WorldWideScience

Sample records for fisheries bycatch jeopardizes

  1. Reducing marine mammal bycatch in global fisheries: An economics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Rebecca; Squires, Dale

    2017-06-01

    The broader ecosystem impacts of fishing continue to present a challenge to scientists and resource managers around the world. Bycatch is of greatest concern for marine mammals, for which fishery bycatch and entanglement is the number one cause of direct mortality. Climate change will only add to the challenge, as marine species and fishing practices adapt to a changing environment, creating a dynamic pattern of overlap between fishing and species (both target and bycatch). Economists suggest policy instruments for reducing bycatch that move away from top-down, command-and-control measures (e.g. effort reduction, time/area closures, gear restrictions, bycatch quotas) towards an approach that creates incentives to reduce bycatch (e.g. transferable bycatch allowances, taxes, and other measures). The advantages of this flexible, incentive-oriented approach are even greater in a changing and increasingly variable environment, as regulatory measures would have to be adapted constantly to keep up with climate change. Unlike the regulatory process, individual operators in the fishery sector can make adjustments to their harvesting practices as soon as the incentives for such changes are apparent and inputs or operations can be modified. This paper explores policy measures that create economic incentives not only to reduce marine mammal bycatch, but also to increase compliance and induce technological advances by fishery operators. Economists also suggest exploration of direct economic incentives as have been used in other conservation programs, such as payments for economic services, in an approach that addresses marine mammal bycatch as part of a larger conservation strategy. Expanding the portfolio of mandatory and potentially, voluntary, measures to include novel approaches will provide a broader array of opportunities for successful stewardship of the marine environment.

  2. Dynamic habitat models: using telemetry data to project fisheries bycatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydelis, Ramūnas; Lewison, Rebecca L; Shaffer, Scott A; Moore, Jeffrey E; Boustany, Andre M; Roberts, Jason J; Sims, Michelle; Dunn, Daniel C; Best, Benjamin D; Tremblay, Yann; Kappes, Michelle A; Halpin, Patrick N; Costa, Daniel P; Crowder, Larry B

    2011-11-01

    Fisheries bycatch is a recognized threat to marine megafauna. Addressing bycatch of pelagic species however is challenging owing to the dynamic nature of marine environments and vagility of these organisms. In order to assess the potential for species to overlap with fisheries, we propose applying dynamic habitat models to determine relative probabilities of species occurrence for specific oceanographic conditions. We demonstrate this approach by modelling habitats for Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes) using telemetry data and relating their occurrence probabilities to observations of Hawaii-based longline fisheries in 1997-2000. We found that modelled habitat preference probabilities of black-footed albatrosses were high within some areas of the fishing range of the Hawaiian fleet and such preferences were important in explaining bycatch occurrence. Conversely, modelled habitats of Laysan albatrosses overlapped little with Hawaii-based longline fisheries and did little to explain the bycatch of this species. Estimated patterns of albatross habitat overlap with the Hawaiian fleet corresponded to bycatch observations: black-footed albatrosses were more frequently caught in this fishery despite being 10 times less abundant than Laysan albatrosses. This case study demonstrates that dynamic habitat models based on telemetry data may help to project interactions with pelagic animals relative to environmental features and that such an approach can serve as a tool to guide conservation and management decisions.

  3. Fisheries bycatch as an inadvertent human-induced evolutionary mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Barbraud

    Full Text Available Selective harvesting of animals by humans can affect the sustainability and genetics of their wild populations. Bycatch - the accidental catch of non-target species - spans the spectrum of marine fauna and constitutes a harvesting pressure. Individual differences in attraction to fishing vessels and consequent susceptibility to bycatch exist, but few studies integrate this individual heterogeneity with demography. Here, we tested for the evidence and consequences of individual heterogeneity on the demography of the wandering albatross, a seabird heavily affected by fisheries bycatch. We found strong evidence for heterogeneity in survival with one group of individuals having a 5.2% lower annual survival probability than another group, and a decrease in the proportion of those individuals with the lowest survival in the population coinciding with a 7.5 fold increase in fishing effort in the foraging areas. Potential causes for the heterogeneity in survival are discussed and we suggest that bycatch removed a large proportion of individuals attracted by fishing vessels and had significant phenotypic and population consequences.

  4. Catch, effort and bycatch of longline fishery in central Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ayala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study is to report some characteristics of fishing trips, effort, catches, fishing areas and bycatch through observations on board and logbooks. 85% of sets were in the first 574 Km of distance from the coast (309 nautical miles. Farthest set was located at 1320 Km (712 nautical miles. A total of 382000 hooks were used to catch Mahi mahi, in 224 sets and 29 fishing trips, 94.6% of catch was Mahi mahi, 2.7% blue shark (Prionace glauca y 1,3% mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus. Also, 103790 hooks were used to catch sharks, in 109 sets y 12 trips, 81.9% of catch was blue sharks and 16.8% mako sharks. Catch per Unit of Effort (CPUE for Mahi mahi shows significative difference among seasons; with a peak from November to January. CPUE for shark shows significative difference among seasons, with peaks in September and October. The Green turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii was the most caugth species and two of three were juveniles. All Loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, caught were juveniles. A petrel is reported as bycatch and, probably, mammal bycatch is scarce. Considering the huge effort of this fishery, it is important to monitor it and establish management actions.

  5. Sea Turtle Bycatch Mitigation in U.S. Longline Fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonat Swimmer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Capture of sea turtles in longline fisheries has been implicated in population declines of loggerhead (Caretta caretta and leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea turtles. Since 2004, United States (U.S. longline vessels targeting swordfish and tunas in the Pacific and regions in the Atlantic Ocean have operated under extensive fisheries regulations to reduce the capture and mortality of endangered and threatened sea turtles. We analyzed 20+ years of longline observer data from both ocean basins during periods before and after the regulations to assess the effectiveness of the regulations. Using generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs, we investigated relationships between the probability of expected turtle interactions and operational components such as fishing location, hook type, bait type, sea surface temperature, and use of light sticks. GAMMs identified a two to three-fold lower probability of expected capture of loggerhead and leatherback turtle bycatch in the Atlantic and Pacific when circle hooks are used (vs. J hook. Use of fish bait (vs. squid was also found to significantly reduce the capture probability of loggerheads in both ocean basins, and for leatherbacks in the Atlantic only. Capture probabilities are lowest when using a combination of circle hook and fish bait. Influences of light sticks, hook depth, geographic location, and sea surface temperature are discussed specific to species and regions. Results confirmed that in two U.S.-managed longline fisheries, rates of sea turtle bycatch significantly declined after the regulations. In the Atlantic (all regions, rates declined by 40 and 61% for leatherback and loggerhead turtles, respectively, after the regulations. Within the NED area alone, where additional restrictions include a large circle hook (18/0 and limited use of squid bait, rates declined by 64 and 55% for leatherback and loggerhead turtles, respectively. Gains were even more pronounced for the Pacific shallow set fishery

  6. Regional variation in bycatches associated with king scallop (Pecten maximus L.) dredge fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostek, Claire L; Murray, Lee G; Bell, Ewen; Lambert, Gwladys; Kaiser, Michel J

    2017-02-01

    The biomass and composition of bycatch from king scallop dredge fisheries was assessed and compared between the English Channel, Cardigan Bay in Wales and around the Isle of Man. Bycatch composition varied significantly at localised, and broad, geographic scales. The mean proportion of scallop dredge bycatch biomass in the English Channel was 19% of total catch biomass. The proportion of bycatch was lower in Cardigan Bay (15%) but notably higher around the Isle of Man (53%). The proportion of individual bycatch species in dredge catches were low, therefore scallop dredging is unlikely to cause a substantial increase the population mortality of individual commercially fished species beyond that caused by the target fisheries for those species, or bycatches of other fisheries. The amount and mortality of organisms left on the seabed in the dredge path was not quantified in this study but should also be considered in management of the fishery. The discard rate of finfish and shellfish of commercial value from the king scallop dredge fishery in the English Channel was between 18 and 100%, with a higher rate of discarding occurring in the eastern English Channel compared to the west. The clear regional differences in bycatch composition and variation in the quantity of discards mean that an area by area approach to managing bycatch species is required in relation to the king scallop dredge fishery.

  7. Assessing incidental bycatch of seabirds in Norwegian coastal commercial fisheries: Empirical and methodological lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Fangel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With diminishing seabird populations and little knowledge on incidental bycatch in fisheries in the Northeast Atlantic, this study aimed to screen seabird bycatch in Norwegian coastal fisheries in 2009. The purpose was to 1 quantify magnitude of seabird bycatch rates and estimate total bycatch from the entire fleet by different estimators 2 evaluate data from an access point survey against monitoring data from a reference fleet as methods for collecting data on bycatch mortality of seabirds and 3 give advice on further bycatch studies. The study focused on three small-vessel fisheries (11 000 birds estimated caught. The black guillemot Cepphus gryllealso stood out as a numerous victim, constituting almost two thirds of the >3000 birds estimated to have drowned in lumpfish gillnets. The two methods were both considered to hold merit and yielded approximately similar estimates of the bycatch in the coastal cod fisheries, however BPUE differs. Further studies are recommended especially on the lumpfish gillnet and Greenland halibut longline fisheries and on temporal and spatial variations in bycatch. More studies are also needed to model effects on seabirds at the population level.

  8. Bycatch and release of pelagic megafauna in industrial trawler fisheries off Northwest Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeberg, J.J.; Corten, A.A.H.M.; Graaf, de E.

    2006-01-01

    The accidental capture of large animals such as sharks, manta rays, sea turtles, and dolphins in pelagic trawler fisheries remains controversial because it threatens biological diversity in many biogeographical regions, including the subtropical eastern North Atlantic. Bycatch rates observed during

  9. Bycatch and release of pelagic megafauna in industrial trawler fisheries off Northwest Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeberg, J.J.; Corten, A.A.H.M.; Graaf, de E.

    2006-01-01

    The accidental capture of large animals such as sharks, manta rays, sea turtles, and dolphins in pelagic trawler fisheries remains controversial because it threatens biological diversity in many biogeographical regions, including the subtropical eastern North Atlantic. Bycatch rates observed during

  10. Disentangling the causes of protected-species bycatch in gillnet fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Simon; Coram, Alex; Kingston, Al; Crawford, Rory

    2017-06-01

    Gillnet fisheries are widely thought to pose a conservation threat to many populations of marine mammals, seabirds, and turtles. Gillnet fisheries also support a significant proportion of small-scale fishing communities worldwide. Despite a large number of studies on protected-species bycatch in recent decades, relatively few have examined the underlying causes of bycatch and fewer still have considered the issue from a multitaxon perspective. We used 3 bibliographic databases and one search engine to identify studies by year of publication and taxon. The majority of studies on the mechanisms of gillnet bycatch are not accessible through the mainstream published literature. Many are reported in technical papers, government reports, and university theses. We reviewed over 600 published and unpublished studies of bycatch in which causal or correlative factors were considered and identified therein 28 environmental, operational, technical, and behavioral factors that may be associated with high or low bycatch rates of the taxa. Of the factors considered, 11 were associated with potential bycatch reduction in 2 out of the 3 taxa, and 3 factors (water depth, mesh size, and net height) were associated with trends in bycatch rate for all 3 taxa. These findings provide a basis to guide further experimental work to test hypotheses about which factors most influence bycatch rates and to explore ways of managing fishing activities and improving gear design to minimize the incidental capture of species of conservation concern while ensuring the viability of the fisheries concerned. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia's commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995–1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  12. Patterns of dolphin bycatch in a north-western Australian trawl fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon J; Tyne, Julian A; Kobryn, Halina T; Bejder, Lars; Pollock, Kenneth H; Loneragan, Neil R

    2014-01-01

    The bycatch of small cetaceans in commercial fisheries is a global wildlife management problem. We used data from skippers' logbooks and independent observers to assess common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) bycatch patterns between 2003 and 2009 in the Pilbara Trawl Fishery, Western Australia. Both datasets indicated that dolphins were caught in all fishery areas, across all depths and throughout the year. Over the entire datasets, observer reported bycatch rates (n = 52 dolphins in 4,124 trawls, or 12.6 dolphins/1,000 trawls) were ca. double those reported by skippers (n = 180 dolphins in 27,904 trawls, or 6.5 dolphins/1,000 trawls). Generalised Linear Models based on observer data, which better explained the variation in dolphin bycatch, indicated that the most significant predictors of dolphin catch were: (1) vessel--one trawl vessel caught significantly more dolphins than three others assessed; (2) time of day--the lowest dolphin bycatch rates were between 00:00 and 05:59; and (3) whether nets included bycatch reduction devices (BRDs)--the rate was reduced by ca. 45%, from 18.8 to 10.3 dolphins/1,000 trawls, after their introduction. These results indicated that differences among vessels (or skippers' trawling techniques) and dolphin behavior (a diurnal pattern) influenced the rates of dolphin capture; and that spatial or seasonal adjustments to trawling effort would be unlikely to significantly reduce dolphin bycatch. Recent skipper's logbook data show that dolphin bycatch rates have not declined since those reported in 2006, when BRDs were introduced across the fishery. Modified BRDs, with top-opening escape hatches from which dolphins might escape to the surface, may be a more effective means of further reducing dolphin bycatch. The vulnerability of this dolphin population to trawling-related mortality cannot be assessed in the absence of an ongoing observer program and without information on trawler-associated dolphin community size

  13. Fish bycatch of the laulao catfish Brachyplatystoma vaillantii (Valenciennes, 1840 trawl fishery in the Amazon Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Antunes Jimenez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse the composition and seasonal variation in the fish bycatch of the Brachyplatystoma vaillantii trawl fishery in the Amazon Estuary in 2009 by monitoring the trips of 48 vessels. The bycatch represented 29% of the catches, totalling 22,228 specimens and 52 taxa, distributed in 22 families (the principal families were Ariidae, Pimelodidae, and Sciaenidae. Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii, Plagioscion squamosissimus, and Sciades herzbergii together contributed 69% of the bycatch and were considered consistent bycatch species. Although a higher proportion of bycatch was captured during the rainy season, the seasonal difference was not significant. A multidimensional scaling (MDS ordination analysis and an analysis of similarity (ANOSIM indicated that the species composition of the bycatch was similar across the seasons. However, larger numbers of B. rousseauxii and P. squamosissimus were captured during the rainy season, whereas S. herzbergii predominated during the dry season. The marine migrants and estuarine species guilds showed the greatest richness, whereas freshwater migrants were the most numerous. Among the feeding guilds, the zoobenthivores were the most diverse, whereas the piscivores were the most abundant. The results indicate that fishing pressure primarily affects small- (20-30 cm and medium-sized (30-50 cm individuals, although the catch of P. squamosissimus was composed primarily of adults. However, the catches of both B. rousseauxii and B. vaillantii were composed primarily of juveniles.

  14. Biodiversity offsets: a cost-effective interim solution to seabird bycatch in fisheries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Pascoe

    Full Text Available The concept of biodiversity offsets is well established as an approach to environmental management. The concept has been suggested for environmental management in fisheries, particularly in relation to the substantial numbers of non-target species--seabirds in particular--caught and killed as incidental bycatch during fishing activities. Substantial areas of fisheries are being closed to protect these species at great cost to the fishing industry. However, other actions may be taken to offset the impact of fishing on these populations at lower cost to the fishing industry. This idea, however, has attracted severe criticism largely as it does not address the underlying externality problems created by the fishing sector, namely seabird fishing mortality. In this paper, we re-examine the potential role of compensatory mitigation as a fisheries management tool, although from the perspective of being an interim management measure while more long-lasting solutions to the problem are found. We re-model an example previously examined by both proponents and opponents of the approach, namely the cost effectiveness of rodent control relative to fishery area closures for the conservation of a seabird population adversely affected by an Australian tuna fishery. We find that, in the example being examined, invasive rodent eradication is at least 10 times more cost effective than area closures. We conclude that, while this does not solve the actual bycatch problem, it may provide breathing space for both the seabird species and the industry to find longer term means of reducing bycatch.

  15. Effects of Climate Change and Fisheries Bycatch on Shy Albatross (Thalassarche cauta) in Southern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Robin B; Alderman, Rachael L; Tuck, Geoffrey N; Hobday, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of climate change on marine species are often compounded by other stressors that make direct attribution and prediction difficult. Shy albatrosses (Thalassarche cauta) breeding on Albatross Island, Tasmania, show an unusually restricted foraging range, allowing easier discrimination between the influence of non-climate stressors (fisheries bycatch) and environmental variation. Local environmental conditions (rainfall, air temperature, and sea-surface height, an indicator of upwelling) during the vulnerable chick-rearing stage, have been correlated with breeding success of shy albatrosses. We use an age-, stage- and sex-structured population model to explore potential relationships between local environmental factors and albatross breeding success while accounting for fisheries bycatch by trawl and longline fisheries. The model uses time-series of observed breeding population counts, breeding success, adult and juvenile survival rates and a bycatch mortality observation for trawl fishing to estimate fisheries catchability, environmental influence, natural mortality rate, density dependence, and productivity. Observed at-sea distributions for adult and juvenile birds were coupled with reported fishing effort to estimate vulnerability to incidental bycatch. The inclusion of rainfall, temperature and sea-surface height as explanatory variables for annual chick mortality rate was statistically significant. Global climate models predict little change in future local average rainfall, however, increases are forecast in both temperatures and upwelling, which are predicted to have detrimental and beneficial effects, respectively, on breeding success. The model shows that mitigation of at least 50% of present bycatch is required to offset losses due to future temperature changes, even if upwelling increases substantially. Our results highlight the benefits of using an integrated modeling approach, which uses available demographic as well as environmental data

  16. Effects of Climate Change and Fisheries Bycatch on Shy Albatross (Thalassarche cauta in Southern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B Thomson

    Full Text Available The impacts of climate change on marine species are often compounded by other stressors that make direct attribution and prediction difficult. Shy albatrosses (Thalassarche cauta breeding on Albatross Island, Tasmania, show an unusually restricted foraging range, allowing easier discrimination between the influence of non-climate stressors (fisheries bycatch and environmental variation. Local environmental conditions (rainfall, air temperature, and sea-surface height, an indicator of upwelling during the vulnerable chick-rearing stage, have been correlated with breeding success of shy albatrosses. We use an age-, stage- and sex-structured population model to explore potential relationships between local environmental factors and albatross breeding success while accounting for fisheries bycatch by trawl and longline fisheries. The model uses time-series of observed breeding population counts, breeding success, adult and juvenile survival rates and a bycatch mortality observation for trawl fishing to estimate fisheries catchability, environmental influence, natural mortality rate, density dependence, and productivity. Observed at-sea distributions for adult and juvenile birds were coupled with reported fishing effort to estimate vulnerability to incidental bycatch. The inclusion of rainfall, temperature and sea-surface height as explanatory variables for annual chick mortality rate was statistically significant. Global climate models predict little change in future local average rainfall, however, increases are forecast in both temperatures and upwelling, which are predicted to have detrimental and beneficial effects, respectively, on breeding success. The model shows that mitigation of at least 50% of present bycatch is required to offset losses due to future temperature changes, even if upwelling increases substantially. Our results highlight the benefits of using an integrated modeling approach, which uses available demographic as well as

  17. Seabird bycatch in pelagic longline fisheries is grossly underestimated when using only haul data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Brothers

    Full Text Available Hundreds of thousands of seabirds are killed each year as bycatch in longline fisheries. Seabirds are predominantly caught during line setting but bycatch is generally recorded during line hauling, many hours after birds are caught. Bird loss during this interval may lead to inaccurate bycatch information. In this 15 year study, seabird bycatch was recorded during both line setting and line hauling from four fishing regions: Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean, Coral Sea and central Pacific Ocean. Over 43,000 albatrosses, petrels and skuas representing over 25 species were counted during line setting of which almost 6,000 seabirds attempted to take the bait. Bait-taking interactions were placed into one of four categories. (i The majority (57% of bait-taking attempts were "unsuccessful" involving seabirds that did not take the bait nor get caught or hooked. (ii One-third of attempts were "successful" with seabirds removing the bait while not getting caught. (iii One-hundred and seventy-six seabirds (3% of attempts were observed being "caught" during line setting, with three albatross species - Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis, black-footed (P. nigripes and black-browed (Thalassarche melanophrys- dominating this category. However, of these, only 85 (48% seabird carcasses were retrieved during line hauling. Most caught seabirds were hooked through the bill. (iv The remainder of seabird-bait interactions (7% was not clearly observed, but likely involved more "caught" seabirds. Bait taking attempts and percentage outcome (e.g. successful, caught varied between seabird species and was not always related to species abundance around fishing vessels. Using only haul data to calculate seabird bycatch grossly underestimates actual bycatch levels, with the level of seabird bycatch from pelagic longline fishing possibly double what was previously thought.

  18. Seabird bycatch in pelagic longline fisheries is grossly underestimated when using only haul data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Nigel; Duckworth, Alan R; Safina, Carl; Gilman, Eric L

    2010-08-31

    Hundreds of thousands of seabirds are killed each year as bycatch in longline fisheries. Seabirds are predominantly caught during line setting but bycatch is generally recorded during line hauling, many hours after birds are caught. Bird loss during this interval may lead to inaccurate bycatch information. In this 15 year study, seabird bycatch was recorded during both line setting and line hauling from four fishing regions: Indian Ocean, Southern Ocean, Coral Sea and central Pacific Ocean. Over 43,000 albatrosses, petrels and skuas representing over 25 species were counted during line setting of which almost 6,000 seabirds attempted to take the bait. Bait-taking interactions were placed into one of four categories. (i) The majority (57%) of bait-taking attempts were "unsuccessful" involving seabirds that did not take the bait nor get caught or hooked. (ii) One-third of attempts were "successful" with seabirds removing the bait while not getting caught. (iii) One-hundred and seventy-six seabirds (3% of attempts) were observed being "caught" during line setting, with three albatross species - Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis), black-footed (P. nigripes) and black-browed (Thalassarche melanophrys)- dominating this category. However, of these, only 85 (48%) seabird carcasses were retrieved during line hauling. Most caught seabirds were hooked through the bill. (iv) The remainder of seabird-bait interactions (7%) was not clearly observed, but likely involved more "caught" seabirds. Bait taking attempts and percentage outcome (e.g. successful, caught) varied between seabird species and was not always related to species abundance around fishing vessels. Using only haul data to calculate seabird bycatch grossly underestimates actual bycatch levels, with the level of seabird bycatch from pelagic longline fishing possibly double what was previously thought.

  19. Extinction is imminent for Mexico’s endemic porpoise unless fishery bycatch is eliminated

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara L Taylor; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Moore, Jeffrey; Jaramillo-Legorreta, Armando; Ver Hoef, Jay M.; Cardenas-Hinojosa, Gustavo; Nieto-Garcia, Edwyna; Barlow, Jay; Gerrodette, Tim; Tregenza, Nicholas; Thomas, Len; Hammond, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Primary funding was by Secretaria del Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (Secretario R. Pacchiano). Mexican support was from SEMARNAT, CONABIO, CONANP, PROFEPA, SEMAR, and WWF-Mexico. US support from NOAA-Fisheries-SWFSC and The Marine Mammal Center. The number of Mexico’s endemic porpoise, the vaquita (Phocoena sinus), is collapsing primarily due to bycatch in illegal gillnets set for totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi), an endangered fish whose swim bladders are exported to China. Previous res...

  20. Bycatch in the purse seine tuna fisheries in the western Indian Ocean.

    OpenAIRE

    Romanov, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    The yield of associated and dependent species taken as bycatch by the purse seine tuna fishery from the Indian Ocean pelagic ecosystem is estimated from data collected by scientific observers aboard Soviet purse seiners in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO), 1986-1992. A total of 494 sets on free swimming schools, whale shark associated schools, whale associated schools, and log associated schools were analyzed. More than 40 fish species and other marine animals were registered. Among them onl...

  1. Dolphinfish Bycatch in Spanish Mediterranean Large Pelagic Longline Fisheries, 2000–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Macías

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the dolphinfish bycatch rates in the longline fisheries of the Western Mediterranean and modelling the nominal bycatch abundance and distribution of dolphinfish from the Spanish Mediterranean as a function of technical, geographical, and seasonality factors. Our results indicate that the impact of the pelagic and semipelagic longline on the dolphinfish population is relatively low (1.083 fishes per 1000 hooks, in contrast with the greater effect on the target species population. We obtained a statistically significant logistic model, with the following factors: technical characteristics of the fishery, geographical location, and seasonality. Drifting surface longliners targeting albacore is the gear with the highest effect on Mediterranean dolphinfish population. The technical characteristics of the fishery and seasonality factors have an important role in explaining the absence or presence of dolphinfish bycatch in the different boat strata, gear types, and seasons. Moreover, sea surface temperature and lunar phases also present additional explanations. Lunar phase as SST has been frequently used as an explanatory variable affecting catch rates of dolphinfish.

  2. 77 FR 5389 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... sectors as well as representatives for the six western Alaska Community Development Quota Program... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the Bering Sea Pollock Fishery; Economic Data Collection AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...

  3. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia’s commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995-1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  4. Acoustic alarms reduce bycatch of harbour porpoises in Danish North Sea gillnet fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau

    2014-01-01

    nets with active pingers, 1056 nets with dummy pingers and 74 nets without pingers. Eight porpoises were caught, all in nets with dummy pingers. In the flat bottom/stony ground fishery the total effort was 5596 nets with active pingers, 5210 nets with dummy pingers and 2973 nets without pingers....... Sixteen porpoises were caught, including 1 animal in a net with active pingers, 6 in nets with dummy pingers and 9 in nets without pingers. The difference in bycatch between nets with active pingers and nets with inactive or no pingers was highly significant (p

  5. Bycatch in the tuna purse-seine fisheries of the western Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Evgeny V Romanov

    2002-01-01

    Bycatch taken by the tuna purse-seine fishery from the Indian Ocean pelagic ecosystem was estimated from data collected by scientific observers aboard Soviet purse seiners in the western Indian Ocean (WIO) during 1986–92. A total of 494 sets on free-swimming schools, whale-shark-associated schools, whale-associated schools, and log-associated schools were analyzed. More than 40 fish species and other marine animals were recorded. Among them only two species, yellow-fin and skipjack tunas, wer...

  6. Deepwater Chondrichthyan Bycatch of the Eastern King Prawn Fishery in the Southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Cassandra L; White, William T; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The deepwater chondrichthyan fauna of the Great Barrier Reef is poorly known and life history information is required to enable their effective management as they are inherently vulnerable to exploitation. The chondrichthyan bycatch from the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery at the Swain Reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef was examined to determine the species present and provide information on their life histories. In all, 1533 individuals were collected from 11 deepwater chondrichthyan species, with the Argus skate Dipturus polyommata, piked spurdog Squalus megalops and pale spotted catshark Asymbolus pallidus the most commonly caught. All but one species is endemic to Australia with five species restricted to waters offshore from Queensland. The extent of life history information available for each species varied but the life history traits across all species were characteristic of deep water chondrichthyans with relatively large length at maturity, small litters and low ovarian fecundity; all indicative of low biological productivity. However, variability among these traits and spatial and bathymetric distributions of the species suggests differing degrees of resilience to fishing pressure. To ensure the sustainability of these bycatch species, monitoring of their catches in the deepwater eastern king prawn fishery is recommended.

  7. Bycatch in net-fisheries, particularly gillnet fisheries, is a global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interview questionnaires and access point surveys were conducted in order ..... Table I: Results of the bycatch component of interviews with gillnet fishers in ..... are taken as food by impoverished helpers (“stropers”) .... changes are widely accepted as being some of the most ... If management strategies aimed at rebuilding.

  8. Assessment of Caspian Seal By-Catch in an Illegal Fishery Using an Interview-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, Lilia; Kondakov, Andrey A; Oleynikov, Eugeny; Kydyrmanov, Aidyn; Karamendin, Kobey; Kasimbekov, Yesbol; Baimukanov, Mirgaliy; Wilson, Susan; Goodman, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) has declined by more than 90% since 1900 and is listed as endangered by IUCN. We made the first quantitative assessment of Caspian seal by-catch mortality in fisheries in the north Caspian Sea by conducting semi-structured interviews in fishing communities along the coasts of Russia (Kalmykia, Dagestan), Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. We recorded a documented minimum by-catch of 1,215 seals in the survey sample, for the 2008-2009 fishing season, 93% of which occurred in illegal sturgeon fisheries. Due to the illegal nature of the fishery, accurately quantifying total fishing effort is problematic and the survey sample could reflect less than 10% of poaching activity in the north Caspian Sea. Therefore total annual by-catch may be significantly greater than the minimum documented by the survey. The presence of high by-catch rates was supported independently by evidence of net entanglement from seal carcasses, during a mass stranding on the Kazakh coast in May 2009, where 30 of 312 carcasses were entangled in large mesh sturgeon net remnants. The documented minimum by-catch may account for 5 to 19% of annual pup production. Sturgeon poaching therefore not only represents a serious threat to Caspian sturgeon populations, but may also be having broader impacts on the Caspian Sea ecosystem by contributing to a decline in one of the ecosystem's key predators. This study demonstrates the utility of interview-based approaches in providing rapid assessments of by-catch in illegal small-scale fisheries, which are not amenable to study by other methods.

  9. Assessment of Caspian Seal By-Catch in an Illegal Fishery Using an Interview-Based Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Dmitrieva

    Full Text Available The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica has declined by more than 90% since 1900 and is listed as endangered by IUCN. We made the first quantitative assessment of Caspian seal by-catch mortality in fisheries in the north Caspian Sea by conducting semi-structured interviews in fishing communities along the coasts of Russia (Kalmykia, Dagestan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. We recorded a documented minimum by-catch of 1,215 seals in the survey sample, for the 2008-2009 fishing season, 93% of which occurred in illegal sturgeon fisheries. Due to the illegal nature of the fishery, accurately quantifying total fishing effort is problematic and the survey sample could reflect less than 10% of poaching activity in the north Caspian Sea. Therefore total annual by-catch may be significantly greater than the minimum documented by the survey. The presence of high by-catch rates was supported independently by evidence of net entanglement from seal carcasses, during a mass stranding on the Kazakh coast in May 2009, where 30 of 312 carcasses were entangled in large mesh sturgeon net remnants. The documented minimum by-catch may account for 5 to 19% of annual pup production. Sturgeon poaching therefore not only represents a serious threat to Caspian sturgeon populations, but may also be having broader impacts on the Caspian Sea ecosystem by contributing to a decline in one of the ecosystem's key predators. This study demonstrates the utility of interview-based approaches in providing rapid assessments of by-catch in illegal small-scale fisheries, which are not amenable to study by other methods.

  10. 76 FR 77757 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... requires suspension of directed pollock fishing when female spawning biomass is equal to or below 20...://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov . The MSA defines bycatch as fish that are harvested in a fishery that are not sold or... Council recommended the split of 73 percent for the Central GOA and 27 percent for the Western GOA...

  11. Common dolphin (Delphinus delphis bycatch in New Zealand commercial trawl fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finlay N Thompson

    Full Text Available Marine mammals are regularly reported as bycatch in commercial and artisanal fisheries, but data are often insufficient to allow assessment of these incidental mortalities. Observer coverage of the mackerel trawl fishery in New Zealand waters between 1995 and 2011 allowed evaluation of common dolphin Delphinus delphis bycatch on the North Island west coast, where this species is the most frequently caught cetacean. Observer data were used to develop a statistical model to estimate total captures and explore covariates related to captures. A two-stage Bayesian hurdle model was used, with a logistic generalised linear model predicting whether any common dolphin captures occurred on a given tow of the net, and a zero-truncated Poisson distribution to estimate the number of dolphin captures, given that there was a capture event. Over the 16-year study period, there were 119 common dolphin captures reported on 4299 observed tows. Capture events frequently involved more than one individual, with a maximum of nine common dolphin observed caught in a single tow. There was a peak of 141 estimated common dolphin captures (95% c.i.: 56 to 276; 6.27 captures per 100 tows in 2002-03, following the marked expansion in annual effort in this fishery to over 2000 tows. Subsequently, the number of captures fluctuated although fishing effort remained relatively high. Of the observed capture events, 60% were during trawls where the top of the net (headline was <40 m below the surface, and the model determined that this covariate best explained common dolphin captures. Increasing headline depth by 21 m would halve the probability of a dolphin capture event on a tow. While lack of abundance data prevents assessment of the impact of these mortalities on the local common dolphin population, a clear recommendation from this study is the increasing of headline depth to reduce common dolphin captures.

  12. Common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) bycatch in New Zealand commercial trawl fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Finlay N; Abraham, Edward R; Berkenbusch, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammals are regularly reported as bycatch in commercial and artisanal fisheries, but data are often insufficient to allow assessment of these incidental mortalities. Observer coverage of the mackerel trawl fishery in New Zealand waters between 1995 and 2011 allowed evaluation of common dolphin Delphinus delphis bycatch on the North Island west coast, where this species is the most frequently caught cetacean. Observer data were used to develop a statistical model to estimate total captures and explore covariates related to captures. A two-stage Bayesian hurdle model was used, with a logistic generalised linear model predicting whether any common dolphin captures occurred on a given tow of the net, and a zero-truncated Poisson distribution to estimate the number of dolphin captures, given that there was a capture event. Over the 16-year study period, there were 119 common dolphin captures reported on 4299 observed tows. Capture events frequently involved more than one individual, with a maximum of nine common dolphin observed caught in a single tow. There was a peak of 141 estimated common dolphin captures (95% c.i.: 56 to 276; 6.27 captures per 100 tows) in 2002-03, following the marked expansion in annual effort in this fishery to over 2000 tows. Subsequently, the number of captures fluctuated although fishing effort remained relatively high. Of the observed capture events, 60% were during trawls where the top of the net (headline) was dolphin captures. Increasing headline depth by 21 m would halve the probability of a dolphin capture event on a tow. While lack of abundance data prevents assessment of the impact of these mortalities on the local common dolphin population, a clear recommendation from this study is the increasing of headline depth to reduce common dolphin captures.

  13. [Bycatch fish species from shrimp industrial fishery in the Gulf of California, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, Juana; Herrera-Valdivia, Eloisa; Rodríguez-Romero, Jesús; Hernández-Vázquez, Sergio

    2010-09-01

    Bycatch fish species from shrimp industrial fishery in the Gulf of California, Mexico. The shrimp fishery in the Gulf of California is one the most important activities of revenue and employment for communities. Nevertheless, this fishery has also created a large bycatch problem, principally fish. To asses this issue, a group of observers were placed on board the industrial shrimp fleet and evaluated the Eastern side of the Gulf during 2004 and 2005. Studies consisted on 20kg samples of the capture for each trawl, and made possible a systematic list of species for this geographic area. Fish represented 70% of the capture. A total of 51 101 fish were collected, belonging to two classes, 20 orders, 65 families, 127 genera, and 241 species. The order Perciformes was the most diverse with 31 families, 78 genera, and 158 species. The best represented families by number of species were: Sciaenidae (34) and Paralichthyidae (18) and Haemulidae and Carangidae (16 each). The best represented genera in number of species were Symphurus (nine) and Diplectrum and Cynoscion (six); other important genera were Larimus and Porichthys with five species each. The best represented species in number were Syacium ovale, Pseudupeneus grandisquamis, Haemulopsis nitidos, Diplectrum pacificum, Synodus scituliceps, Balistes polylepis, Eucinostomus currani, Eucinostomus gracilis, Porichthys analis, Chloroscombrus orqueta, Selene peruviana, Orthopristis reddingi, Etropus crossotus, Scorpaena sonorae and Urobatis halleri. The number of recorded species is notably high, compared with demersal fauna of other areas of the Mexican Pacific, such as Gulf of Tehuantepec (178), Nayarit, Michoacán, Guerrero (174, 120 and 166), Jalisco and Colima (161 species), and those of the Western coast of the Baja California Peninsula (220 species).

  14. National Bycatch Report (NBR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This system collects bycatch data and fishery landings data from all five NOAA Fisheries Regions and automates the generation of the tables required to publish the...

  15. Risk Factors for Seabird Bycatch in a Pelagic Longline Tuna Fishery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gilman

    Full Text Available Capture in global pelagic longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline tuna fishery annually catches hundreds of seabirds, primarily Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis and black-footed (P. nigripes albatrosses. Since seabird regulations were introduced in 2001, the seabird catch rate has declined 74%. However, over the past decade, seabird catch levels significantly increased due to significant increasing trends in both effort and nominal seabird catch rates. We modelled observer data using a spatio-temporal generalized additive mixed model with zero-inflated Poisson likelihood to determine the significance of the effect of various risk factors on the seabird catch rate. The seabird catch rate significantly increased as annual mean multivariate ENSO index values increased, suggesting that decreasing ocean productivity observed in recent years in the central north Pacific may have contributed to the increasing trend in nominal seabird catch rate. A significant increasing trend in number of albatrosses attending vessels, possibly linked to declining regional ocean productivity and increasing absolute abundance of black-footed albatrosses, may also have contributed to the increasing nominal seabird catch rate. Largest opportunities for reductions are through augmented efficacy of seabird bycatch mitigation north of 23° N where mitigation methods are required and during setting instead of during hauling. Both side vs. stern setting, and blue-dyed vs. untreated bait significantly reduced the seabird catch rate. Of two options for meeting regulatory requirements, side setting had a significantly lower seabird catch rate than blue-dyed bait. There was significant spatio-temporal and seasonal variation in the risk of seabird capture with highest catch rates in April and May and to the northwest of the main Hawaiian Islands.

  16. Biology and population dynamics of by-catch fish species of the bottom trawl fishery in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. ORDINES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The teleosts Chelidonichthys cuculus, Trigloporus lastoviza, Serranus cabrilla and Trachinus draco, are important by-catch species, in terms of landed biomass and commercial value, from the continental shelf bottom trawl fishery off the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean. The main biological parameters of these species were calculated from monthly biological samplings, and were used along with three years pseudo-cohorts (2008-2010 obtained from monitoring on-board of the bottom trawl fleet, to assess their exploitation level through Virtual Population Analysis (VPA and Yield per Recruit (Y/R analysis. Time series of fishery independent indicators based on MEDITS surveys data such as the evolution of the abundance and biomass, the distribution range, and the Conservation Status of Fish b (CSFb, were also analyzed. All four species analyzed showed growth overfishing. The reductions of the fishing effort required to reach the Y/RF0,1 reference point were lower, 66-73% depending on the species, to those reported for the target species M. merluccius (87%, but higher than that reported for M. surmuletus (53%, in the study area in the period 2000-2010. The abundance and biomass, and the distribution range did not show any trend for the period 2001-2011, whereas the CSFb showed signs of recovery that may be due to the displacement of the trawl fishing effort from the shelf to the slope during the last decade. Our results underline the necessary incorporation of monitoring and assessment of by-catch species to the management of fisheries as their populations can show a more pronounced overexploitation than target ones.

  17. By-catch impacts in fisheries: utilizing the IUCN red list categories for enhanced product level assessment in seafood LCAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornborg, Sara; Svensson, Mikael; Nilsson, Per; Ziegler, Friederike

    2013-11-01

    Overexploitation of fish stocks causes concern not only to fisheries managers and conservation biologists, but also engages seafood consumers; more integrated product perspectives would be useful. This could be provided by life cycle assessment (LCA); however, further complements of present LCA methodology are needed to assess seafood production, one being by-catch impacts. We studied the scientific rationale behind using the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ for assessment of impacts relating to fish species' vulnerability. For this purpose, the current Red List status of marine fish in Sweden was compared to the advice given in fisheries as well as key life history traits known to indicate sensitivity to high fishing pressure. Further, we quantified the amount of threatened fish (vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered) that was discarded in demersal trawl fisheries on the Swedish west coast. The results showed that not only did the national Red List of marine fish have a high consistency with advice given in fisheries and indices of vulnerability, the different fishing practices studied were also found to have vastly different amounts of threatened fish discarded per kilo landing. The suggested approach is therefore promising as a carrier of aggregated information on the extent to which seafood production interferes with conservation priorities, in particular for species lacking adequate stock assessment. To enable extensive product comparisons, it is important to increase coverage of fish species by the global IUCN Red List, and to reconsider the appropriate assessment unit (species or stocks) in order to avoid false alarms.

  18. By-Catch Impacts in Fisheries: Utilizing the IUCN Red List Categories for Enhanced Product Level Assessment in Seafood LCAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornborg, Sara; Svensson, Mikael; Nilsson, Per; Ziegler, Friederike

    2013-11-01

    Overexploitation of fish stocks causes concern not only to fisheries managers and conservation biologists, but also engages seafood consumers; more integrated product perspectives would be useful. This could be provided by life cycle assessment (LCA); however, further complements of present LCA methodology are needed to assess seafood production, one being by-catch impacts. We studied the scientific rationale behind using the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ for assessment of impacts relating to fish species’ vulnerability. For this purpose, the current Red List status of marine fish in Sweden was compared to the advice given in fisheries as well as key life history traits known to indicate sensitivity to high fishing pressure. Further, we quantified the amount of threatened fish (vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered) that was discarded in demersal trawl fisheries on the Swedish west coast. The results showed that not only did the national Red List of marine fish have a high consistency with advice given in fisheries and indices of vulnerability, the different fishing practices studied were also found to have vastly different amounts of threatened fish discarded per kilo landing. The suggested approach is therefore promising as a carrier of aggregated information on the extent to which seafood production interferes with conservation priorities, in particular for species lacking adequate stock assessment. To enable extensive product comparisons, it is important to increase coverage of fish species by the global IUCN Red List, and to reconsider the appropriate assessment unit (species or stocks) in order to avoid false alarms.

  19. Does by-catch pose a threat for the conservation of seabird populations in the southern Ionian Sea (eastern Mediterranean? A questionnaire based survey of local fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. KARRIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of studies worldwide have shown that incidental catches (by-catch of seabirds in fishing gear might pose a considerable risk for the conservation of their populations. Nevertheless reliable data on by-catch rates of seabirds in European marine ecosystems are patchy and need to be improved. This study constitutes a first attempt at the evaluation of by-catch rates in the southern Ionian Sea. Data were obtained by distributing a specific questionnaire to the fishers of Zakynthos Island. 150 professional fishers (representing 90% of the local fishing fleet participated in the research, and were interviewed during July-December 2010. The information collected showed that commercial longline and (to a lesser extent gillnet fishery gears caused incidental catches mostly of Scopoli’s Shearwater and Mediterranean Shag. The temporal analysis of the incidental bird mortality showed that seabirds were more susceptible to be trapped in fishery gears set around sunrise during spring and summer whereas spatial analysis of by-catch data indicated variations in the number of seabirds caught in different fishery areas.

  20. Does by-catch pose a threat for the conservation of seabird populations in the southern Ionian Sea (eastern Mediterranean? A questionnaire based survey of local fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. KARRIS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of studies worldwide have shown that incidental catches (by-catch of seabirds in fishing gear might pose a considerable risk for the conservation of their populations. Nevertheless reliable data on by-catch rates of seabirds in European marine ecosystems are patchy and need to be improved. This study constitutes a first attempt at the evaluation of by-catch rates in the southern Ionian Sea. Data were obtained by distributing a specific questionnaire to the fishers of Zakynthos Island. 150 professional fishers (representing 90% of the local fishing fleet participated in the research, and were interviewed during July-December 2010. The information collected showed that commercial longline and (to a lesser extent gillnet fishery gears caused incidental catches mostly of Scopoli’s Shearwater and Mediterranean Shag. The temporal analysis of the incidental bird mortality showed that seabirds were more susceptible to be trapped in fishery gears set around sunrise during spring and summer whereas spatial analysis of by-catch data indicated variations in the number of seabirds caught in different fishery areas.

  1. Seasonal Shift of Bycatch in the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery of the Gulf of Salamanca, Caribbean Sea of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Duarte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bycatch assessments in trawl fisheries have been mainly referred to an annual scale, ignoring possible seasonal variations. In the Gulf of Salamanca, an artisanal shrimp trawl fleet operates recently and this study evaluates its bycatch for first time, considering the climatic and oceanographic seasonality that dominates the region (runoff and upwelling. 90 hauls in the calm or rainy season (November 2010 and 86 in the windy season (April 2011 were sampled on board of fishing boats. The bycatch to shrimp ratio was 2,69 (2,37 -3,21, 95 % CI and 6,37 (5,10 – 8,24, 95 % CI for the calm season and windy season respectively. We recorded a total of 101 taxa, with a large number of juveniles. The community structure of bycatch differed between seasons (ANOSIM, pStellifer spp., Symphurus caribbeanus y Callinectes sapidus, whereas, in addition, the calm season was characterized by Cathorops mapale, Anchovia clupeoides, Trichiurus lepturus, and the windy season by Larimus breviceps, Cnidaria (jellyfish, Cetengraulis edentulus (Simper. The results showed a seasonal change in the bycatch, raising the need to implement monitoring programs and management measures that address that temporal variability. Negative ecological effects of this fishery prompt the use of mitigation strategies, involving fishermen, to balance social needs and the ecosystem conservation. CAMBIO ESTACIONAL EN LA FAUNA ACOMPAÑANTE DE LA PESQUERÍA ARTESANAL DE ARRASTRE DE CAMARÓN DEL GOLFO DE SALAMANCA, MAR CARIBE DE COLOMBIALa evaluación de la fauna acompañante en las pesquerías de arrastre se ha referido generalmente a una escala anual, ignorando eventuales variaciones estacionales. En el golfo de Salamanca, recientemente opera una flota artesanal de arrastre de camarón, cuya fauna acompañante es evaluada por primera vez en el presente estudio, considerando la estacionalidad climática y oceanográfica que domina la región (descargas continentales y surgencia

  2. Effects of trawling on the diets of common demersal fish by-catch of a tropical prawn trawl fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Q; Griffiths, S P; Tonks, M L; Rochester, W A; Miller, M J; Duggan, M A; van der Velde, T D; Pillans, R D; Coman, G J; Bustamante, R H; Milton, D A

    2013-03-01

    The ecological effect of prawn trawling on the benthos of the Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia, was investigated by examining stomach contents of common demersal fishes incidentally caught as by-catch in the fishery. Fishes were collected from high and low fishing intensity sites in three regions based on vessel monitoring system data. The diets of eight species of benthic fish predators were compared between regions and fishing intensities. A regional effect on diet was evident for seven species. Only one generalist species had no significant difference in diet among the three regions. For the comparisons within each region, five predator species had significantly different diet between high and low fishing intensities in at least one region. Across the three regions, high fishing intensity sites had predators that consumed a greater biomass of crustaceans, molluscs and echinoderms. At low fishing intensity sites, predators had diets comprising a greater biomass of cnidarians and teleosts, and a different assemblage of molluscs, crustaceans and fishes. These changes in diet suggest that there may have been a shift in the structure of the benthic community following intensive fishing. Analysis of predator diets is a useful tool to help identify changes in the benthic community composition after exposure to fishing. This study also provided valuable diet information on a range of abundant generalist benthic predators to improve the ecosystem modelling tools needed to support ecosystem-based fisheries management.

  3. First steps for mitigating bycatch of Pink-footed Shearwaters Ardenna creatopus: Identifying overlap of foraging areas and fisheries in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Ryan; Felis, Jonathan J.; López, Verónica; Adams, Josh; Hodum, Peter; Beck, Jessie; Colodro, Valentina; Vega, Rodrigo; González, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The Pink-footed Shearwater, Ardenna creatopus, is listed as in danger of extinction by Chile and under Annex 1 of ACAP, with an estimated global population of approximately 56,000 individuals. Incidental bycatch of this species in fisheries is thought to be an important cause in population decline (i.e. annual estimated mortality of >1000 adults). This species is an endemic breeder in Chile, nesting only on the Juan Fernandez Archipelago (JFI; 30% of global population), and Isla Mocha (70% of global population). Using miniature GPS and satellite transmitters, we determined foraging areas of Pink-footed Shearwaters during the chick-rearing period in 2002 (JFI) and 2015-2016 (Isla Mocha). We overlaid shearwater tracking data with data from the Instituto de Fomento Pesquero (IFOP) on fishing effort in Chile (type of fishery, number sets per day, location of sets, and target species) to identify fisheries and fishing zones with the greatest potential for Pink-footed Shearwater bycatch. During the 2002-2006 (N = 28 birds total) and 2015 (N = 18 birds) breeding periods, foraging areas were associated with the continental shelf and shelf-break, generally less than 30 km offshore. All foraging trips occurred between 31.5 and 40.0 degrees south, and birds remained in Chile territorial waters 100% of the time. We identified two primary foraging hotspots, one offshore near Talcahuano, Chile (approximately 36-37.5° south), and one offshore north of Valdivia, Chile (approximately 39-39.5° south). Birds tracked from the Juan Fernández Archipelago foraged in the Talcahuano hotspot but did not visit the southerly hotspot near Valdivia. Birds tracked from Isla Mocha used both areas, with a greater proportion of birds using the Valdivia hotspot than the Talcahuano hotspot. Other major areas of use were around the respective breeding colonies from which the birds were tracked. Overlay of these data with fisheries data is currently in progress. Preliminary results indicate

  4. 76 FR 81844 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Removal of Standardized Bycatch Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... required, and none has been prepared. List of Subjects in 50 CFR Part 648 Fisheries, Fishing, Reporting and..., paragraphs (h) and (i) are revised to read as follows: Sec. 648.11 At-sea sea sampler/observer coverage..., that it is subject to removal from the list of approved observer service providers. Such...

  5. Northern pike bycatch in an inland commercial hoop net fishery: effects of water temperature and net tending frequency on injury, physiology, and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Raby, Graham D.; Hasler, Caleb T.; Haxton, Tim; Smokorowski, Karen; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    In lakes and rivers of eastern Ontario (Canada) commercial fishers use hoop nets to target a variety of fishes, but incidentally capture non-target (i.e., bycatch) gamefish species such as northern pike (Esox lucius). Little is known about the consequences of bycatch in inland commercial fisheries, making it difficult to identify regulatory options. Regulations that limit fishing during warmer periods and that require frequent net tending have been proposed as possible strategies to reduce bycatch mortality. Using northern pike as a model, we conducted experiments during two thermal periods (mid-April: 14.45 ± 0.32 °C, and late May: 17.17 ± 0.08 °C) where fish were retained in nets for 2 d and 6 d. A ‘0 d’ control group consisted of northern pike that were angled, immediately sampled and released. We evaluated injury, physiological status and mortality after the prescribed net retention period and for the surviving fish used radio telemetry with manual tracking to monitor delayed post-release mortality. Our experiments revealed that injury levels, in-net mortality, and post-release mortality tended to increase with net set duration and at higher temperatures. Pike exhibited signs of chronic stress and starvation following retention, particularly at higher temperatures. Total mortality rates were negligible for the 2 d holding period at 14 °C, 14% for 6 d holding at 14 °C, 21% for 2 d holding at 17 °C, and 58% for 6 d holding at 17 °C. No mortality was observed in control fish. Collectively, these data reveal that frequent net tending, particularly at warmer temperatures, may be useful for conserving gamefish populations captured as bycatch in inland hoop net fisheries.

  6. 50 CFR 648.18 - Standardized bycatch reporting methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standardized bycatch reporting methodology... Provisions § 648.18 Standardized bycatch reporting methodology. NMFS shall comply with the Standardized Bycatch Reporting Methodology (SBRM) provisions established in the following fishery management plans...

  7. Present and future potential habitat distribution of Carcharhinus falciformis and Canthidermis maculata by-catch species in the tropical tuna purse-seine fishery under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea eLezama Ochoa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By-catch species from tropical tuna purse seine fishery have been affected by fishery pressures since the last century; however, the habitat distribution and the climate change impacts on these species are poorly known. With the objective of predicting the potential suitable habitat for a shark (Carcharhinus falciformis and a teleost (Canthidermis maculata in the Indian, Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans, a MaxEnt species distribution model (SDM was developed using data collected by observers in tuna purse seiners. The relative percentage of contribution of some environmental variables (depth, sea surface temperature, salinity and primary production and the potential impact of climate change on species habitat by the end of the century under the A2 scenario (scenario with average concentrations of carbon dioxide of 856 ppm by 2100 were also evaluated. Results showed that by-catch species can be correctly modelled using observed occurrence records and few environmental variables with SDM. Results from projected maps showed that the equatorial band and some coastal upwelling regions were the most suitable areas for both by-catch species in the three oceans in concordance with the main fishing grounds. Sea surface temperature was the most important environmental variable which contributed to explain the habitat distribution of the two species in the three oceans in general. Under climate change scenarios, the largest change in present habitat suitability is observed in the Atlantic Ocean (around 16% of the present habitat suitability area of Carcharhinus falciformis and Canthidermis maculata, respectively whereas the change is less in the Pacific (around 10% and 8% and Indian Oceans (around 3% and 2 %. In some regions such as Somalia, the Atlantic equatorial band or Peru’s coastal upwelling areas, these species could lose potential habitat whereas in the south of the equator in the Indian Ocean, the Benguela System and in the Pacific coast of

  8. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  9. 77 FR 21679 - Shrimp Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Revisions of Bycatch Reduction Device...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB61 Shrimp Fisheries of the Gulf... measures of the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf FMP) and the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the South Atlantic Region (South Atlantic FMP), this...

  10. 76 FR 42099 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... cost of harvesting pollock; and Reduction of the annual bycatch of Chinook salmon. Current Data for...: Individual Chinook salmon are difficult to detect in the water column with current sonar technology, prior to..., along with other existing data (e.g., catch accounting and observer data) provide useful information...

  11. Bycatch of franciscana dolphins Pontoporia blainvillei and the dynamic of artisanal fisheries in the species' southernmost area of distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Negri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina, the franciscana dolphin is one of the most vulnerable cetaceans regularly entangled in coastal artisanal fishery nets. The aim of this paper is to estimate the species' incidental mortality on the Southern coast of Buenos Aires province through interviews with the captains of artisanal fishing vessels, in the period 2006-2009. Franciscana bycatch was reported for gillnets and shrimper gear all year round but it occurred more frequently between October and February, at 5 km offshore and 10-20 m depth. The estimated mean annual incidental mortality was 107 dolphins (CI 95% = 87-129, 92 caught in gillnets (CI 95% = 73-112 and 15 in shrimpers' gear (CI 95% = 8-25 with a capture per unit effort of 0.029 dolphins per km of gillnet (CI 95% = 0.023-0.036 and 0.022 per shrimpe r's net (CI 95% = 0.012-0.035. Annual fluctuations were due to differences in the number of gillnetting fishing days. If mortality estimates for the Northern coast are also taken into account, values attain a maximum of 360-539 dolphins bycaught in the entire Buenos Aires province, representing 2.5-3.7% of the species' abundance in Argentina. This will inevitably lead to the decline of franciscana dolphin populations in the near future unless alternative fishing grounds are identified and alternative gearadopted.Na Argentina, a toninha é um dos cetáceos mais vulneráveis devido às capturas por rede de pesca artesanal. O presente estudo teve como objetivo estimar as capturas acidentais no sul da província de Buenos Aires, através de entrevistas aos capitães de barcos de pesca artesanal, entre os anos 2006-2009. As capturas foram reportadas para redes de emalhe e de camarão; com as mais altas frequências entre outubro e fevereiro, a 5 km da costa e 10-20 m de profundidade. A mortalidade acidental média anual estimada foi de 107 golfinhos (IC 95% = 87-129, 92 em redes de emalhe (IC 95% = 73-112 e 15 em redes de camarão (IC 95% = 8-25, com uma captura de 0

  12. Descartes da pesca do camarão sete-barbas como fonte de alimento para aves marinhas Sea-bob-shrimp fishery's by-catch as a feeding source for seabirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Olinto Branco

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available From July 1996 to June 1997, in Armação do Itapocoroy, Penha, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, monthly census were done in three areas of traditional fishery and Itacolomis islands. A total of 10021 seabirds were registered, belonging to eight species, five genus and four families. The average number of seabirds per dragging varied between 80,2 and 113,6. Sterna spp, appeared at first in 43,3% of the released by-catch, followed by Larus dominicanus Lichtenstein, 1823, Fregata magnificens Matheus, 1914, Phalacrocorax brasilianus (Humboldt, 1805 and Sula leucogaster Boddaert, 1783. The average size of the fish consumed by the seabirds oscillated from 8,3 cm (Sterna spp. to 18,5 cm (F. magnificens, with an average time from 6,12 to 7,55 minutes per by-catch released. In general, seabirds use 84,0% of the by-catch fish as a feeding source.

  13. 75 FR 53025 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ..., and sport fisheries in their regions of origin. The ] State of Alaska Board of Fisheries adopts..., sport, and personal use fisheries. The first management priority is to meet spawning escapement goals to... the U.S. exclusive economic zone, and observing vessels fishing in international waters is outside...

  14. Biology of Isopisthus parvipinnis: an abundant sciaenid species captured bycatch during sea-bob shrimp fishery in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato M. Romero

    Full Text Available Trawling is the most common method of shrimp harvesting. This technique causes a negative impact on the fauna due to the high bycatch rates and to the animals that are accidentally caught and generally returned to the sea dead. The consequences of this technique and the biological aspects of the involved species are poorly studied, specially in the Brazilian northeast. The objective of this study was to show some aspects of the population biology of Isopisthus parvipinnis (Bigtooth corvina captured as bycatch during sea-bob (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri shrimp fishing in the region of Ilhéus, in the state of Bahia in Brazil. A total of 1290 individuals were caught in a monthly sampling at three different stations, from March, 2003 to February, 2005. The standardized Morisita index of dispersion suggests that this species has a clumped distribution in the studied area. The number of individuals showed a significant variation (p < 0.0001 between the seasons, being higher during the winter. The estimated first maturation length (L50 was about 159 mm, and 95% of the captured individuals were below this value. The sexual ratio found was 1.5 males for each female. Concerning to diet, 10 feeding categories were identified, and Decapoda Dendobranchiata was the most important in numeric frequency and occurrence. This fact suggests that Isopisthus parvipinnis is a carnivorous species, with a tendency toward crustacean-eating at least in the younger individuals.

  15. Loggerhead sea turtle bycatch data in artisanal fisheries within a marine protected area: fishermen surveys versus scientific observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano, M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Loggerhead sea turtles can be incidentally captured by artisanal gears but information about the impact of this fishing is inconsistent and scarce. Recent studies have observed that the bycatch, or incidental catch rate, in fishermen surveys is irregular. The aim of this study was to compare direct data (onboard observers concerning the incidental catch of loggerhead sea turtles by the artisanal vessels versus data from fishermen surveys. The study area was the Cabo de Gata-Níjar marine protected area, situated in the western Mediterranean (southeast of the Iberian peninsula. We observed two loggerhead turtles that were incidentally caught in a total of 165 fishing operations. According to fishermen surveys, a total of nine loggerheads were incidentally caught in 861 fishing operations. The differences between the loggerhead sea turtle bycatch reported by fishermen surveys and scientific observations versus random distribution (x2 = 0.3146, P = 0.575, df = 1 were not significant. We conclude that the surveys are useful but that findings should be interpreted with caution.

  16. 77 FR 3224 - Shrimp Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Revisions of Bycatch Reduction Device...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... CFR Part 622 [Docket No. 111104664-1798-01] RIN 0648-BB61 Shrimp Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and... published on January 9, 2012, regarding proposed changes to shrimp regulations. The proposed rule stated that the ``Expanded Mesh BRD'' would be decertified for use by the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery after...

  17. 75 FR 14015 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... to allocate fisheries resources to the various users. The State of Alaska Department of Fish and Game... does not affect the incentives or operation of the elements of Amendment 91 (the PSC limit, the...

  18. Investigation of plastic debris ingestion by four species of sea turtles collected as bycatch in pelagic Pacific longline fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Katherine E.; Lepczyk, Christopher A.; Balazs, George H.; Work, Thierry M.; Lynch, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Ingestion of marine debris is an established threat to sea turtles. The amount, type, color and location of ingested plastics in the gastrointestinal tracts of 55 sea turtles from Pacific longline fisheries from 2012 to 2016 were quantified, and compared across species, turtle length, body condition, sex, capture location, season and year. Six approaches for quantifying amounts of ingested plastic strongly correlated with one another and included: number of pieces, mass, volume and surface area of plastics, ratio of plastic mass to body mass, and percentage of the mass of gut contents consisting of plastic. All olive ridley (n = 37), 90% of green (n = 10), 80% of loggerhead (n = 5) and 0% of leatherback (n = 3) turtles had ingested plastic; green turtles ingested significantly more than olive ridleys. Most debris was in the large intestines. No adverse health impacts (intestinal lesions, blockage, or poor body condition) due directly to plastic ingestion were noted.

  19. Pan-atlantic analysis of the overlap of a highly migratory species, the leatherback turtle, with pelagic longline fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossette, S; Witt, M J; Miller, P; Nalovic, M A; Albareda, D; Almeida, A P; Broderick, A C; Chacón-Chaverri, D; Coyne, M S; Domingo, A; Eckert, S; Evans, D; Fallabrino, A; Ferraroli, S; Formia, A; Giffoni, B; Hays, G C; Hughes, G; Kelle, L; Leslie, A; López-Mendilaharsu, M; Luschi, P; Prosdocimi, L; Rodriguez-Heredia, S; Turny, A; Verhage, S; Godley, B J

    2014-04-01

    Large oceanic migrants play important roles in ecosystems, yet many species are of conservation concern as a result of anthropogenic threats, of which incidental capture by fisheries is frequently identified. The last large populations of the leatherback turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, occur in the Atlantic Ocean, but interactions with industrial fisheries could jeopardize recent positive population trends, making bycatch mitigation a priority. Here, we perform the first pan-Atlantic analysis of spatio-temporal distribution of the leatherback turtle and ascertain overlap with longline fishing effort. Data suggest that the Atlantic probably consists of two regional management units: northern and southern (the latter including turtles breeding in South Africa). Although turtles and fisheries show highly diverse distributions, we highlight nine areas of high susceptibility to potential bycatch (four in the northern Atlantic and five in the southern/equatorial Atlantic) that are worthy of further targeted investigation and mitigation. These are reinforced by reports of leatherback bycatch at eight of these sites. International collaborative efforts are needed, especially from nations hosting regions where susceptibility to bycatch is likely to be high within their exclusive economic zone (northern Atlantic: Cape Verde, Gambia, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Senegal, Spain, USA and Western Sahara; southern Atlantic: Angola, Brazil, Namibia and UK) and from nations fishing in these high-susceptibility areas, including those located in international waters.

  20. BIOLOGY AND CPUE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ESCOLAR Lepidocybium flavobrunneum (Smith, 1843 IN EASTERN INDIAN OCEAN (EVOLVING FISHERIES: TODAY’S BY-CATCH IS TOMORROW’S TARGET CATCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathur Rochman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Discharge of by catch is a significant problem in world fishery. Every commercial fishery such as tuna longline has a suite of bycatch species, escolar fish (LEC. LEC as by catch product has received a little attention because of its lower economic value and given its importance as a secondary market. With time, however, market can become establish for this presently undesirable species. Acknowledging that today’s by catch might become tomorrow’s target fish. The aims of this study areto provide information on biological aspect and catch per unit of effort (CPUE spatial distribution of escolar (Lepidocybium flavobrunneum as by catch in Indonesian longline fishery operating in the Eastern Indian Ocean. Total escolar samples of 1,815 were taken from scientific observer data from 2011-2013. The study area of escolar was between 0.897-33.175°S and 85.366– 138.733°E of Eastern Indian Ocean. Results show that the escolar length (cmFL is distributed from 27-178 cmFL (median=83 cmFL, mode=85 cmFL, mean=83.95 cmFL and n= 1.812 and dominated by the size of 85 cmFL. The length weight relationship was determined to be W=0.0002FL2.2926(W in kg, FL in cm. In terms of CPUEs distribution, the lower CPUEs(1.0001 to 7.382 generally occurred in Western Australian, precisely on grid between 10-35°S and 85-110°E. These grids would be a potential for fishing LEC with the best time to catch in June to August.

  1. AFSC/ABL: 2008 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2008 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  2. AFSC/ABL: 2012 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch from the 2012 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) trawl fishery was...

  3. AFSC/ABL: 2009 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2009 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  4. AFSC/ABL: 2011 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch from the 2011 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  5. AFSC/ABL: Chum salmon bycatch genetic stock identification 1994-1995 Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In some years, the Bering Sea trawl fishery incidentally harvests (bycatch) large numbers of chum salmon. Because chum salmon were declining in some western Alaska...

  6. AFSC/ABL: 2010 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2010 Bering Sea groundfish trawl fishery was undertaken to determine the...

  7. AFSC/ABL: 2005 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2005 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  8. AFSC/ABL: 2007 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2007 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  9. AFSC/ABL: 2006 Chum Salmon Bycatch Sample Analysis Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analysis of samples from the chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) bycatch of the 2006 Bering Sea walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) trawl fishery was...

  10. Vulnerability of oceanic sharks as pelagic longline bycatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Gallagher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bycatch (the unintentional catch of non-target species or sizes is consistently ranked as one of the greatest threats to marine fish populations; yet species-specific rates of bycatch survival are rarely considered in risk assessments. Regulations often require that bycatch of threatened species be released; but, if animals are already dead, their release serves no conservation purpose. We examined the survival of 12 shark species caught as bycatch in the US Atlantic pelagic longline fishery. Shark survival was evaluated in relation to fishery target (swordfish versus tuna and four operational, environmental, and biological variables to evaluate the underlying mechanisms affecting mortality. Survival estimates ranged from 33% (night shark to 97% (tiger shark with seven of the 12 species being significantly affected by at least one variable. We placed our survival results within a framework that assessed each species’ relative vulnerability by integrating survival estimates with reproductive potential and found that the bigeye thresher, dusky, night, and scalloped hammerhead shark exhibited the highest vulnerabilities to bycatch. We suggest that considering ecological and biological traits of species shows promise for designing effective conservation measures, whereas techniques that reduce fisheries interactions in the first place may be the best strategy for highly vulnerable species.

  11. By-catch composition of the Patagonian scallop fishery: the fishes Composición de la captura incidental en la pesquería de vieira patagónica: los peces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schejter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An inventory of 24 fish species incidentally caught by the Patagonian scallop fleet in the SW Atlantic Ocean is provided for the first time. The most frequent species were Psammobatis spp. (81.4%, Bathyraja brachyurops (75.1%, B. macloviana (73.5%, Patagonotothen ramsayi (66.1%, Merluccius hubbsi (53.7% and B. albomaculata (50.3%. Many of the recorded chondrichthyes are considered vulnerable or endangered species. The number of taxa (fishes + invertebrates that conforms the by-catch of the fishery was increased and updated to nearly 200 species.Este estudio presenta por primera vez un inventario con 24 especies de peces registradas en la captura incidental de la pesca de la vieira patagónica en el Océano Atlántico sudoccidental por la flota pesquera comercial. Las especies más frecuentes fueron Psammobatis spp. (81,4%, Bathyraja brachyurops (75,1%, B. macloviana (73,5%, Patagonotothen ramsayi (66,1%, Merluccius hubbsi (53,7% y B. albomaculata (50,3%. Muchos de los condrictios registrados se encuentran actualmente considerados como especies vulnerables o en peligro. El número de taxa (peces + invertebrados que conforman la captura incidental de esta pesquería se incrementó y actualizó con estos resultados a aproximadamente 200 especies.

  12. 大西洋金枪鱼延绳钓主要兼捕鱼种垂直分布结构研究%VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF BYCATCH SPECIES CAPTURED BY TUNA LONGLINE FISHERY IN THE ATLANTIC OCEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许友伟; 戴小杰; 庄之栋; 朱江峰; 陈彦

    2012-01-01

    研究延绳钓渔获物的垂直分布结构对于评估延绳钓渔业对目标和兼捕种类的影响具有重要的理论和实际参考价值.根据2007-2010年间2个航次调查采集的热带大西洋公海海域(05°N~15°N,29°W~41°W)金枪鱼延绳钓主要兼捕鱼种的渔获资料,估算了14种渔获物的钓获深度,包括金枪鱼类3种、旗鱼类3种、鲨鱼类3种、其它鱼类3种、海龟2种.当钓钩上浮率假设分别为15%、20%和25%时,最小估算深度分别为122、114和107m,最大估算深度分别为311、293和275m.叉尾长鳍乌鲂的平均钓获深度最深,海龟类的平均钓获深度最浅.四分位距图(IQR)显示,各物种的深度分布范围变化很大,有些种类之间的深度分布中值虽然相近,但深度分布范围却相差很大.除剑鱼外,其余兼捕物种与大眼金枪鱼的深度分布均值均有显著性差异.而除剑鱼和红棱鲂外,其余兼捕物种与大眼金枪鱼的深度分布函数均有显著性差异.聚类分析显示14种渔获物可以分成3种垂直分布结构.%Information of vertical distribution of pelagic species has important value for the assessment of impact of longline fisheries on target and bycatch species. Based on capture hook data of pelagic species in two longline scientific observer trips in the high sea of tropical Atlantic Ocean during 2007~2010, we estimated the capture depths of 14 species, including three species of tunas, three species of billfishes, three species of sharks, two species of sea turtles and others. When the constant shoaling factors were 15%, 20% and 25%, the minimum estimated depths were 122,114 and 107m, and the maximum estimated depths were 311,293 and 275m, respectively. The species with the deepest capture depth was bigscale pomfret. The species with the shallowest capture depth was sea turtles. Interquartile range map (IQR) showed the depth distribution of each species varied greatly. Except for sword-fish, the mean

  13. Determining optimal pinger spacing for harbour porpoise bycatch mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Krog, Carsten; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau

    2013-01-01

    A trial was conducted in the Danish North Sea hake gillnet fishery in July to September 2006 to determine whether the spacing of the Aquatec AQUAmark100 pinger could be increased without reducing the effectiveness of the pinger in mitigating harbour porpoise bycatch. The trial was designed as a c...

  14. Global patterns of marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle bycatch reveal taxa-specific and cumulative megafauna hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Rebecca L.; Crowder, Larry B.; Wallace, Bryan P.; Moore, Jeffrey E.; Cox, Tara; Zydelis, Ramunas; McDonald, Sara; DiMatteo, Andrew; Dunn, Daniel C.; Kot, Connie Y.; Bjorkland, Rhema; Kelez, Shaleyla; Soykan, Candan; Stewart, Kelly R.; Sims, Michelle; Boustany, Andre; Read, Andrew J.; Halpin, Patrick; Nichols, W. J.; Safina, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on ocean health has found large predator abundance to be a key element of ocean condition. Fisheries can impact large predator abundance directly through targeted capture and indirectly through incidental capture of nontarget species or bycatch. However, measures of the global nature of bycatch are lacking for air-breathing megafauna. We fill this knowledge gap and present a synoptic global assessment of the distribution and intensity of bycatch of seabirds, marine mammals, and sea turtles based on empirical data from the three most commonly used types of fishing gears worldwide. We identify taxa-specific hotspots of bycatch intensity and find evidence of cumulative impacts across fishing fleets and gears. This global map of bycatch illustrates where data are particularly scarce—in coastal and small-scale fisheries and ocean regions that support developed industrial fisheries and millions of small-scale fishers—and identifies fishing areas where, given the evidence of cumulative hotspots across gear and taxa, traditional species or gear-specific bycatch management and mitigation efforts may be necessary but not sufficient. Given the global distribution of bycatch and the mitigation success achieved by some fleets, the reduction of air-breathing megafauna bycatch is both an urgent and achievable conservation priority. PMID:24639512

  15. Management implications of the biodiversity and socio-economic impacts of shrimp trawler by-catch in Bahía de Kino, Sonora, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lorayne; Blinick, Naomi S; Fleishman, Abram B

    2012-01-01

    The shrimp fishery is the most economically important fishery in Mexico. The trawler-based portion of this fishery results in high rates of by-catch. This study quantifies and describes the biodiversity of by-catch associated with trawling in the Bahía de Kino region of Sonora, Mexico. Data were collected from 55 trawls, on six boats, over 14 nights, during November of 2003, 2004, 2006-2009. By-catch rates within trawl samples averaged 85.9% measured by weight. A total of 183 by-catch species were identified during the course of this study, including 97 species of bony fish from 43 families, 19 species of elasmobranchs from 12 families, 66 species of invertebrates from eight phyla, and one species of marine turtle; seven of the documented by-catch species are listed on the IUCN Red List, CITES, or the Mexican NOM-059-ECOL-2010; 35 species documented in the by-catch are also targeted by local artisanal fishers. Some of the species frequently captured as juveniles in the by-catch are economically important to small-scale fishers in the region, and are particularly sensitive to overexploitation due to their life histories. This study highlights the need for further research quantifying the impacts of high levels of by-catch upon small-scale fishing economies in the region and presents strong ecological and economic rationale for by-catch management within the shrimp fishery of the Gulf of California. Site-specific by-catch management plans should be piloted in the Bahía de Kino region to address the growing momentum in national and international fisheries policy regimes toward the reduction of by-catch in shrimp fisheries.

  16. Spatial and temporal statistical analysis of bycatch data: Patterns of sea turtle bycatch in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, B.; Sullivan, P.J.; Morreale, S.J.; Epperly, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) sea turtle distributions and movements in offshore waters of the western North Atlantic are not well understood despite continued efforts to monitor, survey, and observe them. Loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles are listed as endangered by the World Conservation Union, and thus anthropogenic mortality of these species, including fishing, is of elevated interest. This study quantifies spatial and temporal patterns of sea turtle bycatch distributions to identify potential processes influencing their locations. A Ripley's K function analysis was employed on the NOAA Fisheries Atlantic Pelagic Longline Observer Program data to determine spatial, temporal, and spatio-temporal patterns of sea turtle bycatch distributions within the pattern of the pelagic fishery distribution. Results indicate that loggerhead and leatherback sea turtle catch distributions change seasonally, with patterns of spatial clustering appearing from July through October. The results from the space-time analysis indicate that sea turtle catch distributions are related on a relatively fine scale (30-200 km and 1-5 days). The use of spatial and temporal point pattern analysis, particularly K function analysis, is a novel way to examine bycatch data and can be used to inform fishing practices such that fishing could still occur while minimizing sea turtle bycatch. ?? 2008 NRC.

  17. Biology, fisheries and distribution of Thryssa vitrirostris (Gilchrist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biology, fisheries and distribution of Thryssa vitrirostris (Gilchrist & Thompson 1908) and ... African Journal of Marine Science ... may be related to an excessive exploitation rate (40–60%) brought about by the directed fishery and trawl bycatch.

  18. Developing ultraviolet illumination of gillnets as a method to reduce sea turtle bycatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John; Barkan, Joel; Fisler, Shara; Godinez-Reyes, Carlos; Swimmer, Yonat

    2013-10-23

    Fisheries bycatch of marine animals has been linked to population declines of multiple species, including many sea turtles. Altering the visual cues associated with fishing gear may reduce sea turtle bycatch. We examined the effectiveness of illuminating gillnets with ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes for reducing green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) interactions. We found that the mean sea turtle capture rate was reduced by 39.7% in UV-illuminated nets compared with nets without illumination. In collaboration with commercial fishermen, we tested UV net illumination in a bottom-set gillnet fishery in Baja California, Mexico. We did not find any difference in overall target fish catch rate or market value between net types. These findings suggest that UV net illumination may have applications in coastal and pelagic gillnet fisheries to reduce sea turtle bycatch.

  19. Mitigating seabird bycatch during hauling by pelagic longline vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gilman

    Full Text Available Bycatch in longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline swordfish fishery reduced seabird captures by an order of magnitude primarily through mitigating bycatch during setting. Now, 75% of captures occur during hauling. We fit observer data to a generalized additive regression model with mixed effects to determine the significance of the effect of various factors on the standardized seabird haul catch rate. Density of albatrosses attending vessels during hauling, leader length and year had largest model effects. The standardized haul catch rate significantly increased with increased albatross density during hauling. The standardized catch rate was significantly higher the longer the leader: shorter leaders place weighted swivels closer to hooks, reducing the likelihood of baited hooks becoming available to surface-scavenging albatrosses. There was a significant linear increasing temporal trend in the standardized catch rate, possibly partly due to an observed increasing temporal trend in the local abundance of albatrosses attending vessels during hauling. Swivel weight, Beaufort scale and season were also significant but smaller model effects. Most (81% haul captures were on branchlines actively being retrieved. Future haul mitigation research should therefore focus on reducing bird access to hooks as crew coil branchlines, including methods identified here of shorter leaders and heavier swivels, and other potentially effective methods, including faster branchline coiling and shielding the area where hooks becomes accessible. The proportion of Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis captures that occurred during hauling was significantly, 1.6 times, higher than for black-footed albatrosses (P. nigripes, perhaps due to differences in the time of day of foraging and in daytime scavenging competitiveness; mitigating haul bycatch would therefore be a larger benefit to Laysans. Locally, findings

  20. Mitigating seabird bycatch during hauling by pelagic longline vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Eric; Chaloupka, Milani; Wiedoff, Brett; Willson, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Bycatch in longline fisheries threatens the viability of some seabird populations. The Hawaii longline swordfish fishery reduced seabird captures by an order of magnitude primarily through mitigating bycatch during setting. Now, 75% of captures occur during hauling. We fit observer data to a generalized additive regression model with mixed effects to determine the significance of the effect of various factors on the standardized seabird haul catch rate. Density of albatrosses attending vessels during hauling, leader length and year had largest model effects. The standardized haul catch rate significantly increased with increased albatross density during hauling. The standardized catch rate was significantly higher the longer the leader: shorter leaders place weighted swivels closer to hooks, reducing the likelihood of baited hooks becoming available to surface-scavenging albatrosses. There was a significant linear increasing temporal trend in the standardized catch rate, possibly partly due to an observed increasing temporal trend in the local abundance of albatrosses attending vessels during hauling. Swivel weight, Beaufort scale and season were also significant but smaller model effects. Most (81%) haul captures were on branchlines actively being retrieved. Future haul mitigation research should therefore focus on reducing bird access to hooks as crew coil branchlines, including methods identified here of shorter leaders and heavier swivels, and other potentially effective methods, including faster branchline coiling and shielding the area where hooks becomes accessible. The proportion of Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) captures that occurred during hauling was significantly, 1.6 times, higher than for black-footed albatrosses (P. nigripes), perhaps due to differences in the time of day of foraging and in daytime scavenging competitiveness; mitigating haul bycatch would therefore be a larger benefit to Laysans. Locally, findings identify opportunities

  1. Brachyuran crustaceans from the bycatch of prawn fisheries at the mouth of the Amazon river Crustáceos Brachyura da fauna acompanhante da pesca artesanal de camarões de água doce na foz do rio Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jô de Farias Lima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a pioneering study on the Brachyura bycatch associated with the artisan prawn fisheries at the mouth of the Amazon River. The study was conducted at four collection sites distributed along the mouth of the Amazon River between the months of January/2009 and January/2010. The animals were caught using handcrafted traps called "matapi", which are used by prawn fisherman in the region. Twenty matapis were used at each collection site. A total of 145 specimens were captured and six species were identified, all belonging to the Trichodactylidae family - Sylviocarcinus maldonadoensis, S. pictus, S. devillei, Valdivia serrata, Dilocarcinus septemdentatus and D. pagei. The most representative species, S. maldonadoensis, S. pictus and S. devillei were classified as regular. Regarding the composition of the capture, there were three specimens of D. pagei , only one male specimen of D. septemdentatus, forty-eight specimens of S. maldonadoensis, sixty-eight specimens of S. pictus, twenty-two specimens of S. devillei and three specimens of V. serrata. In all months, the brachyuran fauna showed a considerably lower biomass when compared to the prawns, representing only 5% of the catch, in a ratio of 1:0.06. For most species, the number of males was always higher than the number of females in almost all collection months.O presente trabalho constitui um estudo inédito sobre a fauna de Brachyura associada à pesca artesanal de camarões na foz do rio Amazonas. Este estudo foi realizado em quatro pontos de coleta distribuídos na foz do Rio Amazonas, entre os meses de janeiro/2009 e janeiro/2010. Os animais foram capturados utilizando armadilhas artesanais denominadas "matapis" usados por pescadores de camarão na região. Em cada ponto da coleta foram usados 20 matapis. Foram identificados seis espécies em um total de 145 indivíduos capturados, sendo todos pertencentes a família Trichodactylidae: Sylviocarcinus maldonadoensis, S. pictus

  2. 热带大西洋金枪鱼延绳钓兼捕鲨鱼种类组成和渔获率及其与表温的关系%Species composition and catch rate of bycatch sharks captured by tuna longline fishery and their relationship with sea surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜润林; 戴小杰; 许柳雄

    2009-01-01

    根据2007年12月~2008年3月采集的热带大西洋(05°37′~12°01′N、29°00′~36°51′W)金枪鱼延绳钓渔获物数据,分析了金枪鱼延绳钓兼捕鲨鱼的种类组成、渔获量、渔获率及其与表温的关系.本次调查共捕获鲨鱼8种,隶属3目7科7属, 总渔获尾数为633 ind,总渔获量达26 837.4 kg, 其中大青鲨为主要兼捕种类.各种鲨鱼渔获率平均值在0.003~1.524 ind/1 000 hooks之间, 其中大青鲨最高, 其值为1.524 ind/1 000 hooks,大眼砂锥齿鲨最低,其值为0.003 ind/1 000 hooks.各种鲨鱼渔获率月变化不明显(ANOVA, P=0.901).鲨鱼总渔获率和大青鲨渔获率与表温都呈显著性负相关.大青鲨主要出现渔场的表温范围为24.6~25.8 ℃.%Based on catch data collected in the tropical Atlantic Ocean (05°37′N-12°01′N, 29°00′W-36°51′W) from December 2007 to March 2008, the species composition, catch, catch rate of bycatch sharks captured by tuna longline fishery and their relationship with sea surface temperature (SST) are analyzed. Altogether 633 individuals of fish are captured, which belong to 3 orders, 7 families, 7 genera and 8 fish species. The total weight of bycatch sharks is 26837.4kg. And the dominant bycatch shark is blue shark ( Prionace glauca ). Average catch rate of bycatch sharks is 0.003-1.524 individual per 1 000 hooks, of which blue shark is the highest, 1.524 individual per 1 000 hooks, and bigeye sand shark( Odontaspis noronhai ) lowest, 0.003 individual per 1 000 hooks. Catch rate of bycatch sharks shows no obvious monthly fluctuation (ANOVA, P=0.901). An obvious negative correlation is found between SST and catch rate of total bycatch shark and blue shark. The range of SST in the dominant fishing ground where blue sharks appear is 24.6-25.8℃.

  3. 76 FR 74725 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Trawl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... seasonally to slow bycatch in the whiting fishery. In addition to closed areas to protect habitat from trawl... it will strive to the best of its ability to conduct site inspections in a timely fashion, not...

  4. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  5. Predicting bycatch hotspots for endangered leatherback turtles on longlines in the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, John H; Morreale, Stephen J; Paladino, Frank V; Shillinger, George L; Benson, Scott R; Eckert, Scott A; Bailey, Helen; Tomillo, Pilar Santidrián; Bograd, Steven J; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Dutton, Peter H; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Block, Barbara A; Spotila, James R

    2014-02-22

    Fisheries bycatch is a critical source of mortality for rapidly declining populations of leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea. We integrated use-intensity distributions for 135 satellite-tracked adult turtles with longline fishing effort to estimate predicted bycatch risk over space and time in the Pacific Ocean. Areas of predicted bycatch risk did not overlap for eastern and western Pacific nesting populations, warranting their consideration as distinct management units with respect to fisheries bycatch. For western Pacific nesting populations, we identified several areas of high risk in the north and central Pacific, but greatest risk was adjacent to primary nesting beaches in tropical seas of Indo-Pacific islands, largely confined to several exclusive economic zones under the jurisdiction of national authorities. For eastern Pacific nesting populations, we identified moderate risk associated with migrations to nesting beaches, but the greatest risk was in the South Pacific Gyre, a broad pelagic zone outside national waters where management is currently lacking and may prove difficult to implement. Efforts should focus on these predicted hotspots to develop more targeted management approaches to alleviate leatherback bycatch.

  6. Effectiveness of tori line use to reduce seabird bycatch in pelagic longline fishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Andrés; Abreu, Martin; Forselledo, Rodrigo; Yates, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Industrial longline fisheries cause the death of large numbers of seabirds annually. Various mitigation measures have been proposed, including the use of tori lines. In this study the efficiency of a single tori line to reduce seabird bycatch was tested on pelagic longline vessels (25-37m length). Thirteen fishing trips were carried out in the area and season of the highest bycatch rates recorded in the southwest Atlantic (2009–2011). We deployed two treatments in random order: sets with a tori line and without a tori line (control treatment). The use of a tori line significantly reduced seabird bycatch rates. Forty three and seven birds were captured in the control (0.85 birds/1,000 hooks, n = 49 sets) and in the tori line treatment (0.13 birds/1,000 hooks, n = 51 sets), respectively. In 47% of the latter sets the tori line broke either because of entanglement with the longline gear or by tension. This diminished the tori line effectiveness; five of the seven captures during sets where a tori line was deployed were following ruptures. Nine additional trips were conducted with a tori line that was modified to reduce entanglements (2012–2016). Seven entanglements were recorded in 73 longline sets. The chance of a rupture on these trips was 4% (95% c.l. = 1–18%) of that during 2009–2011. This work shows that the use of a tori line reduces seabird bycatch in pelagic longline fisheries and is a practice suitable for medium size vessels (~25-40m length). Because the study area has historically very high bycatch rates at global level, this tori line design is potentially useful to reduce seabird bycatch in many medium size pelagic longline vessel fishing in the southern hemisphere. PMID:28886183

  7. Productivity and susceptibility analysis for species caught in Atlantic tuna fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Arrizabalaga, Haritz; De Bruyn, Paul; Diaz, Guillermo A.; Murua, Hilario; Chavance, Pierre; Delgado de Molina, Alicia; Gaertner, Daniel; Ariz, Javier; Ruiz, Jon; Kell, Laurence T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract - Ecological risk assessment is a useful methodology for assisting the management of fisheries from an ecosystem perspective. Atlantic tuna fisheries, managed by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), are economically important and interact with several bycatch species. In spite of these interactions, no comprehensive ecological risk assessment has been conducted for bycatch species caught in ICCAT fisheries. In this paper, we followed a two stag...

  8. Caracterización preliminar de los invertebrados bentónicos capturados accidentalmente en la pesca de camarones en el norte del estado de Río de Janeiro, sudeste de Brasil Preliminary characterization of benthic invertebrates caught as by-catch in the shrimp fishery in the north of the Rio de Janeiro State, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor David da Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Para caracterizar la biodiversidad de invertebrados bentónicos que componen la fauna asociada a la pesca de camarones en el puerto del Farol de Sao Thomé, costa norte del estado de Río de Janeiro, se realizaron 11 pescas mensuales en el año 2004 con redes de arrastre de fondo, cuya área de operaciones comprende 3-5 mn desde la línea de costa, entre 22°00'S y 22°20'S. Los datos registrados de cada taxon y/o especie se refieren a la frecuencia de ocurrencia, frecuencia numérica, biomasa, índice de Importancia Relativa y abundancia. En total se registraron 27 especies de invertebrados bentónicos de Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Crustácea, Echinodermata y Bryozoa. Crustácea fue el más representativo, tanto en número de ejemplares de Petrochirus diogenes, Hepatus pudibundus y Callinectes ornatos, como en biomasa de P. diogenes y H. pudibundas. En términos de frecuencia de ocurrencia en los muéstreos, 11 especies (40,7% fueron constantes; 6 (22,2% accesorias y 10 (37,0% accidentales.In order to characterize the biodiversity of the benthic invertebrate by-catch associated with the shrimp fishery at Farol de Sao Thome harbor, northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in 2004, 11 monthly trawls were conducted using bottom trawl nets between 22°00'S and 22°20'S and from 3 to 5 nm from the shoreline. The analyzed data for each talon and/or species include frequency of occurrence, numeric frequency, biomass, index of Relative Importance, and abundance. In total, 27 benthic invertebrate species were recorded, including Peripheral, Cnidarians, Mollusk, Annelid, Crustacea, Echinodermata, and Bryozoa. The most representative group was Crustacea, both in number of specimens (Petrochirus diogenes, Hepatus pudibundus, Callinectes ornatus and in biomass (P. diogenes, H. pudibundus. In terms of the frequency of occurrence in the samples, 11 species (40.7% were constant, 6 species (22.2% were accessories, and 10 species (37.0% were by-catch.

  9. A Bayesian uncertainty analysis of cetacean demography and bycatch mortality using age-at-death data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey E; Read, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    fisheries mortality, prior to management to reduce bycatch, was 0.690. Our approach takes into account multiple sources of uncertainty in data and process, and it provides posterior distributions for a rich set of demographic rate parameters that are unknown for most cetaceans. This method should be easily adaptable to other taxa for which fertility and age-at-death data are available.

  10. SURVIVAL ESTIMATES OF BYCATCH INDIVIDUALS DISCARDED FROM BIVALVE DREDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Leitão

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The fate of released bycatch is an issue of great interest for fisheries research and management. Survival experiments were carried out to assess the survival capacity of animals damaged and discarded during clam dredging operations. Three common bycatch species, two fish (Trachinus vipera; Dicologlossa cuneata and one crab (Polybius henslowii, were collected during the sorting of catches from a commercial dredging boat. An arbitrary score scale was used to quantify the type and extent of damage to the organisms. Onboard, damaged individuals were placed in tanks containing seawater which were subsequently transferred to the laboratory. Survival experiments were conducted during the subsequent 48h. D. cuneata exhibited the lowest mortality after 48h (54%, followed by P. henslowii (65% and T. vipera (81%. Despite the magnitude of the percentage mortalities determined, the average number of individuals estimated to die during a 15 minutes tow (standard commercial fishing time was relatively small: 1.2, 3.24 and 11 for D. cuneata, T. vipera and P. henslowii, respectively. Nevertheless, when these figures are extrapolated to cover all the dredging fleet the impact of this practice on the populations of the species studied can be significant, particulary for D. cuneata.

  11. Development of quantitative tools for predicting protected species and fishery co-occurrence

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nearly all marine fisheries have at least some bycatch, which concerns commercial and recreational fishermen, resource managers, conservationists, and the public....

  12. Interannual differences for sea turtles bycatch in Spanish longliners from Western Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, José C; Macías, David; García-Barcelona, Salvador; Real, Raimundo

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that regional abundance of loggerhead and leatherback turtles could oscillate interannually according to oceanographic and climatic conditions. The Western Mediterranean is an important fishing area for the Spanish drifting longline fleet, which mainly targets swordfish, bluefin tuna, and albacore. Due to the spatial overlapping in fishing activity and turtle distribution, there is an increasing sea turtle conservation concern. The main goal of this study is to analyse the interannual bycatch of loggerhead and leatherback turtles by the Spanish Mediterranean longline fishery and to test the relationship between the total turtle by-catch of this fishery and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). During the 14 years covered in this study, the number of sea turtle bycatches was 3,940 loggerhead turtles and 8 leatherback turtles, 0.499 loggerhead turtles/1000 hooks and 0.001014 leatherback turtles/1000 hooks. In the case of the loggerhead turtle the positive phase of the NAO favours an increase of loggerhead turtles in the Western Mediterranean Sea. However, in the case of leatherback turtle the negative phase of the NAO favours the presence of leatherback turtle. This contraposition could be related to the different ecophysiological response of both species during their migration cycle.

  13. Interannual Differences for Sea Turtles Bycatch in Spanish Longliners from Western Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Báez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies showed that regional abundance of loggerhead and leatherback turtles could oscillate interannually according to oceanographic and climatic conditions. The Western Mediterranean is an important fishing area for the Spanish drifting longline fleet, which mainly targets swordfish, bluefin tuna, and albacore. Due to the spatial overlapping in fishing activity and turtle distribution, there is an increasing sea turtle conservation concern. The main goal of this study is to analyse the interannual bycatch of loggerhead and leatherback turtles by the Spanish Mediterranean longline fishery and to test the relationship between the total turtle by-catch of this fishery and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO. During the 14 years covered in this study, the number of sea turtle bycatches was 3,940 loggerhead turtles and 8 leatherback turtles, 0.499 loggerhead turtles/1000 hooks and 0.001014 leatherback turtles/1000 hooks. In the case of the loggerhead turtle the positive phase of the NAO favours an increase of loggerhead turtles in the Western Mediterranean Sea. However, in the case of leatherback turtle the negative phase of the NAO favours the presence of leatherback turtle. This contraposition could be related to the different ecophysiological response of both species during their migration cycle.

  14. Characteristics of fishing operations, environment and life history contributing to small cetacean bycatch in the northeast Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Brown

    Full Text Available Fisheries bycatch is a key threat to cetacean species globally. Managing the impact requires an understanding of the conditions under which animals are caught and the sections of the population affected. We used observer data collected on an albacore tuna gillnet fishery in the northeast Atlantic, to assess operational and environmental factors contributing to bycatch of common and striped dolphins, using generalised linear models and model averaging. Life history demographics of the captured animals were also investigated. In both species, young males dominated the catch. The age ratio of common dolphins was significantly different from that estimated for the population in the region, based on life tables (G = 17.1, d.f. = 2, p = 0.002. Skewed age and sex ratios may reflect varying vulnerability to capture, through differences in behaviour or segregation in populations. Adult females constituted the second largest portion of the bycatch for both species, with potential consequences for population sustainability. Depth was the most important parameter influencing bycatch of both species and reflected what is known about common and striped dolphin habitat use in the region as the probability of catching common dolphins decreased, and striped dolphins increased, with increasing depth. Striped dolphin capture was similarly influenced by the extent to which operations were conducted in daylight, with the probability of capture increasing with increased operations in the pre-sunset and post-sunrise period, potentially driven by increased ability of observers to record animals during daylight operations, or by diurnal movements increasing contact with the fishery. Effort, based on net length and soak time, had little influence on the probability of capturing either species. Our results illustrate the importance of assessing the demographic of the animals captured during observer programmes and, perhaps more importantly, suggest that effort

  15. 75 FR 32993 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... quality product for the consumer. 8. Increase safety in the fishery. Because OY on healthy stocks is... ability and result in changes to fishing behavior, which include a reduction in the bycatch rate of...; freezing, cooking, smoking, or drying groundfish; packaging that groundfish for resale into 100 pound units...

  16. Can Cooperative Management of Tuna Fisheries in the Western Pacific Solve the Growth Overfishing Problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, M.L.; Rashid Sumaila, U.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tuna fisheries in the western and central Pacific Ocean are important globally for both food and economic security. Yellowfin and bigeye tuna stocks in this region are declining, in part due to the juvenile bycatch of these species by the purse seine fishery using floating objects and fish aggregati

  17. Can Cooperative Management of Tuna Fisheries in the Western Pacific Solve the Growth Overfishing Problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, M.L.; Rashid Sumaila, U.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Tuna fisheries in the western and central Pacific Ocean are important globally for both food and economic security. Yellowfin and bigeye tuna stocks in this region are declining, in part due to the juvenile bycatch of these species by the purse seine fishery using floating objects and fish aggregati

  18. Aspects of the reproductive biology and characterization of Sciaenidae captured as bycatch in the prawn trawling in the northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Beserra da Silva Júnior

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian prawn fishery, as other bottom trawling fisheries, is considered quite efficient in catching the target species but with low selectivity and high rates of bycatch. The family Sciaenidae prevails among fish species caught. The study was conducted in the Pernambuco State (Barra de Sirihaém, northeastern Brazil. From August 2011 to July 2012, 3,278 sciaenid specimens were caught, distributed into 16 species, 34.2% males and 41.5% females. Larimus breviceps, Isopisthus parvipinnis, Paralonchurus brasiliensis and Stellifer microps were the most abundant species. The area was considered a recruitment and reproduction area with the highest reproductive activity between December 2011 and July 2012. The constant frequency of mature I. parvipinnis and S. microps in catches throughout the year suggests that these species are multiple spawners and use the area during their reproductive period. Since most individuals caught as bycatch have not reached sexual maturity, evidencing the need for a better monitoring of the area and the Sciaenidae caught as bycatch, once this incidental caught can cause fluctuations in the recruitment, increasing the proportion of immature individuals in the population and negatively affecting the reproductive success of the species.

  19. Species Composition - Bycatch Reduction Engineering Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through key regional collaborations with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and...

  20. Oceanographic Data - Bycatch Reduction Engineering Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through key regional collaborations with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and...

  1. Assessing the impact of bycatch on dolphin populations: the case of the common dolphin in the eastern North Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mannocci

    Full Text Available Fisheries interactions have been implicated in the decline of many marine vertebrates worldwide. In the eastern North Atlantic, at least 1000 common dolphins (Delphinus delphis are bycaught each year, particularly in pelagic pair-trawls. We have assessed the resulting impact of bycatch on this population using a demographic modeling approach. We relied on a sample of females stranded along the French Atlantic and western Channel coasts. Strandings represent an extensive source of demographic information to monitor our study population. Necropsy analysis provided an estimate of individual age and reproductive state. Then we estimated effective survivorship (including natural and human-induced mortality, age at first reproduction and pregnancy rates. Reproductive parameters were consistent with literature, but effective survivorship was unexpectedly low. Demographic parameters were then used as inputs in two models. A constant parameter matrix proposed an effective growth rate of -5.5±0.5%, corresponding to the current situation (including bycatch mortality. Subsequently, deterministic projections suggested that the population would be reduced to 20% of its current size in 30 years and would be extinct in 100 years. The demographic invariant model suggested a maximum growth rate of +4.5±0.09%, corresponding to the optimal demographic situation. Then, a risk analysis incorporating Potential Biological Removal (PBR, based on two plausible scenarii for stock structure suggested that bycatch level was unsustainable for the neritic population of the Bay of Biscay under a two-stock scenario. In depth assessment of stock structure and improved observer programs to provide scientifically robust bycatch estimates are needed. Effective conservation measures would be reducing bycatch to less than 50% of the current level in the neritic stock to reach PBR. Our approach provided indicators of the status and trajectory of the common dolphin population in the

  2. 76 FR 37716 - List of Fisheries for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... rainbow runner. Trolling gear usually consists of short, stout fiberglass rods and lever-drag hand... skipjack tuna, and also lands bycatch of sailfish, spearfish, kawakawa, albacore, rainbow runner, and...'' fishery is described as a maze of vertical nets anchored to the bottom and stretched to the...

  3. AVALIAÇÃO DO GANHO DE PESO DE PÓS-LARVAS DO CAMARÃO MARINHO Litopenaeus vannamei (BOONE, 1931, ALIMENTADOS COM PEIXES DA FAUNA ACOMPANHANTE DO CAMARÃO MARINHO EVALUATION OF WEIGHT GAIN IN POST-LARVAE OF MARINE SHRIMP Litopenaeus vannamei (BOONE, 1931 FED ON FISH SPECIES WHICH COMPOSE THE MARINE SHRIMP FISHERIES BYCATCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique José Mascarenhas dos Santos Costa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi analisar o desenvolvimento inicial de pós-larvas de Litopenaeus vannamei em água doce utilizando como alimento peixes da fauna acompanhante da pesca do camarão marinho. Cultivaram-se 48 pós-larvas com peso e comprimento médio total iniciais de 0,008±0,001 g e 11,0±0,5 mm, respectivamente. Para cada tratamento foram utilizados, como alimento, ração comercial (RC para camarão marinho com 45% de proteína bruta, Opisthonema oglinum (OO (sardinha bandeira e Chloroscombus chrysurus (CC (palombeta, respectivamente. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. A densidade de estocagem consistiu de quatro camarões por aquário. Durante os 75 dias de experimento, a alimentação foi administrada ad libitum. Registrou-se a temperatura média final de 27,1±0,8ºC para os três tratamentos e o pH médio final de 7,68±0,27 para os camarões alimentados com RC e 7,66±0,22 para os indivíduos alimentados com OO e CC, respectivamente. Os pesos médios finais foram de 0,560±0,096 g, 0,495±0,091 g e 0,500±0,101 g e os comprimentos totais finais de 62,1±0,9 mm, 57,0±0,8 mm e 56,2±0,9 mm para os tratamentos com RC, OO e CC, respectivamente. Os resultados do peso e comprimento final mostraram que não houve diferença estatística significativa entre os tratamentos testados. A sobrevivência final foi de 87,5±14,4%, 68,8±12,5% e 62,5±14,3% para o RC, OO e CC, respectivamente. Conclui-se que a utilização de ração para camarão marinho e os peixes marinhos O. oglinum e C. chrysurus como alimento para pós-larvas de camarão marinho apresentam desenvolvimento semelhante. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Camarão marinho, dietas, Chloroscombus chrysurus, Litopenaeus vannamei, Opisthonema oglinum. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early development of Litopenaeus vannamei post-larvae in freshwater fed on fish species that compose the shrimp fisheries bycatch. Forty eight post

  4. Bycatch and catch-release mortality of small sharks in the Gulf coast nursery grounds of Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor

    OpenAIRE

    Robert E Hueter; Manire, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    The bays and estuaries of the southeast United States coast generally are thought to serve as nursery areas for various species of coastal sharks, where juvenile sharks find abundant food and are less exposed to predation by larger sharks. Because these areas typically support substantial commercial and recreational fisheries, fishing mortality of sharks in the nurseries particularly by bycatch, may be significant. This two-year project assessed the relative importance of two estuaries of the...

  5. Chinook Bycatch - Contemporary Salmon Genetic Stock Composition Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to measure and monitor impacts on ESA-listed populations and to estimate overall Chinook salmon stock composition in bycatch...

  6. AFSC/ABL: 2007-2013 Chinook Salmon Bycatch Sample

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A genetic analyses of samples from the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) bycatch from the 2007-2013 Bering Sea-Aleutian Island and Gulf of Alaska trawl...

  7. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, Kerstin B. J.; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T.; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M.

    2015-12-01

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji’s inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers’ identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji’s inshore fisheries, suggests that the country’s artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  8. Characteristics of the shark fisheries of Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, Kerstin B J; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; White, William T; Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2015-12-02

    Limited information is available on artisanal and subsistence shark fisheries across the Pacific. The aim of this study was to investigate Fiji's inshore fisheries which catch sharks. In January and February 2013, 253 semi-directive interviews were conducted in 117 villages and at local harbours on Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Ovalau and a number of islands of the Mamanuca and Yasawa archipelagos. Of the 253 interviewees, 81.4% reported to presently catch sharks, and 17.4% declared that they did not presently catch any sharks. Of the 206 fishers that reported to catch sharks, 18.4% targeted sharks and 81.6% caught sharks as bycatch. When targeted, primary use of sharks was for consumption or for sale. Sharks caught as bycatch were frequently released (69.6%), consumed (64.9%) or shared amongst the community (26.8%). Fishers' identification based on an identification poster and DNA barcoding revealed that at least 12 species of elasmobranchs, 11 shark and one ray species (Rhynchobatus australiae) were caught. This study, which is the first focused exploration of the shark catch in Fiji's inshore fisheries, suggests that the country's artisanal shark fisheries are small but have the potential to develop into larger and possibly more targeted fisheries.

  9. Sustainability of capture of fish bycatch in the prawn trawling in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Beserra da Silva Junior

    Full Text Available The prawn fishery produces more discards than any other type of catch and captures a large quantity of immature individuals. This research aimed to assess the sustainability of capture of fish bycatch in prawn trawling. Each species was assessed according to two groups of criteria: (1 their relative vulnerability to capture by trawl and mortality due to this fishery (2 recovery capacity of the specie after a possible collapse of the population. Within each group, each species was ranked (1-3, being 1 the highest value, meaning the species is highly susceptible to capture or has a low resilience. A total of 8,894 individuals were caught, belonging to 28 families. The species with capture least sustainable were Stellifer rastrifer and Isopisthus parvipinnis. These latter species are highly susceptible since they are either benthic or demersal, and their diet may include benthic organism. Chirocentrodon bleekerianus and Anchoa tricolor were the most likely fishes to be sustainable since they are pelagic, they are least susceptible to capture by trawls, and also have a greater capacity to recover, as most individuals have bred before capture. Due to the fishery's multi-specific nature, it is difficult to implement mitigation measures for specific species. Thus, the creation of fishing exclusion zones should be considered as the most appropriate management measure.

  10. Darkedge midshipman Porichthys analis (Batrachoidiformes: Batrachoididae, a common shrimp-bycatch fish from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A. González-Ochoa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp fishery bycatch of the Gulf of California constitutes a wide variety of highly unknown fish, crustacean, and mollusk species with very low or null economic value, in contrast to those of commercial interest. However, there are no studies yet on the role of these low economic valued species have in the community structure and function, together with their possible effect on commercial populations. With the aim of contributing to the knowledge of Darkedge Midshipman fish Porichthys analis, the most common waste species in this fishery, we estimated some population characteristics. For this purpose, we obtained shrimp-bycatch fish during the 2004-2005 fishing season and performed some research surveys. A total of 1 725 Darkedge Midshipman were captured from 350 bycatch samples. Individual size ranged from 43-352mm SL. The weight to standard length relationship was determined as W=0.000092SL3.0509. Von Bertalanffy’s growth coefficient indicated a moderate growth rate (K=0.5 with an estimated asymptotic length ofL∞=352mm standard length, and a longevity of 6yr. Natural mortality was estimated as 0.97 and total mortality as 4.67. The recruitment pattern, as estimated by ELEFAN II, was extended over the year, peaking during spring and summer seasons. Sexual proportion of male:female was 1.65:1. Mature organisms appeared from August to March, and length at maturity was 157mm SL, which is larger than the mean size at capture 135mm SL. We concluded that the species is indirectly protected by its own bathymetric distribution and the off-shrimping season. This is the first study that considers population characteristics from this common but still unknown species.

  11. Estimating abundances of 0-group western Baltic cod by using pound net fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Robert; Stepputtis, Daniel; Storr-Paulsen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Nearshore 0-group western Baltic cod are frequently caught as bycatch in the commercial pound net fishery. Pound net fishermen from the Danish Isle of Funen and Lolland and the German Isle of Fehmarn have recorded their catches of small cod between September and December 2008. Abundance patterns...

  12. Throughout the history of the inshore net-fisheries in the Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    Marine and Coastal Management, Private Bag X2, Rogge Bay 8012, Cape Town, South Africa ... information on the commercial net fishery. ...... tic. Totals of 18 872 kg of L. richardsonii and 4 175 bycatch fish were landed by fishers for these ...

  13. Notch sensitivity jeopardizes titanium locking plate fatigue strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wo-Jan; Chao, Ching-Kong; Wang, Chun-Chin; Lin, Jinn

    2016-12-01

    Notch sensitivity may compromise titanium-alloy plate fatigue strength. However, no studies providing head-to-head comparisons of stainless-steel or titanium-alloy locking plates exist. Custom-designed identically structured locking plates were made from stainless steel (F138 and F1314) or titanium alloy. Three screw-hole designs were compared: threaded screw-holes with angle edges (type I); threaded screw-holes with chamfered edges (type II); and non-threaded screw-holes with chamfered edges (type III). The plates' bending stiffness, bending strength, and fatigue life, were investigated. The stress concentration at the screw threads was assessed using finite element analyses (FEA). The titanium plates had higher bending strength than the F1314 and F138 plates (2.95:1.56:1) in static loading tests. For all metals, the type-III plate fatigue life was highest, followed by type-II and type-I. The type-III titanium plates had longer fatigue lives than their F138 counterparts, but the type-I and type-II titanium plates had significantly shorter fatigue lives. All F1314 plate types had longer fatigue lives than the type-III titanium plates. The FEA showed minimal stress difference (0.4%) between types II and III, but the stress for types II and III was lower (11.9% and 12.4%) than that for type I. The screw threads did not cause stress concentration in the locking plates in FEA, but may have jeopardized the fatigue strength, especially in the notch-sensitive titanium plates. Improvement to the locking plate design is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Arctic marine fishes and their fisheries in light of global change

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgen S. Christiansen; Mecklenburg, Catherine W; Karamushko, Oleg V

    2013-01-01

    In light of ocean warming and loss of Arctic sea ice, harvested marine fishes of boreal origin (and their fisheries) move poleward into yet unexploited parts of the Arctic seas. Industrial fisheries, already in place on many Arctic shelves, will radically affect the local fish species as they turn up as unprecedented bycatch. Arctic marine fishes are indispensable to ecosystem structuring and functioning, but they are still beyond credible assessment due to lack of basic biological data. The ...

  15. Fisheries economics and fisheries management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    spent too much time on fundamentals in fisheries economics at the expense of the development of applicable models for fisheries managers? Of course, this question is relevant only IF fisheries economics and fisheries economists have a role to play in fisheries management.......Professor Rögnvaldur Hannesson's influence on the development and history of fisheries economics is unquestionable. Also, he has strongly pointed out the potential gains from a more active use of fisheries economics in fisheries management. In light of this, one may ask if fisheries economists have...

  16. Hierarchical modeling of bycatch rates of sea turtles in the western North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, B.; Sullivan, P.J.; Epperly, S.; Morreale, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the locations of the endangered loggerhead Caretta caretta and critically endangered leatherback Dermochelys coriacea sea turtles are influenced by water temperatures, and that incidental catch rates in the pelagic longline fishery vary by region. We present a Bayesian hierarchical model to examine the effects of environmental variables, including water temperature, on the number of sea turtles captured in the US pelagic longline fishery in the western North Atlantic. The modeling structure is highly flexible, utilizes a Bayesian model selection technique, and is fully implemented in the software program WinBUGS. The number of sea turtles captured is modeled as a zero-inflated Poisson distribution and the model incorporates fixed effects to examine region-specific differences in the parameter estimates. Results indicate that water temperature, region, bottom depth, and target species are all significant predictors of the number of loggerhead sea turtles captured. For leatherback sea turtles, the model with only target species had the most posterior model weight, though a re-parameterization of the model indicates that temperature influences the zero-inflation parameter. The relationship between the number of sea turtles captured and the variables of interest all varied by region. This suggests that management decisions aimed at reducing sea turtle bycatch may be more effective if they are spatially explicit. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  17. Characterizing Fishing Effort and Spatial Extent of Coastal Fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly R. Stewart; Lewison, Rebecca L.; Daniel C. Dunn; Rhema H Bjorkland; Shaleyla Kelez; Halpin, Patrick N.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2010-01-01

    Biodiverse coastal zones are often areas of intense fishing pressure due to the high relative density of fishing capacity in these nearshore regions. Although overcapacity is one of the central challenges to fisheries sustainability in coastal zones, accurate estimates of fishing pressure in coastal zones are limited, hampering the assessment of the direct and collateral impacts (e.g., habitat degradation, bycatch) of fishing. We compiled a comprehensive database of fishing effort metrics and...

  18. Tradeoffs between fisheries harvest and the resilience of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Yves-Marie; O'Farrell, Shay; Bruggemann, J Henrich; Luckhurst, Brian E; Mumby, Peter J

    2016-04-19

    Many countries are legally obliged to embrace ecosystem-based approaches to fisheries management. Reductions in bycatch and physical habitat damage are now commonplace, but mitigating more sophisticated impacts associated with the ecological functions of target fisheries species are in their infancy. Here we model the impacts of a parrotfish fishery on the future state and resilience of Caribbean coral reefs, enabling us to view the tradeoff between harvest and ecosystem health. We find that the implementation of a simple and enforceable size restriction of >30 cm provides a win:win outcome in the short term, delivering both ecological and fisheries benefits and leading to increased yield and greater coral recovery rate for a given harvest rate. However, maintaining resilient coral reefs even until 2030 requires the addition of harvest limitations (fisheries.

  19. A new approach to study of seabird-fishery overlap: Connecting chick feeding with parental foraging and overlap with fishing vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Junichi Sugishita; Leigh G Torres; Philip J Seddon

    2015-01-01

    Incidental fisheries bycatch is recognised as a major threat to albatross populations worldwide. However, fishery discards and offal produced in large quantities might benefit some scavenging seabirds. Here, we demonstrate an integrated approach to better understand the ecological ramifications of fine-scale overlap between seabirds and fisheries. As a case study, we examined whether foraging in association with a fishing vessel is advantageous for chick provisioning in terms of quantity of f...

  20. 50 CFR 600.350 - National Standard 9-Bycatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provide to the Nation. First, bycatch can increase substantially the uncertainty concerning total fishing... cultural use, or that enter commerce through sale, barter, or trade. (ii) Fish released alive under a... of implemented measures should be evaluated routinely. Monitoring systems should be established prior...

  1. 50 CFR 679.21 - Prohibited species bycatch management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... apportionment of a bycatch allowance on the following types of information: (A) Seasonal distribution of prohibited species; (B) Seasonal distribution of target groundfish species relative to prohibited species... section. (3) Allocations of the BS Chinook salmon PSC limits—(i) Seasonal apportionment. NMFS...

  2. Shrimp by-catch reduction using a short funnel net, in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, South Pacific, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Sarmiento-Náfate

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of the by-catch in shrimp fishery is an important goal worldwide. In order to compare by-catch using the conventional trawling net and a newly designed short funnel net, nine cruises were carried out by the commercial fleet operating in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. A total of 480 trawls were done (mean duration: 85 min. The experimental trawls using the modified net produced a 21.13-28.86 % by-catch reduction (confidence interval 95 %, a 3 % increase of shrimp catch, and a significant reduction on net recovery time. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (3-4: 889-897. Epub 2007 December, 28.La reducción de la fauna de acompañamiento del camarón (FAC es uno de los temas de discusión más importantes en la pesca mundial. Con la finalidad de contribuir en este tópico, se diseñó y utilizó una red de arrastre variando la longitud del túnel, y se comparó su efecto con el de una red tradicional; durante 9 cruceros de la flota comercial en el Golfo de Tehuantepec, México. Se realizó un total de 480 lances con promedio de 85 min cada uno. Los arrastres de la red modificada mostraron mejores resultados, con variación entre 21.13 a 28.86 %, con un 95 % de confianza de reducción de FAC, un incremento de 3 % en la captura de camarón, y una disminución del tiempo de recuperación, lo que sugiere un incremento en la eficiencia gracias al nuevo diseño.

  3. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin M.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics.

  4. Management of fisheries in harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) marine protected areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt-Larsen, Lotte

    The harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is the focus of a range of conservation efforts and policies aiming at reducing bycatch of the species in gillnet fisheries. In European waters, the harbour porpoise is protected within the Habitats Directive (Annexes II and IV), implying that the population...... has to be maintained at a favourable conservation status and the deliberate actions of killing and disturbance and habitat deterioration shall be prohibited in accordance with the directive’s aims. A spatial network, Natura2000, will further protect all Annex II species. According to Natura2000......, the suitability of using high-resolution spatial and temporal data on porpoise density and fishing effort data from the Danish Skagerrak Sea as a method to predict harbour porpoise bycatches was examined. The results showed that a simple relation between the two could predict bycatch and that the final model can...

  5. Catch reconstructions reveal that global marine fisheries catches are higher than reported and declining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Daniel; Zeller, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries data assembled by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) suggest that global marine fisheries catches increased to 86 million tonnes in 1996, then slightly declined. Here, using a decade-long multinational 'catch reconstruction' project covering the Exclusive Economic Zones of the world's maritime countries and the High Seas from 1950 to 2010, and accounting for all fisheries, we identify catch trajectories differing considerably from the national data submitted to the FAO. We suggest that catch actually peaked at 130 million tonnes, and has been declining much more strongly since. This decline in reconstructed catches reflects declines in industrial catches and to a smaller extent declining discards, despite industrial fishing having expanded from industrialized countries to the waters of developing countries. The differing trajectories documented here suggest a need for improved monitoring of all fisheries, including often neglected small-scale fisheries, and illegal and other problematic fisheries, as well as discarded bycatch.

  6. Video Direct Count Data - Bycatch Reduction Engineering Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through key regional collaborations with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, and...

  7. Trends in Stranding and By-Catch Rates of Gray and Harbor Seals along the Northeastern Coast of the United States: Evidence of Divergence in the Abundance of Two Sympatric Phocid Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David W; Frungillo, Jaime; Smith, Ainsley; Moore, Katie; Sharp, Brian; Schuh, Janelle; Read, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seals and gray seals are sympatric phocid pinnipeds found in coastal waters of the temperate and sub-Arctic North Atlantic. In the Northwest Atlantic, both species were depleted through a combination of subsistence hunts and government supported bounties, and are now re-occupying substantial portions of their original ranges. While both species appear to have recovered during the past 2 decades, our understanding of their population dynamics in US waters is incomplete. Here we describe trends in stranding and bycatch rates of harbor and gray seals in the North East United States (NEUS) over the past 16 years through an exploratory curve-fitting exercise and structural break-point analysis. Variability in gray seal strandings in Southern New England and bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery were best described by fitting positive exponential and linear models, and exhibited rates of increase as high as 22%. In contrast, neither linear nor exponential models fit the oscillation of harbor seal strandings and bycatch over the study period. However, a breakpoint Chow test revealed that harbor seal strandings in the Cape Cod, Massachusetts region and harbor seal bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery increased in the 1990s and then started declining in the early to mid-2000s. Our analysis indicates that ongoing variation in natural and anthropogenic mortality rates of harbor and gray seals in the NEUS is not synchronous, and likely represents diverging trends in abundance of these species as they assume new roles in the marine ecosystems of the region.

  8. Trends in Stranding and By-Catch Rates of Gray and Harbor Seals along the Northeastern Coast of the United States: Evidence of Divergence in the Abundance of Two Sympatric Phocid Species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Johnston

    Full Text Available Harbor seals and gray seals are sympatric phocid pinnipeds found in coastal waters of the temperate and sub-Arctic North Atlantic. In the Northwest Atlantic, both species were depleted through a combination of subsistence hunts and government supported bounties, and are now re-occupying substantial portions of their original ranges. While both species appear to have recovered during the past 2 decades, our understanding of their population dynamics in US waters is incomplete. Here we describe trends in stranding and bycatch rates of harbor and gray seals in the North East United States (NEUS over the past 16 years through an exploratory curve-fitting exercise and structural break-point analysis. Variability in gray seal strandings in Southern New England and bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery were best described by fitting positive exponential and linear models, and exhibited rates of increase as high as 22%. In contrast, neither linear nor exponential models fit the oscillation of harbor seal strandings and bycatch over the study period. However, a breakpoint Chow test revealed that harbor seal strandings in the Cape Cod, Massachusetts region and harbor seal bycatch in the Northeast Sink Gillnet Fishery increased in the 1990s and then started declining in the early to mid-2000s. Our analysis indicates that ongoing variation in natural and anthropogenic mortality rates of harbor and gray seals in the NEUS is not synchronous, and likely represents diverging trends in abundance of these species as they assume new roles in the marine ecosystems of the region.

  9. The implications of ecosystem dynamics for fisheries management: a case study of selected fisheries in the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoray, Shanta; Teelucksingh, Sonja Sabita

    2007-10-01

    It is accepted that if fisheries resources are to remain renewable and able to sustain livelihoods, appropriate management practices must be implemented. Even while fisheries management grapples to resolve single-species issues, the biological and economic interactions among species mandate that to be effective, management techniques must be based on more interactive and aggregate-level analyses. In order to implement these techniques, the actual links, and the potential impact of these links, among the fisheries must be established. Vector autoregression (VAR) analysis has the potential to play an increasingly important role in ecosystem modelling for fisheries management. This study uses VAR analysis to demonstrate the quantitative impact of certain ecosystem changes on the productivity of the carite, honey shrimp and croaker fisheries of the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad, in the particular context of the ecosystem dynamics of trophic linkages, bycatch and multispecies fisheries. Four VAR models are constructed to investigate the extent to which these factors affect the production of the selected fisheries, and to evaluate the management implications of these linkages. The empirical analysis is further evidence that, if sustainable management of fishery resources is to be achieved, management practices based on more multi-species, ecosystem approaches must replace the traditional, single-species management techniques.

  10. Fisheries conservation on the high seas: linking conservation physiology and fisheries ecology for the management of large pelagic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodysky, Andrij Z; Cooke, Steven J; Graves, John E; Brill, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Populations of tunas, billfishes and pelagic sharks are fished at or over capacity in many regions of the world. They are captured by directed commercial and recreational fisheries (the latter of which often promote catch and release) or as incidental catch or bycatch in commercial fisheries. Population assessments of pelagic fishes typically incorporate catch-per-unit-effort time-series data from commercial and recreational fisheries; however, there have been notable changes in target species, areas fished and depth-specific gear deployments over the years that may have affected catchability. Some regional fisheries management organizations take into account the effects of time- and area-specific changes in the behaviours of fish and fishers, as well as fishing gear, to standardize catch-per-unit-effort indices and refine population estimates. However, estimates of changes in stock size over time may be very sensitive to underlying assumptions of the effects of oceanographic conditions and prey distribution on the horizontal and vertical movement patterns and distribution of pelagic fishes. Effective management and successful conservation of pelagic fishes requires a mechanistic understanding of their physiological and behavioural responses to environmental variability, potential for interaction with commercial and recreational fishing gear, and the capture process. The interdisciplinary field of conservation physiology can provide insights into pelagic fish demography and ecology (including environmental relationships and interspecific interactions) by uniting the complementary expertise and skills of fish physiologists and fisheries scientists. The iterative testing by one discipline of hypotheses generated by the other can span the fundamental-applied science continuum, leading to the development of robust insights supporting informed management. The resulting species-specific understanding of physiological abilities and tolerances can help to improve stock

  11. DISCARDS OF THE INDONESIAN TUNA LONGLINE FISHERY IN INDIAN OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Setyadji

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidental by-catch and associated discarding are difficult to estimate on the basis of logbook information because they are poorly reported by fishing masters and their importance varies with several interrelated factors. The purpose of this paper is to inform the commonly discarded fishes of the Indonesian tuna longline fishery in the Indian Ocean. The study was carried out during 2010 – 2011 following six commercial tuna longline vessels based in Port of Benoa. Discards composition was dominated by longnose lancetfish and pelagic stingrays which composed almost half of total discards. Almost half of total catch are discards and half of discards are disposed dead or dying.

  12. Exploring trade-offs between fisheries and conservation of the vaquita porpoise (Phocoena sinus using an Atlantis ecosystem model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Nalini Morzaria-Luna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minimizing fishery bycatch threats might involve trade-offs between maintaining viable populations and economic benefits. Understanding these trade-offs can help managers reconcile conflicting goals. An example is a set of bycatch reduction measures for the Critically Endangered vaquita porpoise (Phocoena sinus, in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico. The vaquita is an endemic species threatened with extinction by artisanal net bycatch within its limited range; in this area fisheries are the chief source of economic productivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyze trade-offs between conservation of the vaquita and fisheries, using an end-to-end Atlantis ecosystem model for the Northern Gulf of California. Atlantis is a spatially-explicit model intended as a strategic tool to test alternative management strategies. We simulated increasingly restrictive fisheries regulations contained in the vaquita conservation plan: implementing progressively larger spatial management areas that exclude gillnets, shrimp driftnets and introduce a fishing gear that has no vaquita bycatch. We found that only the most extensive spatial management scenarios recovered the vaquita population above the threshold necessary to downlist the species from Critically Endangered. The scenario that excludes existing net gear from the 2008 area of vaquita distribution led to moderate decrease in net present value (US$ 42 million relative to the best-performing scenario and a two-fold increase in the abundance of adult vaquita over the course of 30 years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Extended spatial management resulted in the highest recovery of the vaquita population. The economic cost of proposed management actions was unequally divided between fishing fleets; the loss of value from finfish gillnet fisheries was never recovered. Our analysis shows that managers will have to confront difficult trade-offs between management scenarios for vaquita conservation.

  13. Fisheries Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Fisheries districts data layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset...

  14. Improving understanding of the functional diversity of fisheries by exploring the influence of global catch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kirsty L; Watson, Reg A; Halpern, Benjamin S; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Blanchard, Julia L

    2017-09-06

    Functional diversity is thought to enhance ecosystem resilience, driving research focused on trends in the functional composition of fisheries, most recently with new reconstructions of global catch data. However, there is currently little understanding of how accounting for unreported catches (e.g. small-scale and illegal fisheries, bycatch and discards) influences functional diversity trends in global fisheries. We explored how diversity estimates varied among reported and unreported components of catch in 2010, and found these components had distinct functional fingerprints. Incorporating unreported catches had little impact on global-scale functional diversity patterns. However, at smaller, management-relevant scales, the effects of incorporating unreported catches were large (changes in functional diversity of up to 46%). Our results suggest there is greater uncertainty about the risks to ecosystem integrity and resilience from current fishing patterns than previously recognized. We provide recommendations and suggest a research agenda to improve future assessments of functional diversity of global fisheries.

  15. Darkedge midshipman Porichthys analis (Batrachoidiformes: Batrachoididae, a common shrimp-bycatch fish from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A. González-Ochoa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp fishery bycatch of the Gulf of California constitutes a wide variety of highly unknown fish, crustacean, and mollusk species with very low or null economic value, in contrast to those of commercial interest. However, there are no studies yet on the role of these low economic valued species have in the community structure and function, together with their possible effect on commercial populations. With the aim of contributing to the knowledge of Darkedge Midshipman fish Porichthys analis, the most common waste species in this fishery, we estimated some population characteristics. For this purpose, we obtained shrimp-bycatch fish during the 2004-2005 fishing season and performed some research surveys. A total of 1 725 Darkedge Midshipman were captured from 350 bycatch samples. Individual size ranged from 43-352mm SL. The weight to standard length relationship was determined as W=0.000092SL3.0509. Von Bertalanffy’s growth coefficient indicated a moderate growth rate (K=0.5 with an estimated asymptotic length ofL∞=352mm standard length, and a longevity of 6yr. Natural mortality was estimated as 0.97 and total mortality as 4.67. The recruitment pattern, as estimated by ELEFAN II, was extended over the year, peaking during spring and summer seasons. Sexual proportion of male:female was 1.65:1. Mature organisms appeared from August to March, and length at maturity was 157mm SL, which is larger than the mean size at capture 135mm SL. We concluded that the species is indirectly protected by its own bathymetric distribution and the off-shrimping season. This is the first study that considers population characteristics from this common but still unknown species.A diferencia de las especies de interés comercial, la historia de vida de los peces no comerciales es casi desconocida a pesar de su potencial importancia en la estructura y función de la comunidad. Para contribuir al conocimiento de estas especies se estimaron algunas caracter

  16. Post-breeding season distribution of black-footed and Laysan albatrosses satellite-tagged in Alaska: Inter-specific differences in spatial overlap with North Pacific fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, K.N.; Suryan, R.M.; Roby, D.D.; Balogh, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    We integrated satellite-tracking data from black-footed albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes; n = 7) and Laysan albatrosses captured in Alaska (Phoebastria immutabilis; n = 18) with data on fishing effort and distribution from commercial fisheries in the North Pacific in order to assess potential risk from bycatch. Albatrosses were satellite-tagged at-sea in the Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and tracked during the post-breeding season, July-October 2005 and 2006. In Alaskan waters, fishing effort occurred almost exclusively within continental shelf and slope waters. Potential fishery interaction for black-footed albatrosses, which most often frequented shelf-slope waters, was greatest with sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) longline and pot fisheries and with the Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepsis) longline fishery. In contrast, Laysan albatrosses spent as much time over oceanic waters beyond the continental shelf and slope, thereby overlapping less with fisheries in Alaska than black-footed albatrosses. Regionally, Laysan albatrosses had the greatest potential fishery interaction with the Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) trawl fishery in the Western Aleutian Islands and the sablefish pot fishery in the Central Aleutian Islands. Black-footed albatrosses ranged further beyond Alaskan waters than Laysan albatrosses, overlapping west coast Canada fisheries and pelagic longline fisheries in the subarctic transition domain; Laysan albatrosses remained north of these pelagic fisheries. Due to inter-specific differences in oceanic distribution and habitat use, the overlap of fisheries with the post-breeding distribution of black-footed albatrosses is greater than that for Laysan albatrosses, highlighting inter-specific differences in potential vulnerability to bycatch and risk of population-level impacts from fisheries. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Pheromone Lure and Trap Color Affects Bycatch in Agricultural Landscapes of Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Lori R; Looney, Chris; Ikerd, Harold; Koch, Jonathan B; Griswold, Terry; Strange, James P; Ramirez, Ricardo A

    2016-08-01

    Aerial traps, using combinations of color and attractive lures, are a critical tool for detecting and managing insect pest populations. Yet, despite improvements in trap efficacy, collection of nontarget species ("bycatch") plagues many insect pest surveys. Bycatch can influence survey effectiveness by reducing the available space for target species and increasing trap screening time, especially in areas where thousands of insects are captured as bycatch in a given season. Additionally, bycatch may negatively impact local nontarget insect populations, including beneficial predators and pollinators. Here, we tested the effect of pheromone lures on bycatch rates of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera), Apoidea (Hymenoptera), and nontarget Lepidoptera. Multicolored (primarily yellow and white) bucket traps containing a pheromone lure for capturing one of three survey target species, Spodoptera litura (F.), S. littoralis (Boisduval), or Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), were placed in alfalfa and corn fields, and compared to multicolored traps without a pheromone lure. All-green traps with and without H. armigera lures were employed in a parallel study investigating the effect of lure and trap color on bycatch. Over 2,600 Coccinellidae representing seven species, nearly 6,400 bees in 57 species, and >9,000 nontarget moths in 17 genera were captured across 180 traps and seven temporal sampling events. Significant effects of lure and color were observed for multiple taxa. In general, nontarget insects were attracted to the H. armigera lure and multicolored trap, but further studies of trap color and pheromone lure specificity are needed to better understand these interactions and to minimize nontarget captures.

  18. Mobility promotes and jeopardizes biodiversity in rock-paper-scissors games

    CERN Document Server

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Frey, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    Biodiversity is essential to the viability of ecological systems. Species diversity in ecosystems is promoted by cyclic, non-hierarchical interactions among competing populations. Such non-transitive relations lead to an evolution with central features represented by the `rock-paper-scissors' game, where rock crushes scissors, scissors cut paper, and paper wraps rock. In combination with spatial dispersal of static populations, this type of competition results in the stable coexistence of all species and the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. However, population mobility is a central feature of real ecosystems: animals migrate, bacteria run and tumble. Here, we observe a critical influence of mobility on species diversity. When mobility exceeds a certain value, biodiversity is jeopardized and lost. In contrast, below this critical threshold all subpopulations coexist and an entanglement of travelling spiral waves forms in the course of temporal evolution. We establish that this phenomenon is robust, it do...

  19. Effects of noise and by-catch on a Danish harbour porpoise population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Sibly, Richard M.; Tougaard, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Ships and wind turbines generate noise, which can have a negative impact on marine mammal popu- lations by scaring animals away. Effective modelling of how this affects the populations has to take account of the location and timing of disturbances. Here we construct an individual-based model of har...... on the population. Annual by-catch rates ≥10% lead to monotonously decreasing populations and to extinction, and even the esti- mated by-catch rate from the adjacent area (approximately 4.1%) has a strong impact on the population. This suggests that conservation efforts should be more focused on reducing by...

  20. Effects of noise and by-catch on a Danish harbour porpoise population - computer code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    PorpoiseModel v.1.0: an individual-based model used for evaluating cumulative effects of by-catch and noise on the harbour porpoise population in the inner Danish waters. This was the model used to generage the results presented in the scientific publication: Nabe-Nielsen, J., Sibly, R.M., Tougaard......, J., Teilmann, J. & Sveegaard, S. (2014) "Effects of noise and by-catch on a Danish harbour porpoise population". Ecological Modelling, 272, 242–251. Please refer to this publication for the full documentation....

  1. Native American fishery issues: Hanford involvement in evaluation of the Zone 6 fishery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C.S.; Neitzel, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Strom, G. (Yakima Indian Nation, Toppenish, WA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Native American fishers are concerned about the deteriorating quality of salmon and other fish caught from the Columbia River. They fear salmon are not healthy and that eating the fish could Jeopardize the health of Native Americans. In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). with the assistance of the Yakima Indian Nation (YIN). monitored the salmon and steelhead fishery in the lower Columbia River (Zone 6 fishery). PNL biologists set up a hot-line'' for Native American fishers to call if they caught fish they suspected were diseased or contaminated. Fish reported to the hot-line were examined by a fish disease pathologist. Additionally. PNL and YIN staff reviewed water-quality data of the lower Columbia River. Water-quality data collected from 1949 through 1990. Results are described.

  2. Introduction to fisheries oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    Fisheries oceanography can be applied to fisheries ecology, fisheries management and practical fishing. Physico-chemical parameters of the environment (temperature, currents, waves, light, oxygen and salinity) have profound effect on fish...

  3. Impact of deep-sea fishery for Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) on non-commercial fish species off West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole A; Bastardie, Francois; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau

    2014-01-01

    . During the period 1988–2011, population abundance and size composition changed as catch and effort in the Greenland halibut fishery increased. Two species showed a significant decrease in abundance, and four populations showed a significant reduction in mean weight of individuals (p , 0.05). Correlation......Since the late 1980s, a deep-sea fishery for Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) has been developing gradually in West Greenland. Deep-sea fish species are generally long-lived and characterized by late age of maturity, low fecundity, and slow growth, features that probably cause low...... resilience following overexploitation. In order to evaluate whether populations of nine potential bycatch species are negatively affected by the commercial fishery for Greenland halibut, scientific data from bottom-trawl surveys conducted in the same area and period as the commercial fishery were analysed...

  4. Quota implementation of the maximum sustainable yield for age-structured fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Zafer; Kucuksenel, Serkan

    2016-06-01

    One of the main goals stated in the proposals for the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) reform was achieving maximum sustainable yield (MSY) for all European fisheries. In this paper, we propose a fishing rights allocation mechanism or management system, which specifies catch limits for individual fishing fleets to implement MSY harvesting conditions in an age-structured bioeconomic model. An age-structured model in a single species fishery with two fleets having perfect or imperfect fishing selectivity is studied. If fishing technology or gear selectivity depends on the relative age composition of the mature fish stock, fixed harvest proportions, derived from catchability and bycatch coefficients, is not valid anymore. As a result, not only the age-structure and fishing technology but also the estimated level of MSY is steering the allocation of quota shares. The results also show that allocation of quota shares based on historical catches or auctioning may not provide viable solutions to achieve MSY.

  5. Danish experiments with a grid system tested in the North Sea shrimp fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Niels; Hansen, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Grids have been proven successful worldwide as bycatch reducers in shrimp fisheries but have never been tested in the North Sea shrimp fishery. The objectives of this experiment were to develop and test a flexible grid system for the Danish Fladen Ground shrimp (Pandalus borealis) fishery, which...... and during sea trials. Two experiments were conducted with a commercial trawler at the Fladen Ground. A standard shrimp codend was compared to a codend with the grid system simultaneously in a twin trawl rig. There was a relatively large and significant reduction in the grid codend of cod (Gadus morhua......), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). whiting (Merlangius merlangus), saithe (Pollachius virens), Norway pout (Trisopterus esmarki). Norway lobster, herring (Clupea harengus) and witch (Glyptocephalus cynoglossus) but no significant difference in weight of shrimp and monkfish (Lophius piscatorius...

  6. Arctic marine fishes and their fisheries in light of global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Jørgen S; Mecklenburg, Catherine W; Karamushko, Oleg V

    2014-02-01

    In light of ocean warming and loss of Arctic sea ice, harvested marine fishes of boreal origin (and their fisheries) move poleward into yet unexploited parts of the Arctic seas. Industrial fisheries, already in place on many Arctic shelves, will radically affect the local fish species as they turn up as unprecedented bycatch. Arctic marine fishes are indispensable to ecosystem structuring and functioning, but they are still beyond credible assessment due to lack of basic biological data. The time for conservation actions is now, and precautionary management practices by the Arctic coastal states are needed to mitigate the impact of industrial fisheries in Arctic waters. We outline four possible conservation actions: scientific credibility, 'green technology', legitimate management and overarching coordination.

  7. Vulnerability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark to Pelagic Longline Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolotti, Mariana Travassos; Bach, Pascal; Hazin, Fábio; Travassos, Paulo; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A combination of fisheries dependent and independent data was used to assess the vulnerability of the oceanic whitetip shark to pelagic longline fisheries. The Brazilian tuna longline fleet, operating in the equatorial and southwestern Atlantic, is used as a case study. Fisheries dependent data include information from logbooks (from 1999 to 2011) and on-board observers (2004 to 2010), totaling 65,277 pelagic longline sets. Fisheries independent data were obtained from 8 oceanic whitetip sharks tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags in the area where longline fleet operated. Deployment periods varied from 60 to 178 days between 2010 and 2012. Tagging and pop-up sites were relatively close to each other, although individuals tended to travel long distances before returning to the tagging area. Some degree of site fidelity was observed. High utilization hotspots of tagged sharks fell inside the area under strongest fishing pressure. Despite the small sample size, a positive correlation between tag recorded information and catch data was detected. All sharks exhibited a strong preference for the warm and shallow waters of the mixed layer, spending on average more than 70% of the time above the thermocline and 95% above 120 m. Results indicate that the removal of shallow hooks on longline gear might be an efficient mitigation measure to reduce the bycatch of this pelagic shark species. The work also highlights the potential of tagging experiments to provide essential information for the development of spatio-temporal management measures.

  8. Vulnerability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark to Pelagic Longline Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolotti, Mariana Travassos; Bach, Pascal; Hazin, Fábio; Travassos, Paulo; Dagorn, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A combination of fisheries dependent and independent data was used to assess the vulnerability of the oceanic whitetip shark to pelagic longline fisheries. The Brazilian tuna longline fleet, operating in the equatorial and southwestern Atlantic, is used as a case study. Fisheries dependent data include information from logbooks (from 1999 to 2011) and on-board observers (2004 to 2010), totaling 65,277 pelagic longline sets. Fisheries independent data were obtained from 8 oceanic whitetip sharks tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags in the area where longline fleet operated. Deployment periods varied from 60 to 178 days between 2010 and 2012. Tagging and pop-up sites were relatively close to each other, although individuals tended to travel long distances before returning to the tagging area. Some degree of site fidelity was observed. High utilization hotspots of tagged sharks fell inside the area under strongest fishing pressure. Despite the small sample size, a positive correlation between tag recorded information and catch data was detected. All sharks exhibited a strong preference for the warm and shallow waters of the mixed layer, spending on average more than 70% of the time above the thermocline and 95% above 120 m. Results indicate that the removal of shallow hooks on longline gear might be an efficient mitigation measure to reduce the bycatch of this pelagic shark species. The work also highlights the potential of tagging experiments to provide essential information for the development of spatio-temporal management measures. PMID:26492091

  9. Vulnerability of the Oceanic Whitetip Shark to Pelagic Longline Fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Travassos Tolotti

    Full Text Available A combination of fisheries dependent and independent data was used to assess the vulnerability of the oceanic whitetip shark to pelagic longline fisheries. The Brazilian tuna longline fleet, operating in the equatorial and southwestern Atlantic, is used as a case study. Fisheries dependent data include information from logbooks (from 1999 to 2011 and on-board observers (2004 to 2010, totaling 65,277 pelagic longline sets. Fisheries independent data were obtained from 8 oceanic whitetip sharks tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags in the area where longline fleet operated. Deployment periods varied from 60 to 178 days between 2010 and 2012. Tagging and pop-up sites were relatively close to each other, although individuals tended to travel long distances before returning to the tagging area. Some degree of site fidelity was observed. High utilization hotspots of tagged sharks fell inside the area under strongest fishing pressure. Despite the small sample size, a positive correlation between tag recorded information and catch data was detected. All sharks exhibited a strong preference for the warm and shallow waters of the mixed layer, spending on average more than 70% of the time above the thermocline and 95% above 120 m. Results indicate that the removal of shallow hooks on longline gear might be an efficient mitigation measure to reduce the bycatch of this pelagic shark species. The work also highlights the potential of tagging experiments to provide essential information for the development of spatio-temporal management measures.

  10. FISHERIES POLICY OF ICELAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Treer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries has recently been very exploited area in the Croatian media, either regarding the EU accession negotiations or regarding the interrelationships of the involved parties within Croatia. Iceland is one of the strongest fishery nations in the world that passed through some heavy struggles to protect its fishery grounds (so called “fishery or cod wars”. Therefore its experience in fisheries can be useful when creating Croatian fishery policy. So, the aim of this article is to present the Statement on Responsible Fisheries in Iceland signed by all the parties involved in the Icelandic fishery industry.

  11. Foraging Strategies of Laysan Albatross Inferred from Stable Isotopes: Implications for Association with Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ann E; Fitzgerald, Shannon M; Parrish, Julia K; Klavitter, John L; Romano, Marc D

    2015-01-01

    Fatal entanglement in fishing gear is the leading cause of population decline for albatross globally, a consequence of attraction to bait and fishery discards of commercial fishing operations. We investigated foraging strategies of Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis), as inferred from nitrogen and carbon isotope values of primary feathers, to determine breeding-related, seasonal, and historic factors that may affect the likelihood of association with Alaskan or Hawaiian longline fisheries. Feather samples were collected from live birds monitored for breeding status and breeding success on Midway Atoll in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, birds salvaged as fisheries-bycatch, and birds added to museum collections before 1924. During the chick-rearing season (sampled April-May), means and variances of stable isotope values of birds with the highest, most consistent reproductive success were distinct from less productive conspecifics and completely different from birds caught in Hawaiian or Alaskan longline fisheries, suggesting birds with higher multi-annual reproductive success were less likely to associate with these fisheries. Contemporary birds with the highest reproductive success had mean values most similar to historic birds. Values of colony-bound, courting prebreeders were similar to active breeders but distinct from prebreeders caught in Alaskan longline fisheries. During the breeding season, δ15N values were highly variable for both contemporary and historic birds. Although some historic birds exhibited extremely low δ15N values unmatched by contemporary birds (fisheries.

  12. A LATITUDINAL GRADIENT OF BETA DIVERSITY IN BY CATCH OF MARINE SHRIMPS FISHERIES IN BRAZILIAN NORTH COAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Portilho Maia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial shrimp fisheries in northern Brazil use vessels equipped with trawls of low selectivity that capture considerable amounts of non-target bycatch species, and consequently, generate fauna biomass. In this study, we aimed to examine the composition and distribution of ichthyofaunal bycatches associated with pink shrimp industrial fishery between May 2010 and June 2011. Seven vessels were monitored for a period of151 travel days, during which trawls were towed 461 times. The northern coast was subdivided into the Pará Continental Platform, Amazonas River Estuary (ARE, and Amapá Continental Platform (ACP. Perciformes was the most abundant order (68.91%; Sciaenidae, the most abundant family (55.89%; and Macrodon ancylodon, the most abundant species (23,48%. ARE and ACP are regions with high biological diversity and density of species and similar ichthyofauna. The similarities between ARE and ACP regions can be attributed to the Guiana Current, which carries most of the water drained from the rivers of the Amazon Basin along the coast of Amapá; it promotes the high productivity of these regions. Monitoring of shrimp trawl fishing in the northern coast of Brazil can contribute to the preservation of populations of endemic animal species such as Macrodon ancylodon and Stellifer rastrifer, which are frequently associated with shrimp bycatch and therefore, particularly affected by this type of fishing. Keywords: Farfantepenaeus subtilis; fish; Sciaenidae; industrial fishing.

  13. Caught in the Same Net? Small-Scale Fishermen's Perceptions of Fisheries Interactions with Sea Turtles and Other Protected Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliki Panagopoulou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale fisheries are responsible for high numbers of animals caught as bycatch, such as turtles, cetaceans, and seals. Bycatch and its associated mortality is a major conservation challenge for these species and is considered undesirable by fishermen. To gain insights on the impact of bycatch on small-scale fishermen and put it in context with other financial and environmental challenges they face, we conducted questionnaire-based interviews on fishermen working on Crete, Greece. We investigated fishermen's perceptions of sea turtle and other protected species interactions, and the impacts of such interactions on their profession and livelihoods. Our results indicate a connection between declining fish stocks, related increased fishing effort, and reported increased frequency of interactions between fishermen and sea turtles. Respondents believed that their livelihoods were endangered by industrial fishing and environmental problems, but thought that combined interactions with turtles and other marine megafauna species were a larger problem. Responses suggested that extending compensation to fishermen may be a good conservation intervention. Small-scale fishermen hold a wealth of knowledge about the marine environment and its resources. This may be of help to researchers and policy makers as it could be used to achieve a better managed, sustainable fishery. Including small-scale fishermen in the process of developing regulations will both enhance those regulations and increase compliance with them.

  14. Pheromone lure and trap color affects bycatch in agricultural landscapes of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerial traps, using combinations of color and attractive lures, are a critical tool for detecting and managing insect pest populations. Yet, despite improvements in trap efficacy, collection of non-target species (“bycatch”) plagues many insect pest surveys. Bycatch can influence survey effectivenes...

  15. Bait type influences on catch and bycatch in tandem hoop nets set in reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Stewart, David R.; Shiflet, Jeremy; Balsman, Dane; Shoup, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Tandem hoop nets have become the primary gear for sampling channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, but suffer from high incidences of bycatch, particularly aquatic turtles that usually drown as a result. We sought to determine if bait type, ZOTE© soap and ground cheese logs, would influence catch of channel catfish (CPUE and mean TL) and bycatch of fishes and aquatic turtles. We sampled with tandem hoop nets in 13 Kentucky reservoirs (5–73 ha) using a crossover design and two sampling events. We found no difference in channel catfish catch rates between bait types, but mean sizes of fish caught using ZOTE© soap were approximately 24 mm longer compared to cheese. Fish bycatch was similar between bait types, but tandem hoop nets baited with ZOTE© soap caught up to 61% fewer turtles and mortality of turtles that were captured was up to 12% lower than those baited with cheese. Depth of net set, water temperature, and Secchi depth were environmental factors measured that affected catch and bycatch, but varied among species. Using ZOTE© soap as bait in tandem hoop nets appears to be a fairly simple and straightforward method for maintaining high catch rates of channel catfish while minimizing turtle mortality.

  16. Observing incidental harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena bycatch by remote electronic monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt-Larsen, Lotte; Dalskov, Jørgen; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of marine mammal bycatch is important in relation to conservation and management of protected species. Hitherto, using onboard observers has been the most reliable and accurate method but observer programs can be prohibitively expensive. To investigate the potential of CCTV cameras...

  17. Dynamic ocean management increases the efficiency and efficacy of fisheries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Daniel C; Maxwell, Sara M; Boustany, Andre M; Halpin, Patrick N

    2016-01-19

    In response to the inherent dynamic nature of the oceans and continuing difficulty in managing ecosystem impacts of fisheries, interest in the concept of dynamic ocean management, or real-time management of ocean resources, has accelerated in the last several years. However, scientists have yet to quantitatively assess the efficiency of dynamic management over static management. Of particular interest is how scale influences effectiveness, both in terms of how it reflects underlying ecological processes and how this relates to potential efficiency gains. Here, we address the empirical evidence gap and further the ecological theory underpinning dynamic management. We illustrate, through the simulation of closures across a range of spatiotemporal scales, that dynamic ocean management can address previously intractable problems at scales associated with coactive and social patterns (e.g., competition, predation, niche partitioning, parasitism, and social aggregations). Furthermore, it can significantly improve the efficiency of management: as the resolution of the closures used increases (i.e., as the closures become more targeted), the percentage of target catch forgone or displaced decreases, the reduction ratio (bycatch/catch) increases, and the total time-area required to achieve the desired bycatch reduction decreases. In the scenario examined, coarser scale management measures (annual time-area closures and monthly full-fishery closures) would displace up to four to five times the target catch and require 100-200 times more square kilometer-days of closure than dynamic measures (grid-based closures and move-on rules). To achieve similar reductions in juvenile bycatch, the fishery would forgo or displace between USD 15-52 million in landings using a static approach over a dynamic management approach.

  18. Dynamic Ocean Management Increases the Efficiency and Efficacy of Fisheries Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, D. C.; Maxwell, S.; Boustany, A. M.; Halpin, P. N.

    2016-12-01

    In response to the inherent dynamic nature of the oceans and continuing difficulty in managing ecosystem impacts of fisheries, interest in the concept of dynamic ocean management, or real-time management of ocean resources, has accelerated in the last several years. However, scientists have yet to quantitatively assess the efficiency of dynamic management over static management. Of particular interest is how scale influences effectiveness, both in terms of how it reflects underlying ecological processes and how this relates to potential efficiency gains. In this presentation, we attempt to address both the empirical evidence gap and further the ecological theory underpinning dynamic management. We illustrate, through the simulation of closures across a range of spatiotemporal scales, that dynamic ocean management can address previously intractable problems at scales associated with coactive and social patterns (e.g., competition, predation, niche partitioning, parasitism and social aggregations). Further, it can significantly improve the efficiency of management: as the resolution of the individual closures used increases (i.e., as the closures become more targeted) the percent of target catch forgone or displaced decreases, the reduction ratio (bycatch/catch) increases, and the total time-area required to achieve the desired bycatch reduction decreases. The coarser management measures (annual time-area closures and monthly full fishery closures) affected up to 4-5x the target catch and required 100-200x the time-area of the dynamic measures (grid-based closures and move-on rules). To achieve similar reductions in juvenile bycatch, the fishery would forgo or displace between USD 15-52 million in landings using a static approach over a dynamic management approach.

  19. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  20. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  1. Mutualism exploitation: predatory drosophilid larvae sugar-trap ants and jeopardize facultative ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Mayra C; Sendoya, Sebastian F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2016-07-01

    An open question in the evolutionary ecology of ant-plant facultative mutualism is how other members of the associated community can affect the interaction to a point where reciprocal benefits are disrupted. While visiting Qualea grandiflora shrubs to collect sugary rewards at extrafloral nectaries, tropical savanna ants deter herbivores and reduce leaf damage. Here we show that larvae of the fly Rhinoleucophenga myrmecophaga, which develop on extrafloral nectaries, lure potentially mutualistic, nectar-feeding ants and prey on them. Foraging ants spend less time on fly-infested foliage. Field experiments showed that predation (or the threat of predation) on ants by fly larvae produces cascading effects through three trophic levels, resulting in fewer protective ants on leaves, increased numbers of chewing herbivores, and greater leaf damage. These results reveal an undocumented mode of mutualism exploitation by an opportunistic predator at a plant-provided food source, jeopardizing ant-derived protection services to the plant. Our study documents a rather unusual case of predation of adult ants by a dipteran species and demonstrates a top-down trophic cascade within a generalized ant-plant mutualism. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Catch composition and management of daytime purse seine fishery on the Southern Mediterranean Sea Coast, Abu Qir Bay, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. EL-HAWEET

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to obtain precise data on the catch of the purse seine net operating at daytime from sunrise till noon in Abu Qir Bay during 1997 and 1998. Sardine, anchovy, mullet and rabbitfish were recorded as the main target fish groups. Twenty-seven species were recorded as by-catch species. Catch per unit effort was estimated to be 93 kg/day/boat. The percentage of each target species in the catch and its length frequency distribution were presented. The length range of by-catch species and the season of catch were recorded. Daytime purse seine in Abu Qir Bay is an effective method but should regulated by directing the fishing to deeper waters outside the bay rather than the inshore coastal area to conserve many economic species of this important fishery.

  3. THE JEOPARDIZED SITUATION OF ELECTRONIC WASTE IN BANGLADESH: CAN CUSTOMIZED POLICY APPROACH SOLVE THE CHALLENGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Md. Bahauddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic waste (e-waste is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. In Bangladesh almost 2.7 million metric tons of e-waste generated per year. Of this amountonly 20 to 30 percent is recycled and the rest of the waste is released in to landfills,  rivers, drains lakes, canals, open spaces which are very hazardous for the health and environment. Since Bangladesh is in the stream of rapid technological advancement, it is seldom to take necessary steps to avoid the future jeopardized situation because of e-waste. The current practices of e-waste management in Bangladesh suffer from a number of drawbacks like the difficulty in inventorisation, unhealthy conditions of informal recycling, inadequate legislation and policy, poor awareness and reluctance on part of the corporate to address the critical issues. The paper highlights the associated issues and strategies to address this emerging problem, analyses the policy and its gaps. Therefore, this paper also suggest that e-waste policy development may require a more customized approach where, instead of addressing e-waste in isolation, it should be addressed as part of the national development agenda that integrates green economy assessment and strategic environmental assessment as part of national policy planning. Finally this work also suggests some alternative strategies and approaches to overcome the challenges of e-waste.

  4. Interactions between harbour seals (Phoca vitulina and coastal fisheries along the Swedish west coast: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Lundström

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The conflicts between seals and fisheries along the Swedish west coast have intensified during the last decades, concurrently with the increase in the harbour seal population size. This study presents published information about interactions between harbour seals and fisheries in the Kattegat-Skagerrak, in addition to new information on the seal by-catch rate and an overview of fisheries suffering from seal damage. Several fisheries have reported interactions with seals, principally fisheries with fyke nets, gill nets and static gear. Development of mitigation measures has been focused on the eel fishery with fyke nets, in which the use of stronger net material has significantly decreased the damage frequency from seals and has yet maintained the catches at satisfactory levels. Under-water filming at fyke nets together with studies of the prey preferences of seals has shown individual specializations in certain foraging techniques. For example, eel may not be a common prey for harbour seals in general, but, it was chosen in preference to other species by seals attacking fyke nets. There is a lack of current data concerning the diet of harbour seals. Previous studies, based on material from the 1970s and 1980s, have shown that locally and seasonally abundant prey is preferred. Due to the non-existent information about the foodchoice, current assessments of the ecological role of harbour seals in Sweden cannot be evaluated.

  5. Characterizing fishing effort and spatial extent of coastal fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Stewart

    Full Text Available Biodiverse coastal zones are often areas of intense fishing pressure due to the high relative density of fishing capacity in these nearshore regions. Although overcapacity is one of the central challenges to fisheries sustainability in coastal zones, accurate estimates of fishing pressure in coastal zones are limited, hampering the assessment of the direct and collateral impacts (e.g., habitat degradation, bycatch of fishing. We compiled a comprehensive database of fishing effort metrics and the corresponding spatial limits of fisheries and used a spatial analysis program (FEET to map fishing effort density (measured as boat-meters per km² in the coastal zones of six ocean regions. We also considered the utility of a number of socioeconomic variables as indicators of fishing pressure at the national level; fishing density increased as a function of population size and decreased as a function of coastline length. Our mapping exercise points to intra and interregional 'hotspots' of coastal fishing pressure. The significant and intuitive relationships we found between fishing density and population size and coastline length may help with coarse regional characterizations of fishing pressure. However, spatially-delimited fishing effort data are needed to accurately map fishing hotspots, i.e., areas of intense fishing activity. We suggest that estimates of fishing effort, not just target catch or yield, serve as a necessary measure of fishing activity, which is a key link to evaluating sustainability and environmental impacts of coastal fisheries.

  6. Characterizing fishing effort and spatial extent of coastal fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelly R; Lewison, Rebecca L; Dunn, Daniel C; Bjorkland, Rhema H; Kelez, Shaleyla; Halpin, Patrick N; Crowder, Larry B

    2010-12-29

    Biodiverse coastal zones are often areas of intense fishing pressure due to the high relative density of fishing capacity in these nearshore regions. Although overcapacity is one of the central challenges to fisheries sustainability in coastal zones, accurate estimates of fishing pressure in coastal zones are limited, hampering the assessment of the direct and collateral impacts (e.g., habitat degradation, bycatch) of fishing. We compiled a comprehensive database of fishing effort metrics and the corresponding spatial limits of fisheries and used a spatial analysis program (FEET) to map fishing effort density (measured as boat-meters per km²) in the coastal zones of six ocean regions. We also considered the utility of a number of socioeconomic variables as indicators of fishing pressure at the national level; fishing density increased as a function of population size and decreased as a function of coastline length. Our mapping exercise points to intra and interregional 'hotspots' of coastal fishing pressure. The significant and intuitive relationships we found between fishing density and population size and coastline length may help with coarse regional characterizations of fishing pressure. However, spatially-delimited fishing effort data are needed to accurately map fishing hotspots, i.e., areas of intense fishing activity. We suggest that estimates of fishing effort, not just target catch or yield, serve as a necessary measure of fishing activity, which is a key link to evaluating sustainability and environmental impacts of coastal fisheries.

  7. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braga, Heitor de Oliveira; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    ... the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen's ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch...

  8. Environmental effects on cephalopod population dynamics: implications for management of fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhouse, Paul G K; Pierce, Graham J; Nichols, Owen C; Sauer, Warwick H H; Arkhipkin, Alexander I; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir V; Lipiński, Marek R; Ramos, Jorge E; Gras, Michaël; Kidokoro, Hideaki; Sadayasu, Kazuhiro; Pereira, João; Lefkaditou, Evgenia; Pita, Cristina; Gasalla, Maria; Haimovici, Manuel; Sakai, Mitsuo; Downey, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Cephalopods are a relatively small class of molluscs (~800 species), but they support some large industrial scale fisheries and numerous small-scale, local, artisanal fisheries. For several decades, landings of cephalopods globally have grown against a background of total finfish landings levelling off and then declining. There is now evidence that in recent years, growth in cephalopod landings has declined. The commercially exploited cephalopod species are fast-growing, short-lived ecological opportunists. Annual variability in abundance is strongly influenced by environmental variability, but the underlying causes of the links between environment and population dynamics are poorly understood. Stock assessment models have recently been developed that incorporate environmental processes that drive variability in recruitment, distribution and migration patterns. These models can be expected to improve as more, and better, data are obtained on environmental effects and as techniques for stock identification improve. A key element of future progress will be improved understanding of trophic dynamics at all phases in the cephalopod life cycle. In the meantime, there is no routine stock assessment in many targeted fisheries or in the numerous by-catch fisheries for cephalopods. There is a particular need for a precautionary approach in these cases. Assessment in many fisheries is complicated because cephalopods are ecological opportunists and stocks appear to have benefited from the reduction of key predator by overexploitation. Because of the complexities involved, ecosystem-based fisheries management integrating social, economic and ecological considerations is desirable for cephalopod fisheries. An ecological approach to management is routine in many fisheries, but to be effective, good scientific understanding of the relationships between the environment, trophic dynamics and population dynamics is essential. Fisheries and the ecosystems they depend on can only be

  9. Effect of bait and gear type on channel catfish catch and turtle bycatch in a reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartabiano, Evan C.; Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Hoop nets have become the preferred gear choice to sample channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus but the degree of bycatch can be high, especially due to the incidental capture of aquatic turtles. While exclusion and escapement devices have been developed and evaluated, few have examined bait choice as a method to reduce turtle bycatch. The use of Zote™ soap has shown considerable promise to reduce bycatch of aquatic turtles when used with trotlines but its effectiveness in hoop nets has not been evaluated. We sought to determine the effectiveness of hoop nets baited with cheese bait or Zote™ soap and trotlines baited with shad or Zote™ soap as a way to sample channel catfish and prevent capture of aquatic turtles. We used a repeated-measures experimental design and treatment combinations were randomly assigned using a Latin-square arrangement. Eight sampling locations were systematically selected and then sampled with either hoop nets or trotlines using Zote™ soap (both gears), waste cheese (hoop nets), or cut shad (trotlines). Catch rates did not statistically differ among the gear–bait-type combinations. Size bias was evident with trotlines consistently capturing larger sized channel catfish compared to hoop nets. Results from a Monte Carlo bootstrapping procedure estimated the number of samples needed to reach predetermined levels of sampling precision to be lowest for trotlines baited with soap. Moreover, trotlines baited with soap caught no aquatic turtles, while hoop nets captured many turtles and had high mortality rates. We suggest that Zote™ soap used in combination with multiple hook sizes on trotlines may be a viable alternative to sample channel catfish and reduce bycatch of aquatic turtles.

  10. Bycatch as a potential threat to harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena in Polish Baltic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof E Skóra

    2003-07-01

    rates of bycatch were reported from bottom set nets, which had a density over 20 times less than that of surface salmon nets in the area in the autumn months. The density and distribution of both types of nets in the surveyed area was comparable during autumn and winter, when the majority of bycaught animals in bottom set nets were reported.

  11. Determinación de los factores que inciden en la captura incidental de aves marinas en la flota palangrera pelágica chilena Determination of factors affecting the bycatch of seabirds in Chilean pelagic longline fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés González

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó la relación entre la variabilidad de la tasa de captura incidental de aves marinas en la pesquería palangrera pelágica de pez espada (Xiphias gladius y diversos factores temporales, ambientales, espaciales y pesqueros, entre 2007 y 2009. Los resultados muestran que las operaciones de pesca de esta flota afectan principalmente a los albatros, grupo que concentra el 83,7% de la captura incidental de aves marinas registrada en el período. Esta captura incidental se debe en primera instancia a la presencia del Frente Subtropical del Pacífico Sur, sistema que provoca la sobreposición entre la actividad de esta flota con la distribución espacial de aves marinas durante la fase residente del período no reproductivo. La variabilidad en esta captura incidental estaría fuertemente relacionada a los estímulos visuales (medido mediante el porcentaje de luces químicas y porcentaje de calamar y las condiciones de luminosidad ambiental existentes en los períodos de forrajeo diurno y nocturno de estas aves marinas durante el calado (medido a través del desfase de la hora del ocaso con respecto a la hora de inicio del calado y fase lunar.We analized the relationship between the variability in the rate of seabird bycatch in pelagic longline fishery for swordfish (Xiphias gladius, and several temporary, environmental, spatial and fisheries factors for the fishing period from 2007 to 2009. The results show that the fishing operations of this fleet mainly affect the albatross, group that accounts for 83.7% of the incidental catch of seabirds recorded in the period. This bycatch is due primarily to the presence of the South Pacific Subtropical Front, a system that causes the overlap between the activities of this fleet with the spatial distribution of these seabird species during the resident phase of the nonbreeding period. By the other hand, the variability in bycatch would be strongly linked to visual stimuli (measured by the percentage of

  12. Genetic Evidence Highlights Potential Impacts of By-Catch to Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Martin; Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Wells, Randall S.; Stamper, Andrew; Bordino, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Incidental entanglement in fishing gear is arguably the most serious threat to many populations of small cetaceans, judging by the alarming number of captured animals. However, other aspects of this threat, such as the potential capture of mother-offspring pairs or reproductive pairs, could be equally or even more significant but have rarely been evaluated. Using a combination of demographic and genetic data we provide evidence that i) Franciscana dolphin pairs that are potentially reproductive and mother-offspring pairs form temporal bonds, and ii) are entangled simultaneously. Our results highlight potential demographic and genetic impacts of by-catch to cetacean populations: the joint entanglement of mother-offspring or reproductive pairs, compared to random individuals, might exacerbate the demographic consequences of by-catch, and the loss of groups of relatives means that significant components of genetic diversity could be lost together. Given the social nature of many odontocetes (toothed cetaceans), we suggest that these potential impacts could be rather general to the group and therefore by-catch could be more detrimental than previously considered. PMID:21179542

  13. A 'simple anterior fish excluder' (SAFE for mitigating penaeid-trawl bycatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J McHugh

    Full Text Available Various plastic strips and sheets (termed 'simple anterior fish excluders'-SAFEs were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels were compared against a control (no SAFE on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE ('continuous plastic' was subsequently tested (against a control on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity.

  14. 75 FR 17070 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-XU60 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ]...

  15. Mortality of Migratory Birds from Marine Commercial Fisheries and Offshore Oil and Gas Production in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne I. Ellis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an imminent need for conservation and best-practice management efforts in marine ecosystems where global-scale declines in the biodiversity and biomass of large vertebrate predators are increasing and marine communities are being altered. We examine two marine-based industries that incidentally take migratory birds in Canada: (1 commercial fisheries, through bycatch, and (2 offshore oil and gas exploration, development, and production. We summarize information from the scientific literature and technical reports and also present new information from recently analyzed data to assess the magnitude and scope of mortality. Fisheries bycatch was responsible for the highest levels of incidental take of migratory bird species; estimated combined take in the longline, gillnet, and bottom otter trawl fisheries within the Atlantic, including the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and Pacific regions was 2679 to 45,586 birds per year. For the offshore oil and gas sector, mortality estimates ranged from 188 to 4494 deaths per year due to the discharge of produced waters resulting in oil sheens and collisions with platforms and vessels; however these estimates for the oil and gas sector are based on many untested assumptions. In spite of the uncertainties, we feel levels of mortality from these two industries are unlikely to affect the marine bird community in Canada, but some effects on local populations from bycatch are likely. Further research and monitoring will be required to: (1 better estimate fisheries-related mortality for vulnerable species and populations that may be impacted by local fisheries, (2 determine the effects of oil sheens from produced waters, and attraction to platforms and associated mortality from collisions, sheens, and flaring, so that better estimates of mortality from the offshore oil and gas sector can be obtained, and (3 determine impacts associated with accidental spills, which are not included in our current assessment. With a

  16. Comparative analysis of depth distribution for seventeen large pelagic fish species captured in a longline fishery in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Zhu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate depth distribution of pelagic species captured in a longline fishery and to evaluate the difference in depth distribution among species. We estimated depth distribution for 17 frequently captured species based on a Chinese longline fishing trip targeting bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean in February-November 2006. The depth distributions of 13 bycatch species were significantly different from that of bigeye tuna. Although most of the bycatch species were found to be distributed in water depths shallower than bigeye tuna (i.e. increasing hook depths can decrease catch rates of these species, the rates of catch rates declined with increasing hook depths may be different. The depth distributions were found to be not significantly different between genders for 7 species. There was no significant correlation between fish sizes and capture depths. The information derived from this study can play an important role in reducing bycatch in pelagic tuna longline fisheries in the central-eastern Pacific Ocean.

  17. Fishery Performance Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Performance indicators for landings, effort, revenue and distribution of revenue are collected for various fisheries nation-wide. The fisheries include catch and...

  18. Fish market surveys indicate unsustainable elasmobranch fisheries in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Spät, Julia L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Elasmobranch populations worldwide are severely threatened due to overexploited and unregulated fisheries. Despite the fact that sharks and rays are captured in fisheries operating along the Red Sea coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), information on any aspects of these fisheries are very limited. Here we document the structure, composition and biological characteristics of eastern Red Sea elasmobranch fisheries based on genetic identification and market survey data over an intensive two-year sampling period at the biggest Red Sea fish market in the KSA (Jeddah). Market surveys conducted two times per month between 2011 and 2013 revealed that 24 previously confirmed elasmobranch species for the Red Sea were landed by fishers and offered for sale. Genetic identification revealed two potentially undescribed guitarfish species as well as four batoid species not formerly reported from the Red Sea. Five coastal carcharhinid species dominated the landings-. Carcharhinus sorrah, C. amblyrhynchos, C. falciformis, C. limbatus, Rhizoprionodon acutus, together comprising 73% numerically of the total catch. Targeted shark fisheries reportedly exist in shark nursery areas. Most elasmobranchs outside of these areas were reportedly landed as bycatch. Most strikingly, the large majority of landed elasmobranchs were immature males or females below their reported size of sexual maturity, which suggests potential for both growth and recruitment overfishing and emphasizes the urgent need to implement region-specific management and conservation strategies to avoid the loss of these critical predators.

  19. Evaluation of three levels of selective devices relevant to management of the Danish Kattegat-Skagerrak Nephrops fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Holst, René; Madsen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    This study illuminates a range of technological options relevant to present legislation for regulating fish by-catch in a small-meshed Nephrops fishery. The selection of cod, haddock, hake, lemon sole, Nephrops, plaice, saithe, witch, and whiting were evaluated using the twin-trawl technique for...... parameters by species and confidence bands to compare the selective properties of different gear types. For cod, haddock, hake, Nephrops, plaice, and whiting we obtained estimates for all three gear variants, whereas we obtained estimates for lemon sole and witch only with the standard and the SMP codends...

  20. Foraging Strategies of Laysan Albatross Inferred from Stable Isotopes: Implications for Association with Fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Edwards

    Full Text Available Fatal entanglement in fishing gear is the leading cause of population decline for albatross globally, a consequence of attraction to bait and fishery discards of commercial fishing operations. We investigated foraging strategies of Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis, as inferred from nitrogen and carbon isotope values of primary feathers, to determine breeding-related, seasonal, and historic factors that may affect the likelihood of association with Alaskan or Hawaiian longline fisheries. Feather samples were collected from live birds monitored for breeding status and breeding success on Midway Atoll in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, birds salvaged as fisheries-bycatch, and birds added to museum collections before 1924. During the chick-rearing season (sampled April-May, means and variances of stable isotope values of birds with the highest, most consistent reproductive success were distinct from less productive conspecifics and completely different from birds caught in Hawaiian or Alaskan longline fisheries, suggesting birds with higher multi-annual reproductive success were less likely to associate with these fisheries. Contemporary birds with the highest reproductive success had mean values most similar to historic birds. Values of colony-bound, courting prebreeders were similar to active breeders but distinct from prebreeders caught in Alaskan longline fisheries. During the breeding season, δ15N values were highly variable for both contemporary and historic birds. Although some historic birds exhibited extremely low δ15N values unmatched by contemporary birds (< 11.2‰, others had values as high as the highest fishery-associated contemporary birds. During the non-breeding season (sampled July-September, isotopic variability coalesced into a more narrow set of values for both contemporary and historic birds. Our results suggest that foraging strategies of Laysan albatross are a complex function of season, breeding status, and

  1. Inland capture fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcomme, Robin L; Cowx, Ian G; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-09-27

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.

  2. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Heitor de Oliveira; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    The use of ethnoecological tools to evaluate possible damage and loss of biodiversity related to the populations of species under some degree of threat may represent a first step towards integrating the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen's ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch in Ilhéus, Southern Bahia, Brazil. Fishermen experts semi-structured interviews were performed using snowball sampling method. The interviews consisted of a series of questions relating to the fishermen's profile, structure and work equipment, the local ecological knowledge of fishermen about sea turtles and bycatch, a projective test, attitudes towards turtle conservation and beliefs and taboos regarding turtles. Indicators for quantitative comparisons of respondents in terms of their broad knowledge and attitudes towards turtle conservation were created. Correlation analyses were made between indicators of knowledge and attitude as well as the relationship between education level and knowledge and attitudes. Thirty experts were interviewed for the study. The local ecological knowledge and attitudes of fishermen towards the conservation of sea turtles were respectively medium (0.43) and moderate (0.69) according to experts (based on Likert scale and Cronbach's Alpha). Potential areas of spawning were reported from Barra Grande to Una covering the entire coast of Ilhéus. Methods for identifying the animal, behavior, and popular names were described by fishermen. The most recent captures of turtles were attributed to fishing line, but according to the respondents, lobster nets and shrimp traps are more likely to capture turtles. Knowledge and attitudes were weakly inversely correlated (r = -0.38, p = 0.04), and the education level of the respondent showed a positive correlation with positive attitudes towards turtle conservation (H = 8.33; p = 0

  3. 77 FR 42629 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Chinook Salmon Bycatch Management in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... to manage the hard caps for Chinook salmon PSC. For the GOA, the data will be more variable and less... effects of the rule fall primarily on a distinct segment of the industry, or portion thereof (e.g., user group, gear type, geographic area), that segment would be considered the universe for purposes of...

  4. A popular and potentially sustainable fishery resource under pressure–extinction risk and conservation of Brazilian Sciaenidae (Teleostei: Perciformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Labbish Chao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Croakers (Sciaenidae are major fishery resource in Brazil; constituting 22% of marine and 9% of freshwater fishery landings. Croakers are subject to heavy fishing pressure throughout Brazil, but habitat alteration is also an important threat to regional populations. In this regional Sciaenidae assessment, each species was analyzed for relative risk of extinction, including the identification and quantification of the impact of major threats and existing conservation measures, based on application of the Categories and Criteria of the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Of the 52 species of Sciaenid fishes (34 marine and 18 freshwater present in Brazilian waters, the majority are at low risk of extinction, with 10 species classified as Data Deficient (DD and 36 as Least Concern (LC. However the Southern black drum (Pogonias cromis, listed as Endangered (EN is the most threatened species in the region, while three other species are classified as Near Threatened (NT. A large portion of Brazilian croakers is landed by small-scale artisanal fisheries, which are scattered along coastal and riverine communities. However, our assessments reveal that available fishery landing statistics may have greatly underestimated the artisanal fishery production and by-catch of Sciaenids. We recommend establishing, with adequate enforcement, coastal and riverine protected areas as well as strategic fishing seasons to improve and maintain the conservation status of Sciaenids and sustainable Sciaenid fisheries.

  5. Health risk assessment from mercury levels in bycatch fish species from the coasts of Guerrero, Mexico (Eastern Pacific).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanopoulos-Zarco, P; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Meza-Montenegro, M; Osuna-Sánchez, K; Amezcua-Martínez, F

    2014-09-01

    With the aim of determining Hg distribution in muscle and liver of bycatch fish from Guerrero state in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and assess the potential risk to consumer, Hg was quantified in 14 species of bycatch fish. For the majority of fish the order of Hg levels was liver > muscle. The highest concentration corresponded to the liver of Isopisthus remifer (2.05 µg g(-1)) and the lowest (0.02 µg g(-1)) was detected in muscle of Prionotus sp. The highest hazard quotient (0.75) was found in the Mexican milkfish Micropogonias ectenes; considering all the individuals, mean hazard quotient was 0.336.

  6. 77 FR 38738 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BB35 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Southern New England Skate Bait Trawl Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  7. 75 FR 1023 - International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... CFR Part 665 [Docket No. 080225267-91393-03] RIN 0648-AW49 International Fisheries Regulations; Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Hawaii-based Shallow-set Longline Fishery; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  8. 77 FR 25117 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BB35 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Southern New England Skate Bait Trawl Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  9. 77 FR 64305 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BC50 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for the Cape Cod Spiny Dogfish Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  10. Understanding Noncompliance with Protected Species Regulations in the Northeast USA Gillnet Fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Bisack

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine mammals and sea turtles in the United States are protected from commercial fishery interactions under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act. To reduce harbor porpoise bycatch in the northeast sink gillnet fishery, fishermen are mandated to attach pingers to their nets in regulated areas. Although, pinger regulations have been in place for over a decade, in practice, enforcement is weak and the penalty for a violation is almost non-existent. In this scenario, the presence of normative factors may motivate a fisherman to comply with the pinger regulation. This study considers both economic and normative factors within a probit framework to explain a fisherman’s compliance decision. Model results indicate fishermen who previously violated pinger regulations, who are not completely dependent on gillnet gear and face a lower chance of being detected by an observer, are more likely to violate. Understanding the influence of normative factors on compliance decisions is a key component for higher compliance. That is, incorporation of these factors in the design of policy instruments may achieve higher compliance rates and thus more success in protecting these species. Our model findings were ground-truthed by conducting focus group research with fishermen using pingers; some preliminary findings are shared in the discussion in support of our model results. Finally, these results also suggest observer data can be used to support compliance and enforcement mechanisms in this fishery and possibly other fisheries as well.

  11. Gill net and long-line catch comparisons in a hake fishery: the case of southern Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel N. Santos

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available During 1998, a study of the European hake (Merluccius merluccius static gear fishery was undertaken in southern Portugal. This study aimed to compare long-line and gill net catches within the same area in terms of catch composition, fishing yield, by-catch and discards, and specifically for hake, catch size frequency distribution and quality of the fished product. At least 35 species of fish and invertebrates were caught, with hake dominating the catches in terms of both weight and number. The by-catch represented 23% and 15% of the catch in weight for long-lines and gill nets respectively. No illegal sized hake (under 27 cm total length were caught in either gear during the study period. Discards of non-commercial species were similar for both gears and considered to be negligible (< 3% by weight. Hake discards were significantly different between gears (7% for long-lines and 42% for gill nets, by weight, due to fish deterioration related to soaking time. Higher daily yields were obtained for long-lines (258.37 kg / 9,000 hooks compared with those for gill nets (127.12 kg / 10 km net. These findings will help to improve the management and conservation of this valuable hake fishery.

  12. Identification of high-risk areas for harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena bycatch using remote electronic monitoring and satellite telemetry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindt-Larsen, Lotte; Berg, Casper Willestofte; Tougaard, J.

    2016-01-01

    and lower risk of porpoise bycatch. From May 2010 to April 2011, 4 commercial gillnet vessels were equipped with remote electronic monitoring (REM) systems. The REM system recorded time, GPS position and closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage of all gillnet hauls. REM data were used to identify fishing...

  13. Fisheries: hope or despair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Tony J; Cheung, William W L

    2013-09-30

    Recent work suggesting that fisheries depletions have turned the corner is misplaced because analysis was based largely on fisheries from better-managed developed-world fisheries. Some indicators of status show improvements in the minority of fisheries subjected to formal assessment. Other indicators, such as trophic level and catch time series, have been controversial. Nevertheless, several deeper analyses of the status of the majority of world fisheries confirm the previous dismal picture: serious depletions are the norm world-wide, management quality is poor, catch per effort is still declining. The performance of stock assessment itself may stand challenged by random environmental shifts and by the need to accommodate ecosystem-level effects. The global picture for further fisheries species extinctions, the degradation of ecosystem food webs and seafood security is indeed alarming. Moreover, marine ecosystems and their embedded fisheries are challenged in parallel by climate change, acidification, metabolic disruptors and other pollutants. Attempts to remedy the situation need to be urgent, focused, innovative and global.

  14. 78 FR 54547 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Highly Migratory Fisheries; California Drift Gillnet Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...; Issuance of Permit; Fisheries Off West Coast States; Highly Migratory Fisheries; California Drift Gillnet Fishery; Sperm Whale Interaction Restriction; Final Rule and Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-BD57 Fisheries Off West Coast...

  15. 78 FR 65887 - International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; 2013 Bigeye Tuna Longline Fishery Closure in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 300 RIN 0648-XC922 International Fisheries; Pacific Tuna Fisheries; 2013 Bigeye Tuna Longline Fishery Closure in the Eastern Pacific Ocean AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),...

  16. Fisheries Reclamation Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer shows waterbodies that have been treated for fish removal(i.e., reclaimed)by DNR Fisheries. Some waterbodies have had multiple treatments. Attributes...

  17. Fishery Management Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is intended to summarize much of the information which has been compiled over the years for the fishery management program on Moosehorn National Wildlife...

  18. International Fisheries Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pintassilgo, Pedro; Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Lindroos, Marko

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of game theory to the economic analysis of international fisheries agreements. The relevance of this study comes not only from the existence of a vast literature on the topic but especially from the specific features of these agreements. The emphasis of the survey...... and stability of international fisheries agreements. A key message that emerges from this literature strand is that self-enforcing cooperative management of internationally shared fish stocks is generally difficult to achieve. Hence, the international legal framework and regulations play a decisive role...... is on coalition games, an approach that has become prominent in the fisheries economics literature over the last decade. It is shown that coalition games were first applied to international fisheries agreements in the late 1990s addressing cooperative issues under the framework of characteristic function games...

  19. Morocco - Artisanal Fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The final performance evaluation roadmap for the Small-Scale Fisheries Project (PPA-MCC) is developed using a grid constructed around indicators relating to Project...

  20. Fishery Biology Database (AGDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Basic biological data are the foundation on which all assessments of fisheries resources are built. These include parameters such as the size and age composition of...

  1. Supply regimes in fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max

    2006-01-01

    Supply in fisheries is traditionally known for its backward bending nature, owing to externalities in production. Such a supply regime, however, exist only for pure open access fisheries. Since most fisheries worldwide are neither pure open access, nor optimally managed, rather between the extremes......-economic supply model with mesh sizes is developed. It is found that in the presence of realistic management schemes, the supply curves are close to vertical in the relevant range. Also, the supply curve under open access with mesh size limitations is almost vertical in the relevant range, owing to constant...... recruitment. The implications are that the effects on supply following from e.g. trade liberalisation and reductions of subsidies are small in several and probably most fisheries worldwide. Keywords: backward-bending supply, regulated open access, regulated restricted access, mesh size regulation, Beverton...

  2. 75 FR 33733 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... as part of the live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of...

  3. Injuries from non-retention in gillnet fisheries suppress reproductive maturation in escaped fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew R; Swanson, Penny; Young, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Exploitation of fisheries resources has unintended consequences, not only in the bycatch and discard of non-target organisms, but also in damage to targeted fish that are injured by gear but not landed (non-retention). Delayed mortality due to non-retention represents lost reproductive potential in exploited stocks, while not contributing to harvest. Our study examined the physiological mechanisms by which delayed mortality occurs and the extent to which injuries related to disentanglement from commercial gear compromise reproductive success in spawning stocks of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). We found evidence for elevated stress in fish injured via non-retention in gillnet fisheries. Plasma cortisol levels correlated with the severity of disentanglement injury and were elevated in fish that developed infections related to disentanglement injuries. We also analyzed sex steroid concentrations in females (estradiol-17β and 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one) to determine whether non-retention impairs reproductive potential in escaped individuals. We demonstrate evidence for delayed or inhibited maturation in fish with disentanglement injuries. These findings have important implications for effective conservation and management of exploited fish stocks and suggest means to improve spawning success in such stocks if retention in commercial fisheries is improved and incidental mortality reduced.

  4. Marine fisheries in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiddawi, Narriman S; Ohman, Marcus C

    2002-12-01

    Fishery resources are a vital source of food and make valuable economic contributions to the local communities involved in fishery activities along the 850 km stretch of the Tanzania coastline and numerous islands. Small-scale artisanal fishery accounts for the majority of fish catch produced by more than 43 000 fishermen in the country, mainly operating in shallow waters within the continental shelf, using traditional fishing vessels including small boats, dhows, canoes, outrigger canoes and dinghys. Various fishing techniques are applied using uncomplicated passive fishing gears such as basket traps, fence traps, nets as well as different hook and line techniques. Species composition and size of the fish varies with gear type and location. More than 500 species of fish are utilized for food with reef fishes being the most important category including emperors, snappers, sweetlips, parrotfish, surgeonfish, rabbitfish, groupers and goatfish. Most of the fish products are used for subsistence purposes. However, some are exported. Destructive fishing methods such as drag nets and dynamite fishing pose a serious problem as they destroy important habitats for fish and other organisms, and there is a long-term trend of overharvested fishery resources. However, fishing pressure varies within the country as fishery resources are utilized in a sustainable manner in some areas. For this report more than 340 references about Tanzanian fishery and fish ecology were covered. There are many gaps in terms of information needed for successful fishery management regarding both basic and applied research. Most research results have been presented as grey literature (57%) with limited distribution; only one-fifth were scientific publications in international journals.

  5. What are we protecting? Fisher behavior and the unintended consequences of spatial closures as a fishery management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Joshua K; Haynie, Alan C

    2012-04-01

    Spatial closures like marine protected areas (MPAs) are prominent tools for ecosystem-based management in fisheries. However, the adaptive behavior of fishermen, the apex predator in the ecosystem, to MPAs may upset the balance of fishing impacts across species. While ecosystem-based management (EBM) emphasizes the protection of all species in the environment, the weakest stock often dominates management attention. We use data before and after the implementation of large spatial closures in a North Pacific trawl fishery to show how closures designed for red king crab protection spurred dramatic increases in Pacific halibut bycatch due to both direct displacement effects and indirect effects from adaptations in fishermen's targeting behavior. We identify aspects of the ecological and economic context of the fishery that contributed to these surprising behaviors, noting that many multispecies fisheries are likely to share these features. Our results highlight the need either to anticipate the behavioral adaptations of fishermen across multiple species in reserve design, a form of implementation error, or to design management systems that are robust to these adaptations. Failure to do so may yield patterns of fishing effort and mortality that undermine the broader objectives of multispecies management and potentially alter ecosystems in profound ways.

  6. 50 CFR 300.106 - Exploratory fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exploratory fisheries. 300.106 Section 300.106 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.106 Exploratory fisheries. (a) An exploratory fishery,...

  7. USVI commercial fisheries cost data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To assist the Caribbean Fishery Management Council in managing marine living resources in the United States Virgin Islands, the Southeast Fisheries Science Center...

  8. African Journals Online: Fish & Fisheries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Marine Science provides an international forum for the ... The African Journal of Tropical Hydrobiology and Fisheries (Afr. J. Trop. ... promote the development of the fisheries profession and related disciplines in Nigeria, ...

  9. Fisheries and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Fish stocks and the fisheries based on them have always experienced variability due to climate. Changes in temperature, salinity, winds, ocean currents, oxygen, and other factors affect their distribution, growth, survival, and recruitment. Examples of such effects are given for several regions...... of the oceans and the processes are described. Poleward distribution shifts have occurred since the 1960s and can be attributed to the effects of anthropogenic climate change with a high degree of confidence. In addition to climate effects, fisheries are subjected to other anthropogenic stresses, including high...... fishing mortality, loss of habitat, pollution, and introduction of alien species. These interact and may reduce the resilience of exploited stocks, although climate change may also increase productivity in some cases. Fisheries production depends on primary production, but to date we have low confidence...

  10. Fisheries and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Fish stocks and the fisheries based on them have always experienced variability due to climate. Changes in temperature, salinity, winds, ocean currents, oxygen, and other factors affect their distribution, growth, survival, and recruitment. Examples of such effects are given for several regions...... of the oceans and the processes are described. Poleward distribution shifts have occurred since the 1960s and can be attributed to the effects of anthropogenic climate change with a high degree of confidence. In addition to climate effects, fisheries are subjected to other anthropogenic stresses, including high...... fishing mortality, loss of habitat, pollution, and introduction of alien species. These interact and may reduce the resilience of exploited stocks, although climate change may also increase productivity in some cases. Fisheries production depends on primary production, but to date we have low confidence...

  11. Management of complex fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Hans Staby; Andersen, Peder; Hoff, Ayoe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how fisheries economics management issues or problems can be analyzed by using a complex model based on conventional bioeconomic theory. Complex simulation models contain a number of details that make them suitable for practical management advice......, including taking into account the response of the fishermen to implemented management measures. To demonstrate the use of complex management models this paper assesses a number of second best management schemes against a first rank optimum (FRO), an ideal individual transferable quotas (ITQ) system....... This is defined as the management scheme which produces the highest net present value over a 25 year period. The assessed management schemes (scenarios) are composed by several measures as used in the Common Fisheries Policy of the European Union for the cod fishery in the Baltic Sea. The scenarios are total...

  12. A new approach to study of seabird-fishery overlap: Connecting chick feeding with parental foraging and overlap with fishing vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Sugishita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Incidental fisheries bycatch is recognised as a major threat to albatross populations worldwide. However, fishery discards and offal produced in large quantities might benefit some scavenging seabirds. Here, we demonstrate an integrated approach to better understand the ecological ramifications of fine-scale overlap between seabirds and fisheries. As a case study, we examined whether foraging in association with a fishing vessel is advantageous for chick provisioning in terms of quantity of food delivered to chicks, in northern royal albatross (Diomedea sanfordi at Taiaroa Head, New Zealand. Fine-scale overlap between albatrosses and vessels was quantified by integrating GPS tracking and Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS. Meal size delivered to chicks was measured using custom-designed nest balances, and monitoring of attendance of adults fitted with radio transmitters was used in conjunction with time-lapse photography at the nest allowed us to allocate each feeding event to a specific parent. The combination of these techniques enabled comparison of meal sizes delivered to chicks with parental foraging trip durations with or without fishing vessels association. A total of 45 foraging trips and associated chick feeding events were monitored during the chick-rearing period in 2012. Differences in the meal size and foraging trip duration relative to foraging overlap with fisheries were examined using a linear mixed-effect model, adjusted for chick age. Our results, based on three birds, suggest that foraging in association with vessels does not confer an advantage for chick feeding for this population that demonstrated low rates of overlap while foraging. The integrated research design presented can be applied to other seabird species that are susceptible to bycatch, and offers a valuable approach to evaluate habitat quality by linking habitat use and foraging success in terms of total amount of food delivered to offspring.

  13. The safety of bycatch: South Korean responses to the moratorium on commercial whaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Tatar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available When the global moratorium on commercial whaling was implemented in 1986, Korea prohibited whaling; however, there was no effort to build the capacity of social institutions to guide local residents to cooperate with the policy. Utilizing a social ecology approach, this research examines the practice of eating whale meat in Ulsan, South Korea, to illustrate the importance of culture for attaining the social acceptance of wildlife conservation policy. The cultural models which influence the consumption of whale meat are here classified as representing four distinct responses to the moratorium: opposition, resistance, evasion and support. The two most important changes are the public utilization of whale meat as a symbol of an endangered culture, and the reliance on meat procured legally from accidental entanglements of whales in fishing nets (cetacean bycatch. These cultural changes have a social function, which is to impart legitimacy and acceptance to the continued consumption of whale meat, from illegal as well as legal sources. Given the cultural acceptance of whale meat, I argue that it will not be possible to eradicate the illegal market through enforcement alone. Instead, the solution is to persuade local consumers of whale meat to cooperate with the moratorium.

  14. Hambantota Fishery Harbour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, P.S.; Julianus, E.J.B.; Marijnissen, M.; Voorend, S.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    At the southern coast of Sri Lanka a small fishery harbour is located in Hambantota. Soon after construction of the harbour in 2006 the harbour started silting up at various places. From that point onwards the harbour’s basin has been dredged multiple times, but the problem turned out to be structur

  15. Hambantota Fishery Harbour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, P.S.; Julianus, E.J.B.; Marijnissen, M.; Voorend, S.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    At the southern coast of Sri Lanka a small fishery harbour is located in Hambantota. Soon after construction of the harbour in 2006 the harbour started silting up at various places. From that point onwards the harbour’s basin has been dredged multiple times, but the problem turned out to be

  16. STATE SUPPORT IN FISHERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jahutka

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available By passing the law on state support in agriculture, fishery and forestry the former support system has been changed. Fishery support beneficiaries can use several kinds of support and help. Former financial stimulations for fishery regulated by law from 1995 to 1st January 2003 were settled by the production stimulation model. Besides that well received model, there are the capital investment model, the support in production insurance, the right to use blue diesel, and granting credit for production of freshwater and saltwater fry, adult fish and shells. These five models of support and help can be used by freshwater and saltwater fish and shell breeders, while for fishing the marine fish the production stimulation model is applied (fishing of small pelagic fish, as well as the capital investment model and right to use blue diesel. Marine and freshwater processors can use the production stimulation and the capital investment model. All these models have in common the fact that all physical and legal entities registered for fishing activities (having licence for commercial fishery, aquaculture (the licence for aquaculture or the one for fish and other marine organisam breeding and processing (having the regulated veterinarian and sanitary conditions, the registration document and having been registered in the List of approved facilities have the right to use them.

  17. Bycatch And Discards: Management INdicators, Trends and locatiON (BADMINTON): Final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilopoulou, V.; Rochet, M.J.; Helmond, van A.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Discarding keeps being an important issue in world fisheries; it is a way for fishers to adjust their landings to the legal and market constraints, but is largely considered as a waste of rare natural resources and as contributing to the depletion of stocks bearing a high fishing pressure. Many

  18. 75 FR 34092 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Weakfish Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 697 RIN 0648-AY41 Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Weakfish Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.... Such action is authorized under the Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act...

  19. 78 FR 45896 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trimester Closure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XC782 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trimester Closure for the Common Pool Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  20. 76 FR 39313 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XA523 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed Butterfish Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  1. 78 FR 51131 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 697 RIN 0648-BD45 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; American Lobster Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  2. 78 FR 76759 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trimester Closure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XD024 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trimester Closure for the Common Pool Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  3. 77 FR 58969 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XC235 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS..., 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carly Bari, Fishery Management Specialist,...

  4. 76 FR 74009 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XA825 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: Carly Bari, Fishery Management Specialist, (978) 281-9224. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  5. 78 FR 64199 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; South Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    .... SUMMARY: The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee... Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: (800) 445-8667 or (843) 308- 9330. Council address: South Atlantic Fishery Management Council,...

  6. 78 FR 48653 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; South Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Fishery Management Council (SAFMC) Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). SUMMARY: The SAFMC will... Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, 4055 Faber Place Drive, Suite 201, N. Charleston, SC...

  7. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. Minimization of late dysphagia without jeopardizing tumor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modesto, Anouchka; Laprie, Anne; Graff, Pierre; Rives, Michel [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Vieillevigne, Laure [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Medical Physics, Toulouse (France); Sarini, Jerome; Vergez, Sebastien; Farenc, Jean-Claude [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Toulouse (France); Delord, Jean-Pierre [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Medical Oncology, Toulouse (France); Vigarios, Emmanuelle [Centre Hospitalo Universitaire de Rangueil, Dental Surgery Department, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Department of Biostatistics, Toulouse (France)

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to retrospectively determine the value of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LHSCC), on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). A total of 175 consecutive patients were treated between 2007 and 2012 at our institution with curative intent RT and were included in this study: 90 were treated with 3D-CRT and 85 with IMRT. Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier statistics; acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events scale v 3.0. Median follow-up was 35 months (range 32-42 months; 95% confidence interval 95 %). Two-year disease-free survival did not vary, regardless of the technique used (69 % for 3D-CRT vs. 72 %; for IMRT, p = 0.16). Variables evaluated as severe late toxicities were all statistically lower with IMRT compared with 3D-CRT: xerostomia (0 vs. 12 %; p < 0.0001), dysphagia (4 vs. 26 %; p < 0.0001), and feeding-tube dependency (1 vs 13 %; p = 0.0044). The rates of overall grade ≥ 3 late toxicities for the IMRT and 3D-CRT groups were 4.1 vs. 41.4 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). IMRT for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer minimizes late dysphagia without jeopardizing tumor control and outcome. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war es, retrospektiv den Nutzen der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) in der Behandlung von Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinom von Kehlkopf und Hypopharynx (LHSCC) zu bewerten und mit dem Outcome und den Spaetfolgen der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3D-CRT) zu vergleichen. Insgesamt wurden zwischen Januar 2007 und Dezember 2012175 LHSCC-Patienten mit einer RT behandelt und in die Studie aufgenommen: 85 Patienten wurden mit 3D-CRT und 90 Patienten mit IMRT behandelt.Das onkologische Outcome wurde mittels Kaplan-Meier-Statistik ermittelt und Akut- und Spaettoxizitaeten anhand der CTCAE

  8. 50 CFR 259.32 - Conditional fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditional fisheries. 259.32 Section 259.32 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Capital Construction...

  9. 50 CFR 600.110 - Intercouncil fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intercouncil fisheries. 600.110 Section 600.110 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Regional Fishery Management Councils §...

  10. Preliminary assessment of the jellyfish bycatch captured off southern and southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Schroeder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Macromedusoid forms of Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa and Cubozoa captured by different fishing gears active in south and southeast of Brazil were recorded on board by scientific observers. After each fishing operation, catch composition was quantified and precise information about the position of the catch was taken between 2008 and 2011. Macromedusae records have been systemized in order to analyze the spatial-temporal distribution, the areas of concentration of the identified species and their relationship with other components of the bycatch. Catch composition analyzed in 986 fishing tows, demonstrated that the participation of these organisms ranged from 6-16%, and the hydromedusae Rhacostoma atlanticum L. Agassiz, 1851 and Olindias sambaquiensis Müller, 1861 were the most abundant and widely distributed species. R. atlanticum was recorded between 20 and 140 m deep while O. sambaquiensis presented registers in shallower waters between 10 and 70 m. No other identified species has been recorded in depths greater than 60 m. Areas of high concentration included the north-central coast of Santa Catarina and Paraná, the northern part of São Paulo and the north-central portion of Rio Grande do Sul State. Although the participation of the macromedusae has been relatively low, in areas of elevated concentration, the relative importance was high, making its participation almost exclusive among other zoological groups. Those registers of abundance and the respective areas of high concentration of macromedusae, which were associated to high primary production sites, may serve as a theoretical reference of the abundance of these organisms for future studies that aim to evaluate possible changes in jellyfish populations.

  11. Green growth in fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max; Ravensbeck, Lars; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Climate change and economic growth have gained a substantial amount of attention over the last decade. Hence, in order to unite the two fields of interest, the concept of green growth has evolved. The concept of green growth focuses on how to achieve growth in environment-dependent sectors, without...... harming the environment. Fishery is an environment-dependent sector and it has been argued that there is no potential for green growth in the sector owing to global overexploitation, leaving no scope for production growth. The purpose of this paper is to explain what green growth is and to develop...... a conceptual framework. Furthermore, the aim is to show that a large green growth potential actually exists in fisheries and to show how this potential can be achieved. The potential green growth appears as value-added instead of production growth. The potential can be achieved by reducing overcapacity...

  12. Gillnet fisheries as a major mortality factor of Magellanic penguins in wintering areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Luis Gustavo; Bugoni, Leandro; Mancini, Patrícia Luciano; Haimovici, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    The incidental capture in fisheries is probably the main conservation problem affecting seabirds. While the capture of albatrosses and petrels on longline hooks is well-known worldwide, the bycatch of diving seabirds in gillnets is an overlooked conservation problem. During a winter coastal fishing trip, the capture of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) was recorded in driftnet and bottom setnet fisheries for the first time in southern Brazil. The highest captures rates were found in driftnets, from 146.5 to 545.5 penguins/km² of net and a total of 56 dead penguins were recorded. In the bottom gillnet, a total of 12 birds were killed and the capture rates varied from 41.7 to 125.0 penguins/km² of net. Although preliminary, the results presented in this paper were consistent between sets. If we consider the magnitude of driftnet and setnet fishing fleets, and that most dead penguins were adults, the impact upon Magellanic penguin populations is probably significant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of the biology, fisheries and conservation of the whale shark Rhincodon typus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, D; Brooks, K S

    2012-04-01

    Although the whale shark Rhincodon typus is the largest extant fish, it was not described until 1828 and by 1986 there were only 320 records of this species. Since then, growth in tourism and marine recreation globally has lead to a significant increase in the number of sightings and several areas with annual occurrences have been identified, spurring a surge of research on the species. Simultaneously, there was a great expansion in targeted R. typus fisheries to supply the Asian restaurant trade, as well as a largely un-quantified by-catch of the species in purse-seine tuna fisheries. Currently R. typus is listed by the IUCN as vulnerable, due mainly to the effects of targeted fishing in two areas. Photo-identification has shown that R. typus form seasonal size and sex segregated feeding aggregations and that a large proportion of fish in these aggregations are philopatric in the broadest sense, tending to return to, or remain near, a particular site. Somewhat conversely, satellite tracking studies have shown that fish from these aggregations can migrate at ocean-basin scales and genetic studies have, to date, found little graphic differentiation globally. Conservation approaches are now informed by observational and environmental studies that have provided insight into the feeding habits of the species and its preferred habitats. Notwithstanding these advances, there remain notable gaps in the knowledge of this species particularly with respect to the life history of neonates and adults who are not found in the feeding aggregations.

  14. Interactions between small cetaceans and the purse-seine fishery in western Portuguese waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Wise

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine mammal interactions with Portuguese purse-seine fisheries operating in four different ports (Figueira da Foz, Sesimbra, Setúbal, Sines were studied (July-October 2003. Observers accompanied commercial fishing vessels and monitored 48 fishing trips. An interview survey of skippers was also carried out (n = 36. Three species of marine mammals were observed in 31 sightings during the commercials trips but only the species Delphinus delphis and the category Delphinidae were observed to interact with fishing activities. Small cetaceans were observed to sink, gather or disperse school fishes and damage gear. Mean CPUE and fishing effort values did not change significantly in the presence of dolphins (H = 0.06 and H = 0, both p>0.05. Results from Figueira da Foz indicate that cetaceans are attracted to fishing grounds with a high abundance of their prey-species. Fishermen reported three by-catch events off Figueira da Foz. Compared with other fisheries, purse-seine fishing does not seem to be among the most damaging to marine mammals.

  15. Impacts of extensive driftnet fishery and late 1990s climate regime shift on dominant epipelagic nekton in the Transition Region and Subtropical Frontal Zone: Implications for fishery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, T.; Nishikawa, H.; Igarashi, H.; Okamura, H.; Mahapatra, K.; Sakai, M.; Wakabayashi, T.; Inagake, D.; Okada, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impacts of extensive anthropogenic (high seas driftnet squid fishery) and natural (late 1990s major climate regime shift) events on dominant epipelagic fish, squid, and shark in the central North Pacific Transition Region based on a driftnet survey covering the years 1979-2006. Fishing was conducted by Japan, Korea and Taiwan to target neon flying squid in the period 1979-1992, resulting in a decline in stocks of the target species and non-target species (Pacific pomfret and juvenile blue shark), which were by-catch of this fishery. The catch was found to be at the maximum sustainable yield (MSY) level for neon flying squid, the underfished level for juvenile blue shark, but the overfished level for Pacific pomfret. The MSY of Pacific pomfret indicated that this species is more susceptible to exploitation than previously considered. In response to the late 1990s regime shift, neon flying squid and Pacific saury showed low stock levels in 1999-2002 and 1998-2002, respectively, as a result of reduced productivity in their nursery grounds (the Subtropical Frontal Zone and Kuroshio Extension Bifurcation Region, respectively). On the other hand, Pacific pomfret showed no decreasing trend in stock during the low- and intermediate-productivity regimes because of the high productivity of their main spawning/nursery ground (Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front), which was independent of the regime shifts. Thus, squid and saury appear to be more susceptible to the regime shift than pomfret. We discuss the implications for stock management of the species-specific responses to the fishery and the regime shift.

  16. The origins of white-chinned petrels killed by long-line fisheries off South Africa and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M.S. Mareile Techow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The white-chinned petrel (Procellaria aequinoctialis is the seabird species most frequently killed by fisheries in the Southern Ocean and is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources as globally vulnerable. It breeds around the sub-Antarctic, but genetic data identified two subspecies: P. a. aequinoctialis from islands in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and P. a. steadi from the New Zealand sub-Antarctic islands. We identify the region of origin of birds killed by two long-line fisheries based on differences in the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b. All 113 birds killed off South Africa had the haplotype of P. a. aequinoctialis, whereas all the 60 birds from New Zealand had P. a. steadi haplotypes. The two subspecies of white-chinned petrels thus appear to disperse to different regions irrespective of their age, which accords with the tracking data of adult birds. Our finding has significant implications for managing the bycatch of this species by regional fisheries.

  17. Aspects of the biology of the Atlantic Midshipman, Porichthys porosissimus (Teleostei, Batrachoididae: an important by-catch species of shrimp trawling off southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Vianna

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Trawl fishing for pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus brasiliensis and F. paulensis catches large quantities of by-catch fish, discarded due to their having no commercial vaue. As these species have rarely been studied, the impact of fisheries on these populations is not known. This contribution studies the biology of a species of no commercial value, the Atlantic midshipman Porichthys porosissimus. The last haul /Tom a commercial trawler, operating on the northern coast of São Paulo State and the southern coast of Rio de Janeiro State, was preserved (/Tom being discarded and identified at the species leveI. It was observed that this fishery affects the juvenile population which is intluenced by the seasonal variation of the water masses. Growth parameters were estimated: L∞ = 37.0 cm, K = 0.285 year-1. Instantaneous mortality coefficients were estimated: 2=2.14, M=0.63, F= 1.51, S= 11.8 and E=0.71. Considering the intensive activity of the shrimp trawl tleet operating in this area, the deleterious action of trawling is considered as of high impact. The stock management measures applied for pink shrimp are without effect regarding P. porosissimus. which has its spawning period before the closed season and its recruitment peak after it. The results show overfishing and the need to apply measures to reduce trawling action, such as adequate policies, introduction of selectivity devices and the creation of exclusion zones for trawl fishing.A pesca de arrasto para a captura do camarão-rosa (Fm:fantepenaeus brasi/iensis e F. paulensis captura grande quantidade de peixes considerados fauna acompanhante que são descartados por não possuírem valor comercial. Assim, pouco aparecem em trabalhos de biologia pesqueira com dados de desembarque, sendo a ação pesqueira sobre estas populações pouco conhecida. Neste estudo, um arrasto mensal de um barco de pesca foi desembarcado sem que nada do material capturado fosse descartado. Analisou-se Porichthys

  18. Artisanal Fishers' Use of Sustainable Fisheries Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artisanal Fishers' Use of Sustainable Fisheries Management Practices in the Jebba Lake ... as key stakeholders in fisheries policy formulation, implementation and evaluation. ... Keywords: Fisheries, Policy, Environment and Management ...

  19. Fisheries management: what chance on coral reefs?

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Failures of fishery management to control fishing effort globally and how this affects the coral reef fisheries are discussed. The use of marine reserves in coral reef fisheries management is also emphasized.

  20. a Continual Engagement Approach Through Gis-Mcda Conflict Resolution of Loggerhead Sea Turtle Bycatch in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojórquez-Tapia, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Continual engagement is an approach that emphasizes of uninterrupted interaction with the stakeholders with the purpose of fully integrating their knowledge into policymaking process. It focuses on the creation of hybrid scientific-local knowledge highly relevant to community and policy makers needs, while balancing the power asymmetries among stakeholders. Hence, it presupposes a capacity for a continuous revision and adjustment of the analyses that support the policymaking process. While continual engagement implies a capacity for enabling an effective communication, translation and mediation of knowledge among the diverse stakeholders, experts and policymakers, it also means keeping a close eye out for how knowledge evolves and how new data and information is introduced along a policymaking process. Through a case study, the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) fishing bycatch in Mexico, a geographical information system-multicriteria modeling (GIS-MCDA) approach is presented to address the challenges of implementing continual engagement in conflict resolution processes. The GIS-MCDA combined the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and compromise programming (CP) to generate consensus regarding the spatial pattern of conflicts. The AHP was fundamental for synthesizing the different sources of knowledge into a geospatial model. In particular, the AHP enabled the assess the salience, legitimacy, and credibility of the information produced for all involved. Results enabled the development of specific policies based upon an assessment of the risk of the loggerhead population to different levels of fishing bycatch, and the needs of the fishing communities in the region.

  1. Fisheries Information Network in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Sarojini

    During the early 1980s the Indonesian government made a policy decision to develop fisheries as an important sector of the national economy. In doing so, it recognized the need for the collection and dissemination of fisheries research information not only for the scientists themselves, but also for the ultimate transfer of technology through…

  2. Fisheries Information Network in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Sarojini

    During the early 1980s the Indonesian government made a policy decision to develop fisheries as an important sector of the national economy. In doing so, it recognized the need for the collection and dissemination of fisheries research information not only for the scientists themselves, but also for the ultimate transfer of technology through…

  3. Qualitative mathematical models to support ecosystem-based management of Australia's Northern Prawn Fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Rothlisberg, Peter C; Loneragan, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    A major decline in the catch of the banana prawn [shrimp], Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) merguiensis, occurred over a six-year period in the Weipa region of the northeastern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Three main hypotheses have been developed to explain this decline: (1) prawn recruitment collapsed due to overfishing; (2) recruitment collapsed due to a change in the prawn's environment; and (3) adult banana prawns were still present, but fishers could no longer effectively find or catch them. Qualitative mathematical models were used to link population biology, environmental factors, and fishery dynamics to evaluate the alternative hypotheses. This modeling approach provides the means to rapidly integrate knowledge across disciplines and consider alternative hypotheses about how the structure and function of an ecosystem affects its dynamics. Alternative models were constructed to address the different hypotheses and also to encompass a diversity of opinion about the underlying dynamics of the system. Key findings from these analyses are that: instability in the system can arise when discarded fishery bycatch supports relatively high predation pressure; system stability can be enhanced by management of fishing effort or stock catchability; catch per unit effort is not necessarily a reliable indicator of stock abundance; a change in early-season rainfall should affect all stages in the banana prawn's life cycle; and a reduced catch in the Weipa region can create and reinforce a shift in fishing effort away from Weipa. Results from the models informed an approach to test the hypotheses (i.e., an experimental fishing program), and promoted understanding of the system among researchers, management agencies, and industry. The analytical tools developed in this work to address stages of a prawn life cycle and fishery dynamics are generally applicable to any exploited natural. resource.

  4. Coral by-catch in shrimp bottom trawl surveys in West Greenland waters (2010 – 2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensbye, Helle; Arboe, Nanette Hammeken

    shrimp stock assessments. A total of 628 hauls were conducted covering an area of 17.1 km2. Sixty-six hauls contained corals and of these 13 hauls had two or more species of corals. Only two hauls contained more than one kilo of coral, which were in each case comprised of one only species...... within which shrimp are fished. This first analysis suggests that dense fields of Sea Pens and patches of octocorals occur in the depth range and within the area covered by the shrimp fishery...

  5. 75 FR 42610 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XX54 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  6. 76 FR 58720 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA709 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  7. 76 FR 40836 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XA554 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  8. 75 FR 59156 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XY79 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine is limited...

  9. 77 FR 50952 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC166 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  10. 78 FR 51097 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-XC783 Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... live bait fishery or incidental to other fisheries; the incidental harvest of Pacific sardine...

  11. 75 FR 13731 - National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific Fishery Management Council (Pacific Council); April 9...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Fisheries Service Report 2. Fishery Management Plan Amendment 2 - Annual Catch Limits and Accountability... Groundfish Fisheries 3. National Marine Fisheries Service Report 4. Part I of Management Measures for 2011... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV42 National Marine Fisheries Service, Pacific...

  12. 77 FR 34024 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program; (4) Pilot Project to Assess Need and Initialize a Methodology to.... Northeast University; (5) Ecological Role of Adult and Juvenile Anadromous Forage fish in Downeast...

  13. Tragedy of the Commons Fisheries Management Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, W. A.

    2011-12-01

    questions about his/her ideas and experience with the game. The game results and answers to the questions are then automatically emailed to the instructor, or printed for hand-in. The teacher can also monitor student progress with an online tool. The game provides an effective way to start students thinking about how science and policy intersect and how human nature and the profit motive affect management strategies. Important issues that are not addressed by the game are destruction of fisheries habitat, by-catch, and international law.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Fisheries in Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The changes that have taken place in Nigerian fisheries are reviewed. Artisanal fishery has continued to dominate the fisheries, contributing over 85% of total fish production. The inland water and coastal seas are fully exploited and the increase in fishery production is not likely. Aquaculture potentials remain untapped as much as deep-sea fisheries. The combined potential of the fisheries resources-freshwater, marine and aquaculture can meet over 90% of the nation's demand for fish. Opportunities for investments, therefore, exist in the various subsectors, especially in the areas of storage, processing and preservation for the capture fishery and fish seed multiplication for aquaculture.

  15. How fisheries management can benefit from genomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Quiñonez, Fausto

    2016-09-01

    Fisheries genomics is an emerging field that advocates the application of genomic tools to address questions in fisheries management. Genomic approaches bring a new paradigm for fisheries management by making it possible to integrate adaptive diversity to understand fundamental aspects of fisheries resources. Hence, this review is focused on the relevance of genomic approaches to solve fisheries-specific questions. Particularly the detection of adaptive diversity (outlier loci) provides unprecedented opportunity to understand bio-complexity, increased power to trace processed sample origin to allow enforcement and the potential to understand the genetic basis of micro-evolutionary effects of fisheries-induced evolution and climate change. The understanding of adaptive diversity patterns will be the cornerstone of the future links between fisheries and genomics. These studies will help stakeholders anticipate the potential effects of fishing or climate change on the resilience of fisheries stocks; consequently, in the near future, fisheries sciences might integrate evolutionary principles with fisheries management.

  16. Feeding Habits and Trophic Level of the Panama Grunt Pomadasys panamensis, an Important Bycatch Species from the Shrimp Trawl Fishery in the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Rodríguez-Preciado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Panama grunt is an abundant and commercially important species in the southeastern Gulf of California, but the research undertaken on this species is scarce despite its ecological and economic importance. We studied the feeding habits of Panama grunt through stomach content analyses as a first step towards understanding the biology of this species in the study area. Our results indicate that the Panama grunt is a benthic predator throughout its life cycle and feeds mainly on infaunal crustaceans. Diet differences among grunt were not found according to size, diet, or season. Shannon diversity index results indicate that Panama grunt has a limited trophic niche breadth with a diet dominated by a limited number of taxa as crustaceans. The estimated trophic level of this species is 3.59. Overall, the Panama grunt is a carnivorous fish occupying the intermediate levels of the trophic pyramid.

  17. Feeding habits and trophic level of the Panama grunt Pomadasys panamensis, an important bycatch species from the shrimp trawl fishery in the Gulf of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Preciado, Jose A.; Amezcua-Martinez, Felipe; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Madrid-Vera, Juan

    2014-10-14

    The Panama grunt is an abundant and commercially important species in the SE Gulf of California, but the research undertaken on this species is scarce despite its ecological and economic importance. We studied the feeding habits of Panama grunt through stomach content analyses as a first step towards understanding the biology of this species in the study area. Our results show that the Panama grunt is a benthic predator throughout its life cycle and feeds mainly on infaunal crustaceans. Diet differences were not found according to size, diet or season. Shannon diversity index results indicate that Panama grunt have a limited trophic niche breadth with a diet dominated by a limited number of taxa. The estimated trophic level of this species is 3.59. Overall, the Panama grunt is a carnivorous fish occupying the intermediate levels of the trophic pyramid.

  18. Oyster Fisheries App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Guerrero, Geraldo A.; Armstrong, Duane; Underwood, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This project is creating a cloud-enabled, HTML 5 web application to help oyster fishermen and state agencies apply Earth science to improve the management of this important natural and economic resource. The Oyster Fisheries app gathers and analyzes environmental and water quality information, and alerts fishermen and resources managers about problems in oyster fishing waters. An intuitive interface based on Google Maps displays the geospatial information and provides familiar interactive controls to the users. Alerts can be tailored to notify users when conditions in specific leases or public fishing areas require attention. The app is hosted on the Amazon Web Services cloud. It is being developed and tested using some of the latest web development tools such as web components and Polymer.

  19. INTERNET IN FISHERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Matulić

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet is a global communication system interconnected with computer networks and intended to exchange the information of any kind. It is frequently called »network of all the networks« because it incorporates thousands and thousands of various computer networks all around the world and in order to communicate, has the same technical standards. The Internet has become an exclusive, unique source of information forever growing population. It has also become an ideal communication channel because of its dynamics, interaction, tractability and miraculously manageable updating of the content published. Nowadays, when fisheries starts playing and important role in Croatia, many people seek professional advice and guidance via Internet in order to fulfil their demanding professional tasks.

  20. 78 FR 35217 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; American Lobster Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... Cooperative Management Act Provisions; American Lobster Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS proposes new Federal American lobster regulations that would control lobster trap fishing effort by limiting access into the lobster trap fishery in Lobster...

  1. 78 FR 43125 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial, Limited Entry Pacific Coast... Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). This action proposes to implement trailing actions for the program... time, the Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and NMFS have been addressing...

  2. 75 FR 43928 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... review the status of the red crab fishery and recent developments in processing, marketing, and.... Thompson, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  3. Hoffman etal 2016 Fisheries Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Fish collection data associated with the data analysis presented in Hoffman et al. 2016. Fisheries 41(1):26-37, DOI: 10.1080/03632415.2015.1114926. This dataset is...

  4. Bycatch And Discards: Management INdicators, Trends and locatiON (BADMINTON)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilopoulou, Vassiliki; Marie-Joëlle Rochet, Marie-Joëlle Rochet; Helmond, A.T.M. van

    2012-01-01

    jurisdictions, including the European Commission, are preparing regulations to reduce or ban discards. To design effective regulations, an understanding of the extent and processes of the issue is required. The MariFish BADMINTON project aimed to build up the knowledge of discarding patterns and factors...... fisheries, and of appropriate indicators; the determination of the most important factors affecting discard amounts and composition; and the elaboration of integrated management approaches to the discard issue. BADMINTON relied on two types of approaches to fulfill these aims and objectives. First...... better integration of national onboard observer programmes. The second approach was to conduct stakeholder interviews and expert consultation, which was meant to complement the data analyses with fishers perspectives on the discard issue, and to provide an integrated approach toward management. Both...

  5. Demography of a deep-sea lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) caught in trawl fisheries of the northeastern Atlantic: Application of Leslie matrices with incorporated uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rui; Alpizar-Jara, Russell; Erzini, Karim

    2015-05-01

    The deep-sea lantern shark Etmopterus spinax occurs in the northeast Atlantic on or near the bottoms of the outer continental shelves and slopes, and is regularly captured as bycatch in deep-water commercial fisheries. Given the lack of knowledge on the impacts of fisheries on this species, a demographic analysis using age-based Leslie matrices was carried out. Given the uncertainties in the mortality estimates and in the available life history parameters, several different scenarios, some incorporating stochasticity in the life history parameters (using Monte Carlo simulation), were analyzed. If only natural mortality were considered, even after introducing uncertainties in all parameters, the estimated population growth rate (λ) suggested an increasing population. However, if fishing mortality from trawl fisheries is considered, the estimates of λ either indicated increasing or declining populations. In these latter cases, the uncertainties in the species reproductive cycle seemed to be particularly relevant, as a 2-year reproductive cycle indicated a stable population, while a longer (3-year cycle) indicated a declining population. The estimated matrix elasticities were in general higher for the survivorship parameters of the younger age classes and tended to decrease for the older ages. This highlights the susceptibility of this deep-sea squaloid to increasing fishing mortality, emphasizing that even though this is a small-sized species, it shows population dynamics patterns more typical of the larger-sized and in general more vulnerable species.

  6. SOME BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SCALLOPED HAMMERHEAD SHARKS (Sphyrna lewini Griffith & Smith, 1834 CAUGHT FROM COASTAL FISHERIES IN THE EASTERN INDIAN OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umi Chodrijah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has the largest chondrichthyan fishery in the world, with a reported of 105,000 and 118,000 tonnes landed in 2002 and 2003 respectively. Scalloped hammerhead shark was either targeted or by-catch from this fishery, mostly for its fins. Despite of the growing concern around the world, the availability of biological data of this species, especially in the Eastern Indian Ocean is still lacking. The objectives of this paper are to present some biological information (size composition and sex ratio of the scalloped hammerhead, from coastal fisheries in Eastern Indian Ocean. The data used for the analysis comprised of two components, i.e. survey data in 2010 (February, March, June, August, October and December and data from daily monitoring shark landing in 2013 (January to December. Substantially lower mean size, more immature sharks and more frequent of female caught over years showed that scalloped hammerhead shark in the Eastern Indian Ocean are facing intensive fishing pressure which could lead to overfishing. This could harm the sustainability of scalloped hammerhead shark resource in the long run. The relationship between clasper length and total length was positively correlated where every 5 cmTL increment on clasper length adding 51 cmTL on total length.

  7. 76 FR 43266 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Fisheries Service (NMFS). ACTION: Notice; Public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA582 New England Fishery Management Council.... Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  8. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  9. Acoustic telemetry and fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Holbrook, Christopher; Hussey, Nigel E.; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Raby, Graham D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled “Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management”. Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively.

  10. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treaty Indian fisheries. 300.95 Section 300.95 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a) Any...

  11. 78 FR 33067 - Fisheries of the United States; NOAA Fisheries Policy for Modifying Fisheries Closures in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC097 Fisheries of the United States; NOAA Fisheries Policy for Modifying Fisheries Closures in the Event of a Public Health Emergency or Oil Spill... public comment on potential adjustments to the draft policy. DATES: Written comments must be received...

  12. 76 FR 43773 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... access general category (LAGC) fleets; open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area (access... Part 648 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework... 0648-BA72 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery;...

  13. 77 FR 73433 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.... SUMMARY: Nominations are being solicited for appointment to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group of the... Recreational Fisheries Working Group (RFWG) in 2010, to assist it in the development of recommendations to...

  14. 75 FR 3416 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Vessel Identification Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-AX38 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Vessel Identification Requirements AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jarad Makaiau, Sustainable Fisheries, NMFS PIR, 808-944-2108. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  15. 78 FR 54399 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XC815 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... December 31, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carly Bari, Fishery Management Specialist,...

  16. 78 FR 64182 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XC921 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carly Bari, Fishery Management Specialist, 978-281-9224....

  17. 75 FR 74005 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Monkfish Fishery; Scoping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BA50 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Monkfish Fishery; Scoping Process AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... statement (EIS) and scoping meetings; request for comments. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery...

  18. 76 FR 53832 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Decrease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XA652 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Decrease for the Common Pool Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  19. 77 FR 76424 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Administration 50 CFR Part 648 [Docket No. 120201086-2418-02] RIN 0648-XC394 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Quota Transfer AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carly Bari, Fishery Management Specialist, 978-281-9224....

  20. 75 FR 57249 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast (NE) Multispecies Fishery; Charter/Party...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BA09 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast (NE) Multispecies Fishery; Charter/Party Fishery Control Date AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce....

  1. 77 FR 22678 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648- XB145 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Trimester 1 Longfin Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  2. Fishery Management Plan : Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fishery Management Plan for Tamarac NWR provides an inventory of fishery resources on the Refuge including a description of the water area and fish sampling...

  3. Fisheries Management Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fisheries Management Plan for Muscatatuck NWR provides an introduction to the Refuge, summarizes the relationship of fishery management to Refuge objectives,...

  4. Observer Coverage of the Southeastern Shrimp Fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Vessel, gear and biological data collected by fishery observers from the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic commerical shrimp fishery.

  5. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) is the primary law governing marine fisheries management in U.S. federal waters. It has since been...

  6. Trust and new modes of fisheries governance

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, de, Ans

    2011-01-01

     It is a commonplace today that many of the world’s commercial fisheries are in a state of crisis. As a response to the state of fisheries management, a large array of governance innovations has been deployed over the past two decades in many fisheries industries worldwide. In these new governance arrangements state, market, and/or civil society actors participate while striving for a more sustainable fisheries industry. These new governance arrangements influence social relations,...

  7. Economic Incentives and Global Fisheries Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Costello; John Lynham; Sarah E. Lester; Gaines, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Widespread global collapses of fisheries corroborate decades-old predictions by economists, made long before large-scale industrialization of the world's fisheries, that open access would have deleterious ecological and economic effects on fishery resources. Incentive-based alternatives (collectively called catch shares) have been shown to generate pecuniary benefits, but little empirical evidence exists for, or against, a link to global fisheries sustainability. We report and expand on an an...

  8. Technological development in fisheries management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Marchal, Paul; Gislason, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    increases by 3.2% per year due to technological developments, an increase often ignored in fisheries management. The documentation and quantification of technological creep improves the basis for successfully integrating the effects of technological development (and catchability changes) in fisheries...... management regulations and policies. Ways of counteracting the undesired effects of technological creep are discussed as are the potential management benefits from improved fishing technology. Specific suggestions are given on the selection, application, and tuning of fisheries management tools that can......Many marine fish stocks are overexploited and considerable overcapacity exists in fishing fleets worldwide. One of the reasons for the imbalance between resource availability and fishing capacity is technological development, which continuously increases the efficiency of the vessels—a mechanism...

  9. Is the Dutch shrimp fishery sustainable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welleman, H.C.; Daan, N.

    2001-01-01

    The fishery of the brown shrimp (Crangon crangon LINNEAUS 1758) is a widespread human activity in the coastal zone. Yet management of this fishery has never been implemented. The question is raised whether an uncontrolled fishery is sustainable or the conceivable ecological stress results in

  10. Trust and new modes of fisheries governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de B.I.

    2011-01-01

     It is a commonplace today that many of the world’s commercial fisheries are in a state of crisis. As a response to the state of fisheries management, a large array of governance innovations has been deployed over the past two decades in many fisheries industries worldwide. In these new g

  11. 75 FR 23245 - American Lobster Fishery Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-AT31 American Lobster Fishery Management AGENCY... American lobster fishery in Federal waters. The management actions are based on recommendations to NMFS by... Fishery Management Plan for American Lobster (ISFMP). Two of the three proposed management...

  12. Increased competition for aquaculture from fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Nielsen, Max; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    ; and supplies from aquaculture have grown continuously. In this paper, the impact of improved fisheries management on aquaculture growth is studied assuming perfect substitution between farmed and wild fish. We find that improved fisheries management, ceteris paribus, reduces the growth potential of global...... aquaculture in markets where wild fisheries constitute a large share of total supply....

  13. Trust and new modes of fisheries governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de B.I.

    2011-01-01

     It is a commonplace today that many of the world’s commercial fisheries are in a state of crisis. As a response to the state of fisheries management, a large array of governance innovations has been deployed over the past two decades in many fisheries industries worldwide. In these new

  14. Is the Dutch shrimp fishery sustainable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welleman, H.C.; Daan, N.

    2001-01-01

    The fishery of the brown shrimp (Crangon crangon LINNEAUS 1758) is a widespread human activity in the coastal zone. Yet management of this fishery has never been implemented. The question is raised whether an uncontrolled fishery is sustainable or the conceivable ecological stress results in recruit

  15. CROATIAN FISHERY IN 2003 YEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jahutka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the analysis and sublimation of all the relevant informations regarding fisheries in Republic of Croatia. This means that there were processed data about freshwater fisheries (farming of freshwater fish and other aquatic organisms, commercial and sports fisheries, marine fisheries (mariculture, commercial fisheries, small–scale fisheries and processing of fish products, import and export of fish and fish products as well as the financial subventions regarding fisheries. The farming of freshwater fish in 2003 is marked by the decrease of production comparing to the past 5 years. Carp is furthermore the most dominant fish species in freshwater fish farming, but it’s percentage is decreasing, and the percentage of the trout is increasing over the years. In addition to the decrease of production, the areas of production are decreasing as well, and now they are the smallest in the past decade — 6,281.97 ha. In 2003 the amount of used food is also decreased, but the amount of used fertilizers and lime is increased, that means it is the biggest in the past decade. This is caused by the bad climate conditions during the summer. Marine fisheries farming (mariculture in 2003 is in a slightly better position then the freshwater fish farming. The production of white fish species, which was reached before few years, is not changing — 2,510 tons, also the farming of oysters is stagnating, but in the past few years the farming of mussels and tuna fish is increasing. The total marine fish catch is 29,102 tons and it is performed over 34,000 km2, comparing to the 2002 it is increased by almost 49.24%. Additional to the increase of the total catch the number of commercial fishermen and fishing vessels is also increased. The number of fisherman which fish for their own consumption without the right to sell fish, that means the small–scale fishermen in 2003 is 13,500. The production of fish and fish products in 2003 is 19,000 tons

  16. Banning is not enough: The complexities of oceanic shark management by tuna regional fisheries management organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Travassos Tolotti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, declining populations of several pelagic shark species have led to global conservation concerns surrounding this group. As a result, a series of species-specific banning measures have been implemented by Regional Fishery Management Organizations (RFMOs in charge of tuna fisheries, which include retention bans, finning bans and trading bans. There are both positive and negative aspects to most management measures, but generally, the positive aspects outweigh the negatives, ensuring the measure is beneficial to the resource and its users in the long term. Banning measures are a good first step towards the conservation of pelagic shark species, especially since they improve conservation awareness among fishers, managers and the public. Measures that impose total bans, however, can lead to negative impacts that may jeopardize the populations they were intended to protect. The majority of pelagic shark catches are incidental and most sharks die before they reach the vessel or after they are released. The legislation set out by RFMOs only prevents retention but not the actual capture or the mortality that may occur as a result. Managers should be fully aware that the development and implementation of mitigation measures are critical for a more effective conservation strategy.

  17. Improving the effectiveness of escape windows in directed Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus trawl fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Niels; Holst, René; Frandsen, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    A substantial improvement in the bycatch selectivity of Norway lobster Nephrops norvegicus trawls is required, particularly with respect to cod Gadus morhua , whose stocks are at low levels in several areas. Conventional escape windows are not adequate to properly release cod and other bycatch sp...

  18. Quantifying the impact of longline fisheries on adult survival in the black-footed albatross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veran, S.; Gimenez, O.; Flint, E.; Kendall, W.L.; Doherty, P.F.; Lebreton, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    1. Industrial longline fishing has been suspected to impact upon black-footed albatross populations Phoebastria nigripes by increasing mortality, but no precise estimates of bycatch mortality are available to ascertain this statement. We present a general framework for quantifying the relationship between albatross population and longline fishing in absence of reliable estimates of bycatch rate. 2. We analysed capture?recapture data of a population of black-footed albatross to obtain estimates of survival probability for this population using several alternative models to adequately take into account heterogeneity in the recapture process. Instead of trying to estimate the number of birds killed by using various extrapolations and unchecked assumptions, we investigate the potential relationship between annual adult survival and several measures of fishing effort. Although we considered a large number of covariates, we used principal component analysis to generate a few uncorrelated synthetic variables from the set and thus we maintained both power and robustness. 3. The average survival for 1997?2002 was 92%, a low value compared to estimates available for other albatross species. We found that one of the synthetic variables used to summarize industrial longline fishing significantly explained more than 40% of the variation in adult survival over 11 years, suggesting an impact by longline fishing on albatross? survival. 4. Our analysis provides some evidence of non-linear variation in survival with fishing effort. This could indicate that below a certain level of fishing effort, deaths due to incidental catch can be partially or totally compensated for by a decrease in natural mortality. Another possible explanation is the existence of a strong interspecific competition for accessing the baits, reducing the risk of being accidentally hooked. 5. Synthesis and applications. The suspicion of a significant impact of longline fishing on the black-footed albatross

  19. Respective impact of climate and fisheries on the growth of an albatross population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, V; Nevoux, M; Barbraud, C; Weimerskirch, H

    2009-07-01

    Climate and human activities such as fisheries impact many animal species. However, the demographic processes through which the population vital rates are affected, and the sensitivity of their growth rates, are poorly understood. The Black-browed Albatross, Thalassarche melanophrys, is a long-lived threatened seabird species. Previous studies have shown that the adult survival and breeding success of the population breeding at Kerguelen are affected by sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) during both the breeding and the nonbreeding season, and by tuna long-lining in Tasmanian waters through bycatch mortality. Here, using long-term demographic data from a Black-browed Albatross colony monitored for 26 years at Kerguelen, we estimate all demographic parameters from early to adult stages of the life cycle in order to build a fully parameterized population model and predict population growth rates under several scenarios of climate and fishing effort. The observed population growth rate (1.003) indicates that the population was stable or slightly increasing, and our population model gives a close estimate of 1.008. Population growth rate is more sensitive to survival of experienced breeders and accordingly to a change in SSTA during incubation and to tuna long-lining effort (both affecting survival of experienced breeders) than to other demographic parameters/environmental covariates. The population stability results from multiple factors and complex relationships between demographic parameters and environmental conditions, and therefore population equilibrium is precarious. If fishing effort remains stable at its current level and positive SSTA increase, or inversely if fishing effort decreases and SSTA remain similar to present values, then the population would increase. However, if fishing effort increases by 20% (i.e., to 40 million hooks) on the wintering grounds, without any change in SSTA, then the population would decrease at 0.9% per year. If fishing

  20. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C; Branch, Trevor A; Steven D Gaines; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    What would extensive fishery reform look like? In addition, what would be the benefits and trade-offs of implementing alternative approaches to fisheries management on a worldwide scale? To find out, we assembled the largest-of-its-kind database and coupled it to state-of-the-art bioeconomic models for more than 4,500 fisheries around the world. We find that, in nearly every country of the world, fishery recovery would simultaneously drive increases in food provision, fishery profits, and fis...

  1. Research agenda shrimp pulse fishery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlen, van B.; Rasenberg, M.M.M.; Verschueren, B.; Polet, H.

    2015-01-01

    In the recent decennia, many developments have taken place to improve the selectivity of the shrimp fishing gears. Recently, the development of a pulse gear for catching shrimps has taken up again as an opportunity to decrease discards, inspired by developments in the flatfish pulse fishery.

  2. New modes of fisheries governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de B.I.; Döring, R.; Aranda, M.; Buisman, F.C.; Frangoudes, K.; Goti, L.; Macher, C.; Maravelias, C.D.; Murillas-Maza, A.; Valk, van der O.; Vasilakopoulos, P.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries policy is increasingly influenced by civil society organizations. The newest example of this is the formulation of the landing obligation, a regulation that should reduce the contested practice of discarding unwanted fish. In this paper the implementation process of the landing

  3. Solving complex fisheries management problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petter Johnsen, Jahn; Eliasen, Søren Qvist

    2011-01-01

    A crucial issue for the new EU common fisheries policy is how to solve the discard problem. Through a study of the institutional set up and the arrangements for solving the discard problem in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway, the article identifies the discard problem as related...

  4. Work sharing in Kerela's fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.M.; Lensing, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Earlier studies suggest that once population growth and market integration reach a certain critical level, traditional practices of work sharing tend to degenerate or disappear altogether. Work sharing has, however, survived to date in small-scale fisheries in Kerala, India. Artisanal fishermen

  5. Market-Based Fisheries Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    This book reveals how a privatization of fish resources has paved the way for a wide-reaching concentration and change in ownership. It is a thought-provoking contribution to the debate on the future of European fisheries and the possible solutions to overfishing in Europe. Readers will discover...

  6. Global marine primary production constrains fisheries catches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassot, Emmanuel; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Mélin, Frédéric; Watson, Reg; Gascuel, Didier; Le Pape, Olivier

    2010-04-01

    Primary production must constrain the amount of fish and invertebrates available to expanding fisheries; however the degree of limitation has only been demonstrated at regional scales to date. Here we show that phytoplanktonic primary production, estimated from an ocean-colour satellite (SeaWiFS), is related to global fisheries catches at the scale of Large Marine Ecosystems, while accounting for temperature and ecological factors such as ecosystem size and type, species richness, animal body size, and the degree and nature of fisheries exploitation. Indeed we show that global fisheries catches since 1950 have been increasingly constrained by the amount of primary production. The primary production appropriated by current global fisheries is 17-112% higher than that appropriated by sustainable fisheries. Global primary production appears to be declining, in some part due to climate variability and change, with consequences for the near future fisheries catches.

  7. Small-scale fisheries in Greenlandic planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rikke Becker

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses an ongoing planning process in Greenlandic fisheries governance aiming to reform the coastal Greenland halibut fishery. It examines the way certain truths about this fishery and the need for reform are produced up to and in the final policy document ‘regulation concerning...... the coastal fishery for Greenland halibut’. Findings highlight the way the small-scale Greenland halibut fishery system becomes a particular governance problem with respect to particular contextual meanings of sustainability and long-term planning. The article then examines whether this governance problem...... could also be understood as primarily a problem to a certain ‘governmentality’ mode of governance. Whereas some fishery studies document how governmentality modes of governance in fisheries succeeds in transforming subjectivities, this study offers a view into the process that might go before successful...

  8. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous—the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world’s fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  9. 76 FR 73911 - List of Fisheries for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... 229 List of Fisheries for 2012; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday... Administration 50 CFR Part 229 RIN 0648-BA76 List of Fisheries for 2012 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) publishes its final List of Fisheries (LOF) for 2012,...

  10. 50 CFR 665.600 - PRIA bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA bottomfish fisheries. 665.600 Section 665.600 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific Remote Island...

  11. 50 CFR 660.324 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660.324 Section 660.324 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  12. 50 CFR 665.640 - PRIA crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA crustacean fisheries. 665.640 Section 665.640 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific Remote Island...

  13. 50 CFR 665.240 - Hawaii crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii crustacean fisheries. 665.240 Section 665.240 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  14. 50 CFR 665.440 - Mariana crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana crustacean fisheries. 665.440 Section 665.440 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  15. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260 Section 665.260 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  16. 50 CFR 229.11 - Confidential fisheries data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidential fisheries data. 229.11 Section 229.11 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS AUTHORIZATION FOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES UNDER THE...

  17. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  18. 50 CFR 660.50 - Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific Coast treaty Indian fisheries. 660.50 Section 660.50 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  19. 50 CFR 229.8 - Publication of List of Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of List of Fisheries. 229.8 Section 229.8 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS AUTHORIZATION FOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES UNDER THE...

  20. 50 CFR 229.5 - Requirements for Category III fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for Category III fisheries. 229.5 Section 229.5 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS AUTHORIZATION FOR COMMERCIAL FISHERIES...

  1. 50 CFR 665.400 - Mariana bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana bottomfish fisheries. 665.400 Section 665.400 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  2. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific...

  3. 50 CFR 665.100 - American Samoa bottomfish fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa bottomfish fisheries. 665.100 Section 665.100 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American...

  4. 50 CFR 665.140 - American Samoa Crustacean Fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa Crustacean Fisheries. 665.140 Section 665.140 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American...

  5. 50 CFR 660.383 - Open access fishery management measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open access fishery management measures... West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.383 Open access fishery management measures. (a) General. Groundfish species taken in open access fisheries will be managed with cumulative trip limits (see...

  6. Under pressure: cetaceans and fisheries co-occurrence off the coasts of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire (Gulf of Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Nita De Boer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the Gulf of Guinea high levels of fisheries-related cetacean mortality (bycatch and direct-capture has been documented. For locally rare species such removals could potentially lead to significant population level effects. However, information on the cetacean abundance and distribution is scarce. Similarly, it remains largely unreported where fishing fleets operate offshore. A cetacean survey took place during geophysical surveys (2013-2014 along the coasts of Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire. This provided a unique opportunity to study both offshore cetacean and fishing communities.Due to large group-sizes, melon-headed whales were the most abundant (0.34 animals km-1 followed by Fraser’s dolphins and short-finned pilot whales. Range state records were confirmed for melon-headed whale and Fraser’s dolphin in Ivoirian waters and ten further species represented first at-sea sightings. The artisanal fishing canoe was most abundant (92% of all vessels and recorded up to 99.5 km from the Ghanaian coast. Asian trawlers operated over shelf areas and tuna purse-seine vessels in deep oceanic and slope waters. Fraser’s dolphins, melon-headed whales, pantropical spotted dolphins, bottlenose dolphins and pilot whales were recorded in areas with the highest fishing densities. Melon-headed whales, pilot whales and rough-toothed dolphins were observed in vicinity of trawlers; bottlenose dolphins, pantropical spotted dolphins and pilot whales in vicinity of canoes. Some notable differences were found in the species composition between the present surveys and port-based surveys of landed cetaceans (bycatch/direct-captures. These may be explained by (1 feeding strategies (nocturnal vs. diurnal; surface vs. deep water; (2 different attractions to vessels/fishing gear; (3 variable body sizes; and (4 difficulty to positively identify species. Despite these differences, both cetaceans and fishing vessels predominantly occurred in shelf and slope waters (< 1

  7. Market-Based Fisheries Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    This book reveals how a privatization of fish resources has paved the way for a wide-reaching concentration and change in ownership. It is a thought-provoking contribution to the debate on the future of European fisheries and the possible solutions to overfishing in Europe. Readers will discover...... a timely, critical insight into the social, cultural and economic aspects and consequences of market-based fisheries management. The privatization of fish quotas in Denmark represents one of the most far-reaching and comprehensive privatization schemes of its kind and has been widely promoted as a market......-based system with innovative social safeguards. This work critically examines this privatization of fish resources, combining quantitative and qualitative material to provide new understanding of fish quotas and their social value. Scholars with an interest in privatization and the socio-economic aspects...

  8. 75 FR 41996 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Pollock Catch Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Pollock Catch Limit Revisions AGENCY: National Marine... associated increases in pollock catch limits under the Northeast (NE) Multispecies Fishery Management Plan..., including Overfishing Levels (OFLs), Acceptable Biological Catches (ABCs), Annual Catch Limits (ACLs),...

  9. 75 FR 22070 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... requirements for the Pacific halibut guided sport fishery in International Pacific Halibut Commission...; Guided Sport Charter Vessel Fishery for Halibut; Recordkeeping and Reporting AGENCY: National Marine... would revise federal requirements regarding the location and time period for submission of Alaska...

  10. Small-scale fisheries in Greenlandic planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rikke Becker

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses an ongoing planning process in Greenlandic fisheries governance aiming to reform the coastal Greenland halibut fishery. It examines the way certain truths about this fishery and the need for reform are produced up to and in the final policy document ‘regulation concerning...... governmentality: The process whereby a selected fishery becomes subjected to planned out-phasing through a combined construction of fleet and human identity....... the coastal fishery for Greenland halibut’. Findings highlight the way the small-scale Greenland halibut fishery system becomes a particular governance problem with respect to particular contextual meanings of sustainability and long-term planning. The article then examines whether this governance problem...

  11. Mixed fisheries forecasts – lessons learned from their initial application to North Sea fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Steven J.; Ulrich, Clara; Reeves, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    the work with the existing single stock assessments. The explicit representation of the complexity of the fisheries also raises questions about the extent to which mixed fisheries science can be used to give „advice‟ in the traditional sense. This paper addresses the challenges and issues that have arisen...... through the practical implementation of mixed-fishery forecasts, then discusses the further developments that will be required to progress towards more integrated multi-stock management using mixed-fishery management plans...

  12. Mixed fisheries forecasts—lessons learned from their initial application to North Sea fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, S.J.; Ulrich, Clara; Reeves, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    the work with the existing single‐stock assessments. The explicit representation of the complexity of the fisheries also raises questions about the extent to which mixed fisheries science can be used to give ”advice” in the traditional sense. This paper addresses the challenges and issues that have arisen...... through the practical implementation of mixed‐fishery forecasts, then discusses the further developments that will be required to progress towards more integrated multistock management using mixed‐fishery management plans...

  13. Species distribution modelling in fisheries science

    OpenAIRE

    Paradinas, Iosu

    2017-01-01

    Latest fisheries directives propose adopting an ecosystem approach to manage fisheries \\citep{FAO-EAFM}. Such an approach aims to protect important ecosystems based on the principle that healthy ecosystems produce more and thus enhance sustainability. Unfortunately, quantifying the importance of an ecosystem is a difficult task to do due the immense number of interactions involved in marine systems. This PhD dissertation relies on the fact that good fisheries distribution maps could play ...

  14. Freedom and poverty in the fishery commons

    OpenAIRE

    Svein Jentoft; Paul Onyango; Mohammad Mahmudul Islam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In fisheries, alleviating poverty sometimes requires strategies that are inherently in conflict. When aiming to develop a fishery as a means to reduce poverty, its common pool resource basis might be undermined, resulting in greater poverty. But poverty in fisheries is also linked to, or a part of deeper social issues and processes, for instance, the marginalization and exclusion of certain communities. Poverty also has many factors— income, health, literacy, gender, power, sec...

  15. Energy consumption in the Danish fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals...... that there are great differences in the fuel consumption between fisheries targeting ground or shellfish and those targeting pelagic or industrial fish....

  16. 78 FR 61828 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Framework Adjustment 2 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ..., which would maintain the status quo of 106,000 mt ABC and 91,200 mt ACL for the next 3 years. Response... Amendment 15 and Framework Adjustment 22 to the Scallop Fishery Management Plan (76 FR 43746, July 21, 2011... Management Plan (Framework 2) and the 2013-2015 fishery specifications for the Atlantic herring fishery...

  17. 76 FR 19929 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... combines the overfishing threshold from the status quo overfishing definition for open areas with a time... Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Amendment 15 to the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management Plan AGENCY: National...

  18. 78 FR 63892 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... catch limits for several stocks managed under the Northeast Multispecies Fishery Management Plan. The...) stocks as part of Framework Adjustment 50 to the NE Multispecies Fishery Management Plan (FMP) (78 FR... Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Monkfish...

  19. 76 FR 23940 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... (LAGC) fleets; open area days-at-sea (DAS) and Sea Scallop Access Area (access area) trip allocations... United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Framework Adjustment 22 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... 22) to the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management Plan (FMP), which was developed and adopted by...

  20. 75 FR 48874 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-AY14 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Herring Fishery; Specifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... announces final specifications for the 2010-2012 fishing years for the Atlantic herring (herring)...

  1. 76 FR 71501 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; American Lobster Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Cooperative Management Act Provisions; American Lobster Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS proposes new Federal American lobster regulations that would limit entry into the lobster trap fishery in Lobster Conservation Management Area 1 (Federal inshore waters-Gulf...

  2. 77 FR 15973 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Highly Migratory Species Fisheries; Swordfish Retention Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... States; Highly Migratory Species Fisheries; Swordfish Retention Limits AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...) to modify retention limits for swordfish harvested in the U.S. West Coast-based deep-set tuna... limits of swordfish captured in the DSLL fishery as follows: if a vessel without an observer onboard...

  3. Ecosystem services and cooperative fisheries research to address a complex fishery problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    The St. Louis River represents a complex fishery management problem. Current fishery management goals have to be developed taking into account bi-state commercial, subsistence and recreational fisheries which are valued for different characteristics by a wide range of anglers, as...

  4. 78 FR 59916 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; South Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.... SUMMARY: The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (SAFMC) will hold a meeting of its Scientific and... 24, 2013. ADDRESSES: ] Meeting address: The meeting will be held at the Crowne Plaza Airport Hotel...

  5. 78 FR 56641 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial Groundfish Fishery Management... Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP) by liberalizing RCA boundaries in order to improve... specifications and management measures in a proposed and final rule, 77 FR 67974, November 14, 2012 and 78 FR...

  6. 78 FR 68764 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Commercial, Limited Entry Pacific Coast... fixed gear sectors managed under the Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). This action... catcher/processor trawl fleets (whiting only). Since that time, the Pacific Fishery Management...

  7. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Adjustment 7, are available from: Dr. Christopher M. Moore, Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) (75 FR 11441, March 11, 2010) as a...: December 10, 2012. Alan Risenhoover, Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, performing the...

  8. 76 FR 43745 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... Part 648 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) Provisions; Fisheries of the... Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BA71 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA... with requirements of the MSA as reauthorized in 2007. Amendment 15 includes additional...

  9. The Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) is headquartered in Miami, FL. The SEFSC is responsible for scientific research on living marine resources that occupy...

  10. 78 FR 59917 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... English. However, simultaneous interpretation (English-Spanish) will be provided. Fishers and other... Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  11. 76 FR 49452 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... English. However, simultaneous interpretation (English-Spanish) will be provided. Fishers and other..., Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE...

  12. 77 FR 63296 - Fisheries of the Northeast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC159 Fisheries of the Northeast Region AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... appropriate fishery management council (Council) whenever it determines that overfishing is occurring, a...

  13. 78 FR 64480 - Fisheries of the Northeast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC866 Fisheries of the Northeast Region AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... overfished condition. NMFS, on behalf of the Secretary, notifies the appropriate fishery management...

  14. 78 FR 31519 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: The New England Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Oversight Committee will meet to... held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI 02903; telephone: (401) 421...

  15. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... are found at § 660.11, subpart C. Daily Trip Limit (DTL) Fishery means a sablefish fishery that occurs... tier limit and when they are not eligible to fish in the DTL fishery. Sablefish primary season...

  16. 78 FR 928 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC428 New England Fishery Management Council... CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  17. 76 FR 70420 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA815 New England Fishery Management Council... CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  18. 75 FR 63146 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ64 New England Fishery Management Council.... Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  19. 76 FR 41216 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA561 New England Fishery Management Council... New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950;...

  20. 77 FR 27440 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  1. 75 FR 49466 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XY17 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  2. 78 FR 53729 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC840 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  3. 78 FR 62587 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC923 New England Fishery Management Council...: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  4. 78 FR 48860 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC802 New England Fishery Management Council...: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, ] New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  5. 76 FR 64073 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA763 New England Fishery Management Council... locations, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  6. 77 FR 19146 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of the shallow-water... Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  7. 75 FR 80469 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ...; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Froeschke, Fishery Biologist- Statistician; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348... of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P ...

  8. Linking fishery management and conservation in a tropical estuarine lagoon: biological and physical effects of an artisanal fishing gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, M.; Defeo, O.

    2003-04-01

    Information coming from fishery monitoring, surveys and experimental fishing with participation of fishers was employed to determine the impact of an artisanal gear, 'boliche', on the biodiversity of the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta (CGSM), an estuarine lagoon on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Fishery monitoring (catch data) included landings before (1968 and 1978) and after (1994-1996) the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM (1985), whereas surveys were conducted seasonally during 1993-1994. Fishing experiments involved evaluating different mesh sizes and the short-term effect of physical disturbance by the boliche. Monitoring suggested potential trophic effects of this fishing gear: the catch of large, long-lived, carnivorous species declined after the introduction of the boliche in the CGSM, whereas catch rates of smaller, shorter-lived, and lower trophic level species increased. Surveys revealed that the boliche retained 41 species. The by-catch made up 62% of the total catch and the remaining 38% involved the three target species Eugerres plumieri, Mugil incilis and Cathorops spixii. Selectivity experiments showed that 2.5 in. stretched mesh size gill nets caught more species than the 3.0-in. mesh. The smaller mesh also increased the risk of a critical reduction in the spawning stock of target species (notably E. plumieri); a situation that could affect the fish community if mesh sizes lower than 2.5 in. were intensively used. Suspended particulate matter significantly increased after fishing activity, with higher resuspension on mud-shells and mud substrata, whereas dissolved oxygen showed no appreciable changes after fishing operations. Notwithstanding, the activity of the boliche would generate sediment resuspension between 382 and 470 t day -1, which could lead to potential cascade impacts on water quality. We propose a framework of redundancy in management measures in order to simultaneously reach management and conservation goals.

  9. Combined spatio-temporal impacts of climate and longline fisheries on the survival of a trans-equatorial marine migrant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raül Ramos

    Full Text Available Predicting the impact of human activities and their derivable consequences, such as global warming or direct wildlife mortality, is increasingly relevant in our changing world. Due to their particular life history traits, long-lived migrants are amongst the most endangered and sensitive group of animals to these harming effects. Our ability to identify and quantify such anthropogenic threats in both breeding and wintering grounds is, therefore, of key importance in the field of conservation biology. Using long-term capture-recapture data (34 years, 4557 individuals and year-round tracking data (4 years, 100 individuals of a trans-equatorial migrant, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea, we investigated the impact of longline fisheries and climatic variables in both breeding and wintering areas on the most important demographic trait of this seabird, i.e. adult survival. Annual adult survival probability was estimated at 0.914±0.022 on average, declining throughout 1978-1999 but recovering during the last decade (2005-2011. Our results suggest that both the incidental bycatch associated with longline fisheries and high sea surface temperatures (indirectly linked to food availability; SST increased mortality rates during the long breeding season (March-October. Shearwater survival was also negatively affected during the short non-breeding season (December-February by positive episodes of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI. Indirect negative effects of climate at both breeding (SST and wintering grounds (SOI had a greater impact on survival than longliner activity, and indeed these climatic factors are those which are expected to present more unfavourable trends in the future. Our work underlines the importance of considering both breeding and wintering habitats as well as precise schedules/phenology when assessing the global role of the local impacts on the dynamics of migratory species.

  10. Solving complex fisheries management problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petter Johnsen, Jahn; Eliasen, Søren Qvist

    2011-01-01

    A crucial issue for the new EU common fisheries policy is how to solve the discard problem. Through a study of the institutional set up and the arrangements for solving the discard problem in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway, the article identifies the discard problem as related to ...... to both natural, other material and to cultural conditions. Hence, solving the discard problem requires not only technical and regulatory instruments, but also arenas and structures that allow and facilitate processes of cultural change....

  11. Market-Based Fisheries Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    This book reveals how a privatization of fish resources has paved the way for a wide-reaching concentration and change in ownership. It is a thought-provoking contribution to the debate on the future of European fisheries and the possible solutions to overfishing in Europe. Readers will discover......-based system with innovative social safeguards. This work critically examines this privatization of fish resources, combining quantitative and qualitative material to provide new understanding of fish quotas and their social value. Scholars with an interest in privatization and the socio-economic aspects...

  12. Training course 'Fisheries data collection and analysis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Course description of the course “Fisheries data collection and analysis”, held from October 1st till October 19th 2007 and organised by the Programme for Capacity development & Institutional Change of Wageningen International in cooperation with Wageningen University – Aquaculture and Fisheries

  13. A Marine Fisheries Program for the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    This government publication describing the national plan for marine fisheries is divided into two parts. The first part contains a statement by the Secretary of Commerce, Elliot L. Richardson; the goals for the national marine fisheries plan; a description of the six parts of the plan; and a cost estimate for the program. The goals for the plan…

  14. Introduction: Regionalising the Common Fisheries Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raakjær, Jesper; Hegland, Troels Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The idea of putting together a special issue of MAST on the issue of regionalisation of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), was born in late 2010. Having participated in an EU funded research project looking into how an eco-system based approach to fisheries management could be operationalised...

  15. Who defines the need for fishery reform?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rikke Becker; Raakjær, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates recent reforms of the Greenland coastal fisheries in order to contribute to the general lessons on reform and policy networks in the context of a changing Arctic stakeholdership. It analyses participation in fisheries governance decision-making by examining the emergence...

  16. On avoidance activities in fishery enforcement models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Abildtrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Compliance and enforcement in fisheries are important issues from an economic point of view since management measures are useless without a certain level of enforcement. These conclusions come from the well-established theoretical literature on compliance and enforcement problems within fisheries...

  17. International Regulation of Central Arctic Ocean Fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Due in particular to the impacts of climate change, the adequacy of the international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years. As shown in this article, however, international regulation of Central Arctic Ocean fisheries is by no means entirely

  18. Report on the Faroese fisheries regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jesper Levring; Boje, Jesper;

    In 2004, the Institute of Food and Resource Economics (FOI) in cooperation with the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research (DIFRES) produced a report on the Faroese Fisheries management in Danish. The report caused significant interest in Denmark from managers and fishing industry....

  19. Challenges in licensing the industrial double-rig trawl fisheries in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo-Pezzuto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bottom trawling is important in Brazilian fisheries and is currently highly multi-specific due to the overexploitation of the original targets; unselective fishing method; very large permitted fishing area and the country's high marine biodiversity. Fishing licensing in Brazil was modified in 2012 and is now based in five criteria: target species; "expected by-catch"; "incidental catches"; fishing method and area of operation. Licenses of trawling fleets exhibit, therefore, dozens of species catchable under the first three criteria. In this paper, we analyze industrial double-rig trawling fleets targeting shrimps and demersal fishes, in order to verify in what extent the new system adhere to the current fishing reality, giving new information to improve the current management regime. A total of 4,194 trips from 191 vessels were studied between 2008 and 2010 in southern Brazil. In spite of depending economically on their targets, the fleets are formally authorized to catch a high percentage of species in common (41 to 71%, and the actual landings revealed an even greater overlapping among them (71 to 82%. Vessels licensed to catch demersal fishes obtained nearly 50% of their revenue from items not included in their licenses. It was concluded that the current system encourages excessive effort concentrations over fishing resources, as they can be legally caught by most vessels irrespective of their licenses. It is suggested that licensing should move from a species-based to a spatial-based approach, by defining smaller management areas according to the respective species assemblages. Landing composition would be, therefore, mostly a biological and technological consequence, making management more reasonable and workable under a multi-specific and mega-diverse scenario.

  20. Energy consumption in the Danish fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of certain fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals...... that there are great differences in fuel consumption between fisheries targeting groundfish or shellfish and those targeting pelagic fish or industrial fish. Here, I show that fuel consumption per kilogram of caught fish varies considerably as a function of fishing gear and vessel size, even considering the same......) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of certain fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals that there are great differences in fuel consumption between...

  1. Energy consumption in the Danish fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals that th...... that there are great differences in the fuel consumption between fisheries targeting ground or shellfish and those targeting pelagic or industrial fish.......Previous studies based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals...

  2. Status of eel fisheries, stocks and their management in England and Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprahamian M.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available All continental life stages of eel are exploited in England and Wales. The main fisheries for glass eel are by estuarine dip-nets in the southwest. The main fisheries for yellow and silver eel occur in southern and eastern England, with fyke nets being the preferred instrument. Fishing effort is not directly recorded but is inferred from licence sales. Around 1100 glass eel licenses were sold annually from 1980 to 1994, increasing to around 2500 in 1998, but declined to about 800 per annum since 2001. Declared catches of glass eel have been below 1–2 t since 2001, compared to 10–70 t in the 1970s and 1980s. Licence sales for yellow and silver eel fisheries (combined varied from around 1100 to 2900 over the period 1983–2007, peaking in the mid-1980s, mid-1990s and again in 2005–2007. Declared catches peaked in the late 1980s and mid-1990s (peak 280 t, but have been low since 2001 (mean 29 t. Nett export data suggests catches may be 4 times higher. Eel landings are reported as bycatch from various marine fisheries around the UK coasts, with landings from 2001 to 2007 ranging from 0.2 to 13.7 t per annum. Assessment of stock status is based mainly on catch and catch per unit effort data as there has been little fishery independent survey of eels. There has been a general decreasing trend in both glass eel catches reported to the Agency and in nett export data. Comparing maximum catch levels in the late 1970s–early 1980s with minimum levels in the 2000s suggests that the catch has declined by around 75–95%. Trends in CPUE are similar, at least until 1998. It is concluded that current glass eel recruitment to the western coast of the UK is approximately 30% of the pre-1980 level of recruitment. Yellow and silver eel indices derived from HMRC nett exports or reported catches per licence sold, both suggest that the current estimate of stocks derived from these data are 20% those of the late 1980s and mid 1990s. The Reference Condition

  3. 76 FR 11857 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... necessary to evaluate the risks of jeopardizing stock status. Therefore, the SSC did not recommend any... amount of catch associated with F MSY , i.e., the F that, if applied over the long term, would result in... (Council) to prevent overfishing, rebuild overfished stocks, achieve optimum yield (OY), and minimize...

  4. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-10-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions-Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of métiers mainly in the small-scale and semi-industrial fishing sectors. The responses manifest statistically significant geographical variation. Multidimensional plots and cluster analyses lead the authors to identify three clusters: (1) Southeast Asian (Vietnam and Thailand); (2) Caribbean (Belize, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic) and (3) Afro-Indian (Senegal, Guinea Bissau, and India). Jamaica is a significant outlier. On a general level, the authors conclude that fishers who report that they are not interested in leaving the occupation of fishing score higher on three traditional job satisfaction scales-basic needs, social needs and self actualization. Those who say they would leave fishing for another occupation are younger, have less fishing experience and smaller households. The latter findings are of relevance with regard to the pressing need, felt by fisheries managers, to move fishers out of the fishery.

  5. Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artifacts from early coastal settlements show that fishing was an important activity for the inhabitants of Alaska. Today, the fish harvested from the waters around Alaska are in excess of two million metric tones per year. The industry is vitally important to the economy of coastal communities. ...

  6. Fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Humans have been fishing for more than 100,000 years, and until c. 1900 most fishing practices were sustainable. During the last 100 years almost every corner of the oceans have been heavily impacted by modern industrial fishing. The amount of wild caught fish peaked in 1980, but due to the rapidly...

  7. 78 FR 29332 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Fisheries i. Offshore fisheries ii. Coastal fisheries 5. Break 6. Agency Perspectives on climate change and...; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Program 8. Status of Endangered Species Act (ESA) Listings 9. Marine Conservation Plan Updates...

  8. 27 CFR 28.22 - Vessels employed in the fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fisheries. 28.22 Section 28.22 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Lading for Use on Certain Vessels and Aircraft § 28.22 Vessels employed in the fisheries. Liquors may be... the fisheries, only for use on vessels of the United States documented to engage in the fisheries...

  9. 78 FR 9660 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The...), incidental halibut catch in the salmon troll fishery, adjust the months for the incidental take fishery from...), and paragraph (7) of section 11, an incidental catch fishery is authorized during salmon troll...

  10. 50 CFR 660.312 - Open access fishery-prohibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open access fishery-prohibitions. 660.312... Groundfish-Open Access Fisheries § 660.312 Open access fishery—prohibitions. General groundfish prohibitions..., possess, or land groundfish in excess of the landing limit for the open access fishery without having...

  11. 50 CFR 660.311 - Open access fishery-definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Open access fishery-definitions. 660.311... Groundfish-Open Access Fisheries § 660.311 Open access fishery—definitions. General definitions for the... specific to the open access fishery covered in this subpart and are in addition to those specified at §...

  12. Screening California Current fishery management scenarios using the Atlantis end-to-end ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Isaac C.; Horne, Peter J.; Levin, Phillip S.

    2012-09-01

    End-to-end marine ecosystem models link climate and oceanography to the food web and human activities. These models can be used as forecasting tools, to strategically evaluate management options and to support ecosystem-based management. Here we report the results of such forecasts in the California Current, using an Atlantis end-to-end model. We worked collaboratively with fishery managers at NOAA’s regional offices and staff at the National Marine Sanctuaries (NMS) to explore the impact of fishery policies on management objectives at different spatial scales, from single Marine Sanctuaries to the entire Northern California Current. In addition to examining Status Quo management, we explored the consequences of several gear switching and spatial management scenarios. Of the scenarios that involved large scale management changes, no single scenario maximized all performance metrics. Any policy choice would involve trade-offs between stakeholder groups and policy goals. For example, a coast-wide 25% gear shift from trawl to pot or longline appeared to be one possible compromise between an increase in spatial management (which sacrificed revenue) and scenarios such as the one consolidating bottom impacts to deeper areas (which did not perform substantially differently from Status Quo). Judged on a coast-wide scale, most of the scenarios that involved minor or local management changes (e.g. within Monterey Bay NMS only) yielded results similar to Status Quo. When impacts did occur in these cases, they often involved local interactions that were difficult to predict a priori based solely on fishing patterns. However, judged on the local scale, deviation from Status Quo did emerge, particularly for metrics related to stationary species or variables (i.e. habitat and local metrics of landed value or bycatch). We also found that isolated management actions within Monterey Bay NMS would cause local fishers to pay a cost for conservation, in terms of reductions in landed

  13. Management effectiveness of the world's marine fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Mora

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing declines in production of the world's fisheries may have serious ecological and socioeconomic consequences. As a result, a number of international efforts have sought to improve management and prevent overexploitation, while helping to maintain biodiversity and a sustainable food supply. Although these initiatives have received broad acceptance, the extent to which corrective measures have been implemented and are effective remains largely unknown. We used a survey approach, validated with empirical data, and enquiries to over 13,000 fisheries experts (of which 1,188 responded to assess the current effectiveness of fisheries management regimes worldwide; for each of those regimes, we also calculated the probable sustainability of reported catches to determine how management affects fisheries sustainability. Our survey shows that 7% of all coastal states undergo rigorous scientific assessment for the generation of management policies, 1.4% also have a participatory and transparent processes to convert scientific recommendations into policy, and 0.95% also provide for robust mechanisms to ensure the compliance with regulations; none is also free of the effects of excess fishing capacity, subsidies, or access to foreign fishing. A comparison of fisheries management attributes with the sustainability of reported fisheries catches indicated that the conversion of scientific advice into policy, through a participatory and transparent process, is at the core of achieving fisheries sustainability, regardless of other attributes of the fisheries. Our results illustrate the great vulnerability of the world's fisheries and the urgent need to meet well-identified guidelines for sustainable management; they also provide a baseline against which future changes can be quantified.

  14. Management effectiveness of the world's marine fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Camilo; Myers, Ransom A; Coll, Marta; Libralato, Simone; Pitcher, Tony J; Sumaila, Rashid U; Zeller, Dirk; Watson, Reg; Gaston, Kevin J; Worm, Boris

    2009-06-16

    Ongoing declines in production of the world's fisheries may have serious ecological and socioeconomic consequences. As a result, a number of international efforts have sought to improve management and prevent overexploitation, while helping to maintain biodiversity and a sustainable food supply. Although these initiatives have received broad acceptance, the extent to which corrective measures have been implemented and are effective remains largely unknown. We used a survey approach, validated with empirical data, and enquiries to over 13,000 fisheries experts (of which 1,188 responded) to assess the current effectiveness of fisheries management regimes worldwide; for each of those regimes, we also calculated the probable sustainability of reported catches to determine how management affects fisheries sustainability. Our survey shows that 7% of all coastal states undergo rigorous scientific assessment for the generation of management policies, 1.4% also have a participatory and transparent processes to convert scientific recommendations into policy, and 0.95% also provide for robust mechanisms to ensure the compliance with regulations; none is also free of the effects of excess fishing capacity, subsidies, or access to foreign fishing. A comparison of fisheries management attributes with the sustainability of reported fisheries catches indicated that the conversion of scientific advice into policy, through a participatory and transparent process, is at the core of achieving fisheries sustainability, regardless of other attributes of the fisheries. Our results illustrate the great vulnerability of the world's fisheries and the urgent need to meet well-identified guidelines for sustainable management; they also provide a baseline against which future changes can be quantified.

  15. 78 FR 15674 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Proposed 2013-2015 Spiny Dogfish Fishery Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... and trip-level spiny dogfish revenues relative to the status quo. The proposed action is expected to... jeopardizing the long-term sustainability of the stock. Therefore, the economic impacts resulting from...

  16. 75 FR 26679 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Amendment to Emergency Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Amendment to Emergency Fisheries Closure in... and recordkeeping requirements, Virgin Islands. 50 CFR Part 635 Fisheries, Fishing, Fishing vessels, Imports, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Treaties. 50 CFR Part 654 Fisheries, Fishing....

  17. 75 FR 18427 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic; Closure AGENCY...-5308, e-mail Catherine.Bruger@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The snapper-grouper fishery of the South Atlantic is managed under the Fishery Management Plan for the Snapper- Grouper Fishery of...

  18. International Fisheries Management and Recreational Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oinonen, Soile; Grønbæk, Lone; Laukkanen, Marita

    2016-01-01

    scenarios. In the first scenario, countries take their participation decision for the IFA based only on the net present value of profits from commercial fisheries. In the second scenario, the net present value of the recreational benefits from angling is also considered. The results show that accounting......This article studies how accounting for the benefits of recreational fisheries affects the formation and stability of an international fisheries agreement (IFA) on the management of Baltic salmon stocks. The interaction between four countries is modelled through a partition function game, under two...

  19. 77 FR 75101 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; West Coast Salmon Fisheries; Amendment 17 to the Salmon Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Chinook and coho landed in the treaty Indian ocean troll fishery was $1.7 million, compared with inflation...). During 2011, the tribal troll harvest was worth $1.7 million exvessel, implying that the average...

  20. Population dynamics and spatial distribution of flatfish species in shrimp trawl bycatch in the Gulf of California Dinámica poblacional y distribución espacial de los lenguados capturados incidentalmente en arrastres camaroneros en el Golfo de California

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hiram Rábago-Quiroz; Juana López-Martínez; Eloisa Herrera-Valdivia; Manuel O. Nevárez-Martínez; Jesús Rodríguez-Romero

    2008-01-01

    By determining the specific composition, spatial distribution and population dynamics of flatfish species captured in shrimp trawls' bycatch in the Gulf of California, this study aims to contribute to the knowledge of bycatch fish population which has thus far been of little interest. Samplings were taken from shrimp trawls' in two fishing seasons (2002 and 2003) onboard shrimp fleets and also from two research cruises during closed shrimp season. The results showed 15 species of flatfish bel...

  1. Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program, Volume I : Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin, 1993 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, Charles F.; Ward, David L.

    1995-06-01

    Modified Merwin trap nets were tested by an experimental fishery in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam to determine their effectiveness in selectively harvesting northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) over 11 inches in total length. The fishery was evaluated for its potential to supplement exploitation rates of the sportreward and dam-angling fisheries to achieve the objectives of the northern squawfish management program. Special consideration was given to the potential for, and impact on, incidental catches of adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) listed as threatened and endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Preseason site and data surveys identified suitable fishing locations where physical parameters are favorable to trap-net deployment and northern squawfish habitat was present. A total of 16 floating trap nets were operated from June 2 through August 4, 1993. We made 1,392 sets with a mean soak time of 2.9 hours. The total catch was 45,803 fishes including 10,440 (23% of the total catch) northern squawfish of which 1,688 (4% of the total catch) were large (greater than 11 inches in total length). Mean catch rate was 0.3 large northern squawfish per hour of soak time. Nearly all incidentally captured fishes were released alive and in good condition. Bycatch of adult salmonids totaled 1,036 fishes (2% of the total catch). Operational criteria, designed to limit incidental take of salmonids, restricted the fishing time, dates, and locations. In addition, lack of prior operating experience with the gear type and limited gear effectiveness in high velocities found in the free-flowing river below Bonneville Dam contributed to the low harvest rate for northern squawfish. We determined that a large scale floating trap-net fishery outside the boat restricted zones (BRZs) of hydropower projects would not significantly improve the exploitation rate of northern squawfish either above or below Bonneville Dam.

  2. Captura incidental de tortugas marinas durante El Niño 1997-1998, en el norte del Perú Sea turtles by-catch during El Niño 1997-1998, in northern Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Castro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta evidencia del aumento de capturas incidentales de tortugas marinas en el norte del Perú, durante el fenómeno El Niño Oscilación del Sur (ENOS 1997-1998. El área de estudio se ubica frente a Lambayeque, entre 6°20'S y 7°10'S, y desde la costa hasta 35 mn mar afuera. Se analizaron y describieron los aparejos de enmalle por ser los que más interactuaban con estas tortugas, así como las características de las embarcaciones. Se registraron las tortugas capturadas por la flota artesanal entre enero 1996 y diciembre 1998; se identificó las especies capturadas y se analizó la captura por unidad de esfuerzo (CPUE; la información se correlacionó con la temperatura superficial del mar (TSM. Se analizó un total de 265 operaciones de pesca, capturándose un total de 383 tortugas, correspondiendo 80,4% a la tortuga pico de loro (Lepidochelys olivacea, 19,3% a la tortuga verde (Chelonia mydas y 0.2% a la tortuga carey (Eretmochelys imbricata. Se encontró una correlación altamente significativa entre las capturas de tortugas marinas y la TSM con un intervalo de confianza del 99% (Pearson; r = 0,787; σ = 0,000; N = 36. Se recomienda reforzar la colaboración entre entidades públicas y privadas para implementar medidas de manejo adecuadas para la conservación de estas especies amenazadas, sobre todo ante la eventualidad de un fenómeno ENOS.The main purpose of this work is to present evidence of sea turtles by-catch increase in northern Peru during the 1997-1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO process. The study area is located off Lambayeque, between 6°20'S and 7°10'S, and from the coastline up to 35 nm offshore. The gillnet artisanal fishery was analyzed and described, since this was the fishing gear which most interact with sea turtles, the boat characteristics were evaluated as well. Sea turtle captures and species identification were registered from January 1996 until December 1998. The catch per unit effort (CPUE was

  3. A conservation program for Alaska's commercial fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this report to show how the present programs of the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries relate to problems of the various...

  4. NMFS Fishery-Independent Survey System (FINSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fishery Independent Survey System (FINSS) is a national system that characterizes NMFS ocean observation activities, stock and ecosystem data collections during...

  5. Harvest control rules in modern fisheries management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturla F. Kvamsdal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harvest control rules have become an important tool in modern fisheries management, and are increasingly adopted to provide continuity in management practices, to deal with uncertainty and ecosystem considerations, and to relieve management decisions from short-term political pressure. We provide the conceptual and institutional background for harvest control rules, a discussion of the structure of fisheries management, and brief introductions to harvest control rules in a selection of present day cases. The cases demonstrate that harvest control rules take different forms in different settings, yet cover only a subset of the full policy space. We conclude with views on harvest control rules in future fisheries management, both in terms of ideal and realistic developments. One major challenge for future fisheries management is closing the gap between ideas and practice.

  6. THE KNOWLEDGE BASE FOR FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    and the associated relevance criteria for knowledge – has been promoted by most national ...... Table III: List of indicators describing the fishery production ..... Rome;. FAO: 41 pp. FAO 1999 — Indicators for sustainable development of marine.

  7. Fishery management scenarios : Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fishery resources at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) have been managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service since the early 1960's. Management activities included...

  8. Fishery Management Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of the Mingo NWR Fishery Management Plan are to maintain and improve the quality of aquatic habitats for a well-balanced community of fish and other...

  9. Seabird mortality caused by Japanese gillnet fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The meeting covered three aspects: (1) review of data collected by the Fishery Agency on gillnetting of seabirds, (2) U.S. participation as observers aboard Japanese...

  10. Fishery management plan for the Dorris reservoir

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fishery Management Plan for Dorris Reservoir at Modoc National Wildlife Refuge. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service proposes to continue a public fishing program...

  11. Energy consumption in the Danish fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel

    2004-01-01

    that there are great differences in fuel consumption between fisheries targeting groundfish or shellfish and those targeting pelagic fish or industrial fish. Here, I show that fuel consumption per kilogram of caught fish varies considerably as a function of fishing gear and vessel size, even considering the same...... fisheries targeting groundfish or shellfish and those targeting pelagic fish or industrial fish. Here, I show that fuel consumption per kilogram of caught fish varies considerably as a function of fishing gear and vessel size, even considering the same target species. I argue that these differences need......Previous studies based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) in Denmark and Sweden have shown that the fishery is the environmental "hot spot" in the life cycle of certain fish products. Within the fishery, fuel consumption is one of the most important factors addressed by LCA. The present study reveals...

  12. American Fisheries Act (AFA) Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning January 1, 2000, all vessels and processors wishing to participate in the non-CDQ Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) pollock fishery are required to...

  13. Guam Commercial Fisheries BioSampling (CFBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Guam Commercial Fisheries Biosampling program, which collects length and weight frequency data for whole commercial catches, and samples 4-8 species for in-depth...

  14. Unregulated high seas fisheries: the interlopers issue

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, M. P.; Filipe, J.; Manuel Alberto M. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Illegal behaviour and public enforcement of law are important theoretical and empirical subjects for Economics. They were dormant in economic scholarship, until the article of Becker, 1968, “Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach”. In the context of Fisheries Economics, the problem can be seen as an externality arising when exclusive property rights are absent. That absence depends on the costs of defining and enforcing exclusivity and the problem becomes more complex when fisheries are t...

  15. Status and solutions for the world's unassessed fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Hilborn, Ray; Gaines, Steven D; Deschenes, Olivier; Lester, Sarah E

    2012-10-26

    Recent reports suggest that many well-assessed fisheries in developed countries are moving toward sustainability. We examined whether the same conclusion holds for fisheries lacking formal assessment, which comprise >80% of global catch. We developed a method using species' life-history, catch, and fishery development data to estimate the status of thousands of unassessed fisheries worldwide. We found that small unassessed fisheries are in substantially worse condition than assessed fisheries, but that large unassessed fisheries may be performing nearly as well as their assessed counterparts. Both small and large stocks, however, continue to decline; 64% of unassessed stocks could provide increased sustainable harvest if rebuilt. Our results suggest that global fishery recovery would simultaneously create increases in abundance (56%) and fishery yields (8 to 40%).

  16. 75 FR 60867 - Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... catch accounting. Response. Appendix H to the EIS for Amendment 20, the ``Regulatory Impact Review and... Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery Management Plan; Amendments 20 and 21; Trawl... Part 902 50 CFR Part 660 RIN 0648-AY68 Fisheries off West Coast States; Pacific Coast Groundfish...

  17. 75 FR 34049 - Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Provisions; Fisheries of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... assessment of changes to other fishery management plans that may impact skates, and determine if changes to... updated biological and socio-economic information regarding the skate complex and its associated fisheries... Amendment 3 and its proposed rule focused on the expected negative economic impacts of the...

  18. 75 FR 22103 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Atlantic Coastal Shark Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Management Act Provisions; Atlantic Coastal Shark Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Atlantic Coastal Sharks (Plan) and that the measures New Jersey has failed to implement and enforce are necessary for the conservation of the shark resource. This determination is consistent with the findings...

  19. 75 FR 9158 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Coastal Sharks Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Management Act Provisions; Coastal Sharks Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... Management Plan (ISFMP) for Coastal Sharks. Subsequently, the Commission referred the matter to NMFS, under... out its responsibilities under the Coastal Sharks ISFMP, and if the measures it failed to...

  20. 78 FR 50347 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Modifications of the West Coast Commercial Salmon Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Salmon Technical Team (STT). Inseason Action The table below lists the inseason actions announced in this... 2,700 Chinook salmon; therefore, 300 Chinook quota from May remained. The Salmon Technical Team (STT... STT calculated that transferring 387 Chinook from the June fishery to the July fishery in the CA-KMZ...

  1. 77 FR 73957 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery; Closure of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... area rotation program, the heavy fishing effort decreased scallop biomass significantly. Framework... Team (PDT) meeting on August 19 and 20, 2012, staff from the NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center... (which represents future recruitment for the fishery) in the ETA is extremely high compared to recent...

  2. 76 FR 65155 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Highly Migratory Species Fisheries; Swordfish Retention Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... States; Highly Migratory Species Fisheries; Swordfish Retention Limits AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... and Management Act (MSA) to modify retention limits for swordfish, Xiphias gladius, harvested in the U... FMP regulations governing the possession and landing limits of swordfish captured in the DSLL...

  3. 76 FR 11969 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... decrease the future stock of the species, as well as harvest limits, thereby reducing future potential... States; Coastal Pelagic Species Fisheries; Annual Specifications AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... this species on July 1, 2011. Vessels with Pacific sardine catch must be at shore and in the process...

  4. 76 FR 23964 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Pelagic Fisheries; Purse Seine Prohibited Areas Around American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... more recent purse seine fishery information exists and more recent troll and longline fishery... information would not change the Council's analyses or management objectives. More recent troll and longline... fishing grounds accessible to the small-scale troll and longline fleets. Reductions in fish density...

  5. The widening gap between fisheries biology and fisheries management in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corten, A.

    1996-01-01

    The extension of economic zones and the introduction of a common fisheries policy in the European Union have not had the results expected in fish stock management. Fisheries managers seem to be increasingly sceptical about the prospects of exploiting fish stocks at anywhere near the maximum

  6. 76 FR 54739 - Pacific Halibut Fishery; Guideline Harvest Levels for the Guided Sport Fishery for Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... NMFS' authority to take action at any time to limit the guided sport angler catch to the GHL (74 FR... the guided sport halibut fishery in Areas 2C and 3A on January 5, 2010 (75 FR 554). As of February 1... guided sport and commercial fisheries in Areas 2C and 3A (76 FR 44156). If approved by the Secretary...

  7. 78 FR 77431 - Appointments to a Recreational Fisheries Working Group by the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... of the following: The management or business of recreational fishing and/or fisheries science; a well.... MAFAC established the RFWG to advise MAFAC on issues of importance to the recreational fishing community... Recreational Fisheries Action Agendas, (2) planning for and participation in a National Saltwater...

  8. 75 FR 24482 - Fisheries Off West Coast States; West Coast Salmon Fisheries; 2010 Management Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... harvest reductions in Canadian intercepting fisheries largely to benefit the escapement of natural origin... salmon primarily between Horse Mountain and Point Arena, California. There will be no commercial salmon.... Recreational fisheries for Chinook salmon south of Cape Falcon, Oregon to Horse Mountain, California will be...

  9. 78 FR 65888 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Adjustments for the Common Pool Fishery... Handgear A, Handgear B, and Small Vessel Category permits be adjusted relative to the cod trip limits for DAS vessels, and these adjustments are specified in Table 3. These trip limit adjustments for all...

  10. 78 FR 10556 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Adjustments for the Common Pool Fishery... fishing year. This rule also decreases the trip limits for white hake and pollock. This is intended to...) established the current trip limits for the common pool vessels fishing under a Category A day-at-sea (DAS...

  11. 76 FR 18661 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Adjustments for the Common Pool Fishery... Southern New England (SNE)/Mid-Atlantic (MA) yellowtail flounder, and reduces the trip limit GOM cod and... additional overharvest of these stocks relative to the pertinent common pool sub-ACLs. DATES: The trip limit...

  12. 76 FR 30035 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Increase...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Increase for the Common Pool Fishery...), Commerce. ACTION: Temporary rule; inseason adjustment of trip limit. SUMMARY: NMFS increases the trip limit... Regional Administrator (RA) to adjust the trip limits for common pool vessels in order to optimize the...

  13. 78 FR 54194 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Adjustments for the Common Pool Fishery... percent of its Gulf of Maine (GOM) haddock allocation of 2 mt. Despite a trip limit reduction for SNE/MA... overharvest, the trip limit for SNE/MA winter flounder is reduced to 300 lb (136.1 kg) per trip, and the GOM...

  14. 78 FR 42478 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Trip Limit Adjustment for the Common Pool Fishery... winter flounder and GOM haddock. DATES: The trip limit decrease for SNE/MA winter flounder is effective... of 136 mt (299,829 lb). The current trip limit for SNE/MA winter flounder is 5,000 lb (2,268 kg) per...

  15. Achieving maximum sustainable yield in mixed fisheries: a management approach for the North Sea demersal fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Vermard, Youen; Dolder, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    . An objective method is suggested that provides an optimal set of fishing mortality within the range, minimizing the risk of total allowable catch mismatches among stocks captured within mixed fisheries, and addressing explicitly the trade-offs between the most and least productive stocks.......Achieving single species maximum sustainable yield (MSY) in complex and dynamic fisheries targeting multiple species (mixed fisheries) is challenging because achieving the objective for one species may mean missing the objective for another. The North Sea mixed fisheries are a representative...... ranges to combine long-term single-stock targets with flexible, short-term, mixed-fisheries management requirements applied to the main North Sea demersal stocks. It is shown that sustained fishing at the upper bound of the range may lead to unacceptable risks when technical interactions occur...

  16. Continuing education needs for fishery professionals: a survey of North American fisheries administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassam, G.N.; Eisler, R.

    2001-01-01

    North American fishery professionals? continuing education needs were investigated in an American Fisheries Society questionnaire sent to 111 senior fishery officials in winter 2000. Based on a response rate of 52.2% (N = 58), a minimum of 2,967 individuals would benefit from additional training, especially in the areas of statistics and analysis (83% endorsement rate), restoration and enhancement (81%), population dynamics (81%), multi-species interactions (79%), and technical writing (79%). Other skills and techniques recommended by respondents included computer skills (72%), fishery modeling (69%), habitat modification (67%), watershed processes (66%), fishery management (64%), riparian and stream ecology (62%), habitat management (62%), public administration (62%), nonindigenous species (57%), and age and growth (55%). Additional comments by respondents recommended new technical courses, training in various communications skills, and courses to more effectively manage workloads.

  17. Sicilian dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Potoschi

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1996, a census was taken of the Sicilian fisheries that engage in dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus L. 1758 fishing. Two different surveys were conducted; data on fishing boats were obtained from the Naval Registers and frominterviewing boat owners on the wharf. The area sampled was divided into 3 zones and 6 strata. 205 boats were recorded in the eastern zone (Tyrrhenian and Ionian seas, 57 boats located in 4 different strata were recorded in the western zone. Fishing activities in the Ionian area begin in early August and end in December. In all other areas of Sicily, dolphinfish fishing begins in early September and continues until December. A census was also taken of the equipment used by the various boats for this activity in the different areas. The surveys showed that FADs are the most commonly employed method for dolphinfish fishing. The geographical distribution, number and characteristics were recorded for each area surveyed. The catches for the 1996 fishing season distributed for strata and zone are reported.

  18. 78 FR 46922 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC786 Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative... Permits AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  19. 77 FR 66585 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC304 Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative... Permits AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration..., Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  20. 76 FR 41764 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA563 Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative... Permits AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-P...

  1. Fishers’ Knowledge And Management: Differing Fundamentals In Artisanal And Industrial Fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Differences in characteristics of industrial and artisanal fisheries should be better understood for improved communication between those who do research on local ecological knowledge in these different fisheries. Artisanal fisheries often differ from industrial fisheries in that:

  2. 77 FR 42699 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...; Public Hearings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Biologist- Statistician; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348-1630 x235..., Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE...

  3. FISHERY MANAGEMENT IN THE DANUBE CATCHMENT AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Treer

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available There are three successive regions of the Danube, each of which has to deal with its own problems in fisheries. Sport fishing and ecological recontruction problem matters predominate in the upper flow. These problems also characterize the middle flow, where to a certain extent, commercial fishery is coming into view, while the lower flow has to deal with commercial fishery problems to full extent. The difference is not so much due to the morphometry as to the development and state of the economy of the countries in the river basin, their legislation on fishery and the manner in which the legislation is applied. Numerous dams of the upper flow of the Danube (29 in Germany, 9 in Austria, influence significantly the ichthyocenoses. An extreme example of that is Gabčikovo dam at the Slovak-Hungarian border where fish catch decreased to one fourth. In the lower segment of the Danube fish catch falls down to one third and is followed, by a drastically negative change of fish species composition. The records show that highly valued species as sturgeons, pike and tench are in drastic decline over the last few years. The changes were caused by physical barriers, like dams and weirs, by water pollution, by increasing concentration of nutrients and heavy metals, by poaching and by overexploitation. For all those alarming reasons, some legal interventions in commercial fishery must be undertaken. In the middle flow, where the Danube flows through Croatian territory, there have also been declining trends of bentivore and phytophyl species respectively. The law supports the coexistence of sport and commercial fishery in this area and although sport fishing should be given the advantage, commercial fishing should be rigorously supervised and allowed only when there is a naturally produced surplus. Because of fish migrations and political frontiers of Danube area, it is essential that the neighboring countries coordinate their efforts in managing fisheries

  4. Freedom and poverty in the fishery commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein Jentoft

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In fisheries, alleviating poverty sometimes requires strategies that are inherently in conflict. When aiming to develop a fishery as a means to reduce poverty, its common pool resource basis might be undermined, resulting in greater poverty. But poverty in fisheries is also linked to, or a part of deeper social issues and processes, for instance, the marginalization and exclusion of certain communities. Poverty also has many factors— income, health, literacy, gender, power, security, etc.—all of which make poverty alleviation a particularly “wicked problem” that would require a broad process of political, social and institutional reform. In other words, poverty alleviation is not only an issue of sustainable resource management but also one of societal governance. Drawing from research in small-scale fisheries communities in Nicaragua, Tanzania, and Bangladesh, this paper describes how fishing people cope with poverty. The paper discusses what the governance implications are for alleviating poverty at individual, household and community levels, and argue that both the definition of poverty and poverty alleviation in small-scale fisheries must be rooted in real life experiences.

  5. Dynamic patterns of overexploitation in fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissi, Ilaria; Bardi, Ugo; El Asmar, Toufic; Lavacchi, Alessandro

    2017-09-10

    Understanding overfishing and regulating fishing quotas is a major global challenge for the 21st Century both in terms of providing food for humankind and to preserve the oceans' ecosystems. However, fishing is a complex economic activity, affected not just by overfishing but also by such factors as pollution, technology, financial factors and more. For this reason, it is often difficult to state with complete certainty that overfishing is the cause of the decline of a fishery. In this study, we developed a simple dynamic model specifically designed to isolate and to study the role of depletion on production. The model is based on the well-known Lotka-Volterra model, or Prey-Predator mechanism, assuming that the fish stock and the fishing industry are coupled variables that dynamically affect each other. In the model, the fishing industry acts as the "predator" and the fish stock as the "prey". If the model can fit historical data, in particular relative to the productive decline of specific fisheries, then we have a strong indication that the decline of the fish stock is driving the decline of the fishery production. The model doesn't pretend to be a general description of the fishing industry in all its varied forms; however, the data reported here show that the model can describe several historical cases of fisheries whose production decreased and collapsed, indicating that the overexploitation of the fish stocks is an important factor in the decline of fisheries.

  6. 50 CFR 665.620 - PRIA coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.620 Section 665.620 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Island Area Fisheries § 665.620 PRIA coral reef ecosystem fisheries. ...

  7. 50 CFR 665.220 - Hawaii coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.220 Section 665.220 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Fisheries § 665.220 Hawaii coral reef ecosystem fisheries. ...

  8. 50 CFR 665.420 - Mariana coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.420 Section 665.420 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... Mariana Archipelago Fisheries § 665.420 Mariana coral reef ecosystem fisheries. ...

  9. 50 CFR 665.120 - American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.120 Section 665.120 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... PACIFIC American Samoa Fisheries § 665.120 American Samoa coral reef ecosystem fisheries....

  10. 78 FR 79674 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...-XD054 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Atran, Senior Fishery Biologist, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348-1630..., Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2013...

  11. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Date on the production and fish cath according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1998 is presented. Ackerages used for the fish production have been increased 6 ha or 0,66%. The total fish amount was bigger for 462 tons, or 10,04%. The feeding coefficient is 3,8 kg 46,15% bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used has decreased by 11,45%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 1,39% of the total fish pond surfaces, the yung carp ponds 19.92%, and the ponds with consumption fish 77,76%. The total amount in the carp ponds with consumption fish 77,76%. The total amount in the carp ponds was 522 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 110,4 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 79,04% followed the herbivorous fish with 10,42%, the trout with 5,89%, while all the other fish species make up 4,65% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the big head carp with 57,57%, followed by the grass carp with 37,31% and the silver carp with 5,12%. Compared to the previous year the production herbivorous fish, the sheat fish, the pike and young carp, while the production the trout. Fish catch in open waters this year not in the files in statisc. The number of fisheries workers has decreased for 5,77%, and the production per worker is bigger for 16,74% compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 8,38 tons of fish.

  12. Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge Fishery. Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge Fishery Management Plan (Fishery Plan) provides comprehensive management direction to insure that fish species and habitats...

  13. Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (PC1204, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (SEFIS) was created by the National Marine Fisheries Service in 2010 and operates out of the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory. The...

  14. 78 FR 32624 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... A. Age-Structured Model of False Killer Whales B. Papahanaumokuakea Associated Cetacean Ecology... Nation's Fisheries 3rd Meeting K. Recreational Fisheries Update L. Education and Outreach M. Asian...

  15. Fishery Manangement Plan : Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan describes fishery management for Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge in 1990. The plan outlines goals, objectives for fishery management for the benefit of...

  16. Fisheries Management Program 1993: Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The intent of this Fisheries Management Plan is to provide an overview of the fishery resources and the aquatic ecosystem of the refuge, historical management...

  17. Fisheries Management Plan Cameron Prairie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the fisheries management plan for the refuge. This plan develops strategies and tasks for maintaining a viable fishery for Unit 8. There are other areas...

  18. Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (PC1402, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (SEFIS) was created by the National Marine Fisheries Service in 2010 and operates out of the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory. The...

  19. Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (PC1304, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (SEFIS) was created by the National Marine Fisheries Service in 2010 and operates out of the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory. The...

  20. 77 FR 56813 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... report on a model developed for crafting recreational measures; discuss potential recreational fishing... recreational fishing opportunities. Other business may be discussed. Although non-emergency issues not..., Acting Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING...

  1. Fishery management plan: Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines goals and objectives recommended by the Service Fisheries Assistance program. The plan is to be used as a guide in managing the Refuge's fishery...

  2. Incidental mortality of seabirds in selected commercial fisheries in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fishery-seabird observers monitored the incidental mortality of seabirds between 1989 and 1993 in three groundfish longline, trawl, and pot fisheries in the Bering...

  3. 78 FR 2255 - Nominations to the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC393 Nominations to the Marine Fisheries Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for nominations. SUMMARY: Nominations are being sought for...

  4. Participatory assessment of the Toliara Bay reef fishery, southwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-22

    Dec 22, 2011 ... Although coral reef fisheries account for a small proportion of global fisheries catches ... targeted and can also cause severe damage to non - target spe- cies, habitats ...... of human activities and suggestions for management.

  5. 76 FR 63904 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Species Management Measures for 2012 G. Habitat Current Habitat Issues H. Ecosystem Based Management 1. Northwest Fisheries Science Center Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Report 2. Development of a Council Ecosystem Fishery Management Plan I. Highly Migratory Species Management 1. Council Recommendations...

  6. casted the increasing need for fisheries managers to take species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    humans and animals; ... Key words: Benguela, ecosystem approach to fisheries, ecosystem models, fisheries management, .... Benguela model developed with the EwE software is ...... pelagic fish may have reduced the reproductive suc-.

  7. Fishery Management Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Fishery Management Plan for Ottawa NWR provides an overview of the relationship between fishery management and Refuge objectives. Wildlife use and production...

  8. Fishery Management Plan: Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) contains a limited fishery resource. Hogback Ponds, Round Lake, Bituminous Pond, and Blick Estate Stream have fishery...

  9. COMMERCIAL FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN REPUBLIC OF CROATIA IN 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Josip Suić; Mirjana Šarić; Zlatko Homen; Irena Jahutka; Ante Mišura

    2008-01-01

    Commercial freshwater fisheries in Republic of Croatia is regulated according to the Freshwater Fisheries Act (2001) and special sub–acts regarding commercial freshwater fisheries, as well as other sub–laws which deal with fish sizes, no–fishing periods and estimation of damages on fish stocks. Subjects of regulations are the areas for commercial fisheries, commercial fishermen exams, fishing permits, fishing tools and gear, yearly allowed catch quotas and catch data delivery. All the sub–act...

  10. South Lancashire Fisheries Advisory Committee 9th January, 1980.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    This is the report from the South Lancashire Fisheries Advisory Committee meeting, which was held on the 9th January 1980. The report contains sections on the minutes of the Special Meeting held on 13rd December 1979, net and fixed engine licence duties, EEC Directive on the quality of freshwaters, the market survey at Worthington Lakes, disposal of redundant reservoirs and a fisheries activities report. The section on the fisheries activities reported by the area fisheries officer looks a...

  11. Marine reserve effects on fishery profit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Crow; Kendall, Bruce E; Gaines, Steven; Siegel, David A; Costello, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    Some studies suggest that fishery yields can be higher with reserves than under conventional management. However, the economic performance of fisheries depends on economic profit, not fish yield. The predictions of higher yields with reserves rely on intensive fishing pressures between reserves; the exorbitant costs of harvesting low-density populations erode profits. We incorporated this effect into a bioeconomic model to evaluate the economic performance of reserve-based management. Our results indicate that reserves can still benefit fisheries, even those targeting species that are expensive to harvest. However, in contrast to studies focused on yield, only a moderate proportion of the coast in reserves (with moderate harvest pressures outside reserves) is required to maximize profit. Furthermore, reserve area and harvest intensity can be traded off with little impact on profits, allowing for management flexibility while still providing higher profit than attainable under conventional management.

  12. 75 FR 8841 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the sideboard..., 2010. James P. Burgess, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine...

  13. 75 FR 54290 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the..., 2010. Carrie Selberg, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine...

  14. 76 FR 70420 - Fisheries of the Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA801 Fisheries of the Pacific Region AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce..., (Sebastes alutus), which is managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council, is in an overfished...

  15. 75 FR 68468 - List of Fisheries for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 229 RIN 0648-AY69 List of Fisheries for 2011 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) publishes its...

  16. 78 FR 23708 - List of Fisheries for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 229 RIN 0648-BC71 List of Fisheries for 2013 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) publishes...

  17. 78 FR 53336 - List of Fisheries for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 229 RIN 0648-BC71 List of Fisheries for 2013 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) publishes its...

  18. 78 FR 73477 - List of Fisheries for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 229 RIN 0648-BD72 List of Fisheries for 2014 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) publishes...

  19. Economic response to harvest and effort control in fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Ayoe; Frost, Hans

    for fisheries management. The report outlines bio-economic models, which are designed to shed light on the efficiency of different management tools in terms of quota or effort restrictions given the objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy about sustainable and economic viable fisheries. The report addresses...... the complexities of biological and economic interaction in a multispecies, multifleet framework and outlines consistent mathematical models....

  20. 75 FR 27989 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... and fishery overlap; review Pacific cod assessment model run proposals (SSC only); review Council... - initial/final action. 10. Staff Tasking: Review Committees and tasking. 11. Other Business The SSC agenda... Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. BILLING CODE 3510-22-S...

  1. Forage fish, their fisheries and their predators: who drives whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, G.H.; Peck, M.A.; Rindorf, A.; Smout, S.C.; Deurs, van M.; Raab, K.E.; Andersen, K.H.; Garthe, S.; Lauerburg, R.A.M.; Scott, F.; Brunel, T.P.A.; Aarts, G.M.; Kooten, van T.; Dickey-Collas, M.

    2014-01-01

    The North Sea has a diverse forage fish assemblage, including herring, targeted for human consumption; sandeel, sprat, and Norway pout, exploited by industrial fisheries; and some sardine and anchovy, supporting small-scale fisheries. All show large abundance fluctuations, impacting on fisheries and

  2. 75 FR 54092 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...-XY69 North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scallop Plan Team will meet September 28th, 2010 at the Anchorage Hilton Hotel. DATES: The meeting will be held on September 28, 2010...

  3. 77 FR 5473 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... incidental catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The... troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by NMFS. This fishery will occur... the salmon troll fishery (316 licenses in 2011); and the charterboat fleet (141 licenses in 2011)....

  4. 76 FR 2871 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... catch in the salmon troll fishery that is allocated 15 percent of the commercial allocation. The... is authorized during salmon troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by... sablefish fishery; incidental halibut caught in the salmon troll fishery (233 licenses in 2010); and...

  5. 75 FR 13024 - Pacific Halibut Fisheries; Catch Sharing Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... fishery during the salmon troll fishery specified in paragraph (3) of section 8. (5) A license issued in... incidental commercial fishery during the salmon troll season in Area 2A must have its ``Application for... salmon troll seasons in Area 2A in accordance with regulations promulgated by NMFS. (4) The...

  6. 76 FR 20959 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Pacific mackerel stock assessment for 2011, in order to inform fisheries management decisions for the 2011... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA366 Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management...

  7. 77 FR 21752 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB153 New England Fishery Management Council...: (860) 572-0328. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  8. 75 FR 43928 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX80 New England Fishery Management Council...-7200; fax: (781) 289-3176. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water...

  9. 76 FR 48807 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA623 New England Fishery Management Council...: (401) 861-8002. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  10. 78 FR 11630 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC504 New England Fishery Management Council... address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950....

  11. 75 FR 32375 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW84 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (207) 775-5411; fax: (207) 775- 2872. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  12. 75 FR 74008 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA065 New England Fishery Management Council... address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950....

  13. 76 FR 7823 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA208 New England Fishery Management Council... (NEFSC), in cooperation with the New England Fishery Management Council (Council) will convene a webinar..., Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978) 465-0492....

  14. 76 FR 44577 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA598 New England Fishery Management Council...) 750-7991. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  15. 78 FR 30868 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC692 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (401) 421-0700; fax: (401) 455-3040. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  16. 76 FR 17381 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA325 New England Fishery Management Council...; fax: (508) 339- 1040. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  17. 76 FR 4870 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA181 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  18. 78 FR 48419 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC796 New England Fishery Management Council...: (978) 535-8283. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  19. 75 FR 1752 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT67 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (603) 431-2300 and fax: (603) 433-5649. Council address: New England Fishery Management...

  20. 77 FR 19228 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB137 New England Fishery Management Council... 04101; telephone: (207) 775-2311; fax: (207) 772-4017. Council address: New England Fishery...