 4.5 × 10- 3 ( n = 1 042), δ34S values of sulfates vary from 19 × 10- 3 to 24× 10-3, with a mean of 21.3× 10-3 (n =217); (2) comparing the sulfur isotopic compositions of hydrothermal sediments from the sediment-hosted hydrothermal fields, the range of sulfur isotopic values for hydrothermal sediments from the sediment-free hydrothermal fields is narrow relatively; (3) the differences of sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfides from different hydrothermal fields show the differences in the sources of sulfur. The sulfur of hydrothermal sulfides in the sediment-free mid-ocean ridges is mainly from mid-ocean ridge basalt, and partially from the reduced seawater sulfate, and it is the result of partially reduced seawater sulfate mixed with basaltic sulfur. In the sediment-hosted nid-ocean ridges and the back-arc basins, the volcanics, the sediments and the organic matters also can offer their sulfur for forming hydrothermal sulfides; (4) the variations of sulfur isotopic compositions and the different sources of sulfur for hydrothermal sediments may be attributed to the various physical-chemical characteristics of hydrothermal fluids, the magmatic evolution and the different geologic-tectonic settings of seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  11. The terrestrial uranium isotope cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten B; Elliott, Tim; Freymuth, Heye; Sims, Kenneth W W; Niu, Yaoling; Kelley, Katherine A

    2015-01-15

    Changing conditions on the Earth's surface can have a remarkable influence on the composition of its overwhelmingly more massive interior. The global distribution of uranium is a notable example. In early Earth history, the continental crust was enriched in uranium. Yet after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen, about 2.4 billion years ago, the aqueous mobility of oxidized uranium resulted in its significant transport to the oceans and, ultimately, by means of subduction, back to the mantle. Here we explore the isotopic characteristics of this global uranium cycle. We show that the subducted flux of uranium is isotopically distinct, with high (238)U/(235)U ratios, as a result of alteration processes at the bottom of an oxic ocean. We also find that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) have (238)U/(235)U ratios higher than does the bulk Earth, confirming the widespread pollution of the upper mantle with this recycled uranium. Although many ocean island basalts (OIBs) are argued to contain a recycled component, their uranium isotopic compositions do not differ from those of the bulk Earth. Because subducted uranium was probably isotopically unfractionated before full oceanic oxidation, about 600 million years ago, this observation reflects the greater antiquity of OIB sources. Elemental and isotope systematics of uranium in OIBs are strikingly consistent with previous OIB lead model ages, indicating that these mantle reservoirs formed between 2.4 and 1.8 billion years ago. In contrast, the uranium isotopic composition of MORB requires the convective stirring of recycled uranium throughout the upper mantle within the past 600 million years.

  12. Assessment of Using 99Mo and 99mTc Isotopes in Kuwait Medical Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Naser

    2016-04-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) in the state of Kuwait currently depends on importing the radioisotope molybdenum (Mo) in its isotopic form (Mo) to fulfill its demands. The present study was conducted on all nuclear medicine departments in the state of Kuwait. Daily, weekly, and monthly data were analyzed to statistically determine the current and future demands for the isotope Tc. This analysis was performed by collecting and analyzing data on MOH consumption of Tc for different diagnostic applications. The overall results indicate a partial decrease of 1.012% in the overall total demand for Tc up to the year 2018 for the state of Kuwait.

  13. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements...... or moderate, and overall sulfur fractionation in the stratosphere is very weak which does not exclude OCS from being an acceptable background the Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol layer. (iii) CO2 photolysis in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere is highly fractionating in both isotopes, enriching...

  14. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Borthwick, David

    2016-01-01

    This modern take on partial differential equations does not require knowledge beyond vector calculus and linear algebra. The author focuses on the most important classical partial differential equations, including conservation equations and their characteristics, the wave equation, the heat equation, function spaces, and Fourier series, drawing on tools from analysis only as they arise.Within each section the author creates a narrative that answers the five questions: (1) What is the scientific problem we are trying to understand? (2) How do we model that with PDE? (3) What techniques can we use to analyze the PDE? (4) How do those techniques apply to this equation? (5) What information or insight did we obtain by developing and analyzing the PDE? The text stresses the interplay between modeling and mathematical analysis, providing a thorough source of problems and an inspiration for the development of methods.

  15. Dynamics of partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wayne, C Eugene

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on the dynamics of partial differential equations that deal with closely related topics but can be read independently. Wayne reviews recent results on the global dynamics of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This system exhibits stable vortex solutions: the topic of Wayne's contribution is how solutions that start from arbitrary initial conditions evolve towards stable vortices. Weinstein considers the dynamics of localized states in nonlinear Schrodinger and Gross-Pitaevskii equations that describe many optical and quantum systems. In this contribution, Weinstein reviews recent bifurcations results of solitary waves, their linear and nonlinear stability properties, and results about radiation damping where waves lose energy through radiation.   The articles, written independently, are combined into one volume to showcase the tools of dynamical systems theory at work in explaining qualitative phenomena associated with two classes of partial differential equ...

  16. Partial AC-coupling minigrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moix, Pierre-Olivier; Ruchet, Claude [Studer Innotec, Sion (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Partial AC-coupling: - It is feasible to make AC-coupling of some compatible elements without V/f droops. Standard elements available on the market were tested. - Optimum design for efficiency is a share of the solar modules between DC-coupling with a solar charger and AC-coupling with a grid inverter according to the load profile. - Partial AC-coupling is better in term of robustness; it is more reliable to have at least a part of the solar production connected directly to DC, or even only DC coupling. The presented concepts are not only theoretical but were implemented and tested on real products available on the market. Many tests have been done to find out the limits and problems that can occur with the use of grid connected and stand alone inverter together. Many combinations were tested and it was found robust enough to be used in the field with the precautions mentioned about microcycling. (orig.)

  17. Interview accuracy in partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besocke, Ana Gabriela; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Valiensi, Stella Maris; Cristiano, Edgardo; Garcia, María del Carmen

    2009-11-01

    The statistical concept of accuracy has never been applied to verify the history data collected on seizure disorders by open format interview. We compared patients'/witnesses' descriptions of epileptic seizures with videotaped seizure characteristics and analyzed the accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), false-positive rate (FPR), and false-negative rate (FNR) of various components of the semiology in patients with partial epilepsy. Language disturbances, complex automatisms, and autonomic signs have high ACC and intermediate FNRs. This means that these manifestations are most obvious to the witness/patient and, therefore, are memorized easily. Dystonic posturing and upper limb automatisms have the highest FNRs, leading to low ACC. These are very subtle signs, not vigorous enough to be paid attention to, but their predictive value in partial epilepsy syndromes is relatively high. We believe these signs need to be directly sought in the interview, because often the patient/witness pays limited attention to them.

  18. Partial oral treatment of endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Høst, Nis Baun; Bruun, Niels Eske;

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) recommend 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Conversion from intravenous to oral antibiotics in clinically stabilized patients could reduce the side effects associated with intravenous treatment and shorten the length...... of hospital stay. Evidence supporting partial oral therapy as an alternative to the routinely recommended continued parenteral therapy is scarce, although observational data suggest that this strategy may be safe and effective....

  19. Exact Dynamical and Partial Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a hierarchy of broken symmetries with special emphasis on partial dynamical symmetries (PDS). The latter correspond to a situation in which a non-invariant Hamiltonian accommodates a subset of solvable eigenstates with good symmetry, while other eigenstates are mixed. We present an algorithm for constructing Hamiltonians with this property and demonstrate the relevance of the PDS notion to nuclear spectroscopy, to quantum phase transitions and to mixed systems with coexisting regularity and chaos.

  20. Exact dynamical and partial symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A, E-mail: ami@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-03-01

    We discuss a hierarchy of broken symmetries with special emphasis on partial dynamical symmetries (PDS). The latter correspond to a situation in which a non-invariant Hamiltonian accommodates a subset of solvable eigenstates with good symmetry, while other eigenstates are mixed. We present an algorithm for constructing Hamiltonians with this property and demonstrate the relevance of the PDS notion to nuclear spectroscopy, to quantum phase transitions and to mixed systems with coexisting regularity and chaos.

  1. Discretized configurations and partial partitions

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    We show that the discretized configuration space of $k$ points in the $n$-simplex is homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres of dimension $n-k+1$. This space is homeomorphic to the order complex of the poset of ordered partial partitions of $\\{1,\\...,n+1\\}$ with exactly $k$ parts. We also compute the Euler characteristic in two different ways, thereby obtaining a topological proof of a combinatorial recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind.

  2. Partial Differential Equations of Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Geroch, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Apparently, all partial differential equations that describe physical phenomena in space-time can be cast into a universal quasilinear, first-order form. In this paper, we do two things. First, we describe some broad features of systems of differential equations so formulated. Examples of such features include hyperbolicity of the equations, constraints and their roles (e.g., in connection with the initial-value formulation), how diffeomorphism freedom is manifest, and how interactions betwee...

  3. Partial Differential Equations An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Choudary, A. D. R.; Parveen, Saima; Varsan, Constantin

    2010-01-01

    This book encompasses both traditional and modern methods treating partial differential equation (PDE) of first order and second order. There is a balance in making a selfcontained mathematical text and introducing new subjects. The Lie algebras of vector fields and their algebraic-geometric representations are involved in solving overdetermined of PDE and getting integral representation of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It is addressing to all scientists using PDE in treating mathe...

  4. Interpolation and partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    MALIGRANDA, Lech; Persson, Lars-Erik; Wyller, John

    1994-01-01

    One of the main motivations for developing the theory of interpolation was to apply it to the theory of partial differential equations (PDEs). Nowadays interpolation theory has been developed in an almost unbelievable way {see the bibliography of Maligranda [Interpolation of Operators and Applications (1926-1990), 2nd ed. (Luleå University, Luleå, 1993), p. 154]}. In this article some model examples are presented which display how powerful this theory is when dealing with PDEs. One main aim i...

  5. Partial Differential Equations An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Choudary, A D R; Varsan, Constantin

    2010-01-01

    This book encompasses both traditional and modern methods treating partial differential equation (PDE) of first order and second order. There is a balance in making a selfcontained mathematical text and introducing new subjects. The Lie algebras of vector fields and their algebraic-geometric representations are involved in solving overdetermined of PDE and getting integral representation of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It is addressing to all scientists using PDE in treating mathematical methods.

  6. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  7. Evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Ternovykh, Mikhail; Saldikov, Ivan; Fomichenko, Peter; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of the development of nuclear power in Russia provides for use of fast power reactors in closed nuclear fuel cycle. The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of energy. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. The closed nuclear fuel cycle concept of the PRORYV assumes self-supplied mode of operation with fuel regeneration by neutron capture reaction in non-enriched uranium, which is used as a raw material. Operating modes of reactors and its characteristics should be chosen so as to provide the self-sufficient mode by using of fissile isotopes while refueling by depleted uranium and to support this state during the entire period of reactor operation. Thus, the actual issue is modeling fuel handling processes. To solve these problems, the code REPRORYV (Recycle for PRORYV) has been developed. It simulates nuclide streams in non-reactor stages of the closed fuel cycle. At the same time various verified codes can be used to evaluate in-core characteristics of a reactor. By using this approach various options for nuclide streams and assess the impact of different plutonium content in the fuel, fuel processing conditions, losses during fuel processing, as well as the impact of initial uncertainties on neutron-physical characteristics of reactor are considered in this study.

  8. Insights into Ancient Human Populations and their Environment through Stable Isotope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental to the understanding of human history is the ability to make interpretations based on artifacts and other remains which are used to gather information about an ancient population. Sequestered in the organic matrices of these remains can be information concerning incidence of disease, population interactions, genetic defects and diet. Stable isotopes have long been used to interpret diet and trophic interactions in modern ecosystems. We suggest that the isotope compositions of a commonly overlooked material, human hair, is an ideal tool to be used in gleaning information, especially on human diets, about ancient civilizations. Hair can be well-preserved and is amenable to routine measurements of 13C, 15N and 34S isotope analyses and distinguishing sources of nutrition. We have isotopically characterized hair from both modern and ancient individuals. There is a wide diversity in isotope values owing, at least partially, to the levels of seafood, corn-fed animals and other grains in diet. Using these isotope tracers, new information regarding historical figures (George Washington, 1799 AD) to perhaps the most ancient of mummies, the Chinchorro of Chile (more than 7000 BP) as well as the Moche of Peru (1500 BP) and the best preserved mummy, the Neolithic Ice Man of the Oetztaler Alps (5200 BP), have been deciphered. It appears that the often-overlooked hair in archaeological sites represents a significant approach for understanding ancient human communities and their environments, as well as new perspectives on our use of our own modern nutritional sources.

  9. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  10. Solar Partial N-burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Jun Ning; Yu-Ying Liu; Qi-Jun Fu; Fu-Ying Xu

    2003-01-01

    We present a new sub-class of type III solar radio burst at the highfrequencies around 6.0 GHz. In addition to a descending and an ascending branchon the dynamic spectrum, it has an inverted morphology different from the simpletype U-burst. We call it "partial N-burst" because it is interpreted as the knownN-burst minus its first branch. The partial N-burst presented here was detectedamong a reverse slope type III (RS-III) burst group prior to the type V solar radiocontinuum and was simultaneously recorded by two spectrometers at the NationalAstronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC, 5.20-7.60 GHz)and at Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO, 4.50-7.50 GHz) on 1999 August 25.After the N-burst and M-burst, the partial N-burst is a third piece of evidence for amagnetic mirror effect in solar radio observation, when the same electron is reflectedat a pinched foot of a flare loop.

  11. Searching for partial Hadamard matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, Víctor; Frau, María-Dolores; Gudiel, Félix; Güemes, María-Belén; Martín, Elena; Osuna, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Three algorithms looking for pretty large partial Hadamard matrices are described. Here "large" means that hopefully about a third of a Hadamard matrix (which is the best asymptotic result known so far, [dLa00]) is achieved. The first one performs some kind of local exhaustive search, and consequently is expensive from the time consuming point of view. The second one comes from the adaptation of the best genetic algorithm known so far searching for cliques in a graph, due to Singh and Gupta [SG06]. The last one consists in another heuristic search, which prioritizes the required processing time better than the final size of the partial Hadamard matrix to be obtained. In all cases, the key idea is characterizing the adjacency properties of vertices in a particular subgraph G_t of Ito's Hadamard Graph Delta (4t) [Ito85], since cliques of order m in G_t can be seen as (m+3)*4t partial Hadamard matrices.

  12. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: Newer trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish Aron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report the advances in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN for renal masses with emphasis on technically challenging cases. Methods: Literature in the English language was reviewed using the National Library of Medicine database using the key words kidney, renal, tumor, nephron sparing surgery, and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, for the period between 1993 and 2009. Over 500 articles were identified. A total of 50 articles were selected for this review based on their relevance to the evolution of the technique and outcomes, as well as expanding indications for LPN. Results: In expert hands, LPN is safe and effective for central tumors, completely intrarenal tumors, hilar tumors, tumor in a solitary kidney, large tumors requiring heminephrectomy, cystic tumors, multiple tumors, obese patients, and even incidental stage ≥ pT2 tumors. Perioperative outcomes and 5-year oncologic outcomes after LPN are comparable to open partial nephrectomy (OPN. Conclusions: In experienced hands indications for LPN have expanded significantly. In 2009, advanced LPN remains a skill-intensive procedure that can nevertheless provide excellent outcomes for patients with renal tumors.

  13. Partial domain wall partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on a rectangular lattice with n (N) horizontal (vertical) lines, and "partial domain wall boundary conditions" defined as 1. all 2n arrows on the left and right boundaries point inwards, 2. n_u (n_l) arrows on the upper (lower) boundary, such that n_u + n_l = N - n, also point inwards, 3. all remaining n+N arrows on the upper and lower boundaries point outwards, and 4. all spin configurations on the upper and lower boundaries are summed over. To generate (n-by-N) "partial domain wall configurations", one can start from A. (N-by-N) configurations with domain wall boundary conditions and delete n_u (n_l) upper (lower) horizontal lines, or B. (2n-by-N) configurations that represent the scalar product of an n-magnon Bethe eigenstate and an n-magnon generic state on an N-site spin-1/2 chain, and delete the n lines that represent the Bethe eigenstate. The corresponding "partial domain wall partition function" is computed in construction {A} ({B}) as an N-by-N (n-by-n) det...

  14. Brief review on the development of isotope hydrology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪集旸; 孙占学

    2001-01-01

    The development of isotope hydrology in China is briefly reviewed. It includes oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of precipitation, application of isotope hydrological methodologies in solving water resources problems, isotope hydrological studies on brines and salt lake waters, as well as isotope hydrological investigations of thermal waters. The review focuses on isotope hydrology in China during the last two decades.

  15. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  16. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  17. Iron and Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatism in the continental crust: Evidence from bimodal volcanic rocks from Hailar basin, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Li, Shuangqing; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    This study presents Fe-Zn isotope data for a suite of well-characterized bimodal volcanic rocks from Hailar Basin, northeast China to understand the mechanism of Fe isotope fractionation in highly differentiated igneous rocks. The samples range from basaltic trachyandesites to trachytes-rhyodacites, and rhyolites. The δ56Fe values increase with increasing SiO2 contents with the rhyolites having the highest δ56Fe (up to 0.64 ± 0.02‰) among the previously reported data for igneous rocks at a similar SiO2. The lack of correlation between δ56Fe and Rb/La argues against the effect of fluid exsolution on Fe isotopes. The δ56Fe do not show a clear correlation with δ66Zn and radiogenic isotopes, suggesting that thermal diffusion or crustal contamination cannot produce the high δ56Fe in Hailar volcanic rocks. Fe isotopic variation in Hailar volcanic rocks can be explained by two steps of magmatism. During the first step, partial melting of basaltic trachyandesites with an average δ56Fe of 0.09 ± 0.14‰ produced trachytes-rhyodacites with an average δ56Fe of 0.24 ± 0.27‰. Modelling using rhyolite-MELTS shows that Fe isotopes can be fractionated by preferential partitioning of isotopically different Fe3+ and Fe2+ between the solid residue and partial melt. The second step involves formation of rhyolites with significantly high δ56Fe through partial melting or extensive crystallization of crust materials, during which isotopically heavy Fe preferentially partition into the rhyolitic melt. Therefore, fractionation of Fe isotopes between melts and minerals can result in high δ56Fe in SiO2-rich igneous rocks and apparent Fe isotope heterogeneity within the continental crust.

  18. The chromium isotope composition of reducing and oxic marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Bleuenn; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Algeo, Thomas J.; Peterson, Larry C.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Wang, Xiangli; Rowe, Harry; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2016-07-01

    The chromium (Cr) isotope composition of marine sediments has the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of Earth-surface redox conditions. There are significant but poorly constrained isotope fractionations associated with oxidative subaerial weathering and riverine transport, the major source of seawater Cr, and with partial Cr reduction during burial in marine sediments, the major sink for seawater Cr. A more comprehensive understanding of these processes is needed to establish global Cr isotope mass balance and to gauge the utility of Cr isotopes as a paleoredox proxy. For these purposes, we investigated the Cr isotope composition of reducing sediments from the upwelling zone of the Peru Margin and the deep Cariaco Basin. Chromium is present in marine sediments in both detrital and authigenic phases, and to estimate the isotopic composition of the authigenic fraction, we measured δ53Cr on a weakly acid-leached fraction in addition to the bulk sediment. In an effort to examine potential variability in the Cr isotope composition of the detrital fraction, we also measured δ53Cr on a variety of oxic marine sediments that contain minimal authigenic Cr. The average δ53Cr value of the oxic sediments examined here is -0.05 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 25), which is within the range of δ53Cr values characteristic of the bulk silicate Earth. This implies that uncertainty in estimates of authigenic δ53Cr values based on bulk sediment analyses is mainly linked to estimation of the ratio of Cr in detrital versus authigenic phases, rather than to the Cr-isotopic composition of the detrital pool. Leaches of Cariaco Basin sediments have an average δ53Cr value of +0.38 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 7), which shows no dependency on sample location within the basin and is close to that of Atlantic deepwater Cr (∼+0.5‰). This suggests that authigenic Cr in anoxic sediments may reliably reflect the first-order Cr isotope composition of deepwaters. For Peru Margin samples

  19. Isotope Harvesting Opportunities at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, David

    2017-01-01

    The fragmentation of fast heavy ion beams now at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) and in the future at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction produce an unprecedentedly broad spectrum of radionuclides but only a small fraction are used in the on-line rare-isotope program. Projectile fragmentation facilities provide an electromagnetically purified beam of a single projectile fragment for nuclear physics experiments ranging from low energy astrophysics, through nuclear structure studies, to probing fundamental symmetries. By augmenting the NSCL and FRIB production facilities with complimentary collection and purification of discarded ions, called isotope harvesting with chemical purification, many other nuclides will become available for off-line experiments in parallel with the primary experiment. A growing user community has established a list of key target isotopes and is working with the FRIB design team to allow inclusion of necessary equipment in the future. An overview of the possibilities and the techniques will be presented in this talk. Supported by Office of Science, US DOE and Michigan State University.

  20. Operation of Electromagnetic Isotope Separator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI; Ya-jing

    2015-01-01

    In 2015,we mainly completed the installation of the electromagnetic isotope separator comprehensive technical transformation projects,including the work of installation,debugging,commissioning and acceptance.In June 30,2015,according to the schedule requirements,the project

  1. Research Progress of Isotope Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Department; of; Isotope

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive isotope is one of the origins of nonnuclear power technology.In the 12th Five Year Plan period,CIAE made breakthrough progresses on several important fields such as research and development of preparation of radioactive nuclides,preparation of radioactive source and study of radiopharmaceuticals relied on different financial support,successfully

  2. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  3. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  4. Partial least squares methods: partial least squares correlation and partial least square regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Hervé; Williams, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Partial least square (PLS) methods (also sometimes called projection to latent structures) relate the information present in two data tables that collect measurements on the same set of observations. PLS methods proceed by deriving latent variables which are (optimal) linear combinations of the variables of a data table. When the goal is to find the shared information between two tables, the approach is equivalent to a correlation problem and the technique is then called partial least square correlation (PLSC) (also sometimes called PLS-SVD). In this case there are two sets of latent variables (one set per table), and these latent variables are required to have maximal covariance. When the goal is to predict one data table the other one, the technique is then called partial least square regression. In this case there is one set of latent variables (derived from the predictor table) and these latent variables are required to give the best possible prediction. In this paper we present and illustrate PLSC and PLSR and show how these descriptive multivariate analysis techniques can be extended to deal with inferential questions by using cross-validation techniques such as the bootstrap and permutation tests.

  5. A global Ge isotope budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronas, J. Jotautas; Hammond, Douglas E.; McManus, James; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Siebert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of Ge isotope composition and ancillary data for samples of river water, low- and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids, and seawater. The dissolved δ74Ge composition of analyzed rivers ranges from 2.0 to 5.6‰, which is significantly heavier than previously determined values for silicate rocks (δ74Ge = 0.4-0.7‰, Escoube et al., Geostand. Geoanal. Res., 36(2), 2012) from which dissolved Ge is primarily derived. An observed negative correlation between riverine Ge/Si and δ74Ge signatures suggests that the primary δ74Ge fractionation mechanism during rock weathering is the preferential incorporation of light isotopes into secondary weathering products. High temperature (>150 °C) hydrothermal fluids analyzed in this study have δ74Ge of 0.7-1.6‰, most likely fractionated during fluid equilibration with quartz in the reaction zone. Low temperature (25-63 °C) hydrothermal fluids are heavier (δ74Ge between 2.9‰ and 4.1‰) and most likely fractionated during Ge precipitation with hydrothermal clays. Seawater from the open ocean has a δ74Gesw value of 3.2 ± 0.4‰, and is indistinguishable among the different ocean basins at the current level of precision. This value should be regulated over time by the isotopic balance of Ge sources and sinks, and a new compilation of these fluxes is presented, along with their estimated isotopic compositions. Assuming steady-state, non-opal Ge sequestration during sediment authigenesis likely involves isotopic fractionation Δ74Gesolid-solution that is -0.6 ± 1.8‰.

  6. Influence of sea ice cover on evaporation and water vapour isotopic composition in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian

    2017-04-01

    Since July 2015, water stable isotopes (HDO and H218O) have been measured at two Arctic facilities: during the summer on board of the research vessel Polarstern, and year-round at the Siberian coastal site of Samoylov, situated in the Lena delta (N 72°22', E 126°29'), close to the Laptev Sea. In both places, the isotopic composition of water vapour is analysed continuously in surface air. Additional isotopic measurements are performed on a daily basis in ocean surface water samples taken on Polarstern and on an event basis from precipitation sampled in Samoylov. The two Polarstern summer campaigns cover a large region of the western Artic Ocean, including a one-month campaign in the central and eastern Arctic crossing the North Pole in September 2015, with very cold conditions (up to -20°C). Combining ocean and atmospheric observations from Polarstern allows an evaluation of local surface water evaporation and its isotopic fingerprint relative to the oceanic and meteorological conditions as well as the partial sea ice cover. In the central and eastern Arctic, a large area of complete sea ice cover also revealed a strong impact on the advected moisture above the ice cap under very cold conditions. A first year of Siberian observations at Samoylov depicted a large seasonal variability, with extremely dry and isotopically depleted winter values. Contrasted seasonal isotopic regimes might be utilized for identifying moisture sources changes in the region, such as ocean surface closure by sea ice, or freezing of the Lena River. Besides documenting the present meteorology and changes in the Arctic, our measurements will contribute to a better interpretation of regional paleoclimate records based on water isotopes and to the evaluation of climate models in the Arctic. A first model-data comparison of our measurements with simulation results by the isotope-enabled atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso have revealed relevant model biases in the Arctic realm.

  7. Low-temperature, non-stoichiometric oxygen isotope exchange coupled to Fe(II)-goethite interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frierdich, Andrew J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Beard, Brian L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scherer, Michelle M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Spicuzza, Michael J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Valley, John W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Johnson, Clark M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of natural iron oxide minerals has been widely used as a paleoclimate proxy. Interpretation of their stable isotope compositions, however, requires accurate knowledge of isotopic fractionation factors and an understanding of their isotopic exchange kinetics, the latter of which informs us how diagenetic processes may alter their isotopic compositions. Prior work has demonstrated that crystalline iron oxides do not significantly exchange oxygen isotopes with pure water at low temperature, which has restricted studies of isotopic fractionation factors to precipitation experiments or theoretical calculations. Using a double three-isotope method (¹⁸O-¹⁷O-¹⁶O and ⁵⁷Fe-⁵⁶Fe-⁵⁴Fe) we compare O and Fe isotope exchange kinetics, and demonstrate, for the first time, that O isotope exchange between structural O in crystalline goethite and water occurs in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) at ambient temperature (i.e., 22–50 °C). The three-isotope method was used to extrapolate partial exchange results to infer the equilibrium, mass-dependent isotope fractionations between goethite and water. In addition, this was combined with a reversal approach to equilibrium by reacting goethite in two unique waters that vary in composition by about 16‰ in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Our results show that interactions between Fe(II)aq and goethite catalyzes O isotope exchange between the mineral and bulk fluid; no exchange (within error) is observed when goethite is suspended in ¹⁷O-enriched water in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In contrast, Fe(II)-catalyzed O isotope exchange is accompanied by significant changes in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Despite significant O exchange, however, we observed disproportionate amounts of Fe versus O exchange, where Fe isotope exchange in goethite was roughly three times that of O. This disparity provides novel insight into the reactivity of oxide minerals in aqueous

  8. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  9. Serpentinization Changes Nd, but not Hf Isotopes of Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Frisby, C. P.; Mallick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Serpentinization of the oceanic lithosphere is a known sink for fluid mobile elements (B, Cl, Li, Sr, etc.), while high field strength elements (HFSE: e.g., Hf, Zr, Ti, Nb) are thought to be unaffected by it. In contrast, the fate of REE during serpentinization is equivocal. Correlations between REE and HFSE concentrations in abyssal peridotites suggest control by magmatic processes (Niu, 2004, J. Pet), while some LREE enrichments in serpentinized peridotites compared to their clinopyroxene (cpx) and Nd, Sr isotope data (Delacour et al., 2008, Chem. Geol.) imply seawater-derived REE addition to the mantle protolith (Paulick et al., 2006, Chem. Geol). To further constrain peridotite-seawater interaction during serpentinization we compare bulk rock and cpx Hf and Nd isotope data in partially (up to ~70%) serpentinized abyssal peridotites (9-16°E South West Indian Ridge). We also present a new method that improves yields in Hf, Nd and Pb separations from depleted (90% of Hf, Zr, Ti are retained in the residue. LA-ICPMS data shows that serpentine after olivine typically has higher LREE/HREE ratios than cpx, pronounced negative Ce anomalies, high U, Sr concentrations and low HFSE, unlike the coexisting cpx. These data are consistent with some seawater-derived LREE addition to peridotite during serpentinization, localized in the serpentine and other secondary phases, while cpx retains the magmatic value. This process will lower the Sm/Nd relative to Lu/Hf ratio in the peridotite and can lead to decoupled radiogenic Hf and unradiogenic Nd isotopes upon recycling and aging. Our data further testifies to the fidelity of Hf isotopes in tracing mantle processes, even in serpentinized rocks.

  10. Laparoscopic Partial Hepatectomy: Animal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiro Inoue

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available As a first step in firmly establishing laparoscopic hepatectomy, we introduce a porcine model of laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. This procedure has been successfully performed under the normal-pressure or low-pressure pneumoperitoneum condition supported by the full-thickness abdominal wall lifting technique. An ultrasonic dissector combined with electrocautery, newly developed by Olympus Optical Corporation (Japan was effectively utilized in facilitating safe and smooth incisions into the liver parenchyma. Although indications for this procedure seem to be limited only to peripheral lesions and not to central lesions, clinical application of this method may be useful for some patients in the near future.

  11. Partial differential equations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Colton, David

    2004-01-01

    Intended for a college senior or first-year graduate-level course in partial differential equations, this text offers students in mathematics, engineering, and the applied sciences a solid foundation for advanced studies in mathematics. Classical topics presented in a modern context include coverage of integral equations and basic scattering theory. This complete and accessible treatment includes a variety of examples of inverse problems arising from improperly posed applications. Exercises at the ends of chapters, many with answers, offer a clear progression in developing an understanding of

  12. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  13. Tracking people through partial occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian-guo; CAI An-ni

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a novel people-tracking approach to cope with partial occlusions caused by scene objects. Instead of predicting when and where the occlusions will occur, a part-based model is used to model the pixel distribution of the target body under occlusion. The subdivided patches corresponding to a template image will be tracked independently using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. A set of voting-based rules is established for the patch-tracking result to verify if the target is indeed located at the estimated position. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Implementing circularity using partial evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawall, Julia Laetitia

    2001-01-01

    of an imperative C-like language, by extending the language with a new construct, persistent variables. We show that an extension of partial evaluation can eliminate persistent variables, producing a staged C program. This approach has been implemented in the Tempo specializer for C programs, and has proven useful......Complex data dependencies can often be expressed concisely by defining a variable in terms of part of its own value. Such a circular reference can be naturally expressed in a lazy functional language or in an attribute grammar. In this paper, we consider circular references in the context...

  15. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates : Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  16. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, h

  17. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  18. Measuring SNM Isotopic Distributions using FRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-02

    The first group of slides provides background information on the isotopic composition of plutonium. It is shown that 240Pu is the critical isotope in neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting. Next, response function analysis to determine isotopic composition is discussed. The isotopic composition can be determined by measuring the net peak counts from each isotope and then taking the ratio of the counts for each isotope relative to the total counts for the element. Then FRAM (Fixed energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies) is explained. FRAM can control data acquisition, automatically analyze newly acquired data, analyze previously acquired data, provide information on the quality of the analysis, and facilitate analysis in unusual situations (non-standard energy calibrations, gamma rays from non-SNM isotopes, poor spectra (within limits)).

  19. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  20. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  1. Planning with Partial Preference Models

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Tuan; Gerevini, Alfonso; Serina, Ivan; Srivastava, Biplav; Kambhampati, Subbarao

    2011-01-01

    Current work in planning with preferences assume that the user's preference models are completely specified and aim to search for a single solution plan. In many real-world planning scenarios, however, the user probably cannot provide any information about her desired plans, or in some cases can only express partial preferences. In such situations, the planner has to present not only one but a set of plans to the user, with the hope that some of them are similar to the plan she prefers. We first propose the usage of different measures to capture quality of plan sets that are suitable for such scenarios: domain-independent distance measures defined based on plan elements (actions, states, causal links) if no knowledge of the user's preferences is given, and the Integrated Convex Preference measure in case the user's partial preference is provided. We then investigate various heuristic approaches to find set of plans according to these measures, and present empirical results demonstrating the promise of our app...

  2. The effects of magmatic processes and crustal recycling on the molybdenum stable isotopic composition of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezard, Rachel; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hamelin, Cédric; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) stable isotopes hold great potential to investigate the processes involved in planetary formation and differentiation. However their use is currently hampered by the lack of understanding of the dominant controls driving mass-dependent fractionations at high temperature. Here we investigate the role of magmatic processes and mantle source heterogeneities on the Mo isotope composition of Mid-Ocean Ridges Basalts (MORBs) using samples from two contrasting ridge segments: (1) the extremely fast spreading Pacific-Antarctic (66-41°S) section devoid of plume influence and; (2) the slow spreading Mohns-Knipovich segment (77-71°N) intercepted by the Jan Mayen Plume (71°N). We show that significant variations in Mo stable isotope composition exist in MORBs with δ98/95Mo ranging from - 0.24 ‰ to + 0.15 ‰ (relative to NIST SRM3134). The absence of correlation between δ98/95Mo and indices of magma differentiation or partial melting suggests a negligible impact of these processes on the isotopic variations observed. On the other hand, the δ98/95Mo variations seem to be associated with changes in radiogenic isotope signatures and rare earth element ratios (e.g., (La/Sm)N), suggesting mantle source heterogeneities as a dominant factor for the δ98/95Mo variations amongst MORBs. The heaviest Mo isotope compositions correspond to the most enriched signatures, suggesting that recycled crustal components are isotopically heavy compared to the uncontaminated depleted mantle. The uncontaminated depleted mantle shows slightly sub-chondritic δ98/95Mo, which cannot be produced by core formation and, therefore, more likely result from extensive anterior partial melting of the mantle. Consequently, the primitive δ98/95Mo composition of the depleted mantle appears overprinted by the effects of both partial melting and crustal recycling.

  3. Isotopic (Pb, Sr, Nd, C, O) evidence for plume-related sampling of an ancient, depleted mantle reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Simonetti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    The exact mantle source for carbonatite melts remains highly controversial. Despite their predominant occurrence within continental (lithospheric) domains, the radiogenic isotope data from young (oceanic island basalts (OIBs). This feature suggests an intimate petrogenetic relationship with asthenospheric mantle. New Pb, Sr, C, and O isotopic data are reported here for constituent minerals from the Oka carbonatite complex, which is associated with the Cretaceous Monteregian Igneous Province (MIP), northeastern North America. The Pb isotope data define linear arrays in Pb-Pb isotope diagrams, with the corresponding Sr isotope ratios being highly variable (0.70314-0.70343); both these features are consistent with open system behavior involving at least three distinct mantle reservoirs. Compared to the isotope composition of known mantle sources for OIBs and carbonatite occurrences worldwide, the least radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb (14.96 ± 0.07) and 208Pb/204Pb (37.29 ± 0.15) isotopic compositions relative to their corresponding 206Pb/204Pb ratios (18.86 ± 0.08) reported here are distinct, and indicate the involvement of an ancient depleted mantle (ADM) source. The extremely unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions necessitate U/Pb fractionation early in Earth's history (prior to 4.0 Ga ago) and growth via a multi-stage Pb evolution model. The combined stable (C and O) and radiogenic isotopic compositions effectively rule out crustal/lithosphere contamination during the petrogenetic history of the Oka complex. Instead, the isotopic variations reported here most likely result from the mixing of discrete, small volume partial melts derived from a heterogeneous plume source characterized by a mixed HIMU-EM1-ADM signature.

  4. Fair Preorder for Partial Fair Kripke Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蔚文; 陆鑫达

    2003-01-01

    This paper discussed how to handle the fairness conditions in partial Kripke structures. The partial Krip-ke structures were used for partial state spaces model checking, which is a new technique to solve problems of stateexplosion. This paper extended the partial Kripke structure with fairness conditions by defining a partial fair Krip-ke structure, and a 3-valued fair CTL(Computation-Tree Logic) semantics correspondingly. It defines a fair pre-order between partial Kripke structures that preserves fairness and is akin to fair bisimulation. In addition, a perti-nent theorem is also given, which indicates the relationship between the partial state spaces and the more completeone by illustrating the characterizations of states in the partial fair structure in terms of CTL formulae.

  5. Abstract methods in partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Detailed, self-contained treatment examines modern abstract methods in partial differential equations, especially abstract evolution equations. Suitable for graduate students with some previous exposure to classical partial differential equations. 1969 edition.

  6. What is the Role of the Transition State in Soret and Chemical Diffusion Induced Isotopic Fractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, G.

    2013-12-01

    For over six decades, Urey's (1) statistical mechanical model of isotopic fractionation based on partition functions with quantized energy levels have enjoyed enormous success in quantitatively explaining equilibrium isotopic fractionation in a wide variety of geochemical systems For example, the interpretation of oxygen isotopic variations in carbonate systems (e.g. foraminiferas), in terms of partition functions with quantized energy levels, forms the basis for paleothermometry (2). Recent observations of isotopic fractionation from chemical and thermal (Soret) diffusion (3-7) appear to challenge our theoretical understanding of mass-transport and isotopic fractionation (8, 9). For example, a recently proposed quantum mechanical model of Soret diffusion, which correctly predicts the isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients for isotopes of Mg, Ca, Fe, Si, and possibly oxygen, was critiqued as being unphysical. First, it was argued that the zero point energies needed to explain the magnitude of isotopic fractionation in basalt melts were unrealistically high based on infrared spectra of these melts. Second, it was argued that the chemical diffusion isotopic fractionation (beta) factors expected from these zero-point energies were also unphysical (10). A recently proposed collision-momentum transfer model partially explains observed fractionation factors, although it fails miserably (by a factor of 3) to account for the isotopic fractionation of Mg isotopes (11). In this presentation, I will review recent observations and models of isotopic fractionation in geochemical melts with thermal gradients and expand upon previous work (8, 12) to show how transition state theory can simultaneously explain mass-transport induced isotopic fractionation, including kinetic, equilibrium, and Soret isotopic fractionation. I show this by providing a few example calculations of the kinetic fractionation factors (a.k.a. beta factors) expected in chemical diffusion as well as

  7. Thallium-isotopic compositions of euxinic sediments as a proxy for global manganese-oxide burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Horner, Tristan J.; Ostrander, Chadlin M.; Peterson, Larry C.

    2017-09-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are a new and potentially powerful paleoredox proxy that may track bottom water oxygen conditions based on the global burial flux of manganese oxides. Thallium has a residence time of ∼20 thousand years, which is longer than the ocean mixing time, and it has been inferred that modern oxic seawater is conservative with respect to both concentration and isotopes. Marine sources of Tl have nearly identical isotopic values. Therefore, the Tl sinks, adsorption onto manganese oxides and low temperature oceanic crust alteration (the dominant seawater output), are the primary controls of the seawater isotopic composition. For relatively short-term, ∼million years, redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominant mechanism that alters the Tl isotopic composition of seawater is associated with manganese oxide burial because large variability in low temperature ocean crust alteration is controlled by long-term, multi-million years, average ocean crust production rates. This study presents new Tl isotope data for an open ocean transect in the South Atlantic, and depth transects for two euxinic basins (anoxic and free sulfide in the water column), the Cariaco Basin and Black Sea. The Tl isotopic signature of open ocean seawater in the South Atlantic was found to be homogeneous with ε205Tl = -6.0 ± 0.3 (±2 SD, n = 41) while oxic waters from Cariaco and the Black Sea are -5.6 and -2.2, respectively. Combined with existing data from the Pacific and Arctic Oceans, our Atlantic data establish the conservatism of Tl isotopes in the global ocean. In contrast, partially- and predominantly-restricted basins reveal Tl isotope differences that vary between open-ocean (-6) and continental material (-2) ε205Tl, scaling with the degree of restriction. Regardless of the differences between basins, Tl is quantitatively removed from their euxinic waters below the chemocline. The burial of Tl in euxinic sediments is estimated to be an order of magnitude

  8. Stable isotopic composition of perchlorate and nitrate accumulated in plants: Hydroponic experiments and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nubia Luz; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.; Gu, Baohua; Harvey, Greg; Burkey, Kent O.; Grantz, David A.; McGrath, Margaret T.; Anderson, Todd A.; Rao, Balaji; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Jackson, W. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4−) in soil and groundwater exhibits a wide range in stable isotopic compositions (δ37Cl, δ18O, and Δ17O), indicating that ClO4− may be formed through more than one pathway and/or undergoes post-depositional isotopic alteration. Plants are known to accumulate ClO4−, but little is known about their ability to alter its isotopic composition. We examined the potential for plants to alter the isotopic composition of ClO4− in hydroponic and field experiments conducted with snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In hydroponic studies, anion ratios indicated that ClO4− was transported from solutions into plants similarly to NO3− but preferentially to Cl− (4-fold). The ClO4− isotopic compositions of initial ClO4− reagents, final growth solutions, and aqueous extracts from plant tissues were essentially indistinguishable, indicating no significant isotope effects during ClO4− uptake or accumulation. The ClO4− isotopic composition of field-grown snap beans was also consistent with that of ClO4− in varying proportions from irrigation water and precipitation. NO3− uptake had little or no effect on NO3− isotopic compositions in hydroponic solutions. However, a large fractionation effect with an apparent ε (15N/18O) ratio of 1.05 was observed between NO3− in hydroponic solutions and leaf extracts, consistent with partial NO3− reduction during assimilation within plant tissue. We also explored the feasibility of evaluating sources of ClO4− in commercial produce, as illustrated by spinach, for which the ClO4− isotopic composition was similar to that of indigenous natural ClO4−. Our results indicate that some types of plants can accumulate and (presumably) release ClO4− to soil and groundwater without altering its isotopic characteristics. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of ClO4−and NO3− in plants may be useful for determining sources of fertilizers and sources of ClO4− in their growth environments and

  9. In Vivo Mass-independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent experimental work and analyses of natural samples have revealed both mass-dependent and mass- independent isotope fractionation effects in mercury. These findings portend new avenues toward understanding the global mercury cycle. It has been shown experimentally that photo reduction of Hg+2 and methylmercury in water with concomitant release of the reduced, gaseous species Hg° results in the residual methylmercury possessing a mass-independent isotope effect. This effect is a relative enrichment of isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg over the even mass number isotopes when compared to the mercury standard NIST SRM3133. Large mass independent fractionation (MIF) effects (Δ199Hg values of a few ‰) have been found in mercury in fish and interpreted as isotope effects inherited from the water. To evaluate the possibility that MIF might be produced within the fish, we have analyzed 38 samples that include zooplankton and twelve different species of fish from a single lake collected over a 2-month time period for mercury isotopic compositions. Trophic levels of the same fish specimens had previously been determined from stomach contents and nitrogen isotopes. Zooplankton in the lake contain mercury with Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values of +0.43 (±0.07) and +0.44 (±0.07) respectively. Among the fish species there is a striking correspondence between trophic level and Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values for primary, secondary, and tertiary consumers. The Δ199Hg values ranges over ~1‰ from ~+0.4 in zooplankton, juvenile bluegill and several other small fishes to Δ199Hg = + 1.36 for the Florida gar that is the top predator fish in the lake. These observations indicate that the MIF effect, rather than being an artifact of the water column is produced in vivo. Partial separation of 199Hg and 201Hg from isotopes of even neutron number can be achieved by the magnetic isotope effect in reactions involving sufficiently long-lived intermediate free radicals, where nuclear - electron

  10. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Deformed Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the notion of partial dynamical symmetry in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Partial dynamical symmetry in deformed nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the notion of partial dynamical symmetry in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei.

  12. The Hydra-k Partial Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pendavingh; S.H.M. van Zwam (Stefan)

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractIn the paper "Confinement of matroid representations to subsets of partial fields" (arXiv:0806.4487) we introduced the Hydra-k partial fields to study quinary matroids with inequivalent representations. The proofs of some results on these partial fields require extensive computations.

  13. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  14. Lasers utilizing CO2 isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenin, Iu. V.; Domanov, M. S.

    1980-08-01

    The emission spectra and power characteristics of CW (C-12)(O-16)2, (C-13)(O-16)2, (C-12)(O-16)(O-18)2 and (C-12)(O-18) lasers are investigated. Laser output power is found to depend equally on the proportion of carbon and oxygen isotopes in the active medium for all isotopes except the asymmetrical (C-12)(O-16)(O-18), in which maximum output power is four to five times less due to the doubling of emission lines and limited enrichment caused by recombination into (C-12)(O-16)2 and (C-12)(O-18)2 molecules during discharge. The unsaturated gain is observed to increase linearly with enrichment, with that of nonsymmetrical molecules half that of the symmetrical molecules, while the maximum power output is independent of enrichment.

  15. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  16. The Re-Os Isotopic System: Geochemistry and Methodology at the Geochronological Research Center (CPGeo of the University of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Teixeira Correia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Re-Os isotopic system is an important tool for the study of mantle-crust processes, geochronology and the tracingof source reservoirs for metal deposition. Rhenium and osmium differ fundamentally from other lithophile isotopic systemswith regards to their behavior during partial melting processes, coupled with the chalcophile/siderophile nature of bothelements. These differences make the system extremely useful for a number of novel applications not traditionally addressedby lithophile isotopic systems. A low-blank technique for the analysis of Re-Os isotopes in geological materials has beenestablished at the Geochronological Research Center (CPGeo of the Geosciences Institute of the University of São Paulo,Brazil, with the aim of furthering knowledge of regional geology, tectonic evolution, petrology and ore deposition in SouthAmerica. The techniques described here use isotope dilution to simultaneously determine the concentration of Os and Re aswell the Os isotopic composition of geologic materials. Sample digestion and sample-isotopic spike equilibration are achievedin sealed borosilicate glass tubes at high temperature. Osmium is separated and purified by carbon tetrachloride solventextraction and micro-distillation techniques. Rhenium is separated and purified by anion exchange chromatography. Accuracyof the concentration and isotopic determinations is monitored by the analysis of a certified reference material (WPR-1 andthe use of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM Os isotopic standard. Measured values and precision of thesestandards is within error and comparable to established Re-Os laboratories.

  17. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  18. Partial Synchronization of Interconnected Boolean Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Lu, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the partial synchronization problem for the interconnected Boolean networks (BNs) via the semi-tensor product (STP) of matrices. First, based on an algebraic state space representation of BNs, a necessary and sufficient criterion is presented to ensure the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs. Second, by defining an induced digraph of the partial synchronized states set, an equivalent graphical description for the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs is established. Consequently, the second partial synchronization criterion is derived in terms of adjacency matrix of the induced digraph. Finally, two examples (including an epigenetic model) are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  19. Partial cubes: structures, characterizations, and constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    Partial cubes are isometric subgraphs of hypercubes. Structures on a graph defined by means of semicubes, and Djokovi\\'{c}'s and Winkler's relations play an important role in the theory of partial cubes. These structures are employed in the paper to characterize bipartite graphs and partial cubes of arbitrary dimension. New characterizations are established and new proofs of some known results are given. The operations of Cartesian product and pasting, and expansion and contraction processes are utilized in the paper to construct new partial cubes from old ones. In particular, the isometric and lattice dimensions of finite partial cubes obtained by means of these operations are calculated.

  20. A novel methodology to investigate isotopic biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2012-04-01

    An enduring goal of trace metal isotopic studies of Earth History is to find isotopic 'fingerprints' of life or of life's individual physiochemical processes. Generally, such signatures are sought by relating an isotopic effect observed in controlled laboratory conditions or a well-characterized environment to a more complex system or the geological record. However, such an approach is ultimately limited because life exerts numerous isotopic fractionations on any one element so it is hard to dissect the resultant net fractionation into its individual components. Further, different organisms, often with the same apparent cellular function, can express different isotopic fractionation factors. We have used a novel method to investigate the isotopic fractionation associated with a single physiological process-enzyme specific isotopic fractionation. We selected Cd isotopes since only one biological use of Cd is known, CdCA (a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase from the coastal diatom T. Weissflogii). Thus, our investigation can also inform the long standing mystery as to why this generally toxic element appears to have a nutrient-like dissolved isotopic and concentration profile in the oceans. We used the pET-15b plasmid to insert the CdCA gene into the E. coli genome. There is no known biochemical function for Cd in E. coli, making it an ideal vector for studying distinct physiological processes within a single organism. The uptake of Cd and associated isotopic fractionation was determined for both normal cells and those expressing CdCA. It was found that whole cells always exhibited a preference for the light isotopes of Cd, regardless of the expression of CdCA; adsorption of Cd to cell surfaces was not seen to cause isotopic fractionation. However, the cleaning procedure employed exerted a strong control on the observed isotopic composition of cells. Using existing protein purification techniques, we measured the Cd isotopic composition of different subcellular fractions of E

  1. Partial migration in fishes: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B B; Hulthén, K; Brodersen, J; Nilsson, P A; Skov, C; Hansson, L-A; Brönmark, C

    2012-07-01

    Partial migration, where only some individuals from a population migrate, has been widely reported in a diverse range of animals. In this paper, what is known about the causes and consequences of partial migration in fishes is reviewed. Firstly, the ultimate and proximate drivers of partial migration are reflected upon: what ecological factors can shape the evolution of migratory dimorphism? How is partial migration maintained over evolutionary timescales? What proximate mechanisms determine whether an individual is migratory or remains resident? Following this, the consequences of partial migration are considered, in an ecological and evolutionary context, and also in an applied sense. Here it is argued that understanding the concept of partial migration is crucial for fisheries and ecosystem managers, and can provide information for conservation strategies. The review concludes with a reflection on the future opportunities in this field, and the avenues of research that are likely to be fruitful to shed light on the enduring puzzle of partial migration in fishes.

  2. Spinel-olivine-pryoxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, Francois L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-15

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (beta-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fe-tot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fe-tot on the beta-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite- fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  3. Anharmonicity effects in impurity-vacancy centers in diamond revealed by isotopic shifts and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimov, E. A.; Krivobok, V. S.; Lyapin, S. G.; Sherin, P. S.; Gavva, V. A.; Kondrin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    We studied isotopically enriched nano- and microdiamonds with optically active GeV- centers synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures in nonmetallic growth systems. The influence of isotopic composition on optical properties has been thoroughly investigated by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to get insight into the nature and electronic structure of this color center. We have demonstrated that the large frequency defect (difference between oscillation frequencies in the ground and excited electronic states) does bring about large discrepancy between PLE and PL spectra and comparatively high isotopic shift of the zero phonon line. Both effects seem to be rather common to split-vacancy centers (for example SiV-), where the frequency defect reaches record high values. Isotopic substitution of carbon atoms in the diamond lattice results in even larger shifts, which are only partially accounted for by a redistribution of electron density caused by the volume change of the diamond lattice. It was shown that the vibronic frequency in this case does not depend on the mass of carbon atoms. The greatest part of this isotopic shift is due to anharmonicity effects, which constitute a substantial part of vibronic frequency observed in this center. The exact physical mechanism, which leads to significant enhancement of anharmonicity on substitution of 12C to 13C, is yet to be clarified.

  4. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations of the Middle-Late Triassic Al Aziziyah Formation, northwest Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mohamed S. H.; Pope, Michael C.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Mriheel, Ibrahim Y.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the δ13C and δ18O records from whole rock samples of the Middle-Late Triassic (Ladinian-Carnian) Al Aziziyah Formation that were deposited on a gently sloping carbonate ramp within the Jifarah Basin of Northwest Libya. The Al Aziziyah Formation consists of gray limestone, dolomite, and dolomitic limestone interbedded with shale. The Ghryan Dome and Kaf Bates sections were sampled and analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope chemostratigraphy to integrate high-resolution carbon isotope data with an outcrop-based stratigraphy, to provide better age control of the Al Aziziyah Formation. This study also discusses the relation between the facies architecture of the Al Aziziyah Formation and the carbon isotope values. Seven stages of relative sea level rise and fall within the Ghryan Dome were identified based on facies stacking patterns, field observations and carbon stable isotopes. The Al Aziziyah Formation δ13C chemostratigraphic curve can be partially correlated with the Triassic global δ13C curve. This correlation indicates that the Al Aziziyah Formation was deposited during the Ladinian and early Carnian. No straight-forward relationship is seen between δ13C and relative sea level probably because local influences complicated systematic environmental and diagenetic isotopic effects associated with sea level change.

  5. Pb isotopes during mingling and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  6. Measuring In Vivo Ureagenesis With Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkoff, Marc; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak; Payan, Irma; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been an invaluable adjunct to biomedical research for more than 70 years. Indeed, the isotopic approach has revolutionized our understanding of metabolism, revealing it to be an intensely dynamic process characterized by an unending cycle of synthesis and degradation. Isotopic studies have taught us that the urea cycle is intrinsic to such dynamism, since it affords a capacious mechanism by which to eliminate waste nitrogen when rates of protein degradation (or dietary protein intake) are especially high. Isotopes have enabled an appreciation of the degree to which ureagenesis is compromised in patients with urea cycle defects. Indeed, isotopic studies of urea cycle flux correlate well with the severity of cognitive impairment in these patients. Finally, the use of isotopes affords an ideal tool with which to gauge the efficacy of therapeutic interventions to augment residual flux through the cycle. PMID:20338795

  7. Isotope Geochemistry for Comparative Planetology of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K. E.; Atreya, S.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mousis, O.; Simon, A.; Hofstadter, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Isotope geochemistry has played a critical role in understanding processes at work in and the history of solar system bodies. Application of these techniques to exoplanets would be revolutionary and would allow comparative planetology with the formation and evolution of exoplanet systems. The roadmap for comparative planetology of the origins and workings of exoplanets involves isotopic geochemistry efforts in three areas: (1) technology development to expand observations of the isotopic composition of solar system bodies and expand observations to isotopic composition of exoplanet atmospheres; (2) theoretical modeling of how isotopes fractionate and the role they play in evolution of exoplanetary systems, atmospheres, surfaces and interiors; and (3) laboratory studies to constrain isotopic fractionation due to processes at work throughout the solar system.

  8. Stable Oxygen-18 and Deuterium Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sascha

    The application of stable Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes, as a tracer for fluxes between different compartments of the water cycle was subject of the present PhD-thesis. During a three year period, temporal data from a wide range of water cycle constituents was collected from...... the Skjern River catchment, Denmark. The presented applications focused on studying the isotopic 'input signal' to the hydrosphere in the form of precipitation, the isotopic 'output signal' with its related dynamic processes at a coastal saltwater-freshwater interface (groundwater isotopes) and the temporal...... development within a given lowland headwater catchment (stream water isotopes). Based on our investigations on the precipitation isotopic composition a local meteoric water line (LMWL) was constructed and expressed as: δ2H=7.4 δ18O + 5.36‰. Moreover, we showed that under maritime temperature climate influence...

  9. Impact of deep convection on the isotopic amount effect in tropical precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharammal, Thejna; Bala, Govindasamy; Noone, David

    2017-02-01

    The empirical "amount effect" observed in the distribution of stable water isotope ratios in tropical precipitation is used in several studies to reconstruct past precipitation. Recent observations suggest the importance of large-scale organized convection systems on amount effect. With a series of experiments with Community Atmospheric Model version 3.0 with water isotope tracers, we quantify the sensitivity of amount effect to changes in modeled deep convection. The magnitude of the regression slope between long-term monthly precipitation amount and isotope ratios in precipitation over tropical ocean reduces by more than 20% with a reduction in mean deep convective precipitation by about 60%, indicating a decline in fractionation efficiency. Reduced condensation in deep convective updrafts results in enrichment of lower level vapor with heavier isotope that causes enrichment in total precipitation. However, consequent increases in stratiform and shallow convective precipitation partially offset the reduction in the slope of amount effect. The net result is a reduced slope of amount effect in tropical regions except the tropical western Pacific, where the effects of enhanced large-scale ascent and increased stratiform precipitation prevail over the influence of reduced deep convection. We also find that the isotope ratios in precipitation are improved over certain regions in the tropics with reduced deep convection, showing that analyses of isotope ratios in precipitation and water vapor are powerful tools to improve precipitation processes in convective parameterization schemes in climate models. Further, our study suggests that the precipitation types over a region can alter the fractionation efficiency of isotopes with implications for the reconstructions of past precipitation.

  10. Iron isotope tracing of mantle heterogeneity within the source regions of oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Helen M.; Bizimis, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Mineralogical variations in the Earth's mantle and the relative proportions of peridotitic versus enriched and potentially crustally-derived pyroxenitic domains within the mantle have important implications for mantle dynamics, magma generation, and the recycling of surface material back into the mantle. Here we present iron (Fe) stable isotope data (δ57Fe, deviation in 57Fe/54Fe from the IRMM-014 standard in parts per thousand) for peridotite and garnet-pyroxenite xenoliths from Oahu, Hawaii and explore Fe isotopes as tracer of both peridotitic and pyroxenitic components in the source regions of oceanic basalts. The pyroxenites have δ57Fe values that are heavy (0.10 to 0.27‰) relative to values for mid-ocean ridge and ocean island basalts (MORB; OIB; δFe57∼0.16‰) and the primitive mantle (PM; δFe57∼0.04‰). Pyroxenite δ57Fe values are positively correlated with bulk pyroxenite titanium and heavy rare earth element (REE) abundances, which can be interpreted in terms of stable isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and pyroxene cumulate formation. In contrast, the peridotites have light δ57Fe values (-0.34 to 0.14‰) that correlate negatively with degree of melt depletion and radiogenic hafnium isotopes, with the most depleted samples possessing the most radiogenic Hf isotope compositions and lightest δ57Fe values. While these correlations are broadly consistent with a scenario of Fe isotope fractionation during partial melting, where isotopically heavy Fe is extracted into the melt phase, leaving behind low-δ57Fe peridotite residues, the extent of isotopic variation is far greater than predicted by partial melting models. One possibility is derivation of the samples from a heterogeneous source containing both light-δ57Fe (relative to PM) and heavy-δ57Fe components. While pyroxenite is a viable explanation for the heavy-δ57Fe component, the origin of the depleted light-δ57Fe component is more difficult to explain, as melting

  11. Normalization of oxygen and hydrogen isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    To resolve confusion due to expression of isotopic data from different laboratories on non-corresponding scales, oxygen isotope analyses of all substances can be expressed relative to VSMOW or VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on scales normalized such that the ??18O of SLAP is -55.5% relative to VSMOW. H3+ contribution in hydrogen isotope ratio analysis can be easily determined using two gaseous reference samples that differ greatly in deuterium content. ?? 1988.

  12. Production of radioactive isotopes from stable isotopes, for nuclear medicine; A partir d`isotopes stables, production d`isotopes radioactifs pour la medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdoiseau, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Office des Rayonnements Ionisants

    1994-12-31

    Around 15 radioactive isotopes only are used for nuclear medicine diagnosis (kinetics or preferential fixation in the body); characteristics of these {gamma} and {beta}-minus emitters are presented: period, energy, production mode (isotopic filiation, fission product separation, cyclotron, reactor); details are given on applications, production mode, properties and consumption of various isotopes: Technetium 99m, Thallium 201, Iodine 123, Indium 111, Gallium 67, Rhenium 186, Erbium 169, Yttrium 90, Iron 59, Chromium 51, Krypton 81m. 1 tab.

  13. Silicon isotopes: from cosmos to benthos

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, Ramananda

    2015-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element on the Earth and one of the more abundant elements in our Solar System. Variations in the relative abundance of the stable isotopes of Si (Si isotope fractionation) in different natural reservoirs, both terrestrial (surface and deep Earth) as well as extra-terrestrial (e.g. meteorites, lunar samples), are a powerful tracer of present and past processes involving abiotic as well as biotic systems. The versatility of the Si isotope tracer is reflected...

  14. Quantitative microbial ecology through stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Bruce A; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Morrissey, Ember M; Price, Lance B

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in (18)O and (13)C composition after exposure to [(18)O]water or [(13)C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of (18)O into DNA from [(18)O]water. However, the increase in (18)O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing.

  15. S-Isotope Fractionation between Fluid and Silicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, A.; Holtz, F.; Shimizu, N.; Behrens, H.; Mandeville, C. W.; Simon, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Large amounts of sulfur (S) can be released from silicate melts during volcanic eruption. Degassing of magma can lead to S-isotope fractionation between fluid and melt. However, experimental data on fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation are scarce and no data exist for silicate melts at temperatures (T) > 1000°C. Recent advances in in situ S-isotope analyses using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) enable determinations of the isotopic composition in silicate glasses with low S content [1] and allow us to investigate experimentally fluid-melt S-isotope fractionation effects in magmatic systems. Isothermal decompression experiments were conducted in internally heated pressure vessels (IHPV). Volatile-bearing (~3 to ~8 wt% H2O, 140 to 2700 ppm S, 0 to 1000 ppm Cl) andesitic and basaltic glasses were synthesized at ~1040°C, ~500 MPa and log(fO2) = QFM to QFM+4 (QFM: quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer). The decompression experiments were carried out at T = 1030 to 1200°C and similar fO2. Pressure (P) was released continuously from ~400 MPa to 150, 100 or 70 MPa with rates (r) ranging from 0.001 to 0.2 MPa/s. The samples were either rapidly quenched after decompression or annealed for various times (tA) at final conditions (1 to 72 h) before quenching. The volatile-bearing starting glasses and the partially degassed experimental glasses were analyzed by electron microprobe (e.g. Cl-, S-content), IR-spectroscopy (H2O content) and SIMS (δ34S). The gas-melt isotope fractionation factors (αg-m) were estimated following Holloway and Blank [2] and utilizing mass balance calculations. The results show that αg-m remains constant within error over the investigated range of r and tA, reflecting fluid-melt equilibrium fractionation of S isotopes for given T and fO2. Data obtained for oxidizing conditions (~QFM+4) are in agreement with observations in arc magmas [3] and close to what is predicted by previous theoretical and experimental data [4; 5; 6]; e.g. a α(SO2 gas - SO42

  16. Clumped Isotopes in Bahamian Dolomites: A Rosetta Stone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.; Arienzo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low temperature dolomite formation continues to be an enigmatic process. However, with the advent of the clumped isotope technique, there is an opportunity to determine the temperature of formation as well as the δ18O of the fluid (δ18Ow) from which it formed. By using samples with a well constrained geologic and thermal history, we have attempted to accurately develop a technique for the application of clumped isotopes to varying dolomite systems. Samples for this study were taken from two cores, one from the island of San Salvador and one on Great Bahama Bank (known as Clino), located on the eastern and western edges respectively of the Bahamian Archipelago. Both cores penetrate through Pleistocene to Miocene aged carbonates. The San Salvador core has a 110m section of pure, near stoichiometric dolomite, while the Clino core is of a mixed carbonate composition with varying abundances (0% - 50%) of calcian dolomite (42-46 mol % MgCO3). The water temperature profile of the Bahamas can be assumed over time due to the stable geology and no influence of higher temperature waters. Because of its location and the present burial depth, the largest influence on dolomite formation has been changes in sea level. As the dolomites from San Salvador are 100% dolomite, the Δ47 was determined directly. The Clino dolomites however were only partially dolomitized and so were treated with buffered acetic acid to remove non-dolomite carbonates. This was carried out in stages, using X-ray diffraction to determine composition, followed by the measurement of Δ47 after each leaching episode. Because the dolomite formation temperature and δ18Ow can be constrained, it becomes possible to evaluate the applicability of the multitude of clumped isotope correction schemes that have been applied to various dolomite samples. Also tested were several different equations which link temperature to the δ18O of the dolomite allowing the δ18O of the water to be calculated. This is a necessary

  17. Scattering lengths of calcium and barium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammalapati, U.; Willmann, L.; Knoop, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); LaserLaB Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    We have calculated the s-wave scattering length of all the even isotopes of calcium (Ca) and barium (Ba) in order to investigate the prospect of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). For Ca we have used an accurate molecular potential based on detailed spectroscopic data. Our calculations show that Ca does not provide other isotopes alternative to the recently Bose condensed {sup 40}Ca that suffers strong losses because of a very large scattering length. For Ba we show by using a model potential that the even isotopes cover a broad range of scattering lengths, opening the possibility of BEC for at least one of the isotopes.

  18. The trend of stable isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekawa, Shigeru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works; Aoki, Eiji; Yato, Yumio

    1994-12-01

    Recently, stable isotopes are used in the field of medical science, nuclear physics, environmental science and agriculture. This report reviews the present status of stable isotope enrichment in ORNL, Urenco, Russia and PNC. Further the utilization method of the stable isotopes in the field of medical science, nuclear power and material science are described, and the application possibility of Laser separation method and Gas Centrifuge method are estimated. There are many overseas actual results of stable isotope separation with Gas Centrifuge method, therefore this method is possible enough in principle. (author).

  19. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete, Jesica U., E-mail: jnavarrete2@miners.utep.edu [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Borrok, David M. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  20. Controlling Weapons-Grade Fissile Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotblat, J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problems of controlling weapons-grade fissionable material. Projections of the growth of fission nuclear reactors indicates sufficient materials will be available to construct 300,000 atomic bombs each containing 10 kilograms of plutonium by 1990. (SL)

  1. DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

    2007-05-29

    The dissolution of composite materials containing plutonium (Pu) and tantalum (Ta) metals is currently performed in Phase I of the HB-Line facility. The conditions for the present flowsheet are the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal in the 15 L dissolver using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) at 95 C for 4-6 h.[1] The Ta metal, which is essentially insoluble in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride solutions, is rinsed with process water to remove residual acid, and then burned to destroy classified information. During the initial dissolution campaign, the total mass of Pu and Ta in the dissolver charge was limited to nominally 300 g. The reduced amount of Pu in the dissolver charge coupled with significant evaporation of solution during processing of several dissolver charges resulted in the precipitation of a fluoride salt contain Pu. Dissolution of the salt required the addition of aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and a subsequent undesired 4 h heating cycle. As a result of this issue, HB-Line Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to optimize the dissolution flowsheet to reduce the cycle time, reduce the risk of precipitating solids, and obtain hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation data at lower fluoride concentrations.[2] Using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material, we performed three experiments to demonstrate the dissolution of the Pu metal using HNO{sub 3} solutions containing 0.15 and 0.175 M KF. When 0.15 M KF was used in the dissolving solution, 95.5% of the Pu in the sample dissolved in approximately 6 h. The undissolved material included a small amount of Pu metal and plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) solids. Complete dissolution of the metal would have likely occurred if the dissolution time had been extended. This assumption is based on the steady increase in the Pu concentration observed during the last several hours of the experiment. We attribute the formation of PuO{sub 2} to the complexation of fluoride by the Pu. The fluoride became unavailable to catalyze the dissolution of PuO{sub 2} as it formed on the surface of the metal. The mass of Pu dissolved is equivalent to the dissolution of 343 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. In the initial experiment with 0.175 M KF in the solution, we achieved complete dissolution of the Pu in 6 h. The mass of Pu dissolved scales to the dissolution of 358 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. The second experiment using 0.175 M KF was terminated after approximately 6 h following the dissolution of 92.7% of the Pu in the sample; however, dissolution of additional Pu was severely limited due to the slow dissolution rate observed beyond approximately 4 h. A small amount of PuO{sub 2} was also produced in the solution. The slow rate of dissolution was attributed to the diminishing surface area of the Pu and a reduction in the fluoride activity due to complexation with Pu. Given time (>4 h), the Pu metal may have dissolved using the original solution or a significant portion may have oxidized to PuO{sub 2}. If the metal oxidized to PuO{sub 2}, we expect little of the material would have dissolved due to the fluoride complexation and the low HNO{sub 3} concentration. The mass of Pu dissolved in the second experiment scales to the dissolution of 309 g of Pu in the HB-Line dissolvers. Based on the data from the Pu/Ta dissolution experiments we recommend the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.175 M KF for the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal in the 15 L HB-Line dissolver. A dissolution temperature of nominally 95 C should allow for essentially complete dissolution of the metal in 6 h. Although the H{sub 2} concentration in the offgas from the experiments was at or below the detection limit of the gas chromatograph (GC) used in these experiments, small concentrations (<3 vol %) of H{sub 2} are typically produced in the offgas during Pu metal dissolutions. Therefore, appropriate controls must be established to address the small H{sub 3} generation rates in accordance with this work and the earlier flowsheet demonstrated for Pu metal.[3

  2. Sensing Fissile Materials at Long Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    production . Cyclotron  technology  has  been developed over many decades, and today it is considered a mature  technology .     The present approach for making...the water or its bydroducts (oxygen ions, atoms and  water clusters) and  ammonia  and its by  products , (nitrogen, ammonium clusters, …)  would not...HDTRA1-09-1-0042 Leslie Bromberg et al. Prepared by: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77

  3. The role of quantum interference and partial redistribution in the solar Ba II D2 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2014-01-01

    The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a good example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that do not exhibit F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. In this paper we present radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD), which is shown to be essential to model this line. This is because complete frequency redistribution (CRD) cannot reproduce the observed wing polarization. We present the observed and computed Q/I profiles at different limb distances. The theoretical profiles strongly depend on limb distance (\\mu) and the model atmosphere which fits the limb observations fails at other \\mu\\ positions.

  4. Development and test of a cryogenic trap system dedicated to confinement of radioactive volatile isotopes in SPIRAL2 post-accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souli, M., E-mail: souli@ganil.fr [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Dolegieviez, P.; Fadil, M.; Gallardo, P.; Levallois, R.; Munoz, H.; Ozille, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Rouille, G.; Galet, F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue Georges CLEMENCEAU 91406 ORSAY (France)

    2011-12-11

    A cryogenic trap system called Cryotrap has been studied and developed in the framework of nuclear safety studies for SPIRAL2 accelerator. The main objective of Cryotrap is to confine and reduce strongly the migration of radioactive volatile isotopes in beam lines. These radioactive gases are produced after interaction between a deuteron beam and a fissile target. Mainly, Cryotrap is composed by a vacuum vessel and two copper thermal screens maintained separately at two temperatures T{sub 1}=80 K and T{sub 2}=20 K. A Cryocooler with two stages at previous temperatures is used to remove static heat losses of the cryostat and ensure an efficient cooling of the system. Due to strong radiological constraints that surround Cryotrap, the coupling system between Cryocooler and thermal screens is based on aluminum thermo-mechanical contraction. The main objective of this original design is to limit direct human maintenance interventions and provide maximum automated operations. A preliminary prototype of Cryotrap has been developed and tested at GANIL laboratory to validate its design, and determine its thermal performance and trapping efficiency. In this paper, we will first introduce briefly SPIRAL2 project and discuss the main role of Cryotrap in nuclear safety of the accelerator. Then, we will describe the proposed conceptual design of Cryotrap and its main characteristics. After that, we will focus on test experiment and analyze experimental data. Finally, we will present preliminary results of gas trapping efficiency tests.

  5. The isotopic imprint of fixed nitrogen elimination in the redox transition zone of Lake Lugano, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Christine; Blees, Jan; Niemann, Helge; Zopfi, Jakob; Schubert, Carsten J.; Veronesi, Mauro; Simona, Marco; Koba, Keisuke; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) loading in lakes from natural and anthropogenic sources is partially mitigated by microbially mediated processes that take place in redox transition zones (RTZ) in the water column and in sediments. However, the role of lakes as a terrestrial sink of fixed N is still poorly constrained. Furthermore, modes of suboxic N2 (and N2O) production other than canonical denitrification (e.g. anaerobic ammonium oxidation, or anammox) have barely been investigated in lakes, and the microbial communities involved in N transformations in lacustrine RTZ are mostly unknown. The isotopic composition of dissolved nitrogen species can serve as a reliable indicator of N-transformations in aquatic environments. However, the successful application of N (and O) isotope measurements in natural systems requires a solid understanding of the various N-transformation-specific isotope effects. The deep, south-alpine Lake Lugano, with a permanent chemocline in its North Basin, is an excellent model system for a biogeochemically dynamic lake, in which to study N isotope ratio variations associated with fixed N elimination and regeneration processes. We present the first comprehensive dataset of hydrochemical parameters (including N2/Ar and dissolved N2O concentrations), natural abundance stable isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) compounds (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, dinitrogen, nitrous oxide), and the isotopomeric composition of water column N2O for the North Basin of Lake Lugano. Isotopic data will be integrated with molecular microbiological phylogenetic analyses and results from incubation experiments with 15N-labeled N-substrates. Strong gradients in DIN concentrations, as well as in the N and O isotope (and isotopomeric) compositions of nitrate and N2O towards the redox-transition zone indicate nitrate reduction, occurring with a high community N-fractionation. The site preference of N2O isotopomers above the chemocline indicates that the N2O is not only

  6. Isotopic determination of uranium in soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Choi, Inhee; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Lam, Oanh P.; Shuh, David K.; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) operated under ambient pressure has been evaluated for isotopic analysis of uranium in real-world samples such as soil, with U concentrations in the single digit percentage levels. The study addresses the requirements for spectral decomposition of 235U and 238U atomic emission peaks that are only partially resolved. Although non-linear least-square fitting algorithms are typically able to locate the optimal combination of fitting parameters that best describes the experimental spectrum even when all fitting parameters are treated as free independent variables, the analytical results of such an unconstrained free-parameter approach are ambiguous. In this work, five spectral decomposition algorithms were examined, with different known physical properties (e.g., isotopic splitting, hyperfine structure) of the spectral lines sequentially incorporated into the candidate algorithms as constraints. It was found that incorporation of such spectral-line constraints into the decomposition algorithm is essential for the best isotopic analysis. The isotopic abundance of 235U was determined from a simple two-component Lorentzian fit on the U II 424.437 nm spectral profile. For six replicate measurements, each with only fifteen laser shots, on a soil sample with U concentration at 1.1% w/w, the determined 235U isotopic abundance was (64.6 ± 4.8)%, and agreed well with the certified value of 64.4%. Another studied U line - U I 682.691 nm possesses hyperfine structure that is comparatively broad and at a significant fraction as the isotopic shift. Thus, 235U isotopic analysis with this U I line was performed with spectral decomposition involving individual hyperfine components. For the soil sample with 1.1% w/w U, the determined 235U isotopic abundance was (60.9 ± 2.0)%, which exhibited a relative bias about 6% from the certified value. The bias was attributed to the spectral resolution of our measurement system - the measured line

  7. The future of partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthouse, Theo; Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Raison, Nicholas; Lam, Wayne; Challacombe, Ben

    2016-12-01

    Innovation in recent times has accelerated due to factors such as the globalization of communication; but there are also more barriers/safeguards in place than ever before as we strive to streamline this process. From the first planned partial nephrectomy completed in 1887, it took over a century to become recommended practice for small renal tumours. At present, identified areas for improvement/innovation are 1) to preserve renal parenchyma, 2) to optimise pre-operative eGFR and 3) to reduce global warm ischaemia time. All 3 of these, are statistically significant predictors of post-operative renal function. Urologists, have a proud history of embracing innovation & have experimented with different clamping techniques of the renal vasculature, image guidance in robotics, renal hypothermia, lasers and new robots under development. The DaVinci model may soon no longer have a monopoly on this market, as it loses its stranglehold with novel technology emerging including added features, such as haptic feedback with reduced costs. As ever, our predictions of the future may well fall wide of the mark, but in order to progress, one must open the mind to the possibilities that already exist, as evolution of existing technology often appears to be a revolution in hindsight.

  8. Activation of O2 and CH4 on yttrium-stabilized zircoma for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Ommen, van Jan G.; Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.; Lefferts, Leon

    2005-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction on ZrO2 and yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) during catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (CPOM) was studied with transient pulse experiments. The results reveal, surprisingly, that CPOM over both oxides proceeds via a Mars¿van Krevelen mechanism. Despit

  9. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  10. CO Isotopes in Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Balser, Dana S.; McMullin, Joseph P.; Wilson, T. L.

    2002-01-01

    Standard stellar evolution theory is inconsistent with the observed isotopic carbon ratio, 12C/13C, in evolved stars. This theory is also inconsistent with the 3He/H abundance ratios observed in Galactic HII regions, when combined with chemical evolution theory. These discrepancies have been attributed to an extra, non-standard mixing which further processes material during the RGB and should lower both the 12C/13C and 3He/H abundance ratios for stars with masses < 2 solar masses. Measurement...

  11. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  12. On multivariate quantiles under partial ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on generalizing quantiles from the ordering point of view. We propose the concept of {\\it partial quantiles} based on a given partial order. We establish that partial quantiles are equivariant under partial-order-preserving transformations of the data, display a concentration of measure phenomenon, generalize the concept of efficient frontier, and can measure dispersion from the partial order perspective. We also study several statistical aspects of partial quantiles. We provide estimators, associated rates of convergence, and asymptotic distributions that hold uniformly over a continuum of quantile indices. Furthermore, we provide procedures that can restore monotonicity properties that might have been disturbed by estimation error, and establish computational complexity bounds. Finally, we illustrate the concepts by discussing several theoretical examples and simulations. Empirical applications to compare intake nutrients within diets and to evaluate the performance of investment funds ar...

  13. Partial migration in fishes: causes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, B.B.; Hulthén, K.; Brodersen, J.;

    2012-01-01

    migration are reflected upon: what ecological factors can shape the evolution of migratory dimorphism? How is partial migration maintained over evolutionary timescales? What proximate mechanisms determine whether an individual is migratory or remains resident? Following this, the consequences of partial...... with a reflection on the future opportunities in this field, and the avenues of research that are likely to be fruitful to shed light on the enduring puzzle of partial migration in fishes......Partial migration, where only some individuals from a population migrate, has been widely reported in a diverse range of animals. In this paper, what is known about the causes and consequences of partial migration in fishes is reviewed. Firstly, the ultimate and proximate drivers of partial...

  14. Representations of partial derivatives in thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John R.; Manogue, Corinne A.; Roundy, David J.; Mountcastle, Donald B.

    2012-02-01

    One of the mathematical objects that students become familiar with in thermodynamics, often for the first time, is the partial derivative of a multivariable function. The symbolic representation of a partial derivative and related quantities present difficulties for students in both mathematical and physical contexts, most notably what it means to keep one or more variables fixed while taking the derivative with respect to a different variable. Material properties are themselves written as partial derivatives of various state functions (e.g., compressibility is a partial derivative of volume with respect to pressure). Research in courses at the University of Maine and Oregon State University yields findings related to the many ways that partial derivatives can be represented and interpreted in thermodynamics. Research has informed curricular development that elicits many of the difficulties using different representations (e.g., geometric) and different contexts (e.g., connecting partial derivatives to specific experiments).

  15. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    .3, and thus more than one mass-independent isotope effect is inferred. MIF of mercury can be caused by the nuclear volume effect. Schauble, 2007 has calculated nuclear volume fractionation scaling factors for a number of common mercury chemical species in equilibrium with Hg° vapor. From his calculations the nuclear field shift effect is larger in Δ199Hg than in Δ201Hg by approximately a factor of two. The predominant mercury chemical species in fish is methylmercury cysteine. From the experimental studies of Buchachenko and others (2004) on the reaction of methylmercury chloride with creatine kinase it seems reasonable to predicted that the thiol functional groups of cysteine gets enriched in 199Hg and 201Hg. Here the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) produces a kinetic partial separation of isotopes with non-zero nuclear spin quantum numbers from the even-N isotopes. The ratio of enrichment of Δ201Hg /Δ199Hg is predicted from theory to be 1.11, which is the ratio of the magnetic moments of 199Hg and 201Hg. Because mercury possesses two odd-N isotopes, it is possible to detect and evaluate the effects of two distinct, mass-independent isotope fractionating processes. From the data obtained on fish samples, we can deconvolute the contributions of the isotope effects of nuclear mass, spin and volume. For these samples the role of spin or the magnetic isotope effect is the most dominant.

  16. Evidence for Mo isotope fractionation in the solar nebula and during planetary differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Hin, Remco C.; Kleine, Thorsten; Bourdon, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    of a lunar core at a metal-silicate equilibration temperature of 1800±200 °C. The investigated martian meteorites, angrites and eucrites exhibit more variable Mo isotope compositions, which for several samples extend to values above the maximum δMo=+0.14‰ that can be associated with core formation. For these samples post-core formation processes such as partial melting, metamorphism and in the case of meteorite finds terrestrial weathering must have resulted in Mo isotope fractionation. Estimates of the metal-silicate equilibration temperatures for Mars (2490±770 °C) and the angrite parent body (1790±230 °C) are thus more uncertain than that derived for the Moon. Although the Mo isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth has not been determined as part of this study, a value of -0.16‰Earth. This estimate is in agreement with four analyzed basalt standards (-0.10±0.10). Improved application of mass-dependent Mo isotope fractionation to investigate core formation most of all requires an improved understanding of potential Mo isotope fractionation during processes not related to metal-silicate differentiation.

  17. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  18. Quantum states with strong positive partial transpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Jurkowski, Jacek; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-02-01

    We construct a large class of bipartite M⊗N quantum states which defines a proper subset of states with positive partial transposes (PPTs). Any state from this class has PPT but the positivity of its partial transposition is recognized with respect to canonical factorization of the original density operator. We propose to call elements from this class states with strong positive partial transposes (SPPTs). We conjecture that all SPPT states are separable.

  19. On circulant states with positive partial transpose

    OpenAIRE

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    We construct a large class of quantum "d x d" states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure - that is way we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. ...

  20. Partial differential equations of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, S L

    1964-01-01

    Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics emphasizes the study of second-order partial differential equations of mathematical physics, which is deemed as the foundation of investigations into waves, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and other physical problems. The book discusses in detail a wide spectrum of topics related to partial differential equations, such as the theories of sets and of Lebesgue integration, integral equations, Green's function, and the proof of the Fourier method. Theoretical physicists, experimental physicists, mathematicians engaged in pure and applied math

  1. Phylogenetic estimation with partial likelihood tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sumner, J G

    2008-01-01

    We present an alternative method for calculating likelihoods in molecular phylogenetics. Our method is based on partial likelihood tensors, which are generalizations of partial likelihood vectors, as used in Felsenstein's approach. Exploiting a lexicographic sorting and partial likelihood tensors, it is possible to obtain significant computational savings. We show this on a range of simulated data by enumerating all numerical calculations that are required by our method and the standard approach.

  2. Partial differential equations possessing Frobenius integrable decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wen-Xiu [Department of Mathematics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620-5700 (United States)]. E-mail: mawx@cas.usf.edu; Wu, Hongyou [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115-2888 (United States)]. E-mail: wu@math.niu.edu; He, Jingsong [Department of Mathematics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)]. E-mail: jshe@ustc.edu.cn

    2007-04-16

    Frobenius integrable decompositions are introduced for partial differential equations. A procedure is provided for determining a class of partial differential equations of polynomial type, which possess specified Frobenius integrable decompositions. Two concrete examples with logarithmic derivative Baecklund transformations are given, and the presented partial differential equations are transformed into Frobenius integrable ordinary differential equations with cubic nonlinearity. The resulting solutions are illustrated to describe the solution phenomena shared with the KdV and potential KdV equations.

  3. Partial Evaluation of the Euclidian Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Goldberg, Mayer

    1997-01-01

    -like behavior. Each of them presents a challenge for partial evaluation. The Euclidian algorithm is one of them, and in this article, we make it amenable to partial evaluation. We observe that the number of iterations in the Euclidian algorithm is bounded by a number that can be computed given either of the two...... arguments. We thus rephrase this algorithm using bounded recursion. The resulting program is better suited for automatic unfolding and thus for partial evaluation. Its specialization is efficient....

  4. Stable isotope utilization methodology; Methodologie de l`emploi des isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    The various applications of stable isotope utilization are reviewed, as a function of their specific properties: poly-isotopic abundance modification is used for tracer applications; the accurate measurement of the stable isotope abundance may be applied to isotopic dilution for ultra-trace measurement, physical constant determination, fluid volume and concentration measurement; isotopic effects, such as reaction equilibrium differences are used for separation and identification of molecule active centers (pharmacology, paleoclimatology, hydrogeological studies) while reaction rate differences (competitive and non competitive methods) are used for the study of reaction mechanisms, such as enzymatic reactions. Analysis techniques (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, optical methods) are reviewed. 2 figs., 18 refs.

  5. Identification of neutron-rich isotope 197Os

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei-Fan; YUAN Shuang-Gui; XU Yan-Bing; XIAO Yong-Hou; ZHAO Li-Min; WANG Ping-Zhi; LI Heng-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    A new neutron-rich isotope 197Os was produced in the 198Pt(n, 2p) reaction by irradiating natural Pt targets with 14 MeV neutrons. The γ(X) singles spectrum and coincidence spectrum measurements were performed using two HPGe γ-ray detectors. Ten unknown γ-rays at 41.2, 50.7, 196.8, 199.6, 223.9, 233.1, 250.2, 342.1,403.6, and 460.4 keV attributed to the decay of 197Os were observed in the experiments. The half-life of 197Os was found to be (2.8 ± 0.6) min. A partial decay scheme of 197Os was proposed on the basis of decay and coincidence relations. The half-life was compared with the values expected by different theoretical models.

  6. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  7. Isotopic gas analysis through Purcell cavity enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, B.; Cooper, J.; Konthasinghe, K.; Peiris, M.; Djeu, N.; Hopkins, A. J.; Muller, A.

    2016-02-01

    Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) by means of a doubly resonant Fabry-Perot microcavity (mode volume ≈ 100 μm3 and finesse ≈ 30 000) has been investigated as a technique for isotopic ratio gas analysis. At the pump frequency, the resonant cavity supports a buildup of circulating power while simultaneously enabling Purcell spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the resonant Stokes frequency. The three most common isotopologues of CO2 gas were quantified, and a signal was obtained from 13C16O2 down to a partial pressure of 2 Torr. Due to its small size and low pump power needed (˜10 mW) PERS lends itself to miniaturization. Furthermore, since the cavity is resonant with the emission frequency, future improvements could allow it to serve as its own spectral analyzer and no separate spectroscopic device would be needed.

  8. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-05-01

    The accumulation of substantial quantities of O2 in the atmosphere has come to control the chemistry and ecological structure of Earth's surface. Non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulphur isotope anomalies in the rock record are the central tool used to reconstruct the redox history of the early atmosphere. The generation and initial delivery of these anomalies to marine sediments requires low partial pressures of atmospheric O2 (p(O2); refs 2, 3), and the disappearance of NMD anomalies from the rock record 2.32 billion years ago is thought to have signalled a departure from persistently low atmospheric oxygen levels (less than about 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level) during approximately the first two billion years of Earth's history. Here we present a model study designed to describe the long-term surface recycling of crustal NMD anomalies, and show that the record of this geochemical signal is likely to display a 'crustal memory effect' following increases in atmospheric p(O2) above this threshold. Once NMD anomalies have been buried in the upper crust they are extremely resistant to removal, and can be erased only through successive cycles of weathering, dilution and burial on an oxygenated Earth surface. This recycling results in the residual incorporation of NMD anomalies into the sedimentary record long after synchronous atmospheric generation of the isotopic signal has ceased, with dynamic and measurable signals probably surviving for as long as 10-100 million years subsequent to an increase in atmospheric p(O2) to more than 10(-5) times the present atmospheric level. Our results can reconcile geochemical evidence for oxygen production and transient accumulation with the maintenance of NMD anomalies on the early Earth, and suggest that future work should investigate the notion that temporally continuous generation of new NMD sulphur isotope anomalies in the atmosphere was likely to have ceased long before their ultimate disappearance from the rock record.

  9. Clinical Analysis of Partial Epilepsy with Auras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This study suggested that auras played an important role in the diagnosis, classification, and localization of epilepsy. Epileptic aura could help differentiate partial seizure from generalized seizure.

  10. EXISTENCE OF OPTIMAL STRONG PARTIALLY BALANCED DESIGNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Beiliang

    2007-01-01

    A strong partially balanced design SPBD(v, b, k; λ,0) whose b is the maximum number of blocks in all SPBD(v, b, k; λ, 0), as an optimal strong partially balanced design, briefly OSPBD(v, k, λ) is studied. In investigation of authentication codes it has been found that the strong partially balanced design can be used to construct authentication codes. This note investigates the existence of optimal strong partially balanced design OSPBD(v, k, 1) for k = 3and 4, and shows that there exists an OSPBD(v, k, 1) for any v ≥ k.

  11. Competition between alpha-decay and spontaneous fission at isotopes of superheavy elements Rf, Db, and Sg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, Claudia Ioana, E-mail: claudia.anghel@theory.nipne.ro [Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, P.O.Box MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, RO-077125 Bucharest - Magurele (Romania); Silisteanu, Andrei Octavian [Radiopharmaceutical Research Center, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, P.O.Box MG-6, RO-077125 (Romania)

    2015-12-07

    The most important decay modes for heavy and superheavy nuclei are their α-decay and spontaneous fission. This work investigates the evolution and the competition of these decay modes in long isotopic sequences. The partial half-lives are given by minimal sets of parameters extracted from the fit of experimental data and theoretical results. A summary of the experimental and calculated α-decay and spontaneous fission half-lives of the isotopes of elements Rf, Db, and Sg is presented. Some half-life extrapolations for nuclides not yet known are also obtained.

  12. Volatile Concentrations and H-Isotope Composition of Unequilibrated Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafian, Adam R.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Marschall, Horst R.; Gaetani, Glenn A.; Hauri, Erik H.; Righter, Kevin; Berger, Eve L.

    2017-01-01

    Eucrites are among the oldest and best studied asteroidal basalts (1). They represent magmatism that occurred on their parent asteroid, likely 4-Vesta, starting at 4563 Ma and continuing for approx. 30 Myr. Two hypotheses are debated for the genesis of eucrites, a magma ocean model (2), and a mantle partial melting model. In general, volatiles (H, C, F, Cl) have been ignored for eucrites and 4-Vesta, but solubility of wt% levels of H2O are possible at Vestan interior PT conditions. Targeted measurements on samples could aid our understanding considerably. Recent studies have found evidence of volatile elements in eucrites, but quantifying the abundance of volatiles remains problematic (6). Volatile elements have a disproportionately large effect on melt properties and phase stability, relative to their low abundance. The source of volatile elements can be elucidated by examining the hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H), as different H reservoirs have drastically different H isotope compositions. Recent studies of apatite in eucrites have shown that the D/H of 4-Vesta matches that of Earth and carbonaceous chondrites, however, the D/H of apatites may not represent the D/H of a primitive 4-Vesta melt due to the possibility of degassing prior to the crystallization of apatite. Therefore, the D/H of early crystallizing phases must be measured to determine if the D/H of 4-Vesta is equal to that of the Earth and carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. ISOTOPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    1 A New Therapeutic Agent for Radiation Synovectomy: Preparation of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA Bai Hongsheng Jin Xiaohai Du Jin Wang Fan Chen Daming Fan Hongqiang Cheng Zhen In order to treat the patient with inflammatory synovial disease, HA particle is labeled with 166Ho by EDTMP under the condition of pH6.0-8.0 and vibration time 15 min, its labeling efficiency is more than 98%, the size of particle is mainly in the range of 2-5 μm. The absorbed capacity is 5 mg Ho per 1g HA. Study on stability of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA in vitro shows that loss of 166Ho is less than 2% for166Ho-EDTMP-HA incubated 72 h in the 0.9% saline and 1% BSA solution at 37 ℃ .Biodistribution in vivo and extra articular leakage are investigated following injection of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA into knee of normal rabbits. The experimental results show that the extra leakage of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA is 0.32% at 48 h post-injection, most of 166Ho radioactivity leaked from the knee joint is excreted in the urine. 99% of 166Ho radioactivity is retained in the knee joint of rabbits. Thereby 166Ho-EDTMP-HA, as a new therapeutical agent of radiation synovectomy, had a value of further clinical study.

  14. The isotopic dipole moment of HDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Mohallem, Jose R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-03-14

    An adiabatic variational approximation is used to study the monodeuterated water molecule, HDO, accounting for the isotopic effect. The isotopic dipole moment, pointing from D to H, is then calculated for the first time, yielding (1.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -3} Debye, being helpful in the interpretation of experiments. (fast track communication)

  15. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  16. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  17. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  18. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacok

  19. Isotopic niches support the resource breadth hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Jonathan A.; Newsome, Seth D.; Sabat, Pablo; Chesser, R. Terry; Dillon, Michael E.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Because a broad spectrum of resource use allows species to persist in a wide range of habitat types, and thus permits them to occupy large geographical areas, and because broadly distributed species have access to more diverse resource bases, the resource breadth hypothesis posits that the diversity of resources used by organisms should be positively related with the extent of their geographic ranges.We investigated isotopic niche width in a small radiation of South American birds in the genus Cinclodes. We analysed feathers of 12 species of Cinclodes to test the isotopic version of the resource breadth hypothesis and to examine the correlation between isotopic niche breadth and morphology.We found a positive correlation between the widths of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic niches (which estimate breadth of elevational range) and widths of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic niches (which estimates the diversity of resources consumed, and hence of habitats used). We also found a positive correlation between broad isotopic niches and wing morphology.Our study not only supports the resource breadth hypothesis but it also highlights the usefulness of stable isotope analyses as tools in the exploration of ecological niches. It is an example of a macroecological application of stable isotopes. It also illustrates the importance of scientific collections in ecological studies.

  20. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  1. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  2. Isotope Program Report June FY2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Egle, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Isotope Program Monthly Highlights are briefly described. These include data on isotopes shipped, updates on equipment fabrication and testing, a potential new approach for nondestructive measurement of the amount of Cf-252 deposited on a surface, and efforts to recover and purify uranium-234 obtained from old PuBe sources.

  3. Different degrees of partial melting of the enriched mantle source for Plio-Quaternary basic volcanism, Toprakkale (Osmaniye) Region, Southern Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, U; Alpaslan, M; Frei, Robert

    2011-01-01

    ) Ba, Th and U, and show light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment relative to heavy rare earth element (HREE) on primitive mantle trace and rare earth element patterns that indicate different partial melting of the same source. The isotopic 87Sr/86Sr ratio is relatively low (0.703534 –0...... volcanic unit was calculated using the dynamic melting method. The alkali basalts were formed by a high degree of partial melting (9.19%) whereas basanites were formed by a low degree of partial melting (4.58%) of the same mantle source. All the geochemical evidence suggests that the basic volcanism...

  4. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  5. Geochemical research on C-O and Sr-Nd isotopes of mantle-derived rocks from Shandong Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianming; ZHANG Hongfu; SUN Jinggui; YE Jie

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents systematic studies on the C-O and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for Cretaceous Badou carbonatites, Fangcheng basalts, and Jiaodong lamprophyres and Paleozoic Mengyin kimberlites in Shandong Province, China. Paleozoic kimberlites have normal and uniform C-O isotopic compositions with δ13C and δ18O in the range of -4.8‰--7.6‰ and +9.9‰-+13.2‰, respectively. However, Cretaceous three different types of mantle-derived rocks have quite different C-O isotopic compositions, indicating that the mantle sources are probably partially contaminated with organic carbon-bearing crustal materials. These Cretaceous rocks show uniform and EMII-like Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and also indicate that the mantle sources were affected by recycled crustal materials. Comparative studies of C-O and Sr-Nd isotopes reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern North China Craton had different isotope characteristics in the Paleozoic, the early Cretaceous, and the Tertiary time. This demonstrates that the lithospheric mantle beneath the region underwent at least twice reconstructions since the Paleozoic. Available data imply that the first reconstruction mainly happened during the Triassic-Jurassic time with gradual changes and the second in the Cretaceous with abrupt changes. Results also show that the early Cretaceous (especially at 120-130 Ma) was perhaps the key period leading to the dramatic change of the Mesozoic geodynamics on the eastern North China Craton.

  6. Validation of adsorbents for sample preconcentration in compound-specific isotope analysis of common vapor intrusion pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, Monika; Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, R Paul; McHugh, Thomas E

    2012-12-28

    Isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment are often of interest in contaminant fate studies. Adsorbent preconcentration-thermal desorption of VOCs can be used to collect environmental vapor samples for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). While active adsorbent samplers offer logistic benefits in handling large volumes of air, their performance in preserving VOCs isotope ratios was not previously tested under sampling conditions corresponding to typical indoor air sampling conditions. In this study, the performance of selected adsorbents was tested for preconcentration of TCE (for determination of C and Cl isotope ratios), PCE (C and Cl) and benzene (C and H). The key objective of the study was to identify the adsorbent(s) permitting preconcentration of the target VOCs present in air at low μg/m(3) concentrations, without significant alteration of their isotope ratios. Carboxen 1016 was found to perform well for the full range of tested parameters. Carboxen 1016 can be recommended for sampling of TCE, PCE and benzene, for CSIA, from air volumes up to 100 L. Variable extent of isotope ratio alteration was observed in the preconcentration of the target VOCs on Carbopack B and Carbopack X, resulting from partial analyte loss via adsorbent bed breakthrough and (possibly) via incomplete desorption. The results from testing the Carbopack B and Carbopack X highlight the need of adsorbent performance validation at conditions fully representative of actual sample collection conditions, and caution against extrapolation of performance data toward more challenging sampling conditions.

  7. Proteome Scale-Protein Turnover Analysis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometric Data from Stable-Isotope Labeled Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai-Ting; Rendahl, Aaron K; Chen, Wen-Ping; Freund, Dana M; Gray, William M; Cohen, Jerry D; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2016-03-04

    Protein turnover is an important aspect of the regulation of cellular processes for organisms when responding to developmental or environmental cues. The measurement of protein turnover in plants, in contrast to that of rapidly growing unicellular organismal cultures, is made more complicated by the high degree of amino acid recycling, resulting in significant transient isotope incorporation distributions that must be dealt with computationally for high throughput analysis to be practical. An algorithm in R, ProteinTurnover, was developed to calculate protein turnover with transient stable isotope incorporation distributions in a high throughput automated manner using high resolution MS and MS/MS proteomic analysis of stable isotopically labeled plant material. ProteinTurnover extracts isotopic distribution information from raw MS data for peptides identified by MS/MS from data sets of either isotopic label dilution or incorporation experiments. Variable isotopic incorporation distributions were modeled using binomial and beta-binomial distributions to deconvolute the natural abundance, newly synthesized/partial-labeled, and fully labeled peptide distributions. Maximum likelihood estimation was performed to calculate the distribution abundance proportion of old and newly synthesized peptides. The half-life or turnover rate of each peptide was calculated from changes in the distribution abundance proportions using nonlinear regression. We applied ProteinTurnover to obtain half-lives of proteins from enriched soluble and membrane fractions from Arabidopsis roots.

  8. Manus Water Isotope Investigation Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Jessica L [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Cobb, Kim M [Georgia Institute of Technology; Noone, David [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to investigate climatic controls on the stable isotopic composition of water vapor, precipitation, and seawater in the western tropical Pacific. Simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation from April 28 to May 8, 2013, at the Manus Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site, provided several key insights into the nature of the climate signal archived in precipitation and vapor isotope ratios. We observed a large shift from lower to higher isotopic values in vapor and precipitation because of the passage of a mesoscale convective system west of the site and a transition from a regional stormy period into a more quiescent period. During the quiescent period, the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation indicated the predominance of oceanic evaporation in determining the isotopic composition of boundary-layer vapor and local precipitation. There was not a consistent relationship between intra-event precipitation amount at the site and the stable isotopic composition of precipitation, thus challenging simplified assumptions about the isotopic “amount effect” in the tropics on the time scale of individual storms. However, some storms did show an amount effect, and deuterium excess values in precipitation had a significant relationship with several meteorological variables, including precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and cloud base height across all measured storms. The direction of these relationships points to condensation controls on precipitation deuterium excess values on intra-event time scales. The relationship between simultaneous measurements of vapor and precipitation isotope ratios during precipitation events indicates the ratio of precipitation-to-vapor isotope ratios can diagnose precipitation originating from a vapor source unique from boundary-layer vapor and rain re-evaporation.

  9. Some examples of universal and generic partial orders

    CERN Document Server

    Nesetril, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    We survey structures endowed with natural partial orderings and prove their universality. These partial orders include partial orders on set of words, partial orders formed by geometric objects, grammars, polynomials and homomorphism order for various combinatorial objects.

  10. An Action Analysis for Combining Partial Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖湖声

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes an action analysis for implementing combining partial evaluation efficiently. By analyzing the results of binding time analysis, operations, which should be used in the combining partial evaluation, are determined in advance, so that the computation in the combination of specialized programs is reduced effectively.

  11. Generalized Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2002-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a generalized partial dynamical symmetry for which part of the eigenstates have part of the dynamical symmetry. This general concept is illustrated with the example of Hamiltonians with a partial dynamical O(6) symmetry in the framework of the interacting boson model. The resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions are compared with empirical data in $^{162}$Dy.

  12. Generalized partial dynamical symmetry in nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, A; Isacker, P Van

    2002-11-25

    We introduce the notion of a generalized partial dynamical-symmetry for which part of the eigenstates have part of the dynamical symmetry. This general concept is illustrated with the example of Hamiltonians with a partial dynamical O(6) symmetry in the framework of the interacting boson model. The resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions are compared with empirical data in 162Dy.

  13. Partial dynamical symmetry in a fermion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher; Leviatan

    2000-02-28

    The relevance of the partial dynamical symmetry concept for an interacting fermion system is demonstrated. Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the symplectic shell model of nuclei and shown to be closely related to the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. Implications are discussed for the deformed light nucleus 20Ne.

  14. Partial dynamical symmetry in a fermion system

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, J; Escher, Jutta; Leviatan, Amiram

    2000-01-01

    The relevance of the partial dynamical symmetry concept for an interactingfermion system is demonstrated. Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry arepresented in the framework of the symplectic shell-model of nuclei and shown tobe closely related to the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. Implications arediscussed for the deformed light nucleus $^{20}$Ne.

  15. Coefficient of Partial Correlation and Its Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段全才; 张保法

    1992-01-01

    This thesis offers the general concept of coefficient of partial correlation.Starting with regres-sion analysis,the paper,by using samples,infers the general formula of expressing coefficient of partial correlation by way of simple correlation coefficient.

  16. Zero ischemia laparoscopic partial thulium laser nephrectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomas, Arun Z

    2013-11-01

    Laser technology presents a promising alternative to achieve tumor excision and renal hemostasis with or without hilar occlusion, yet its use in partial nephrectomy has not been significantly evaluated. We prospectively evaluated the thulium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) in our institution over a 1-year period.

  17. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for endophytic hilar tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Pierro, G B; Tartaglia, N; Aresu, L

    2014-01-01

    To analyze feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) for endophytic hilar tumors in low-intermediate (ASA I-II) risk patients.......To analyze feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) for endophytic hilar tumors in low-intermediate (ASA I-II) risk patients....

  18. On the Category of Partial Bijections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Schwab

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Categories of partial functions have become increasingly important principally because of their applications in theoretical computer science. In this note we prove that the category of partial bijections between sets as an inverse-Baer*-category with closed projections and in which the idempotents split is an exact category. Finally the Noether isomorphism theorems are given for this exact category.

  19. Enhancing Energy Efficient TCP by Partial Reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donckers, L.; Smit, G.J.M.; Smit, L.T.

    2002-01-01

    We present a study on the effects on a mobile system's energy efficiency of enhancing, with partial reliability, our energy efficient TCP variant (E/sup 2/TCP) (see Donckers, L. et al., Proc. 2nd Asian Int. Mobile Computing Conf. - AMOC2002, p.18-28, 2002). Partial reliability is beneficial for mult

  20. Solution techniques for elementary partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Constanda, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating a number of enhancements, Solution Techniques for Elementary Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition presents some of the most important and widely used methods for solving partial differential equations (PDEs). The techniques covered include separation of variables, method of characteristics, eigenfunction expansion, Fourier and Laplace transformations, Green’s functions, perturbation methods, and asymptotic analysis.

  1. Lead Isotopes in Highway Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M.; Lau, S.; Green, P. G.; Stenstrom, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopes have been used extensively to study the provenance of lead pollution on air, water, and sediments. In this study, we measured Pb isotopes and Pb aqueous concentration in highway runoff in three west Los Angeles sites. Those three sites, part of a long-term study sponsored by the California Department of Transportation, represent small catchment areas, and host heavy traffic. In addition, there were no inputs of sand or salt to the highway because the sites are almost completely impervious and also due to the lack of snow to be controlled. Highway runoff from the three sites was collected for 7 storms during the 2004-2005 Winter. Grab samples were collected every 15 minutes during the first hour, and hourly afterwards. A total of 202 samples were collected and filtered into five size fractions (100μm). Aqueous concentration of Pb range from 0.08μg/L to 46.95μg/L (7.98±10.89μg/L) and it is not correlated with any of the lead isotope ratios. The 208Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 1.983 to 2.075 (2.024±0.026) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 208Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). However, the 208Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils yield 2.060±0.021 and it is statistically different from the ratios obtained for the highway runoff. This hints that the lead present in highway runoff does not come from local soils. The 207Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 0.804 to 0.847 (0.827±0.011) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 207Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). Surprisingly, there is also no statistical difference with the 207Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils (0.833±0.009).

  2. Numerical modeling of partial discharges parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartalović Nenad M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent testing of the partial discharges or the use for the diagnosis of insulation condition of high voltage generators, transformers, cables and high voltage equipment develops rapidly. It is a result of the development of electronics, as well as, the development of knowledge about the processes of partial discharges. The aim of this paper is to contribute the better understanding of this phenomenon of partial discharges by consideration of the relevant physical processes in isolation materials and isolation systems. Prebreakdown considers specific processes, and development processes at the local level and their impact on specific isolation material. This approach to the phenomenon of partial discharges needed to allow better take into account relevant discharge parameters as well as better numerical model of partial discharges.

  3. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR DENSITIES OF RANDOM PROCESSES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS , STOCHASTIC PROCESSES), (*STOCHASTIC PROCESSES, PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS ), EQUATIONS, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, STATISTICAL PROCESSES, PROBABILITY, NUMERICAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES

  4. Trophic Niche Differentiation in Rodents and Marsupials Revealed by Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetti, Mauro; Rodarte, Raisa Reis; Neves, Carolina Lima; Moreira, Marcelo; Costa-Pereira, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Tropical rainforests support the greatest diversity of small mammals in the world, yet we have little understanding about the mechanisms that promote the coexistence of species. Diet partitioning can favor coexistence by lessening competition, and interspecific differences in body size and habitat use are usually proposed to be associated with trophic divergence. However, the use of classic dietary methods (e.g. stomach contents) is challenging in small mammals, particularly in community-level studies, thus we used stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) to infer about trophic niche. We investigated i) how trophic niche is partitioned among rodent and marsupial species in three Atlantic forest sites and ii) if interspecific body size and locomotor habit inequalities can constitute mechanisms underlying the isotopic niche partitioning. We found that rodents occupied a broad isotopic niche space with species distributed in different trophic levels and relying on diverse basal carbon sources (C3 and C4 plants). Surprisingly, on the other hand, marsupials showed a narrow isotopic niche, both in δ13C and δ15N dimensions, which is partially overlapped with rodents, contradicting their description as omnivores and generalists proposed classic dietary studies. Although body mass differences did not explained the divergence in isotopic values among species, groups of species with different locomotor habit presented clear differences in the position of the isotopic niche space, indicating that the use of different forest strata can favor trophic niche partitioning in small mammals communities. We suggest that anthropogenic impacts, such as habitat modification (logging, harvesting), can simplify the vertical structure of ecosystems and collapse the diversity of basal resources, which might affect negatively small mammals communities in Atlantic forests. PMID:27049763

  5. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of the Archean Mantle As Inferred from Studies of Komatiites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, N. D.; Puchtel, I. S.; Nagler, T. F.; Mezger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum isotopic composition has been shown to be a powerful tool in studies of planetary processes, e.g. estimating core formation temperatures [1,2]. However, Mo isotope compositions of terrestrial reservoirs are not well constrained. In order to better constrain the Mo isotopic composition of the early Earth's mantle, komatiites from four locations were analyzed for their Mo concentrations and isotopic compositions. Komatiites are particularly appropriate for this type of study because they formed by high degrees of partial melting of the mantle leading to a complete base metal sulfide removal from the residual mantle and the production of sulfur-undersaturated melts and thus a quantitative removal of Mo from the source into the melt. All samples, except for two strongly altered specimens specifically chosen to study the effects of secondary alteration, are very fresh having preserved most of their primary mineralogy. The Mo concentrations in komatiites range from 10 to 120 ng/g. Fresh komatiites have lighter δ98Mo (NIST SRM 3134 = 0.25‰, [3]) than altered samples. The estimated primary Mo isotope compositions of the studied komatiite melts range from 0.02 ± 0.16‰ to 0.19 ± 0.14‰ and are therefore indistinguishable within analytical uncertainty (2SD) from published values for chondritic meteorites (0.09 ± 0.04 ‰; 2SD; [2]) and lighter than the proposed average for Earth's continental crust (0.3 to 0.4‰ [4]). All data combined, although overlapping in errors, show a consistent trend of lighter δ98Mo and lower Mo concentrations in more melt-depleted mantle sources, indicating incompatible behaviour of Mo and preferential mobilization of heavy Mo isotopes during mantle melting. [1] Hin et al. (2013) EPSL, 379 [2] Burkhardt et al. (2014) EPSL, 391 [3] Nägler, et al. (2014) GGR, 38. [4] Voegelin et al. (2014) Lithos, 190-191.

  6. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  7. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  8. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  9. 76 FR 4601 - Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 RIN 2060-AQ66 Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval... Determination Concerning the Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval, and...

  10. Carbon isotopic characteristics and their genetic relationships for individual lipids in plants and sediments from a marsh sedimentary environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yi; ZHANG Hui; ZHENG Chaoyang; WU Baoxiang; ZHENG Guodong

    2005-01-01

    The carbon isotopes of individual lipids in herbaceous plants and tree leaves in Ruoergai marsh were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique in order to understand the inherent relationships of carbon isotopes between sedimentary and plant lipids from typical marsh environment. The analytical results show that the carbon isotopic compositions of n-alkanes in different kinds of plants differ significantly. Mean δ13C values of n-alkanes in herbaceous plants (-32.2‰―-36.9‰) are 3.3‰ lower than those in woody plant (-27.2‰― -35.0‰). The carbon isotopic compositions of fatty acids in organisms (-30.3‰― -36.2‰) are very similar to those of n-alkanes and the δ13C values for unsaturated fatty acids are within the range of those for saturated fatty acids. The differences in δ13C values between plant lipids are obvious and range from 2.4‰ to 7.8‰. It is observed that the carbon isotopic compositions of sedimentary lipids are closely related to those of plant lipids. The carbon isotopic compositions (-27.0‰―-36.9‰) of n-alkanes, ≥C16 fatty acids, n-alkanols, sterols and n-alkanones in the sediments are similar to those of plant lipids and the carbon isotopic compositions of short-chain sedimentary lipids are similar to those of long-chain sedimentary homologues. These indicate that the sedimentary lipids are derived from high plants. However, the δ13C values of C14:0 and C15:0 fatty acids in the sediments are lighter than those of the same carbon number saturated homologues in plants, reflecting the genetic features partially derived from bacteria. These data provide scientific evidence for carbon isotope-applied research of individual lipids.

  11. Compound specific isotope analysis of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Yao, Jun; Trebse, Polonca; Zhang, Ning; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-09-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants. In this study, CSIA was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides: dichlorvos, omethoate and dimethoate. The linearity of the GC-C-IRMS system was tested for target pesticides and led to an acceptable isotope composition within the uncertainty of the instrument. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed method, the effect of the evaporation procedure on measured carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) values was studied and showed that concentration by evaporation of solvents had no significant isotope effect. The CSIA was then applied to investigate isotope fractionation of the hydrolysis and photolysis of selected pesticides. The carbon isotope fractionation of tested pesticides was quantified by the Rayleigh model, which revealed a bulk enrichment factor (ε) of -0.2±0.1‰ for hydrolysis of dichlorvos, -1.0±0.1‰ and -3.7±1.1‰ for hydrolysis and photolysis of dimethoate respectively. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to trace the transport and degradation of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment.

  12. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  13. The isotope effect: Prediction, discussion, and discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The precise position of a spectral line emitted by an atomic system depends on the mass of the atomic nucleus and is therefore different for isotopes belonging to the same element. The possible presence of an isotope effect followed from Bohr's atomic theory of 1913, but it took several years before it was confirmed experimentally. Its early history involves the childhood not only of the quantum atom, but also of the concept of isotopy. Bohr's prediction of the isotope effect was apparently at odds with early attempts to distinguish between isotopes by means of their optical spectra. However, in 1920 the effect was discovered in HCl molecules, which gave rise to a fruitful development in molecular spectroscopy. The first detection of an atomic isotope effect was no less important, as it was by this means that the heavy hydrogen isotope deuterium was discovered in 1932. The early development of isotope spectroscopy illustrates the complex relationship between theory and experiment, and is also instructive with...

  14. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jackson, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 (United States); Barrat, Jean-Alix, E-mail: eapringle@wustl.edu, E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: pringle@ipgp.fr, E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr, E-mail: jackson@geol.ucsb.edu, E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, Université de Brest, CNRS UMR 6538 (Domaines Océaniques), I.U.E.M., Place Nicolas Copernic, F-29280 Plouzané Cedex (France)

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  15. Partiality and distributive justice in African bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Christopher Simon

    2017-04-01

    African ethical theories tend to hold that moral agents ought to be partial, in the sense that they should favour members of their family or close community. This is considered an advantage over the impartiality of many Western moral theories, which are regarded as having counterintuitive implications, such as the idea that it is unethical to save a family member before a stranger. The partiality of African ethics is thought to be particularly valuable in the context of bioethics. Thaddeus Metz, in particular, argues that his African-derived theory best accounts for a number of plausible intuitions, such as the intuition that health care practitioners ought to be biased towards the patients for whom they are directly responsible. In this article, I claim that the plausible intuitions drawn on in favour of partiality can be satisfactorily explained on the basis of impartial moral theories. Moreover, I argue that blanket acceptance of partiality has problematic consequences for distributive justice in resource allocation in biomedical contexts. By contrast, impartial theories can justify plausible instances of partiality whilst avoiding the pitfalls of fully partial moral theories. Although this provides grounds for abandoning partiality in principle, I claim that this finding should not be seen as damaging to African medical ethics. Instead, it prompts investigation of underexplored possibilities of impartial African moral theories. To demonstrate the value of this direction, I sketch some novel and attractive conceptions that combine impartiality with elements of African ethics.

  16. Beneficial uses and production of isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Isotopes, radioactive and stable, are used worldwide in various applications related to medical diagnosis or care, industry and scientific research. More than fifty countries have isotope production or separation facilities operated for domestic supply, and sometimes for international markets. This publication provides up-to-date information on the current status of, and trends in, isotope uses and production. It also presents key issues, conclusions and recommendations, which will be of interest to policy makers in governmental bodies, scientists and industrial actors in the field.

  17. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.-C.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Burton, K.W.; Christensen, J.N.; Gunther, D.

    1999-01-01

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in 87Sr/86Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  18. Isotopic Fractionation of Selenium Oxyanions in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. K.; Johnson, T. M.

    2004-05-01

    As oxic surface waters pass through aquatic macrophytes and over anoxic sediments in wetlands and lakes, the dissolved Se load often decreases; and, Se isotope ratio measurements can provide information about the mechanisms involved. Previous work on microbially induced isotopic fractionation of Se oxyanions under nearly natural conditions using wetland sediments shows consistent Se isotopic shifts during reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) to insoluble Se(0). However, previous isotopic studies of total dissolved selenium in wetlands found little to no isotopic shift as dissolved selenium concentrations decreased. This suggests that plant/algal uptake, followed by deposition and degradation, is the primary route of Se transfer into sediments. However, it is possible that the effective isotopic fractionation between Se in the surface water and Se deposited into sediments is somehow much less than the fractionation induced by the reduction reaction, or that cycling of organically bound Se is involved. In this study, we report Se isotope data for Se(VI), Se(IV) and total dissolved Se, Se(T), in surface waters from three wetland/lake sites: Sweitzer Lake, CO; 33-Mile Reservoir, WY; and, a small pond adjacent to Benton Lake, MT. We isolated Se(IV) via hydride generation, and Se(VI) via ion exchange. Se(T), including any organic components, was also analyzed. Isotope analysis was performed on an Isoprobe MC-ICPMS, using a method modified from that of Rouxel et al. (2002). We used the 82Se + 74Se double spike approach, and spiked samples before species separation. Our results for all three locations indicate similar trends in concentration changes and isotopic shifts between the inflow and outflow waters. Se(T) concentrations decrease by 45-70%, and Se(VI) concentrations decrease by 60-90%, whereas Se(IV) concentrations increase by 60-150%. Concomitant 80Se/76Se shifts are +0.5-0.8‰ for Se(T); -0.1-0.5‰ for Se(VI); and +0.4-6.5‰ for Se(IV). These data provide greater

  19. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  20. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, C.

    2015-05-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a United States Department of Energy user facility currently under construction on the campus of Michigan State University. Based on a 400 kW, 200 MeV/u heavy-ion driver linac, FRIB will deliver high-quality fast, thermalized, and re-accelerated beams of rare isotopes with unprecedented intensities to a variety of experimental areas and equipment. New science opportunities at the frontiers of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries, and societal applications will be enabled by this future world-leading rare-isotope beam facility.

  1. Extremely large fractionation of Li isotopes in a chromitite-bearing mantle sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ben-Xun; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Robinson, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    We report Li isotopic compositions of olivine from the mantle sequence of the Luobusa ophiolite, southern Tibet. The olivine in the Luobusa ophiolite has Li concentrations from ~0.1 to 0.9 ppm and a broad range of δ7Li (+14 to −20‰). An inverse correlation of Li concentration and δ7Li in olivine from harzburgite suggests recent diffusive ingress of Li into the rock. Olivine from dunite enveloping podiform chromitites shows positive δ7Li values higher than those of MORB, whereas olivine from the chromitite has negative δ7Li values. Such variations are difficult to reconcile by diffusive fractionation and are thought to record the nature of the magma sources. Our results clearly indicate that the Luobusa chromitites formed from magmas with light Li isotopic compositions and that the dunites are products of melt-rock interaction. The isotopically light magmas originated by partial melting of a subducted slab after high degrees of dehydration and then penetrated the overlying mantle wedge. This study provides evidence for Li isotope heterogeneity in the mantle that resulted from subduction of a recycled oceanic component. PMID:26927333

  2. Diet control on carbon isotopic composition of land snail shell carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZongXiu; GU ZhaoYan; WU NaiQin; XU Bing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon isotope compositions for both the carbonate shells and soft bodies (organic tissue) of living land snails collected mostly from the Loess Plateau, China have been measured. The result shows that δ13C values range from -13.1‰ to -4.3‰ for the aragonite shell samples and from -26.8‰ to -18.0‰ for the soft body samples. Although the shells are enriched in 13C relative to the bodies averagely by 14.2(±0.8)‰, the shell δ13Ca values are closely correlated to the body δ13Corg values, expressed as δ13Ca = 1.021 δ13Corg + 14.38 (R = 0.965; N = 31). This relationship indicates that δ13Ca is primarily a function of the isotopic composition of the snail diets since previous studies have proved that the snail body is the same as their food in carbon isotope composition. In other words, carbon isotope compo-sition of the carbonate shell can be used as a proxy to estimate the dietary 13C abundance of the land snails. The data also support that the 13C enrichment of the carbonate shells results mainly from the equilibrium fractionations between the metabolic CO2, HCO3- in the hemolymph and shell aragonite, and partially from kinetic fractionations when snail shells form during their activity.

  3. Isotope effects in the non enzymic glycation of hemoglobin catalyzed by DPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Herminia; Uzcategui, Jorge [Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela). Dept. de Quimica

    1993-12-31

    The paradigmatic reaction of glucose with hemoglobin (Hb A{sub o}) has been studied and is known to occur most rapidly at the N-terminal valine of the {beta}-subunit. An initial, rapid imine formation is succeeded by slower Amadori rearrangement. Non enzymic glycation of Hb A{sub o} was studied in vitro in buffer Tris 10 mM in H{sub 2} O and D{sub 2} O, pH 7.3, pD 7.8 at 37 deg C at a fixed concentration of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG). The reaction exhibits identical rates in protium and deuterium oxides. When D-glucose-2-h is compared with D-glucose-2-d, the kinetic isotope effect for the DPG-dependent rate is 2.1 {+-} 0.3, while the DPG-independent rate constant shows no isotope effect (1.1 {+-} 0.1). The absence of a rate in isotopic water solvents shows that proton donation for solvent, lyons or DPG does not limit the rate. The substrate isotope effect of around 2 for the DPG kinetic term indicates that the proton abstraction step of the Amadori rearrangement by DPG is wholly or partially rate-limiting for this reaction. (author) 23 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Chemocline instability and isotope variations of the Ediacaran Doushantuo basin in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG GanQing; ZHANG ShiHong; SHI XiaoYing; WANG XinQiang

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotope analyses in sections across a shelf to basinal transect of the Ediacaran Doushantuo basin show substantial isotope variabilities.In Songlin section where sediments were deposited in an intrashelf basin,δ13C values are persistently negative (-3%.to -5%.VPDB) through the entire Doushantuo Formation,similar to those obtained from the slope section in Wuhe (-5%.to -10%.,VPDB).Shallow water sections in Weng'an and Duoding show two broad δ13C anomalies overprinted with significant meter-scale variations,but none of the curves has similar absolute δ13C values compared to the Yangtze Gorges areas in South China and other sections globally.Such isotope variations,if partially recording ancient seawater signature,imply spatial and temporal chemocline instability in the Doushantuo basin.In combination with available δ13C records from other Ediacaran successions globally,the data from the Doushantuo basin are consistent,in first order,with the existence and oxidation of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir in Ediacaran oceans,but imply local environmental controls on Neoproterozoic isotope values and call attentions for using δ13C anomalies as time lines in stratigraphic correlation.

  5. Deformation and mixing of coexisting shapes in neutron-deficient polonium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesteloot, N.; Bastin, B.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Auranen, K.; Bauer, C.; Bender, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Damyanova, A.; Darby, I.; De Witte, H.; Di Julio, D.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, C.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Laurent, B.; Lecesne, N.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Piselli, E.; Próchniak, L.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Sferrazza, M.; Siebeck, B.; Sjodin, M.; Tornqvist, H.; Traykov, E.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; Zielińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments are performed with postaccelerated beams of neutron-deficient Po 196 ,198 ,200 ,202 isotopes at the REX-ISOLDE facility. A set of matrix elements, coupling the low-lying states in these isotopes, is extracted. In the two heaviest isotopes, Po,202200, the transitional and diagonal matrix elements of the 21+ state are determined. In Po,198196 multistep Coulomb excitation is observed, populating the 41+,02+ , and 22+ states. The experimental results are compared to the results from the measurement of mean-square charge radii in polonium isotopes, confirming the onset of deformation from 196Po onwards. Three model descriptions are used to compare to the data. Calculations with the beyond-mean-field model, the interacting boson model, and the general Bohr Hamiltonian model show partial agreement with the experimental data. Finally, calculations with a phenomenological two-level mixing model hint at the mixing of a spherical structure with a weakly deformed rotational structure.

  6. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  7. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  8. Environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes: Applications of a new stable isotope approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhanmin; LIU Congqiang; HAN Guilin; WANG Zhongliang; XUE Zichen; SONG Zhaoliang; YANG Cheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes isotope fractionation mechanism, analytical method and applications in environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes. Calcium isotopic composition can be used to constrain material sources and study geological and environmental processes as the isotopic composition of calcium (δ 44Ca) and fractionation processes depend on geochemical circumstances in nature. Recently, thanks to current advances in analytical technology of calcium isotopes, calcium isotopes are broadly used in biological and geochemical studies, such as the mechanism of plants imbibing nutrients through their roots, calcium transport in the environmental ecosystem, calcium cycle in oceans and paleo-oceans and paleo-climate. The elementary data show that δ44Ca values vary from -2.88‰ to 0.92‰ in natural samples.

  9. Newtonian kinetic isotope effects. Observation, prediction, and origin of heavy-atom dynamic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kelmara K; Hirschi, Jennifer S; Singleton, Daniel A

    2009-06-24

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of cyclopentadiene. Substantial isotope effects were observed in three positions, despite the C(2) symmetry of the cycloaddition transition state and the absence of dynamical bottlenecks after this transition state. The observed isotope effects were predicted well from trajectory studies by extrapolating the outcomes of trajectories incorporating superheavy isotopes of carbon, ranging from (20)C to (140)C. Trajectory studies suggest that the isotope effects are unrelated to zero-point energy or the geometrical and momentum properties of the transition state. However, steepest-descent paths in mass-weighted coordinates correctly predict the direction of the isotope effects, supporting a novel origin in Newton's second law of motion.

  10. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, Matthias M M; Marty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14'000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150 to 650 {\\deg}C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of ...

  11. Multiple Partial Attacks on Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yan-Ping; ZHANG Duan-Ming; TAN Jin; PAN Gui-Jun; HE Min-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of four kinds of partial attacks of multiple targets on the Barabási-Albert (BA) scale-free network and the Erd(o)s-Rényi (ER) random network.Comparing with the effect of single target complete knockout we find that partial attacks of multiple targets may produce an effect higher than the complete knockout of a single target on both BA scale-free network and ER random network.We also find that the BA ecale-free network seems to be more susceptible to multi-target partial attacks than the ER random network.

  12. Partial differential equations for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Farlow, Stanley J

    1993-01-01

    Most physical phenomena, whether in the domain of fluid dynamics, electricity, magnetism, mechanics, optics, or heat flow, can be described in general by partial differential equations. Indeed, such equations are crucial to mathematical physics. Although simplifications can be made that reduce these equations to ordinary differential equations, nevertheless the complete description of physical systems resides in the general area of partial differential equations.This highly useful text shows the reader how to formulate a partial differential equation from the physical problem (constructing th

  13. Circulant states with positive partial transpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-09-01

    We construct a large class of quantum d⊗d states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure—that is why we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. This class contains many well-known examples of PPT states from the literature and gives rise to a huge family of completely new states.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, S H

    2011-01-01

    A balanced guide to the essential techniques for solving elliptic partial differential equations Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations provides a comprehensive, self-contained treatment of the quantitative methods used to solve elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), with a focus on the efficiency as well as the error of the presented methods. The author utilizes coverage of theoretical PDEs, along with the nu merical solution of linear systems and various examples and exercises, to supply readers with an introduction to the essential concepts in the numerical analysis

  15. Method for partially coating laser diode facets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Bars of integral laser diode devices cleaved from a wafer are placed with their p regions abutting and n regions abutting. A thin BeCu mask having alternate openings and strips of the same width as the end facets is used to mask the n region interfaces so that multiple bars can be partially coated over their exposed p regions with a reflective or partial reflective coating. The partial coating permits identification of the emitting facet from the fully coated back facet during a later device mounting procedure.

  16. Higher-Order Rewriting and Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Rose, Kristoffer H.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness of higher-order rewriting techniques for specializing programs, i.e., for partial evaluation. More precisely, we demonstrate how casting program specializers as combinatory reduction systems (CRSs) makes it possible to formalize the corresponding program...... for additional restrictions such as types that would complicate the description unnecessarily (for our purpose). In addition, partial evaluation provides a number of examples of higher-order rewriting where being higher order is a central (rather than an occasional or merely exotic) property. We illustrate...... this by demonstrating how standard but non-trivial partial-evaluation examples are handled with higher-order rewriting....

  17. Partial chord diagrams and matrix models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Fuji, Hiroyuki; Manabe, Masahide

    spectrum. Furthermore, we consider the boundary length and point spectrum that unifies the last two types of spectra. We introduce matrix models that encode generating functions of partial chord diagrams filtered by each of these spectra. Using these matrix models, we derive partial differential equations......In this article, the enumeration of partial chord diagrams is discussed via matrix model techniques. In addition to the basic data such as the number of backbones and chords, we also consider the Euler characteristic, the backbone spectrum, the boundary point spectrum, and the boundary length...... – obtained independently by cut-and-join arguments in an earlier work – for the corresponding generating functions....

  18. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  19. Energy measurement and fragment identification using digital signals from partially depleted Si detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A.A.; Valdre, S. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Vient, E. [ENSICAEN et Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, Caen-Cedex (France); Ademard, G.; Borderie, B.; Edelbruck, P.; Rivet, M.F.; Salomon, F. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay cedex (France); Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Gruyer, D. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, B.P. 5027, Caen cedex (France); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Piantelli, S. [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T. [INFN-LNL Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Duenas, J.A. [FCCEE Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Huelva (Spain); Kordyasz, A. [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Kozik, T.; Twarog, T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics IFJ-PAN, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Morelli, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ordine, A. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Parlog, M. [ENSICAEN et Universite de Caen, LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, Caen-Cedex (France); ' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D. [INFN-LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Collaboration: FAZIA Collaboration

    2014-05-15

    A study of identification properties of a Si-Si ΔE-E telescope exploiting an underdepleted residual-energy detector has been performed. Five different bias voltages have been used, one corresponding to full depletion, the others associated with a depleted layer ranging from 90% to 60% of the detector thickness. Fragment identification has been performed using either the ΔE-E technique or the Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA). Both detectors are reverse mounted: particles enter from the low field side, to enhance the PSA performance. The achieved charge and mass resolution has been quantitatively expressed using a Figure of Merit (FoM). Charge collection efficiency has been evaluated and the possibility of energy calibration corrections has been considered. We find that the ΔE-E performance is not affected by incomplete depletion even when only 60% of the wafer is depleted. Isotopic separation capability improves at lower bias voltages with respect to full depletion, though charge identification thresholds are higher than at full depletion. Good isotopic identification via PSA has been obtained from a partially depleted detector, whose doping uniformity is not good enough for isotopic identification at full depletion. (orig.)

  20. Energy measurement and fragment identification using digital signals from partially depleted Si detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, G.; Pastore, G.; Le Neindre, N.; Ademard, G.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Cinausero, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; Edelbruck, P.; Frankland, J. D.; Gramegna, F.; Gruyer, D.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Morelli, L.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Pârlog, M.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Salomon, F.; Spadaccini, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Valdrè, S.; Vient, E.; Twaróg, T.; Alba, R.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.

    2014-05-01

    A study of identification properties of a Si-Si ΔE- E telescope exploiting an underdepleted residual-energy detector has been performed. Five different bias voltages have been used, one corresponding to full depletion, the others associated with a depleted layer ranging from 90% to 60% of the detector thickness. Fragment identification has been performed using either the ΔE- E technique or the Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA). Both detectors are reverse mounted: particles enter from the low field side, to enhance the PSA performance. The achieved charge and mass resolution has been quantitatively expressed using a Figure of Merit (FoM). Charge collection efficiency has been evaluated and the possibility of energy calibration corrections has been considered. We find that the ΔE- E performance is not affected by incomplete depletion even when only 60% of the wafer is depleted. Isotopic separation capability improves at lower bias voltages with respect to full depletion, though charge identification thresholds are higher than at full depletion. Good isotopic identification via PSA has been obtained from a partially depleted detector, whose doping uniformity is not good enough for isotopic identification at full depletion.