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Sample records for fish parasite gyrodactylus

  1. Surveys on Gyrodactylus parasites onwild Atlantic salmon in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Heinecke, Rasmus Demuth; Buchmann, Kurt

    Gyrodactylus salaris is a monogenean ectoparasite parasitizing salmonids in freshwater. This parasite is highly pathogenic to both Norwegian and Scottish salmon and has decimated the salmon populations in 45 Norwegian rivers after anthropogenic transfer from Sweden. G. salaris has also been found...... on several occasions in Danish rainbow trout farms but has never been recorded as a pathogenic parasite on Danish wild salmon. In the present study the occurrence of G. salaris and other Gyrodactylus parasites on wild Danish salmon fry and parr were monitored. Electrofishing was conducted in three river...... were examined for Gyrodactylus parasites under a dissection microscope. The location of each parasite was registered and each parasite was isolated for later morphological and genetic typing. The opisthaptor was separated from the body, fixed and mounted using Malmbergs fixative (ammonium picrate...

  2. An assessment of the risk of spreading the fish parasite Gyrodactylus salaris to uninfected territories in the European Union with the movement of live Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) from coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeler, E.; Thrush, M.; Paisley, Larry;

    2006-01-01

    The freshwater, monogenean fish ecto-parasite, Gyrodactylus salaris, was introduced into Norway through the importation of juvenile salmon from Sweden in the 1970s and resulted in dramatic declines in the number of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in 45 Norwegian rivers. From May 1, 2004, a change....... This risk assessment was undertaken to establish whether exports of live Atlantic salmon from coastal sites increased the risk of G. salaris introduction and establishment in uninfected EU territories. A scenario tree of events necessary for the introduction and establishment of the parasite was constructed......). Transmission from seawater sites, where salinity is greater than 25 parts per thousand, is only possible if infected fish were introduced hours before export. Furthermore, transport via wellboat in full-strength seawater (33 parts per thousand) reduced the risk of introduction to a negligible level. Similarly...

  3. Alternations in the liver enzymatic activity of Common carp, Cyprinus carpio in response to parasites, Dactylogyrus spp. and Gyrodactylus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastiannasab, Abulhasan; Afsharmanesh, Shiva; Rahimi, Ruhollah; Sharifian, Iman

    2016-12-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of parasites, monogenea, Dactylogyrus spp. and Gyrodactylus spp. on some enzymatic and biochemical components of liver in healthy and infected common carp, Cyprinus carpio. For this purpose, 10 healthy and 10 infected fish were collected from farm. The blood samples were taken and after separation of serum, the values of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzymes activities as well as Creatinine and Urea were measured. Based on obtained results, the values of AST, ALT enzymes activities as well as Creatinine and Urea were higher in the infected fish compared to non-infected fish. In conclusion; our results reveals that infection with external parasites, Dactylogyrus spp. and Gyrodactylus spp. can causes some dysfunctions in liver and kidney of common carp.

  4. Speciation and host-parasite relationships in the parasite genus Gyrodactylus (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) infecting gobies of the genus Pomatoschistus (Gobiidae, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyse, Tine; Audenaert, Vanessa; Volckaert, Filip A M

    2003-12-01

    Using species-level phylogenies, the speciation mode of Gyrodactylus species infecting a single host genus was evaluated. Eighteen Gyrodactylus species were collected from gobies of the genus Pomatoschistus and sympatric fish species across the distribution range of the hosts. The V4 region of the ssrRNA and the internal transcribed spacers encompassing the 5.8S rRNA gene were sequenced; by including published sequences a total of 30 species representing all subgenera were used in the data analyses. The molecular phylogeny did not support the morphological groupings into subgenera as based on the excretory system, suggesting that the genus needs systematic revisions. Paraphyly of the total Gyrodactylus fauna of the gobies indicates that at least two independent colonisation events were involved, giving rise to two separate groups, belonging to the subgenus Mesonephrotus and Paranephrotus, respectively. The most recent association probably originated from a host switching event from Gyrodactylus arcuatus, which parasitises three-spined stickleback, onto Pomatoschistus gobies. These species are highly host-specific and form a monophyletic group, two possible "signatures" of co-speciation. Host specificity was lower in the second group. The colonising capacity of these species is illustrated by a host jump from gobiids to another fish order (Anguilliformes), supporting the hypothesis of a European origin of Gyrodactylus anguillae and its intercontinental introduction by the eel trade. Thus, allopatric speciation seems to be the dominant mode of speciation in this host-parasite system, with a possible case of sympatric speciation.

  5. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  6. Neotropical Monogenoidea. 23. Two new species of Gyrodactylus (Gyrodactylidae from a Cichlid and an Erythrinid fish of Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter A. Boeger

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of Gyrodactylus Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes, Monogenoidea are described from fishes collected from southeastern Brazil. Gyrodactylus geophagensis n. sp. was collected from the body surface of the "cará", Geophagus brasiliensis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824 (Cichlidae, from the Rio da Guarda, state of Rio de Janeiro; its major diagnostic features are the morphology of the anchor with a short, truncate superficial root and the shape of the hooks - with a long, delicate shaft. Gyrodactylus trairae n. sp. parasitizes the body surface of the "traíra", Hoplias aff. malabaricus (Bloch, 1794 (Erythrinidae, from the rio Guandu, state of Rio de Janeiro and can be easily differentiated from other species of the genus by having a thin, dorsal bridge, connecting the superficial bar with the spathulated shield. These are the first species of Gyrodactylus formally reported from Brazil. Presently, 26 species of Gyrodactylidae are known from freshwater fishes in the neotropical region; a list of these species is provided.

  7. Gyrodactylus Infection in Fish of the Ergis River and Report on New Record Species of Gyrodactylus%额尔齐斯河三代虫种类研究及新纪录种记述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张薇; 郝翠兰; 王新; 岳城

    2015-01-01

    Gyrodactylus,a monogenean Platyhelminthe,parasitize the skin and gills of host fish.The parasite re-produces rapidly,causing damage to the skin and gills that can lead to severe secondary infections.The problem has received the attention of scientists,both home and abroad.The Ergis River (Chinese Section)is the only inter-national river of the Arctic Ocean system in China.It originates in the Altai Mountains of Xinjiang and supports many European cold water fish,including Esox lucius,Lota lota,Tinca tinca,Perca fluviatilis and Leuciscus idus. The river has become important resource repository of European freshwater fish and the backbone of aquaculture in Xinjiang since connected with Wulungu Lake in 1986.With the development of aquaculture,the parasite has nega-tively affected fish breeding in the Ergis River and large scale farming of native fish,but relevant research on Gyro-dactylus in Ergis River fish is lacking.This study seeks to further characterize the species,describe Gyrodactylus infection of fish in the Ergis River and provide basic data for fishery development in Xinjiang.The investigation was conducted at four sampling sites on the Ergis River from August,2009 to August 2014.Fish were captured by our team and purchased from fishermen.Gyrodactylus specimens from each host were sampled using a needle mounted under an anatomical lens.The mucus on the skin and gills was also examined under a microscope to detect the par-asites.We observed the morphological characteristics of Gyrodactylus with a staining method,and made comparison of all Gyrodactylus species found during the investigation by drawing and measuring the chitin structures.We also analyzed and discussed the infection rates,infection intensity,infection abundance,and host specificity of different Gyrodactylus species on fish hosts.A total of 14 Gyrodactylus species were identified.Four species,G.tinca (Malmberg,1957),G.lucii (Kulakowskaja,1951 ),G.luciopercae (Gusev ,1962),and G

  8. Occurrence and morphogenetic characteristics of Gyrodactylus (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from a rainbow trout farm (Lake Ladoga, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshko, Evgeny; Barskaya, Yulia; Parshukov, Aleksey; Lumme, Jaakko; Khlunov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Gyrodactylus parasite infected juveniles on rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792) from a fish farm in Lake Ladoga were investigated. The observed cases of infection in fish featured a high prevalence, when almost all of the fish were infected. However, if an outbreak of the monogenean infection is observed in spring, the intensity of the infection may be low, and when the infection occurs in the ice-covered period (late autumn - winter), the number of parasites on the fins of a single fish may exceed 3000 specimens. Molecular identification of the parasite demonstrated that the infecting clone was identical with rainbow trout specific strain of Gyrodactylus salaris RBT widely spread in Northern Europe, but a small proportion of the parasites were the hybrid clone Gyrodactylus pomeraniae x G. lavareti. Morphological variations of hooks and other opisthaptor parts in the monogenean Gyrodactylus depending on the intensity of infection in rainbow trout were demonstrated.

  9. Comparing host and parasite phylogenies: gyrodactylus flatworms jumping from goby to goby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyse, Tine; Volckaert, Filip A M

    2005-10-01

    The combination of exceptionally high species diversity, high host specificity, and a complex reproduction system raises many questions about the underlying mechanisms triggering speciation in the flatworm genus Gyrodactylus. The coevolutionary history with their goby hosts was investigated using both topology- and distance-based approaches; phylogenies were constructed of the V4 region of the 18S rRNA and the complete ITS rDNA region for the parasites, and 12S and 16S mtDNA fragments for the hosts. The overall fit between both trees was significant according to the topology-based programs (TreeMap 1.0, 2.0 beta and TreeFitter), but not according to the timed analysis in TreeMap 2.0 beta and the distance-based method (ParaFit). An absolute timing of speciation events in host and parasite ruled out the possibility of synchronous speciation for the gill parasites, favouring the distance-based result. Based on this information together with the biological background of host and parasite, the following TreeMap solution was selected. The group of gill parasites evolved from a host switch from G. arcuatus, parasitizing the three-spined stickleback onto the gobies, followed by several host-switching events among the respective goby hosts. The timing of these events is estimated to date back to the Late Pleistocene, suggesting a role for refugia-mediated mixing of parasite species. In contrast, it is suggested that co-speciation in the fin-parasites resulted in several host-associated species complexes. This illustrates that phylogenetically conserved host-switching mimics the phylogenetic signature of co-speciation, confounding topology-based programs.

  10. PARASITES OF FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intent of this chapter is to describe the parasites of importance to fishes maintained and used in laboratory settings. In contrast to the frist edition, the focus will be only on those parasites that pose a serious threat to or are common in fishes held in these confined en...

  11. Reproduction and survival under different water temperatures of Gyrodactylus mexicanus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea), a parasite of Girardinichthys multiradiatus in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; Zambrano, Luis; García-Varela, Martín

    2012-12-01

    Gyrodactylid population growth may depend on abiotic variables such as temperature. We tested the survival and reproductive rate of Gyrodactylus mexicanus, a parasite infecting fins of Girardinichthys multiradiatus, at 3 different water temperatures, 10-13, 19-22, and 24 C. The temporal sequence of birth and age at death of each parasite isolated from the hosts was recorded through at least 8 generations. Our results showed that the average number of offspring per parasite was 2.0 when averaged across all temperatures. However, the generation time was negatively correlated with temperature. The innate capacity for increase (r(m)) was positively correlated with water temperature: from 0.29 parasite/day at 13 C to 0.48 parasite/day at 24 C. These data confirm that water temperature has a direct influence on parasite population dynamics. The current study represents the first contribution to understanding the population ecology of the monogenean G. mexicanus in central Mexico.

  12. The mitochondrial genome of Gyrodactylus derjavinoides (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea)--a mitogenomic approach for Gyrodactylus species and strain identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyse, Tine; Buchmann, Kurt; Littlewood, D T J

    2008-07-01

    Systematists and evolutionary biologists are constantly on the lookout for new sources of characters to discriminate amongst taxa and estimate interrelationships within and between taxa. Entire mitochondrial genomes provide a wealth of data, both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. Molecular markers are of particular utility when applied to small, morphologically conserved taxa, as is the case for many monogenean ectoparasites of fish. Gyrodactylus species display a considerable degree of anatomical conservatism, complicating diagnostics based solely on morphology, and some are significant pests of wild and cultured fish. Here we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Gyrodactylus derjavinoides Malmberg, Collins, Cunningham & Behiar 2007, one of the most frequently found gyrodactylid species on salmonids in Scandinavia, and compared it with the recently published genomes of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 and Gyrodactylus thymalli Zitnan 1960. Through comparative sliding window analysis we identified regions of high sequence variability and designed new primer sequences. In total, 6 new primer pairs have been developed, amplifying fragments of cox1, cox3, nad1, nad2, nad4, nad5 and atp6. Together, they amplify regions capturing almost half the nucleotide variability present in the complete mitochondrial genome. These degenerate primers should also work for other Gyrodactylus species parasitizing salmonids. In addition, we developed a multiplex assay that simultaneously amplifies four fragments in a single PCR reaction. Besides the diagnostic value, these fragments can be used for studying the transmission dynamics of Gyrodactylus, providing crucial information for an improved understanding of the spread and epidemiology of these important fish pathogens.

  13. Effect of Australian tea tree oil on Gyrodactylus spp. infection of the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steverding, Dietmar; Morgan, Edward; Tkaczynski, Patrick; Walder, Foster; Tinsley, Richard

    2005-08-09

    Gyrodactylus spp. infections of commercially farmed fishes are responsible for significant economic losses. Existing treatments have proved uneconomic, stressful to the fishes, and ecologically damaging. Essential oils are naturally occurring compounds that exhibit a wide range of anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities. This study explored the possibility of using Australian tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil (TTO) to treat Gyrodactylus spp. infection on the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. In the presence of 0.01 % Tween 80 as an emulsifier, TTO treatments at concentrations between 3 and 30 ppmv (parts per million by volume) lowered the prevalence and significantly reduced the parasite burden of sticklebacks naturally infected with Gyrodactylus spp. In addition, Tween 80 alone exhibited parasiticidal activity against Gyrodactylus spp. These findings show the potential of TTO in combination with Tween 80 as an effective treatment of Gyrodactylus spp. infection of fishes.

  14. Metazoan Parasites of Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğuz, Mehmet Cemal; Tepe, Yahya; Belk, Mark C; Heckmann, Richard A; Aslan, Burçak; Gürgen, Meryem; Bray, Rodney A; Akgül, Ülker

    2015-06-01

    To date, there have been nearly 100 papers published on metazoan parasites of Antarctic fishes, but there has not yet been any compilation of a species list of fish parasites for this large geographic area. Herein, we provide a list of all documented occurrences of monogenean, cestode, digenean, acanthocephalan, nematode, and hirudinean parasites of Antarctic fishes. The list includes nearly 250 parasite species found in 142 species of host fishes. It is likely that there are more species of fish parasites, which are yet to be documented from Antarctic waters.

  15. Associations between fish reproductive cycle and the dynamics of metazoan parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simková, Andrea; Jarkovský, Jirí; Koubková, Bozena; Barus, Vlastimil; Prokes, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    The parasite fauna of the stone loach (Barbatula barbatula) was investigated monthly from May to December 2001. Four parasite species were recorded: Gyrodactylus spp. (Monogenea), Tylodelphys clavata (Digenea), Proteocephalus sagittus (Cestoda), and Raphidascaris acus (Nematoda). The changes in the seasonal dynamics of parasite infection were investigated throughout the 8 months. The potential effect of the reproductive investment of the host, measured by gonad mass and gonado-somatic index (GSI), on the parasite infection was tested against the prediction that, during periods of high reproductive investment (beginning of the breeding period or forming gonads after breeding), the fish are more susceptible to parasite infection. Differences between parasite loads between genders were also hypothesized. Seasonal differences in infection were observed for all parasite species studied. The values of GSI showed a pattern of energy accumulation in the pre-reproductive period and at the beginning of breeding, a decrease during breeding, and an increase in the post-breeding period. A similar pattern was observed for parasite abundance, a strong or weak increase in spring and/or autumn and a decrease during summer (July and August). Positive correlations between the abundance of Gyrodactylus spp. and R. acus and both gonad mass and GSI were found in females after eliminating the effect of fish weight. Our results suggest that stone loach females are more susceptible to parasite infection in periods of higher reproductive investment. The main factor determining the infection of T. clavata was fish size. The abundance of P. sagittus was positively correlated with GSI in the total fish sample with no detectable effect of sex or fish weight. The increase in cestode infection in spring supports the hypothesis that the parasite life cycle could by synchronized with the beginning of host reproduction, probably induced by increasing fish hormone levels in the spring.

  16. Monogènes parasites de Clariidae (Teleostei, Siluriformes au Cameroun : I. Description de deux nouvelles espèces du genre Gyrodactylus dans le bassin du Nyong

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    Nack J.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available L’étude des parasites branchiaux et cutanés de trois espèces de Poissons du genre Clarias : C. camerunensis, C. jaensis et C. pachynema pêchés dans le bassin du Nyong (Cameroun a révélé la présence de deux espèces nouvelles de Monogènes du genre Gyrodactylus Nordmann : G. camerunensis n. sp. et G. nyongensis n. sp parasites de Clarias camerunensis, C. jaensis et C. pachynema. Gyrodactylus camerunensis n. sp. se sépare aisément de G. nyongensis n. sp. par la taille plus faible des pièces sclérifiées du hapteur. Ces deux nouvelles espèces se distinguent aussi des Gyrodactylus africains les plus proches, G. rysavyi, G. clarii et G. alberti par la morphologie et la taille des sclérites du hapteur. L’étude de leur spécificité montre qu’elle est du type stenoxène (mesosténoxène.

  17. Monogenean parasites of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus from two fish farms in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

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    Eyo Victor Oscar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence, mean intensity, and abundance of monogenean parasites in Clarias gariepinus (C. gariepinus from two selected fish farms in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods: Eighty specimens of C. gariepinus from the two farms (40 each were necropsied for parasitological analysis. Skin, gill and fin biopsies were prepared from each specimen following standard methods for microscopic analysis. Parasitological indices including dominance (D, prevalence, mean intensity and abundance were calculated according to standard formulae. Data were analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. Results: C. gariepinus from the two farms were infested with a total of ninety individuals of monogenean parasites belonging to three species including Macrogyrodactylus clarii (M. clarii, Gyrodactylus sp. and Dactylogyrus sp. D index showed that the three monogenean species were eudominant (D-value > 10%. Gyrodactylus sp. was more abundant (46 followed by Dactylogyrus sp. (23 while M. clarii was the lowest (21. Prevalence, meaning intensity and abundance of monogenean parasites in the two farms, varied insignificantly higher (P > 0.05. Prevalence in both farms were higher in female C. gariepinus than that in male. Monogenean parasites exhibited organ specificity as M. clarii and Dactylogyrus sp. were recovered from the gills while Gyrodactylus sp. colonized the skin and fin. Conclusions: High abundance of these parasites may lead to poor growth performance and high mortality in C. gariepinus, leading to huge monetary loss and low profit margin by increasing production cost due to the cost of treatments.

  18. Gyrodactylus salaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinecke, Rasmus Demuth; Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Bresciani, José;

    2006-01-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris er en lille snylter, der angriber laksefiskenes hud og finner, hvilket kan medføre betydelig sygdom og dødelighed hos angrebne fisk. En særlig aggressiv type af denne snylter-art har decimeret bestanden af vildlaks i 45 norske elve siden 1970'erne. Snylteren forekommer også i...

  19. Can mixed-species groups reduce individual parasite load? A field test with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta.

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    Felipe Dargent

    Full Text Available Predation and parasitism are two of the most important sources of mortality in nature. By forming groups, individuals can gain protection against predators but may increase their risk of being infected with contagious parasites. Animals might resolve this conflict by forming mixed-species groups thereby reducing the costs associated with parasites through a relative decrease in available hosts. We tested this hypothesis in a system with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta and their host-specific monogenean ectoparasites (Gyrodactylus spp. in Trinidad. Fish from three different rivers were sampled from single and mixed-species groups, measured and scanned for Gyrodactylus. The presence and abundance of Gyrodactylus were lower when fish of both species were part of mixed-species groups relative to single-species groups. This is consistent with the hypothesis that mixed-species groups provide a level of protection against contagious parasites. We discuss the importance of potentially confounding factors such as salinity and individual fish size.

  20. Can mixed-species groups reduce individual parasite load? A field test with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargent, Felipe; Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Scott, Marilyn E; Ramnarine, Indar; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2013-01-01

    Predation and parasitism are two of the most important sources of mortality in nature. By forming groups, individuals can gain protection against predators but may increase their risk of being infected with contagious parasites. Animals might resolve this conflict by forming mixed-species groups thereby reducing the costs associated with parasites through a relative decrease in available hosts. We tested this hypothesis in a system with two closely related poeciliid fishes (Poecilia reticulata and Poecilia picta) and their host-specific monogenean ectoparasites (Gyrodactylus spp.) in Trinidad. Fish from three different rivers were sampled from single and mixed-species groups, measured and scanned for Gyrodactylus. The presence and abundance of Gyrodactylus were lower when fish of both species were part of mixed-species groups relative to single-species groups. This is consistent with the hypothesis that mixed-species groups provide a level of protection against contagious parasites. We discuss the importance of potentially confounding factors such as salinity and individual fish size.

  1. Relative host body condition and food availability influence epidemic dynamics: a Poecilia reticulata-Gyrodactylus turnbulli host-parasite model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadiri, Christina P; Dargent, Felipe; Scott, Marilyn E

    2013-03-01

    Understanding disease transmission is important to species management and human health. Host body condition, nutrition and disease susceptibility interact in a complex manner, and while the individual effects of these variables are well known, our understanding of how they interact and translate to population dynamics is limited. Our objective was to determine whether host relative body condition influences epidemic dynamics, and how this relationship is affected by food availability. Poecilia reticulata (guppies) of roughly similar size were selected and assembled randomly into populations of 10 guppies assigned to 3 different food availability treatments, and the relative condition index (Kn) of each fish was calculated. We infected 1 individual per group ('source' fish) with Gyrodactyus turnbulli and counted parasites on each fish every other day for 10 days. Epidemic parameters for each population were analysed using generalized linear models. High host Kn-particularly that of the 'source' fish-exerted a positive effect on incidence, peak parasite burden, and the degree of parasite aggregation. Low food availability increased the strength of the associations with peak burden and aggregation. Our findings suggest that host Kn and food availability interact to influence epidemic dynamics, and that the condition of the individual that brings the parasite into the host population has a profound impact on the spread of infection.

  2. Parasites of native and nonnative fishes of the Little Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

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    Choudhury, A.; Hoffnagle, T.L.; Cole, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-yr, seasonal, parasitological study of 1,435 fish, belonging to 4 species of native fishes and 7 species of nonnative fishes from the lower Little Colorado River (LCR) and tributary creeks, Grand Canyon, Arizona, yielded 17 species of parasites. These comprised 1 myxozoan (Henneguya exilis), 2 copepods (Ergasilus arthrosis and Lernaea cyprinacea), 1 acarine (Oribatida gen. sp.), 1 piscicolid leech (Myzobdella lugubris), 4 monogeneans (Gyrodactylus hoffmani, Gyrodactylus sp., Dactylogyrus extensus, and Ligictaluridus floridanus), 4 nematodes (Contracaecum sp., Eustrongylides sp., Rhabdochona sp., and Truttaedacnitis truttae), 3 cestodes (Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, Corallobothrium fimbriatum, and Megathylacoides giganteum), and 2 trematodes (Ornithodiplostomum sp. and Posthodiplostomum sp.). Rhabdochona sp. was the only adult parasite native to the LCR. Infection intensities of Ornithodiplostomum sp. and B. acheilognathi were positively correlated with length of the humpback chub Gila cypha. Adult helminths showed a high degree of host specificity, except B. acheilognathi, which was recovered from all fish species examined but was most abundant in cyprinids. Abundance of B. acheilognathi in the humpback chub was highest in the fall and lowest in the summer in both reaches of the LCR. There was no major taxonomic difference in parasite assemblages between the 2 different reaches of the river (LC1 and LC2). Parasite community diversity was very similar in humpback chub, regardless of sampling site or time. The parasite fauna of the LCR is numerically dominated by B. acheilognathi and metacercariae of Ornithodiplostomum sp. The richest and most diverse component community occurred in a nonnative species, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, but infracommunity species richness was highest in a native host, humpback chub.

  3. A new species of Gyrodactylus (Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae, an ectoparasite from the endemic Iranocichla hormuzensis (Teleostei, Cichlidae, the only Iranian cichlid

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    Walter A. Boeger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iranocichla hormuzensis occupies a biogeographically peculiar position. This endemic of southern Iran is the only Iranian cichlid. While it is phylogenetically related to African oreochromine members of the cichlid family, it remains unclear how it has dispersed into its current range. It is one of the many lasting enigmas of cichlid biogeography. Monogenean fish parasites may provide useful additional information in such cases. Therefore, I. hormuzensis was examined for these flatworms. A gyrodactylid parasite is reported and compared to congeners from the Palearctic and from cichlids. In this way, we verify whether it shows affinities to parasites from fishes that are either biogeographically or phylogenetically close to Iranocichla hormuzensis. The species is new to science and described as Gyrodactylus jalalii sp. nov. This is the first description of a parasite infecting I. hormuzensis. Because of the fixation method or age of the material, DNA could not be isolated. Due to the lack of genetic data, no conclusions can be drawn on its phylogenetic positioning. Indeed, Gyrodactylus phylogeny cannot be inferred from morphological characteristics alone. Moreover, the congeners phenotypically reminiscent of the new species belong to a Gyrodactylus clade which is highly diverse in geographic range and host choice. Hence, there is no evidence linking the new species to an exclusively African or cichlid-bound Gyrodactylus lineage.

  4. Copepoda parasites in economically important fish, Mugilidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FUNMILAYO

    parasites are ecto-parasites which negatively affect the appearance and reduced production of species of economically ... pathogenic problems in cultured mullet fish in marine and brackish ..... pollution resulting from the human settlement.

  5. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Gyrodactylus salmonis (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) isolates collected in Mexico from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel; Paladini, Giuseppe; Freeman, Mark A; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Shinn, Andrew P

    2012-05-25

    Gyrodactylus salmonis (Yin et Sproston, 1948) isolates collected from feral rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in Veracruz, southeastern Mexico are described. Morphological and molecular variation of these isolates to G. salmonis collected in Canada and the U.S.A. is characterised. Morphologically, the marginal hook sickles of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis closely resemble those of Canadian specimens - their shaft and hook regions align closely with one another; only features of the sickle base and a prominent bridge to the toe permit their separation. The 18S sequence determined from the Mexican specimens was identical to two variable regions of SSU rDNA obtained from a Canadian population of G. salmonis. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (spanning ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis are identical to ITS sequences of an American population of G. salmonis and to Gyrodactylus salvelini Kuusela, Ziętara et Lumme, 2008 from Finland. Analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis show 98-99% similarity to those of Gyrodactylus gobiensis Gläser, 1974, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, and Gyrodactylus rutilensis Gläser, 1974. Mexican and American isolates of G. salmonis are 98% identical, as assessed by sequencing the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Oncorhynchus mykiss is one of the most widely-dispersed fish species in the world and has been shown to be an important vector for parasite/disease transmission. Considering that Mexican isolates of G. salmonis were collected well outside the native distribution range of all salmonid fish, we discuss the possibility that the parasites were translocated with their host through the aquacultural trade. In addition, this study includes a morphological review of Gyrodactylus species collected from rainbow trout and from other salmonid fish of the genus Oncorhynchus which occur throughout North America.

  6. Fish Parasites: A Growing Concern During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villazanakretzer, Diana L; Napolitano, Peter G; Cummings, Kelly F; Magann, Everett F

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal parasitic worms affect more than 2 billion people worldwide according to the World Health Organization. Fish-borne parasitic infections are becoming more common with the increasing popularity of sushi, sashimi, Carpaccio, tartare, gefilte, and ceviche. The ingestion of these parasites can cause serve anemia, malabsorption, severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, strong allergic reactions, and gastric ulcers. Knowledge about fish parasites and pregnancy is limited. A literature search on PubMed and Web of Science used the search terms "fish parasites" OR "diphyllobothrium" OR "anisakiasis" OR "pseudoterranova" OR ("food borne parasites" AND "fish") AND "pregnancy" OR "maternal" OR "fetus" OR "fetal" OR "newborn" OR "neonatal" OR "childbirth." No limit was put on the number of years searched. There were 281 publications identified. The abstracts of all of these publications were read. After exclusion of the articles that were not relevant to pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, and fish parasites, there were 24 articles that became the basis of this review. The pathophysiology, altered maternal immunity related to the infection, limited information about fish-borne parasitic infections and pregnancy, and treatments are discussed. The main impact of a fish-borne parasitic infection on pregnant women is anemia and altered immunity, which may increase the risk of a maternal infection. The primary fetal effects include intrauterine growth restriction and preterm delivery.

  7. Parasites can enhance infections of fish with bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by multiple pathogens, including parasites. Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri are two common pathogens of cultured channel catfish. The objectives were to 1) evaluate the susceptibility of Ich parasitize...

  8. Mixed infections and hybridisation in monogenean parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schelkle

    Full Text Available Theory predicts that sexual reproduction promotes disease invasion by increasing the evolutionary potential of the parasite, whereas asexual reproduction tends to enhance establishment success and population growth rate. Gyrodactylid monogeneans are ubiquitous ectoparasites of teleost fish, and the evolutionary success of the specious Gyrodactylus genus is thought to be partly due to their use of various modes of reproduction. Gyrodactylus turnbulli is a natural parasite of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata, a small, tropical fish used as a model for behavioural, ecological and evolutionary studies. Using experimental infections and a recently developed microsatellite marker, we conclusively show that monogenean parasites reproduce sexually. Conservatively, we estimate that sexual recombination occurs and that between 3.7-10.9% of the parasites in our experimental crosses are hybrid genotypes with ancestors from different laboratory strains of G. turnbulli. We also provide evidence of hybrid vigour and/or inter-strain competition, which appeared to lead to a higher maximum parasite load in mixed infections. Finally, we demonstrate inbreeding avoidance for the first time in platyhelminths which may influence the distribution of parasites within a host and their subsequent exposure to the host's localized immune response. Combined reproductive modes and inbreeding avoidance may explain the extreme evolutionary diversification success of parasites such as Gyrodactylus, where host-parasite coevolution is punctuated by relatively frequent host switching.

  9. Baltic salmon activates immune relevant genes in fin tissue when responding to Gyrodactylus salaris infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Larsen, Thomas Bjerre; Ingerslev, Hans C.;

    2007-01-01

    A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection......A series of immune relevant genes are expressed when the Baltic salmon responds on infections with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris which leads to a decrease of the parasite infection...

  10. Preliminary investigations of hydrogen peroxide treatment of selected ornamental fishes and efficacy against external bacteria and parasites in green swordtails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Riccardo; Curtis, Eric W; Yanong, Roy P E

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of these preliminary studies were to evaluate the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the treatment of selected species of ornamental fishes and its efficacy in treating external bacteria and parasites. In the first part of the study, fish of five species (serpae tetra Hyphessobrycon eques (also known as Serpa tetra H. serpae), tiger barb Puntius tetrazona, blue gourami Trichogaster trichopterus, suckermouth catfish Hypostomus plecostomus, and green swordtail Xiphophorus hellerii) were exposed to H2O2 for 1 h at concentrations between 6 and 34 mg/L or for 24 h at concentrations between 1 and 6 mg/L. The results were species specific: green swordtails tolerated all of the treatments, serpae tetras and tiger barbs were sensitive only to the highest concentration, and mortalities of suckermouth catfish and blue gourami were recorded in every treatment. In the second part of the study, clinically healthy green swordtails and fish infested with external motile rod-shaped bacteria (i.e., Ichthyobodo spp., Trichodina spp., and Gyrodactylus spp.) were treated with several concentrations of H2O2. A single H2O2 treatment of 3.1 mg/L or more for 1 h effectively eliminated external bacteria, concentrations of 6.5 mg/L or more appeared to effectively kill Ichthyobodo spp., and none of the treatments tested was effective against Trichodina spp. or Gyrodactylus spp. These preliminary findings suggest that H2O2 is effective for treating certain external bacterial infections and flagellate infestations in some species of ornamental fish at the dosages tested. Other treatment regimens may need to be tested for effectiveness against Trichodina spp. and Dactylogyrus spp.

  11. Fighting fish parasites with photodynamically active chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, D-P; Schmidl, J; Hilbig, R; Oberle, M; Wedekind, H; Richter, P

    2016-06-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin) was used in a phototoxic reaction against a number of fish ectoparasites such as Ichtyobodo, Dactylogyrus, Trichodina, and Argulus. Chlorophyllin is applied to the water at concentrations of several micrograms per milliliter for a predefined incubation time, and afterwards, the parasites are exposed to simulated solar radiation. Application in the dark caused only little damage to the parasites; likewise, light exposure without the addition of the photosensitizer was ineffective. In Ichthyobodo, 2 μg/mL proved sufficient with subsequent simulated solar radiation to almost quantitatively kill the parasites, while in Dactylogyrus, a concentration of about 6 μg/mL was necessary. The LD50 value for this parasite was 1.02 μg/mL. Trichodina could be almost completely eliminated at 2 μg/mL. Only in the parasitic crustacean Argulus, no killing could be achieved by a photodynamic reaction using chlorophyllin. Chlorophyllin is non-toxic, biodegradable, and can be produced at low cost. Therefore, we propose that chlorophyllin (or other photodynamic substances) are a possible effective countermeasure against several ectoparasites in ponds and aquaculture since chemical remedies are either forbidden and/or ineffective.

  12. Microhabitat selection of Gyrodactylus salaris  with reference to susceptibility status of the salmonid host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinecke, Rasmus Demuth; Buchmann, Kurt

    Five strains of salmon Salmo salar and a strain of Danish rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were experimentally infected with the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris (Lærdalselva strain, Norway). All fish were hatchery-reared and the genetic origins were from the East Atlantic: River Conon (Scotland......), Storå (western Denmark) and Ätran (western Sweden) and from the Baltic: River Lule and Ume (Sweden). The rainbow trout used were from a Danish fish farm. Three replicate aquaria infested with G. salaris were established containing 10 fish of every strain. The numbers of parasites were assessed...... of parasites on the tail fins of the salmon from the East Atlantic strains and a converse tendency of decreasing percentages on this site was seen on the Lule salmon. The pectoral fins of the Lule salmon had a relatively higher percentage of parasites compared to salmon from the East Atlantic strains...

  13. Checklists of Parasites of Farm Fishes of Babylon Province, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furhan T. Mhaisen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature reviews of all references concerning the parasitic fauna of fishes in fish farms of Babylon province, middle of Iraq, showed that a total of 92 valid parasite species are so far known from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio, the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella, and the silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix as well as from three freshwater fish species (Carassius auratus, Liza abu, and Heteropneustes fossilis which were found in some fish farms of the same province. The parasitic fauna included one mastigophoran, three apicomplexans, 13 ciliophorans, five myxozoans, five trematodes, 45 monogeneans, five cestodes, three nematodes, two acanthocephalans, nine arthropods, and one mollusc. The common carp was found to harbour 81 species of parasites, the grass carp 30 species, the silver carp 28 species, L. abu 13 species, C. auratus one species, and H. fossilis one species. A host-parasite list for each fish species was also provided.

  14. Multiple parasitic crustacean infestation on belonid fish Strongylura strongylura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneesh, Panakkool-Thamban; Sudha, Kappalli; Helna, Ameri Kottarathil; Anilkumar, Gopinathan; Trilles, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous multiple infestation of parasitic crustacean species involving a cymothoid isopod, Cymothoa frontalis Milne Edward, 1840 and four species of copepods such as Lernanthropus tylosuri Richiardi, 1880, Caligodes lacinatus Kroyer, 1863, Bomolochus bellones Burmeister, 1833 and Dermoergasilus coleus Cressey & Collette, 1970 was frequently noticed on spot-tail needlefish, Strongylura strongylura (Belonidae) captured from the Malabar coast (Kerala, India) during the period from April 2011 to March 2012. All the 43 fishes (Strongylura strongylura) collected, were under the hyper-infection with parasitic crustaceans; a total of 388 parasitic crustaceans including 57 Cymothoa frontalis, 252 Lernanthropus tylosuri, 31 Caligodes lacinatus, 24 Bomolochus bellones and 32 Dermoergasilus coleus were recovered from the host fish. 4 members (9.30%) of host fish were under quadruple parasitism, in two different combinations. Seventeen (39.53%) host fishes showed triple parasitism and 20 (46.51%) members exhibited double parasitism, with four and five parasitic combinations respectively. Remaining two (4.65%) fishes were parasitized only by the copepod, Lernanthropus tylosuri. The infestations by all recovered parasitic crustaceans were highly site specific. The damage caused by the parasitic crustaceans was also discussed. PMID:25561846

  15. Prevalence and seasonality of parasites of fish in Agulu Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2014-01-15

    Jan 15, 2014 ... parasites of fish in a natural, freshwater, tropical lake, southeast Nigeria. A total of 1191 fish ... Fish interacts with the various levels of food chain and influence the ..... clear indication of a high species diversity characteristic ..... University of George, College of Agricultural and Environmental. Sciences.

  16. Effect of the Gill Fluke Gyrodactylus on Haematology of Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of the Gill Fluke Gyrodactylus on Haematology of Infected African Catfish Clarias gariepinus in Culture. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... A good number of infected fish were found to have spur cell in their erythrocyte ...

  17. PARASITES INFECTIONS OF GOLDFISH (Carassius auratus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Gjurčević

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Removing fish from their natural environment, and placing them in aquariums, where large number is concentrated on small space, causes not only stress but increases the possibility of disease. In these unnatural conditions but often adequate for parasite reproduction, parasites can cause diseases leading to death. In our work we investigated parasites presence in goldfish (Carassius auratus L. kept in aquarium, from three different pet shops. The study showed presence of: Trypanoplasma sp., Trichodina sp., Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Myxoboulus sp., Dactylogyrus sp. and Gyrodactylus sp. Considering the number of parasites found in examined fish, it can be possible that parasites can cause mortality in goldfish. Therefore, special caution has to be on quarantine and healthcare while importing especially exotic aquarium fish that may be infected with exotic parasites. In case of disease, proper treatment in due time has to be conducted.

  18. Histopathological alterations in the vital organs of Indian Major Carps with parasitic infestation in fish farms West Bengal, India

    OpenAIRE

    Kurva Raghu Ramudu; Gadadhar Dash

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the histological changes of vital organs such as kidney, gills and brain with the mixed infestation of parasites in Indian Major Carps (IMC). The parasites such as Myxobolus spp., Thelohanellus spp., Trichodina spp., Dactylogyrus spp., Gyrodactylus spp. and Nematodes were observed in three IMC. Several histological alterations were observed in the kidney of Catla catla, Labeo rohita and Cirrhinus mrigala, which includes vacuolar degeneration in the epith...

  19. Waterborne zinc alters temporal dynamics of guppy Poecilia reticulata epidermal response to Gyrodactylus turnbulli (Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Cristina; Marcogliese, David J; Scott, Marilyn E

    2012-03-20

    The present study assessed the histological changes in the epidermis of Poecilia reticulata induced by the combined effects of an ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli and differing concentrations of waterborne zinc (Zn). Infected guppies were exposed to 0, 15, 30, 60, or 120 µg Zn l-1 and monitored over 3 wk during the exponential increase in parasite numbers on the fish. The fish epidermis responded within 3 d to G. turnbulli infection with a rapid increase in epidermal thickness and a modest increase in number, but not size or composition, of mucous cells. In contrast, in the presence of combined waterborne Zn and infection, mucous cell numbers declined rapidly. As the parasite numbers increased, the epidermis remained thicker than normal, and the number and size of mucous cells decreased. The addition of Zn led to a dramatic thickening of the epidermis during the exponential growth of the parasite population. Mucous cell numbers remained depressed. Temporal changes in mucous cell size were Zn concentration dependent. At 60 µg Zn l-1, cells returned to normal size as infection progressed, whereas they remained extremely small at 120 µg Zn l-1. Changes in mucin composition previously reported in response to Zn alone were subdued in the presence of the parasite except at 60 µg Zn l-1, where all cells contained only acidic mucins. Together these results demonstrate that, on exposure to both Zn and G. turnbulli infection, the epidermal response is initially a protective response to both stressors, and then mainly driven by the increased parasite burden.

  20. Parasitic fauna in hybrid tambacu from fish farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronilson Macedo Silva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the parasitic fauna of hybrid tambacu (Colossoma macropomum x Piaractus mesopotamicus from fish farms and the host-parasite relationship. A hundred and fourteen fish were collected from four fish farms in Macapá, in the state of Amapá, Brazil, 80.7% of which were infected by: Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ciliophora; Piscinoodinium pillulare (Dinoflagellida; Anacanthorus spatulatus, Notozothecium janauachensis, and Mymarothecium viatorum (Monogenoidea; Neoechinorhynchus buttnerae (Acanthocephala; Cucullanus colossomi (Nematoda; Perulernaea gamitanae (Lernaeidae; and Proteocephalidae larvae (Cestoda. A total of 8,136,252 parasites were collected from the examined fish. This is the first record of N. buttnerae, C. colossomi, N. janauachensis, M. viatorum, and Proteocephalidae for hybrid tambacu in Brazil. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis was the most prevalent parasite, whereas endohelminths were the less. A positive correlation was observed between number of I. multifiliis and total length and weight of fish, as well as between number of P. gamitanae and total length. The infection by I. multifiliis had association with the parasitism by Monogenoidea. Low water quality contributes to high parasitism of hybrid tambacu by ectoparasites, which, however, does not influence the relative condition factor of fish.

  1. Bucephalus polymorphus Baer, 1827 - a new fish parasite in Austria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Mühlegger, J; Jirsa, Franz; Konecny, Robert; Sattmann, Helmut; Frank, Christa

    2009-10-01

    During parasitological studies of the invasive round goby fish species Apollonia melanostoma (Pallas, 1814) from the Danube River in 2007 the digenean Bucephalus polymorphus Baer, 1827 was detected for the first time in Austria. Encysted metacercariae of the parasite were found on the fins, skin and gills of the fish. The occurrence of the parasite is strictly dependant on the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771), which acts as the obligatory first intermediate host in its life cycle. The mussel has also invaded Austrian waters, but has appeared in 1870 already. It will not be possible to establish whether the parasite was introduced to Austria with the gobies, or has arrived earlier, but it should be the subject of future investigations to ascertain whether the parasite will be able to establish a firm population in Austria, and whether this introduction puts additional pressure on the native fish populations.

  2. Factors associated with parasite dominance in fishes from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fernandes do Amarante

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study used regression models to evaluate the existence of factors that may influence the numerical parasite dominance with an epidemiological approximation. A database including 3,746 fish specimens and their respective parasites were used to evaluate the relationship between parasite dominance and biotic characteristics inherent to the studied hosts and the parasite taxa. Multivariate, classical, and mixed effects linear regression models were fitted. The calculations were performed using R software (95% CI. In the fitting of the classical multiple linear regression model, freshwater and planktivorous fish species and body length, as well as the species of the taxa Trematoda, Monogenea, and Hirudinea, were associated with parasite dominance. However, the fitting of the mixed effects model showed that the body length of the host and the species of the taxa Nematoda, Trematoda, Monogenea, Hirudinea, and Crustacea were significantly associated with parasite dominance. Studies that consider specific biological aspects of the hosts and parasites should expand the knowledge regarding factors that influence the numerical dominance of fish in Brazil. The use of a mixed model shows, once again, the importance of the appropriate use of a model correlated with the characteristics of the data to obtain consistent results.

  3. Drivers of parasite sharing among Neotropical freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Mariana P; Razzolini, Emanuel; Boeger, Walter A

    2015-03-01

    Because host-parasite interactions are so ubiquitous, it is of primary interest for ecologists to understand the factors that generate, maintain and constrain these associations. Phylogenetic comparative studies have found abundant evidence for host-switching to relatively unrelated hosts, sometimes related to diversification events, in a variety of host-parasite systems. For Monogenoidea (Platyhelminthes) parasites, it has been suggested that the co-speciation model alone cannot explain host occurrences, hence host-switching and/or non-vicariant modes of speciation should be associated with the origins and diversification of several monogenoid taxa. The factors that shape broad patterns of parasite sharing were investigated using path analysis as a way to generate hypotheses about the origins of host-parasite interactions between monogenoid gill parasites and Neotropical freshwater fishes. Parasite sharing was assessed from an interaction matrix, and explanatory variables included phylogenetic relationships, environmental preferences, biological traits and geographic distribution for each host species. Although geographic distribution of hosts and host ecology are important factors to understand host-parasite interactions, especially within host lineages that share a relatively recent evolutionary history, phylogeny had the strongest overall direct effect on parasite sharing. Phylogenetic contiguity of host communities may allow a 'stepping-stone' mode of host-switching, which increases parasite sharing. Our results reinforce the importance of including evolutionary history in the study of ecological associations, including emerging infectious diseases risk assessment. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  4. A survey on ectoparasite fauna of cold water fish farms in Mazandaran Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mehdizadeh Mood

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available the important areas of this industry in Iran. The present study was carried out to survey onectoparasite fauna of cold water fish farms in Mazandaran Province (Iran during a period of 12 months.For this aim 500 samples were obtained from 50 fish farms and after arriving to laboratory the parasiteexamination started immediately. From the total of 500 specimens, 182 fish (36.4% were infected withectoparasites. Through the parasitic examinations five species of parasites were detected, namely:Ichthyophthirius multifillis, Trichodina sp., Chilodonella sp., Gyrodactylus sp. and Dactylogyrus sp. Theresults showed that, from total percentage (36.4% of detection, 31.4% of detected parasites wereprotozoan (16.4% Ichthyophthirius multifillis, 14% Trichodina sp., and 1% Chilodonella sp. and 5% weremonogenean trematodes (3% Dactylogyrus sp. and 2% Gyrodactylus sp.. The highest prevalence ofparasites in our study belonged to the Ichthyophthirius multifiliis causative agent of White Spot Disease.

  5. Can myxosporean parasites compromise fish and amphibian reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna

    2009-08-22

    Research into fish and amphibian reproduction has increased exponentially in recent years owing to the expansion of the aquaculture industry, the need to recover fishery populations, the impact of endocrine disruptors on the aquatic environment and the global decline of amphibian populations. This review focuses on a group of parasites, the Myxozoa, that affect fish and amphibian reproduction. Lists of the myxosporeans that specifically infect gonads are provided. Most of these are parasitic of freshwater hosts, and most amphibian cases are reported from testes. Sex specificity and sex reversal are discussed in relation to gonadal parasitism. The immune response of the fish to the infection is described, and the contribution of the immunoprivilege of gonads to host invasion is emphasized. The pathological effect of these parasites can be significant, especially in aquacultured broodstocks, on some occasions, leading to parasitic castration. Although myxosporean parasites are currently not very frequent in gonads, their impact could increase in the future owing to the transactions in the global market. Their easy release into the aquatic environment with spawning could make their spreading even more feasible. In the absence of commercial drugs or vaccines to treat and prevent these infections, there is an urgent need to develop specific, rapid and reliable diagnostic tools to control and manage animal movements. In addition, much effort is still to be made on deciphering the life cycle of these organisms, their invasion strategies and their immune evasion mechanisms.

  6. Parasites of freshwater fishes in North America: why so neglected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomáš; Choudhury, Anindo

    2014-02-01

    Fish parasitology has a long tradition in North America and numerous parasitologists have contributed considerably to the current knowledge of the diversity and biology of protistan and metazoan parasites of freshwater fishes. The Journal of Parasitology has been essential in disseminating this knowledge and remains a significant contributor to our understanding of fish parasites in North America as well as more broadly at the international level. However, with a few exceptions, the importance of fish parasites has decreased during the last decades, which is reflected in the considerable decline of funding and corresponding decrease of attention paid to these parasites in Canada and the United States of America. After the 'golden age' in the second half of the 20th Century, fish parasitology in Canada and the United States went in a new direction, driven by technology and a shift in priorities. In contrast, fish parasitology in Mexico has undergone rapid development since the early 1990s, partly due to extensive international collaboration and governmental funding. A critical review of the current data on the parasites of freshwater fishes in North America has revealed considerable gaps in the knowledge of their species composition, host specificity, life cycles, evolution, phylogeography, and relationships with their fish hosts. As to the key question, "Why so neglected?" this is probably because: (1) fish parasites are not in the forefront due to their lesser economic importance; (2) there is little funding for this kind of research, especially if a practical application is not immediately apparent; and (3) of shifting interests and a shortage of key personalities to train a new generation (they switched to marine habitats or other fields). Some of the opportunities for future research are outlined, such as climate change and cryptic species diversity. A significant problem challenging future research seems to be the loss of trained and experienced fish

  7. Tracking transparent monogenean parasites on fish from infection to maturity

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Trujillo-González; Constantinoiu, Constantin C.; Richard Rowe; Hutson, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The infection dynamics and distribution of the ectoparasitic fish monogenean Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae) throughout its development was examined on barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch) (Latidae), by labelling transparent, ciliated larvae (oncomiracidia) with a fluorescent dye. Replicate fish were each exposed to approximately 50 fluorescent oncomiracidia and then examined for parasites using an epifluorescence stereomicroscope at 10 time intervals post-exposure (15, 30, 60, 120 m...

  8. Parasites modify sub-cellular partitioning of metals in the gut of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoo-Okoth, Elijah, E-mail: elijaoyoo2009@gmail.com [Division of Environmental Health, School of Environmental Studies, Moi University, P.O. Box 3900, Eldoret (Kenya); Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Admiraal, Wim [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Osano, Odipo [Division of Environmental Health, School of Environmental Studies, Moi University, P.O. Box 3900, Eldoret (Kenya); Kraak, Michiel H.S. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 9424/1090 GE (Netherlands); Gichuki, John; Ogwai, Caleb [Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, P.O. Box 1881, Kisumu (Kenya)

    2012-01-15

    Infestation of fish by parasites may influence metal accumulation patterns in the host. However, the subcellular mechanisms of these processes have rarely been studied. Therefore, this study determined how a cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) partitioned four metals (Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) in the subcellular fractions of the gut in presence of an endoparasite (Ligula intestinalis). The fish were sampled along four sites in Lake Victoria, Kenya differing in metal contamination. Accumulation of Cd, Cr and Zn was higher in the whole body and in the gut of parasitized fish compared to non-parasitized fish, while Cu was depleted in parasitized fish. Generally, for both non-parasitized and parasitized fish, Cd, Cr and Zn partitioned in the cytosolic fractions and Cu in the particulate fraction. Metal concentrations in organelles within the particulate fractions of the non-parasitized fish were statistically similar except for Cd in the lysosome, while in the parasitized fish, Cd, Cr and Zn were accumulated more by the lysosome and microsomes. In the cytosolic fractions, the non-parasitized fish accumulated Cd, Cr and Zn in the heat stable proteins (HSP), while in the parasitized fish the metals were accumulated in the heat denatured proteins (HDP). On the contrary, Cu accumulated in the HSP in parasitized fish. The present study revealed specific binding of metals to potentially sensitive sub-cellular fractions in fish in the presence of parasites, suggesting interference with metal detoxification, and potentially affecting the health status of fish hosts in Lake Victoria.

  9. Developmental stage of parasites influences the structure of fish-parasite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellay, Sybelle; de Oliveira, Edson Fontes; Almeida-Neto, Mário; Lima Junior, Dilermando Pereira; Takemoto, Ricardo Massato; Luque, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Specialized interactions tend to be more common in systems that require strong reciprocal adaptation between species, such as those observed between parasites and hosts. Parasites exhibit a high diversity of species and life history strategies, presenting host specificity which increases the complexity of these antagonistic systems. However, most studies are limited to the description of interactions between a few parasite and host species, which restricts our understanding of these systems as a whole. We investigated the effect of the developmental stage of the parasite on the structure of 30 metazoan fish-parasite networks, with an emphasis on the specificity of the interactions, connectance and modularity. We assessed the functional role of each species in modular networks and its interactions within and among the modules according to the developmental stage (larval and adult) and taxonomic group of the parasites. We observed that most parasite and host species perform a few interactions but that parasites at the larval stage tended to be generalists, increasing the network connectivity within and among modules. The parasite groups did not differ among each other in the number of interactions within and among the modules when considering only species at the larval stage. However, the same groups of adult individuals differed from each other in their interaction patterns, which were related to variations in the degree of host specificity at this stage. Our results show that the interaction pattern of fishes with parasites, such as acanthocephalans, cestodes, digeneans and nematodes, is more closely associated with their developmental stage than their phylogenetic history. This finding corroborates the hypothesis that the life history of parasites results in adaptations that cross phylogenetic boundaries.

  10. Pathological and ecological host consequences of infection by an introduced fish parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J Robert; Pegg, Josephine; Williams, Chris F

    2011-01-01

    The infection consequences of the introduced cestode fish parasite Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were studied in a cohort of wild, young-of-the-year common carp Cyprinus carpio that lacked co-evolution with the parasite. Within the cohort, parasite prevalence was 42% and parasite burdens were up to 12% body weight. Pathological changes within the intestinal tract of parasitized carp included distension of the gut wall, epithelial compression and degeneration, pressure necrosis and varied inflammatory changes. These were most pronounced in regions containing the largest proportion of mature proglottids. Although the body lengths of parasitized and non-parasitized fish were not significantly different, parasitized fish were of lower body condition and reduced weight compared to non-parasitized conspecifics. Stable isotope analysis (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) revealed trophic impacts associated with infection, particularly for δ(15)N where values for parasitized fish were significantly reduced as their parasite burden increased. In a controlled aquarium environment where the fish were fed ad libitum on an identical food source, there was no significant difference in values of δ(15)N and δ(13)C between parasitized and non-parasitized fish. The growth consequences remained, however, with parasitized fish growing significantly slower than non-parasitized fish, with their feeding rate (items s(-1)) also significantly lower. Thus, infection by an introduced parasite had multiple pathological, ecological and trophic impacts on a host with no experience of the parasite.

  11. [Copepode parasites of fish from the Kerkennah Islands (Southern Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essafi, K; Cabral, P; Raibaut, A

    1984-12-01

    Out of 29 species of fish from the Kerkennah Islands examined, 30 species of parasitic copepoda were collected which belong to seven families and nine different genera. Among them three new species have been found and ten were reported for the first time in Tunisia.

  12. Haematological and histopathological analysis in South American fish Piaractus mesopotamicus parasitized by monogenean (Dactylogyridae

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    GT Jerônimo

    Full Text Available Monogeneans are the parasites mostly found on the body surface and gills of fish and can cause large losses in farmed fish. Some studies demonstrate elevated parasitic levels causing hematological alterations. But few of them relate the effects of parasitism on the hematology and histopathology of native freshwater farmed fish. This study evaluated the host-parasite relationship in pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus parasitized by the monogenean Anacanthorus penilabiatus. Hematological and parasitological assessments were obtained in 60 fish captured in a fish farm located in Dourados, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Central Brazil. Fish were analyzed in different categories of parasite number: class I (n=13; 0-200 parasites, class II (n=17; 201-1200 parasites; class III (n=7; 1201-2200 parasites; and class IV (n=23; more than 2200 parasites per host. The highest levels of parasitism caused significant decrease (p<0.05 in the hematocrit, red blood cells (RBC, mean hemoglobin concentration (MCHC and basophils number. Thrombocytes, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, monocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils and LG-PAS did not present significant difference among the parasitic levels. In contrast, increased number of total leukocytes and lymphocytes were found in highly-parasitized fish. A positive linear correlation (p<0.01 was found between the amount of parasites and fish weight. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplasia, sub-epithelial edema, fusion of the secondary lamellae, focal and multifocal necrosis in highly parasitized fish.

  13. Fish-borne parasitic zoonoses: status and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Darwin Murrell, K; Lymbery, Alan J

    2005-10-01

    The fish-borne parasitic zoonoses have been limited for the most part to populations living in low- and middle-income countries, but the geographical limits and populations at risk are expanding because of growing international markets, improved transportation systems, and demographic changes such as population movements. While many in developed countries will recognize meat-borne zoonoses such as trichinellosis and cysticercosis, far fewer are acquainted with the fish-borne parasitic zoonoses which are mostly helminthic diseases caused by trematodes, cestodes and nematodes. Yet these zoonoses are responsible for large numbers of human infections around the world. The list of potential fish-borne parasitic zoonoses is quite large. However, in this review, emphasis has been placed on liver fluke diseases such as clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis and metorchiasis, as well as on intestinal trematodiasis (the heterophyids and echinostomes), anisakiasis (due to Anisakis simplex larvae), and diphyllobothriasis. The life cycles, distributions, epidemiology, clinical aspects, and, importantly, the research needed for improved risk assessments, clinical management and prevention and control of these important parasitic diseases are reviewed.

  14. Tracking transparent monogenean parasites on fish from infection to maturity

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    Alejandro Trujillo-González

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The infection dynamics and distribution of the ectoparasitic fish monogenean Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae throughout its development was examined on barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch (Latidae, by labelling transparent, ciliated larvae (oncomiracidia with a fluorescent dye. Replicate fish were each exposed to approximately 50 fluorescent oncomiracidia and then examined for parasites using an epifluorescence stereomicroscope at 10 time intervals post-exposure (15, 30, 60, 120 min, 24, 48 h, four, eight, 12, and 16 days. Fluorescent labelling revealed that parasites attached underneath and on the surface of the scales of host fish. Parasite infection success was 20% within 15 min, and peaked at 93% two days post-exposure, before gradually declining between four and sixteen days. Differences in parasite distribution on L. calcarifer over time provided strong evidence that Neobenedenia sp. larvae settled opportunistically and then migrated to specific microhabitats. Parasites initially attached (<24 h in greater mean numbers on the body surface (13 ± 1.5 compared to the fins (4 ± 0.42 and head region (2 ± 0.41. Once larvae recruitment had ceased (48 h, there were significantly higher mean post-larvae counts on the head (5 ± 3.4 and fins (12 ± 3 compared to previous time intervals. Neobenedenia sp. aggregated on the eyes, fins, and dorsal and ventral extremities on the main body. As parasites neared sexual maturity, there was a marked aggregation on the fins (22 ± 2.35 compared to the head (4 ± 0.97 and body (9 ± 1.33, indicating that Neobenedenia sp. may form mating aggregations.

  15. Protozoários e metazoários parasitos do cardinal Paracheirodon axelrodi Schultz, 1956 (Characidae, peixe ornamental proveniente de exportador de Manaus, Estado do Amazonas, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i1.872 Protozoan and metazoan parasites of the cardinal Paracheirodon axelrodi Schultz, 1956 (Characidae, ornamental fish from Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i1.872

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leonora Silva Brito

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos sobre a parasitofauna de peixes ornamentais cultivados são de grande relevância para o conhecimento das espécies de parasitos, permitindo interferência em sua proliferação para evitar epizootias e, consequentemente, perdas econômicas na criação. O presente estudo investigou a prevalência e intensidade de parasitos protozoários e metazoários em cardinal Paracheirodon axelrodi (N = 89, mantidos em tanques de um exportador de Manaus, Estado do Amazonas, Brasil. Dos espécimes de P. axelrodi necropsiados, 65,2% (N = 58 estavam parasitados pelos Protozoa Piscinoodinium pillulare (3,4% e Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (7,9%, Monogenoidea Gyrodactylus sp. (42,7%, Nematoda Procamallanus sp. (23,6% e Trematoda (1,1%. Gyrodactylus sp. e Procamallanus sp., porém, foram os parasitos de maior prevalência e intensidade. Apesar da elevada prevalência de parasitismo em P. axelrodi durante a sua permanência no exportador, a intensidade de protozoários e metazoários foi baixa pelo manejo profilático nos tanques. Os resultados demonstram que os cuidados com tratamento e profilaxia são de extrema importância na aquicultura de peixes ornamentais.Studies regarding parasites fauna in farmed ornamental fish are of great relevance for knowledge of the parasites species, allowing interference in their proliferation to avoid epizooties and consequently, economical losses. This study was designed to investigate the protozoan and metazoan parasites prevalence and intensity on cardinal Paracheirodon axelrodi, maintained in tanks of an exporter from Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. On necropsy 65.2% of P. axelrodi were found parasitized by Piscinoodium pillulare, Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Protozoa, Gyrodactylus sp. (Monogenoidea, Procamallanus sp. (Nematoda and Trematoda. Gyrodactylus sp. (42.7% and Procamallanus sp. (23.6% were the parasites of greatest prevalence, and protozoan I. multifiliis was the parasite of greatest mean intensity (4

  16. Efficacy of ginger-based treatments against infection with Gyrodactylus turnbulli in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata (Peters)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G; Zilberg, D; Paladini, G; Fridman, S

    2015-04-30

    Monogenean infections of commercially farmed fishes are responsible for significant economic losses and existing chemical therapeutants, often stressful to the fish, pose associated risks. As part of a recent trend to move towards the use of alternative, plant-based remedies for commonly occurring aquaculture-related diseases, the efficiency of ginger (Zingiber officinale) was investigated against the monogenean parasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli in the guppy. In vitro trials revealed the clear anti-parasitic effects of ginger. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts, prepared from freeze dried ginger, were tested. An increase in extract concentration was associated with reduced time to parasite immobilisation, with ethanolic extract being more efficient; at 75 and 200ppt aqueous ginger extract parasites died at 65.6±2.8 and 1.8±0.2min, respectively, whereas at 5 and 40ppt ethanolic extract parasites died at 26.1±0.7 and 4.9±0.3min, respectively. Bathing G. turnbulli-infected fish in ethanolic ginger extract (i.e. 5 and 7.5ppt for 90 and 30min, respectively) significantly reduced infection prevalence and intensity when compared to the water and ethanol controls. The higher concentration (i.e. 7.5ppt) proved as equally effective as Praziquantel, the conventionally used chemical treatment for gyrodactylosis, with the fish appearing to be completely cleared of the infection in both cases. Oral treatments of G. turnbulli-infected guppies with diets supplemented with 10 and 20% ginger powder proved to be ineffective in decreasing parasite load. These findings demonstrate that immersion in ginger extract offers an effective, alternative treatment against monogenean infection in fish.

  17. Fish parasites in the Arctic deep-sea: Poor diversity in pelagic fish species vs. heavy parasite load in a demersal fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, Sven; Palm, Harry Wilhelm; Busch, Markus Wilhelm; Kellermanns, Esra; Rückert, Sonja

    2006-07-01

    A total of 219 deep-sea fishes belonging to five families were examined for the parasite fauna and stomach contents. The demersal fish Macrourus berglax, bathypelagic Bathylagus euryops, and mesopelagic Argentina silus, Borostomias antarcticus, Chauliodus sloani, and Lampanyctus macdonaldi were caught at 243-708 m trawling depth in the Greenland and the Irminger Sea in 2002. A total of 21 different parasite species, six Digenea, one Monogenea, two Cestoda, seven Nematoda, one Acanthocephala, and four Crustacea, were found. The parasite diversity in the meso- and bathypelagic environment was less diverse in comparison to the benthal. Macrourus berglax had the highest diversity (20 species), usually carrying 4-10 different parasite species (mean 7.1), whereas Bathylagus euryops harbored up to three and Argentina silus, Borostomias antarcticus, Chauliodus sloani and Lampanyctus macdonaldi each up to two species. Most Digenea, Cestoda, Nematoda, Acanthocephala, and Crustacea are known from a wide host range. Several of the encountered parasites occurred at a very low prevalence (<10%), indicating that the studied deep-sea fishes are most probably not instrumental to complete the parasite life cycles in the area of investigation. It is suggested that the lack of nutrients in the meso- and bathypelagial limits the abundance of potential first intermediate hosts of nematodes and cestodes, resulting in low infestation rates even of widely distributed, non-specific species. In contrast, the higher biomass in the benthic deep-sea environment increases the availability of potential intermediate hosts, such as molluscs for the digeneans, resulting in increased parasite diversity. Because many deep-sea fish have a generalistic feeding behavior, the observed different parasite diversity reflects a different depth range of the fish and not necessarily a specific fish feeding ecology.

  18. Parasitic infections in ornamental cichlid fish in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga, Jefferson Yunis; Marcusso, Paulo Fernandes; Claudiano, Gustavo da Silva; Lima, Bruno Tadeu Marotta; Marotta, Bruno L; Sebastião, Fernanda de Alexandre; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; de Moraes, Flávio Ruas; de Moraes, Julieta Rodini Engracia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and seasonal distribution of the main parasite species in Amazonian ornamental cichlids that affect their trade. The study was conducted from August 2007 to September 2009. We sampled 3042 specimens from 9 different species, of which 9.47% had at least one type of external parasite. 81.25% of the cases occurred in the dry season. Crenicichla anthurus (28.57%) was the most parasitized, followed by Aequidens diadema (26.32%), Pterophyllum scalare (22.69%), Cichlasoma sp. (9.52%), Apistogramma sp. (3.88%) and Symphysodon aequifasciatus (3.66%). Monogenea was the most abundant group of parasites, occurring in 66.67% of the cases, of which 96.88% occurred in the dry season. This parasite infested 95.68% of Pterophyllum scalare, 76.67% of Apistogramma sp, 33.33% of Cichlasoma sp. and 23.81% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus cases. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infested 100% of Aequidens diadema, 76.19% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus, 66.67% of Cichlasoma sp, 41.67% of Crenicichla anthurus and 23.33% of Apistogramma sp cases. Myxosporidia infested 58.33% of Crenicichla anthurus. Trichodina infested 4.32% of Pterophyllum scalare. The prevalence of these parasites is related to the season, preferred habitat, fish behavior, individual susceptibility and handling of animals during transportation by fishermen.

  19. Parasitic infections in ornamental cichlid fish in the Peruvian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Yunis Aguinaga

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and seasonal distribution of the main parasite species in Amazonian ornamental cichlids that affect their trade. The study was conducted from August 2007 to September 2009. We sampled 3042 specimens from 9 different species, of which 9.47% had at least one type of external parasite. 81.25% of the cases occurred in the dry season. Crenicichla anthurus (28.57% was the most parasitized, followed by Aequidens diadema (26.32%, Pterophyllum scalare (22.69%, Cichlasoma sp. (9.52%, Apistogramma sp. (3.88% and Symphysodon aequifasciatus (3.66%. Monogenea was the most abundant group of parasites, occurring in 66.67% of the cases, of which 96.88% occurred in the dry season. This parasite infested 95.68% of Pterophyllum scalare, 76.67% of Apistogramma sp, 33.33% of Cichlasoma sp. and 23.81% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus cases. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infested 100% of Aequidens diadema, 76.19% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus, 66.67% of Cichlasoma sp, 41.67% of Crenicichla anthurus and 23.33% of Apistogramma sp cases. Myxosporidia infested 58.33% of Crenicichla anthurus. Trichodina infested 4.32% of Pterophyllum scalare. The prevalence of these parasites is related to the season, preferred habitat, fish behavior, individual susceptibility and handling of animals during transportation by fishermen.

  20. Analysis of the parasitic copepod species richness among Mediterranean fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaut, André; Combes, Claude; Benoit, Françoise

    1998-06-01

    The Mediterranean ichthyofauna is composed of 652 species belonging to 405 genera and 117 families. Among these, 182 were studied for their parasitic copepods. The analysis of all the works conducted on these crustacea yielded 226 species distributed in 88 genera and 20 families. For each fish species we have established a file providing the species name of the fish, its family, its geographical distribution within the Mediterranean and some of its bio-ecological characteristics. Within each file, all the parasitic copepod species reported on each host species were listed. This allowed to know the species richness (SR) of these hosts. We thus produced 182 files within which 226 copepod species are distributed. A program was created under the Hypercard software, in order to analyse our data. Two parameters were studied. The first one is the mean species richness (MSR), which corresponds to the mean of the different SR found on the different host species. The second is the parasite-host ratio (P/H), which is the ratio of the number of copepod species by the number of host species. These parameters are calculated by our program for all the 182 species of Mediterranean fishes retained in our investigation, on the first hand, and, on the second hand, for one particular group of fish species. We used the following variables to investigate their correlations with copepod species richness: taxonomy—fish families, genera and species; biometry—maximal size of the adult fish; eco-ethology—mode of life (benthic, pelagic or nectonic), displacements (sedentary, migratory with environmental change, or migratory without environmental change), behaviour (solitary or gregarious). Other variables (colour, food, reproduction, abundance, distribution area) were also analysed but did not reveal any clear correlation. Providing that our study does not rely on quantitative (prevalence, intensity) but qualitative basis our aim was only to reveal some tendencies. These tendencies are

  1. Molecular markers in studies on fish parasites (Platyhelminthes: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Junio da Graça

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies with molecular markers are currently more common for all groups of living organisms. Molecular techniques used in Platyhelminthes parasites of fishes do not merely reveal complex life cycles, but are important for species distinction and the elucidation of the phylogenetic hypothesis. Current research verified which molecular markers were mainly used phylogenetic studies on Platyhelminthes parasites of fish so that subsidies for further phylogenetic studies in Icthyoparasitology could be provided. Data base of CAPES Journals platform was employed for bibliometric analysis comprising the keywords “fish” and “phylogeny” associated with “Cestoda”, “Digenea” or “Monogenea”. Information retrieved was quantified and tabulated. Most studies were on Monogenea (43%, followed by Digenea (37% and Cestoda (18%. Ribosomal molecular markers were the most used in the phylogenetic studies for fish parasites. Due to the advance of molecular biology techniques and of bioinformatics, with more robust phylogenetic analysis, the use of these techniques in other areas such as Ichytioparasitology is on the increase. In fact, molecular phylogenetics and morphological structures analysis have efficiently contributed towards the understanding of phylogenetic relationships among the groups.

  2. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of garlic compounds against Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkle, Bettina; Snellgrove, Donna; Cable, Joanne

    2013-11-15

    Traditional compounds used to treat fish diseases in aquaculture and the ornamental fish industry (such as formalin and malachite green) can be more toxic to the hosts than their parasites. With the reviviscence in the use of herbal products, various botanicals have been heralded as cures for particular pathogens, but the efficacy of these compounds for parasitic worms is questionable. Here, we tested a range of garlic (Allium sativum) products against a major aquarium pathogen, Gyrodactylus turnbulli, infecting the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). All garlic products significantly reduced parasite mean survival time in vitro, from 13 h to garlic from different sources. Two garlic treatments (minced and granule forms) reduced worm burdens by 66% and 75% after three doses, whereas Chinese freeze-dried garlic and allyl disulphide were 95% effective after a single application. In fact, Chinese freeze dried garlic was equally effective as Levamisole, a licensed livestock dewormer that is highly effective against G. turnbulli but not routinely prescribed for use in fish; hence, garlic may be a potential alternative treatment for gyrodactylosis.

  3. Metazoan parasite species richness in Neotropical fishes: hotspots and the geography of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, J L; Poulin, R

    2007-06-01

    Although research on parasite biodiversity has intensified recently, there are signs that parasites remain an underestimated component of total biodiversity in many regions of the planet. To identify geographical hotspots of parasite diversity, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of the parasite-host associations in fishes from Latin America and the Caribbean, a region that includes known hotspots of plant and animal biodiversity. The database included 10,904 metazoan parasite-host associations involving 1660 fish species. The number of host species with at least 1 parasite record was less than 10% of the total known fish species in the majority of countries. Associations involving adult endoparasites in actinopterygian fish hosts dominated the database. Across the whole region, no significant difference in parasite species richness was detected between marine and freshwater fishes. As a rule, host body size and study effort (number of studies per fish species) were good predictors of parasite species richness. Some interesting patterns emerged when we included only the regions with highest fish species biodiversity and study effort (Brazil, Mexico and the Caribbean Islands). Independently of differences in study effort or host body sizes, Mexico stands out as a hotspot of parasite diversity for freshwater fishes, as does Brasil for marine fishes. However, among 57 marine fish species common to all 3 regions, populations from the Caribbean consistently harboured more parasite species. These differences may reflect true biological patterns, or regional discrepancies in study effort and local priorities for fish parasitology research.

  4. Chlorophycean parasite on a marine fish, Sillago japonica (Japanese sillago).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kazuhiko; Akai, Noriko; Liao, Lawrence M; Ikeda, Shota; Yoshimatsu, Sadaaki

    2013-12-01

    A green spotted Japanese sillago (Sillago japonica) was caught by a fisherman and brought to the laboratory for pathological inspection. The green spots were abundant on the lateral line and more extensively so within the mouth cavity. In both sites, green spots were embedded within the fish flesh and formed 2-3mm dome-shaped colonies. SEM revealed these colonies to harbor numerous unknown cells with small, surface warts (ornamentations). Molecular analysis showed the cells were Desmodesmus (D. komarekii), a common freshwater coccoid green alga found in ponds and rivers worldwide. It is uncertain how the host fish came to be infected with the alga which was not merely attached externally but embedded within the flesh and inside the mouth cavity. This is the first case of parasitic form of coccoid green algae in marine fish and provides new insights into the variable nature of green algae.

  5. Efficacy of commercially available products against Gyrodactylus turnbulli infections on guppies Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkle, Bettina; Snellgrove, Donna; Jones, Lewis L; Cable, Jo

    2015-07-23

    The demand for ornamental fish has led to a steep rise in aquaculture for the hobbyist trade, promoting the emergence, persistence and spread of various infectious diseases. Complete control of disease outbreaks with antibiotics and chemical-based medicines is rare, but plant compounds may herald potential alternatives effective against a range of pathogens. Melafix® and Pimafix® are formulated with the essential oils cajuput (Melaleuca cajuputi) and West Indian bay (Pimenta racemosa) and are marketed against bacterial and fungal infections, respectively. Previous experiments showed high efficacy of emulsified cajuput oil against gyrodactylids; the current study tested Melafix® and Pimafix® and their individual compounds against Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting the guppies Poecilia reticulata. In particular, a combination treatment of Melafix® and Pimafix® was highly effective at reducing in vitro survival of parasites from 15 to 2 h and eradicating 95% of gyrodactylids in vivo. The unexpected high efficacy of this combination treatment is likely explained by the high content of terpenes and phenol propanoids in the cajuput and West Indian bay oils, as well as the anti-helminthic properties of the emulsifier Crovol PK 70. Hence, Melafix® and Pimafix® effectively reduce gyrodactylid burdens on fish, increasing the chances of efficient disease control in ornamental fish.

  6. Preliminary identification schemes for some unicellular ciliated and flagellated parasites of warmwater fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are few keys for the identification of small unicellular parasites of warmwater fishes and few experts who can confidently identify these parasites to species. Molecular identification tools for these parasites are largely unavailable. For fishery biologists and even fish health diagnosticia...

  7. Chlorophyllin as a possible measure against vectors of human parasites and fish parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Rolf Richter; Sebastian Michael Strauch; Azizullah eAzizullah; Donat P. Häder

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin) exerts pronounced photodynamic activity. Chlorophyllin is a potential remedy against mosquito larvae and aquatic stages in the life cycle of parasites as well as against ectoparasites in fish. In the recent years it was found that mosquito larvae and other pest organisms can be killed by means of photodynamic substances such as different porphyrin derivates (e.g. hematoporphyrin, meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl), meso-mono(N-tetra-decylpyridyl) porphyrine, h...

  8. Marine protected areas facilitate parasite populations among four fished host species of central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Micheli, Fiorenza; Fernández, Miriam; Gelcich, Stefan; Castilla, Juan Carlos; Carvajal, Juan

    2013-11-01

    1. Parasites comprise a substantial proportion of global biodiversity and exert important ecological influences on hosts, communities and ecosystems, but our knowledge of how parasite populations respond to human impacts is in its infancy. 2. Here, we present the results of a natural experiment in which we used a system of highly successful marine protected areas and matched open-access areas in central Chile to assess the influence of fishing-driven biodiversity loss on parasites of exploited fish and invertebrate hosts. We measured the burden of gill parasites for two reef fishes (Cheilodactylus variegatus and Aplodactylus punctatus), trematode parasites for a keyhole limpet (Fissurella latimarginata), and pinnotherid pea crab parasites for a sea urchin (Loxechinus albus). We also measured host density for all four hosts. 3. We found that nearly all parasite species exhibited substantially greater density (# parasites m(-2)) in protected than in open-access areas, but only one parasite species (a gill monogenean of C. variegatus) was more abundant within hosts collected from protected relative to open-access areas. 4. These data indicate that fishing can drive declines in parasite abundance at the parasite population level by reducing the availability of habitat and resources for parasites, but less commonly affects the abundance of parasites at the infrapopulation level (within individual hosts). 5. Considering the substantial ecological role that many parasites play in marine communities, fishing and other human impacts could exert cryptic but important effects on marine community structure and ecosystem functioning via reductions in parasite abundance.

  9. Chlorophyllin as a possible measure against vectors of human parasites and fish parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rolf Richter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin exerts pronounced photodynamic activity. Chlorophyllin is a potential remedy against mosquito larvae and aquatic stages in the life cycle of parasites as well as against ectoparasites in fish. In the recent years it was found that mosquito larvae and other pest organisms can be killed by means of photodynamic substances such as different porphyrin derivates (e.g. hematoporphyrin, meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl, meso-mono(N-tetra-decylpyridyl porphyrine, hematoporphyrin IX, or hermatoporphyrin formula (HPF. It was found that incubation of mosquito larvae in chlorophyllin solution and subsequent irradiation results in photodynamic destruction of the larvae. Incorporation of about 8 ng chlorophyllin per larvae was sufficient to induce its death. In fish mass cultivation ichthyophthiriosis is a severe parasitic protozoan disease caused by the ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. It was found that incubation of infected fishes in chlorophyllin and subsequent illumination reduced the number of trophonts significantly (more than 50 %. The fishes were not impaired. Chlorophyllin and other photodynamic substances may become a possible countermeasure against I. multifiliis and other ectoparasites in aquaculture. The effectiveness of chlorophyllin depends on light attenuation in the water body.

  10. Impact and control of protozoan parasites in maricultured fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Aquaculture, including both freshwater and marine production, has on a world scale exhibited one of the highest growth rates within animal protein production during recent decades and is expected to expand further at the same rate within the next 10 years. Control of diseases is one of the most prominent challenges if this production goal is to be reached. Apart from viral, bacterial, fungal and metazoan infections it has been documented that protozoan parasites affect health and welfare and thereby production of fish in marine aquaculture. Representatives within the main protozoan groups such as amoebae, dinoflagellates, kinetoplastid flagellates, diplomonadid flagellates, apicomplexans, microsporidians and ciliates have been shown to cause severe morbidity and mortality among farmed fish. Well studied examples are Neoparamoeba perurans, Amyloodinium ocellatum, Spironucleus salmonicida, Ichthyobodo necator, Cryptobia salmositica, Loma salmonae, Cryptocaryon irritans, Miamiensis avidus and Trichodina jadranica. The present report provides details on the parasites' biology and impact on productivity and evaluates tools for diagnosis, control and management. Special emphasis is placed on antiprotozoan immune responses in fish and a strategy for development of vaccines is presented.

  11. Monogenean parasites of the African catifsh Clarias gariepinus from two ifsh farms in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eyo Victor Oscar; Edet Theresa Arit; Ekanem Albert Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, mean intensity, and abundance of monogenean parasites in Clarias gariepinus (C. gariepinus) from two selected fish farms in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods:Eighty specimens of C. gariepinus from the two farms (40 each) were necropsied for parasitological analysis. Skin, gill and fin biopsies were prepared from each specimen following standard methods for microscopic analysis. Parasitological indices including dominance (D), prevalence, mean intensity and abundance were calculated according to standard formulae. Data were analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. Results:C. gariepinus from the two farms were infested with a total of ninety individuals of monogenean parasites belonging to three species including Macrogyrodactylus clarii (M. clarii), Gyrodactylus sp. and Dactylogyrus sp. D index showed that the three monogenean species were eudominant (D-value>10%). Gyrodactylus sp. was more abundant (46) followed by Dactylogyrus sp. (23) while M. clarii was the lowest (21). Prevalence, meaning intensity and abundance of monogenean parasites in the two farms, varied insignificantly higher (P>0.05). Prevalence in both farms were higher in female C. gariepinus than that in male. Monogenean parasites exhibited organ specificity as M. clarii and Dactylogyrus sp. were recovered from the gills while Gyrodactylus sp. colonized the skin and fin. Conclusions:High abundance of these parasites may lead to poor growth performance and high mortality in C. gariepinus, leading to huge monetary loss and low profit margin by increasing production cost due to the cost of treatments.

  12. Distribution of isopod parasites in Carangid fishes from Parangipettai, Southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Ramesh, Mathan

    2016-03-01

    Crustacean parasites absorb their nourishment directly from hosts for feeding. The present study was aimed at collecting information as possible on this so far neglected group of isopod parasites of the Carangid fishes of Parangipettai coastal environment. A very little information is available regarding the isopod parasites of Carangid fishes. In the present study six species of isopods belonging to 3 genera were found on four species of fishes. The distribution of Catoessa boscii is found throughout the year.

  13. Study of parasites native and introduced species of fish in Caspian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Bozorgnia, Abbas

    2007-01-01

    Seven native and introduced species of fish in south east Caspian Sea coast examined for parasite infestation during 2004-2006. Native fishes include Barbus capito, Carassius auratus, Cyprinus carpio, Rutilus frisii kutum, Rutilus rutilus, Stizostidion lucioperca, Alosa caspia persica, 24 ecto and endo parasites were found in different organs of 7 species of fishes of them 2 of the metazoan 12 species of crustacean Lernaea cyprinacea , Lamproglena pukhella nematodea and cestodea parasite were...

  14. Parasites of marine, freshwater and farmed fishes of Portugal: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge da Costa Eiras

    Full Text Available Abstract An extensive literature review is made of the parasites in marine and freshwater fish in mainland Portugal, the Portuguese archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira, as well as in farmed fish. The host(s of each parasite species, its location in the host, site of capture of the host, whenever possible, and all the available bibliographic references are described. The economic importance of some parasites and the zoonotic relevance of some parasitic forms are discussed. A general overview of the data is provided, and some research lines are suggested in order to increase and complement the current body of knowledge about the parasites of fish from Portugal.

  15. Neobenedenia melleni Parasite of Red Snapper, Lutjanus erythropterus, with Regression Statistical Analysis between Fish Length, Temperature, and Parasitic Intensity in Infected Fish, Cultured at Jerejak Island, Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fish parasites collected from Lutjanus erythropterus fish species showed a correlation with parasitic intensity, fish size, and temperature, and statistical model summary was produced using SPSS version 20, statistical software. Statistical model summary concluded that among the variables which significantly predict the prevalence of Neobenedenia melleni parasites are fish length and water temperature, both significant at 1% and 5%. Furthermore, the increase in one unit of fish length, holding other variables constant, increases the prevalence of parasite by approximately 1 (0.7≈1 unit. Also, increasing the temperature from 32°C to 33°C will positively increase the number of parasites by approximately 0.32 units, holding other variables constant. The model can be summarized as estimated number of Neobenedenia melleni parasites = 8.2 + 0.7 ⁎ (fish length + 0.32 ⁎ (water temperature. Next, this study has also shown the DNA sequence and parasitic morphology of Neobenedenia melleni. Nucleotide sequence for 18s ribosomal gene RNA in this study showed 99% similarity with N. melleni EU707804.1 from GenBank. Finally, all the sequence of Neobenedenia melleni in this study was deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KU843501, KU843502, KU843503, and KU843504.

  16. Neobenedenia melleni Parasite of Red Snapper, Lutjanus erythropterus, with Regression Statistical Analysis between Fish Length, Temperature, and Parasitic Intensity in Infected Fish, Cultured at Jerejak Island, Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Rajiv; Yahaya, Zary Shariman

    2016-01-01

    The fish parasites collected from Lutjanus erythropterus fish species showed a correlation with parasitic intensity, fish size, and temperature, and statistical model summary was produced using SPSS version 20, statistical software. Statistical model summary concluded that among the variables which significantly predict the prevalence of Neobenedenia melleni parasites are fish length and water temperature, both significant at 1% and 5%. Furthermore, the increase in one unit of fish length, holding other variables constant, increases the prevalence of parasite by approximately 1 (0.7≈1) unit. Also, increasing the temperature from 32°C to 33°C will positively increase the number of parasites by approximately 0.32 units, holding other variables constant. The model can be summarized as estimated number of Neobenedenia melleni parasites = 8.2 + 0.7 ⁎ (fish length) + 0.32 ⁎ (water temperature). Next, this study has also shown the DNA sequence and parasitic morphology of Neobenedenia melleni. Nucleotide sequence for 18s ribosomal gene RNA in this study showed 99% similarity with N. melleni EU707804.1 from GenBank. Finally, all the sequence of Neobenedenia melleni in this study was deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KU843501, KU843502, KU843503, and KU843504.

  17. Neobenedenia melleni Parasite of Red Snapper, Lutjanus erythropterus, with Regression Statistical Analysis between Fish Length, Temperature, and Parasitic Intensity in Infected Fish, Cultured at Jerejak Island, Penang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The fish parasites collected from Lutjanus erythropterus fish species showed a correlation with parasitic intensity, fish size, and temperature, and statistical model summary was produced using SPSS version 20, statistical software. Statistical model summary concluded that among the variables which significantly predict the prevalence of Neobenedenia melleni parasites are fish length and water temperature, both significant at 1% and 5%. Furthermore, the increase in one unit of fish length, holding other variables constant, increases the prevalence of parasite by approximately 1 (0.7≈1) unit. Also, increasing the temperature from 32°C to 33°C will positively increase the number of parasites by approximately 0.32 units, holding other variables constant. The model can be summarized as estimated number of Neobenedenia melleni parasites = 8.2 + 0.7 ⁎ (fish length) + 0.32 ⁎ (water temperature). Next, this study has also shown the DNA sequence and parasitic morphology of Neobenedenia melleni. Nucleotide sequence for 18s ribosomal gene RNA in this study showed 99% similarity with N. melleni EU707804.1 from GenBank. Finally, all the sequence of Neobenedenia melleni in this study was deposited in GenBank with accession numbers of KU843501, KU843502, KU843503, and KU843504. PMID:27190634

  18. Metazoan parasites of fishes from the Celestun coastal lagoon, Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Medina, Trinidad; Vidal-Martínez, Víctor M; Aguirre-Macedo, M Leopoldina

    2015-08-31

    The aims of this study were to produce a checklist of the metazoan parasites of fishes from the Celestun coastal lagoon and to determine the degree of faunal similarity among the fishes based on the metazoan parasites they share. A checklist was prepared including all available records (1996-2014) of parasites of marine, brackish water and freshwater fishes of the area. All of these data were included in a presence/absence database and used to determine similarity via Jaccard's index. The results indicate the presence of 62 metazoan parasite species infecting 22 fish species. The number of metazoan parasite species found in the fishes from the Celestún lagoon is apparently the highest reported worldwide for a tropical coastal lagoon. The parasites included 12 species of adult digeneans, 27 digeneans in the metacercarial stage, 6 monogeneans, 3 metacestodes, 9 nematodes, 2 acanthocephalans, 2 crustaceans and 1 annelid. Forty parasite species were autogenic and 23 were allogenic and 1 unknown. The overall similarity among all of the species of fish with respect to the metazoan parasites they share was low (0.08 ± 0.12), with few similarity values above 0.4 being obtained. This low similarity was due primarily to the presence of suites of parasites exclusive to specific species of fish. The autogenic component of the parasite fauna (40 species) dominated the allogenic component (21 species). The most likely explanation for the large number of fish parasites found at Celestún is the good environmental condition of the lagoon, which allows the completion of parasite life cycles and free circulation of euryhaline fishes from the marine environment bringing marine parasites into the lagoon.

  19. Escape from an evolutionary dead end: a triploid clone of Gyrodactylus salaris is able to revert to sex and switch host (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietara, Marek S; Kuusela, Jussi; Lumme, Jaakko

    2006-12-01

    Diploid parthenogenesis, with rare sex, is considered as the basic mode of reproduction among the hermaphroditic and viviparous Gyrodactylus. A particular strain of the monogenean parasite Gyrodactylus salaris (RBT clone) was recognized by an invariable, unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) farms. The RBT clone was shown to be triploid and asexual by analyzing a 493 bp sequence of a nuclear DNA marker. Three alleles were present as heterozygous in all 237 individuals sampled in years 2001-2005 from five isolated Finnish farms. The triploid clone probably originated from a diploid oocyte fertilized by a non-self hermaphrodite, most probably in a fish farm. Identical mitochondrial COI gene (1606 bp) was also found in G. salaris parasites on landlocked salmon (Salmo salar) in two rivers draining to the lake Kuitozero, Russian Karelia. In the river Pisto, the clone was triploid, but the diagnostic "short" nuclear allele of the RBT clone was replaced by an allele typical for salmon specific parasites in the Lake Onega. The clone in the river Kurzhma was diploid, having lost the "short" allele, but still heterozygous for the other two alleles of the RBT clone. Evidently, the triploid parthenogenetic RBT clone had produced diploid oocytes, when (as a female) stimulated by a non-self mate in the new environment. The genetic reorganization coincided with a switch to the salmon host. Participation of triploids into the gene pool of the species is rarely reported in animals, and the triploidy is generally considered as an irreversible dead-end of the evolution. Liberalism in ploidy level may significantly add to the evolutionary options available for a parasite in ever-changing environments.

  20. Parasites of juvenile golden grey mullet Liza aurata Risso, 1810 in Sarıkum Lagoon Lake at Sinop, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Türkay

    2013-12-01

    Juvenile golden grey mullet, Liza aurata were collected from Sarıkum Lagoon Lake which connected to the Black Sea at Sinop, Turkey and examined for parasitic fauna. A total of 219 fish were investigated throughout a 1-year period. Parasite species recovered were Trichodina lepsii, T. puytoraci, Gyrodactylus sp., Ligophorus cephali, Ligophorus mediterraneus, Solostamenides mugilis, Ascocotyle sp. (metacercaria) and Ergasilus lizae. Overall infection prevalence (%) and mean intensity values were 95.9% and 412.65 ± 85.31 parasites per infected fish, respectively. Infection prevalence and mean intensity values for each parasite species in relation to season and fish size were also determined and discussed. While Ligophorus cephali and L. mediterraneus are new records for Turkish parasite fauna, the juvenile Liza aurata is a new host record for Ligophorus cephali and L. mediterraneus.

  1. The diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens produces hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Coralie O M; Cable, Joanne; Lloyd, David

    2010-01-01

    The diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens causes major problems in aquaculture of ornamental fish, resulting in severe economic losses in the fish farming industry. The strain of S. vortens studied here was isolated from an angelfish and grown in Keister's modified TY-I-S33 medium. A membrane-inlet mass spectrometer was employed to monitor, in a closed system, O(2), CO(2), and H(2) When introduced into air-saturated buffer, S. vortens rapidly consumed O(2) at the average rate of 62+/-4 nmol/min/10(7) cells and CO(2) was produced at 75+/-11 nmol/min/10(7) cells. Hydrogen production began under microaerophilic conditions ([O(2)]=33.+/-15 microM) at a rate of 77+/-7 nmol/min/10(7) cells. Hydrogen production was inhibited by 62% immediately after adding 150 microM KCN to the reaction vessel, and by 50% at 0.24 microM CO, suggesting that an Fe-only hydrogenase is responsible for H(2) production. Metronidazole (1 mM) inhibited H(2) production by 50%, while CO(2) production was not affected. This suggests that metronidazole may be reduced by an enzyme of the H(2) pathway, thus competing for electrons with H(+).

  2. Fishes and their parasites in the water district of Massaciuccoli (Tuscany, Central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchioni, Fabio; Chelucci, Luca; Torracca, Beatrice; Prati, Maria Cristina; Magi, Marta

    2015-01-01

    This study has been conducted in the district of Massaciuccoli (lake, marsh and reclaimed areas with drainage channels) in Tuscany region (Central Italy). The aim of the research was to detect the presence of parasites in fishes, in particular of Opisthorchis felineus, which causes an important zoonosis. Between 2010-2012, the health status of 381 fishes was monitored, morphometric characteristics were determined, and parasites were searched for and identified. Of the 381 examined fishes, 189 were free of parasites while 192 were infected, among them 91 presented multiple infections. Opisthorchis felineus was not found in any of the examined fishes.

  3. General aspects concerning strictly meat and fish transmitted parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available All helminths parasitosis transmitted to humans trough ingestion of infested fleshes, where man is definitive host too, are represented by four groups of helminths: the cestodes Dyphyllobothrium spp and Spirometra spp. (Sparganum proliferum is the name of the immature plerocercoid larva, the trematodes Opisthorchis Clonorchis “group” (many could be the genera and species involved, and the nematode Capillaria philippinensis. So, for fishes humans foods (fresh or salted water the control and prevention in veterinary health must be directed to investigation regarding intermediate stages of these parasites in fishes for human alimentation; if present, they must be eliminated. The helminths parasitosis transmitted to humans trough ingestion of infected mammals meats, are represented by taeniasis (Taenia saginata, T. solium and T. saginata asiatica, where man id definitive host and the infection is caused by ingestion of bovine or swine meat, containing larvae of these cestodes, and by trichinellosis, where humans represent a intermediate stage, and the eventual pathology is caused as by adult (acute infection as by larvae (chronic infection of this nematode: usually the meats responsible are infected pork, wild pork or horse (Trichinella spp. Is inside the meats of these animals. So the veterinary control and prophylaxis are necessary to avoid this disease and preventing the infection that could be severe.

  4. Studies on some fish parasites of public health importance in the southern area of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Ibrahim Khalil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was the first attempt to survey the diversity of fish zoonotic parasites in the southern region of Saudi Arabia, particularly the Najran area, from October 2012 to October 2013. Approximately 163 fish representing seven species (two of freshwater fish and five of marine fish were examined for fish-borne trematode metacercariae using the compression technique, and for zoonotic nematode larvae. Adult flukes were obtained from cats experimentally infected with the metacercariae on day 25 post-infection The prevalence of each parasite species was recorded. The parasites found belonged to two taxa: Digenea (Heterophyes heterophyes and Haplorchis pumilio in muscle tissue; and nematodes (larvae of Capillaria sp. in the digestive tract. The morphological characteristics of the fish-borne trematode metacercariae and their experimentally obtained adults were described. This is the first report of these parasites in fish in Saudi Arabia. Moreover, Myripristis murdjan presented higher prevalence of Capillaria sp. infection (22.7%, while Haplorchis pumilio was the dominant metacercarial species (7.9%. Although the number of documented cases continues to increase, the overall risk of human infection is slight. The increasing exploitation of the marine environment by humans and the tendency to reduce cooking times when preparing seafood products both increase the chances of becoming infected with these parasites. Furthermore, our results indicate that certain fish production systems are at risk of presenting fish zoonotic parasites, and that control approaches will benefit from understanding these risk factors.

  5. Effect of the parasitic isopod, Catoessa boscii (Isopoda, Cymothoidae), a buccal cavity parasite of the marine fish, Carangoides malabaricus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganapathy Rameshkumar; Samuthirapandian Ravichandran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of isopod parasite Catoessa boscii (C. boscii) on Carangoides malabaricus (C. malabaricus). Methods:The host fish C. malabaricus infested by C. boscii were collected directly from the trawlers landed at Parangipettai coast during December 2008 to November 2009. Data regarding the total length, width, weight and sex of the host fish were recorded. Effect of infestation on C. malabaricus, the length and weight data were analysed and host specificity of isopods was also examined. Results:During the sampling period, 585 C. malabaricus were examined. Among them, 218 specimens were found to carry 243 parasites. Three pairs of isopods (one male with one female) were recorded from the host fish and each pair was attached to the tongue in the buccal cavity of the host. Another pair was also found where the male and male, female and female isopod had settled on the tongue in the buccal cavity. Gross lesions observed in the buccal cavity of infested fish showed small pin-holes in the tongue region, through which dactyls of pereopod’s penetrating claws dig into the host tissues. The maximum weight loss was reported in females (5.43%) than in males (3.75%) of C. malabaricus. Due to infestation of different isopod parasites in both male and female fish, the effects on the length-weight relationship of C. malabaricus were compared. The rate of increased growth in weight in uninfested female fish was found to be higher than that of the infested. The weight gain is faster in uninfested fish than in the infested fish. Conclusions:From the above mentioned observations, it is clear that the worst of fish on account of the infestation of isopods are the C. malabaricus succumbed to the attack of isopod parasites. Although, the infestation did not cause immediate death, it had affected the normal growth of the host fish.

  6. Parasite-induced aggression and impaired contest ability in a fish host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taskinen J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Success of trophically transmitted parasites depends to a great extent on their ability to manipulate their intermediate hosts in a way that makes them easier prey for target hosts. Parasite-induced behavioural changes are the most spectacular and diverse examples of manipulation. Most of the studies have been focused on individual behaviour of hosts including fish. We suggest that agonistic interactions and territoriality in fish hosts may affect their vulnerability to predators and thus the transmission efficiency of trophically transmitted parasites. The parasite Diplostomum spathaceum (Trematoda and juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were used to study whether infection can alter aggression rates and territorial behaviour of intermediate fish hosts. Results The changes in behaviour of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, infected with an eye fluke Diplostomum spathaceum (Trematoda, was monitored over the course of an experimental infection for 1.5 months. At the beginning of their development, not yet infective D. spathaceum metacercariae decreased the aggressiveness of rainbow trout. By the time that metacercariae were fully infective to their definitive hosts, the aggressiveness increased and exceeded that of control fish. Despite the increased aggressiveness, the experimentally infected fish lost contests for a territory (dark parts of the bottom against the control fish. Conclusions The results obtained indicate that the parasitized fish pay the cost of aggressiveness without the benefit of acquiring a territory that would provide them with better protection against predators. This behaviour should increase transmission of the parasite as expected by the parasite manipulation hypothesis.

  7. [Nematodes parasitizing fishes from Termas de Rio Hondo Pond, Santiago del Estero, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo, G

    1999-01-01

    Cucullanus pinnai and Spinitectus jamundensis are cited parasitizing three freshwater fish species: Pimelodus albicans, Leporinus obtusidens and Prochilodus lineatus, captured in Termas de Río Hondo pond, province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, in 1992 and 1995. The three fish species were parasited by S. jamundensis, but C. pinnai was found only in P. albicans and L. obtusidens. Morphologic and morphometric parasitological studies were carried out. The specimens described were drawned. In addition, the following parasitic infection indexes were calculated: prevalence, mean and maximum intensity. The two nematode species identified are described for the first time in Argentina and increased the host range cited for the parasite species studied in this work.

  8. Coccidian parasites of fish encompass profound phylogenetic diversity and gave rise to each of the major parasitic groups in terrestrial vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams-Morel, Detiger; Ostoros, Gyorgyi; Molnár, Kálmán

    2016-06-01

    Fish are the oldest and most diverse group of vertebrates; it therefore stands to reason that fish may have been the original hosts for many types of extant vertebrate parasites. Here, we sought to determine whether coccidian parasites of fish are especially diverse. We therefore sampled such parasites from thirty-nine species of fish and tested phylogenetic hypotheses concerning their relationships, using 18S rDNA. We found compelling phylogenetic support for distinctions among at least four lineages of piscine parasites presently ascribed to the genus Goussia. Some, but not all parasites attributed to Eimeria were confirmed as such. Major taxonomic revisions are likely justified for these parasites of fish, which appear to have given rise to each of the major lineages of coccidian parasites that subsequently proliferated in terrestrial vertebrates, including those such as Toxoplasma gondii that form tissue cysts in intermediate hosts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Fish population studies using parasites from the Southeastern Pacific Ocean: considering host population changes and species body size as sources of variability of parasite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Nascimento, Mario; Oliva, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Research using parasites in fish population studies in the South Eastern Pacific (SEP) is summarized. There are 27 such studies (snapshots mainly) in single host species sampled at different geographic localities and at somewhat similar times. They have been devoted mainly to economically important species, though others on coastal and intertidal fish or on less- or non-commercial species provide insights on scales of temporal and spatial variation of parasite infracommunities. Later, we assess whether the probability of harbouring parasites depends on the host species body size. Our results indicate that a stronger tool for fish population studies may be developed under regular (long term) scrutiny of parasite communities, especially of small fish host species, due to their larger variability in richness, abundance and total biomass, than in large fish species. Finally, it might also be necessary to consider the effects of fishing on parasite communities as well as the natural oscillations (coupled or not) of host and parasite populations.

  10. Parasites of sticklebacks (Actinopterygii: Gasterosteidae) from South-Eastern Baltic Sea (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulgostowska, Teresa; Vojtkova, Ludmila

    2005-01-01

    A total of 142 individuals of Gasterosteus aculeatus L. and 22 individuals of Pungitius pungitius (L.) from several areas of the coastal waters of the Gdańsk Bay both brackish- and freshwater were examined for parasites. The survey was carried out within 1988-1991. Six parasite species, namely: Gyrodactylus arcuatus, Apatemon gracilis, Sphaerostomum bramae, Phyllodistomumfolium, Neoechinorhynchus rutili, and Argulus foliaceus were recovered from sticklebacks caught in freshwater habitats; while the other 4 parasites: Apatemon annuligerum, Bothriocephalus sp., Schistocephalus solidus, Proteocephalus percae occurred only in fish from brackish-water areas. Additional 5 parasites: Trichodina domerguei, Diplostomum pungitii, Diplostomum spathaceum, Rhaphidascaris acus, and Thersitina gasterostei were recorded in fishes from both habitats.

  11. Predicting what helminth parasites a fish species should have using Parasite Co-occurrence Modeler (PaCo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Giovanni; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Fish pathologists are often interested in which parasites would likely be present in a particular host. Parasite Co-occurrence Modeler (PaCo) is a tool for identifying a list of parasites known from fish species that are similar ecologically, phylogenetically, and geographically to the host of interest. PaCo uses data from FishBase (maximum length, growth rate, life span, age at maturity, trophic level, phylogeny, and biogeography) to estimate compatibility between a target host and parasite species–genera from the major helminth groups (Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, and Trematoda). Users can include any combination of host attributes in a model. These unique features make PaCo an innovative tool for addressing both theoretical and applied questions in parasitology. In addition to predicting the occurrence of parasites, PaCo can be used to investigate how host characteristics shape parasite communities. To test the performance of the PaCo algorithm, we created 12,400 parasite lists by applying any possible combination of model parameters (248) to 50 fish hosts. We then measured the relative importance of each parameter by assessing their frequency in the best models for each host. Host phylogeny and host geography were identified as the most important factors, with both present in 88% of the best models. Habitat (64%) was identified in more than half of the best models. Among ecological parameters, trophic level (41%) was the most relevant while life span (34%), growth rate (32%), maximum length (28%), and age at maturity (20%) were less commonly linked to best models. PaCo is free to use at www.purl.oclc.org/fishpest.

  12. Predicting what helminth parasites a fish species should have using Parasite Co-occurrence Modeler (PaCo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Giovanni; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2013-02-01

    Fish pathologists are often interested in which parasites would likely be present in a particular host. Parasite Co-occurrence Modeler (PaCo) is a tool for identifying a list of parasites known from fish species that are similar ecologically, phylogenetically, and geographically to the host of interest. PaCo uses data from FishBase (maximum length, growth rate, life span, age at maturity, trophic level, phylogeny, and biogeography) to estimate compatibility between a target host and parasite species-genera from the major helminth groups (Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, and Trematoda). Users can include any combination of host attributes in a model. These unique features make PaCo an innovative tool for addressing both theoretical and applied questions in parasitology. In addition to predicting the occurrence of parasites, PaCo can be used to investigate how host characteristics shape parasite communities. To test the performance of the PaCo algorithm, we created 12,400 parasite lists by applying any possible combination of model parameters (248) to 50 fish hosts. We then measured the relative importance of each parameter by assessing their frequency in the best models for each host. Host phylogeny and host geography were identified as the most important factors, with both present in 88% of the best models. Habitat (64%) was identified in more than half of the best models. Among ecological parameters, trophic level (41%) was the most relevant while life span (34%), growth rate (32%), maximum length (28%), and age at maturity (20%) were less commonly linked to best models. PaCo is free to use at www.purl.oclc.org/fishpest.

  13. The effect of octopaminergic compounds on the behaviour and transmission of Gyrodactylus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron James E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high transmission potential of species belonging to the monogenean parasite genus Gyrodactylus, coupled with their high fecundity, allows them to rapidly colonise new hosts and to increase in number. One gyrodactylid, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, has been responsible for devastation of Altantic salmon (Salmo salar L. populations in a number of Norwegian rivers. Current methods of eradicating G. salaris from river systems centre around the use of non-specific biocides, such as rotenone and aluminium sulphate. Although transmission routes in gyrodactylids have been studied extensively, the behaviour of individual parasites has received little attention. Specimens of Gyrodactylus gasterostei Gläser, 1974 and G. arcuatus Bychowsky, 1933, were collected from the skin of their host, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L., and permitted to attach to the substrate. The movements of individual parasites were recorded and analysed. Results The behaviour patterns of the two species were similar and parasites were more active in red light and darkness than in white light. Four octopaminergic compounds were tested and all four inhibited the movements of parasites. Treatment ultimately led to death at low concentrations (0.2 μM, although prolonged exposure was necessary in some instances. Conclusions Octopaminergic compounds may affect the parasite's ability to locate and remain on its host and these or related compounds might provide alternative or supplementary treatments for the control of G. salaris infections. With more research there is potential for use of octopaminergic compounds, which have minimal effects on the host or its environment, as parasite-specific treatments against G. salaris infections.

  14. [Diplectanidae (Monogenea) parasites of fish of the Kerkennah Islands (Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euzet, L

    1984-12-01

    Eleven Diplectanidae (Monogenea) gill parasites from various Sparidae and Serranidae of the Kerkennah Islands are noted. Three new species: Lamellodiscus hilii, L. bidens, L. impervius, parasites of Puntazzo puntazzo (Sparidae) are described.

  15. [Seasonal distribution of gill parasites in fishes from fee-fishing at Guariba, São Paulo State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Sergio H C; Moraes, Flávio R de

    2005-01-01

    This study was accomplished with the objective of knowing the seasonal distribution of the main species of parasites causes of branchial damages to the fish from fee-fishing at Guariba, State of São Paulo. This city is situated at 21 degrees 15'22'' S, 48 degrees 18'58'' W, in altitude 595 meters. This research was conducted between April, 1997 to March, 1999. From 408 fishes examined, 29.1% of them were infested by the protozoans e metazoans. Leporinus macrocephalus showed the highest parasitism by Trichodina sp., although Piaractus mesopotamicus and Cyprinus carpio were also parasited. Piscinoodinium pillulare infestation were found in L. macrocephalus, P. mesopotamicus, C. carpio e Colossoma macropomum. Monogenetics metazoan have largely been observed in L. macrocephalus, P. mesopotamicus, C. carpio, C. macropomum e cross-bred tambacu. The incidence of this parasite was elevated in the summer for L. macrocephalus, spring for P. mesopotamicus and C. macropomum, and both seasons for cross-bred tambacu. Lernaea cyprinacea copepodes were observed in L. macrocephalus, P. mesopotamicus, C. carpio and cross- breeding tambacu, in spite of the fact that C. carpio has demonstrated high parasitism of adult form. The fish L. macrocephalus, P. mesopotamicus and C. carpio were sponged intensely by Dolops carvalhoi, in situation of high population density. Piaractus mesopotamicus was considered the species more parasited by myxosporídeos, that were also observed in L. macrocephalus and cross-breeding tambacu.

  16. On some ecological and faunistic pecularities of fish parasites in large oligotrophic lakes of Karelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumjantsev Yevgeny

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The ecological and faunistic pecularities of parasite fauna of fishes in large oligotrophic lakes of Karelia were studied. These lakes belong typologically to different classes. The presence of glacial species of parasites in Onega Lake and sea relict representatives in Ladoga lake is shown.

  17. Parasites of fishes in the Colorado River and selected tributaries in Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Rebecca A.; Sterner, Mauritz C.; Linder, Chad; Hoffnagle, Timothy L.; Persons, Bill; Choudhury, Anindo; Haro, Roger

    2012-01-01

    As part of the endangered humpback chub (HBC; Gila cypha) Adaptive Management Program, a parasite survey was conducted from 28 June to 17 July 2006 in 8 tributaries and 7 adjacent sections of the main stem of the Colorado River, U.S.A. In total, 717 fish were caught, including 24 HBC. Field necropsies yielded 19 parasite species, 5 of which (Achtheres sp., Kathlaniidae gen. sp., Caryophyllaidae gen. sp., Myxidium sp., and Octomacrum sp.) are new records for Grand Canyon, Arizona, U.S.A. Spearman's correlation coefficient analyses showed no correlations between parasite burden and fork length for various combinations of fish and parasite species. Regression analyses suggest that no parasite species had a strong effect on fish length. The most diverse parasite community (n=14) was at river kilometer (Rkm) 230, near the confluence of Kanab Creek. The most diverse parasite infracommunity (n=12) was found in the non-native channel catfish (CCF; Ictaluris punctatus). Overall parasite prevalence was highest in CCF (85%) followed by that in HBC (58%). The parasite fauna of humpback chub was mainly composed of Bothriocephalus acheilognathi and Ornithodiplostomum sp. metacercariae.

  18. Growth of the fish parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi under food relevant conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The physical and chemical limits for growth of the internal fish parasite, Ichthyophonus hoferi, have been studied to understand better the ecology of I. hoferi both as a possible food contaminant and a fish pathogen. The effect of temperature (0 degrees-30 degrees C), pH (3-7) and NaCl (0%-10%w/...

  19. Parasites modify sub-cellular partitioning of metals in the gut of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo-Okoth, E.; Admiraal, W.; Osano, O.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Gichuki, J.; Ogwai, C.

    2012-01-01

    Infestation of fish by parasites may influence metal accumulation patterns in the host. However, the subcellular mechanisms of these processes have rarely been studied. Therefore, this study determined how a cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) partitioned four metals (Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) in the

  20. Helminth parasites of fish and shellfish from the Santa Gilla Lagoon in southern Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culurgioni, J; Sabatini, A; De Murtas, R; Mattiucci, S; Figus, V

    2014-12-01

    An extensive survey of helminth parasites in fish and shellfish species from Santa Gilla, a brackish water lagoon in southern Sardinia (western Mediterranean), resulted in the identification of 69 helminth parasite taxa and/or species from 13 fish species (n= 515) and seven bivalve species (n= 2322) examined between September 2001 and July 2011. The list summarizes information on the helminth parasites harboured by fish and molluscs contained in the available literature. Digenea species (37), both adults and larvae, dominated the parasite fauna, whereas Cestoda were the least represented class (three species). Monogenea, Nematoda and Acanthocephala were present with 17, 6 and 6 species, respectively, which were mainly adults. The most widespread parasite species was the generalist Contracaecum rudolphii A (Nematoda). Other species, such as the Haploporidae and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) spp. 1 and 2 (Digenea), showed a high family specificity in Mugilidae. Importantly, the study recorded the occurrence of potential zoonotic agents, such as Heterophyes heterophyes, Ascocotyle (Phagicola) spp. and C. rudolphii A, the latter two reaching the highest indices of infection in the highly marketed fish grey mullet and sea bass, respectively. The highest parasite richness was detected in Dicentrarchus labrax, which harboured 17 helminth species, whereas the lowest value was observed in Atherina boyeri, infected by only three species. The list includes the first geographical record in Italian coastal waters of Robinia aurata and Stictodora sawakinensis, and 30 reports of new host-parasite complexes, including the larval stages of Ascocotyle (Ascocotyle) sp. and Southwellina hispida in D. labrax.

  1. Diversity and distribution of parasites from potentially cultured freshwater fish in Nakhon Si Thammarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supamattaya, K.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one species from 16 genera of potentially cultured freshwater fish were examined for external and internal parasites. Ten individuals of each fish species were sampled from various places in Nakhon Si Thammarat. Eight groups, 72 species were identified and the majority was external (52 spp.. The parasites found were ciliated protozoan (2 spp., myxozoan (2 spp., monogenean (44 spp., digenean (7 spp., cestode (6 spp., nematode (6 spp., acanthocephalan (2 spp. and crustacean (3 spp.. Monogenean was regarded as a major group of parasites with 44 species. Dactylogyrus (Monogenea had the highest number of species (12 spp., whereas Trichodina pediculus (Ciliophora was the most widely distributed species observed from at least 7 fish species (7 families. Most of the parasites (72 % found in this study were specific to their host species.

  2. Parasitic Infection of an Endemic Fish (Blicca bjoerkna and an Exotic Fish (Hemiculter beucisculus In Anzali Lagoon, Caspian Sea, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Masoumian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Anzali Lagoon, there are some endemic and exotic fishes. The present study was conducted to compare the parasitic fauna of Blicca bjeorkna, as an endemic fish and Hemicul­ter leucisculus, as an introduced fish to the lagoon.Methods: A parasitological investigation was done on 78 specimens of B. bjoerkna and 114 of H. leu­cisculus. The fishes were collected from August 2009 to April 2010 by the electro fishing from Anzali Lagoon.Results: Eleven parasites species were found in 192 fish samples. The prevalence and mean inten­sity of parasites in each host were as follows: Parasites from B. bjorkna were Trichodina perforata (53.85%; Myxobolus musayevi (27.19%, 1±0.79; Dactylogyrus difformis (88.05%, 8±7.24 and D. sphyrna (5.18%, 0.95±0.51, Diplostomum spataceum (98.72%, 9.51±9.01, Post­hodiplostomum cuticula (15.38%, 4.25±2.5, Ripidocotyle sp. (1.28%, 2±0.74; Contracaecum osculatum (17.95%, 1.64±0.79, Philometra rischta (12.8%, 1.4±0.54, and Raphidascaris acus (1.04%, 0.03±0.26. The H. leucisculus were infected with T. perforata (27.19%, D. spataceum (7.89%, 1.33±0.54, Ps. tomentosa (7.02%, 1.62±0.49 and R. acus (0.88%, 3±0.28. B. bjoerkna was presented as a new host for M. musayevi and C. osculatum, while H. leucisculus was intro­duced as a new host for T. perforata and Ps. tomentosa.Conclusion: The prevalence of parasites was significantly more in native fish than that of exotic fish (P<0.05. This reduction in parasitic infection in H. leucisculus may be due to its immune system resistance, well adaptation to the new environment, host-specific limitation for endemic parasites and disability of introduced parasite to complete its life cycle in the new host as well.

  3. Patterns of interactions of a large fish-parasite network in a tropical floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Dilermando P; Giacomini, Henrique C; Takemoto, Ricardo M; Agostinho, Angelo A; Bini, Luis M

    2012-07-01

    1. Describing and explaining the structure of species interaction networks is of paramount importance for community ecology. Yet much has to be learned about the mechanisms responsible for major patterns, such as nestedness and modularity in different kinds of systems, of which large and diverse networks are a still underrepresented and scarcely studied fraction. 2. We assembled information on fishes and their parasites living in a large floodplain of key ecological importance for freshwater ecosystems in the Paraná River basin in South America. The resulting fish-parasite network containing 72 and 324 species of fishes and parasites, respectively, was analysed to investigate the patterns of nestedness and modularity as related to fish and parasite features. 3. Nestedness was found in the entire network and among endoparasites, multiple-host life cycle parasites and native hosts, but not in networks of ectoparasites, single-host life cycle parasites and non-native fishes. All networks were significantly modular. Taxonomy was the major host's attribute influencing both nestedness and modularity: more closely related host species tended to be associated with more nested parasite compositions and had greater chance of belonging to the same network module. Nevertheless, host abundance had a positive relationship with nestedness when only native host species pairs of the same network module were considered for analysis. 4. These results highlight the importance of evolutionary history of hosts in linking patterns of nestedness and formation of modules in the network. They also show that functional attributes of parasites (i.e. parasitism mode and life cycle) and origin of host populations (i.e. natives versus non-natives) are crucial to define the relative contribution of these two network properties and their dependence on other ecological factors (e.g. host abundance), with potential implications for community dynamics and stability.

  4. Host range, host ecology, and distribution of more than 11800 fish parasite species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Giovanni; Palomares, Maria Lourdes D.; Bailly, Nicholas; Galli, Paolo; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Our data set includes 38 008 fish parasite records (for Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, Trematoda) compiled from the scientific literature, Internet databases, and museum collections paired to the corresponding host ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic traits (maximum length, growth rate, life span, age at maturity, trophic level, habitat preference, geographical range size, taxonomy). The data focus on host features, because specific parasite traits are not consistently available across records. For this reason, the data set is intended as a flexible resource able to extend the principles of ecological niche modeling to the host–parasite system, providing researchers with the data to model parasite niches based on their distribution in host species and the associated host features. In this sense, the database offers a framework for testing general ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic hypotheses based on the identification of hosts as parasite habitat. Potential applications of the data set are, for example, the investigation of species–area relationships or the taxonomic distribution of host-specificity. The provided host–parasite list is that currently used by Fish Parasite Ecology Software Tool (FishPEST, http://purl.oclc.org/fishpest), which is a website that allows researchers to model several aspects of the relationships between fish parasites and their hosts. The database is intended for researchers who wish to have more freedom to analyze the database than currently possible with FishPEST. However, for readers who have not seen FishPEST, we recommend using this as a starting point for interacting with the database.

  5. The Seasonal Distribution of Rudd Fish (Scardinus erythrophthalmus L. 1758)Helminthes Parasites Living in Terkos Lake

    OpenAIRE

    DEMIRTAS, Murat; ALTINDAG, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study that was carried out from September, 2009 to August, 2010 was to determine the seasonal distribution of rudd fish (Scardinus erythrophthalmus L. 1758) helminthes inhabiting the Terkos lake. During the study examined 166 fish rudd, Dactylogyrus difformis from Monogenia, Ligula intestinalis plerocercoid from Cestoda, Asymphylodora markesvitschi Diplostomulum spathaceum metacerceria from Digenia, Piscicola geometra from Hirudinea were parasited.87% with 137 fish recorded th...

  6. An annotated list of fish parasites (Isopoda, Copepoda, Monogenea, Digenea, Cestoda, Nematoda) collected from Snappers and Bream (Lutjanidae, Nemipteridae, Caesionidae) in New Caledonia confirms high parasite biodiversity on coral reef fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Coral reefs are areas of maximum biodiversity, but the parasites of coral reef fishes, and especially their species richness, are not well known. Over an 8-year period, parasites were collected from 24 species of Lutjanidae, Nemipteridae and Caesionidae off New Caledonia, South Pacific. Results Host-parasite and parasite-host lists are provided, with a total of 207 host-parasite combinations and 58 parasite species identified at the species level, with 27 new host records. Results are presented for isopods, copepods, monogeneans, digeneans, cestodes and nematodes. When results are restricted to well-sampled reef fish species (sample size > 30), the number of host-parasite combinations is 20–25 per fish species, and the number of parasites identified at the species level is 9–13 per fish species. Lutjanids include reef-associated fish and deeper sea fish from the outer slopes of the coral reef: fish from both milieus were compared. Surprisingly, parasite biodiversity was higher in deeper sea fish than in reef fish (host-parasite combinations: 12.50 vs 10.13, number of species per fish 3.75 vs 3.00); however, we identified four biases which diminish the validity of this comparison. Finally, these results and previously published results allow us to propose a generalization of parasite biodiversity for four major families of reef-associated fishes (Lutjanidae, Nemipteridae, Serranidae and Lethrinidae): well-sampled fish have a mean of 20 host-parasite combinations per fish species, and the number of parasites identified at the species level is 10 per fish species. Conclusions Since all precautions have been taken to minimize taxon numbers, it is safe to affirm than the number of fish parasites is at least ten times the number of fish species in coral reefs, for species of similar size or larger than the species in the four families studied; this is a major improvement to our estimate of biodiversity in coral reefs. Our results suggest that

  7. Histopathological alterations in the vital organs of Indian Major Carps with parasitic infestation in fish farms West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurva Raghu Ramudu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the histological changes of vital organs such as kidney, gills and brain with the mixed infestation of parasites in Indian Major Carps (IMC. The parasites such as Myxobolus spp., Thelohanellus spp., Trichodina spp., Dactylogyrus spp., Gyrodactylus spp. and Nematodes were observed in three IMC. Several histological alterations were observed in the kidney of Catla catla, Labeo rohita and Cirrhinus mrigala, which includes vacuolar degeneration in the epithelium of renal tubules, focal areas of necrosis, proliferation of bowman′s capsule and many cases the renal tubules lost its shape and canalculi formation was observed. The gills showed focal areas of necrosis, exacerbated swelling of gill arch, deposition of distinct black melanin pigmentation at the basal point of the gill arch, loss of primary and secondary lamellae, prominent vacuolar degeneration and formation of vacuoles. The presence of protozoan parasites in brain tissue resulted necrosis of the brain tissue, black pigmentation, vacuolization of myelin sheath of nerve fibers and common degenerative changes. Aims: To study histological changes of vital organs such as kidney, gills and brain with the mixed infestation of parasites in Indian Major Carps (IMC. Settings and Design: The organs fixed in 4% formalin are transferred to 50% ethyl alcohol and stored for further analysis. Materials and Methods: Histopathological analysis was made as described by Roberts. Statistical Analysis Used: Nil. Results: Described in text. Conclusions: The present study brings about conclusion that impact of mixed infestation of the parasites on their hosts was severe. Histopathological changes were observed in vital organs which might be due to toxins released by different parasites or physical damage of tissue with the presence of parasites.

  8. Common fish diseases and parasites affecting wild and farmed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Current control strategies to control aquatic pathogens include use of chemo- therapeutants and ... Diagnosis and control of diseases and parasites in aquaculture production systems requires adoption of a ..... plan with enforceable regulatory.

  9. Patterns of distribution of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Quiroz-Martínez

    Full Text Available In order to draw patterns in helminth parasite composition and species richness in Mexican freshwater fishes we analyse a presence-absence matrix representing every species of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from 23 Mexican hydrological basins. We examine the distributional patterns of the helminth parasites with regard to the main hydrological basins of the country, and in doing so we identify areas of high diversity and point out the biotic similarities and differences among drainage basins. Our dataset allows us to evaluate the relationships among drainage basins in terms of helminth diversity. This paper shows that the helminth fauna of freshwater fishes of Mexico can characterise hydrological basins the same way as fish families do, and that the basins of south-eastern Mexico are home to a rich, predominantly Neotropical, helminth fauna whereas the basins of the Mexican Highland Plateau and the Nearctic area of Mexico harbour a less diverse Nearctic fauna, following the same pattern of distribution of their fish host families. The composition of the helminth fauna of each particular basin depends on the structure of the fish community rather than on the limnological characteristics and geographical position of the basin itself. This work shows distance decay of similarity and a clear linkage between host and parasite distributions.

  10. Intensity of parasitic infestation in silver carp,Hypophthalmichthys molitrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. M. ALAM; M. A. KHAN; M. A. HUSSAIN; D. MOUMITA; A. G. MAZLAN; K. D. SIMON

    2012-01-01

    Silver carp,Hypopthalmichthys molitrix is one of the most economically valuable fish species in Bangladesh.However,its production is often hindered by parasite-induced mortality.The present study reports the intensity of parasitic infestation in 216 specimens of H.molitrix collected from different fish markets in Rajshahi City,Bangladesh.Nine different parasite species (Trichodina pediculatus,Dactylogyrus vastator,Ichthyophthirius multifilis,Gyrodactylus elegans,Lernaea sp.,Apiosoma sp.,Myxobolus rohitae,Camallanus ophiocephali,and Pallisentis ophiocephali) were recovered from the gill,skin,stomach,and intestine of host fish.The highest level of infection was observed for host skin,while lower levels were observed for host gill,stomach,and intestine.The results also revealed that the intensity of parasite infection in different organs of H.molitrix varied with the season.In particular,the highest levels of infection were recorded during the winter period (November-February),when fish are most susceptible to parasites.The findings of the study will help in the management and conservation of H.molitrix.

  11. Parasites as biological tags of fish stocks: a meta-analysis of their discriminatory power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Robert; Kamiya, Tsukushi

    2015-01-01

    The use of parasites as biological tags to discriminate among marine fish stocks has become a widely accepted method in fisheries management. Here, we first link this approach to its unstated ecological foundation, the decay in the similarity of the species composition of assemblages as a function of increasing distance between them, a phenomenon almost universal in nature. We explain how distance decay of similarity can influence the use of parasites as biological tags. Then, we perform a meta-analysis of 61 uses of parasites as tags of marine fish populations in multivariate discriminant analyses, obtained from 29 articles. Our main finding is that across all studies, the observed overall probability of correct classification of fish based on parasite data was about 71%. This corresponds to a two-fold improvement over the rate of correct classification expected by chance alone, and the average effect size (Zr = 0·463) computed from the original values was also indicative of a medium-to-large effect. However, none of the moderator variables included in the meta-analysis had a significant effect on the proportion of correct classification; these moderators included the total number of fish sampled, the number of parasite species used in the discriminant analysis, the number of localities from which fish were sampled, the minimum and maximum distance between any pair of sampling localities, etc. Therefore, there are no clear-cut situations in which the use of parasites as tags is more useful than others. Finally, we provide recommendations for the future usage of parasites as tags for stock discrimination, to ensure that future applications of the method achieve statistical rigour and a high discriminatory power.

  12. Cooling water of power plant creates "hot spots" for tropical fishes and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Dörge, Dorian D; Plath, Martin; Miesen, Friedrich W; Klimpel, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Thermally altered water bodies can function as "hot spots" where non-native species are establishing self-sustaining populations beyond their tropical and subtropical native regions. Whereas many tropical fish species have been found in these habitats, the introduction of non-native parasites often remains undetected. Here, n = 77 convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) were sampled by electro-fishing at two sites from a thermally altered stream in Germany and examined for parasite fauna and feeding ecology. Stomach content analysis suggests an opportunistic feeding strategy of A. nigrofasciata: while plant material dominated the diet at the warm water inlet (∼30 °C), relative contributions of insects, plants, and crustaceans were balanced 3 km downstream (∼27 °C). The most abundant non-native parasite species was the tropical nematode Camallanus cotti with P = 11.90 % and P = 80.00 % at the inlet and further downstream, respectively. Additionally, nematode larvae of Anguillicoloides crassus and one specimen of the subtropical species Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were isolated. A. nigrofasciata was also highly infected with the native parasite Acanthocephalus anguillae, which could be linked to high numbers of the parasite's intermediate host Asellus aquaticus. The aim of this study was to highlight the risk and consequences of the release and establishment of ornamental fish species for the introduction and spread of non-indigenous metazoan parasites using the convict cichlid as a model species. Furthermore, the spread of non-native parasites into adjacent fish communities needs to be addressed in the future as first evidence of Camallanus cotti in native fish species was also found.

  13. Gyrodactylids parasitizing salmonids in Brittany and Western Pyrénées water basins: epidemiological features of infection and species composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAUTRAITE A.

    1999-07-01

    99.4 % . A new Gyrodactylus species was identified first by morphological examination and confirmed by molecular analysis. This new species is named Gyrodactylus teuchis (CUNNINGHAM et al., in prep.. T his result has been confirmed by an independent study performed in t h e same time (Dr. C.O. CUNNINGHAM, personal communication. G. teuchis shares several morphological and molecular characters with G. salaris. The wrong identification of the latter in France by JOHNSTON et al. (1996 probably originates in their similarities . The absence of Gyrodactylus salaris in both sampled régions, displaying optimal conditions for the parasite's maintenance, leads us to deny its current presence in France. Atlantic salmon parr, mainly parasitized by G. derjavini, are not infected by G. salaris in Brittany and Western Pyrénées. Rainbow trout and brown trout, for which prevalence of gyrodactylids is significantly higher than on salmon parr, are suitable hosts for G. teuchis. This wild fish survey will be extended to other parts of France and probably to farmed salmonids. In t he same way, the actual status towards G. salaris in whole continental Europe needs to be clarified. Biological characteristics of G. teuchis, particularly, its specificity, population dynamics and pathogenesis towards the main host species should be investigated. Besides, further work should be carried out to improve the reliability and efficiency of both identification methods.

  14. Influence of host diet and phylogeny on parasite sharing by fish in a diverse tropical floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L B; Bellay, S; Giacomini, H C; Isaac, A; Lima-Junior, D P

    2016-03-01

    The patterns of parasite sharing among hosts have important implications for ecosystem structure and functioning, and are influenced by several ecological and evolutionary factors associated with both hosts and parasites. Here we evaluated the influence of fish diet and phylogenetic relatedness on the pattern of infection by parasites with contrasting life history strategies in a freshwater ecosystem of key ecological importance in South America. The studied network of interactions included 52 fish species, which consumed 58 food types and were infected with 303 parasite taxa. Our results show that both diet and evolutionary history of hosts significantly explained parasite sharing; phylogenetically close fish species and/or species sharing food types tend to share more parasites. However, the effect of diet was observed only for endoparasites in contrast to ectoparasites. These results are consistent with the different life history strategies and selective pressures imposed on these groups: endoparasites are in general acquired via ingestion by their intermediate hosts, whereas ectoparasites actively seek and attach to the gills, body surface or nostrils of its sole host, thus not depending directly on its feeding habits.

  15. Host-parasite interaction between crustaceans of six fish species from the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huann Carllo Gentil Vasconcelos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-parasite interactions between crustaceans and six fish species (Psectrogaster falcata, Ageneiosus ucayalensis, Acestrorhynchus falcirostris, Hemiodus unimaculatus, Serrasalmus gibbus and Geophagus proximus from a reservoir in eastern Amazon, northern Brazil, were investigated. Eight hundred and seventy-eight parasites belonging to three crustacean species, Excorallana berbicensis, Argulus chicomendesi and Ergasilus turucuyus, which parasitized the hosts’ mouth, gills and tegument, were collected from 295 fish and examined. High infestation levels were caused by E. berbicensis on the body surface of the hosts. Excorallana berbicensis showed aggregate dispersion, except in S. gibbus, while E. turucuyus showed random dispersion in A. falcirostris. The host’s sex did not influence infestation by E. berbicensis, and high parasitism failed to affect the body conditions of the fish. In the case of some hosts, rainfall rates, temperature, dissolved oxygen levels and water pH affected the prevalence and abundance of E. berbicensis, the dominant parasite species. Results revealed that the environment and life-style of the hosts were determining factors in infestations by parasites. Current assay is the first report on E. berbicensis for the six hosts, as well as on A. chicomendesi for G. proximus and P. falcata.

  16. Parasite abundance and its determinants in fishes from Brazil: an eco-epidemiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fernandes do Amarante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The variability in parasite abundance has an ecological basis; however, from an epidemiological point of view, the contribution of factors inherent to the host to the variability in parasite abundance remains an open question. A database consisting of 3,746 specimens of 73 fish species was used to verify the relation between the distribution of parasite abundance in fishes and a set of biotic factors inherent to the hosts. Classical and mixed Poisson regression models were constructed. Prevalence ratios (PR and their respective 95% confidence intervals were estimated. The parasite abundance was significantly higher in female hosts, nonschooling species, species from benthopelagic and pelagic habitats, and fishes with greater body length. Overall, these results suggest that the variability in the abundance of infection is an attribute of the parasite species. Although the results are biologically plausible, important gaps may still exist and should be explored to better understand the variations in parasite abundance, which has great relevance in epidemiological studies. We reinforce the importance of choosing the statistical model most appropriate for the nature of the data to avoid spurious results, especially when the autocorrelation in the data is not taken into account.

  17. Parasite transfer from crustacean to fish hosts in the Lübeck Bight, SW Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. D.; Groenewold, S.; Strohbach, U.

    1994-03-01

    Four helminth parasites out of 19 species found in the Lübeck Bight, Baltic Sea, were chosen for investigations on the transfer from invertebrate to small-sized fish hosts: larvae of the tapeworms Schistocephalus sp. and Bothriocephalus sp. (Cestoda) living in planktonic copepods as primary hosts; Podocotyle atomon (Digenea) and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda) were found in benthic crustaceans, especially Gammarus spp. These hosts were the prey of 3 gobiid fishes, Gobiusculus flavescens (feeding mainly on plankton), Pomatoschistus minutus (preferring benthos), and P. pictus (feeding more on plankton than benthos). Because the fishes selected smaller sizes of crustaceans, they ingested all stages of the copepods but only the smaller-sized groups of gammarids which were often less infested by parasites. In order to evaluate the probability for a fish to be parasitized by a helminth, an infestation potential index (IP) was calculated. Podocotyle atomon and Hysterothylacium sp. revealed an IP which was far lower in gobies than expected when the prevalences of the previous hosts were taken into consideration. The IP of tapeworm larvae was mainly influenced by the feeding pressure of the gobiid predators, which might change with developmental stage and season. It is concluded that parasite transfer to the next host decreases when sizes of prey and predator differ only moderately. This mechanism can reduce the numbers of parasites transferred to less suitable or wrong hosts.

  18. Some parasites and diseases of estuarine fishes in polluted habitats of Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overstreet, R.M.; Howse, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    Diseases that afflict aquatic animals living in waters suspected or known to be polluted are described. The following pollutants are discussed with regard to their effects on the environment and the animals of the estuaries; pesticides, industrial chemicals, heavy metals, and fecal pollution. Microorganisms are discussed with regard to public health and fish health. Transmission of the virus of infectious hepatitis by oysters is emphasized. Parasitic diseases are discussed with regard to life cycle of the parasite, effects of pollution on intermediate hosts, and host specificity. Diseases caused by various helminth and protozoan parasites are described. Nonparasitic diseases discussed are integumental hyperplasia, liver disease, and various neoplasms. (HLW)

  19. A survey on occurrence of internal and external fish parasites and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parasites were then identified under stereomi- croscope using the ..... management system in which case post-harvest fishes were processed and the ..... Urquhart, G.M., Armour, J., Duncan, J.L., Dunn, A.M., Jennings, F.W., 2003. Veteri-.

  20. High prevalence of dermal parasites among coral reef fishes of Curaçao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Bernal; S.R. Floeter; M.R. Gaither; G.O. Longo; R. Morais; C.E.L. Ferreira; M.J.A. Vermeij; L.A. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    During expeditions to Curaçao in August and October of 2013, a large number of fish infected with dermal parasites was observed. Infected individuals presented black spots and white blemishes on their skin and fins that were easily observed by divers, and which have been associated with infections b

  1. High prevalence of dermal parasites among coral reef fishes of Curaçao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernal, M.A.; Floeter, S.R.; Gaither, M.R.; Longo, G.O.; Morais, R.; Ferreira, C.E.L.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Rocha, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    During expeditions to Curaçao in August and October of 2013, a large number of fish infected with dermal parasites was observed. Infected individuals presented black spots and white blemishes on their skin and fins that were easily observed by divers, and which have been associated with infections b

  2. Gastrointestinal parasites of fish as bio-indicators of the ecology of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal parasites of fish as bio-indicators of the ecology of Chanchaga ... unidentified species of insects and Copepods were 12.00% and a mean intensity of 7.85. ... Result showed no significant (P>0.05) difference in the heavy metal ...

  3. Immune modulation by fish kinetoplastid parasites : a role for nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Groeneveld, A.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2002-01-01

    Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii are kinetoplastid parasites infecting cyprinid fish. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in immune modulation during T. borreli and T. carassii infection of carp. Phagocytic cells from different organs produced NO and serum nitrate levels incr

  4. The use of fish parasites as biological indicators of anthropogenic influences in coral-reef lagoons: a case study of Apogonidae parasites in New-Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasal, Pierre; Mouillot, David; Fichez, Renaud; Chifflet, Sandrine; Kulbicki, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Parasite species have been widely used as fish host migration tag or as indicators of local pollution. In this paper our approach is to consider the entire parasite community as a biological indicator of the fish environmental conditions. Seven fish species belonging to the Apogonidae, Apogon bandanensis, A. cookii, A. doderleini, A. norfolkensis, A. trimaculatus, Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus and Fowleria variegata, were sampled on six stations in two bays (Grand-Rade and Sainte-Marie) around Nouméa (New-Caledonia). The two bays are submitted to urban wastewater inputs alone or combined with additional industrial inputs which influences decrease from the inner part to the entrance of each bay. A total of 592 fish were dissected for macro parasite examination. Parasites were grouped according to their taxonomical rank and development stage for the analysis. We found an inconsistent effect of the confinement between the two bays, revealing that the parasite community is not the same in the two bays. Moreover, the encysted metacercariae found in the pericardic cavity were found to be significant indicators of the specific anthropogenically impacted environmental conditions prevailing in the inner parts of the two bays. Other parasite taxa were found to be significant indicators of specific environmental conditions in one or two stations among the six sampled. Results on parasite specificity and biological life cycle of the parasite taxa found in sampled Apogonid were further compared with environmental parameters.

  5. Characterisation of a low pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris from rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; Larsen, Thomas B; Jørgensen, Louise G; Bresciani, José; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-18

    Gyrodactylus salaris was isolated from rainbow trout in a Danish freshwater trout farm, and a laboratory population of this particular parasite form was established on rainbow trout. Challenge infections were performed using different salmonid strains and species, including East Atlantic salmon Salmo salar (from the Danish River Skjernå), Baltic salmon S. salar (from the Swedish River Ume Alv) and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (from the Danish rainbow trout farm Fousing). These were compared to infection studies on the Norwegian Laerdalselva parasite form kept under exactly the same conditions in the laboratory. The Danish G. salaris form had low virulence towards both Atlantic and Baltic salmon, whereas rainbow trout proved susceptible to the parasite. The Danish G. salaris form was able to maintain a very low infection on East Atlantic salmon, but not on the Baltic salmon, which eliminated the infection within 2 wk. Rainbow trout developed infection intensities ranging up to several hundred parasites per host. The host colonization patterns of the parasite differed clearly from those of previous studies on microhabitats of the Norwegian form of G. salaris. A comparative study on morphological characters (opisthaptoral hard parts) from the Danish parasite form and Norwegian G. salaris showed no significant differences. Selected genes comprising internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS), ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (IGS) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) regions were cloned and sequenced. Five sequenced ITS clones from 5 individuals of the Danish strain consistently revealed a single base substitution compared to ITS sequences from all other known species and strains of Gyrodactylus. Mitochondrial COI gene sequences demonstrated that the Danish G. salaris form is closely similar to the Laerdalselva parasite form found in Norway. The IGS sequences were highly variable, but very similar to those obtained from German isolates of G. salaris.

  6. An invasive fish and the time-lagged spread of its parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Gaither

    Full Text Available Efforts to limit the impact of invasive species are frustrated by the cryptogenic status of a large proportion of those species. Half a century ago, the state of Hawai'i introduced the Bluestripe Snapper, Lutjanus kasmira, to O'ahu for fisheries enhancement. Today, this species shares an intestinal nematode parasite, Spirocamallanus istiblenni, with native Hawaiian fishes, raising the possibility that the introduced fish carried a parasite that has since spread to naïve local hosts. Here, we employ a multidisciplinary approach, combining molecular, historical, and ecological data to confirm the alien status of S. istiblenni in Hawai'i. Using molecular sequence data we show that S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are genetically affiliated with source populations in French Polynesia, and not parasites at a geographically intermediate location in the Line Islands. S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are a genetic subset of the more diverse source populations, indicating a bottleneck at introduction. Ecological surveys indicate that the parasite has found suitable intermediate hosts in Hawai'i, which are required for the completion of its life cycle, and that the parasite is twice as prevalent in Hawaiian Bluestripe Snappers as in source populations. While the introduced snapper has spread across the entire 2600 km archipelago to Kure Atoll, the introduced parasite has spread only half that distance. However, the parasite faces no apparent impediments to invading the entire archipelago, with unknown implications for naïve indigenous Hawaiian fishes and the protected Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

  7. An invasive fish and the time-lagged spread of its parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Michelle R; Aeby, Greta; Vignon, Matthias; Meguro, Yu-ichiro; Rigby, Mark; Runyon, Christina; Toonen, Robert J; Wood, Chelsea L; Bowen, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to limit the impact of invasive species are frustrated by the cryptogenic status of a large proportion of those species. Half a century ago, the state of Hawai'i introduced the Bluestripe Snapper, Lutjanus kasmira, to O'ahu for fisheries enhancement. Today, this species shares an intestinal nematode parasite, Spirocamallanus istiblenni, with native Hawaiian fishes, raising the possibility that the introduced fish carried a parasite that has since spread to naïve local hosts. Here, we employ a multidisciplinary approach, combining molecular, historical, and ecological data to confirm the alien status of S. istiblenni in Hawai'i. Using molecular sequence data we show that S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are genetically affiliated with source populations in French Polynesia, and not parasites at a geographically intermediate location in the Line Islands. S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are a genetic subset of the more diverse source populations, indicating a bottleneck at introduction. Ecological surveys indicate that the parasite has found suitable intermediate hosts in Hawai'i, which are required for the completion of its life cycle, and that the parasite is twice as prevalent in Hawaiian Bluestripe Snappers as in source populations. While the introduced snapper has spread across the entire 2600 km archipelago to Kure Atoll, the introduced parasite has spread only half that distance. However, the parasite faces no apparent impediments to invading the entire archipelago, with unknown implications for naïve indigenous Hawaiian fishes and the protected Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

  8. Parasitism of the isopod Artystone trysibia in the fish Chaetostoma dermorhynchum from the Tena River (Amazonian region, Ecuador).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The isopod Artystone trysibia Schioedte, 1866 is described by using a collection of specimens that were found parasitizing loricariid fish Chaetostoma dermorhynchum Boulenger, 1887 in the Tena River (Napo province, Ecuador, Amazonian region). Additionally to freshly collected specimens, complementary data of the parasite was obtained from preserved fishes at Ecuadorian museums. This is the first record of A. trysibia in Ecuador, and the most upstream location for the species. The new host fish, Chaetostoma dermorhynchum, is used locally as food.

  9. [Method for an absolute count of the number of parasitic protozoa in fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sous', S M

    1976-01-01

    A new technique is given of the absolute calculation of parasitic Protozoa in fishes. The mucus from the body and gills of fishes was mixed with such volume of water (V) that the drop of mixture (v) was clearly seen under themicroscope. The calculation of Protozoa was done in a sample from three drops of mixture covered with three slides (S). From 50 to 100 viewing fields were seen the them and an average number of Protozoa in one field was calculated. The total number of Protozoa in one fish (N) was equal to an average number of parasites in a viewing field (n) multiplied by the total number of viewing fields (m) which could be obtained at the examination of the whole mixture. The latter was calculated conventionally (see articles).

  10. The invasive fish tapeworm Atractolytocestus huronensis (Cestoda), a parasite of carp, colonises Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomáš; Tavakol, Sareh; Halajian, Ali; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J

    2015-09-01

    Biological invasions represent a serious threat for aquaculture because many of introduced parasites may negatively affect the health state of feral and cultured fish. In the present account, the invasive tapeworm Atractolytocestus huronensis Anthony, 1958 (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), which was originally described from North America and has been introduced to Europe including the British Isles with its specific host, common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), is reported from Africa for the first time. Its recent introduction to South Africa, where it was found in four localities where common carp is cultured, is another evidence of insufficient prophylactic measures and inadequate veterinary control during transfers of cultured fish, especially common carp, between continents. Together with the Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, A. huronensis is another fish tapeworm with ability to spread throughout the globe as a result of man-made introductions of its fish hosts.

  11. Current status of parasitic ciliates Chilodonella spp. (Phyllopharyngea: Chilodonellidae) in freshwater fish aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos Gomes, G; Jerry, D R; Miller, T L; Hutson, K S

    2016-07-30

    Freshwater fish farming contributes to more than two-thirds of global aquaculture production. Parasitic ciliates are one of the largest causes of production loss in freshwater farmed fishes, with species from the genus Chilodonella being particularly problematic. While Chilodonella spp. include 'free-living' fauna, some species are involved in mortality events of fish, particularly in high-density aquaculture. Indeed, chilodonellosis causes major productivity losses in over 16 species of farmed freshwater fishes in more than 14 countries. Traditionally, Chilodonella species are identified based on morphological features; however, the genus comprises yet uncharacterized cryptic species, which indicates the necessity for molecular diagnostic methods. This review synthesizes current knowledge on the biology, ecology and geographic distribution of harmful Chilodonella spp. and examines pathological signs, diagnostic methods and treatments. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics and the ability to culture Chilodonella spp. in vitro will enable the development of preventative management practices and sustained freshwater fish aquaculture production.

  12. General aspects concerning strictly meat and fish transmitted parasitic infections

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Crotti; Silvia Crotti; Andrea Gustinelli

    2012-01-01

    All helminths parasitosis transmitted to humans trough ingestion of infested fleshes, where man is definitive host too, are represented by four groups of helminths: the cestodes Dyphyllobothrium spp and Spirometra spp. (Sparganum proliferum is the name of the immature plerocercoid larva), the trematodes Opisthorchis Clonorchis “group” (many could be the genera and species involved), and the nematode Capillaria philippinensis. So, for fishes humans foods (fresh or salted water) the control and...

  13. First records of parasitic copepods (Crustacea, Siphonostomatoida) from marine fishes in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venmathi Maran, B A; Soh, H Y; Hwang, U W; Chang, C Y; Myoung, J G

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of the biodiversity of parasitic copepods in South Korea is increasing. Interestingly we report here, some parasitic copepods considered as the first record of findings from Korea. Nine species of parasitic copepods (Siphonostomatoida) including six genera of three different families [Caligidae (7), Lernaeopodidae (1), Lernanthropidae (1)] were recovered from eight species of wild fishes in Korea: 1) Caligus hoplognathi Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959 (♀, ♂) from the body surface of barred knifejaw Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel); 2) Caligus lagocephali Pillai, 1961 (♀) from the gills of panther puffer Takifugu pardalis (Temminck & Schlegel); 3) Euryphorus brachypterus (Gerstaecker, 1853) (♀, ♂) from the opercular cavity of Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus); 4) Euryphorus nordmanni Milne Edwards, 1840 (♀, ♂) from the opercular cavity of common dolphin fish Coryphaena hippurus Linnaeus; 5) Gloiopotes huttoni (Thomson) (♀, ♂) from the body surface of black marlin Istiompax indica (Cuvier); 6) Lepeophtheirus hapalogenyos Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959 (♀) from the gill filaments of O. fasciatus; 7) Lepeophtheirus sekii Yamaguti, 1936 (♀, ♂) from the body surface of red seabream Pagrus major (Temminck & Schlegel); 8) Brachiella thynni Cuvier, 1830 (♀) from the body surface of longfin tuna or albacore Thunnus alalunga (Bonnaterre); 9) Lernanthropinus sphyraenae (Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959) (♀) from the gill filaments of moon fish Mene maculata (Bloch & Schneider). Since the female was already reported in Korea, it is a new record for the male of C. hoplognathi. A checklist for the parasitic copepods of the family Caligidae, Lernaeopodidae and Lernanthropidae of Korea is provided.

  14. Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites Community of Fish Species in a Niger Delta Tidal Creek, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ekata Ogbeibu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A pool of fish species in a Niger Delta tidal creek, Buguma Creek, Nigeria, collected monthly from November 2004 to June 2006, at flood tides, were examined for gastrointestinal helminth parasites. The fish species were caught with hooks and lines and cast nets. Only nematode parasites were encountered in the study. Of the 1,149 fish specimens examined, 213 (representing 18.5% were infected with various nematodes parasites. Dasyatis margarita had the highest prevalence rate of 66.7% (2 infected out of 3 examined, followed by Pseudotolithus (Pseudotolithus senegalensis with a prevalence of 41.7% (10 infected out of 24, while the least infected were Arius gigas and Pomadasys jubelini with prevalence of 3.8% and 1.4%, respectively. No infection was recorded in Elops lacerta, Gobius sp., Lutjanus agennes, L. goreensis, Argyrosomus regius, Sphyraena guachancho, S. sphyraena, Cynoglossus senegalensis, Sarotherodon melanotheron, Tilapia guineensis, Liza falcipinnis, Mugil cephalus, and M. curema. The nematode parasites, Capillaria zederi, and Aplectana hamatospicula had the highest prevalence of 33.3% in D. margarita. Laurotravassoxyuris sp. also had the same prevalence in Trichiurus lepturus. Goezia sigalasi had the second highest prevalence of 12.5% in P. (Fonticulus elongatus which had the highest number examined, due to its high dominance in the water.

  15. Distribution and transmission of the highly pathogenic parasite Ichthyophonus in marine fishes of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jacob L.; Grady, Courtney A.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    A combination of field surveys, molecular typing, and laboratory experiments were used to improve our understanding of the distribution and transmission mechanisms of fish parasites in the genus Ichthyophonus. Ichthyophonus spp. infections were detected from the Bering Sea to the coast of Oregon in 10 of 13 host species surveyed. Sequences of rDNA extracted from these isolates indicate that a ubiquitous Ichthyophonus type occurs in the NE Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea and accounts for nearly all the infections encountered. Among NE Pacific isolates, only parasites from yellowtail rockfish and Puget Sound rockfish varied at the DNA locus examined. These data suggest that a single source population of these parasites is available to fishes in diverse niches across a wide geographic range. A direct life cycle within a common forage species could account for the relatively low parasite diversity we encountered. In the laboratory we tested the hypothesis that waterborne transmission occurs among Pacific herring, a common NE Pacific forage species. No horizontal transmission occurred during a four-month cohabitation experiment involving infected herring and conspecific sentinels. The complete life cycle of Ichthyophonus spp. is not known, but these results suggest that system-wide processes maintain a relatively homogenous parasite population.

  16. Fish parasites as bioindicators of water pollution. Canadian translation of fisheries and aquatic sciences No. 5598

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of monogenetic flukes of the species Diplozoon paradoxum and cestodes of the species Caryophyllaeus laticeps (parasites of bream) as bioindicators of water pollution resulting from human activity since they are highly resistant to toxins and increase significantly in number in a polluted zone. The data presented was obtained during a study on the effect of the effluent of the coal-tar chemical industry on the fish parasites in the Sheksna pool of the Rybinsk Reservoir after the breakdown of purification installations at the Cherepovets metallurgical combine in 1987.

  17. Does fish reproduction and metabolic activity influence metal levels in fish intestinal parasites, acanthocephalans, during fish spawning and post-spawning period?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Raspor, Biserka

    2014-10-01

    Application of fish intestinal parasites, acanthocephalans, as bioindicators in metal exposure assessment usually involves estimation of their metal levels and bioconcentration factors. Metal levels in parasite final host, fishes, are influenced by fish physiology but there is no data for acanthocephalan metal levels. Gastrointestinal Zn, Fe, Mn, Cd, Ag levels in European chub (Squalius cephalus L.) from the Sava River were significantly higher during chub spawning (April/May) compared to the post-spawning period (September). In acanthocephalans (Pomphorhynchus laevis and Acanthocephalus anguillae) significantly higher metal levels during chub spawning were observed only for Zn in P. laevis. Bioconcentration factors were twice as high for Fe, Mn, Ag, Pb in the post-spawning period, probably as a consequence of lower gastrointestinal metal levels in fish rather than metal exposure. Therefore, bioconcentration factors should be interpreted with caution, due to their possible variability in relation to fish physiology. In addition, gastrointestinal Cu, Cd and Pb levels were lower in infected than uninfected chub, indicating that metal variability in fishes might be affected by the presence of acanthocephalans.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of parasitic trematodes of the genus Euclinostomum found in Trichopsis and Betta fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapin, S; Phiwsaiya, K; Laosinchai, P; Kowasupat, C; Ruenwongsa, P; Panijpan, B

    2014-06-01

    Many species of fish in the world are infected with digenean trematodes belonging to the genera Clinostomum and Euclinostomum. In this study, metacercariae, identified as Euclinostomum sp. on the basis of morphological characteristics and molecular data, were taken from 3 osphronemid fish- Trichopsis vittata , Trichopsis schalleri, and Betta imbellis, in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) and 2 nuclear genes (18S rDNA and ITS-internal transcribed spacer) of these Euclinostomum parasites indicated a clear distinction from those belonging to the Clinostomum genus. These are the first records of partial mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences of an Euclinostomum sp.

  19. Characterisation of potential novel allergens in the fish parasite Anisakis simplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kruse Fæste

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex occurs in fish stocks in temperate seas. A. simplex contamination of fish products is unsavoury and a health concern considering human infection with live larvae (anisakiasis and allergic reactions to anisakid proteins in seafood. Protein extracts of A. simplex produce complex band patterns in gel electrophoresis and IgE-immunostaining. In the present study potential allergens have been characterised using sera from A. simplex-sensitised patients and proteome data obtained by mass spectrometry. A. simplex proteins were homologous to allergens in other nematodes, insects, and shellfish indicating cross-reactivity. Characteristic marker peptides for relevant A. simplex proteins were described.

  20. Characterisation of a low pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris from rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas Rohde; Larsen, Thomas Bjerre; Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2007-01-01

    A Danish form of Gyrodactylus salaris has been isolated and characterised. It is not pathogenic to Atlantic salmon.......A Danish form of Gyrodactylus salaris has been isolated and characterised. It is not pathogenic to Atlantic salmon....

  1. Parasites of freshwater fishes and the Great American Biotic Interchange: a bridge too far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, A; García-Varela, M; Pérez-Ponce de León, G

    2017-03-01

    We examine the extent to which adult helminths of freshwater fishes have been part of the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), by integrating information in published studies and new data from Panama with fish biogeography and Earth history of Middle America. The review illustrates the following: (1) the helminth fauna south of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, and especially south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, shows strong Neotropical affinities; (2) host-parasite associations follow principles of the 'biogeographic core fauna' in which host-lineage specificity is pronounced; (3) phylogenetic analysis of the widespread freshwater trematode family Allocreadiidae reveals a complex history of host-shifting and co-diversification involving mainly cyprinodontiforms and characids; (4) allocreadiids, monogeneans and spiruridan nematodes of Middle American cyprinodontiforms may provide clues to the evolutionary history of their hosts; and (5) phylogenetic analyses of cryptogonimid trematodes may reveal whether or how cichlids interacted with marine or brackish-water environments during their colonization history. The review shows that 'interchange' is limited and asymmetrical, but simple narratives of northward isthmian dispersal will likely prove inadequate to explain the historical biogeography of many host-parasite associations in tropical Middle America, particularly those involving poeciliids. Finally, our study highlights the urgent need for targeted survey work across Middle America, focused sampling in river drainages of Colombia and Venezuela, and deeper strategic sampling in other parts of South America, in order to develop and test robust hypotheses about fish-parasite associations in Middle America.

  2. Microbial Diversity and Parasitic Load in Tropical Fish of Different Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennersdorf, Philipp; Kleinertz, Sonja; Theisen, Stefan; Abdul-Aziz, Muslihudeen A; Mrotzek, Grit; Palm, Harry W; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analysed fecal bacterial communities and parasites of three important Indonesian fish species, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, Epinephelus sexfasciatus and Atule mate. We then compared the biodiversity of bacterial communities and parasites of these three fish species collected in highly polluted Jakarta Bay with those collected in less polluted Indonesian areas of Cilacap (E. sexfasciatus, A. mate) and Thousand Islands (E. fuscoguttatus). In addition, E. fuscoguttatus from net cages in an open water mariculture facility was compared with free living E. fuscoguttatus from its surroundings. Both core and shared microbiomes were investigated. Our results reveal that, while the core microbiomes of all three fish species were composed of fairly the same classes of bacteria, the proportions of these bacterial classes strongly varied. The microbial composition of phylogenetically distant fish species, i.e. A. mate and E. sexfasciatus from Jakarta Bay and Cilacap were more closely related than the microbial composition of more phylogentically closer species, i.e. E. fuscoguttatus, E. sexfasciatus from Jakarta Bay, Cilacap and Thousand Islands. In addition, we detected a weak negative correlation between the load of selected bacterial pathogens, i.e. Vibrio sp. and Photobacterium sp. and the number of endoparasites. In the case of Flavobacterium sp. the opposite was observed, i.e. a weak positive correlation. Of the three recorded pathogenic bacterial genera, Vibrio sp. was commonly found in E. fuscoguttatus from mariculture, and lessly in the vicinity of the net cages and rarely in the fishes from the heavily polluted waters from Jakarta Bay. Flavobacterium sp. showed higher counts in mariculture fish and Photobacteria sp. was the most prominent in fish inside and close to the net cages.

  3. A scoring system approach for the parasite predictive assessment of fish lots: a proof of concept with anisakids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llarena-Reino, María; Abollo, Elvira; Pascual, Santiago

    2013-12-01

    A total of 982 individuals distributed in 11 lots belonging to 10 fish species from three Atlantic FAO fishing areas were sampled and examined to detect the presence of anisakid larvae in fish muscle. After hazard identification by genetic sequencing and exposure assessment by anatomic extent and demographic characterization of infection, all data were fitted for each fish species to a new proposed scoring schema of parasite prediction. In the absence of a criterion standard method for inspection and precise definition of the quantum satis for parasites in contaminated fish lots, the inspection rating scheme called SADE (Site of infection, Assurance of quality, Demography, Epidemiology) may help fish industries to precisely handle and to evaluate the likely outcome of infected fish lots after being diagnosed. For this purpose, a supporting flow diagram for decision was defined and suggested. This new performance assessment tool has the aim of staging fish lots, thus helping in planning manufacture, commercial, and research decisions during self-management programs. This novel scoring system provides an improved inspection format by implementing the occurrence stratification for parasites to guide Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) programs for the uniform exchange of information among fish industries, administration and researchers, thus facilitating standardization and communication. In the future, this scoring version could be validated (in terms of classification and wording) for similar overall predictive purposes in other muscular parasites infecting seafood products.

  4. Parasites of non-native gobies in the Włocławek Reservoir on the lower Vistula River, first comprehensive study in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mierzejewska K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A parasitological study of Ponto-Caspian gobies, including the monkey goby Neogobius fluviatilis, racer goby Babka gymnotrachelus and tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris, carried out over four years in the lower Vistula River is described. These fish species represent one of the most impressive invasions of European inland waters, connected with the spontaneous, east-to-west intracontinental movement observed in the last two decades. The parasite community consisted of 24 taxa. Typical for racer goby were: Trichodina domerguei, Diplostomum pseudospathaceum, Gyrodactylus proterorhini and glochidia of unionids. The list of parasites typical for monkey goby is supplemented with: Tylodelphys clavata (met. and Eimeria sp., while the glochidia were rarely detected in this fish host. Holostephanus spp., Apatemon gracilis, Diplostomum gobiorum and glochidia predominated in parasite fauna of tubenose goby. Unlike the other species tested, P. semilunaris was poorly infected with T. domerguei and G. proterorhini. Parasites commonly distributed through native fishes in the observed area prevailed in gobies. Species rare in natives were also numerously represented. In this way, alien fish reinforce populations of those parasites in invaded waters. Parasites dragged to the colonized area (G. proterorhini, Holostephanus spp., A. gracilis and D. gobiorum complement the community. Larval stages were typical for parasite fauna of all studied gobies.

  5. Fish immunity and parasite infections: from innate immunity to immunoprophylactic prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar

    2008-12-15

    The increasing economic importance of fish parasitoses for aquaculture and fisheries has enhanced the interest in the defence mechanisms against these infections. Both innate and adaptive immune responses are mounted by fish to control parasite infections, and several mechanisms described for mammalian parasitoses have also been demonstrated in teleosts. Innate immune initiation relies on the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pathogen recognizing receptors (PRRs). A number of PRRs, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLRs), have been characterized in fish, and some molecules susceptible of functioning as PAMPs are known for some fish parasites. A lectin-carbohydrate interaction has also been described in some host fish-parasite systems, thus probably involving C-type lectin receptors. Inflammatory reactions involving cellular reactions, as phagocytosis and phagocyte activity (including oxidative mechanisms), as well as complement activity, are modulated by many fish parasites, including mainly ciliates, flagellates and myxozoans. Besides complement, a number of humoral immune factors (peroxidases, lysozyme, acute-phase proteins) are also implicated in the response to some parasites. Among adaptive responses, most data deal with the presence of B lymphocytes and the production of specific antibodies (Abs). Although an increasing number of T-cell markers have been described for teleosts, the specific characterization of those involved in their response is far from being obtained. Gene expression studies have demonstrated the involvement of other mediators of the innate and adaptive responses, i.e., cytokines [interleukins (IL-1, IL-8), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon (IFN)], chemokines (CXC, CC), as well as several oxidative enzymes [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2)]. Information is scarcer for factors more directly linked to adaptive responses, such as major histocompatibility (MH) receptors, T cell

  6. Approaches towards DNA vaccination against a skin ciliate parasite in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise von Gersdorff Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss were immunized with plasmid DNA vaccine constructs encoding selected antigens from the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Two immobilization antigens (I-ags and one cysteine protease were tested as genetic vaccine antigen candidates. Antigenicity was evaluated by immunostaining of transfected fish cells using I-ag specific mono- and polyclonal antibodies. I. multifiliis specific antibody production, regulation of immune-relevant genes and/or protection in terms of parasite burden or mortality was measured to evaluate the induced immune response in vaccinated fish. Apart from intramuscular injection, needle free injection and gene gun delivery were tested as alternative administration techniques. For the I-ags the complement protein fragment C3d and the termini of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glyco(Gprotein (VHSV G were tested as opsonisation and cellular localisation mediators, respectively, while the full length viral G protein was tested as molecular adjuvant. Expression of I-ags in transfected fish cells was demonstrated for several constructs and by immunohistochemistry it was possible to detect expression of a secreted form of the Iag52B in the muscle cells of injected fish. Up-regulations of mRNA coding for IgM, MHC I, MHC II and TCR β, respectively, were observed in muscle tissue at the injection site in selected trials. In the spleen up-regulations were found for IFN-γ and IL-10. The highest up-regulations were seen following co-administration of I-ag and cysteine protease plasmid constructs. This correlated with a slight elevation of an I. multifiliis specific antibody response. However, in spite of detectable antigen expression and immune reactions, none of the tested vaccination strategies provided significant protection. This might suggest an insufficiency of DNA vaccination alone to trigger protective mechanisms against I. multifiliis or that other or additional parasite antigens

  7. Multi-centre testing and validation of current protocols for the identification of Gyrodactylus salaris (Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, A P; Collins, C; García-Vásquez, A; Snow, M; Matejusová, I; Paladini, G; Longshaw, M; Lindenstrøm, T; Stone, D M; Turnbull, J F; Picon-Camacho, S M; Rivera, C Vázquez; Duguid, R A; Mo, T A; Hansen, H; Olstad, K; Cable, J; Harris, P D; Kerr, R; Graham, D; Monaghan, S J; Yoon, G H; Buchmann, K; Taylor, N G H; Bakke, T A; Raynard, R; Irving, S; Bron, J E

    2010-10-01

    Despite routine screening requirements for the notifiable fish pathogen Gyrodactylus salaris, no standard operating procedure exists for its rapid identification and discrimination from other species of Gyrodactylus. This study assessed screening and identification efficiencies under real-world conditions for the most commonly employed identification methodologies: visual, morphometric and molecular analyses. Obtained data were used to design a best-practice processing and decision-making protocol allowing rapid specimen throughput and maximal classification accuracy. True specimen identities were established using a consensus from all three identification methods, coupled with the use of host and location information. The most experienced salmonid gyrodactylid expert correctly identified 95.1% of G. salaris specimens. Statistical methods of classification identified 66.7% of the G. salaris, demonstrating the need for much wider training. Molecular techniques (internal transcribed spacer region-restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP)/cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) sequencing) conducted in the diagnostic laboratory most experienced in the analysis of gyrodactylid material, identified 100% of the true G. salaris specimens. Taking into account causes of potential specimen loss, the probabilities of a specimen being accurately identified were 95%, 87% and 92% for visual, morphometric and molecular techniques, respectively, and the probabilities of correctly identifying a specimen of G. salaris by each method were 81%, 58% and 92%. Inter-analyst agreement for 189 gyrodactylids assessed by all three methods using Fleiss' Kappa suggested substantial agreement in identification between the methods. During routine surveillance periods when low numbers of specimens are analysed, we recommend that specimens be analysed using the ITS-RFLP approach followed by sequencing of specimens with a "G. salaris-like" (i.e. G. salaris, Gyrodactylus thymalli) banding pattern

  8. Parasites and diseases in marine copepods: Challenges for future mass-production of live feed for fish larva production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Alf

    Copepods are the natural food for many marine fish larvae, and the use of cultured copepods as life feed is, therefore, becoming increasingly important as more marine fish species are being produced in aquaculture. Large-scale cultivation of copepods may be challenged by diseases and parasites...

  9. Distribution of Helminth Parasites in Intestines and Their Seasonal Rate of Infestation in Three Freshwater Fishes of Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Asifa; Balkhi, Masood-Ul Hassan; Maqbool, Rafia; Darzi, Mohammed Maqbool; Shah, Feroz Ahmad; Bhat, Farooz Ahmad; Bhat, Bilal Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of helminth parasites in fishes with special reference to water quality parameters in Dal Lake and River Jhelum and correlate the observations. Water, fish, and parasite samples were collected during different seasons from various sites and processed. Three fish species, namely, Schizothorax niger Heckel 1838, Schizothorax esocinus Heckel 1838, and Schizothorax curvifrons Heckel 1838, were recovered from these water bodies. The physicochemical parameters temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and free carbon dioxide showed variation vis-à-vis the season and location of the stations in water bodies. Acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis Kaw 1941 (27.47%) and two intestinal cestodes Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti 1934 (30.63%) and Adenoscolex oreini Fotedar 1958 (32.43%) were recovered from all the three species of Schizothorax. All the three parasites showed higher prevalence during summer and the least prevalence during winter. Parasitic infections were prevalent more in male fishes compared to females. The presence of the parasites had reduced the condition coefficient of the infected fishes in both water bodies. The study also showed that some of the physicochemical features showed a significant positive correlation with the prevalence.

  10. Distribution of Helminth Parasites in Intestines and Their Seasonal Rate of Infestation in Three Freshwater Fishes of Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asifa Wali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of helminth parasites in fishes with special reference to water quality parameters in Dal Lake and River Jhelum and correlate the observations. Water, fish, and parasite samples were collected during different seasons from various sites and processed. Three fish species, namely, Schizothorax niger Heckel 1838, Schizothorax esocinus Heckel 1838, and Schizothorax curvifrons Heckel 1838, were recovered from these water bodies. The physicochemical parameters temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and free carbon dioxide showed variation vis-à-vis the season and location of the stations in water bodies. Acanthocephalan parasite Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis Kaw 1941 (27.47% and two intestinal cestodes Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti 1934 (30.63% and Adenoscolex oreini Fotedar 1958 (32.43% were recovered from all the three species of Schizothorax. All the three parasites showed higher prevalence during summer and the least prevalence during winter. Parasitic infections were prevalent more in male fishes compared to females. The presence of the parasites had reduced the condition coefficient of the infected fishes in both water bodies. The study also showed that some of the physicochemical features showed a significant positive correlation with the prevalence.

  11. First report of the intracellular fish parasite Sphaerothecum destruens associated with the invasive topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva in France

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    Charrier Amélie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerothecum destruens has emerged as a serious parasite of fish. Its life cycle, as well as its association with Asian cyprinids, allows it to infect a wide range of hosts. The topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva, an invasive species that has rapidly colonized Europe, has been shown to be a healthy carrier of the parasite. However, in France, the presence of S. destruens and its possible association with P. parva have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we screened topmouth gudgeon DNA for S. destruens using PCR amplification of an 18S rRNA gene fragment of the parasite. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of S. destruens in the invasive fish species. Our results suggest that P. parva can be a potent vector of the parasite, and has the potential to become a major ecological and economic threat to the French fish population.

  12. Rapid detection of parasite in muscle fibers of fishes using a portable microscope imaging technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jayoung; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoungkwan

    2017-05-01

    Fishes are a widely used food material in the world. Recently about 4% of the fishes are infected with Kudoa thyrsites in Asian ocean. Kudoa thyrsites is a parasite that is found within the muscle fibers of fishes. The infected fishes can be a reason of food poisoning, which should be sorted out before distribution and consumption. Although Kudoa thyrsites is visible to the naked eye, it could be easily overlooked due to the micro-scale size and similar color with fish tissue. In addition, the visual inspection is labor intensive works resulting in loss of money and time. In this study, a portable microscopic camera was utilized to obtain images of raw fish slices. The optimized image processing techniques with polarized transmittance images provided reliable performance. The result shows that the portable microscopic imaging method can be used to detect parasites rapidly and non-destructively, which could be an alternative to manual inspections.

  13. Fish parasites in the bathyal zone: The halosaur Halosauropsis macrochir (Günther, 1878) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, S.; Palm, H. W.; Busch, M. W.; Kellermanns, E.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 42 Halosauropsis macrochir from a single position on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) were collected for studies on parasites and feeding ecology. A total of 9 different parasite species were found, with most of them belonging to the Digenea (4 species) and Nematoda (3). The host specific Degeneria halosauri, (Digenea) and Cystidicolidae indet. (Nematoda) were the predominant species, reaching a prevalence of 100.0% and 57.1% with intensities of infection of 1-12 and 1-10, respectively. Less host specific parasites such as Gonocerca phycidis (Digenea) and Tetraphyllidea indet. (Cestoda) occurred at low rates of infection. The parasite fauna of this bathyal fish can be described as predominantly adult and host specific, with larval and less host specific components. A total of 16 different food groups were identified, most of them of benthic origin or associated with the benthopelagial. The predominant prey organisms belonged to the Crustacea (e.g., Copepoda, Gammaridea, Amphipoda and Isopoda), which serve as main parasite vectors for H. macrochir. This deep-sea fish seems to follow a general pattern of fish parasites in the deep sea, with most isolated parasites belonging to the digeneans, nematodes and a cestode. The parasite composition is caused by the narrow depth range of the species and the restricted distribution of the fish family Halosauridae. The species richness was found to be lower than other demersal fish from the deep sea and shallow waters, however, higher than those from deep-sea fish living in the pelagial.

  14. Taxonomic distinctness and richness of helminth parasite assemblages of freshwater fishes in Mexican hydrological basins.

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    Benjamín Quiroz-Martínez

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyse the distributional patterns of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes with respect to the main hydrological basins of Mexico. We use the taxonomic distinctness and the variation in taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of parasite diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. We address questions about the factors that determine the variation of observed diversity of helminths between basins. We also investigate patterns of richness, taxonomic distinctness and distance decay of similarity amongst basins. Our analyses suggest that the evolution of the fauna of helminth parasites in Mexico is mostly dominated by independent host colonization events and that intra--host speciation could be a minor factor explaining the origin of this diversity. This paper points out a clear separation between the helminth faunas of northern--nearctic and southern--neotropical components in Mexican continental waters, suggesting the availability of two distinct taxonomic pools of parasites in Mexican drainage basins. Data identifies Mexican drainage basins as unities inhabited by freshwater fishes, hosting a mixture of neotropical and nearctic species, in addition, data confirms neotropical and neartic basins/helminth faunas. The neotropical basins of Mexico are host to a richest and more diversified helminth fauna, including more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse helminth fauna in the nearctic basins. The present analysis confirms distance--decay as one of the important factors contributing to the patterns of diversity observed. The hypothesis that helminth diversity could be explained by the ichthyological diversity of the basin received no support from present analysis.

  15. Taxonomic distinctness and richness of helminth parasite assemblages of freshwater fishes in Mexican hydrological basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamín; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the distributional patterns of adult helminth parasites of freshwater fishes with respect to the main hydrological basins of Mexico. We use the taxonomic distinctness and the variation in taxonomic distinctness to explore patterns of parasite diversity and how these patterns change between zoogeographical regions. We address questions about the factors that determine the variation of observed diversity of helminths between basins. We also investigate patterns of richness, taxonomic distinctness and distance decay of similarity amongst basins. Our analyses suggest that the evolution of the fauna of helminth parasites in Mexico is mostly dominated by independent host colonization events and that intra--host speciation could be a minor factor explaining the origin of this diversity. This paper points out a clear separation between the helminth faunas of northern--nearctic and southern--neotropical components in Mexican continental waters, suggesting the availability of two distinct taxonomic pools of parasites in Mexican drainage basins. Data identifies Mexican drainage basins as unities inhabited by freshwater fishes, hosting a mixture of neotropical and nearctic species, in addition, data confirms neotropical and neartic basins/helminth faunas. The neotropical basins of Mexico are host to a richest and more diversified helminth fauna, including more families, genera and species, compared to the less rich and less diverse helminth fauna in the nearctic basins. The present analysis confirms distance--decay as one of the important factors contributing to the patterns of diversity observed. The hypothesis that helminth diversity could be explained by the ichthyological diversity of the basin received no support from present analysis.

  16. Histopathological changes in the skins and gills of some marine fishes due to parasitic isopod infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganapathy Rameshkumar; Samuthirapandian Ravichandran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the histopathological symptoms owing to cymothoid isopod that were categorised as gross lesions.Methods:Nature of damage fish tissues and gills were taken from the parasite attachment area of infested and uninfested fishes which were cut out in fresh condition fixed in 10% buffered neutral formalin. Fresh and recently preserved tissues and gills were washed in tap water and dehydrated using alcohol series. The tissues gills were then cleaned in methylbenzoate and benzene and embedded in paraffin wax. The serial sections cutting 4 to 5 m thickness, were stained with Erlich’s haematoxylin and Eosin for histopathological analysis.Results:In normal muscle tissue, the tensile strength of muscle fibers with extra cellular matrix collagen was extensively tight associated. This gave a rigid musculature pattern to the tissues. Infested fish exhibited histopathological anomalies such as tissue reactions, primarily associated with the formation of granulomas consisted of macrophages and epitheleioid cells, which were occasionally surrounded by a thin rim of fibroblasts. The infestations such as lipofibrosis, hyperaemia, haemorhagic lesions and penetration of dactylus usually pressure atrophy often accompanied by the presence of parasites. Lesions had well developed granulomas that underlined in the muscle or overlying subcutaneous tissue, form these spread to underlying organs.Conclusions:It could be concluded that the infection studies of parasite that attaches or settles on the host body, at first, causes localized inflammatory changes, but with time, assuring a different or diffused character. The changes always begin with hyperaemia in the angles between adjacent sides at the site of attachment and then move towards deeply situated area.

  17. Histopathological changes in the skins and gills of some marine fishes due to parasitic isopod infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Rameshkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the histopathological symptoms owing to cymothoid isopod that were categorised as gross lesions. Methods: Nature of damage fish tissues and gills were taken from the parasite attachment area of infested and uninfested fishes which were cut out in fresh condition fixed in 10% buffered neutral formalin. Fresh and recently preserved tissues and gills were washed in tap water and dehydrated using alcohol series. The tissues gills were then cleaned in methylbenzoate and benzene and embedded in paraffin wax. The serial sections cutting 4 to 5 m thickness, were stained with Erlich’s haematoxylin and Eosin for histopathological analysis. Results: In normal muscle tissue, the tensile strength of muscle fibers with extra cellular matrix collagen was extensively tight associated. This gave a rigid musculature pattern to the tissues. Infested fish exhibited histopathological anomalies such as tissue reactions, primarily associated with the formation of granulomas consisted of macrophages and epitheleioid cells, which were occasionally surrounded by a thin rim of fibroblasts. The infestations such as lipofibrosis, hyperaemia, haemorhagic lesions and penetration of dactylus usually pressure atrophy often accompanied by the presence of parasites. Lesions had well developed granulomas that underlined in the muscle or overlying subcutaneous tissue, form these spread to underlying organs. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the infection studies of parasite that attaches or settles on the host body, at first, causes localized inflammatory changes, but with time, assuring a different or diffused character. The changes always begin with hyperaemia in the angles between adjacent sides at the site of attachment and then move towards deeply situated area.

  18. Parasites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-06

    In this podcast, a listener wants to know what to do if he thinks he has a parasite or parasitic disease.  Created: 5/6/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/6/2010.

  19. Ascaridoid parasites infecting in the frequently consumed marine fishes in the coastal area of China: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Ting; Lü, Liang; Chen, Hui-Xia; Yang, Yue; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Li, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Marine fishes represent the important components of the diet in the coastal areas of China and they are also natural hosts of various parasites. However, to date, little is known about the occurrence of ascaridoid parasites in the frequently consumed marine fishes in China. In order to determine the presence of ascaridoid parasites in the frequently consumed marine fishes in the coastal town Huizhou, Guangdong Province, China, 211 fish representing 45 species caught from the South China Sea (off Daya Gulf) were examined. Five species of ascaridoid nematodes at different developmental stages were detected in the marine fishes examined herein, including third-stage larva of Anisakis typica (Diesing, 1860), third and fourth-stage larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. IV-A of Shamsi, Gasser & Beveridge, 2013, adult and third-stage larvae of Hysterothylacium zhoushanense Li, Liu & Zhang, 2014, adults and third-stage larvae of Raphidascaris lophii (Wu, 1949) and adults of Raphidascaris longispicula Li, Liu & Zhang, 2012. The overall prevalence of infection is 18.0%. Of them, Hysterothylacium sp. IV-A with the highest prevalence (17.5%) and intensity (mean=14.6) of infection was the predominant species. The prevalence and intensity of A. typica were very low (1/211 of marine fish infected with an intensity of one parasite per fish). The morphological and molecular characterization of all nematode species was provided. A cladistic analysis based on ITS sequence was constructed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships of these ascaridoid parasites obtained herein. The present study provided important information on the occurrence and diagnosis of ascaridoid nematodes in the commercially important marine fishes from the South China Sea. The low level of infection and the species composition of ascaridoid nematodes seem to indicate the presence of low risk of human anisakidosis when local population consumed these marine fishes examined herein.

  20. Life cycle of the fish parasite Gnathia maxillaris (Crustacea: Isopoda: Gnathiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispano, Coral; Bultó, Patrici; Blanch, Anicet R

    2014-06-01

    The taxonomic classification of some parasitic isopods of the family Gnathiidae has been revised in the last years. However, their biological cycles have been described only partially or incompletely. Gnathia maxillaris (Montagu, 1804) is one of the most studied species, but certain aspects of its life cycle are still poorly known. A detailed study on the life cycle of G. maxillaris was carried out over several years by sampling larvae from an infestation of large volume aquaria at the Aquarium of Barcelona. At the same time, a system of in vitro cultivation of G. maxillaris was developed, which provided new data to complete the description of its life cycle. Periods of incubation, fertilization, planktonic stages, the attachment site on the fish host and biometric characteristics of larval forms were detailed. The new information may help better control health state of marine fish in aquaculture.

  1. Host specificity and the structure of helminth parasite communities of fishes in a Neotropical river in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Novelo-Turcotte, María Teresa; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Vazquez-Hurtado, Gabriela; Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamin; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Favila, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In a tropical locality of Río La Antigua, Veracruz, Mexico, 11 fish species, represented by 244 individual fish from six freshwater fish families living sympatrically and synchronically, were examined for helminth parasites. A total of 36 taxa of helminths were recorded, 24 autogenic and 12 allogenic forms, including 6 monogeneans, 14 trematodes, 1 cestode, and 15 nematodes. Most helminth taxa were recovered for 10/11 of the component communities we analyzed. The results contribute empirical evidence that host specificity is an important force in the development of helminth communities of freshwater fishes. Each fish family has their own set of parasites, host species belonging to the same taxon share parasite species. High component community similarity among related host species was recorded, demonstrated by high prevalence and abundance, as well as dominance, of autogenic specialist species in each component community. Most autogenic helminth species are numerically and reproductively successful in relatively few host species. Autogenic helminths common in one host species are not common in others. Our findings give empirical support to the idea that low levels of sharing of parasites favor animal coexistence and high species richness, because large phylogenetic differences allow potentially competing animals to consume the same resources without being sensitive of another’s parasites. PMID:28004635

  2. Host specificity and the structure of helminth parasite communities of fishes in a Neotropical river in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado-Maldonado Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a tropical locality of Río La Antigua, Veracruz, Mexico, 11 fish species, represented by 244 individual fish from six freshwater fish families living sympatrically and synchronically, were examined for helminth parasites. A total of 36 taxa of helminths were recorded, 24 autogenic and 12 allogenic forms, including 6 monogeneans, 14 trematodes, 1 cestode, and 15 nematodes. Most helminth taxa were recovered for 10/11 of the component communities we analyzed. The results contribute empirical evidence that host specificity is an important force in the development of helminth communities of freshwater fishes. Each fish family has their own set of parasites, host species belonging to the same taxon share parasite species. High component community similarity among related host species was recorded, demonstrated by high prevalence and abundance, as well as dominance, of autogenic specialist species in each component community. Most autogenic helminth species are numerically and reproductively successful in relatively few host species. Autogenic helminths common in one host species are not common in others. Our findings give empirical support to the idea that low levels of sharing of parasites favor animal coexistence and high species richness, because large phylogenetic differences allow potentially competing animals to consume the same resources without being sensitive of another’s parasites.

  3. First study on communities of parasites in Triportheus rotundatus, a Characidae fish from the Amazon River system (Brazil

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    Paulo Henrique Nascimento Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was the first investigation on the parasites of Triportheus rotundatus, a Characiformes fish from the Amazon, in Brazil. All the fish collected (100% in a tributary from the Amazon River system were infected by one or more parasite species. The mean species richness of parasites was 4.9 ± 0.9, the Brillouin index was 0.39 ± 0.16, the evenness was 0.24 ± 0.09 and the Berger-Parker dominance was 0.81 ± 0.13. A total of 1316 metazoan parasites were collected, including Anacanthorus pithophallus, Anacanthorus furculus, Ancistrohaptor sp. (Dactylogyridae, Genarchella genarchella (Derogenidae, Posthodiplostomum sp. (Diplostomidae, Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus inopinatus (Camallanidae, Echinorhynchus paranensis (Echinorhynchidae and Ergasilus sp. (Ergasilidae, but monogenoideans were the dominant parasites. These parasites presented an aggregate dispersion pattern, except for P. (S. inopinatus, which showed a random dispersion pattern. The body conditions of the hosts were not affected by the parasitism levels. This first report of these parasites for T. rotundatus indicates that the presence of ectoparasites and endoparasites was due to hosts behavior and availability of infective stages in the environment, and this was discussed.

  4. Reproductive trade-offs may moderate the impact of Gyrodactylus salaris in warmer climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Denholm

    Full Text Available Gyrodactylus salaris is a notifiable freshwater ectoparasite of salmonids. Its primary host is Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, upon which infections can cause death, and have led to massive declines in salmon numbers in Norway, where the parasite is widespread. Different strains of S. salar vary in their susceptibility, with Atlantic strains (such as those found in Norway exhibiting no resistance to the parasite, and Baltic strains demonstrating an innate resistance sufficient to regulate parasite numbers on the host causing it to either die out or persist at a low level. In this study, Leslie matrix and compartmental models were used to generate data that demonstrated the population growth of G. salaris on an individual host is dependent on the total number of offspring per parasite, its longevity and the timing of its births. The data demonstrated that the key factor determining the rate of G. salaris population growth is the time at which the parasite first gives birth, with rapid birth rate giving rise to large population size. Furthermore, it was shown that though the parasite can give birth up to four times, only two births are required for the population to persist as long as the first birth occurs before a parasite is three days old. As temperature is known to influence the timing of the parasite's first birth, greater impact may be predicted if introduced to countries with warmer climates than Norway, such as the UK and Ireland which are currently recognised to be free of G. salaris. However, the outputs from the models developed in this study suggest that temperature induced trade-offs between the total number of offspring the parasite gives birth to and the first birth timing may prevent increased population growth rates over those observed in Norway.

  5. New records of parasitic copepods (Crustacea, Copepoda) from marine fishes in the Argentinean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Cantatore Delfina María; Elizabeth, Braicovich Paola; Julia, Alarcos Ana; Laura, Lanfranchi Ana; Alejandra, Rossin María; Gustavo, Vales Damián; Tomás, Timi Juan

    2012-03-01

    Increasing knowledge of the biodiversity of parasitic copepods in the Argentinean Sea will provide a baseline against which changes in the distribution of marine biota can be detected. We provide new information on the distribution of 13 known species of parasitic copepods gathered from 11 species of marine fishes from Argentinean Sea, including 7 new host records and 9 new locality records. These species are: Bomolochus globiceps (Vervoort et Ramírez, 1968) and Nothobomolochus cresseyi Timi et Sardella, 1997 (Bomolochidae Sumpf, 1871); Brasilochondria riograndensis Thatcher et Pereira, 2004 (Chondracanthidae Milne Edwards, 1840); Taeniacanthus lagocephali Pearse, 1952 (Taeniacanthidae Wilson, 1911); Caligus rogercresseyi Boxshall et Bravo, 2000 and Metacaligus uruguayensis (Thomsen, 1949) (Caligidae Burmeister, 1835); Hatschekia conifera Yamaguti, 1939 (Hatschekiidae Kabata, 1979); Clavellotis pagri (Krøyer, 1863), Clavella adunca (Strøm, 1762), Clavella bowmani Kabata, 1963 and Parabrachiella amphipacifica Ho, 1982 (Lernaeopodidae Milne Edwards, 1840), and Lernanthropus leidyi Wilson, 1922 and Lernanthropus caudatus Wilson, 1922 (Lernanthropidae Kabata, 1979). A list of host species lacking parasitic copepods, for which large samples were investigated by the authors, is also provided in order to compare in future surveys.

  6. The description of Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. and G. neretum sp. n. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) with comments on other gyrodactylids parasitising pipefish (Pisces: Syngnathidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Giuseppe; Cable, Joanne; Fioravanti, Maria Letizia; Faria, Patricia J; Shinn, Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    The current work describes two new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 collected from pipefish Syngnathus scovelli (Evermann et Kendall) and Syngnathus typhle L. during two separate gyrodactylosis episodes on fish held in a public aquarium located in northern Italy. The gyrodactylids collected from the skin, fins and gills of pipefish were subjected to a morphological analysis of the attachment hooks and the morphometric data were compared to the four species of Gyrodactylus previously described from syngnathid hosts, namely G. eyipayipi Vaughan, Christison, Hansen et Shinn, 2010, G. pisculentui Williams, Kritsky, Dunnigan, Lash et Klein, 2008, G. shorti Holliman, 1963 and G. syngnathi Appleby, 1996. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the morphological data indicated six clusters; two discrete groups among the specimens taken from the pipefisli held in the Italian aquarium and four further groups representing G. eyipayipi, G. pisculentus, G. shorti and G. syngnathi. Molecular sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene for the new species considered here were then compared with those available for other species in GenBank. The comparison did not reveal any identical match, supporting the morphological analysis that Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. from S. typhle and Gyrodactylus neretum sp. n. from S. scovelli represent distinct species. Both G. corleonis and G. neretum possess robust hamuli, marginal hook blades that curve smoothly from their sickle base to a point beyond the toe and, ventral bars with a broad median portion and a reduced membrane. Gyrodactylus corleonis, however, can be distinguished on the basis of its heart-shaped ventral bar; G. neretum has a 1:2 hamulus point:shaft ratio and a rectangular-shaped ventral bar. A redescription of the haptoral hard parts of the four species previously recorded on pipefish is also presented.

  7. Some monogenoidea parasitic on peruvian marine fishes, with description of Anoplocotyloides chorrillensis new species and new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Luque

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of four Monogenoidea parasitic on marine fishes from the central Peruvian coast is recorded. One of them, Anoplocotyloides chorrillensis (Monocotylidae described from the gills of Rhinobatos planiceps (Rhinobatidae is considered a new species. The three other species are: Caballerocotyla autralis Oliva, 1986 (Capsalidae; Callorhynchocotyle marplatensis Suriano & Incorvaia, 1982 (Hexabothriidae and Anoplocotyloides papillatus (Doran, 1953 (Monocotylidae parasitic on Sarda chiliensis chiliensis (Scombridae, Callorhinchus callorhinchus (Callorhinchidae and Rhinobatos planiceps (Rhinobatidae respectively.

  8. Spot the difference: Two cryptic species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) infecting Astyanax aeneus (Actinopterygii, Characidae) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the course of one year, undescribed specimens of Gyrodactylus were recovered from banded tetra, Astyanax aeneus collected in the La Antigua and Nautla river basins in central Veracruz, Mexico. Parasites were processed for morphometric and molecular analyses. Morphometrically, Gyrodactylus samples collected in the La Antigua river had slightly smaller haptoral structures than those collected from the Nautla river. During the 12month-collection of samples, however, water temperature varied considerably (ca. 20°C to 30°C), and this abiotic factor is known to affect the size of gyrodactylid attachment structures. Moreover, no clear discrimination was possible between individual parasites collected from the two rivers based on the morphology of the marginal hook, which is recognised as a very informative character to discriminate between species. The morphology of the ventral bar, however, differed between specimens from both rivers: worms from Nautla all had long, rounded processes on the ventral bar, which formed a relatively closed angle with the dorsal edge of the bar proper, while most - but not all - specimens from La Antigua had comparatively slender processes forming a more open angle with respect to the ventral bar. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of the ITS1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2 of gyrodactylids indicated the existence of two distinct, well-supported lineages whose sequences differ by >4%, one of which was only found in the Nautla basin, while the other was collected in both river systems. A posteriori, principal component analysis (PCA) of the morphometric data of sequenced specimens indicated that features of the dorsal bar, the hamuli and the ventral bar enable discrimination between the two phylogenetic lineages. Based on these independent sources of information (morphometric and molecular data), two new species of Gyrodactylus are described: Gyrodactyluspakan n. sp. and Gyrodactylusteken n. sp. The phylogenetic relationships of

  9. Parasite transmission in social interacting hosts: Monogenean epidemics in guppies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mirelle B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection incidence increases with the average number of contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. Contact rates are normally assumed to increase linearly with host density. However, social species seek out each other at low density and saturate their contact rates at high densities. Although predicting epidemic behaviour requires knowing how contact rates scale with host density, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of host density. Also, most theory assumes each host has an equal probability of transmitting parasites, even though individual parasite load and infection duration can vary. To our knowledge, the relative importance of characteristics of the primary infected host vs. the susceptible population has never been tested experimentally. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we examine epidemics using a common ectoparasite, Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting its guppy host (Poecilia reticulata). Hosts were maintained at different densities (3, 6, 12 and 24 fish in 40 L aquaria), and we monitored gyrodactylids both at a population and individual host level. Although parasite population size increased with host density, the probability of an epidemic did not. Epidemics were more likely when the primary infected fish had a high mean intensity and duration of infection. Epidemics only occurred if the primary infected host experienced more than 23 worm days. Female guppies contracted infections sooner than males, probably because females have a higher propensity for shoaling. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that in social hosts like guppies, the frequency of social contact largely governs disease epidemics independent of host density.

  10. Parasite transmission in social interacting hosts: monogenean epidemics in guppies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirelle B Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection incidence increases with the average number of contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. Contact rates are normally assumed to increase linearly with host density. However, social species seek out each other at low density and saturate their contact rates at high densities. Although predicting epidemic behaviour requires knowing how contact rates scale with host density, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of host density. Also, most theory assumes each host has an equal probability of transmitting parasites, even though individual parasite load and infection duration can vary. To our knowledge, the relative importance of characteristics of the primary infected host vs. the susceptible population has never been tested experimentally. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we examine epidemics using a common ectoparasite, Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting its guppy host (Poecilia reticulata. Hosts were maintained at different densities (3, 6, 12 and 24 fish in 40 L aquaria, and we monitored gyrodactylids both at a population and individual host level. Although parasite population size increased with host density, the probability of an epidemic did not. Epidemics were more likely when the primary infected fish had a high mean intensity and duration of infection. Epidemics only occurred if the primary infected host experienced more than 23 worm days. Female guppies contracted infections sooner than males, probably because females have a higher propensity for shoaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that in social hosts like guppies, the frequency of social contact largely governs disease epidemics independent of host density.

  11. Parasites as biological tags of marine, freshwater and anadromous fishes in North America from the Tropics to the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcogliese, David J; Jacobson, Kym C

    2015-01-01

    Parasites have been considered as natural biological tags of marine fish populations in North America for almost 75 years. In the Northwest Atlantic, the most studied species include Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and the redfishes (Sebastes spp.). In the North Pacific, research has centred primarily on salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.). However, parasites have been applied as tags for numerous other pelagic and demersal species on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Relatively few studies have been undertaken in the Arctic, and these were designed to discriminate anadromous and resident salmonids (Salvelinus spp.). Although rarely applied in fresh waters, parasites have been used to delineate certain fish stocks within the Great Lakes-St Lawrence River basin. Anisakid nematodes and the copepod Sphyrion lumpi frequently prove useful indicators in the Northwest Atlantic, while myxozoan parasites prove very effective on the coast and open seas of the Pacific Ocean. Relative differences in the ability of parasites to discriminate between fish stocks on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts may be due to oceanographic and bathymetric differences between regions. Molecular techniques used to differentiate populations and species of parasites show promise in future applications in the field.

  12. Mucins as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in a fish-parasite model: transcriptional and functional analysis.

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    Jaume Pérez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Mucins are O-glycosylated glycoproteins present on the apex of all wet-surfaced epithelia with a well-defined expression pattern, which is disrupted in response to a wide range of injuries or challenges. The aim of this study was to identify mucin gene sequences of gilthead sea bream (GSB, to determine its pattern of distribution in fish tissues and to analyse their transcriptional regulation by dietary and pathogenic factors. Exhaustive search of fish mucins was done in GSB after de novo assembly of next-generation sequencing data hosted in the IATS transcriptome database (www.nutrigroup-iats.org/seabreamdb. Six sequences, three categorized as putative membrane-bound mucins and three putative secreted-gel forming mucins, were identified. The transcriptional tissue screening revealed that Muc18 was the predominant mucin in skin, gills and stomach of GSB. In contrast, Muc19 was mostly found in the oesophagus and Muc13 was along the entire intestinal tract, although the posterior intestine exhibited a differential pattern with a high expression of an isoform that does not share a clear orthologous in mammals. This mucin was annotated as intestinal mucin (I-Muc. Its RNA expression was highly regulated by the nutritional background, whereas the other mucins, including Muc2 and Muc2-like, were expressed more constitutively and did not respond to high replacement of fish oil (FO by vegetable oils (VO in plant protein-based diets. After challenge with the intestinal parasite Enteromyxum leei, the expression of a number of mucins was decreased mainly in the posterior intestine of infected fish. But, interestingly, the highest down-regulation was observed for the I-Muc. Overall, the magnitude of the changes reflected the intensity and progression of the infection, making mucins and I-Muc, in particular, reliable markers of prognostic and diagnostic value of fish intestinal health.

  13. Mercury accumulation in Mediterranean Fish and Cephalopods Species of Sicilian coasts: correlation between pollution and the presence of Anisakis parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graci, Stefania; Collura, Rosaria; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Buscemi, Maria Drussilla; Giangrosso, Giuseppe; Principato, Deborah; Gervasi, Teresa; Cicero, Nicola; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate mercury accumulation in some species, caught in Mediterranean Sea, in the period between May and December 2015, and to compare it to the presence of Anisakis parasites. The samples were examined by direct mercury analyzer (DMA-80) for their Hg levels. The metal concentration was compared to the presence or the absence of Anisakis parasites. Significant differences in Hg concentration in analysed samples were observed. The low-infested fishes contained 1-6 larvae of parasites whereas the high-infested one had 7-83 larvae.

  14. The patterns of organisation and structure of interactions in a fish-parasite network of a neotropical river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellay, Sybelle; Oliveira, Edson F de; Almeida-Neto, Mário; Abdallah, Vanessa D; Azevedo, Rodney K de; Takemoto, Ricardo M; Luque, José L

    2015-07-01

    The use of the complex network approach to study host-parasite interactions has helped to improve the understanding of the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. In this study, this network approach is applied to evaluate the patterns of organisation and structure of interactions in a fish-parasite network of a neotropical Atlantic Forest river. The network includes 20 fish species and 73 metazoan parasite species collected from the Guandu River, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. According to the usual measures in studies of networks, the organisation of the network was evaluated using measures of host susceptibility, parasite dependence, interaction asymmetry, species strength and complementary specialisation of each species as well as the network. The network structure was evaluated using connectance, nestedness and modularity measures. Host susceptibility typically presented low values, whereas parasite dependence was high. The asymmetry and species strength were correlated with host taxonomy but not with parasite taxonomy. Differences among parasite taxonomic groups in the complementary specialisation of each species on hosts were also observed. However, the complementary specialisation and species strength values were not correlated. The network had a high complementary specialisation, low connectance and nestedness, and high modularity, thus indicating variability in the roles of species in the network organisation and the expected presence of many specialist species.

  15. A Review of Some Parasite Diseases of African Fish Gut Lumen Protozoa, Coccidioses, Cryptosporidium Infections, Haemoprotozoa, Haemosporidia

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    A.A. Ekubo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of some parasite diseases of African fish: Gut lumen protozoa, coccidioses, cryptosporidium infections, haemoprotozoa, haemosporidia was carried out from some existing literature to provide fish culturists and the public sector information on some challenges faced in culture fisheries. The Description, taxonomy, diagnosis Life cycles, biology, Epizootiology and control, Protozoans of the gut lumen, Coccidioses, Cryptosporidium Infections, Haemoprotozoa (Haemoflagellates, Haemosporidia - Dactylosoma and Hemogregarines are reviewed in this study.

  16. Patterns of variation in parasite component communities and infracommunities of a littoral fish species from the northern coast of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Vania; González, M Teresa

    2014-03-01

    The structure and similarity of the parasite communities of fish can be evaluated at the component community (CC) and infracommunity (IC) levels. Both hierarchical levels have been used to assess parasite variations in fish at large (biogeographic) scales. However, studies evaluating the consistency between these two hierarchical levels at smaller geographical scales are scarce. In this study, the parasite assemblages of 124 Paralabrax humeralis collected by local fishermen by spear fishing at four sites (El Fierro, EF; P. Angamos, PA; Santa María, ISM; San Jorge, BSJ) in northern Chile were compared to assess the variability (or similarity) of their CCs and ICs at a limited geographical scale using multivariate analysis. At the IC level, discriminant analyses showed that P. humeralis parasite communities varied significantly among sites; 70% of ectoparasite ICs were correctly assigned to each site, but only 55% of helminth parasite ICs were correctly classified. At the CC level, the composition of parasite communities as assessed by correspondence analyses varied significantly between sites. Tagia sp., Neobenedenia sp. and Philometra sp. were associated with BSJ, ISM and PA, respectively; Corynosoma sp. and most digeneans were associated with both ISM and EF. Analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) showed significant variations in the degree of similarity between P. humeralis CCs from different sites, but not between ICs. Variations between CCs from different sites reflect fish population processes (e.g., population age, reproductive segregation) and the particular conditions of their respective habitats, whereas ICs reflect individual host movements. This study demonstrated that, when examined at a limited geographical scale, IC is better than CC at capturing the local pool of parasite assemblages when host populations are spatially segregated. Therefore, in this study, it is demonstrated that at a small geographic scale, CC variations are not reflected by IC, when

  17. Structure and Dynamics of the French upper Rhône ecosystems XII. An inventory of helminth fish parasites from the upper Rhône river (France)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, van Marion J.

    1979-01-01

    Eleven species of helminth parasites (five acanthocephalans, five cestodes and one trematode) are reported from altogether sixteen fish hosts in the Rhône River, N.E. of Lyon. The most common parasite is Pomphorhynchus laevis, which occurs in all fish species examined. Echinorhynchus borealis seems

  18. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies on epidermal responses in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. induced by Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walter; Evensen, O.; Larsen, Thomas Bjerre;

    2010-01-01

    salmon, and IL-10 may play a role in this regard. It can be hypothesized that resistant salmon regulate the parasite population by restricting nutrients (sloughed epithelial cells and associated material) and thereby starve the parasites. In association with this ‘scorchedearth strategy’, the production......Various strains of Atlantic salmon exhibit different levels of susceptibility to infections with the ectoparasitic monogenean Gyrodactylus salaris. The basic mechanisms involved in this differential ability to respond to this monogenean were elucidated using controlled and duplicated challenge...

  19. Parasites of the deep-sea fish Mora moro (Risso, 1810) from the NW Mediterranean Sea and relationship with fish diet and enzymatic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallarés, Sara; Constenla, María; Padrós, Francesc; Cartes, Joan E.; Solé, Montse; Carrassón, Maite

    2014-10-01

    Specimens of Mora moro were collected in two seasons and three localities of the Balearic Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea) and parasitological, dietary (to prey-species level), enzymatic and histological data were obtained, alongside with environmental information (T, S, O2). The relationships among fish parasite load, condition indices, diet, enzymatic activity of muscular acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intensity of splenic melano-macrophage centres (MMC) and hepatic granulomas were tested. M. moro showed a rich and abundant parasite fauna, and was a new host record for 17 out of the 18 different endoparasite taxa found. Significant differences were detected among locality-season groups, in turn related to different environmental variables, for Anisakidae gen. sp., Anisakis Type II and Tetraphyllidea fam. gen. sp.; thus, they are proposed as potentially useful as biological tags for geographical discrimination of M. moro in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Detailed relationships were found between parasite taxa and prey ingested (e.g. Anisakidae gen. sp. related with meso-bathypelagic crustaceans; Anisakis Type I with benthopelagic squids). Most parasites were linked to samples with highest levels of near-bottom O2, which is consistent with direct relationships found between near-bottom O2 and zooplankton biomass in the Balearic Basin. Total parasite abundance and the abundance of Tetraphyllidea fam. gen. sp. showed a significant relationship with the activity of AChE and the abundance of Anisakis Type II with LDH. AChE was associated with hepatosomatic index (HSI) and condition factor (K); LDH with gonadosomatic index (GSI), K and fish total length (TL). LDH activity showed differences among sampling groups. Splenic MMC and hepatic granulomas were not associated with fish parasite load. A positive relationship was found between MMC area and fish TL and LDH activity.

  20. Histopathological study of parasitic infestation of skin and gill on Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus and discus (Symphysodon discus

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    Forough Mohammadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Histopathology provides a rapid method to detect effects of irritants and pathogens in different organs and it can be considered as theindicator for abnormal condition for fish environment. The present study was initiated to record the histopathological lesions of gill and skinassociated with external parasites in two common aquarium fish, Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus and Discus (Symphysodon discus fish. TwentyOscar and twenty Discus were obtained from aquarium shops and wet mount was prepared from skin and gill mucosa and histopathologicalstudy was performed on tissue samples of gills and skin on tissue sections which were stained with haematoxilin-eosin. Based on the results,Dactylogyrus sp. was the most prevalent parasites in Oscar and Discus fish. Ichthyophthirius multifliis, Trichodina sp. and Gyrodactylus sp.,Epistylis sp. and Vorticella sp. were seen in the skin and gill of fish. In histopathological examination, fusion of secondary lamella associatedwith hyperplasia, aneurysm, edema, purulent bronchitis were seen. Sections of Ichthyobodo sp. and purulent bronchitis are rare and in skin.Dermatitis was observed. Histopathological lesions in Oscar were in high rate in comparison with lesions which were seen in Discus and theyare in relation to parasitic infestation.

  1. Parasite communities of the predatory fish, Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris, living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon

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    Maria Danielle Figueiredo Guimarães Hoshino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the parasite communities of wild Acestrorhynchus falcatus and Acestrorhynchus falcirostris populations living in sympatry in Brazilian Amazon. In these two hosts, a total of 12 parasite species e 1-9 parasite species were found per fish, and 10 of these species are metazoans. Eight species of parasites were common to both host species and four of them exhibited differences in abundance and/or prevalence. Parasite communities of the hosts were taxonomically similar (83% and composed of both ectoparasites and endoparasites, and characterized by high prevalence and high abundance of endoparasites and an aggregated dispersion pattern. For A. falcirostris, the dominant parasite was Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, and for A. falcatus, it was Piscinoodinium pillulare. Shannon diversity and Berger-Parker dominance were similar for both hosts, while the parasites species richness and evenness showed differences influenced by the ectoparasites species. These two populations of hosts that inhabited the same geographical area had different sizes, but were exposed to the same infective stages, and acquired qualitatively and quantitatively similar endoparasites community, thus indicating that the amounts and types of prey congeneric that they were eating were similar. Therefore, the overlap in the same occurrence area play an important role in the parasite communities to these phylogenetically related hosts.

  2. Pathological Studies on the Small Intestine of Wild Rabbit Fish (Siganus Rivulatus) Infected by Helminthes Parasite (Procamallanus Sp) in Red Sea Coast Area, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Salah Eldeen Y.M.H; Omer F. Idris; Murwan K. Sabahelkhier

    2012-01-01

    Wild rabbit fish (Siganus rivulatus) Forsskål (Teleostei, Siganidae) herbivores fish were collected from two sites (Dongnab and Swakin) on Sudanese Red Sea Coast during February 2010 - January 2011 and then examine for helminthes parasites. Microscopic anatomy of intestine with worms and without worms compared to each other. Helminth parasites belong to Procamallanus sp. The abundance of lymphocytes cell, eosinphils, red blood cells and goblet cells in parasitized intestine was significantly ...

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterisation of a cathepsin L-like proteinases from the fish kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a fish kinetoplastid parasite that belongs to the family Trypanosomatida. In the present study we cloned a cathepsin L-like proteinase from T. carassii. The nucleotide sequence of 1371 bp translated into a preproprotein of 456 amino acids. The preproprotein contained the oxya

  4. Acanthocephala, Annelida, Arthropoda, Myxozoa, Nematoda and Platyhelminthes parasites of fishes from the Guandu river, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using information from all published reports and data collected during several parasitological surveys betweenApril 2003 and September 2009, a checklist of the parasites of fishes from Guandu River, southeastern of Brazil wasgenerated. A total of 85 parasite species, 54 named species (1 Acanthocephala, 1 Cestoda, 2 Crustacea, 13 Digenea, 11Nematoda, 23 Monogenea and 3 Myxozoa and 31 undetermined species (3 Acanthocephala, 2 Cestoda, 1 Crustacea, 8Digenea, 8 Nematoda, 4 Hirudinea, 3 Monogenea and 2 Myxozoa in 21 fish host species from Guandu River, were listed inthe current study, including 36 new locality records and 36 new host records. Also, a host-parasite list is included herein.

  5. Diversity and Universality of Endosymbiotic Rickettsia in the Fish Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaila, Kassandra E; Doak, Thomas G; Ellerbrock, Hannah; Tung, Che-Huang; Martins, Mauricio L; Kolbin, Daniel; Yao, Meng-Chao; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Clark, Theodore G; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Although the presence of endosymbiotic rickettsial bacteria, specifically Candidatus Megaira, has been reported in diverse habitats and a wide range of eukaryotic hosts, it remains unclear how broadly Ca. Megaira are distributed in a single host species. In this study we seek to address whether Ca. Megaira are present in most, if not all isolates, of the parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Conserved regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were either PCR amplified, or assembled from deep sequencing data, from 18 isolates/populations of I. multifiliis sampled worldwide (Brazil, Taiwan, and USA). We found that rickettsial rRNA sequences belonging to three out of four Ca. Megaira subclades could be consistently detected in all I. multifiliis samples. I. multifiliis collected from local fish farms tend to be inhabited by the same subclade of Ca. Megaira, whereas those derived from pet fish are often inhabited by more than one subclade of Ca. Megaira. Distributions of Ca. Megaira in I. multifiliis thus better reflect the travel history, but not the phylogeny, of I. multifiliis. In summary, our results suggest that I. multifiliis may be dependent on this endosymbiotic relationship, and the association between Ca. Megaira and I. multifiliis is more diverse than previously thought.

  6. Diversity and Universality of Endosymbiotic Rickettsia in the Fish Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaila, Kassandra E.; Doak, Thomas G.; Ellerbrock, Hannah; Tung, Che-Huang; Martins, Mauricio L.; Kolbin, Daniel; Yao, Meng-Chao; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M.; Clark, Theodore G.; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Although the presence of endosymbiotic rickettsial bacteria, specifically Candidatus Megaira, has been reported in diverse habitats and a wide range of eukaryotic hosts, it remains unclear how broadly Ca. Megaira are distributed in a single host species. In this study we seek to address whether Ca. Megaira are present in most, if not all isolates, of the parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Conserved regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were either PCR amplified, or assembled from deep sequencing data, from 18 isolates/populations of I. multifiliis sampled worldwide (Brazil, Taiwan, and USA). We found that rickettsial rRNA sequences belonging to three out of four Ca. Megaira subclades could be consistently detected in all I. multifiliis samples. I. multifiliis collected from local fish farms tend to be inhabited by the same subclade of Ca. Megaira, whereas those derived from pet fish are often inhabited by more than one subclade of Ca. Megaira. Distributions of Ca. Megaira in I. multifiliis thus better reflect the travel history, but not the phylogeny, of I. multifiliis. In summary, our results suggest that I. multifiliis may be dependent on this endosymbiotic relationship, and the association between Ca. Megaira and I. multifiliis is more diverse than previously thought. PMID:28232825

  7. The evolution of bourgeois, parasitic, and cooperative reproductive behaviors in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborsky, M

    2001-01-01

    Among vertebrate classes, fishes exhibit by far the greatest variability in competitive and cooperative behaviors in male reproduction. Scramble competition between reproductive males is one possibility. Another possibility occurs when resources, mates, or locations can be monopolized, in which case males may invest in primary access to fertilizations by adopting a "bourgeois" strategy, or they may employ alternative mating tactics to evade the reproductive monopoly of other males. Adaptations in morphology, physiology, and behavior to bourgeois and alternative phenotypes are highly divergent. Here I review the functional characteristics that differ between bourgeois and parasitic phenotypes, and discuss the variability of alternative reproductive tactics at the levels of plasticity, determination, and selection. Examples will illustrate the importance of ecology, and will suggest that variation in reproductive tactics is largely adaptive. Behavioral solutions to competition for mates and fertilizations often involve agonistic behavior and conflict, but also cooperation among competitors (e.g., when subordinate males pay a price to bourgeois males for gaining access to fertilizable eggs). Application of molecular genetic tools has helped to uncover intricate sexual and social relationships in various fish species, including species that display some of the most complex reproductive and social patterns known among the vertebrates.

  8. Co-Speciation of the Ectoparasite Gyrodactylus teuchis (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) and Its Salmonid Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Weiss, Steven J; Stojanovski, Stojmir; Bachmann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Co-speciation is a fundamental concept of evolutionary biology and intuitively appealing, yet in practice hard to demonstrate as it is often blurred by other evolutionary processes. We investigate the phylogeographic history of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus teuchis and G. truttae on European salmonids of the genus Salmo. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 were sequenced for 189 Gyrodactylus individuals collected from 50 localities, distributed across most major European river systems, from the Iberian- to the Balkan Peninsula. Despite both anthropogenic and naturally caused admixture of the principal host lineages among major river basins, co-phylogenetic analyses revealed significant global congruence for host and parasite phylogenies, providing firm support for co-speciation of G. teuchis and its salmonid hosts brown trout (S. trutta) and Atlantic salmon (S. salar). The major split within G. teuchis, coinciding with the initial divergence of the hosts was dated to ~1.5 My BP, using a Bayesian framework based on an indirect calibration point obtained from the host phylogeny. The presence of G. teuchis in Europe thus predates some of the major Pleistocene glaciations. In contrast, G. truttae exhibited remarkably low intraspecific genetic diversity. Given the direct life cycle and potentially high transmission potential of gyrodactylids, this finding is interpreted as indication for a recent emergence (<60 ky BP) of G. truttae via a host-switch. Our study thus suggests that instances of two fundamentally different mechanisms of speciation (co-speciation vs. host-switching) may have occurred on the same hosts in Europe within a time span of less than 1.5 My in two gyrodactylid ectoparasite species.

  9. Co-Speciation of the Ectoparasite Gyrodactylus teuchis (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes and Its Salmonid Hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hahn

    Full Text Available Co-speciation is a fundamental concept of evolutionary biology and intuitively appealing, yet in practice hard to demonstrate as it is often blurred by other evolutionary processes. We investigate the phylogeographic history of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus teuchis and G. truttae on European salmonids of the genus Salmo. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 were sequenced for 189 Gyrodactylus individuals collected from 50 localities, distributed across most major European river systems, from the Iberian- to the Balkan Peninsula. Despite both anthropogenic and naturally caused admixture of the principal host lineages among major river basins, co-phylogenetic analyses revealed significant global congruence for host and parasite phylogenies, providing firm support for co-speciation of G. teuchis and its salmonid hosts brown trout (S. trutta and Atlantic salmon (S. salar. The major split within G. teuchis, coinciding with the initial divergence of the hosts was dated to ~1.5 My BP, using a Bayesian framework based on an indirect calibration point obtained from the host phylogeny. The presence of G. teuchis in Europe thus predates some of the major Pleistocene glaciations. In contrast, G. truttae exhibited remarkably low intraspecific genetic diversity. Given the direct life cycle and potentially high transmission potential of gyrodactylids, this finding is interpreted as indication for a recent emergence (<60 ky BP of G. truttae via a host-switch. Our study thus suggests that instances of two fundamentally different mechanisms of speciation (co-speciation vs. host-switching may have occurred on the same hosts in Europe within a time span of less than 1.5 My in two gyrodactylid ectoparasite species.

  10. The colonization of the invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus by parasites in new localities in the southwestern Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvach, Yuriy; Winkler, Helmut M

    2011-09-01

    The round goby Neogobius melanostomus is a bottom-dwelling fish native for the Ponto-Caspian basin, which started to colonize the Baltic Sea since 1991. The parasites of this fish species in the southwestern Baltic region are studied for the first time. The round goby in the SW Baltic Sea was infected with 12 parasite species: 1 species of Microsporidia, 1 species of Monogenea, 1 of Cestoda, 3 species of Trematoda, 3 species of Nematoda, 2 of Acanthocephala, and 1 species of Bivalvia. Microsporidia genus species have the great tendency to join the infracommunity in all localities, except the Stettiner Haff, where this tendency have Diplostomum spathaceum met and Unio sp. glochidia. The round goby was colonized by seven new parasites species not found in this fish in the Baltic Sea earlier: Microsporidia gen. sp., Gyrodactylus rugiensis, Bucephalus polymorphus, Cosmocephalus obvelatus L3, Eustrongylides excisus L3, Paracuaria adunca L3, Unio sp. glochidia. Microsporidia gen. sp., G. rugiensis, and Unio sp. are new parasites for the round goby. In general, the processes of colonization have the same tendency as in the Gulf of Gdańsk.

  11. Gyrodactylus salinae n. sp. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea infecting the south European toothcarp Aphanius fasciatus (Valenciennes (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae from a hypersaline environment in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyse Tine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Historically, non-native species of Gambusia (Poeciliidae have been used to control larval stages of the Asian tiger mosquito, Stegomyia albopicta Reinert, Harbach et Kitching, 2004 throughout Italy. The potential utility of indigenous populations of Aphanius fasciatus (Valenciennes (Teleostei: Cyprinodontidae as an appropriate alternative biological control is currently being explored. A sub-sample of ten fish collected from Cervia Saline, Italy (salinity 65 ppt; 30°C to assess their reproductive capability in captivity, harboured a moderate infection of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea. A subsequent morphological and molecular study identified this as being a new species. Results Gyrodactylus salinae n. sp. is described from the skin, fins and gills of A. fasciatus. Light and scanning electron microscopical (SEM examination of the opisthaptoral armature and their comparison with all other recorded species suggested morphological similarities to Gyrodactylus rugiensoides Huyse et Volckaert, 2002 from Pomatoschistus minutus (Pallas. Features of the ventral bar, however, permit its discrimination from G. rugiensoides. Sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene and a comparison with all species listed in GenBank confirmed they are unique and represent a new species (most similar to Gyrodactylus anguillae Ergens, 1960, 8.3% pair-wise distance based on 5.8S+ITS2. This represents the first species of Gyrodactylus to be described from Aphanius and, to date, has the longest ITS1 (774 bp sequenced from any Gyrodactylus. Additional sampling of Cervia Saline throughout the year, found G. salinae n. sp. to persist in conditions ranging from 35 ppt and 5°C in December to 65 ppt and 30°C in July, while in captivity a low level of infection was present, even in freshwater conditions (0 ppt. Conclusions The ability of G. salinae n. sp. to tolerate a wide

  12. Gyrodactylus salinae n. sp. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) infecting the south European toothcarp Aphanius fasciatus (Valenciennes) (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from a hypersaline environment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Giuseppe; Huyse, Tine; Shinn, Andrew P

    2011-06-09

    Historically, non-native species of Gambusia (Poeciliidae) have been used to control larval stages of the Asian tiger mosquito, Stegomyia albopicta Reinert, Harbach et Kitching, 2004 throughout Italy. The potential utility of indigenous populations of Aphanius fasciatus (Valenciennes) (Teleostei: Cyprinodontidae) as an appropriate alternative biological control is currently being explored. A sub-sample of ten fish collected from Cervia Saline, Italy (salinity 65 ppt; 30°C) to assess their reproductive capability in captivity, harboured a moderate infection of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea). A subsequent morphological and molecular study identified this as being a new species. Gyrodactylus salinae n. sp. is described from the skin, fins and gills of A. fasciatus. Light and scanning electron microscopical (SEM) examination of the opisthaptoral armature and their comparison with all other recorded species suggested morphological similarities to Gyrodactylus rugiensoides Huyse et Volckaert, 2002 from Pomatoschistus minutus (Pallas). Features of the ventral bar, however, permit its discrimination from G. rugiensoides. Sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 and the 5.8S rRNA gene and a comparison with all species listed in GenBank confirmed they are unique and represent a new species (most similar to Gyrodactylus anguillae Ergens, 1960, 8.3% pair-wise distance based on 5.8S+ITS2). This represents the first species of Gyrodactylus to be described from Aphanius and, to date, has the longest ITS1 (774 bp) sequenced from any Gyrodactylus. Additional sampling of Cervia Saline throughout the year, found G. salinae n. sp. to persist in conditions ranging from 35 ppt and 5°C in December to 65 ppt and 30°C in July, while in captivity a low level of infection was present, even in freshwater conditions (0 ppt). The ability of G. salinae n. sp. to tolerate a wide range of salinities and temperatures shows its

  13. Variation in the parasite community of the sardine fish Triportheus nematurus (Actinopterygii: Characidae) from the Medalha lagoon in the Pantanal wetland, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Pereira, R; Paiva, F; Tavares, L E R

    2014-09-01

    In July 2009 and July 2010 (two dry periods separated by an atypically large flood in the Pantanal wetland of Brazil), 34 and 33 specimens of the sardine fish Triportheus nematurus were collected, respectively, for the study of the metazoan parasite community of this species. Parasite ecological and community descriptors were calculated for both host samples, and possible similarities were tested statistically. Five species of metazoan parasites were identified, four of which were common to both host samples. A total of 61 metazoan parasites were collected from all fish hosts (17 specimens in July 2009 (mean: 0.5 ± 0.66 parasites/fish) and 44 specimens in July 2010 (mean: 1.33 ± 1.41 parasites/fish)). The nematode Procamallanus hilarii and the monogenean Anacanthorus sp. were the most prevalent and abundant species in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The mean total abundance and species richness were significantly higher in 2010. Parasite communities in both samples of T. nematurus were characterized by species with low prevalence, abundance, mean total abundance and species richness, thus indicating low parasite diversity. Significant differences in the prevalence and abundance of P. hilarii and Anacanthorus sp. between the two samples allowed the discrimination of infracommunities, which were united in two distinct groups. This appears to be the first evidence that the peculiar hydrological dynamics of the southern Pantanal wetland (Brazil) exert an important influence over the structure of the parasite community.

  14. An outbreak of myxozoan parasites in farmed freshwater fish Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier, 1818 (Characidae, Serrasalminae in the Amazon region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Videira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum is a native fish species that is farmed most frequently and in the largest quantities throughout Brazil. The high production of this species from fish farms has contributed to the occurrence of emerging parasites, which may compromise fish health and productivity. In a batch of 2500 tambaqui fry acquired for experimental farming procedures in Brazil, a mortality rate of 80% was observed, with the fish swimming erratically and gasping for air at the water surface. From among the specimens that were still alive, 60 individuals were selected at random. Organs or fragments of organs containing lesions and/or cysts were examined under an optical microscope to investigate for the presence of parasitic spores. Of the 60 specimens of tambaqui analyzed, 83.3% were found to be infected in different organs, such as the gills, liver, and gallbladder with myxosporidian species belonging to four genera, namely, Myxobolus, Ellipsomyxa, Henneguya and Thelohanellus. The parasite with the greatest prevalence was Myxobolus sp., located in the gills (70%, followed by Henneguya sp. in the gills region (68.3%, Myxobolus sp. in the liver (63.3%, Thelohanellus sp. in the liver (58.3%, and Ellipsomyxa in the gallbladder (50%. This is the first report of parasitic infection caused by the genera Ellipsomyxa and Thelohanellus in C. macropomum. The present study reported the second incidence of the occurrence of the genus Thelohanellus in South America. This study suggested that the mortality among C. macropomum specimens was caused by the outbreak of myxosporidians.

  15. The BMB/ICES sea-going workshop "Fish diseases and parasites in the Baltic sea" - introduction and conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, T.; Mellergaard, Stig

    1999-01-01

    General information on the rationale and objectives of the BMB/ICES Sea-going Workshop "Fish Diseases and Parasites in the Baltic Sea" (25 November to 8 December 1994), as well as cruise and methodological information, is presented as an introduction to a set of right contributions that describe...... the different studies carried out. Some main conclusions in relation to the objectives and results are highlighted. (C) 1999 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea....

  16. Metazoan parasites of deep-sea fishes from the South Eastern Pacific: Exploring the role of ecology and host phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñacari, Luis A.; Oliva, Marcelo E.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the parasite fauna of five deep-sea fish species (>1000 m depth), Three members of Macrouridae (Macrourus holotrachys, Coryphaenoides ariommus and Coelorhynchus sp.), the Morid Antimora rostrata and the Synaphobranchidae Diaptobranchus capensis caught as by-catch of the Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) from central and northern Chile at depths between 1000 and 2000 m. The parasite fauna of M. holotrachys was the most diverse, with 32 species (The higher reported for Macrourus spp.) and the lower occur in the basketwork eel D. capensis (one species). Trophically transmitted parasites, mainly Digenea and Nematoda explain 59.1% of the total number of species obtained (44 species) and the 81.1% of the 1020 specimens collected. Similarity analysis based on prevalence as well as a Correspondence analysis shows that higher similitude in parasite fauna occurs in members of Macrouridae. The importance of diet and phylogeny is discussed as forces behind the characteristics of the endoparasite and ectoparasite communities found in the studied fish species.

  17. cDNA expression library screening and identification of two novel antigens, ubiquitin and receptor for activated C kinase (RACK) homologue, of the fish parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruszczyk, A.; Joerink, M.; Guldenaar, C.; Hermsen, G.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a kinetoplastid parasite infecting cyprinid fish with a high prevalence in nature. Antibodies have been shown to play a protective role in the immune response against this parasite in common carp, Cyprinus carpio. To identify immunogenic and putative protective T. carassii an

  18. Effects of a parasitic nematode on male mate choice in a livebearing fish with a coercive mating system (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Raelynn

    2009-01-01

    I examined the effects of the parasitic larval nematode, Eustrongylides ignotus, on male mate choice in the western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis. I hypothesized that parasite presence influences male mate choice either directly (via reduction in male mating behavior due to presence of parasite in females) or indirectly (via reduction in male mating behavior due to reduced condition of infected females). Specifically, I tested the predictions that (1) males would mate preferentially with uninfected over infected females (scoring both mating attempts and association time with females); (2) parasitized females would be in poorer condition than non-parasitized females (measured as soluble fat stores); and (3) parasitized females would have reduced fecundity (measured as number of developing embryos). Males preferred to mate with non-parasitized over parasitized females, but showed no differences in association time between females. The nematode did not decrease female body condition, but did decrease female mass, and appeared to decrease female fecundity via reduction in broods (# embryos). Results support that parasites affect male mate choice in mosquitofish; however, the mechanisms used by males to differentiate between parasitized and non-parasitized females remain untested. This study provides the first empirical evidence of parasite affects on male mate choice in livebearing fishes, and suggest a potentially important role for parasite-mediated sexual selection in organisms that use coercive mating as the primary mechanism of obtaining mates.

  19. Occurrence of parasites of the genus Eustrongylides spp. (Nematoda: Dioctophymatidae in fish caught in Trasimeno lake, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Branciari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Eustrongylides spp. is considered a freshwater fish zoonotic nematode. In the present study, the prevalence of Eustrongylides spp. in six edible fish (European perch - Perca fluviatilis, goldfish - Carassius auratus, largemouth black bass - Micropterus salmoides, tench- Tinca tinca, carp - Cyprinus carpio and sand smelt - Atherina boyeri of Trasimeno lake was surveyed. The investigations were conducted from October 2014 to September 2015 and 384 specimens per species for each season were caught in Trasimeno lake and examined for the presence of larvae in the abdominal cavity and muscle. The presence of nematodes in the abdominal cavity and musculature was revealed in three fish species. The prevalence of Eustrongylides spp. infection was 6.84, 1.89 and 0.13% in perch, largemouth black bass and sand smelt, respectively. The number of parasites per fish was only one in largemouth black bass and sand smelt and ranged from one up to three in perch. This study states that the European perch, largemouth black bass and sand smelt of Trasimeno lake are infected with zoonotic parasites; therefore, food business operators have to take appropriate measures to guarantee the health of consumers.

  20. Occurrence of Parasites of the Genus Eustrongylides spp. (Nematoda: Dioctophymatidae) in Fish Caught in Trasimeno Lake, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciari, Raffaella; Ranucci, David; Miraglia, Dino; Valiani, Andrea; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Urbani, Eleonora; Lo Vaglio, Giovanni; Pascucci, Luisa; Franceschini, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Eustrongylides spp. is considered a freshwater fish zoonotic nematode. In the present study, the prevalence of Eustrongylides spp. in six edible fish (European perch - Perca fluviatilis, goldfish - Carassius auratus, largemouth black bass - Micropterus salmoides, tench- Tinca tinca, carp - Cyprinus carpio and sand smelt - Atherina boyeri) of Trasimeno lake was surveyed. The investigations were conducted from October 2014 to September 2015 and 384 specimens per species for each season were caught in Trasimeno lake and examined for the presence of larvae in the abdominal cavity and muscle. The presence of nematodes in the abdominal cavity and musculature was revealed in three fish species. The prevalence of Eustrongylides spp. infection was 6.84, 1.89 and 0.13% in perch, largemouth black bass and sand smelt, respectively. The number of parasites per fish was only one in largemouth black bass and sand smelt and ranged from one up to three in perch. This study states that the European perch, largemouth black bass and sand smelt of Trasimeno lake are infected with zoonotic parasites; therefore, food business operators have to take appropriate measures to guarantee the health of consumers. PMID:28058245

  1. Mitochondria-derived organelles in the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Coralie O M; Williams, Catrin F; Hayes, Anthony J; Hann, Anthony C; Cable, Joanne; Lloyd, David

    2013-10-01

    In some eukaryotes, mitochondria have become modified during evolution to yield derived organelles (MDOs) of a similar size (hydrogenosomes), or extremely reduced to produce tiny cellular vesicles (mitosomes). The current study provides evidence for the presence of MDOs in the highly infectious fish pathogen Spironucleus vortens, an organism that produces H₂ and is shown here to have no detectable cytochromes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that S. vortens trophozoites contain electron-dense, membranous structures sometimes with an electron-dense core (200 nm-1 μm), resembling the hydrogenosomes previously described in other protists from habitats deficient in O₂. Confocal microscopy establishes that these organelles exhibit autofluorescence emission spectra similar to flavoprotein constituents previously described for mitochondria and also present in hydrogenosomes. These organelles possess a membrane potential and are labelled by a fluorescently labeled antibody against Fe-hydrogenase from Blastocystis hominis. Heterologous antibodies raised to mitochondrial proteins frataxin and Isu1, also exhibit a discrete punctate pattern of localization in S. vortens; however these labelled structures are distinctly smaller (90-150 nm) than hydrogenosomes as observed previously in other organisms. TEM confirms the presence of double-membrane bounded organelles of this smaller size. In addition, strong background immunostaining occurs in the cytosol for frataxin and Isu1, and labelling by anti-ferredoxin antibody is generally distributed and not specifically localized except for at the anterior polar region. This suggests that some of the functions traditionally attributed to such MDOs may also occur elsewhere. The specialized parasitic life-style of S. vortens may necessitate more complex intracellular compartmentation of redox reactions than previously recognized. Control of infection requires biochemical characterization of redox-related organelles.

  2. Species richness and diversity of the parasites of two predatory fish species - perch (Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, 1758) and zander (Sander lucioperca Linnaeus, 1758) from the Pomeranian Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielat, Iwona; Legierko, Monika; Sobecka, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Pomeranian Bay as an ecotone is a transition zone between two different biocenoses, which is characterized by an increase in biodiversity and species density. Therefore, Pomeranian Bay is a destination of finding and reproductive migrations of fish from the rivers entered the area. The aim of the study was to compare parasitic fauna of two predatory fish species from the Pomeranian Bay, collected from the same fishing grounds at the same period. A total of 126 fish studied (53 perches and 73 zanders) were collected in the summer 2013. Parasitological examinations included: skin, fins, gills, vitreous humour and lens of the eye, mouth cavity, body cavity and internal organs. Apart from the prevalence and intensity of infection (mean, range) the parasite communities of both fish species were compared. European perch and zander were infected with parasites from five different taxonomic units. The most numerous parasites were Diplostomum spp. in European perch and Bucephalus polymorphus in zander. The prevalence of infection of European perch ranged from 5.7% (Diphyllobothrium latum) to 22.3% (Diplostomum spp.) and for zander from 1.4% (Ancyrocephalus paradoxus, Hysterothylacium aduncum) to 12.3% (Bucephalus polymorphus). Different composition of the parasitic fauna is likely due to the different biology of both fish species.

  3. Gene discovery in the freshwater fish parasite Trypanosoma carassii: identification of trans-sialidase-like and mucin-like genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüero, Fernán; Campo, Vanina; Cremona, Laura; Jäger, Adriana; Di Noia, Javier M; Overath, Peter; Sánchez, Daniel O; Frasch, Alberto Carlos

    2002-12-01

    A total of 1,921 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma carassii, a parasite of economic importance due to its high prevalence in fish farms. Analysis of the data set allowed us to identify a trans-sialidase (TS)-like gene and three ESTs coding for putative mucin-like genes. TS activity was detected in cell extracts of bloodstream trypomastigotes. We have also used the sequence information obtained to identify genes that have not been previously described in trypanosomatids. (Additional information on these ESTs can be found at http://genoma.unsam.edu.ar/projects/tca.)

  4. Diversity of monogenean parasites in belonid fishes off the Mediterranean Sea with redescription of Aspinatrium gallieniEuzet and Ktari, 1971 andAxine belonesAbildgaard, 1794

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manel Châari; Hela Derbel; Lassâd Neifar

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To provide informations on the diversity of Monogenea parasitizing belonid fishes from the Mediterranean Sea. Monogenean speciesAspinatrium gallieniEuzet and Ktari, 1971 (A. gallieni) and Axine belonesAbildgaard, 1794 (A. belones) from belonids Tylosurus acus imperialis Rafinesque, 1810 (T. a. imperialis) and Belone belone Lowe, 1839 (B. belone) off Tunisian coast were redescribed. Methods:During the sampling period between 2004 and 2009, a total of 624 belonid fish belonging to three species, 453 B. belone, 45 Belone svetovidoviCollette and Parin, 1970 and 126 T. a. imperialiswere investigated for monogenean parasites. Results: Five Polyopisthocotylean monogenean parasites species were founded infected belonid fishes from Tunisian coast. These are,Nudaciraxine imperium Châari, Derbel and Neifar, 2010,A. belones, Axinesp.,Axinoidessp. (Axinidae) andA. gallieni (Micrcotylidae). Among them, the most prevalent speciesA. gallieni from the inner gill cover and gill filaments of T. a. imperialisandA. belones from the gills of B. belone were redescribed.A. gallieni represented new host record for T. a. imperialis. A complete list of monogenean parasites found in belonid fishes from our study and those reported from the Mediterranean Sea was presented. Conclusions: This paper enhances the current knowledge of Monogenea infecting belonids off the Mediterranean Sea. It’s the first study on monogenean parasites of the overall belonid fishes off Tunisia.

  5. Diversity of monogenean parasites in belonid fishes off the Mediterranean Sea with redescription of Aspinatrium gallieni Euzet and Ktari, 1971 and Axine belones Abildgaard, 1794

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Châari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide informations on the diversity of Monogenea parasitizing belonid fishes from the Mediterranean Sea. Monogenean species Aspinatrium gallieni Euzet and Ktari, 1971 (A. gallieni and Axine belones Abildgaard, 1794 (A. belones from belonids Tylosurus acus imperialis Rafinesque, 1810 (T. a. imperialis and Belone belone Lowe, 1839 (B. belone off Tunisian coast were redescribed. Methods: During the sampling period between 2004 and 2009, a total of 624 belonid fish belonging to three species, 453 B. belone, 45 Belone svetovidovi Collette and Parin, 1970 and 126 T. a. imperialis were investigated for monogenean parasites. Results: Five Polyopisthocotylean monogenean parasites species were founded infected belonid fishes from Tunisian coast. These are, Nudaciraxine imperium Châari, Derbel and Neifar, 2010, A. belones, Axine sp., Axinoides sp. (Axinidae and A. gallieni (Micrcotylidae. Among them, the most prevalent species A. gallieni from the inner gill cover and gill filaments of T. a. imperialis and A. belones from the gills of B. belone were redescribed. A. gallieni represented new host record for T. a. imperialis. A complete list of monogenean parasites found in belonid fishes from our study and those reported from the Mediterranean Sea was presented. Conclusions: This paper enhances the current knowledge of Monogenea infecting belonids off the Mediterranean Sea. It’s the first study on monogenean parasites of the overall belonid fishes off Tunisia.

  6. Salinity of the Little Colorado River in Grand Canyon confers anti-parasitic properties on a native fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Water in the Little Colorado River within Grand Canyon is naturally high in salt (NaCl), which is known to prohibit development of external fish parasites such as Ich (Ichthyophthirius multifiliis). The naturally high salinity (>0.3%) of the Little Colorado River at baseflow may be one factor allowing survival and persistence of larval and juvenile humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other native fishes in Grand Canyon. We compared salinity readings from the Little Colorado River to those reported in the literature as being effective at removing protozoan parasites from fish. In laboratory tests, 10 juvenile roundtail chub (Gila robusta; 61–90 mm TL) were randomly placed into each of 12, 37-L aquaria filled with freshwater, water obtained from the Little Colorado River (0.3% salinity), or freshwater with table salt added until the salinity reached 0.3%. Roundtail chub was used as a surrogate for humpback chub in this study because the species is not listed as endangered but is morphologically and ecologically similar to humpback chub. All roundtail chub infected with Ich recovered and survived when placed in water from the Little Colorado River or water with 0.3% salinity, but all experimental fish placed in freshwater died because of Ich infection. The naturally high salinity of the Little Colorado River at baseflow (0.22%–0.36%), appears sufficiently high to interrupt the life cycle of Ich and may allow increased survival of larval and juvenile humpback chub relative to other areas within Grand Canyon.

  7. Infectious bacterial pathogens, parasites and pathological correlations of sewage pollution as an important threat to farmed fishes in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud A; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Mahdy, Olfat A; El Miniawy, Hala M F; Ahmed, Zakia A M; Osman, Ahmed H; Mohamed, Hussein M H; Khattab, A M; Zaki Ewiss, M A

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a part of a multi-disciplinary research "Application of Decentralized On-Site Water Treatment System in Egypt for Use in Agriculture and Producing Safe Fish and Animal Proteins". The project aimed to investigate the environmental impact of implementing sewage water before and after treatment using the effluent of the on-site decentralized Japanese' Johkasou system, in agriculture and producing fish protein. The aim is to establish such system in Egypt to strengthen the sanitary conditions of water resources. In the present study, the impact of the sewage pollution in some fish farms at El-Fayyum, Port Said and El-Dakahlia governorates in Egypt was carried out. Water and fish (Oreochromis niloticus and Mugil cephalus) samples were collected from private fish farms of such localities. Bacteriological and chemical examination of water samples revealed the existence of coliforms and many other bacterial species of significant human health hazards. The chemical parameters of water showed a marked deviation from normal levels while examination of fish flesh specimens indicated contamination with Streptococcus Sp., Staphylococcus Sp., and Salmonella in all examined localities. Other bacterial isolates of human health importance (Morganella morganii, Pseudomonas cepacia and Enterococcos durans) were identified. The parasitological examination revealed the presence of encysted metacercariae (EMC); Diplostomatidae, Prohemistomatidae and Heterphyidae. Moreover, two protozoan parasites (Mxyoboulus tilapiae and Ichthyophthirius multifilis) were also recorded. The histopathological examination revealed mild tissue reaction in case of bacterial infection and severe pathological lesions in different organs in case of EMC infection. Lamellar hyperplasia and mononuclear cell infiltration in branchial tissue was common findings. In skeletal muscles, atrophy of muscle fibres, myolysis and myophagia were detected.

  8. Description of the Microsporidian Parasite, Heterosporis sutherlandae n. sp., Infecting Fish in the Great Lakes Region, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B D Phelps

    Full Text Available Heterosporosis is an increasingly important microsporidian disease worldwide, impacting wild and farmed raised fishes in both marine and freshwater environments. A previously undescribed species (Heterosporis sp., with widespread distribution in the Great Lakes region, was the subject of this study. Three angler-caught fish were submitted to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory from 2009-2010 with lesions caused by intracellular proliferation of parasitic spores, resulting in destruction and eventual widespread necrosis of the host skeletal muscles. Mature ovoid (5.8 x 3.5 μm spores of a microsporidian parasite, consistent with the genus Heterosporis, were observed by light and electron microscopy. Molecular identification was performed using primer walking to obtain a near-complete rRNA gene sequence (~3,600 bp. A unique species of Heterosporis was identified, demonstrating less than 96% sequence identity to other published Heterosporis sp. on the basis of partial rRNA gene sequence analysis. Heterosporis sutherlandae n. sp. (formerly Heterosporis sp. was identified in yellow perch (Perca flavescens, northern pike (Esox lucius and walleye (Sander vitreus from inland lakes in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Previous research suggests this species may be even more widespread in the Great Lakes region and should be reexamined using molecular techniques to better understand the distribution of this novel species.

  9. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Polly M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although widely used in medicine, the application of three-dimensional (3D imaging to parasitology appears limited to date. In this study, developmental stages of a marine fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina curvata (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina, were investigated in their leech vector, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis; this involved 3D visualisation of brightfield and confocal microscopy images of histological sections through infected leech salivary gland cells. Findings 3D assessment demonstrated the morphology of the haemogregarine stages, their spatial layout, and their relationship with enlarged host cells showing reduced cellular content. Haemogregarine meronts, located marginally within leech salivary gland cells, had small tail-like connections to the host cell limiting membrane; this parasite-host cell interface was not visible in two-dimensional (2D light micrographs and no records of a similar connection in apicomplexan development have been traced. Conclusions This is likely the first account of the use of 3D visualisation to study developmental stages of an apicomplexan parasite in its invertebrate vector. Elucidation of the extent of development of the haemogregarine within the leech salivary cells, together with the unusual connections between meronts and the host cell membrane, illustrates the future potential of 3D visualisation in parasite-vector biology.

  10. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  11. Estimation of the species richness of fish parasite fauna: an ecological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieshko Evgeny Pavlovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the biological diversity of the parasite fauna in pike from four habitats found in northern lakes of Karelia. The curves of the expected species richness versus sampling effort (the number of examined specimens dependency were plotted. A universal approach to the description of the new species replenishment dynamics is proposed – including finding (through combinatorial analysis the median value between the fastest and the slowest paths of the species richness growth followed by approximation using logistic function . Our analysis showed that the leading ecological factors controlling the formation of the parasite species richness in a specific waterbody are the richness of infracommunities and the age composition of the host sample. The sample of 15 host specimens contains at least 80% of all species in the parasite community.

  12. New parasites and predators follow the introduction of two fish species to a subarctic lake: implications for food-web structure and functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Per-Arne; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Knudsen, Rune; Primicerio, Raul; Kristoffersen, Roar; Klemetsen, Anders; Kuris, Armand M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduced species can alter the topology of food webs. For instance, an introduction can aid the arrival of free-living consumers using the new species as a resource, while new parasites may also arrive with the introduced species. Food-web responses to species additions can thus be far more complex than anticipated. In a subarctic pelagic food web with free-living and parasitic species, two fish species (arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus and three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus) have known histories as deliberate introductions. The effects of these introductions on the food web were explored by comparing the current pelagic web with a heuristic reconstruction of the pre-introduction web. Extinctions caused by these introductions could not be evaluated by this approach. The introduced fish species have become important hubs in the trophic network, interacting with numerous parasites, predators and prey. In particular, five parasite species and four predatory bird species depend on the two introduced species as obligate trophic resources in the pelagic web and could therefore not have been present in the pre-introduction network. The presence of the two introduced fish species and the arrival of their associated parasites and predators increased biodiversity, mean trophic level, linkage density, and nestedness; altering both the network structure and functioning of the pelagic web. Parasites, in particular trophically transmitted species, had a prominent role in the network alterations that followed the introductions.

  13. Leeches (Hirudinida: Piscicolidae)--parasites of Antarctic fish from Channichthyidae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Aleksander; Rokicka, Magdalena; Ropelewska, Ewa; Dziekońska-Rynko, Janina

    2008-01-01

    There has hitherto been very few research projects focusing on ectoparasites of Antarctic fishes. The presently reported study provides data on the prevalence and the intensity of leeches (Hirudinida: Piscicolidae) infecting fishes. The materials were collected in December-February 1986/87 off the Elephant Island, South Georgia, Joinville Island, and South Shetlands. The following leech taxa were recorded in the Antarctic fishes of the family Channichthyidae: Trulliobdella capitis (Brinkmann, 1947); Cryobdella antarctica Epstein, 1970; Nototheniobdella sawyeri Utevsky, 1997; and Cryobdella sp. The above findings constitute new geographic records from off Elephant and Joinville Island and South Georgia.

  14. The role of lantern fish (Myctophidae) in the life-cycle of cetacean parasites from western Mediterranean waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Paula; Nardi, Valentina; Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Gil de Sola, Luis; Raga, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Mercedes; Aznar, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Myctophids (lantern fish) and cephalopods play a key role in trophic webs from the continental slope and oceanic waters linking the zooplankton to top predators. Many cetaceans feed on both lantern fish and cephalopods, and such prey would thus be expected to bridge the trophic gap in the life-cycles of helminths infecting cetaceans. However, information on the life-cycles of most of these helminths is extremely scanty. We examined the parasite fauna of myctophids and cephalopods in two areas from the western Mediterranean where at least 21 helminth taxa from cetaceans have been reported and both cetacean diversity and abundance is high. A total of 1012 individuals of 8 lantern fish species, namely, Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lampanyctus crocodilus, Notoscopelus elongatus, Benthosema glaciale, Myctophum punctatum, Lobianchia dofleini, Diaphus holti and Hygophum benoiti, and 792 individuals of 2 cephalopod species, Alloteuthis media and Sepietta oweniana, were collected from the Gulf of Valencia and Alboran Sea (Spanish Mediterranean) during 2010-2012 and examined for larval helminths. All these species have been reported as prey for at least some cetacean species in the area. Only five helminth taxa were found. The nematodes Anisakis pegreffii and Anisakis physeteris were detected in N. elongatus and C. maderensis (overall prevalence for Anisakis: 8.1% and 0.5%, respectively). Their prevalence in N. elongatus was significantly higher than that from the other three myctophid species with n>50 individuals. A single individual of Hysterothylacium sp. was found in N. elongatus (prevalence: 0.5%) and Raphidascarididae gen. spp. in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 20.3% and 0.7%, respectively). Juvenile didymozoid digeneans (Torticaecum type) were detected in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 18.5% and 4.3%, respectively). Two unidentified cestode plerocercoids were collected from N. elongatus. Our study suggests, for the first time, that myctophids

  15. Philometra mirabilis sp. n. (Nematoda: Philometridae), a new gonad-infecting parasite from the freshwater fish Cichla mirianae (Cichlidae) in Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, František; Diggles, Ben

    2015-05-01

    A new nematode species, Philometra mirabilis sp. n. (Philometridae), is described based on a subgravid female specimen recovered from the ovary of the freshwater perciform fish Cichla mirianae Kullander and Ferreira (Cichlidae) in the Juruena River (Amazon River basin), State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The new species is morphologically very different from congeners parasitizing fishes in South America, being mainly characterized by the markedly elongate, narrow body 171 mm long (maximum width/body length 1:598), the presence of three small cone-shaped oesophageal teeth protruding out of the mouth and an onion-shaped oesophageal inflation distinctly separated from the posterior part of the oesophagus, the relative length of the oesophagus, and the rounded posterior end of the body without any caudal projections. It is the third known valid species of Philometra Costa, 1845 parasitizing a freshwater fish in South America and the second species of this genus reported from fishes of the family Cichlidae.

  16. Scaling up from epidemiology to biogeography: local infection patterns predict geographical distribution in fish parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulin, R.; Blanar, C.A.; Thieltges, D.W.; Marcogliese, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim We investigated how the spatial distribution of parasites, measured as either their geographical range size or their frequency of occurrence among localities, relates to either their average local abundance or the variance in their abundance among localities where they occur. Location We used da

  17. Fine structure and cellular responses at the host-parasite interface in a range of fish-helminth systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Shinn, A P; Giari, L

    2015-03-15

    A series of ultrastructural-based studies were conducted on the interface region in different fish-helminth systems: (a) an intestinal infection of the cestode Monobothrium wageneri in tench, Tinca tinca; (b) an extensive intestinal submucosa and mucosal infection in tench by metacercariae of an unidentified digenean trematode; (c) an intestinal infection in brown trout, Salmo trutta, by the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae; (d) an extraintestinal infection by larvae of the acanthocephalan, Pomphorhynchus laevis in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus; and (e) an infection in the livers of Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus, by larvae of the nematode Raphidascaris acus. Endoparasitic helminths frequently cause inflammation of the digestive tract and associated organs, inducing the recruitment of various immune cells to the site of infection. In each of the fish-helminth systems that were studied, a massive hyperplastic granulocyte response involving mast cells (MCs) and neutrophils in close proximity to the helminths was documented. The current study presents data on the interface region in each fish-helminth system and documents the penetration of mast cells granules within the tegument of P. laevis larvae. No extracellular vesicles containing tegumental secretions from any of the four different taxa of endoparasitic helminths species at the host-parasite interface region were seen.

  18. First report of blood parasites in fishes from Kashmir and their effect on the haematological profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, N.; Yousuf, A.R.; Rather, M.I.; Ahmad, F.; Yaseen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinus carpio communis Linnaeus, Carassius carassius Linnaeus, Schizothorax curvifrons Heckel and Triplophysa marmorata species of fishes were captured from Anchar Lake and river Jhelum of Kashmir Himalaya for hematological and parasitological analysis. During the investigation haemoflagellates from the genus Babesiosoma and Trypanosoma were recorded in the blood smears. Trypanosomes were present in all the species except C. carpio, whereas Babesiosoma were only found in T. marmorata. Haematological analysis revealed a significant (p<0.01) reduction in red blood cell count in the fishes infected with Babesiosoma and Trypanosoma. A significant decrease (p<0.05) was recorded in haemoglobin value and packed cell volume in the infected fishes in comparison to the non-infected fishes. PMID:26623319

  19. Differentiation between a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris using PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Jørgensen, Thomas Rohde; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form.......A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form....

  20. Fish tapeworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with the tapeworm parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  1. Efficacy of garlic based treatments against monogenean parasites infecting the guppy (Poecilia reticulata (Peters)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, S; Sinai, T; Zilberg, D

    2014-06-16

    Monogenean infections of commercially farmed fishes are responsible for significant economic losses. Garlic (Allium sativum) is a well-known spice which also possesses anti-microbial and anti-parasitical properties. The current work aimed to test the efficacy of garlic-based treatments against infection with monogenean sp. in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Clipped sections of tail fins of guppies heavily infected with Gyrodactylus turnbulli were exposed to aqueous garlic extract (7.5 to 30 mL L(-1)) and visually observed under a dissecting microscope. Results revealed that exposure to garlic caused detachment of parasite and cessation of movement indicating death. A positive correlation was seen between garlic concentration and time to detachment and death of parasites, which, at the highest concentration of 30 mL L(-1), occurred at 4.1 and 8.6 min, respectively. Bathing in aqueous garlic extract (7.5 and 12.5 mL L(-1)) was tested in guppies infected with G. turnbulli. Prior acute toxicity tests revealed the maximum tolerance levels of guppies to garlic extract to be 12.5 mL L(-1) for 1h. Bathing of infected fish in garlic extract (7.5 and 12.5 mL L(-1)) significantly (pgarlic powder-supplemented diet were tested on guppies infected with G. turnbulli and Dactylogyrus sp. Fish were fed with food containing 10% and 20% dry garlic powder for 14 days. Groups fed with garlic supplemented diets showed significantly reduced (pgarlic did not appear to affect palatability. Fresh crushed garlic was added at a level of 1 gL(-1) and applied as an indefinite bath for 14 days. This treatment was seen to significantly reduce (pgarlic-fed group, as compared to control. These findings demonstrate the potential of garlic as a natural alternative to currently used chemical treatments for monogenean sp. infection in the guppy.

  2. Parasites of Apollonia melanostoma (Pallas 1814) and Neogobius kessleri (Guenther 1861) (Osteichthyes, Gobiidae) from the Danube River in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlegger, J M; Jirsa, F; Konecny, R; Frank, C

    2010-03-01

    Two invasive fish species, the round goby Apollonia melanostoma syn. Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas 1814) and the bighead goby Neogobius kessleri (Günther, 1861), have established a firm population in Austrian waters during the past 15 years. As there have been no records of the parasite fauna from these populations, a total of 79 specimens of A. melanostoma and 12 specimens of N. kessleri were examined for parasites between May and October 2007 from three different sampling sites from the Danube River in Austria. In total 12 parasite taxa were recovered. The protozoans Trichodina sp. and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis from the gills and skin; two crustacean species, Paraergasilus brevidigitus and Ergasilus sieboldi, from the gills; and the two monogeneans Gyrodactylus sp. and Dactylogyrus sp., from the skin and gills respectively, all occurred at low prevalence and intensities. Furthermore, cystacanths of the acanthocephalan Acanthocephalus lucii were found in the body cavity. Metacercariae of the digeneans Diplostomum sp. and Tylodelphys clavata were found in the lens of the eye and the vitreous humour, respectively. Adults of two digeneans, Nicolla skrjabini and Bunodera nodulosa, were found in the intestine. In addition, during this survey metacercariae of the Holarctic digenean Bucephalus polymorphus, encysted in the skin and fins, with prevalence up to 78%, were recorded for the first time in Austria.

  3. How have fisheries affected parasite communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    To understand how fisheries affect parasites, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that contrasted parasite assemblages in fished and unfished areas. Parasite diversity was lower in hosts from fished areas. Larger hosts had a greater abundance of parasites, suggesting that fishing might reduce the abundance of parasites by selectively removing the largest, most heavily parasitized individuals. After controlling for size, the effect of fishing on parasite abundance varied according to whether the host was fished and the parasite's life cycle. Parasites of unfished hosts were more likely to increase in abundance in response to fishing than were parasites of fished hosts, possibly due to compensatory increases in the abundance of unfished hosts. While complex life cycle parasites tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, directly transmitted parasites tended to increase. Among complex life cycle parasites, those with fished hosts tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, while those with unfished hosts tended to increase. However, among directly transmitted parasites, responses did not differ between parasites with and without fished hosts. This work suggests that parasite assemblages are likely to change substantially in composition in increasingly fished ecosystems, and that parasite life history and fishing status of the host are important in predicting the response of individual parasite species or groups to fishing.

  4. Host-dependent differences in resource use associated with Anilocra spp. parasitism in two coral reef fishes, as revealed by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welicky, Rachel; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Sikkel, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    The role of parasites in trophic ecology is poorly understood in marine ecosystems. Stable isotope analyses (SIA) have been widely used in studies of trophic ecology, but have rarely been applied to study the role of parasites. Considering that some parasites are associated with altered host foraging patterns, SIA can help elucidate whether parasitism influences host trophic interactions. French grunt (Haemulon flavolineatum), an abundant Caribbean coral reef fish, contributes greatly to trophic connectivity. They typically depart the reef at dusk, feed overnight in seagrass beds, and return to the reef at dawn. The large parasitic isopod Anilocra haemuli commonly infects French grunt, and infected fish are less likely to complete their diel migration, and are in poorer condition than uninfected conspecifics. Brown chromis (Chromis multilineata) are diurnally feeding planktivores and infection by Anilocra chromis does not influence host condition. To determine if Anilocra infection influences host diet and foraging locality, we conducted stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses on scale, muscle, heart and gill tissues of infected and uninfected French grunt and brown chromis. We determined that all French grunt had δ13C values representative of seagrass habitats, but infected French grunt were significantly enriched in 13C and 15N compared to uninfected conspecifics. This suggests that compared to uninfected conspecifics, infected French grunt forage in seagrass, but on isotopically enriched prey, and/or are in poorer condition, which can elevate δ13C and δ15N values. For brown chromis, infection did not significantly influence any δ13C and δ15N values; hence they all foraged in the same environment and on similar prey. This is the first study to use SIA to examine differences in resource use by Caribbean coral reef fishes associated with parasitism and to evaluate how closely related parasites might have host-dependent effects on host trophic ecology.

  5. Morphology and small subunit rDNA-based phylogeny of Ceratomyxa amazonensis n. sp. parasite of Symphysodon discus, an ornamental freshwater fish from Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Patrick D; Naldoni, Juliana; Maia, Antonio A; Adriano, Edson A

    2016-10-01

    The specious genus Ceratomyxa Thélodan, 1892, infect mainly gallbladder of marine fishes, with only five species reported infecting species from freshwater environment. This study performed morphological and phylogenetic analyses involving a new Ceratomyxa species (Ceratomyxa amazonensis n. sp.) found in gallbladder of Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840 (Perciformes: Cichlidae), an important ornamental fish endemic to Amazon basin. Mature spores were strongly arcuate shaped and measured 7.0 ± 0.3 (6.2-7.6) μm in length, 15.8 ± 0.4 (15.0-16.7) μm in thickness, and polar capsules 3.22 ± 0.34 (2.4-3.6) μm in length and 2.63 ± 0.17 (2.4-2.9) μm in width. This was the first small subunit ribosomal DNA (SS rDNA) sequencing performed to Ceratomyxa species parasite of freshwater fish, and the phylogenetic analysis showed C. amazonensis n. sp. clustering in the early diverging subclade of the ceratomyxids, together with species of parasites of amphidromous/estuaries fishes, suggesting some role of the transition of the fishes between marine/freshwater environments in the evolutionary history of these parasites.

  6. Ultrastructure and phylogeny of the parasite Henneguya carolina sp. nov. (Myxozoa), from the marine fish Trachinotus carolinus in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, S; Casal, G; Garcia, P; Matos, E; Al-Quraishy, S; Azevedo, C

    2014-12-02

    Microscopic and molecular procedures are used to describe a new myxosporean species, Henneguya carolina sp. nov., found infecting the intestine of the marine teleost fish Trachinotus carolinus on the southern Atlantic coast of Brazil. Spherical to ellipsoid cysts, measuring up to ~750 µm, display synchronous development. Mature myxospores are ellipsoidal with a bifurcated caudal process. Myxospore body length, width, and thickness are 12.7 ± 0.8 (12.0-13.4) µm, 8.8 ± 0.6 (7.5-9.6) µm, and 5.8 ± 0.4 (5.0-6.4) µm, respectively; 2 equal caudal processes are 16.8 ± 1.1 (15.9-18.0) µm long, and the total myxospore length is 29.4 ± 0.8 (28.4-30.4) µm. Two pyriform polar capsules measure 5.0 ± 0.5 (4.6-5.6) × 2.4 ± 0.4 (1.9-2.9) µm, and each contains a polar filament forming 3 to 4 coils. Sporoplasm is binucleated and presents a spherical vacuole surrounded by numerous globular sporoplasmosomes. Molecular analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene by maximum parsimony, neighbor joining, and maximum likelihood reveals the parasite clustering together with other myxobolids that are histozoic in marine fish of the order Perciformes, thereby strengthening the contention that the host phylogenetic relationships and aquatic environment are the strongest evolutionary signal for myxosporeans of the family Myxobolidae.

  7. Redescription of Eubothrium fragile (Rudolphi, 1802) and E. rugosum (Batsch, 1786) (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea), parasites of fish in the Holarctic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Roman; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Shinn, Andy P; Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Scholz, Tomás

    2005-09-01

    Two fish cestodes, the little-known Eubothrium fragile (Rudolphi, 1802) and E. rugosum (Batsch, 1786), the type species of the genus Eubothrium Nybelin, 1922, are redescribed on the basis of new material from twaite shad, Alosa fallax (Lacépède, 1803), from England and burbot, Lota lota (Linnaeus, 1758), from Russia, respectively. The tapeworms are compared with two other species of the genus, E. crassum (Bloch, 1779) and E. salvelini (Schrank, 1790), common parasites of salmonid fish in the Holarctic. The most notable differential characters are the size and the shape of the scolex (smaller and oval in E. fragile), the shape of the apical disc (four or more indentations in E. crassum), the number and size of the testes (the largest and least numerous in E. rugosum), and the position and size of the vitelline follicles (almost entirely cortical in distribution in E. fragile and E. crassum versus largely medullary in E. rugosum and E. salvelini). A comparison of species has also shown the morphological similarity of the freshwater species (E. rugosum and E. salvelini) on one hand and those of marine origin, E. fragile and E. crassum, on the other, with the latter species occurring also in fresh waters. A key to the identification of the species studied is also provided.

  8. The Evolution of Bourgeois, Parasitic, and Cooperative Reproductive Behaviors in Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Taborsky, M.

    2017-01-01

    Among vertebrate classes, fishes exhibit by far the greatest variability in competitive and cooperative behaviors in male reproduction. Scramble competition between reproductive males is one possibility. Another possibility occurs when resources, mates, or locations can be monopolized, in which case males may invest in primary access to fertilizations by adopting a "bourgeois” strategy, or they may employ alternative mating tactics to evade the reproductive monopoly of other males. Adaptation...

  9. Natural variability of parasite communities of Macrouridae of the middle and lower slope of the Mediterranean Sea and their relation with fish diet and health indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-i-García, D.; Constenla, M.; Soler-Membrives, A.; Cartes, J. E.; Solé, M.; Carrassón, M.

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the parasite communities of Coelorinchus caelorhincus, Coelorinchus mediterraneus, Coryphaenoides guentheri and Coryphaenoides mediterraneus of the middle and lower slopes of the Mediterranean Sea. Histopathological, enzymatic activity (acetylcholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase), dietary and environmental (oxygen, salinity, temperature and turbidity) information were also obtained. A total of 11 parasite taxa were found in the four fish species, the copepod Hamaticolax resupinus being the only parasite shared by all of them. Coelorinchus mediterraneus, Coryphaenoides guentheri and Cor. mediterraneus exhibited rather homogeneous parasite communities, especially in the case of the latter two. Coelorinchus mediterraneus showed the highest richness of parasite taxa (eight species), whereas C. guentheri and Cor. mediterraneus harboured up to five and six, respectively, and C. caelorhincus up to three. Several of the parasites encountered occurred at very low prevalences (<10%), while only three species were exceptionally prevalent and abundant: Cucullanidae fam. gen. sp. larvae in C. caelorhincus; Lepidapedon desclersae in Coe. mediterraneus and Hysterothylacium aduncum in both Coryphaenoides spp. The abundance of the nematode H. aduncum, present in all host species except for C. caelorhincus, increased with water temperature and depth and became the dominant parasite below 2000 m. Salinity may be an important factor affecting the distribution of H. resupinus. The diet was generally homogeneous between the studied species, C. guentheri being more specialized on suprabenthic/benthic prey. The parasites H. aduncum and Tetraphylidea, and to lesser extent Raphidascaris sp., were associated with the most mobile (swimming) prey consumed by macrourids (Chaetognaths, decapod larvae, and Boreomysis arctica). The parasites L. desclersae, Capillostrongyloides morae and Otodistomum sp. were associated in Coe. mediterraneus with epibenthic prey (ophiuroids

  10. First record of protozoan parasites in cyprinid fish, Schizothorax niger Heckel, 1838 from Dal lake in Kashmir Himalayas with study on their pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shoaib Ali; Kaur, Harpreet; Chishti, M Z; Ahmad, Fayaz; Tak, Irfan ur Rauf; Dar, Gowhar Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Trichodina heterodentata Duncan, 1977 and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 obtained from gills during a parasitological survey conducted for the protozoan parasitic fauna of Schizothorax niger a snow trout in Dal Lake, Kashmir, India during the period October 2013 and March 2015. Thirty out of 180 fish were found infected with protozoan parasites. During the study of their pathogenecity the most common deteriorating signs observed in gill tissue were necrosis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia and fusion of secondary lamellae. Prevalence of infection was found to be 16.66%. This is the first record of the protozoan fauna of the schizothoracines from Kashmir valley, India.

  11. Infestation pattern and parasitic castration of the crustacean Riggia paranensis (Crustacea: Cymothoidea on the fresh water fish Cyphocharax gilbert (Teleostei: Curimatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Souza Azevedo

    Full Text Available Cyphocharax gilbert infested by Riggia paranensis shows parasitic castration. The prevalence of parasitism in C. gilbert varied among different environments, being higher in the middle rio Itabapoana. Fish were collected monthly using two cast nets (thrown 30 times during the day and gillnets kept in the river during 12 hour, from sunset to sunrise, between September 1997 and August 2000. Infestation pattern was investigated on 1358 specimens. Most of them were infested (57.9%, with one or two parasites; the majority (62.9% was collected during the rainy season (spring-summer. The parasite did not show preference for sex or size of hosts. A total of 91.5% of the 511 examined parasites had a body size that represented 10.1% to 20% of host standard length. The reproductive condition of 311 specimens of R. paranensis was analyzed checking the presence of oocytes in the ovarian and eggs or embryos in the marsupium. Nearly 73% of them were at reproductive phase, and had a body size that represented 5.1% to 20% of host standard length. The size of the immature parasites varied from 0.1% to 5% of the host size. The results suggest that R. paranensis may adopt a fast growth rate strategy and increase the investment in reproduction when they occupy most of the host's pericardial space.

  12. Seasonal variation in parasite infection patterns of marine fish species from the Northern Wadden Sea in relation to interannual temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Franziska M.; Raupach, Michael J.; Mathias Wegner, K.

    2016-07-01

    Marine environmental conditions are naturally changing throughout the year, affecting life cycles of hosts as well as parasites. In particular, water temperature is positively correlated with the development of many parasites and pathogenic bacteria, increasing the risk of infection and diseases during summer. Interannual temperature fluctuations are likely to alter host-parasite interactions, which may result in profound impacts on sensitive ecosystems. In this context we investigated the parasite and bacterial Vibrionaceae communities of four common small fish species (three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, Atlantic herring Clupea harengus, European sprat Sprattus sprattus and lesser sand eel Ammodytes tobianus) in the Northern Wadden Sea over a period of two years. Overall, we found significantly increased relative diversities of infectious species at higher temperature differentials. On the taxon-specific level some macroparasite species (trematodes, nematodes) showed a shift in infection peaks that followed the water temperatures of preceding months, whereas other parasite groups showed no effects of temperature differentials on infection parameters. Our results show that even subtle changes in seasonal temperatures may shift and modify the phenology of parasites as well as opportunistic pathogens that can have far reaching consequences for sensitive ecosystems.

  13. Redescriptions of two species of Lepeophtheirus (Copepoda, Siphonostomatoida, Caligidae parasitic on teleost marine fishes from the coastal zone of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Luque

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Lepeophtheirus Nordmann, 1832 parasitic on the ariid fish Netuma barba Lacépède, 1803, and the bothiid fish Paralichthys sp. from the coastal zone of the State of Rio de Janeiro, are redescribed and illustrated: L. bagri Dana, 1852, and L. monacanthus Heller, 1865. New junior synonyms for these species are proposed: L. marginatus syn.n., L. christianensis syn.n. and L. platensis syn.n. of L. bagri and L. unispinosus syn.n. of L. monacanthus.

  14. A new species of Henneguya, a gill parasite of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) affected with ulcerative disease syndrome from Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanand, Th; Meitei, N Mohilal; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mitra, Amlan K

    2008-01-01

    A new species of Henneguya parasitizing tissues affected by the ulcerative disease syndrome of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) from Khiodum and Pumlen lakes of Manipur state is described. Of the fishes examined 75% were found to be infested with this myxozoan parasite. Mature spores of the new species are elongated, biconvex, and oval with bluntly rounded anterior end and gradually tapering posterior end with a caudal prolongation, measuring 12.6-15.4 (14.0+/- 1.1) microm in length. Length of the caudal prolongation is 11.2-12.6 (11.7+/- 0.6) microm. The width of the spores is 5.6-7.0 (6.3+/- 0.5) microm. The length of the polar capsules is 5.6-6.3 (5.5+/- 0.3) microm.

  15. A new myxozoan parasite from the Amazonian fish Metynnis argenteus (Teleostei, Characidae): light and electron microscope observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Graça; Matos, Edilson; Azevedo, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Myxobolus metynnis n. sp. (Phylum Myxozoa) is described in the connective subcutaneous tissues of the orbicular region of the fish, Metynnis argenteus (Characidae), collected in the lower Amazon River, near the city of Peixe Boi, Pará State, Brazil. Polysporic, histozoic plasmodia were delimited by a double membrane with numerous microvilli on the peripheral cytoplasm. Several life-cycle stages, including mature spores, were observed. An envelope formed by numerous fine and anastomosed microfibrils was observed at the spore surface. The spore body presented an ellipsoidal shape and was about 13.1 microm long, 7.8 microm wide, and 3.9 microm thick. Elongated-pyriform polar capsules were of equal size, measuring 5.2 microm in length, 3.2 microm in width, and possessing a polar filament with 8-9 turns around the longitudinal axis. The binucleated sporoplasm contained a vacuole and numerous sporoplasmosomes. These were circular in cross-section, showing an adherent eccentric, dense structure, with a half-crescent section. Based on the morphological differences and host specificity, we propose that the parasite is a new species named Myxobolus metynnis n. sp.

  16. Coccidian parasites of intertidal fishes from Wales: systematics, development, and cytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A J

    1978-02-01

    Examination of littoral fish Blennius pholis and Cottus bubalis caught at Aberystwyth and Porth Cwyfan, Wales, U.K. revealed 2 species of coccidia. Eimeria dingleyi sp. n. Oocysts spherical (16.1-19.2) to subspherical (13.9-14.2 X 18.8-20.0) micron, with thin walls; sporulation outside the host to produce ellipsoid sporocysts; endogenous phases in epithelial cells throughout intestine; 26 of 58 B. pholis infected. Eimeria variabilis (Théohan) Reichenow. Oocysts spherical (11.9-14.6) to subspherical (9.2-10.9 X 13.9-14.3) micron, sporulation in lining of pyloric ceca and rectum; previously unrecorded schizonts and gametocytes present; 21 of 25 C. bubalis infected. Electron microscopy revealed that the oocyst wall of E. variabilis consists of a thin membrane whereas the sporocyst wall is thick and 3-layered. Typical oocyst wall-forming bodies were absent from the macrogamete. Cytochemical tests on the endogenous stages of E. dingleyi and E. variabilis indicated that in general they resembled other coccidia in their chemical constitution.

  17. A Monte Carlo simulation model for assessing the risk of introduction of Gyrodactylus salaris to the Tana river, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, L G; Karlsen, E; Jarp, J; Mo, T A

    1999-07-30

    The Tana river in northern Norway, the most productive salmon river in Europe, is free of Gyrodactylus salaris. Currently there is one salmon farm in operation on the Tana fjord. Because of the strong association between stocking of rivers with salmon and infestations with G. salaris there is national and international concern that the existing farm might lead to the introduction of the parasite to the Tana river. In response to these concerns a quantitative analysis of the risk of introduction of G. salaris to the Tana river was undertaken. A scenario tree, the Monte Carlo simulation model and results of the simulations including sensitivity analyses are presented and discussed. Results show that the probability of introduction of G. salaris to the Tana river via transfer of smolt to the existing salmon farm is extremely low primarily due to the low probability that the transferred smolt become infested. The total risk was very sensitive to changes in the salinity of the water at the sea site.

  18. Mitochondrial haplotype diversity of Gyrodactylus thymalli (Platyhelminthes; Monogenea): extended geographic sampling in United Kingdom, Poland, and Norway reveals further lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Haakon; Bakke, Tor A; Bachmann, Lutz

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, the mitochondrial haplotype diversity of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 on Atlantic salmon and G. thymalli Zitnan, 1960 on grayling has been studied intensively to understand the taxonomy and phylogeography of the two species. According to these studies, neither species can be considered monophyletic, but unfortunately, the geographic sampling has mostly been restricted to Fennoscandia. Only few samples from continental Europe have been analysed, and samples from the United Kingdom have not been included at all. Gyrodactylosis is a notifiable disease in Europe and is in the UK considered the most important exotic disease threat to wild Atlantic salmon populations. In this study, we report six new mitochondrial haplotypes of G. thymalli from England, Poland, and Norway detected by sequencing 745 bp of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. The six new haplotypes add five new clades to a neighbor-joining dendrogram deduced on the basis of the currently known 44 mitochondrial haplotypes for G. thymalli and G. salaris. We conclude that G. thymalli established in the UK along with the immigration of grayling. There is currently no reason to suspect that this parasite is a threat to Atlantic salmon in the UK, although its infectivity to salmon stocks in the UK has not been tested.

  19. The impacts of ecological factors on prevalence, mean intensity and seasonal changes of the monogenean gill parasite, Microcotyloides sp., infesting the Terapon puta fish inhabiting coastal region of Mediterranean Sea at Damietta region

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    Abdel-Aziz A. Khidr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study has revealed, for the first time, the presence of the monogenean parasite, Microcotyloides sp., on the gills of the small scaled terapon fish, Terapon puta, inhabiting the costal region of the Mediterranean Sea near Damietta province, Egypt. This work was carried out between May 2006 and April 2007. A total sample of 180 fish specimens, 15 fish a month, were examined. Seasonally, the prevalence and mean intensity of the Microcotyloides sp. are found to be 84% and 3.38 parasite/infected fish, respectively. The prevalence of the Microcotyloides sp. reached its maximum value of 92% in summer and a minimum value of 69% during autumn. The mean intensity of the Microcotyloides sp. increased to its maximum value of 5 parasite/infected fish during spring; declined dramatically to reach 3.44 parasite/infected fish during summer and recorded its lowest value, 2.97 parasite/infected fish during winter. Monthly, fluctuation in the prevalence of the Microcotyloides sp. recorded two peaks during the year, the first time in February and the second one in July. Monthly fluctuation in the mean intensity of the Microcotyloides sp. showed its highest value, 7.41 parasite/infected fish, in May while its lowest one, 2.2 parasite/infected fish, was recorded in January. The present study has revealed that the correlation between the mean intensity of the Microcotyloides sp. and the body weight of T. puta fish is positive. The mean intensity of the Microcotyloides sp. is positively correlated with each temperature and pH of water but negatively correlated with the salinity of water. To signify the results, statistical analysis using ANOVA’s and Chi-squared tests were applied.

  20. Gyrodactylus eyipayipi sp. n. (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from Syngnathus acus (Syngnathidae) from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David B; Christison, Kevin W; Hansen, Haakon; Shinn, Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    Gyrodactylus eyipayipi sp. n. is described from the skin, gills, flute and male brood pouch of captive specimens of the greater pipefish Syngnathus acus L., collected for and maintained at the Two Oceans Aquarium in Cape Town, South Africa. It is the first marine Gyrodactylus species reported from the African continent. The new species is compared to the three known Gyrodactylus species affecting syngnathiform hosts (G. pisculentus Williams, Kritsky, Dunnigan, Lash et Klein, 2008, G. shorti Holliman, 1963, and G. syngnathi Appleby, 1996). Although all four species have similar-sized and shaped attachment hooks with some overlap, separation of the species is possible using marginal hook morphology. The marginal hooks of G. eyipayipi measure (mean) 30 pm in total length and are larger than those of the three other species (mean, 24-28 tm). Gyrodactylus eyipayipi can also be discriminated based on differences in the shape of the marginal hook sickle notably by its long sickle point which extends far beyond the toe, its blunt rounded toe and, by the approximate rectangular shape to the base of the sickle. By comparison, the sloping toe regions of G. pisculentus and G. syngnathi give the sickle bases an approximately triangular shape, whilst the short sickle point and open aperture to the sickles of G. shorti allow for their discrimination from G. eyipayipi.

  1. Can parasites be indicators of free-living diversity? Relationships between species richness and the abundance of larval trematodes and of local benthos and fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechinger, Ryan F; Lafferty, Kevin D; Huspeni, Todd C; Brooks, Andrew J; Kuris, Armand M

    2007-02-01

    Measuring biodiversity is difficult. This has led to efforts to seek taxa whose species richness correlates with the species richness of other taxa. Such indicator taxa could then reduce the time and cost of assessing the biodiversity of the more extensive community. The search for species richness correlations has yielded mixed results, however. This may be primarily because of the lack of functional relationships between the taxa studied. Trematode parasites are highly promising bioindicators. Diverse assemblages of larval trematode parasites are easily sampled in intermediate host snails. Through their life cycles these parasites are functionally coupled with the surrounding free-living diversity of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. It has been shown that larval trematodes in snails correlate positively with bird diversity and abundance. Here, we explore whether trematodes also correlate with standard measures of fishes, and large and small benthos, for 32 sites in three wetlands. We found associations between trematodes and benthic communities that were not consistent across wetlands. The associations were, however, consistently positive for large benthic species richness and density. Some of the contrasting associations between trematode and benthos may be explained by negative associations between large and small benthos. We found no associations with fish communities (probably because of the inadequacy of standard "snapshot" sampling methods for highly mobile fishes). The results support further exploration of trematodes as bioindicators of diversity and abundance of animal communities.

  2. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  3. Revision of Khawia spp. (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), parasites of cyprinid fish, including a key to their identification and molecular phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomás; Brabec, Jan; Král'ová-Hromadová, Ivica; Oros, Mikulás; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Ermolenko, Alexey; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2011-09-01

    Monozoic cestodes of the genus Khawia Hsü, 1935 (Caryophyllidea: Lytocestidae), parasites of cyprinid fish in Europe, Asia, Africa and North America, are revised on the basis of taxonomic evaluation of extensive materials, including recently collected specimens of most species. This evaluation has made it possible to critically assess the validity of all 17 nominal species of the genus and to provide redescriptions of the following seven species considered to be valid: Khawia sinensis Hsü, 1935 (type species); K. armeniaca (Cholodkovsky, 1915); K. baltica Szidat, 1941; K. japonensis (Yamaguti, 1934); K. parva (Zmeev, 1936); K. rossittensis (Szidat, 1937); and K. saurogobii Xi, Oros, Wang, Wu, Gao et Nie, 2009. Several new synonyms are proposed: Khawia barbi Rahemo et Mohammad, 2002 and K. lutei Al-Kalak et Rahemo, 2003 are synonymized with K. armeniaca; K. coregoni Kritscher, 1990 with Caryophyllaeus laticeps (Pallas, 1781) (family Caryophyllaeidae); K. cyprini Li, 1964 and K. iowensis Calentine et Ulmer, 1961 with K. japonensis; K. dubia (Szidat, 1937) (syn. Bothrioscolex dubius Szidat, 1937) with K. rossittensis; and Tsengia neimongkuensis Li, 1964 and T. xiamenensis Liu, Yang et Lin, 1995 with K. sinensis. Khawia prussica (Szidat, 1937) (syn. Bothrioscolex prussicus Szidat, 1937) is considered to be species incertae sedis, but its morphology indicates it may belong to Caryophyllaeus Gmelin, 1790 (Caryophyllaeidae). The molecular analysis of all seven valid species, based on comparison of sequences of two nuclear ribosomal and two mitochondrial genes, has shown that the species form three major groups clustered according to their fish hosts. Five species from common and crucian carp and goldfish were grouped together, whereas K. armeniaca from barbels (Barbinae) and K. baltica from tench (Tinca) formed separate clades. In contrast, geographical distribution does not seem to play a crucial role in grouping of individual taxa. A phylogenetic tree based on

  4. Coccidian parasites of fish encompass profound phylogenetic diversity and gave rise to each of the major parasitic groups in terrestrial vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidian paraasites are ubiquitous single-celled protists that cause enteric disease in all manner of vertebrate hosts. These include infections of wildlife, livestock, and people, resulting in a variety of disease outcomes. The diversity and relationships among these diverse parasites is best kn...

  5. Records of new localities and hosts for crustacean parasites in fish from the eastern Amazon in northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Corrêa, Lincoln Lima; Oliveira Ferreira, Drielly; Neves, Lígia Rigor; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate parasites crustacean fauna in Arapaima gigas, Cichla monoculus, Cichla ocellaris, Cichla jariina, Satanoperca jurupari, Leporinus friderici, Leporinus fasciatus, Hoplias malabaricus, Phractocephalus hemioliopterus, Serrasalmus altispinis, Pseudoplatystoma tigrinum and Potamotrygon motoro of the State Amapá and Pará, in northern Brazil. A total of 242 parasites, including Argulus elongatus, Argulus multicolor,Argulus juparanaensis, Argulus nattereri, Dolops discoidalis, Dolops longicauda, Braga patagonica, Braga fluviatilis, Livoneca guianensis and undetermined Lernaeidae, were collected from these hosts. The Argulus species had the greatest richness among the community of parasitic crustaceans. There was a low abundance of parasites among the hosts, other than D. discoidalis, was most abundant in the integument of A. gigas and P. tigrinum. Finally, the present study reported nine new hosts for the crustacean parasite species and expanded knowledge of the occurrence of some parasite species in the Jari River basin, in eastern Amazon.

  6. Predicting the Potential for Natural Recovery of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Populations following the Introduction of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 (Monogenea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Andrew P.; Paladini, Giuseppe; Taylor, Nick G. H.; Norman, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) is a notifiable freshwater pathogen responsible for causing catastrophic damage to wild Atlantic salmon stocks, most notably in Norway. In some strains of Baltic salmon (e.g., from the river Neva) however, the impact is greatly reduced due to some form of innate resistance that regulates parasite numbers, resulting in fewer host mortalities. Gyrodactylus salaris is known from 17 European states; its status in a further 35 states remains unknown; the UK, the Republic of Ireland and certain watersheds in Finland are free of the parasite. Thus, the parasite poses a serious threat if it emerges in Atlantic salmon rearing regions throughout Europe. At present, infections are generally controlled via extreme measures such as the treatment of entire river catchments with the biocide rotenone, in order to remove all hosts, before restocking with the original genetic stock. The use of rotenone in this way in EU countries is unlikely as it would be in contravention of the Water Framework Directive. Not only are such treatments economically and environmentally costly, they also eradicate the potential for any host/parasite evolutionary process to occur. Based on previous studies, UK salmon stocks have been shown to be highly susceptible to infection, analogous to Norwegian stocks. The present study investigates the impact of a G. salaris outbreak within a naïve salmon population in order to determine long-term consequences of infection and the likelihood of coexistence. Simulation of the salmon/ G. salaris system was carried out via a deterministic mathematical modelling approach to examine the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions. Results indicated that in order for highly susceptible Atlantic strains to evolve a resistance, both a moderate-strong deceleratingly costly trade-off on birth rate and a lower overall cost of the immune response are required. The present study provides insights into the potential long term

  7. Morphology and phylogeny of Thelohanellus marginatus n. sp. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea), a parasite infecting the gills of the fish Hypophthalmus marginatus (Teleostei: Pimelodidae) in the Amazon River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sónia; Casal, Graça; Velasco, Michele; Alves, Angela; Matos, Edilson; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Azevedo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Thelohanellus marginatus n. sp., a new myxosporean parasite infecting the primary gill filaments of the teleost fish Hypophthalmus marginatus (Pimelodidae) in the Amazon River, is described on the basis of microscopic and molecular procedures. The parasite forms whitish and ellipsoidal cysts up to 250 μm in diam. Myxospores ellipsoidal with a slightly more pointed anterior end, measuring 17.1 ± 0.6 μm in length, 6.9 ± 0.4 μm in width, and 5.1 ± 0.5 μm in thickness. A single pyriform polar capsule, 9.0 ± 0.3 μm long and 6.1 ± 0.4 μm wide, positioned slightly right to the medial plane in valvular view, contains a polar filament arranged in 4-5 coils. Molecular analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by Maximum Parsimony, Neighbor-Joining, and Maximum Likelihood revealed the parasite clustering among other myxobolids, namely Henneguya and Myxobolus. Host affinity is supported as an important evolutionary signal for the phylogeny of myxobolids. The parasite here described represents the first record of the genus Thelohanellus Kudo, 1933 from the South American fauna. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  8. Helminth parasites of freshwater fishes from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico: inventory and biogeographical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Espinosa-Pérez, Héctor; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2014-06-01

    As part of an ongoing inventory of the helminth parasites of freshwater fishes in Mexico, 570 individual fish were collected between Apr 2008 and Oct 2011 in 26 localities along the Cuatro Ciénegas region in Coahuila State, northern Mexico. Seventeen species of hosts, mostly corresponding to Nearctic freshwater elements, were studied. A total of 8324 individual worms were collected during this survey, representing 25 species of helminths, of which 9 were digeneans, 3 monogeneans, 3 acanthocephalans, 9 nematodes and 1 cestode. Most of the records in this checklist represent new host or locality records. The information provided in this checklist may be helpful for our understanding of the biodiversity and historical biogeography of this host-parasite system, because in the Cuatro Ciénegas region occur a Nearctic freshwater fish fauna, along with Neotropical and endemic elements, and from a biogeographical point of view, this may represent a transitional area. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The role of environmental contaminants in the prevalence of fish infected with a wading bird parasite (Eustronglides ignotus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Northern Florida Eustrongylid larvae were found in 66 fish from 5 of 9 the sites (Table 2). Four species Gambusia holbrooki, Heterandria formosa, Lepomis gulosus,...

  10. Evidence for cryptic speciation in directly transmitted gyrodactylid parasites of Trinidadian guppies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Xavier

    Full Text Available Cryptic species complexes are common among parasites, which tend to have large populations and are subject to rapid evolution. Such complexes may arise through host-parasite co-evolution and/or host switching. For parasites that reproduce directly on their host, there might be increased opportunities for sympatric speciation, either by exploiting different hosts or different micro-habitats within the same host. The genus Gyrodactylus is a specious group of viviparous monogeneans. These ectoparasites transfer between teleosts during social contact and cause significant host mortality. Their impact on the guppy (Poecilia reticulata, an iconic evolutionary and ecological model species, is well established and yet the population genetics and phylogenetics of these parasites remains understudied. Using mtDNA sequencing of the host and its parasites, we provide evidence of cryptic speciation in Gyrodactylus bullatarudis, G. poeciliae and G. turnbulli. For the COII gene, genetic divergence of lineages within each parasite species ranged between 5.7 and 17.2%, which is typical of the divergence observed between described species in this genus. Different lineages of G. turnbulli and G. poeciliae appear geographically isolated, which could imply allopatric speciation. In addition, for G. poeciliae, co-evolution with a different host species cannot be discarded due to its host range. This parasite was originally described on P. caucana, but for the first time here it is also recorded on the guppy. The two cryptic lineages of G. bullatarudis showed considerable geographic overlap. G. bullatarudis has a known wide host range and it can also utilize a killifish (Anablepsoides hartii as a temporary host. This killifish is capable of migrating overland and it could act as a transmission vector between otherwise isolated populations. Additional genetic markers are needed to confirm the presence of these cryptic Gyrodactylus species complexes, potentially leading

  11. Learned parasite avoidance is driven by host personality and resistance to infection in a fish-trematode interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klemme, Ines; Karvonen, Anssi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities related to the assessment of risk improve survival. While earlier studies have examined the ability of animals to learn to avoid predators, learned parasite avoidance has received little interest...

  12. Henneguya paraensis n. sp. (Myxozoa; Myxosporea), a new gill parasite of the Amazonian fish Cichla temensis (Teleostei: Cichlidae): morphological and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Michele; Videira, Marcela; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Matos, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; Matos, Edilson

    2016-05-01

    The present study describes light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and molecular analyses of a myxosporid found parasitizing the gill region of the teleost fish Cichla temensis, collected from the Tocantins River, near Cametá, Pará State, Brazil. The prevalence of infection was 60 %. The spore-containing cysts that were located in the gill lamellae were oval and whitish. The spores had a mean length of 42.3 ± 0.65 μm; fusiform body, 12.8 ± 0.42-μm long and 8.6 ± 0.32-μm wide; each of the two valves exhibited a tapering tail of 29.5 ± 0.73 μm length. The spores had two polar capsules, 7.4 ± 0.16-μm long by 2.6 ± 0.08-μm wide, containing a polar filament with 5-7 twists. The spores differ from the species previously described, and phylogenetic analysis based on spore morphology and molecular aspects indicated that the fish parasite Henneguya sp. has a strong trend to form clades mainly based on the environment and host order/family. Thus, we conclude that the species belongs to the family Myxobolidae, genus Henneguya, which comprises a new species: Henneguya paraensis n. sp.

  13. Correlation between host specificity and genetic diversity for the muscle-dwelling fish parasite Myxobolus pseudodispar: examples of myxozoan host-shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forro, Barbara; Eszterbauer, Edit

    2016-06-02

    Myxobolus pseudodispar Gorbunova, 1936 (Myxozoa) is capable of infecting and developing mature myxospores in several cyprinid species. However, M. pseudodispar isolates from different fish show up to 5% differences in the SSU rDNA sequences. This is an unusually large intraspecific difference for myxozoans and only some of the muscle-dwelling myxozoan species possess such a high genetic variability. We intended to study the correlation between the host specificity and the phylogenetic relationship of the parasite isolates, and to find experimental proof for the putatively wide host range of M. pseudodispar with cross-infection experiments and phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rDNA. The experimental findings distinguished 'primary' and less-susceptible 'secondary' hosts. With some exceptions, M. pseudodispar isolates showed a tendency to cluster according to the fish host on the phylogenetic tree. Experimental and phylogenetic findings suggest the cryptic nature of the species. It is likely that host-shift occurred for M. pseudodispar and the parasite speciation in progress might explain the high genetic diversity among isolates which are morphologically indistinguishable.

  14. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a

  15. Learned parasite avoidance is driven by host personality and resistance to infection in a fish-trematode interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemme, Ines; Karvonen, Anssi

    2016-09-14

    Cognitive abilities related to the assessment of risk improve survival. While earlier studies have examined the ability of animals to learn to avoid predators, learned parasite avoidance has received little interest. In a series of behavioural trials with the trematode parasite Diplostomum pseudospathaceum, we asked whether sea trout (Salmo trutta trutta) hosts show associative learning in the context of parasitism and if so, whether learning capacity is related to the likelihood of infection mediated through host personality and resistance. We show that animals are capable of learning to avoid visual cues associated with the presence of parasites. However, avoidance behaviour ceased after the likely activation of host resistance following consecutive exposures during learning, suggesting that resistance to infection outweighs avoidance. Further, we found a positive relationship between learning ability and boldness, suggesting a compensation of risky lifestyles through increased investment in cognitive abilities. By contrast, an increased risk of infection due to low resistance was not balanced by learning ability. Instead, these traits were positively related, which may be explained by inherent physiological qualities controlling both traits. Overall, the results demonstrate that parasitism, in addition to other biological interactions such as predation, is an important selective factor in the evolution of animal cognition. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. A genomic survey of the fish parasite Spironucleus salmonicida indicates genomic plasticity among diplomonads and significant lateral gene transfer in eukaryote genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logsdon John M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic studies of the mitochondrion-lacking protist group Diplomonadida (diplomonads has been lacking, although Giardia lamblia has been intensively studied. We have performed a sequence survey project resulting in 2341 expressed sequence tags (EST corresponding to 853 unique clones, 5275 genome survey sequences (GSS, and eleven finished contigs from the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus salmonicida (previously described as S. barkhanus. Results The analyses revealed a compact genome with few, if any, introns and very short 3' untranslated regions. Strikingly different patterns of codon usage were observed in genes corresponding to frequently sampled ESTs versus genes poorly sampled, indicating that translational selection is influencing the codon usage of highly expressed genes. Rigorous phylogenomic analyses identified 84 genes – mostly encoding metabolic proteins – that have been acquired by diplomonads or their relatively close ancestors via lateral gene transfer (LGT. Although most acquisitions were from prokaryotes, more than a dozen represent likely transfers of genes between eukaryotic lineages. Many genes that provide novel insights into the genetic basis of the biology and pathogenicity of this parasitic protist were identified including 149 that putatively encode variant-surface cysteine-rich proteins which are candidate virulence factors. A number of genomic properties that distinguish S. salmonicida from its human parasitic relative G. lamblia were identified such as nineteen putative lineage-specific gene acquisitions, distinct mutational biases and codon usage and distinct polyadenylation signals. Conclusion Our results highlight the power of comparative genomic studies to yield insights into the biology of parasitic protists and the evolution of their genomes, and suggest that genetic exchange between distantly-related protist lineages may be occurring at an appreciable rate in eukaryote

  17. Bioaccumulation of six PCB indicator congeners in a heavily polluted water reservoir in Eastern Slovakia: tissue-specific distribution in fish and their parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázová, Tímea; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of six indicator PCB congeners (IUPAC nos. 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) were measured in several organs and adipose tissue of a freshwater predatory fishes (European perch, northern pike, pike perch, wels catfish) as well as in nonpredators (common carp, freshwater bream, goldfish, white bream) and in acanthocephalan Acanthocephalus lucii from the water reservoir Zemplínska šírava (Eastern Slovakia), which is considered to be one of the most PCB-contaminated places in Europe. Concentration of PCBs was determined by capillary gas chromatography in samples from May to September 2009. The two-way main-effect ANOVA confirmed that feeding habits of fish (P kidney, brain, and adipose tissue of their host. About 20 times lower amount of PCBs was detected in the liver and almost 3 times in muscles of infected perch. Data on PCB accumulation in perch infected with acanthocephalans demonstrated a decline of PCB values in all organs as well as in adipose tissue compared to noninfected fish. About 20 times lower amount of PCBs was detected in the liver and almost 3 times in muscles of infected perch. Present results could indicate that some parasitic organisms may influence positively their hosts in PCB-contaminated environment.

  18. Parasite infections revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, G.F.; Forlenza, M.; Joerink, M.; Scharsack, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Studying parasites helps reveal basic mechanisms in immunology. For long this has been recognized for studies on the immune system of mice and man. But it is not true for immunological studies on fish. To support this argument we discuss selected examples of parasite infections not only in warm-bloo

  19. Fishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜群山

    2002-01-01

    @@ Last Saturday my cousin (表兄) came to my home. We were very happy to see each other. We decided that the next day we went to fish. We got up very early that day. When we left home,the moon could still be seen in the sky.

  20. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  1. Ultrastructural description of Ceratomyxa tenuispora (Myxozoa), a parasite of the marine fish Aphanopus carbo (Trichiuridae), from the Atlantic coast of Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Graça; Costa, Graça; Azevedo, Carlos

    2007-09-01

    The first ultrastructural description of Ceratomyxa tenuispora Kabata, 1960 (Myxozoa, Bivalvulida) from Madeira Island (Portugal), a parasite found in the gall bladder of the commercially important black-scabbard fish, Aphanopus carbo Lowe is presented. This parasite possesses spherical to ellipsoidal disporous trophozoites. Spores have a central crescent-shaped body averaging 11.0 microm in length, 28.5 microm in thickness and 12.1 microm in width. The valves have two long opposite lateral processes (ribbon-like structures or tails), each averaging 173 microm in length. The total thickness of the spore averages 375 microm. The spore has two sub-spherical polar capsules (approximately 5.2 x 4.1 microm), each with a polar filament with 7 to 8 coils. Some ultrastructural aspects of the sporogonic stages are described. The trophozoites develop without contact with epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic membrane has numerous evenly distributed external slender projections about 0.3 to 0.7 microm long. The sporogenesis produces two spores without pansporoblast formation. In the matrix of the capsular primordium, microtubules with an unusual organisation were observed. A binucleate sporoplasm that contains several sporoplasmosomes and dense bodies fills the spore cavity and extends to the tails without penetrating them.

  2. Fine structure of Henneguya hemiodopsis sp. n. (Myxozoa, a parasite of the gills of the Brazilian teleostean fish Hemiodopsis microlepes (Hemiodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Azevedo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A fish-infecting myxosporean, Henneguya hemiodopsis sp. n., found infecting the gills of Hemiodopsis microlepis and collected from the Poty River near the city of Teresina, Brazil, was described based on ultrastructural studies. The parasite occurred within large whitish polysporic plasmodia (up to 200 μm in diameter containing asynchronous developmental sporogonic stages, mainly mature spores. The spores measured 19.7 ± 0.9 μm in total length (n = 30 and the ellipsoidal spore body was 10.8 ± 0.5 μm long, 3.3 ± 0.4 μm wide and 2.5 ± 0.5 μm thick. The spores were composed of two equal shell valves adhering together along the straight suture line, with each valve having equal-sized caudal tapering tails measuring 8.7 ± 0.6 μm in length. The spores were surrounded by a thin anastomosed network of microfibrils, more evident on the tails. There were two symmetric elongated bottle-like polar capsules 3.5 ± 0.3 μm long and 1.0 ± 0.2 μm wide, each with a polar filament with five to six coils. Given the morphological and ultrastructural differences from previously described parasites and the specificity of the host species, we propose a new species, named H. hemiodopsis sp. n.

  3. Morphometric and molecular characterization of Gyrodactylus teuchis Lautraite, Blanc, Thiery, Daniel & Vigneulle, 1999 (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from an Austrian brown trout population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christoph; Bakke, Tor A; Bachmann, Lutz; Weiss, Steven; Harris, Phil D

    2011-12-01

    Gyrodactylus teuchis is a widespread parasite of wild and farmed salmonids throughout Europe. It has been frequently confused with the notifiable pathogen G. salaris, to which it bears a striking morphological similarity. The species is frequently referred to as 'cryptic', and diagnoses are primarily based on molecular evidence. We provide the first comprehensive re-description of G. teuchis from a natural wild brown trout population in the Danube watershed, based on the state of the art morphometrics in addition to standard molecular markers. We demonstrate that despite the lack of uni-variate diagnostic character measurements, G. teuchis can be reliably distinguished from G. salaris using multivariate morphological approaches such as Principal Component Analysis or Canonical Variate Analysis, suggesting that automated diagnostic approaches for G. salaris can be modified to take account of potential G. teuchis in samples. This is the first record of G. teuchis from a host population unlikely to have been modified by human stocking efforts. The morphological variability observed in the samples collected from one site on 1 day reflects the overall level of variation reported for European G. teuchis. We also report new sequence variants of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of the nuclear ribosomal gene cluster with evidence for intra-individual heterogeneity of ITS-1 within this population of G. teuchis.

  4. Endohelminth parasites of the freshwater fish Zoogoneticus purhepechus (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae) from two springs in the Lower Lerma River, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Martínez-Aquino; David Iván Hernández-Mena; Rodolfo Pérez-Rodríguez; Rogelio Aguilar-Aguilar; Gerardo Pérez-Ponce de León

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish the helminthological record of the viviparous fish species Zoogoneticus purhepechus, 72 individuals were collected from 2 localities, La Luz spring (n= 45) and Los Negritos spring (n= 27), both in the lower Lerma River, in Michoacán state, Mexico. Twelve helminth taxa were recovered, 5 adults (the digeneans Margotrema bravoae and Phyllodistomum sp., the cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, the nematode Rhabdochona lichtenfelsi and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus cf....

  5. Parasites in marine food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Most species interactions probably involve parasites. This review considers the extent to which marine ecologists should consider parasites to fully understand marine communities. Parasites are influential parts of food webs in estuaries, temperate reefs, and coral reefs, but their ecological importance is seldom recognized. Though difficult to observe, parasites can have substantial biomass, and they can be just as common as free-living consumers after controlling for body mass and trophic level. Parasites have direct impacts on the energetics of their hosts and some affect host behaviors, with ecosystem-level consequences. Although they cause disease, parasites are sensitive components of ecosystems. In particular, they suffer secondary extinctions due to biodiversity loss. Some parasites can also return to a system after habitat restoration. For these reasons, parasites can make good indicators of ecosystem integrity. Fishing can indirectly increase or decrease parasite populations and the effects of climate change on parasites are likely to be equally as complex.

  6. [Characteristics of the Effect of Cestodes Parasitizing the Fish Intestine on the Activity of the Host Proteinases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, G I; Solovyev, M M

    2016-01-01

    The activity and spectrum of proteinases in the intestines of host fishes change upon infestation with cestodes. Serine proteinases are found to make a greater contribution to the total proteolytic activity. The reduction of proteolytic activity is associated with adsorption of the enzymes of the host on the surface of cestodes, and the increase in the activity is caused by the injury of the intestinal mucosa by the attachment apparatuses of cestodes. The inhibition of proteainase activity indicates the possible participation of microbiota enzymes in protein hydrolyses.

  7. Proctophantastes brayi, n. sp. (Digenea: Zoogonidae) parasite of the deep-sea fish Polymixia Lowe, 1838 from Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouahid, Gabriel; Faliex, Elisabeth; Allienne, Jean-François; Cribb, Thomas H

    2008-03-01

    Proctophantastes brayi n. sp. (Digenea: Zoogonidae; Lepidophyllinae) has been found in the intestine of two species of deep-sea fish Polymixia (silver eye fish) near the island of Erromango in Vanuatu at a depth ranging from 720 to 830 m. Specimen whole mounts, histological and scanning electron microscopy preparations showed that P. brayi differs from the five known species of the genus Proctophantastes (P. abyssorum, P. gillissi, P. glandulosum, P. infundibulum and P. nettastomatis) by the following morphological characters: (i) a slit in the anterior part of the oral sucker, (ii) Laurer's canal is absent, (iii) a more extended periatrial gland than the ones in the other species of Proctophantastes, consisting of divided masses of cells and that form a conspicuous multilobated structure which does not have a membrane-bounded sac, (iv) the distal part of the metraterm has vesicle-like processes which we refer to as metratermal sacs, in addition to atrial sacs, (v) a long extension of the glandular cells surrounding the saccular bladder which extends posteriorly to the excretory pore.

  8. Sequence structure and intragenomic variability of ribosomal ITS2 in monozoic tapeworms of the genus Khawia (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), parasites of cyprinid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Oros, Mikuláš; Scholz, Tomáš

    2012-10-01

    The sequence structure of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was determined for six species of Khawia (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), parasites of cyprinid fish in the Holarctic Region. Homologous intragenomic ITS2 structure was found in Khawia armeniaca, Khawia baltica, and Khawia rossittensis; whereas divergent intragenomic ITS2 copies were detected in Chinese, Japanese, and Slovak isolates of Khawia sinensis and in Khawia japonensis, both parasitic in common carp, and in Khawia saurogobii, recently described from Chinese lizard gudgeon in China. Despite distinct morphological differences between K. saurogobii and K. sinensis, both species display very high level of molecular homogeneity. Variation in number of short repetitive motifs [(GCCT)(n) (GCCC)(n)], [(GTG)(n)], [(ATAC)(n)], [ACGTGT (TCGTGT)(n)], [(GT)(n)], [(GT)(n)], and [(ACCT)(n) (GCCT)(n)] resulted in assortment of ITS2 sequences in four ITS2 variants in K. saurogobii from China, three in Chinese and Japanese isolates of K. sinensis, and five ITS2 variants in K. sinensis from Slovakia. In K. japonensis, the structure and arrangement of microsatellites was different from those of K. sinensis and K. saurogobii. The heterogeneity in the number of two microsatellite regions [(TG)(n); (TTG)(n)] divided ITS2 clones into two variants-first ITS2 variant (472 bp) with (TG)(5) and (TTG)(6), and second variant with (TG)(7) and (TTG)(2) (465 bp). Sequence identity of K. saurogobii with all but one (K. sinensis) congeneric species ranged between 49.5 and 69.2%, which corresponds to the interspecific differences. In contrast, sequence identity of K. saurogobii and K. sinensis (87.6-95.0%) failed into the range of intraspecific variation determined for K. sinensis samples. This close genetic similarity indicates that recently described K. saurogobii may have undergone morphological divergence as a result of ongoing sympatric speciation by host switching.

  9. A new species of Dactylogyrus (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) parasitic on an endangered freshwater fish, Rhodeus atremius atremius, endemic to Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masato; Nagasawa, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    A new dactylogyrid monogenean Dactylogyrus bicorniculus sp. nov. is described from the gills of the kazetoge bitterling, Rhodeus atremius atremius (Jordan and Thompson, 1914), an endemic species in Japan, from Saga Prefecture, northern Kyūshū. D. bicorniculus sp. nov. resembles Dactylogyrus bicornis Malevitskaja, 1941 and Dactylogyrus lophogonus Zhang and Ji, 1980 because they have two common features, a large V-shaped ventral bar and well-developed second marginal hooks. However, the new species is distinguished from these congeners by a shorter penis and an accessory piece. A phylogenetic analysis of 28S rDNA shows that D. bicorniculus sp. nov. is a basal species with the T-shaped ventral bar in the genus. The new species has strict host-specificity to R. a. atremius, one of the endangered freshwater fishes in Japan, and may face the danger of co-extinction with its host.

  10. Parasite treatment reduced Flavobacterium columnare infection in tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and parasite Trichodina are common pathogens of cultured fish. The authors conducted a study to evaluate whether treatment of Trichodina parasitized tilapia with formalin would improve fish survival and reduce F. columnare infection in fish. Tilapia parasitized by...

  11. [Anisakiasis - a little-known parasitic zoonosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoň, Jan; Harna, Jiří; Pijáček, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Parasites of the family Anisakidae cause enteric parasitic zoonoses developing after consumption of inadequately cooked marine fish. Cases of such diseases are reported mainly from Japan or other countries where raw or uncooked fish are traditionally consumed. The presented short communication briefly reports detection of larvae of Pseudoterranova spp., parasites of the family Anisakidae, in a fresh chilled angler-fish (Lophius piscatorius) bought at a retail store in the Czech Republic.

  12. Ultrastructural studies of Henneguya rhamdia n. sp. (Myxozoa) a parasite from the Amazon teleost fish, Rhamdia quelen (Pimelodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Edilson; Tajdari, Jessica; Azevedo, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Henneguya rhamdia n. sp. is described in the gill filaments of the teleost fish Rhamdia quelen, collected from the Peixe Boi River, State of Pará, Brazil. This myxosporean produced spherical to ellipsoidal plasmodia, up to 300 microm in diameter, which contained developmental stages, including spores. Several dense bodies up to 2 microm in diameter were observed among the spores. The spore body was ellipsoidal (13.1 microm in length, 5.2 microm in width, and 2.5 microm in thickness) and each of the two valves presented a tapering tail (36.9 microm in length). These valves surrounded the binucleated sporoplasm cell and two equal ellipsoidal polar capsules (4.7 x 1.1 microm), which contained 10-11 (rarely 12) polar filament coils. The sporoplasm contained sporoplasmosomes with a laterally eccentric dense structure with a half-crescent section. Based on the data obtained by electron microscopy and on the host specificity, the spores differed from previously described Henneguya species, mainly in their shape and size, number and arrangement of the polar filament coils, and sporoplasmosome morphology.

  13. Myxobolus insignis sp. n. (Myxozoa, Myxosporea, Myxobolidae, a parasite of the Amazonian teleost fish Semaprochilodus insignis (Osteichthyes, Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC Eiras

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A new myxosporean species is described from the fish Semaprochilodus insignis captured from the Amazon River, near Manaus. Myxobolus insignis sp. n. was located in the gills of the host forming plasmodia inside the secondary gill lamellae. The spores had a thick wall (1.5-2 µm all around their body, and the valves were symmetrical and smooth. The spores were a little longer than wide, with rounded extremities, in frontal view, and oval in lateral view. They were 14.5 (14-15 µm long by 11.3 (11-12 µm wide and 7.8 (7-8 µm thick. Some spores showed the presence of a triangular thickening of the internal face of the wall near the posterior end of the polar capsules. This thickening could occur in one of the sides of the spore or in both sides. The polar capsules were large and equal in size surpassing the midlength of the spore. They were oval with the posterior extremity rounded, and converging anteriorly with tapered ends. They were 7.6 (7-8 µm long by 4.2 (3-5 µm wide, and the polar filament formed 6 coils slightly obliquely to the axis of the polar capsule. An intercapsular appendix was present. There was no mucous envelope or distinct iodinophilous vacuole.

  14. Biodiversity of parasites in a freshwater environment with respect to pollution: metazoan parasites of chub (Leuciscus cephalus L.) as a model for statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, L; Gelnar, M; Sebelová, S

    1998-10-01

    This paper represents an attempt to evaluate the environmental indicative potential of the biodiversity of monogenean parasites using hierarchically structured species-abundance data. A logical set of statistical methods integrating standard diversity indices, a novel approach to quantitative analysis of cumulative species-abundance curves and species-abundance models was applied for this purpose. Applicability of biodiversity measures was demonstrated using experimental data from a 1-year study on the ecology of metazoan parasites of chub (Leuciscus cephalus) in one polluted and one control site in the Morava river, Czech Republic. Analyses at the component community level revealed a significant decrease in the number of parasite species with a more equal distribution of their abundances in the polluted site compared with the control site. In order to reach a better understanding of the changes, diversity of Monogenea as a dominant part of the community was further examined within categories of species created according to: (1) specificity of infection (specialists and generalists), (2) monogenean genera (Dactylogyrus, Gyrodactylus and Paradiplozoon) and (3) inhabited guilds (skin + fins, gills). Assemblages of specialists in the polluted site exhibited a significantly reduced species richness and unequal distribution of abundances. The opposite pattern was observed in the case of generalists. The influence of pollution was also reflected by the distribution of species abundances within communities of Dactylogyrus and Paradiplozoon, while no significant shift was identified in the genus Gyrodactylus.

  15. New circumscription of freshwater fish parasites Monobothrium diesing, 1863 and Promonobothrium mackiewicz, 1968 (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea) using morphological and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomáš; Oros, Mikuláš; Choudhury, Anindo; Brabec, Jan; Waeschenbach, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Two genera of caryophyllidean cestodes, Monobothrium Diesing, 1863 and Promonobothrium Mackiewicz, 1968 , from cypriniform fishes (cyprinids and suckers) in the Holarctic Region, are revised using morphological and molecular evidence. Monobothrium, which includes morphologically distinct species that occur in European cyprinids (Cyprinidae) and North American suckers (Catostomidae), is separated into 3 genera. Monobothrium becomes monotypic and is represented by its type species, Monobothrium wageneri Nybelin, 1922 , which occurs in European tench, Tinca tinca (Cyprinidae). Monobothrium auriculatum Kulakovskaya, 1961 from Leuciscus danilevskii (Cyprinidae) in the Ukraine, is tentatively transferred to Caryophyllaeus Gmelin, 1790 as Caryophyllaeus auriculatus ( Kulakovskaya, 1961 ) n. comb. because it possesses morphological characteristics considered to be typical of Caryophyllaeus but which are absent in Monobothrium (shape of the scolex, presence of a seminal receptacle, short neck, and absence of a large, muscular papilla surrounding the large gonopores). The 5 remaining Monobothrium species from suckers in North America are transferred to Promonobothrium based on shared morphological features and molecular data. Species of Promonobothrium differ from M. wageneri by having an external seminal vesicle (absent in M. wageneri), the absence of postovarian vitelline follicles in North American species (present in M. wageneri), and a scolex that is digitiform papillate, loculopapillate, or loculotruncate, i.e., equipped with weak loculi and a terminal introvert (vs. claviform, bluntly ended, with 6 weak, shallow, longitudinal grooves in M. wageneri). Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes ssr- and lsrDNA placed Promonobothrium minytremi within a clade of 3 of the 5 North American Monobothrium species. The position of M. wageneri, although distinct from the remaining Monobothrium species, is unresolved within the Caryophyllidea. This study further

  16. A survey of nematodes of the genus Cucullanus Müller, 1777 (Nematoda, Seuratoidea) parasitic in marine fishes off Brazil, including description of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabiano M; Pereira, Felipe B; Pantoja, Camila; Soares, Iris A; Pereira, Aldenice N; Timi, Juan T; Scholz, Tomáš; Luque, José L

    2015-11-05

    A taxonomic survey of six nematode species (including three new taxa) from the genus Cucullanus Müller, 1777, parasites of marine fishes off the Brazilian coast, is provided. Nematodes were studied using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cucullanus gastrophysi n. sp. parasitic in Lophius gastrophysus Miranda Ribeiro differs from its congeners by the combination of the following features: shape and number of sclerotized structures in the oesophastome (a pair of lateral elongate structures and a single small reniform one), position of deirids and excretory pore (both anterior to oesophagus base), spicule length and spicule/body length ratio (0.97-1.29 mm and 6.5-10.5%, respectively), morphology and length of gubernaculum (V-shaped, 107-135 µm long). Cucullanus protrudens n. sp. from Pagrus pagrus (Linnaeus) has the cloacal lips broadly protruded, which differentiates it from several species of Cucullanus; other features, e.g., the length of spicules and gubernaculum (400-415 µm and 91-103 µm, respectively), arrangement of caudal papillae and position of excretory pore (slightly posterior to oesophagus-intestine junction) also characterize this species. Cucullanus pseudopercis n. sp. from Pseudopercis semifasciata (Cuvier) has deirids and excretory pore posterior to the oesophagus-intestine junction, which distinguishes the species from most of the congeners; furthermore, the arrangement of caudal papillae in combination with the length of spicules and gubernaculum (1.0-1.5 mm and 178-196 µm, respectively) separate this species from other taxa. Newly collected specimens of C. cirratus Müller, 1777 (type species of the genus) from Urophycis brasiliensis (Kaup), C. pedroi from Conger orbignianus Valenciennes (type host of the species) and C. genypteri Sardella, Navone & Timi, 1997 from Genypterus brasiliensis Regan, were studied as well. Comparisons between newly collected samples and the taxonomic data available for each respective species revealed

  17. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  18. Treatment of fish parasites. 11. Effects of different benzimidazole derivatives (albendazole, mebendazole, fenbendazole) on Glugea anomala, Moniez, 1887 (Microsporidia): ultrastructural aspects and efficacy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahl, G; Benini, J

    1998-01-01

    Three different benzimidazole derivatives, albendazole [methyl-5-(propylthio)-2-benzimidazolcarbamate], mebendazole (methyl-5-benzoyl-2-benzimidazolcarbamatic acid methyl ester), and fenbendazole [methyl-5-(phenylthio)-2-benzimidazolcarbamate] were tested in vivo against Glugea anomala parasitizing the connective tissue of sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Naturally infected sticklebacks were incubated in aerated plastic aquaria (10 1) at 22 degrees C in water containing 0, 1, 5, 10, or 50 micrograms of either albendazole, mebendazole or febendazole for 2 or 6 h. For intermittent treatment, 2 micrograms substance was administered three times for 6 h at intervals of 36 h. At the ultrastructural level, at all developmental stages of G. anomala there were no significant differences in the kind of damage caused by either albendazole, mebendazole, or febendazole. Starting with a dose of 1 microgram/ml for 2 h, each of the drugs irreversibly damaged uni- and multinucleate meronts, sporogonial plasmodia, and sporoblasts. Disorganized spores were also observed. Treatment with higher doses (10 micrograms/ml, 2 or 6 h) caused malformations of the merogonic and the sporogonic stages, a significant reduction in the number of ribosomes, and disruptions of the nuclear membranes. The first recognizable treatment effect was an enlargement of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. In the sporogonial plasmodia, the membranes of the sporophorous vesicle envelopes were lumpy or even completely destroyed. After incubation with the highest dose (50 micrograms/ml, 6 h), microtubules were apparent within the karyoplasm of the uninucleate meronts. After interval treatment, all forms of damage were intensified, especially in the mature spores. When treatment was done three times at low doses (3 x 2 micrograms/ml, 6 h, 36-h intervals), spore infectivity was drastically lowered. Therefore, it seems likely that an intermittent regimen of medicinal baths can be successfully applied against

  19. Abundance of host fish and frequency of glochidial parasitism in fish assessed in field and laboratory settings and frequency of juvenile mussels or glochidia recovered from hatchery-held fish, central and southeastern Texas, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher L.; Stevens, Charrish L.; Echo-Hawk, Patricia D.; Johnson, Nathan A.; Moring, James B.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012–13, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), completed the first phase of a two-phase study of mussel host-fish relations for five endemic mussel species in central and southeastern Texas that were State-listed as threatened on January 17, 2010: (1) Texas fatmucket (Lampsilis bracteata), (2) golden orb (Quadrula aurea), (3) smooth pimpleback (Quadrula houstonensis), (4) Texas pimpleback (Quadrula petrina), and (5) Texas fawnsfoot (Truncilla macrodon). On October 6, 2011, the USFWS announced the completion of a status review and determined that the five mussel species warranted listing under the Endangered Species Act; however, listing of these species at that time was precluded by higher priority listing actions, and currently (December 2014), they remained unlisted.

  20. Helminth parasites of atherinopsid freshwater fishes (Osteichthyes: Atheriniformes from central Mexico Helmintos parásitos de aterinópsidos de agua dulce (Osteichthyes: Atheriniformes del centro de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Lira-Guerrero

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Between May 1997 and September 1998, 270 atherinopsids belonging to 7 fish species were analyzed for helminths in 6 lakes located in central Mexico. In addition, a database with all the available previous records of helminth parasites of atherinopsids was built. Based on both information sources, we analyze the composition of the helminth fauna parasitizing atherinopsid freshwater fishes from central Mexico, in order to determine some general species compositional patterns. The helminth fauna parasitizing this fish family in central Mexico is composed by 10 digeneans, 13 cestodes, 1 acanthocephalan, and 8 nematodes (24 of them as larval stage. Individual species richness ranged from 1 to 22 helminth species. Feeding habits of the hosts are identified as the main factor in determining helminth species composition (22 of them are acquired through ingestion. Helminth species composition of almost all host species was dominated by generalist helminth species. Only 2 specialist species were found: Allocreadium mexicanum and Spinitectus osorioi, representing the core helminth fauna of this group of fishes. These results corroborate the hypothesis that the parasite fauna in freshwater fishes is largely circumscribed by higher levels of monophyletic host taxa.Entre mayo de 1997 y septiembre de 1998, se recolectaron 270 aterinópsidos pertenecientes a 7 especies de peces en busca de helmintos, en 6 lagos del centro de México. Basados en esta información y en los registros previos sobre helmintos en este grupo de hospederos, se construyó una base de datos. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar dicha información, para establecer algunos patrones generales acerca de la composición de los helmintos que los parasitan. Treinta y dos especies de helmintos infectan a los peces de esta familia (10 digéneos, 13 cestodos, 1 acantocefalo y 8 nematodos, 24 de ellas en estado larvario. Los hábitos alimenticios de los aterinópsidos determinan la composici

  1. The fish parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2017-01-01

    , making vaccine strategies feasible. However, there is no prophylactic treatment available and repetitive treatments with auxiliary substances are needed to control the infection. Historically, a variety of drugs and chemicals have been used to combat the disease but due to changing regulations...

  2. Parasite communities in two sparid fishes from the western Mediterranean: a comparative analysis based on samples from three localities off the Algerian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benhamou F.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide the first known comparative assessment of metazoan parasite communities in two taxonomically and ecologically related sparids, Boops boops and Spicara maena, that are common in the coastal infralittoral habitats in the Mediterranean. Using abundant data for infracommunities in three localities off the Algerian coasts of the Mediterranean, we tested the general prediction that the phylogenetic proximity of the two hosts, their overlapping geographical distribution and habitat occupation, as well as the similar feeding habits and diet would contribute to a homogenization of their parasite community composition and structure. The regional fauna of parasites of B. boops and S. maena along the Algerian coasts of the western Mediterranean was species-rich (36 species and dominated by heteroxenous species (27 spp; of these 20 digenean spp.. The phylogenetic relatedness between the two hosts resulted in a large number of shared parasites (56 %, 20 spp.. However, the significant overlap in the parasite faunas of the two sparid hosts and their similar feeding habits and diet did not translate into homogeneous parasite community pattern; a significant differentiation in terms of both, composition and structure, was observed.

  3. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  4. Gyrodactylus aff. mugili Zhukov, 1970 (Monogenoidea: Gyrodactylidae) from the gills of mullets (Mugiliformes: Mugilidae) collected from the inland waters of southern Iraq, with an evalutation of previous records of Gyrodactylus spp. on mullets in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C; Ali, Atheer H; Khamees, Najim R

    2013-11-01

    Gyrodactylus aff. mugili Zhukov, 1970 (Monogenoidea: Gyrodactylidae) is recorded and described from the gill lamellae of 11 of 35 greenback mullet, Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes) (minimum prevalence 31%), from the brackish waters of the Shatt Al-Arab Estuary in southern Iraq. The gyrodactylid was also found on the gill lamellae of one of eight Speigler's mullet, Valamugil speigleri (Bleeker), from the brackish waters of the Shatt Al-Basrah Canal (minimum prevalence 13%). Fifteen Klunzinger's mullet, Liza klunzingeri (Day), and 13 keeled mullet, Liza carinata (Valenciennes), collected and examined from southern Iraqi waters, were apparently uninfected. The gyrodactylids from the greenback mullet and Speigler's mullet were considered to have affinity to G. mugili Zhukov, 1970, and along with G. mugili may represent members of a species complex occurring on mullets in the Indo-Pacific Region. A single damaged gyrodactylid from the external surfaces of the abu mullet, Liza abu (Heckel), was insufficient for species identification. Previously identified species of Gyrodactylus recorded on L. abu in Iraq by various authors were considered possible misidentifications or accidental infections.

  5. Parasites of four ornamental fish from the Chumucuí River (Bragança, Pará, Brazil Parasitas de quatro peixes ornamentais do Rio Chumucuí (Bragança-Pará, Brasil

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    Rodrigo Yudi Fujimoto

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the parasite fauna of four species of ornamental fish collected in the Chumucuí River, municipality of Bragança, Pará, Brazil. From June 2006 to December 2007. Fishes (n=307 belonging to four species were collected, including 23 specimens of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (redeye tetra, 37 Carnegiella strigata (marbled hatchetfish, 7 Chilodus punctatus (spotted headstander, and 240 Astyanax bimaculatus (twospot astyanax. The parasites found belonged to three taxa: monogeneans in the gills, nematodes (larvae of Capillaria sp. and Contracaecum sp. in the digestive tract and liver and acanthocephalans (Quadrigyrus torquatus, Q. brasiliensis and Q. nickoli in the stomach and intestine. Astyanax bimaculatus presented higher prevalence of acanthocephalans in the wet season, and lower prevalence of nematodes in the dry season. The possible importance of these parasites in the exportation of ornamental fish is discussed.O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar a fauna parasitária de quatro espécies de peixes ornamentais capturados no rio Chumucuí, no município de Bragança-PA. Foram coletados um total de 307 peixes pertencentes a 4 espécies, sendo elas: Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (olho de fogo, n = 23, Carnegiella strigata (borboleta, n = 37, Chilodus punctatus (cabeça-para-baixo, n = 7 e Astyanax bimaculatus (lambari, n = 240 coletados de junho de 2006 a dezembro de 2007. Foram observados 3 taxa parasitando os peixes: monogenéticos nas brânquias, nematóides (larvas de Capillaria sp. e Contracaecum sp. no trato digestório e fígado e acantocéfalos (Quadrigyrus torquatus, Q. brasiliensis e Q. nickoli no estômago e intestino. Astyanax bimaculatus apresentou maior prevalência de acantocéfalos na estação chuvosa, menor prevalência de nematóides na estação seca. Discute-se a eventual importância destes parasitas na exportação de peixes ornamentais.

  6. Trichodina colisae (Ciliophora: Trichodinidae: new parasite records for two freshwater fish species farmed in Brazil Trichodina colisae (Ciliophora: Trichodinidae: novo registro de parasito para duas espécies de peixes de água doce cultivadas no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Tomas Jerônimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Family Trichodinidae comprises ciliate protozoa distributed worldwide; they are considered some of the main parasitological agents infecting cultivated fish. However, the trichodinidae parasitizing important fish species cultured in Brazil are unknown, and more taxonomic studies on this group of parasites are required. This research morphologically characterizes Trichodina colisae Asmat & Sultana, (2005 of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus and patinga hybrid (P. mesopotamicus × P. brachypomus cultivated in the central and southeast regions of the country. Fresh assemblies were made from mucus scraped from the skin, fins and gills, fixed with methanol and, subsequently, impregnated with silver nitrate and stained with Giemsa for assessment under light microscopy. This research reports not only the second occurrence of T. colisae in the world, but also its first occurrence in South America.Tricodinídeos são protozoários ciliados móveis com ampla distribuição mundial; são considerados um dos agentes parasitários que mais acometem peixes cultivados. No Brasil, a maioria dos tricodinídeos que parasitam importantes espécies de peixes cultivados são desconhecidos, o que requer mais estudos taxonômicos com esse grupo de parasitos. Este estudo caracteriza morfologicamente Trichodina colisae Asmat & Sultana, 2005 de pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus e do híbrido patinga (P. mesopotamicus × P. brachypomus cultivados, respectivamente, no Centro-Oeste e Sudeste do Brasil. Foram feitas montagens a fresco do raspado de muco da pele, nadadeiras e brânquias, fixados com metanol e, posteriormente, impregnados com nitrato de prata e coradas com Giemsa para avaliação em microscopia óptica. O presente estudo relata não só a segunda ocorrência de T. colisae no mundo, mas também a primeira ocorrência na América do Sul.

  7. Integrated parasite management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jesper Hedegaard; Madsen, Henry; Van, Phan Thi

    2015-01-01

    Fishborne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) are an emerging problem and there is now a consensus that, in addition to wild-caught fish, fish produced in aquaculture present a major food safety risk, especially in Southeast Asia where aquaculture is important economically. Current control programs target ...... that target critical control points in the aquaculture production cycle identified from a thorough understanding of FZT and host biology and epidemiology. We present recommendations for an integrated parasite management (IPM) program for aquaculture farms.......Fishborne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) are an emerging problem and there is now a consensus that, in addition to wild-caught fish, fish produced in aquaculture present a major food safety risk, especially in Southeast Asia where aquaculture is important economically. Current control programs target...

  8. Is a vertebrate a better host for a parasite than an invertebrate host? Fecundity of Proctoeces cf lintoni (Digenea: Fellodistomidae), a parasite of fish and gastropods in northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Marcelo Enrique; Alvarez, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The fecundity, the relationship between fecundity and worm size, as well as abundance of the adult worm Proctoeces cf. lintoni (Digenea: Fellodistomidae) in four gastropod hosts (keyhole limpets of the genus Fissurella) and one vertebrate host, the clingfish Sicyases sanguineus from northern Chile, were compared. Worms obtained from Fissurella latimarginata were smaller than those from Fissurella maxima, Fissurella limbata, and S. sanguineus. The mean fecundity of parasites from Fissurella crassa was significantly lower than those from F. limbata, F. maxima and S. sanguineus. For all invertebrate hosts, there were significant, positive relationships between worm size and fecundity, and the slopes of the regression did not differ significantly for the invertebrate hosts. Parasites of the keyhole limpet F. limbata and the clingfish showed the highest intensity, prevalence, and mean fecundity, and these species must be considered to be the hosts in which P. cf lintoni shows the best fitness.

  9. Hematologia de teleósteos brasileiros com infecção parasitária. I. Variáveis do Leporinus macrocephalus Garavelo e Britski, 1988 (Anostomidae e Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 (Characidae Haematology of parasitized Brazilian teleost fishes. I. Parameters of Leporinus macrocephalus Garavelo and Britski, 1988 (Anostomidae and Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 (Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilermando Perecin

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Espécimes de Leporinus macrocephalus (piauçu e de Piaractus mesopotamicus (pacu foram colhidos em piscicultura do município de Franca (SP para avaliação dos efeitos da infecção parasitária sobre a taxa de hemoglobina e de hematócrito, a concentração de hemoglobina corpuscular média (CHCM, o fator relativo de condição (Kn e a distribuição percentual de células sangüíneas de defesa orgânica (leucócitos e trombócitos. Ambas as espécies apresentavam-se parasitadas por monogenea ou por monogenea e outros parasitas: monogenea e Trichodina sp; monogenea e Lernaea cyprinacea; monogenea e Piscinoodinium pillulare; monogenea e Ichthyophthirius multifiliis; monogenea, I. multifiliis e Trichodina sp. Os resultados demonstraram que os parâmetros estudados em L. macrocephalus e em P. mesopotamicus não foram significativamente (p > 0,05 alterados pelo parasitismo. A análise de regressão linear mostrou correlação negativa (p > 0,05 entre linfócitos e trombócitos em L. macrocephalus e correlação positiva (p > 0,01 da taxa de hemoglobina com o peso e com o comprimento total em P. mesopotamicus.Specimens of cultivated Leporinus macrocephalus (piauçu and Piaractus mesopotamicus (pacu were collected in a fishfarm at Franca, SP. Effects of parasite infection upon hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, condition factor (Kn and differential count of defense cells (leucocyte and thrombocyte were evaluated. Both fish species were parasitized by monogenean; monogenean and Trichodina sp; monogenean and Lernaea cyprinacea; monogenean and Piscinoodinium pillulare; monogenean and Ichthyophthirius miltifiliis; monogenean, I. multifiliis and Trichodina sp. Parasitism did not influence (p > 0.05 the studied haematological characteristics in L. macrocephalus and P. mesopotamicus. Linnear regression showed negative correlation (p > 0.05 between lymphocytes and thrombocytes in L. macrocephalus and positive

  10. Parasites of commercial shrimps and fishes in Argentine sea: on the adult and metacercaria of Opecoeloides feliciae n. sp. (Digenea: Opecoelidae

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    Sergio Roberto Martorelli

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Opecoeloides feliciae n. sp., first record of opecoelid metacercariae in commercial shrimps of South Atlantic Ocean, parasitizing Cynoscion striatus (adults and Artemesia longinaris (metacercariae, is described, illustrated and compared with related species of the genus. Adults, immature worms and metacercariae are compared, and rates of prevalence and intensity of infection are also given.

  11. Efectos del parasitismo sobre el tejido branquial en peces cultivados: estudio parasitologico e histopatologico Effect of the parasitism on the gill tissue of cultivated fishes: parasitological and histopathological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Laterça Martins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred four out of 225 diagnosticated cases were myxosporidian, monogenean, Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 and bacterial diseases in Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 (pacu, Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818 (tambaqui and tambacu, at Aquaculture Center, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, between 1992 and 1995. The gills were fixed in 10% buffered formalin solution to posterior histologic routine. It was observed Henneguya sp. cysts into the capillaries of the secondary lamellae, encapsulated by the respiratory epithelium cells. It provoked adherence of the adjacent lamellae, hyperplasia, congestion, oedema and epithelium displacement. Monogeneans infestations by Anacanthorus penilabiatus Boeger, Husak & Martins, 1995 and Ancyrocephalinae sub-family caused light inflammatory reaction and hyperplasia. In severe infestations was observed hyperplasia of primary lamellae, necrosis, oedema, respiratory epithelium displacement, ruptured pillar cells and telangiectasis. Response to I. multifiliis was limited to surrounding epithelial cells in young fishes and hyperplasia, necrosis, inflammatory infiltrate and oedema in old fishes. Such lesions iniciate hyperplasic and oedematous process that with inflammation of the parasitic sites, provoked alterations over gases and ions interchange surface and consequently fish metabolism.

  12. Parasitic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  13. Parasitic Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complication...

  14. Cat parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Vošická, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    The content of this bachelor thesis describes a different variety of cat parasites. This study discovers that the most infected group of the outdoor cats due to the fact that these animals are not provided with the same care as the household pets. Those cats are usually not vaccinated, not rid of worms, no one takes care of their fur and so they tend to become a host for the parasites. There are several kinds of parasites which attack cats. Among those belong the skin parasites like a cat fle...

  15. Can parasites be indicators of free-living diversity? Relationships between the species richness and abundance of larval trematodes with that of local fishes and benthos

    OpenAIRE

    Hechinger, Ryan F.; Lafferty, K D; Huspeni, T C; A. J. Brooks; Kuris, A M

    2007-01-01

    Measuring biodiversity is difficult. This has spawned efforts to seek taxa whose species richness correlates with the species richness of other taxa. Such indicator taxa could then reduce the time and cost of assessing the biodiversity of the more extensive community. However, the search for species richness correlations has yielded mixed results. This may primarily be due to the lack of functional relationships between the taxa studied. Trematode parasites are highly promising bioindica...

  16. Notes on helminth parasites of tuna fishes (Scombridae in Brazil Notas sobre los helmintos parásitos del atún (Scombridae en Brasil

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    Márcia Cristina Nascimento-Justo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Scombridae from the coast of Rio de Janeiro, southwest Atlantic Ocean were found to be parasitized with species of Didymozoidae (Digenea: Thunnus atlanticus (Lesson a new host record for Nephrodidymotrema ahi Yamaguti, 1970, Didymocystis neothunni (Yamaguti, 1970, and Didymozoon longicolle (Yamaguti, 1970; Thunnus obesus (Lowe parasitized by Didymozoon longicolle and reported as a new host for Nephrodidymotrema ahi; Thunnus albacares (Bonaterre parasitized by Nephrodidymotrema ahi, and Katsuwonus pelamis (Linnaeus by Didymozoon longicolle. Measurements, figures, and parameters of infection are presented.Cuatro especies de Scombridae de la costa de Río de Janeiro, suroeste del océano Atlántico, se reportan parasitados con diferentes especies de Didymozoidae (Digenea: Thunnus atlanticus (Lesson un registro de nuevo huésped para Nephrodidymotrema ahi Yamaguti, 1970, Didymocystis neothunni (Yamaguti, 1970 y para Didymozoon longicolle (Yamaguti, 1970; Thunnus obesus (Lowe parasitado por Didymozoon longicolle, se indica como nuevo huésped para Nephrodidymotrema ahi; Thunnus albacares (Bonaterre parasitados por Nephrodidymotrema ahi y Katsuwonus pelamis (Linnaeus por Didymozoon longicolle. Se presentan las mediciones, las figuras y los parámetros de la infección.

  17. Estudo comparativo dos helmintos parasitos de peixes do rio Mogi Guassu, coletados nas excursões realizadas entre 1927 e 1985 Comparative study of helminth parasites of fishes from Mogi Guassu river, collected during expeditions between 1927 and 1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kohn

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho abrange o parasitismo por nematóides, acantocéfalos, trematódeos e cestóides de 1027 peixes pertencentes a 45 espécies do rio Mogi Guassu, examinados nos anos de 1927, 1946, 1947, 1962, 1983 e 1985, como uma contribuição ao conhecimento da fauna parasitária em 58 anos. São relacionadas 32 espécies de nematóides, 21 de trematódeos, três de acantocéfalos e duas de cestóides. São referidos novos hospedeiros para Cucullanus pinnai, Spirocamallanus inopinatus e Travnema travnema, para o trematódeo Pararhipidocotyle jeffersoni e para o acantocéfalo Gorytocephalus spectabilis. São apresentadas medidas adicionais de Creptotrema lynchi, tabelas, gráficos e a lista dos hospedeiros examinados e seus parasitos.This paper concerns the parasitism of Nematoda, Trematoda, Acanthocephala and Cestoda from 1027 fishes of 45 species from Mogi Guassu river, examined in the years 1927, 1946, 1947, 1962, 1983 and 1985 as a contribution to the knowledge of the parasitological fauna in 58 years. Thirty two species of nematodes, 21 of trematodes, 3 of acanthocephalans and 2 of cestodes are reported. New hosts are presented for the nematodes Cucullanus pinnai, Spirocamallanus inopinatus and Travnema travnema, for the trematode Pararhipidocotyle jeffersoni and for the acanthocephalan Gorytocephalus spectabilis. New measurements for the trematode Creptotrema lynchy, tables, graphics and a list of the examined hosts with their parasites are presented.

  18. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Raes, G.; Ghassabeh, G.H.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pontes, M.J.S.L.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of

  19. Host-parasite relationships of Rhabdochona kidderi Pearse, 1936 (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) in fishes of the Lacantún River in the Lacandon rain forest of Chiapas State, southern Mexico, with a key to Mexican species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, František; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; González-Solís, David; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan M

    2012-05-01

    For the first time, the nematode Rhabdochona kidderi kidderi Pearse, 1936 (Rhabdochonidae) was recorded from fishes of the Lacantún River (Usumacinta River basin) in the Lacandon rain forest, Chiapas State, southern Mexico. Amphilophus nourissati (Allgayer) and Theraps irregularis Günther (both Perciformes: Cichlidae) were found to be the only definitive hosts in the locality, whereas Eugerres mexicanus (Steindachner) (Perciformes: Gerreidae), Ariopsis sp., Cathorops aguadulce (Meek) and Potomarius nelsoni (Evermann & Goldsborough) (all Siluriformes: Ariidae), Ictalurus furcatus (Valenciennes) (Siluriformes: Ictaluridae) and Strongylura hubbsi Collette (Beloniformes: Belonidae) all harboured the nematode's fourth-stage larva and only served as paratenic hosts. All these fish species represent new host records for this parasite. The morphology of both adults and larvae was studied in detail by light and scanning electron microscopy, and some conspecific museum specimens from three other host species were also examined for comparison. Rhabdochona ictaluri Aguilar-Aguilar, Rosas-Valdez & Pérez-Ponce de León, 2010 is considered here to be a junior synonym of R. kidderi kidderi. A high degree of the variability of some morphological and biometrical features (deirid shape, left spicule length) and an unusually wide range of hosts suggest that R. kidderi may represent a species complex, but further studies are necessary in this respect. A key to Rhabdochona species and subspecies occurring in Mexico is provided.

  20. Myxobolus nanokiensis sp. nov. (Myxozoa: Bivalvulidae), a new pathogenic myxosporean parasite causing haemorrhagic gill disease in cultured Indian major carp fish, Labeo rohita (Hamilton 1822) in Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harpreet; Katoch, Anu; Dar, Shoaib Ali; Singh, Ranjeet

    2015-09-01

    The plasmodia of Myxobolus nanokiensis sp. nov. were found infecting gills of Labeo rohita (Hamilton 1822) The infection rate was found to be 36.67 % (30 fishes were examined and 11 fishes were infected) in the Nanoki pond in Patiala district Punjab. Numerous minute plasmodia each filled with 150-200 spores were detected. Smear of scrapped blood-tinged mucous from gills exhibited millions of spores. Histological sections also indicated numerous plasmodia measuring 38.33-40.33 μm in diameter in the blood vessels of gill filaments. Spores of M. nanokiensis sp. nov. were elongate pyriform in shape and morphologically unique in having sharply pointed beak-like anterior end. Spores measured 9.28 μm × 5.71 μm in size. Polar capsules were equal, pyriform, 5.71 × 2.73 μm in size, each having polar filament with 7-9 coils. The present species has been proposed as new on the basis of its peculiar shape and morphometrics. This is the first report of any myxobolid infection in the farmland fishes in Punjab (India). The plasmodia in the gill filaments were of intralamellar vascular type (LV) and were present within the entire length of the filament. These plasmodia caused hemorrhage, necrosis of the blood vessels and cellular infiltration.

  1. Parasite fauna of farmed Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Uganda.

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    Akoll, Peter; Konecny, Robert; Mwanja, Wilson W; Nattabi, Juliet K; Agoe, Catherine; Schiemer, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    An intensive parasite survey was conducted in 2008 to better understand the parasite fauna occurrence, distribution and diversity in the commercial aquaculture fish species in Uganda. A total of 265 fish collected from hatcheries and grow-out systems were examined for parasites using routine parasitological techniques. The survey yielded 17 parasite species: 11 from Oreochromis niloticus and ten from Clarias gariepinus. Four parasites-Amirthalingamia macracantha, Monobothrioides sp., Zoogonoides sp. and a member of the family Amphilinidae-were recorded for the first time in the country. The parasite diversity was similar between hosts; however, O. niloticus was dominated by free-living stage-transmitted parasites in lower numbers, whereas both trophically and free-living stage-transmitted parasites were equally represented in C. gariepinus in relatively high intensities. The patterns in parasite numbers and composition in the two hosts reflect differences in fish habitat use and diet. A shift in parasite composition from monoxenous species-dominated communities in small-sized fish to heteroxenous in large fishes was recorded in both hosts. This was linked to ontogenetic feeding changes and prolonged exposure to parasites. Polyculture systems showed no effect on parasite intensity and composition. The gills were highly parasitized, mainly by protozoans and monogeneans. Generally, the occurrence and diversity of parasites in these fish species highlight the likelihood of disease outbreak in the proposed intensive aquaculture systems. This calls for raising awareness in fish health management among potential farmers, service providers and researchers.

  2. Same barcode, different biology: differential patterns of infectivity, specificity and pathogenicity in two almost identical parasite strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Raúl; Bakke, Tor A; Harris, Philip D

    2014-07-01

    Two Norwegian isolates of the monogenean Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 with identical cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcodes from different hosts, show highly divergent biological and behavioural characteristics. The Lierelva parasite strain, typically infecting Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., grew exponentially on Atlantic salmon, but the Pålsbufjorden parasite strain, commonly infecting Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus L., grew slowly on both hosts and was non-pathogenic to Atlantic salmon. Both parasite strains reproduced successfully on Arctic charr, but the Atlantic salmon-infecting Lierelva strain grew faster on both hosts. Experiments with isolated worms revealed differences in reproductive rates which may account for the observed population differences. Atlantic salmon parasites consistently gave birth at an earlier age than the Arctic charr parasites, with the differential increasing from 1 day for the first birth up to 2-4 days for the third birth. Arctic charr-infecting parasites were more active on Atlantic salmon than salmon parasites on Arctic charr, a behavioural strategy leading to enhanced G. salaris mortality. Sequencing of 10 kb of nuclear genomic markers revealed only four single nucleotide polymorphisms, confirming that isolates of G. salaris with differences in fitness traits influencing establishment, fecundity and behaviour may be remarkably similar at a molecular level. The framework for reporting and control of G. salaris requires re-appraisal in light of the discovery of variants with such divergent biology.

  3. Emerging food-borne parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorny, P; Praet, N; Deckers, N; Gabriel, S

    2009-08-07

    Parasitic food-borne diseases are generally underrecognised, however they are becoming more common. Globalization of the food supply, increased international travel, increase of the population of highly susceptible persons, change in culinary habits, but also improved diagnostic tools and communication are some factors associated with the increased diagnosis of food-borne parasitic diseases worldwide. This paper reviews the most important emerging food-borne parasites, with emphasis on transmission routes. In a first part, waterborne parasites transmitted by contaminated food such as Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium and Giardia are discussed. Also human fasciolosis, of which the importance has only been recognised in the last decades, with total numbers of reported cases increasing from less than 3000 to 17 million, is looked at. Furthermore, fasciolopsiosis, an intestinal trematode of humans and pigs belongs to the waterborne parasites as well. A few parasites that may be transmitted through faecal contamination of foods and that have received renewed attention, such as Toxoplasma gondii, or that are (re-)emerging, such as Trypanosoma cruzi and Echinococcus spp., are briefly reviewed. In a second part, meat-borne parasite infections are reviewed. Humans get infected by eating raw or undercooked meat infected with cyst stages of these parasites. Meat inspection is the principal method applied in the control of Taenia spp. and Trichinella spp. However, it is often not very sensitive, frequently not practised, and not done for T. gondii and Sarcocystis spp. Meat of reptiles, amphibians and fish can be infected with a variety of parasites, including trematodes (Opisthorchis spp., Clonorchis sinensis, minute intestinal flukes), cestodes (Diphyllobothrium spp., Spirometra), nematodes (Gnathostoma, spp., anisakine parasites), and pentastomids that can cause zoonotic infections in humans when consumed raw or not properly cooked. Another important zoonotic food

  4. Parasitism enhances tilapia susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of columnaris disease. Many commercially important freshwater fish worldwide are susceptible to columnaris disease that can result in high fish mortality. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a protozoan parasite in many ...

  5. Evidence that sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) complete their life cycle within a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes by parasitizing fishes in inland lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Twohey, Michael B.; Miehls, Scott M.; Cwalinski, Tim A; Godby, Neal A; Lochet, Aude; Slade, Jeffrey W.; Jubar, Aaron K.; Siefkes, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) invaded the upper Laurentian Great Lakes and feeds on valued fish. The Cheboygan River, Michigan, USA, is a large sea lamprey producing tributary to Lake Huron and despite having a renovated dam 2 km from the river mouth that presumably blocks sea lamprey spawning migrations, the watershed upstream of the dam remains infested with larval sea lamprey. A navigational lock near the dam has been hypothesized as the means of escapement of adult sea lampreys from Lake Huron and source of the upper river population (H1). However, an alternative hypothesis (H2) is that some sea lampreys complete their life cycle upstream of the dam, without entering Lake Huron. To evaluate the alternative hypothesis, we gathered angler reports of lamprey wounds on game fishes upstream of the dam, and captured adult sea lampreys downstream and upstream of the dam to contrast abundance, run timing, size, and statolith microchemistry. Results indicate that a small population of adult sea lampreys (n life cycle upstream of the dam during 2013 and 2014. This is the most comprehensive evidence that sea lampreys complete their life history within a tributary of the upper Great Lakes, and indicates that similar landlocked populations could occur in other watersheds. Because the adult sea lamprey population upstream of the dam is small, complete elimination of the already low adult escapement from Lake Huron might allow multiple control tactics such as lampricides, trapping, and sterile male release to eradicate the population.

  6. Parasitic copepods in the nasal fossae of five fish species (Characiformes from the upper Paraná river floodplain, Paraná, Brazil = Copépodes parasitos de fossas nasais de cinco espécies de peixes (Characiformes da planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná, Paraná, Brasil

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    Ana Carolina Figueiredo Lacerda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work had the objective to study parasitic copepods in thenasal fossae of fish from the upper Paraná river floodplain. Fish were captured in different locations of the floodplain in March, June and September, 2004. A total of 73 specimens (Characiformes were collected, belonging to 4 distinct families and 5 species: Acestrorhynchus lacustris (Acestrorhynchidae, Schizodon borellii (Anostomidae, Prochilodus lineatus (Prochilodontidae, Serrasalmus marginatus and Serrasalmus maculatus (Serrasalmidae. Among 73 fishes examined, 53 were parasitized by nasal fossae copepods, varying from 1 to 146 parasites per host. Parasites found belonged to 3 known species: Gamidactylus jaraquensis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984; Gamispatulus schizodontis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984; and Rhinergasilus piranhus Boeger & Thatcher, 1988. There were differences in parasite corporal measurements and in the quantity of parasites per host in relation to copepod parasites from the Amazon region. The present study constitutes one of the few studies of identification of copepod parasites in the nasal fossae of fish from the Southern region of Brazil.O presente trabalho teve como objetivo o estudo de copépodes parasitos de fossas nasais de peixes da planície de inundação do alto Rio Paraná. As coletas foram realizadas em diversos pontos da planície nos meses de março, junho e setembro de 2004. Foram coletados 73 exemplares de peixes da ordem Characiformes, de quatrofamílias distintas, pertencentes a cinco espécies: Acestrorhynchus lacustris, Prochilodus lineatus, Schizodon borellii, Serrasalmus maculatus e Serrasalmus marginatus. Dentre os 73 peixes examinados, 53 encontravam-se parasitados por copépodes de fossas nasais,variando de 1 a 146 parasitos por peixe. Os parasitos encontrados pertenciam a três espécies conhecidas: Gamidactylus jaraquensis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984; Gamispatulus schizodontis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984 e Rhinergasilus piranhus Boeger & Thatcher

  7. A new species of Hedruris Nitzsch, 1821 (Nematoda: Hedruridae) parasitic in the freshwater fish Oligosarcus jenynsii (Günther, 1864) (Characidae) from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, María Alejandra; Timi, Juan Tomás

    2016-11-01

    Nematodes belonging to genus Hedruris Nitzsch, 1821 (Nematoda: Hedruridae) were found in the stomach of the freshwater fish Oligosarcus jenynsii (Günther, 1864) (Characidae) from a shallow eutrophic lake in Argentina. Morphological comparisons with congeneric relatives showed that these nematodes belong to a new species, for which H. bifida n. sp. is proposed. Hedruris bifida n. sp. can be distinguished from its congeners by the following combination of characters: bifid deirids, absence of precloacal papillae and nine pairs of postcloacal papillae and non-mammillated eggs. The new species closely resembles Hedruris suttonae Brugni & Viozzi, 2010¸ the only known species from Argentina; however, the bifid deirids in the new species and the distribution pattern of perianal spines in females clearly distinguish both species. Hedruris bifida n. sp. represents the second nominal species of the genus in Argentina and the eighth species described in the Neotropical region.

  8. A Comparative Study of the Common Protozoan Parasites of Clarias gariepinus from the Wild and Cultured Environments in Benue State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeji, S; Solomon, S G; Idoga, E S

    2011-01-01

    A total of one hundred and twenty Clarias gariepinus comprising 30 dead and 30 live fishes were examined for protozoan parasites infestation, sixty each from the wild and a pond (cultured environment) over a period of six months. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis was the most common protozoan parasites found in C. gariepinus from the wild (River Benue) and cultured (pond) environments. These protozoan parasites constitute 37.08% of the total parasites encountered for fishes in the pond and 42.51% of fishes in the wild. Among the body parts of the sampled fishes from the pond, the gills had the highest parasite load (38.86%). Also, the gills had the highest parasite load (40.54%) among the body parts of the fishes sampled from the wild. Fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the pond constituted 36.70% of the total fish sampled. On the other hand, fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the wild constituted 31.65% of the total fish sampled. Female fishes had more protozoan parasites than the male fishes. Bigger fishes of total length (25-48 cm) had more parasite load than the smaller ones (19-24 cm). Also, fishes between 150-750 g had more parasite load than the smaller ones of less than 150 g. Protozoan parasite load of fish from the cultured environment (pond) did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) from those from River Benue (wild).

  9. Metazoários parasitos de seis espécies de peixes do Reservatório de Lajes, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Metazoan parasites of six fishes species from Lajes Reservoir in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Aline R. Paraguassú

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Entre abril de 2002 e julho de 2003, foram necropsiados 231 espécimes de peixes: 39 Astyanax bimaculatus (Linnaeus, 1758, 79 A. fasciatus (Cuvier, 1819, 23 Hypostomus affinis (Steindachner, 1877, 26 Hoplias malabaricus (Bloch, 1794, 30 Loricariichthys castaneus (Castelnau, 1855 e 34 Trachelyopterus striatulus (Steindachner, 1876 provenientes do Reservatório de Lajes (22º42' - 22º50'S, 43º53' 44º05'O, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, para estudo das suas comunidades parasitárias. A maioria dos espécimes de H. affinis (95,6% e H. malabaricus (84,6% estavam parasitados por pelo menos uma espécie de metazoário. Em A. bimaculatus, A. fasciatus, L. castaneus e T. striatulus 41%, 39,2%, 56,7% e 14,7% dos espécimes estavam parasitados, respectivamente. Foram coletadas oito diferentes espécies de metazoários parasitos: 2 em A. bimaculatus, 3 em A. fasciatus, 3 em H. affinis, 4 em H. malabaricus, 4 em L. castaneus e 1 em T. striatulus. As comunidades de metazoários parasitos das seis espécies de peixes estudadas apresentaram típico padrão de distribuição agregada. Foram observados dois casos de correlação negativa entre a abundância e a prevalência parasitárias e o comprimento total dos hospedeiros. A comunidade parasitária de L. castaneus apresentou os maiores valores de intensidade média, índice de dispersão e diversidade. As comunidades parasitárias dos peixes estudados apresentaram escassez de correlação entre a abundância, riqueza parasitária e diversidade com o comprimento total dos hospedeiros. Os baixos valores de riqueza e diversidade das comuni-dades parasitárias podem ser atribuídos as características oligotróficas do Reservatório de Lajes.From April 2002 to July 2003, 231 freshwater fishes from Lajes Reservoir in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (22º42' - 22º50'S, 43º53' - 44º05'W were necropsied to study their community metazoan parasites: 39 Astyanax bimaculatus (Linnaeus, 1758, 79 A. fasciatus

  10. Scanning electron microscope observations on the monogenean parasite Paraquadriacanthus nasalis from the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus in Egypt with a note on some surface features of its microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Safaa Zaky

    2012-05-01

    Surface features of the monogenean Paraquadriacanthus nasalis Ergens, 1988 (quoted by Kritsky, 1990) inhabiting the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus were studied for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The anterior adhesive areas possess two slit-like openings. Many small openings were detected on the tegument covering the anterior-most region of the head. Some considerably large openings were also found in the median region between the two slit-like openings of the adhesive sacs. A transverse slit-like mouth opening with two lip-like structures was detected on the ventral surface of the body. Three types of presumed sensory structures were found associated with the tegument of the anterior adhesive area and anterior region of the body. These are surface ciliary sensilla, dome-shaped structures, and many spherical structures. The possible functions of these presumed sensory structures were discussed. The tegument covering the anterior adhesive area lacks microvilli, while the tegument covering the haptor is associated with microvilli. The haptoral sclerites were found in two different positions. Some surface features of the nasal cavities of C. gariepinus (microhabitat of P. nasalis) were also studied using scanning electron microscopy. Many lamellae-like and spine-like structures were recognized. The epithelium lining in some regions of the nasal cavities has small and large openings and covered with mucus. The possible roles of some haptoral sclerites in the attachment of the parasite to the host tissues were discussed.

  11. Redescrição de Nomimoscolex admonticellia (Woodland, comb.n. (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea, parasito de Pinirampus pirinampu (Spix, um siluriforme de água doce Redescription of Nomimoscolex admonticellia (Woodland, comb.n (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea parasite of Pinirampus pirinampu (Spix, a freshwater siluriform fish

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    Amilcar Arandas Rego

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The Monticelliidae species, Nomimoscolex admonticellia (Woodland, 1934, comb.n., parasite of Pinirampus pirinampu (Spix, 1829 a freshwater siluriform fish, is redescribed. This species is the type of the genus Myzophorus Woodland, 1934. The authors discuss the validity of this genus and propose its suppression. Their species are transferred to Nomimoscolex (Zigobothriinae whose diagnose is modified to include: N. admonticellia, comb.n., N. pirarara (Woodland, 1935, comb.n. and N. woodlandi (Rego, 1984, comb.n.

  12. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

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    ... Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the United States cannot diagnose parasites? How are parasitic diseases diagnosed? Many kinds of lab tests are available ...

  13. Host-based identification is not supported by morphometrics in natural populations of Gyrodactylus salaris and G. thymalli (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, K; Shinn, A P; Bachmann, L; Bakke, T A

    2007-12-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris is a serious pest of wild pre-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Norway. The closely related G. thymalli, originally described from grayling (Thymallus thymallus), is assumed harmless to both grayling and salmon. The 2 species are difficult to distinguish using traditional, morphometric methods or molecular approaches. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is a consistent pattern of morphometrical variation between G. salaris and G. thymalli and to analyse the morphometric variation in the context of 'diagnostic realism' (in natural populations). Specimens from the type-material for the 2 species are also included. In total, 27 point-to-point measurements from the opisthaptoral hard parts were used and analysed by digital image processing and uni- and multivariate morphometry. All populations most closely resembled its respective type material, as expected from host species, with the exception of G. thymalli from the Norwegian river Trysilelva. We, therefore, did not find clear support in the morphometrical variation among G. salaris and G. thymalli for an a priori species delineation based on host. The present study also indicates an urgent need for more detailed knowledge on the influence of environmental factors on the phenotype of gyrodactylid populations.

  14. Myxobolus chushi n. sp. (Myxozoa:Myxosporea) parasitizing Schizothorax niger (Heckel), a native cyprinid fish from Wullar Lake in Kashmir Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shoaib Ali; Kaur, Harpreet; Chishti, M Z

    2017-06-01

    In the study, a new species, Myxobolus chushi n. sp. infecting gills of wild specimens of Schizothorax niger (Heckel) inhabiting Wullar Lake in Kashmir Himalayas, (J&K) India has been described based on morphology of the myxospore and using partial 18S rDNA sequencing. Pathological changes in the gills have been studied with the help of histological sections stained with Luna's method. Twenty fish specimens were examined, out of which four had oval, white plasmodia in gills measuring 2.0×0.5mm. The myxospores were spherical to ovoidal in shape with slightly attenuated posterior end, measuring 11.17±0.23 (10.60-11.40)μm in length and 9.14±0.06 (8.80-9.20)μm in width, having a prominent pore at the anterior end. The polar capsules were pyriform in shape, measuring 4.25±0.15 (4.00-4.40)μm in length and 2.38±0.27 (2.00-2.65)μm in width having polar filaments forming coils up to 5 in number. Parietal folds 9 in number present on the posterior part of the shell. The intensity of infection was recorded to be moderate as indicated by gill plasmodial index (GPI=2). The plasmodium was located in the vascular network occupying whole of the gill lamella therefore typed as intralamellar vascular type, LV3. Analysis of 18S small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequence of the isolate demonstrated 90% homogeneity with M. sp. KLT-2014 infecting scales of Labeo rohita from Myanmar and 89% with M. dermiscalis infecting scales of Labeo rohita from India. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. How to catch a parasite: Parasite Niche Modeler (PaNic) meets Fishbase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Giovanni; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Parasite Niche Modeler (PaNic) is a free online software tool that suggests potential hosts for fish parasites. For a particular parasite species from the major helminth groups (Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, Trematoda), PaNic takes data from known hosts (maximum body length, growth rate, life span, age at first maturity, trophic level, phylogeny, and biogeography) and hypothesizes similar fish species that might serve as hosts to that parasite. Users can give varying weights to host attributes and create custom models. In addition to suggesting plausible hosts (with varying degrees of confidence), the models indicate known host species that appear to be outliers in comparison to other known hosts. These unique features make PaNic an innovative tool for addressing both theoretical and applied questions in fish parasitology. PaNic can be accessed at .

  16. MicroRNA preparations from individual monogenean Gyrodactylus salaris-a comparison of six commercially available totalRNA extraction kits

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    Harris Philip

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Describing and evaluating miRNA inventories with Next Generation Sequencing is a goal of scientists from a wide range of fields. It requires high purity, high quality, and high yield RNA extractions that do not only contain abundant ribosomal RNAs but are also enriched in miRNAs. Here we compare 6 disparate and commercially available totalRNA extraction kits for their suitability for miRNA-preparations from Gyrodactylus salaris, an important but small (500 μm in length monogenean pathogen of Norwegian Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. Findings We evaluated 1 salt precipitation method (MasterPure™ Complete RNA Purification Kit, Epicentre, 2 Phenol based extraction methods (mirVana Kit, Ambion, and Trizol Plus Kit, Invitrogen, 1 paramagnetic bead extraction method (RNA Tissue kit, GeneMole and 2 purification methods based on spin column chromatography using a proprietary resin as separation matrix (Phenol-free Total RNA Purification Kit, Amresco, and ZR MicroPrep Kit, Zymo Research. The quality of the extractions from 1, 10 and 100 individuals, respectively, was assessed in terms of totalRNA yield, RNA integrity, and smallRNA and miRNA yield. The 6 RNA extraction methods yielded considerably different total RNA extracts, with striking differences in low molecular weight RNA yield. The Phenol-free Total RNA Purification Kit (Amresco showed the highest totalRNA yield, but the best miRNA/totalRNA ratio was obtained with the ZR MicroPrep Kit (Zymo Research. It was not possible to extract electrophoretically detectable miRNAs from Gyrodactylus salaris with the RNA Tissue Kit (GeneMole or the Trizol Plus Kit (Invitrogen. Conclusions We present an optimized extraction protocol for single and small numbers of Gyrodactylus salaris from infected Atlantic salmon that delivers a totalRNA yield suitable for downstream next generation sequencing analyses of miRNA. Two of the six tested totalRNA kits/methods were not suitable for the

  17. Parasitic fauna of eight species of ornamental freshwater fish species from the middle Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon Region Fauna parasitária de oito espécies de peixes ornamentais de água doce do médio Rio Negro na Amazônia brasileira

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    Marcos Tavares-Dias

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-seven specimens of cardinal tetra Paracheirodon axelrodi, 33 rosy tetra Hyphessobrycon copelandi (Characidae, 28 marbled hatchetfish Carnegiella strigata, 26 blackwing hatchetfish Carnegiella martae (Gasteropelecidae, 27 bodó Ancistrus hoplogenys (Loricariidae, 31 brown pencilfish Nannostomus eques, 38 oneline pencilfish Nannostomus unifasciatus (Lebiasinidae and 13 angelfish Pterophyllum scalare (Cichlidae were collected from the middle Negro River, State of Amazonas, Brazil, for parasitological studies. Out of the total of 223 fish examined, 143 (64.1% were parasitized by at least one parasite species. The highest prevalence rate was for Monogenea (36.7%, followed by Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ciliophora (20.6%, Trichodina spp. (Ciliophora (4.0%, Piscinoodinium pillulare (Dinoflagellida (1.3%, Tetrahymena sp. (Ciliophora (0.89%, and Procamallanus sp. (Nematoda (0.4%. All eight fish species had Monogenea (Gyrodactylidae and Dactylogyridae in the gills, but the highest prevalence occurred in P. scalare and the lowest in P. axelrodi and C. strigata. However, the highest mean intensity of Monogenea was found in P. scalare and A. hoplogenys. The protozoan I. multifiliis occurred in the six ornamental fish species examined, but C. strigata and C. martae had higher prevalence and mean intensity. Trichodina spp. were found only in the gills of C. strigata, C. martae and N. eques, and with higher mean intensity in C. strigata. On the other hand, the protozoan P. pilullare was found only in the gills of C. martae. This is the first report of Tetrahymena sp. in Brazil, and it occurred in the gills of C. strigata.Para estudos parasitológicos, 27 espécimes de cardinal Paracheirodon axelrodi, 33 rosa-céu Hyphessobrycon copelandi (Characidae, 28 peixes borboleta Carnegiella strigata e 26 Carnegiella martae (Gasteropelecidae, 27 bodó ou cascudo Ancistrus hoplogenys (Loricariidae, 31 peixes-lápis Nannostomus eques e 38 Nannostomus unifasciatus

  18. Fish allergy: in review.

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    Sharp, Michael F; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-06-01

    Globally, the rising consumption of fish and its derivatives, due to its nutritional value and divergence of international cuisines, has led to an increase in reports of adverse reactions to fish. Reactions to fish are not only mediated by the immune system causing allergies, but are often caused by various toxins and parasites including ciguatera and Anisakis. Allergic reactions to fish can be serious and life threatening and children usually do not outgrow this type of food allergy. The route of exposure is not only restricted to ingestion but include manual handling and inhalation of cooking vapors in the domestic and occupational environment. Prevalence rates of self-reported fish allergy range from 0.2 to 2.29 % in the general population, but can reach up to 8 % among fish processing workers. Fish allergy seems to vary with geographical eating habits, type of fish processing, and fish species exposure. The major fish allergen characterized is parvalbumin in addition to several less well-known allergens. This contemporary review discusses interesting and new findings in the area of fish allergy including demographics, novel allergens identified, immunological mechanisms of sensitization, and innovative approaches in diagnosing and managing this life-long disease.

  19. Parásitos de peces nativos de la cuenca del Río Laja (Chile Central y alcances sobre sus ciclos de vida Parasitism of native fishes from Laja river basin (Región del Bío-Bío, Chile and approaches about life cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. OLMOS

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que en Chile los estudios parasitológicos en peces de agua dulce son escasos, es relevante reconocer las especies de parásitos presentes en las poblaciones de peces nativos como reservorios o potenciales infecciones para especies de importancia comercial. Esto permite indagar sobre los posibles hospedadores que participan de los ciclos de vida de los parásitos encontrados y elaborar estrategias de mitigación para las parasitosis potencialmente importantes, con una adecuada anticipación. En este contexto se estudió la parasitofauna de tres especies de peces de agua dulce nativos, Trichomycterus areolatus, Diplomystes nahuelbutaensis y Percilia irwini en una cuenca andina de Chile Central. Los peces fueron capturados en la parte media de la cuenca del río Laja (37º20’S; 72º56’O y examinados en laboratorio. En la muestra total de peces examinados se registró la presencia de Mixobolus sp, Henneguya sp, Ancyrocephalidae (Monogenea, Zoogonidae (Digenea, Steganodermata sp (Zoogonidae, Nematoda y Pomphorhynchus sp (Acantocephala. P. irwini presentó la mayor riqueza específica de parásitos con 4 de los taxa encontrados, al que le sigue T. areolatus con 3 taxa. D. nahuelbutaensis con un solo taxón parasitario presenta altos valores de prevalencia con un 89% de los individuos parasitados. Se discute el ciclo de vida general para los taxa parásitos encontrados y su eventual relación con peces de importancia económicaThe parasites from three species of native freshwater fishes, Trichomycterus areolatus, Diplomystes nahuelbutaensis and Percilia irwini, common from Central Chile were studied. These parasites are interesting because they could infect farmed salmon. Fishes were caught from an Andean watershed (37º20‘S; 72º56‘W and examined in laboratory for parasites. A camera placed on a stereomicroscope and microscope were used for the photographs and observations. The specimens were later fixed in formalin at 5% or

  20. Host-parasite relationships as determinants of heavy metal concentrations in perch (Perca fluviatilis) and its intestinal parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázová, Tímea; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana; Šalamún, Peter; Vidal-Martínez, Víctor M

    2015-12-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn and their bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were determined in two intestinal parasites, an acanthocephalan, Acanthocephalus lucii, a tapeworm, Proteocephalus percae, present in the same host, the European perch (Perca fluviatilis, L.), in the heavily polluted Ružín reservoir in eastern Slovakia. The bioaccumulation of heavy metals in the fish organs and parasites was studied for acanthocephalan and tapeworm monoinfections or mixed infections by the two parasites and for the size of their parasitic infrapopulations. Bioconcentration factors (c[parasite]/c[muscle tissue]) showed that the concentrations of As, Ni, Pb and Zn were higher in mixed infections than in monoinfections. Negative correlations between heavy metal concentrations in perch organs and the parasites were found. For example, higher concentrations of Ni and Zn in both parasite species corresponded with lower metal concentrations in perch and hard roe. Likewise, significant negative relationships between metal concentrations in fish organs and number of parasites were noticed with lower levels of Pb in fish harbouring higher numbers of tapeworms. Similarly, in both parasite species the concentrations of some essential elements (Cr, Mn) were lower at high infection intensities compared to low intensities. Our study revealed that the differential concentration of heavy metals in perch organs was affected by the type of infection (mono- or mixed-infection), and needs to be considered in field ecotoxicological and parasitological studies as a potentially important factor influencing the pollutant concentrations in fish.

  1. Phylogeny of Fish-Infecting Calyptospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are numerous species of apicomplexans that infect poikilothermic vertebrates such as fishes, and possess unique morphological features that provide insight into the evolution of this important phylum of parasites. Here the relationship of the fish-infecting Calyptospora spe...

  2. Phylogeny of Fish-Infecting Calyptospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are numerous species of apicomplexans that infect poikilothermic vertebrates such as fishes, and possess unique morphological features that provide insight into the evolution of this important phylum of parasites. Here the relationship of the fish-infecting Calyptospora spe...

  3. variabilty in parasites' community structure and composition in cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. This study investigated the composition and structure of the parasite communities in Cat fish ... The western shore is mainly sandy ... part of which is sandy and rocky and along the shores ..... Sediment And Microalgae From Lake ...

  4. Parasitology: Parasite survives predation on its host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponton, Fleur; Lebarbenchon, Camille; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    As prisoners in their living habitat, parasites should be vulnerable to destruction by the predators of their hosts. But we show here that the parasitic gordian worm Paragordius tricuspidatus is able to escape not only from its insect host after ingestion by a fish or frog but also from the diges...

  5. Impacts of parasite infection on columnaris disease of tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no information available on whether parasite infection will increase the susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare and whether parasite treatment could improve fish survival after F. columnare exposure. Two trials were conducted to evaluate 1) the susceptibility of hybrid tilapi...

  6. Parasitism affects vaccine efficacy against Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilapia culture worldwide is estimated to be US$ 5 billion and is important to domestic and global food security. Parasites and bacteria co-occur in both extensive and intensive production of tilapia. The effect of parasitism on vaccine performance in fish is little studied. The objective of this ...

  7. Sushi delights and parasites: the risk of fishborne and foodborne parasitic zoonoses in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yukifumi; Hatz, Christoph; Blum, Johannes

    2005-11-01

    Because of the worldwide popularization of Japanese cuisine, the traditional Japanese fish dishes sushi and sashimi that are served in Japanese restaurants and sushi bars have been suspected of causing fishborne parasitic zoonoses, especially anisakiasis. In addition, an array of freshwater and brackish-water fish and wild animal meats, which are important sources of infection with zoonotic parasites, are served as sushi and sashimi in rural areas of Japan. Such fishborne and foodborne parasitic zoonoses are also endemic in many Asian countries that have related traditional cooking styles. Despite the recent increase in the number of travelers to areas where these zoonoses are endemic, travelers and even infectious disease specialists are unaware of the risk of infection associated with eating exotic ethnic dishes. The aim of this review is to provide practical background information regarding representative fishborne and foodborne parasitic zoonoses endemic in Asian countries.

  8. Three new species of Monogenea (Platyhelminthes parasites of fish in the Guandu river, southeastern Brazil=Três novas espécies de Monogenea (Platyhelminthes parasitos de peixes do rio Guandu, Sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fernando Luque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Current essay describes three new Monogenean species, namely, Cosmetocleithrum striatuli sp. nov., Jainus leporini sp. nov. and Rhabdosynochus guanduensis sp. nov., parasites on the gills of Trachelyopterus striatulus (Steindachner, 1877, Leporinus copelandii Steindachner, 1875 and Centropomus undecimalis (Bloch, 1792, respectively. Fish were collected from the Guandu river, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil between August 2005 and November 2008. Cosmetocleithrum striatuli sp. nov. differs from all other congeneric species by the shape of an accessory piece (more robust and resembling a crustacean claw or chela and by the shape of its ventral and dorsal bars (not V-shaped and with expanded lateral ends directed to the rear. Jainus leporini sp. nov. differs from all other Jainus species by the male copulation organ (MCO, with a 2-ring coil, by the absence of medial projection on ventral bar and by a plate-like sclerotized structure associated to the vagina. Rhabdosynochus guanduensis sp. nov. differs from all other congeneric species by the morphology of the copulation complex and by a shell-shaped vagina.Três novas espécies, Cosmetocleithrum striatuli sp. nov., Jainus leporini sp. nov. e Rhabdosynochus guanduensis sp. nov., parasitando as brânquias de Trachelyopterus striatulus (Steindachner, 1877, Leporinus copelandii Steindachner, 1875 e Centropomus undecimalis (Bloch, 1792, respectivamente, são descritas no presente trabalho. Os peixes foram coletados do rio Guandu, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, no período de agosto de 2005 a novembro de 2008. Cosmetocleithrum striatuli sp. nov. difere de todas as outras espécies congenéricas pelo formato da pesca acessória (muito robusta e semelhante a uma quela de crustáceo e pelo formato das barras ventral e dorsal (sem o formato de V e com as extremidades laterais expandidas e direcionadas posteriormente. Jainus leporini sp. nov. difere de todas as outras espécies do gênero pelo

  9. Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    • Stool antigen detection for Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are now commercially available, have better sensitivity and specificity than the traditional stool microscopy, and are less dependent on personnel skill. Tests employing newer techniques with faster turnaround time are also available for diagnosing trichomoniasis.• Nitazoxanide, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for therapy of cryptosporidiosis, is effective among immunocompetent patients. However, on the basis of strong evidence from multiple clinical trials, nitazoxanide is considered ineffective among immunocompromised patients. (14) • Giardiasis can be asymptomatic or have a chronic course leading to malabsorption and failure to thrive. It can be treated with metronidazole, tinidazole, or nitazoxanide. On the basis of growing observational studies, postinfectious and extraintestinal manifestations of giardiasis occur, but the mechanisms are unclear. Given the high prevalence of giardiasis, public health implications need to be defined. (16) • Eradicating E histolytica from the gastrointestinal tract requires only intraluminal agent therapy. Therapy for invasive illnesses requires use of imidazole followed by intraluminal agents to eliminate persistent intraluminal parasites. • Malaria is considered the most lethal parasitic infection, with Plasmodium falciparum as the predominant cause of mortality. P vivax and P ovale can be dormant in the liver, and primaquine is necessary to resolve infection by P vivax and P ovale. • Among immunocompetent patients, infection with Toxoplasma gondii may be asymptomatic, involve localized lymphadenopathy, or cause ocular infection. In immunocompromised patients, reactivation or severe infection is not uncommon. On the basis of limited observational studies (there are no well-controlled randomized trials), therapy is recommended for acute infection during pregnancy to prevent transmission to the

  10. Relação parasito-hospedeiro em peixes de pisciculturas da região de Assis, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. 1. Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1757 - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i2.594 Host-parasite relationship in fish from fish farms in the Assis region, São Paulo State, Brazil. 1. Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1757

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Tavares Ranzani-Paiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Um total de 90 espécimes de Oreochromis niloticus foi coletado bimestralmente entre os meses de fevereiro a dezembro de 2004, em três pisciculturas do Estado de São Paulo. Do total, 82,2% estavam parasitados por pelo menos uma espécie de parasito. Os parâmetros físicos e químicos da água foram utilizados para caracterizar a qualidade da água em cada propriedade. Sete espécies de ectoparasitos foram registradas. Foi possível observar que as pisciculturas apresentam a mesma parasitofauna, porém cada propriedade apresenta uma estrutura da comunidade peculiar. Cichlidogyrus sclerosus e Cichlidogyrus sp. 1 apresentaram correlação negativa significativa da abundância com o comprimento padrão do hospedeiro somente em Palmital. A espécie Cichlidogyrus sp. 2 e o copépode Lamproglena sp. apresentaram correlação positiva significativa da abundância com o comprimento padrão nas pisciculturas de Tarumã e Cândido Mota, respectivamente. Em relação ao fator de condição relativo, somente a espécie Cichlidogyrus sp. 1 apresentou correlação significativa negativa com a abundância de parasitismo. Lamproglena sp. apresentou correlação positiva significativa com a relação hepatossomática (RHS das tilápias em Palmital, e o ergasilídeo apresentou correlação significativa negativa da abundância de parasitismo e a relação esplenossomática (RES dos hospedeiros em Cândido Mota.A total of ninety specimens of Oreochromis niloticus were collected every other month between February and December of 2004 at three fish farms in São Paulo State. 82.2% were parasitized by at least one species of parasite. Physical and chemical water parameters were used to characterize water quality in each fish farm. Seven species of ectoparasites were registered. It was possible to observe that all fish farms presented the same parasite fauna; however, each farm featured its own peculiar community structure. Cichlidogyrus sclerosus and Cichlidogyrus

  11. Ectoparasites increase swimming costs in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G; Layton, Cayne

    2013-02-23

    Ectoparasites can reduce individual fitness by negatively affecting behavioural, morphological and physiological traits. In fishes, there are potential costs if ectoparasites decrease streamlining, thereby directly compromising swimming performance. Few studies have examined the effects of ectoparasites on fish swimming performance and none distinguish between energetic costs imposed by changes in streamlining and effects on host physiology. The bridled monocle bream (Scolopsis bilineatus) is parasitized by an isopod (Anilocra nemipteri), which attaches above the eye. We show that parasitized fish have higher standard metabolic rates (SMRs), poorer aerobic capacities and lower maximum swimming speeds than non-parasitized fish. Adding a model parasite did not affect SMR, but reduced maximum swimming speed and elevated oxygen consumption rates at high speeds to levels observed in naturally parasitized fish. This demonstrates that ectoparasites create drag effects that are important at high speeds. The higher SMR of naturally parasitized fish does, however, reveal an effect of parasitism on host physiology. This effect was easily reversed: fish whose parasite was removed 24 h earlier did not differ from unparasitized fish in any performance metrics. In sum, the main cost of this ectoparasite is probably its direct effect on streamlining, reducing swimming performance at high speeds.

  12. [Parasite fauna of the snakehead Channa argus warpachowskii from Primorsky Krai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolenko, A V; Besprozvannykh, V V

    2008-01-01

    Parasite fauna of the snakehead Channa argus warpachowskii was studied in water bodies of Primorsky Krai. Thirty-one parasite species were recorded in this host from the studied area according to original and literary data. Most part of these species are host-specific parasites of snakehead originated from Chinese-Indian region or parasites having a wide host range and able to infest almost all freshwater fishes. Moreover, three brackishwater species of parasites were found in the fishes introduced into the rivers of the southern part of Primorsky Krai. The causes of this invasion are discussed.

  13. Observations on the metazoan parasites of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) after its reintroduction into the Elbe River basin in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Frantisek

    2003-12-01

    In the years 1999-2002, first studies were carried out on the metazoan parasites of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) recently reintroduced into the Elbe River drainage system, after more than 50 years after the complete extinction of the Elbe salmon population. A total of six helminth species were recorded from salmon smolts from three streams of the Elbe River basin (Kamenice River, Jestedský and Libocanský Brooks) in North Bohemia, Czech Republic, where S. salar fingerlings have been released since 1998: Gyrodactylus truttae Gläser, 1974, Crepidostomum metoecus Braun, 1900, Diplostomum spathaceum (Rudolphi, 1819) metacercariae, Raphidascaris acus (Bloch, 1799) adults and encapsulated larvae, Cystidicoloides ephemeridarum (Linstow, 1872), and Neoechinorhynchus rutili (Müller, 1780). Except for D. spathaceum, all these freshwater parasites have been received from the helminth fauna of the co-habiting brown trout (Salmo trutta fario L.). Due to local ecological conditions, the parasite faunae of both salmon and brown trout exhibited distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in the three localities. The finding of G. truttae on S. salar represents a new host record. Three helminth parasites of marine origin, the cestodes Eubothrium crassum (Bloch, 1779) and Scolex pleuronectis Müller, 1788 plerocercoids, and the nematode Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) larvae were found in the single examined adult S. salar from the Kamenice River. New data on the geographical distribution of some nematode parasites of Salmo trutta fario L., Barbatula barbatula (L.) and Anguilla anguilla (L.) are presented.

  14. Parasitism by Ich enhanced susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare

    Science.gov (United States)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by two or more pathogens. Bacterium Flavobacterium columnare and parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) are two common pathogens of cultured fish and result in heavy economic losses for aquaculture. There is no published information available ...

  15. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Fish Allergy KidsHealth > For Parents > Fish Allergy Print A ... From Home en español Alergia al pescado About Fish Allergy A fish allergy is not exactly the ...

  16. Ecosystem energetic implications of parasite and free-living biomass in three estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuris, Armand M; Hechinger, Ryan F; Shaw, Jenny C; Whitney, Kathleen L; Aguirre-Macedo, Leopoldina; Boch, Charlie A; Dobson, Andrew P; Dunham, Eleca J; Fredensborg, Brian L; Huspeni, Todd C; Lorda, Julio; Mababa, Luzviminda; Mancini, Frank T; Mora, Adrienne B; Pickering, Maria; Talhouk, Nadia L; Torchin, Mark E; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2008-07-24

    Parasites can have strong impacts but are thought to contribute little biomass to ecosystems. We quantified the biomass of free-living and parasitic species in three estuaries on the Pacific coast of California and Baja California. Here we show that parasites have substantial biomass in these ecosystems. We found that parasite biomass exceeded that of top predators. The biomass of trematodes was particularly high, being comparable to that of the abundant birds, fishes, burrowing shrimps and polychaetes. Trophically transmitted parasites and parasitic castrators subsumed more biomass than did other parasitic functional groups. The extended phenotype biomass controlled by parasitic castrators sometimes exceeded that of their uninfected hosts. The annual production of free-swimming trematode transmission stages was greater than the combined biomass of all quantified parasites and was also greater than bird biomass. This biomass and productivity of parasites implies a profound role for infectious processes in these estuaries.

  17. Fish mucus metabolome reveals fish life-history traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter, M.; Sasal, P.; Banaigs, B.; Lecchini, D.; Lecellier, G.; Tapissier-Bontemps, N.

    2017-06-01

    Fish mucus has important biological and ecological roles such as defense against fish pathogens and chemical mediation among several species. A non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomic approach was developed to study gill mucus of eight butterflyfish species in Moorea (French Polynesia), and the influence of several fish traits (geographic site and reef habitat, species taxonomy, phylogeny, diet and parasitism levels) on the metabolic variability was investigated. A biphasic extraction yielding two fractions (polar and apolar) was used. Fish diet (obligate corallivorous, facultative corallivorous or omnivorous) arose as the main driver of the metabolic differences in the gill mucus in both fractions, accounting for 23% of the observed metabolic variability in the apolar fraction and 13% in the polar fraction. A partial least squares discriminant analysis allowed us to identify the metabolites (variable important in projection, VIP) driving the differences between fish with different diets (obligate corallivores, facultative corallivores and omnivorous). Using accurate mass data and fragmentation data, we identified some of these VIP as glycerophosphocholines, ceramides and fatty acids. Level of monogenean gill parasites was the second most important factor shaping the gill mucus metabolome, and it explained 10% of the metabolic variability in the polar fraction and 5% in the apolar fraction. A multiple regression tree revealed that the metabolic variability due to parasitism in the polar fraction was mainly due to differences between non-parasitized and parasitized fish. Phylogeny and butterflyfish species were factors contributing significantly to the metabolic variability of the apolar fraction (10 and 3%, respectively) but had a less pronounced effect in the polar fraction. Finally, geographic site and reef habitat of butterflyfish species did not influence the gill mucus metabolome of butterflyfishes.

  18. Muscoid Diptera and their parasitoids collected from fish bait in Itumbiara, Goiás Dípteros muscóides e seus parasitóides coletados em isca de peixe em Itumbiara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.H. Marchiori

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Determinaram-se as espécies de parasitóides associados às moscas sinantrópicas coletados em iscas de peixe, em Itumbiara, Goiás. As pupas, obtidas pelo método de flutuação, foram individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência das moscas adultas ou de seus parasitóides. A porcentagem total de parasitismo foi 21,4%.

  19. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF GASTROINTESTINAL CESTODE PARASITES IN OVIS BHARAL (L. FROM VIDHARBHA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Sonune

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the parasites reside in association of animals, birds, and fishes of economic importance. Parasitic biochemistry has great practical importance through chemotherapy and vaccine production and in understanding of the complex association involved in the host parasite relationship However; information in parasite biochemistry is patchy. It is a field growing in parallel with the new surge of interest in tropical diseases. Whereas previously parasitologists have been required to adopt biochemical methodology in order to stay abreast of development. Gastrointestinal cestodes are the most pathogenic parasites in Ovis bharal in tropic and subtropic areas. Present investigation deals with the biochemistry (Protein, glycogen and lipid of Cestode parasites in Ovis bharal.

  20. Floriceps saccatus plerocerci (Trypanorhyncha, Lacistorhynchidae) as parasites of dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus L.) and pompano dolphin (Coryphaena equiselis L.) in western Mediterranean and eastern Atlantic waters. Ecological and biological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, E; Castro, J J; Massutí, E

    1998-10-01

    A study of the plerocerci of Floriceps saccatus from the abdominal cavity of dolphin fish (Coryphaena hippurus) and pompano dolphin (Coryphaena equiselis) was conducted. In all, 565 dolphin fishes were collected from Majorcan waters (Balearic Islands, western Mediterranean) during 3 summer and autumn seasons (1990, 1991, and 1995). From the Canary Islands (eastern Atlantic), 41 specimens of dolphin fish were caught during 1994 and 49 specimens of pompano dolphin during 1995. Cysts of different shapes and sizes appeared in the conjunctive tissues of the abdomen and viscera, mainly in the liver, gonads, and pancreas. A larva was found inside every cyst examined. Small, medium size, and large larvae were found. The largest larvae correspond to Floriceps saccatus plerocercoids. Stomach contents indicated that crustaceans and fish larvae were the main prey items of juvenile C. hippurus, whereas teleosts and cephalopods were the only food found in adult dolphin fishes. Infection of F. saccatus plerocercoids takes place in preadult dolphin fishes. Prevalence increases as fishes grow and change to a diet of teleosts. Coryphaena equiselis was not infected.

  1. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multicellular organism that is generally visible to the naked eye in its adult stages. Helminths can be ... with parasites such as Cyclospora and Cryptosporidium . (Also see " coccidian " and " sporulation .") Back To Top P Parasite: ...

  2. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources How to Find A Physician Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Statistics More Information Get Email Updates To receive ... often need special consideration when being treated for parasitic diseases in order to avoid harm to the fetus, ...

  3. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Parasites About Parasites Animals Blood Food Insects Water Education and Training CDC Bottle Bioassay References ... flowing water. It can cause itching and impaired vision in children, and lead to blindness in adulthood. ...

  4. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    ... be manipulated to develop therapeutic interventions against parasitic infection. For easy reference, the most commonly studied parasites are examined in individual chapters written by investigators at the forefront of their field...

  5. Joint effects of parasitism and pollution on oxidative stress biomarkers in yellow perch Perca flavescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcogliese, David J; Brambilla, Lila Gagnon; Gagné, François; Gendron, Andrée D

    2005-01-25

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens were collected from a contaminated site and a reference site in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Fish were assessed for oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione levels) and parasitism by the nematode Raphidascaris acus and metacercariae of the digenean Apophallus brevis. Lipid peroxidation is not only considered a measure of oxidative stress, but of stress in general, and thus serves as an indicator of fish health. Fish from the contaminated site exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than those from the reference site, independent of parasitic infections. However, fish infected with R. acus at the contaminated site tended to have higher levels of lipid peroxidation than uninfected fish at the same site, whereas no difference was observed between infected and uninfected fish at the reference site. Yellow perch infected with > 10 metacercariae of A. brevis expressed higher levels of lipid peroxidation than those infected with < 10 metacercariae at both the contaminated and the reference sites. No differences were found in levels of reduced glutathione in liver or muscle in relation to site or either parasite species. Results support the use of lipid peroxidation as a biomarker of water contamination. They further suggest that lipid peroxidation may be used as a biomarker of pathological effects caused by parasitism. Most importantly, results demonstrate that contaminants and parasites occurring together exacerbate oxidative stress in fish, suggesting that parasitized fish in polluted environments are in a poorer state of health than uninfected fish.

  6. First Report of Lappetascaris lutjani Rasheed, 1965 (Nematoda, Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae Parasitizing Trachipterus arawatae (Pisces, Lampridiformes on the Atlantic Coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Joaquim Júlio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available New host and geographical records are reported for the nematode Lappetascaris lutjani Rasheed, 1965, parasitizing the marine fish Trachipterus arawatae Clark, 1881 in Brazilian waters. Morphometric data and illustrations of the parasites are included.

  7. Fish Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaxter, J. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides related information about hearing in fish, including the sensory stimulus of sound in the underwater environment, mechanoreceptors in fish, pressure perception and the swimbladder, specializations in sound conduction peculiar to certain fish families. Includes numerous figures. (CS)

  8. Fish Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a clear and consistent manner, so that consumers with food allergies and their caregivers can be informed as ... the menu, cross-contact with fish is possible. Ethnic ... fish. Avoid foods like fish sticks and anchovies. Some individuals with ...

  9. Helminth parasites of finfish commercial aquaculture in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Jiménez, L C; Paredes-Trujillo, A I; Vidal-Martínez, V M

    2017-03-01

    Latin America has tripled production by aquaculture up to 78 million tonnes in the past 20 years. However, one of the problems that aquaculture is facing is the presence of helminth parasites and the diseases caused by them in the region. In this review we have collected all the available information on helminths affecting commercial aquaculture in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), emphasizing those causing serious economic losses. Monogeneans are by far the most common and aggressive parasites affecting farmed fish in LAC. They have been recognized as serious pathogens in intensive fish culture because they reach high levels of infection rapidly, and can infect other phylogenetically related fish species. The next most important group comprises the larval stages of digeneans (metacercariae) such as Diplostomum sp. and Centrocestus formosanus, which cause serious damage to farmed fish. Since LAC aquaculture has been based mainly on exotic species (tilapia, salmon, trout and carp), most of their parasites have been brought into the region together with the fish for aquaculture. Recently, one of us (A.I.P.-T.) has suggested that monogeneans, which have generally been considered to be harmless, can produce serious effects on the growth of cultured Nile tilapia. Therefore, the introduction of fish together with their 'harmless' parasites into new sites, regions or countries in LAC should be considered a breakdown of biosecurity in those countries involved. Therefore, the application of quarantine procedures and preventive therapeutic treatments should be considered before allowing these introductions into a country.

  10. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  11. Proliferative kidney disease in rainbow trout: time- and temperature-related renal pathology and parasite distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettge, Kathrin; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike

    2009-01-28

    Proliferative kidney disease is a parasitic infection of salmonid fishes caused by Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. The main target organ of the parasite in the fish is the kidney. To investigate the influence of water temperature on the disease in fish, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with T bryosalmonae were kept at 12 degrees C and 18 degrees C. The number of parasites, the type and degree of lesions in the kidney and the mortality rate was evaluated from infection until full development of disease. While mortality stayed low at 12 degrees C, it reached 77% at 18 degrees C. At 12 degrees C, pathological lesions were dominated by a multifocal proliferative and granulomatous interstitial nephritis. This was accompanied by low numbers of T. bryosalmonae, mainly located in the interstitial lesions. With progression of the disease, small numbers of parasites appeared in the excretory tubuli, and parasite DNA was detected in the urine. Parasite degeneration in the interstitium was observed at late stages of the disease. At 18 degrees C, pathological lesions in kidneys were more severe and more widely distributed, and accompanied by significantly higher parasite numbers. Distribution of parasites in the renal compartments, onset of parasite degeneration and time course of appearance of parasite DNA in urine were not clearly different from the 12 degrees C group. These findings indicate that higher mortality at 18 degrees C compared to 12 degrees C is associated with an enhanced severity of renal pathology and increased parasite numbers.

  12. Parasites: evolution's neurobiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Shelley Anne

    2013-01-01

    For millions of years, parasites have altered the behaviour of their hosts. Parasites can affect host behaviour by: (1) interfering with the host's normal immune-neural communication, (2) secreting substances that directly alter neuronal activity via non-genomic mechanisms and (3) inducing genomic- and/or proteomic-based changes in the brain of the host. Changes in host behaviour are often restricted to particular behaviours, with many other behaviours remaining unaffected. Neuroscientists can produce this degree of selectivity by targeting specific brain areas. Parasites, however, do not selectively attack discrete brain areas. Parasites typically induce a variety of effects in several parts of the brain. Parasitic manipulation of host behaviour evolved within the context of the manipulation of other host physiological systems (especially the immune system) that was required for a parasite's survival. This starting point, coupled with the fortuitous nature of evolutionary innovation and evolutionary pressures to minimize the costs of parasitic manipulation, likely contributed to the complex and indirect nature of the mechanisms involved in host behavioural control. Because parasites and neuroscientists use different tactics to control behaviour, studying the methods used by parasites can provide novel insights into how nervous systems generate and regulate behaviour. Studying how parasites influence host behaviour will also help us integrate genomic, proteomic and neurophysiological perspectives on behaviour.

  13. Fluctuations in Densities of the Invasive Gill Parasite Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) in the Comal River, Comal County, Texas, U.S.A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew S. Johnson; Anne Bolick; Mara Alexander; David Huffman; Ed Oborny; Allen Monroe

    2012-01-01

    Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) is an invasive fish parasite in the Comal River, Texas, and is considered a threat to the federally endangered fountain darter, Etheostoma fonticola...

  14. Cystatins of parasitic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Christian; Ziegler, Thomas; Daniłowicz-Luebert, Emilia; Hartmann, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily comprises several groups of protease inhibitors. In this chapter we will focus on I25 family members, which consist predominantly of the type 2 cystatins. Recently, a wealth of information on these molecules and their activities has been described. Parasite cystatins are shown to have dual functions via interaction with both parasite and host proteases. Thereby, parasite cystatins are not only essentially involved in the regulation of physiological processes during parasite development, but also represent important pathogenicity factors. Interestingly, some studies indicate that parasite cystatins evolved exceptional immuno-modulatory properties. these capacities could be exploited to interfere with unwanted immune responses in unrelated human inflammatory diseases. We highlight the different biological roles of parasite cystatins and the anticipated future developments.

  15. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  16. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  18. Potential interactions between metazoan parasites of the Mayan catfish Ariopsis assimilis and chemical pollution in Chetumal Bay, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martínez, V M; Aguirre-Macedo, M L; Noreña-Barroso, E; Gold-Bouchot, G; Caballero-Pinzón, P I

    2003-06-01

    The effect of pollutants on the intensity of infection of metazoan parasites in the Mayan catfish, Ariopsis assimilis was investigated. Data were collected on pollutants and metazoan parasites from 76 catfish from five localities in Chetumal Bay in October, 1996. Nineteen pollutants (pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) were found in the catfish livers. Heavy metal content was not determined. Nineteen metazoan parasite species were recovered. After controlling for fish length and sampling station, there was a significant negative linear relationship between the intensity of the larval digenean Mesostephanus appendiculatoides and 1,1,1,-trichloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) concentrations. This negative relationship may be explained either by the effect of the pesticide on the mortality of (i) free-living larval forms, (ii) metacercariae in the fish, (iii) infected fish or (iv) intermediate host snails. There were significant differences between fish parasitized and not parasitized with M. appendiculatoides with respect to their DDT concentrations. There were also significant differences between the variances of the mean Clark's coefficient of condition values between catfish parasitized and not parasitized by M. appendiculatoides, with the variance of non-parasitized catfish being significantly larger. The results provided statistical evidence that DDT has a detrimental effect on M. appendiculatoides infection intensity. Furthermore, the significantly larger variance value of Clark's coefficient for non-parasitized fish suggested that DDT affects both the parasite and general host condition.

  19. BACTERIAL DESEASES IN SEA FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available With development of the fish culturing in the sea, the interest in their health also increased. The reason for this are diseases or rather mortality that occur in such controlled cultures and cause great economic losses. By growing large quantities of fish in rather small species, natural conditions are changed, so fish is more sensitive and prone to infection agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites. Besides, a large fish density in the cultural process accelerates spreading if the diseases, but also enables a better perception of them. In wild populations sick specimen very quickly become predator’s prey, witch makes it difficult to note any pathological changes in such fish. There are lots of articles on viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases nowdays, but this work deals exclusively with bacterial deseases that occur in the controlled sea cultures (vibriosis, furunculosis, pastherelosis, nocardiosis, mycobaceriosis, edwardsielosis, yersiniosis, deseases caused by bacteria of genera Flexibacter, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Streptococus and bacteria nephryithis. Yet, the knowledge of these deseases vary, depending on wether a fish species is being cultured for a longer period of time or is only being introduced in the controlled culture.

  20. Fish allergy and fish allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuehn, A; Hilger, Christiane; Ollert, Markus

    2016-01-01

    but patients with this phenotype constitute an important sub-group among fish-allergic individuals. 2. Newly identified fish allergens, enolases, aldolases, and fish gelatin, are of high relevance as the majority of the fish-allergic individuals seem to develop specific IgE against these proteins. The present...

  1. Tropical veterinary parasites at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, David Bruce

    2008-12-01

    Tropical veterinary parasites have been maintained by the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University since the mid 1800s. Most of these are maintained by the Department of Invertebrate Zoology, but many vectors and intermediate hosts are maintained by the Departments of Entomology and Malacology. The largest collections are of avian and mammalian ticks (Acarina) that are important as both parasites and vectors. Nematodes are second in numbers, followed by cestodes, trematodes, and several minor helminth groups, crustacean parasites of fish, and protozoan parasites of various hosts. The MCZ directed or participated in several major expeditions to tropical areas around the globe in the early 1900s. Many of these expeditions focused on human parasites, but hundreds of veterinary and zoonotic parasites were also collected from these and numerous, smaller, tropical expeditions. Host sources include companion animals, livestock, laboratory species, domestic fowl, reptiles, amphibians, exotics/zoo animals, commercially important fishes, and other wildlife. Specimens are curated, either fixed whole in vials or mounted on slides as whole mounts or histopathological sections. The primary emphasis of MCZ's current work with tropical veterinary parasites is on voucher specimens from epidemiological, experimental, and clinical research.

  2. Ocorrência e aspectos ecológicos de metazoários parasitos de peixes do Lago do Parque do Ingá, Maringá, Estado do Paraná = Occurrence and ecological aspects of the metazoan fish parasites from Ingá lake, Maringá, Paraná State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Haruko Machado

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nenhum estudo de peixes e parasitos foi realizado, até o momento, no Lago do Parque do Ingá que sofre influências antrópicas desde seu represamento, em 1970. Este trabalho analisou alguns aspectos ecológicos dos parasitos metazoários dos peixes deste lago. Dos peixes analisados, (69,5% estavam parasitados por pelo menos uma espécie de parasito. Foram encontrados 1.372 parasitos pertencentes à Nematoda (larvas e Platyhelminthes (Monogenea e Cestoda, sendo estes os mais prevalentes e numerosos. O encontro de larvas decestóides em Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus confirma a importância destas espécies como participantes de níveis tróficos intermediários. A maior abundância de T. rendalli e O. niloticus,no local, pode ser um fator determinante no recrutamento de parasitos. O parasito aproveita-se das espécies de hospedeiros mais abundantes para garantir o desenvolvimento de seu ciclo de vida e também por serem os mais disponíveis à predação pelas aves piscívorasali presentes, o que torna o local de grande importância para a sustentação do ciclo de vida desses parasitos. A baixa diversidade de endoparasitos coletados pode ser justificada pela presença de metais pesados – Cu e Pb – no sedimento, o que deve estar interferindo nodesenvolvimento dos invertebrados, possíveis hospedeiros intermediários.Ingá lake was dammed in 1970 and, since then, no study on fish and parasites had been done, but it has suffered anthropic influences. This study analyzed some ecological aspects of the metazoan parasites form this lake. From analyzed fish, 69.5% had at least one species of parasite. Among them, 1.372 parasites were found, prevailing Nematoda (larvae and Platyhelminthes (Monogenea and Cestoda. The discovery of cestode larvae in Tilapia rendalli and Oreochromis nitolicus confirms the importance of these species as participants of intermediate trophic levels. The great number of Tilapia rendalli and Oreochromis nitolicus

  3. Parasites and marine invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchin, M.E.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduced marine species are a major environmental and economic problem. The rate of these biological invasions has substantially increased in recent years due to the globalization of the world's economies. The damage caused by invasive species is often a result of the higher densities and larger sizes they attain compared to where they are native. A prominent hypothesis explaining the success of introduced species is that they are relatively free of the effects of natural enemies. Most notably, they may encounter fewer parasites in their introduced range compared to their native range. Parasites are ubiquitous and pervasive in marine systems, yet their role in marine invasions is relatively unexplored. Although data on parasites of marine organisms exist, the extent to which parasites can mediate marine invasions, or the extent to which invasive parasites and pathogens are responsible for infecting or potentially decimating native marine species have not been examined. In this review, we present a theoretical framework to model invasion success and examine the evidence for a relationship between parasite presence and the success of introduced marine species. For this, we compare the prevalence and species richness of parasites in several introduced populations of marine species with populations where they are native. We also discuss the potential impacts of introduced marine parasites on native ecosystems.

  4. Parasites from the Past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Nejsum, Peter

    will investigate how the diversity of food-borne parasitic infections has changed with cultural and dietary habits, hunting practice and intensity of animal husbandry. This is done by isolating and typing ancient DNA remains from parasite eggs found in archeological samples from across Denmark....

  5. AIDS - associated parasitic diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of human immunodeficiency virus infection, with its profound and progressive effect on the cellular immune system, a group of human opportunistic pathogens has come into prominence. Opportunistic parasitic infection can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Because many of these infections are treatable, an early and accurate diagnosis is important. This can be accomplished by a variety of methods such as direct demonstration of parasites and by serological tests to detect antigen and/or specific antibodies. However, antibody response may be poor in these patients and therefore immunodiagnostic tests have to be interpreted with caution. Cryptosporidium parvum , Isospora belli , Cyclospora cayetanensis , Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica and Strongyloides stercoralis are the commonly detected parasites. Detection of these parasites will help in proper management of these patients because drugs are available for most of these parasitic infections.

  6. Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Joseph T.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    1986-01-01

    Explains the adaptations to Antarctic waters that Notothenioidei, a group of advanced bony fishes, have exhibited. Discusses the fishes' mechanisms of production of antifreeze properties and their capacities for neutral buoyancy in water. (ML)

  7. The parasitic copepod Lernaeocera branchialis negatively affects cardiorespiratory function in Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Jane W.; Seth, H.; Axelsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    The parasitic copepod Lernaeocera branchialis had a negative effect on cardiorespiratory function in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua such that it caused pronounced cardiac dysfunction with irregular rhythm and reduced stroke amplitude compared with uninfected fish. In addition, parasite infection...... depressed the postprandial cardiac output and oxygen consumption...

  8. HEAVY METALS IN THE HOST-PARASITE SYSTEM LEPIDOPUS CAUDATUS- ANISAKIS LARVAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ruolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Authors have investigated on the relationship between pollution in the host parasite-system Lepidopus caudatus-Anisakis larvae. Lead, mercury and cadmium concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry in the larvae and in the muscle of fish host. Hg concentrations were often higher in parasites than host muscles. Finally, some hygienic and inspective implications were discussed.

  9. SURVEY OF PROTOZOA PARASITES INFESTATION OF Synodintis schall COLLECTED FROM JABEL AWLIA DAM RESERVOIR AT KHARTOUM STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzi Ali MOHAMED AHMED

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main target of the present research to conduct a survey of protozoan parasitic infestation in (Synodontis schall.collected from natural environment, study also aimed to identify the protozoan parasite of high parasitic load. 69 samples of fish were examined, 38 male and 31 female on the region of the label Awlia reservoir in the White Nile represented in (Synodontis schall which is one of most consumed species in Khartoum state. This study was conducted in Sudan University of Science and Technology College of Animal Production Science and Technology, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Science in the period from beginning of April to June 2014. The study revealed that the Haemogregarines was most common parasite obtained in this study with high prevalence rate followed by Trichodina sp, Chilodenella sp, Ich sp, in skin and gill of the mentioned fish as external protozoa. Indoparasite include Hexamita sp., Myxobolus sp., Cryptobia sp., Ichthyobodo sp., and Hennguya sp. Most found in the blood, gonad, liver and kidney respectively as internal parasite. The finding of this study showed prevalence rate of parasite in fish sample examined from skin and gill has high prevalence rate in male than female of studied fish. Also prevalence rate of parasite from internal organ has high prevalence rate of parasite in male than female of the fish study. All the result was analysis by SPSS version 16 by using t-test and the prevalence and means abundance of parasite represent by tables.

  10. Fish Dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that was inspired by Greek pottery, specifically dishes shaped as fish. Explains that fourth-grade students drew a fish shape that was later used to create their clay version of the fish. Discusses how the students examined the pottery to make decisions about color and design. (CMK)

  11. Metazoan Parasite Infracommunities of the Freshwater Eel, Mastacembelus armatus Lacpde, 1800 from River Godavari, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastacembelus armatus is considered to be the delicacy of Southern India. Four hundred ninety four specimens of M. armatus collected from river Godavari from August 2005 to September 2007 were analyzed in order to study their metazoan parasite infracommunities. Twelve species of parasites were collected, 6 digenea, 2 cestodes, 1 monogenea, 1 copepoda, 1 nematoda and 1 acanthocephala; 78% of the fishes were parasitized by one or more than one metazoan, with a mean of 67 parasites/fish. The endoparasites represents 98.3% of the total parasites collected. The digenean Tetracotyle sp. and Circumonchobothrium shindei occupy the position of secondary species and the remaining were satellite species. Relationships between total body length of fish and both total parasite abundance and mean parasite species richness were observed. A new copepod species, Neoergasilus indicus is also encountered in the present investigation. The metazoan parasite infracommunities of M. armatus presented dominance of larval endoparasites; correlation of parasite burden, diversity and species richness with host total length; and no influence of host sex on parasitisation.

  12. Copépodes parasitos de fossas nasais de cinco espécies de peixes (Characiformes da planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná, Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.887 Parasitic copepods in the nasal fossae of five fish species (Characiformes from the upper Paraná river floodplain, Paraná, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.887

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles Perez Lizama

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo o estudo de copépodes parasitos de fossas nasais de peixes da planície de inundação do alto Rio Paraná. As coletas foram realizadas em diversos pontos da planície nos meses de março, junho e setembro de 2004. Foram coletados 73 exemplares de peixes da ordem Characiformes, de quatro famílias distintas, pertencentes a cinco espécies: Acestrorhynchus lacustris, Prochilodus lineatus, Schizodon borellii, Serrasalmus maculatus e Serrasalmus marginatus. Dentre os 73 peixes examinados, 53 encontravam-se parasitados por copépodes de fossas nasais, variando de 1 a 146 parasitos por peixe. Os parasitos encontrados pertenciam a três espécies conhecidas: Gamidactylus jaraquensis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984; Gamispatulus schizodontis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984 e Rhinergasilus piranhus Boeger & Thatcher, 1988. Diferenças foram observadas nas medidas corporais dos parasitos e na quantidade de espécies de parasitos por espécie de peixe em relação aos copépodes encontrados em estudos anteriores na região amazônica. O presente estudo constitui um dos poucos trabalhos de identificação de copépodes parasitos de fossas nasais de peixes da região Sul do Brazil.The present work had the objective to study parasitic copepods in the nasal fossae of fish from the upper Paraná river floodplain. Fish were captured in different locations of the floodplain in March, June and September, 2004. A total of 73 specimens (Characiformes were collected, belonging to 4 distinct families and 5 species: Acestrorhynchus lacustris (Acestrorhynchidae, Schizodon borellii (Anostomidae, Prochilodus lineatus (Prochilodontidae, Serrasalmus marginatus and Serrasalmus maculatus (Serrasalmidae. Among 73 fishes examined, 53 were parasitized by nasal fossae copepods, varying from 1 to 146 parasites per host. Parasites found belonged to 3 known species: Gamidactylus jaraquensis Thatcher & Boeger, 1984; Gamispatulus schizodontis Thatcher & Boeger

  13. [Parasitism and ecological parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism as one of the life modes is a general biological phenomenon and is a characteristic of all viruses, many taxa of bacteria, fungi, protists, metaphytes, and metazoans. Zooparasitology is focused on studies of parasitic animals, particularly, on their taxonomy, anatomy, life cycles, host-parasite relations, biocoenotic connections, and evolution. Ecological parasitology is a component of ecology, as the scientific study of the relation of living organisms with each other and their surroundings. In the present paper, critical analysis of the problems, main postulates, and terminology of the modern ecological parasitology is given.

  14. Copepods and fishes in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Vernon E.

    1998-06-01

    The Amazon basin comprises the largest river ecosystem in the world (7 million km 2) with annual high and low water peaks and a constant temperature near 29°C. Some 2000 fish species and 40 species of free-living copepods are known to occur in Amazonia. The free-living forms serve as food for most larval fishes and some adults, but they also transmit several parasites including representatives of the nematode family Camallanidae. About three dozen species of parasitic copepods have been described from the Brazilian Amazon. Females of Amazonian parasitic copepods are found on skin, gill filaments, gill rakers or within the nasal fossae. Parasitic copepods are found on fishes that are from a few millimeters long up to those over 2 m in length and they are usually quite host specific. All have body pigmentation in different patterns and colors (frequently blues, such as cerulean, cobalt, spectrum, smalt or campanula). It is suggested that the coloration serves to attract specific host fish. Copepods have evolved adaptations for attachment and feeding, especially in the second antennae and endopods. Examples of progenesis, phoresis and commensalism are shown. Some species produce pathology such as a tourniquet effect, hyperplasia, blood loss and anemia, and can kill fishes by limiting their respiration.

  15. IMMUNE REGULATING ES-PRODUCTS IN PARASITIC NEMATODES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlool, Qusay Zuhair Mohammad; Buchmann, Kurt; Kania, Per Walter;

    Excretory/secretory (ES) products are molecules including various proteins produced by parasitic nematodes including larval A. simplex which is occurring in numerous marine fish hosts. The function of these substances and their effect on host physiology has not been fully described. The present...

  16. An annotated bibliography of parasitic Isopoda (Crustacea of Chondrichthyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plínio Soares Moreira

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available This annotated bibliography is an attempt to bring together all available published records on the parasitic isopods of Chondrichthian fishes as a basic reference source. An effort was made to synonymise old names according to the presently accepted scientific names.

  17. Morphometric, molecular and ecological analyses of the parasites of the sharpsnout seabream Diplodus puntazzo Cetti (Sparidae) from the Spanish Mediterranean: implications for aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, N; Ahuir-Baraja, A E; Raga, J A; Montero, F E

    2015-03-01

    One of the fish species with the highest potential for aquaculture is the sharpsnout seabream, Diplodus puntazzo Cetti. Among other aspects, the development of new fish cultures requires studies of potential pathogens that may compromise survival of the fish in captivity. Moreover, both cultured and wild fish can act as sources or reservoirs of pathogens which may negatively affect other well-established cultures. We have studied the parasite fauna of the wild sharpsnout seabream, and monitored the survival of the parasites in culture conditions. The sharpsnout seabream was sampled from two different Spanish localities and examined for parasites. Additionally, 20 fish were maintained in captivity. Ten of them were examined for parasites after a period of 10 days and a further ten fish after another 10 days. All fish were parasitized with at least four species, with 19 parasite species being identified, seven of which were recorded for the first time in the sharpsnout seabream. These included Microcotyle sp., Magnibursatus bartolii, Steringotrema pagelli, Galactosomum sp., Cardiocephaloides longicollis, Caligus ligusticus and Gnathia vorax. We also report the first records of two parasite species in the wild sharpsnout seabream, the polyopisthocotylean monogeneans Atrispinum seminalis and Sparicotyle chrysophrii. Previously, these parasites had only been recorded in farmed sharpsnout seabream. Most parasites in the skin, gills and alimentary tract disappeared under the conditions of captivity, with the exception of the monogeneans of the genus Lamellodiscus. The information provided about the sharpsnout seabream parasite fauna will be useful to prevent possible problems in fish farms due to some parasite species. Many parasites of the sharpsnout seabream recorded in the present study are shared by the main fish species in Mediterranean aquaculture, the gilthead seabream, thus suggesting the possibility of cross-infections.

  18. Metabolomics and protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Timothy; Haroune, Nicolas; Bagchi, Sushmita; Jarroll, Edward

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we examine the state-of-the-art technologies (gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.) in the well-established area of metabolomics especially as they relate to protozoan parasites.

  19. Transfection of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, A P; Thomas, A W; van Dijk, M R; Janse, C J

    1997-10-01

    The stable genetic transformation of three phylogenetically diverse species of Plasmodium, the parasitic etiological agent of malaria, is now possible. The parasite is haploid throughout the vast majority of its life cycle. Therefore with the single selectable marker activity and protocols currently available, it is possible not only to express introduced transgenes but also to study the effects of site-specific homologous recombination such as gene knockout. Transgene expression will allow the detailed study of many aspects of the cellular biology of malaria parasites, for example, the mechanisms underlying drug resistance and protein trafficking. We describe here the methods for propagation of the two animal models (Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium knowlesi) and for transfection of these two species and the human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Examples of transgene expression are given.

  20. Bipteria vetusta n. sp. – an old parasite in an old host: tracing the origin of myxosporean parasitism in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodádková, Alena; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Holzer, Astrid S; Fiala, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Myxosporea (Myxozoa), a group of parasitic Cnidaria, use mostly bony fishes (Teleostei) as intermediate hosts; however, they can also parasitize other vertebrates such as cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes). Molecular data of myxosporeans from sharks and rays (Elasmobranchii) revealed these parasites to be one of the most basal representatives in the myxosporean phylogenetic tree, suggesting their ancient evolutionary history. A new myxosporean species, Bipteria vetusta n. sp., was found in the gall bladder of rabbit fish, Chimaera monstrosa (Holocephali; Chondrichthyes), and ssrDNA-based phylogeny revealed its basal position within the marine myxosporean lineage. Molecular dating based on ssrDNA analysis suggested the origin of a stem lineage leading to the marine myxosporean lineage at the time of the origin of Chondrichthyes in the Silurian era. The two common lineages of Myxozoa, Myxosporea and Malacosporea, were estimated to have split from their common ancestor in the Cambrian era. Tracing the history of evolution of the "vertebrate host type" character in the context of molecular dating showed that cartilaginous fish represented an ancestral state for all myxosporeans. Teleosts were very likely subsequently parasitized by myxozoans four times, independently. Myxosporean radiation and diversification appear to correlate with intermediate host evolution. The first intermediate hosts of myxosporeans were cartilaginous fish. When bony fish evolved and radiated, myxosporeans switched and adapted to bony fish, and subsequently greatly diversified in this new host niche. We believe that the present study is the first attempt at molecular dating of myxozoan evolution based on an old myxosporean species – a living myxosporean fossil. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new species of Neolebouria Gibson, 1976 (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae) from the whitecheek monocle bream, Scolopsis vosmeri (Perciformes: Nemipteridae), from the Panjim coast at Goa, with a checklist of parasites previously reported from this fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Neeshma; Upadhyay, S K; Malhotra, Anshu; Blend, Charles K; Dronen, Norman O; Malhotra, Sandeep K

    2014-05-23

    Neolebouria capoori n. sp. (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae) is described from the whitecheek monocle bream, Scolopsis vosmeri (Bloch) (Perciformes: Nemipteridae) from the Panjim coast on the central west coast of India at Goa. The new species differs from both Neolebouria cantherhini (Li, Qiu & Zhang, 1988) as originally described from Thamnaconus modestus (Günther) (syn. Cantherines modestus Günther ) and Neolebouria confusum (Overstreet, 1969) as originally described from Ocyurus chrysurus (Bloch) by having the cirrus sac surpassing the ventral sucker posteriorly in N. cantherhini and being entirely preacetabular in N. confusum compared to terminating near the midlevel of the ventral sucker in N. capoori n. sp. The new species is most similar to N. confusum, but it further differs from this species by having the vitelline fields terminating near the level of the esophageal bifurcation compared to terminating near the level of the posterior margin of the pharynx, a larger sucker ratio (1:1.7-1:2.0 compared to 1:1.4-1:1.7), a somewhat shorter cirrus sac relative to body length (160-448, representing 9-18% of the body length compared to about 367, representing 22%), and the egg of the new species has a boss at the anopercular end that is not present in N. confusum. This study represents the first report on an opecoelid from S. vosmeri. A review of the parasites reported from S. vosmeri is included.

  2. Pathoecology of Chiribaya parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The excavations of Chiribaya culture sites in the Osmore drainage of southern Peru focused on the recovery of information about prehistoric disease, including parasitism. The archaeologists excavated human, dog, guinea pig, and llama mummies. These mummies were analyzed for internal and external parasites. The results of the analysis and reconstruction of prehistoric life from the excavations allows us to interpret the pathoecology of the Chiribaya culture.

  3. On a New Species of Phyllodistomum Braun, 1899 (Digenea: Gorgoderidae, a Parasite of Fresh Water Fish, Channa Punctatus (Bl. from Betwa River, Bundelkhand Region Jhansi, U.P, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jag Mohan Sen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a new species of genus Phyllodistum Braun, 1899. Phyllodistomum betwaensis sp.n. is reported from fresh water fish Channa punctatus (Bl. from Betwa river, Bundelkhand region,Jhansi. It differs from all the earlier reported species in having the body of fluke is spatulate and dorso-ventrally flattened; anterior portion of body is long and curved while posterior portion of body is broad; slightly curved, tubular oesophagus: ventral sucker oval and larger than oral sucker; testes, post-equatorial, inter-caecal, anterior testis is larger than posterior one and parallel to ovary; ovary, oval, just behind right vitelline lobe, parallel to anterior testis; vitelline lobes posterior-lateral to ventral sucker, oval. Right vitelline lobe is larger than left vitelline lobe; eggs are oval and non-operculated.

  4. Parasite prevalence in Bagrus filamentosus and Citharinus citharus from lower River Benue, Makurdi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shola Gabriel Solomon; Victor Tosin Okomoda; Victoria Makeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the parasite prevalence in Bagrus filamentosus (B. filamentosus) and Citharinus citharus (C. citharus) from lower River Benue in Makurdi. Methods: A total of 100 specimens each of both B. filamentosus and C. citharus were collected from River Benue, Makurdi, Nigeria and were examined for parasites after measuring basic morphometric parameters. Results: A total of 198 parasitic organisms comprising Eustrongylides africanus (nematode), Diphyllobothrium latum (cestode), Microsporidium sp. (fungi) and Clinostomum complanatum (trematode) were isolated and identified in B. filamentosus while 16 parasitic trematode (Clinostomum complanatum) were found in C. citharus. There was high correlation between total parasites and length as well as weight of the sample (r = 0.945 and r = 0.727 respectively). Conclusions: The result suggests that carnivorous/omnivorous fish species harbor more heterogeneous communities of parasites than herbivorous species do. This implies that the feeding habit is a major factor associated with parasitic infestation.

  5. Parasites and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  6. Evidence for suppression of immunity as a driver for genomic introgressions and host range expansion in races of Albugo candida, a generalist parasite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMullan, Mark; Gardiner, Anastasia; Bailey, Kate;

    2015-01-01

    How generalist parasites with wide host ranges can evolve is a central question in parasite evolution. Albugo candida is an obligate biotrophic parasite that consists of many physiological races that each specialize on distinct Brassicaceae host species. By analyzing genome sequence assemblies of......, Darwin's finches, sunflowers and cichlid fishes, and the implications of introgression for pathogen evolution in an agro-ecological environment....

  7. Records of Copiatestes filiferus (Leukart, in Sars, 1885 Gibson and Bray, 1977 (Digenea and Gorgorhynchus sp. (Acanthocepahala of marine fish from peruvian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tantaleán V

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Copiatestes filiferus (Leukart, in Sars, 1885 Gibson and Bray, 1977 (Digenea and Gorgorhynchus sp. (Acanthocephala parasites of Hemilutjanus macrophthalmos (Teleostei, both parasites are new records from Peru and the fish is a new host.

  8. Parasitic fauna of Gobiidae in Mazandaran coastal zones, north of Iran 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Roushan, Reza Habibnejad; Hosseinifard, Seyed Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Gobiidae is considered as one of the diverse families of fishes in Caspian Sea. Due to abundant species and no harvest, this family plays an important role in ecology and feed chain of fishes in Caspian Sea. Present study was performed to determine parasitic fauna of Gobiidae in southern parts of Caspian Sea (coasts of Nowshahr, Sorkhrood, Jouybar, Sari and Amirabad). Primarily, length and weight of each fish was measured. Then, fish's various organs were examined by routine parasitology methods. From 150 fishes which were caught from six studied coastal zones, 51 (34 %) were infected. Majority of caught fishes was belonged to sand goby (Neogobius fluviatilis pallasi) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) was the least. Highest rate of infection was seen in N. fluviatilis pallasi while, this percentage in round goby (N. melanostomus) was low (8.57 %) and in Caspian bighead goby (Neogobius kessleri gorlap) no parasitic infection was observed. Most of infected fishes were from Jouybar coastal zone while Nowshahr coastal zone had the lowest infection rate. In present study parasites such as Dactylogyrus, Rhobdochona fortuneti and Bothrocephalus gowkogensis were diagnosed in Caspian gobies. Regarding importance of gobies in chain feed of other fishes and their indirect economic importance, need of diagnosing of gobies parasitic fauna seems to be essential.

  9. Alternative non chemical possibilities to control fish infections caused by Bucephalus polymorphus Baer, 1827 (Trematoda: Bucephalidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wolber, Jens-Erik

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of Council Regulation (ECC) 2377/90, German agriculture has been se-verely affected by stringent restrictions concerning the use of medications in animals reared for human consumption. In commercial fish production, legal administration has been limited to a few desinfectants and antibiotic drugs. Currently, no permitted antiparasitic drug is available to treat fish stock threatened by endogenous parasites. After demonstrating the detrimental effects of fish-pathogenic parasit...

  10. Testing the niche apportionment hypothesis with parasite communities: is random assortment always the rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, G; Mouillot, D; Poulin, R

    2006-05-01

    Niche apportionment models have only been applied once to parasite communities. Only the random assortment model (RA), which indicates that species abundances are independent from each other and that interspecific competition is unimportant, provided a good fit to 3 out of 6 parasite communities investigated. The generality of this result needs to be validated, however. In this study we apply 5 niche apportionment models to the parasite communities of 14 fish species from the Great Barrier Reef. We determined which model fitted the data when using either numerical abundance or biomass as an estimate of parasite abundance, and whether the fit of niche apportionment models depends on how the parasite community is defined (e.g. ecto, endoparasites or all parasites considered together). The RA model provided a good fit for the whole community of parasites in 7 fish species when using biovolume (as a surrogate of biomass) as a measure of species abundance. The RA model also fitted observed data when ecto- and endoparasites were considered separately, using abundance or biovolume, but less frequently. Variation in fish sizes among species was not associated with the probability of a model fitting the data. Total numerical abundance and biovolume of parasites were not related across host species, suggesting that they capture different aspects of abundance. Biovolume is not only a better measurement to use with niche-orientated models, it should also be the preferred descriptor to analyse parasite community structure in other contexts. Most of the biological assumptions behind the RA model, i.e. randomness in apportioning niche space, lack of interspecific competition, independence of abundance among different species, and species with variable niches in changeable environments, are in accordance with some previous findings on parasite communities. Thus, parasite communities may generally be unsaturated with species, with empty niches, and interspecific interactions may

  11. Altered energetics and parasitism in juvenile northern pike (Esox lucius) inhabiting metal-mining contaminated lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jocelyn M; Janz, David M

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate possible factors that could be contributing to altered bioenergetics of juvenile northern pike (Esox lucius) living in lakes receiving effluent from the Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Although glycogen and triglycerides stores in liver and muscle were significantly greater in pike from exposure lakes compared to the reference, triglycerides stores of aquatic insects and spottail shiners that are prey items of juvenile pike showed no overall differences among lakes. Measures of parasitism, on the other hand, were negatively correlated with pike bioenergetics thereby reflecting a possible energetic cost of parasitism on reference lake fishes. The degree of infection, as measured by the abundance and biomass of intestinal parasites and the abundance of monogeneans on pike gills, was greatest in reference fishes and intermediate in low-exposure pike, whereas high-exposure fishes harbored no parasites.

  12. Human Parasites in Medieval Europe: Lifestyle, Sanitation and Medical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Piers D

    2015-01-01

    Parasites have been infecting humans throughout our evolution. However, not all people suffered with the same species or to the same intensity throughout this time. Our changing way of life has altered the suitability of humans to infection by each type of parasite. This analysis focuses upon the evidence for parasites from archaeological excavations at medieval sites across Europe. Comparison between the patterns of infection in the medieval period allows us to see how changes in sanitation, herding animals, growing and fertilizing crops, the fishing industry, food preparation and migration all affected human susceptibility to different parasites. We go on to explore how ectoparasites may have spread infectious bacterial diseases, and also consider what medieval medical practitioners thought of parasites and how they tried to treat them. While modern research has shown the use of a toilet decreases the risk of contracting certain intestinal parasites, the evidence for past societies presented here suggests that the invention of latrines had no observable beneficial effects upon intestinal health. This may be because toilets were not sufficiently ubiquitous until the last century, or that the use of fresh human faeces for manuring crops still ensured those parasite species were easily able to reinfect the population.

  13. Taxonomy, distribution and prevalence of parasites of tigerfish, Hydrocynus vittatus (Castelnau, 1861) in the Sanyati basin, Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabika, Nyasha; Barson, Maxwell; Van Dyk, Cobus; Avenant-Oldewage, Annemariè

    2016-09-01

    Parasites of the tigerfish (Hydrocynus vittatus) were investigated in the period October 2014 to July 2015 in the Sanyati Basin, Lake Kariba. The fish were collected using seine netting and also during the annual Kariba International Tiger Fishing Tournament. A total of 80 fish specimens (24 males and 56 females) were collected and were infected with the following seven parasite taxa: Monogenea (Annulotrema sp.1 from the gills and Annulotrema sp.2 from the skin), Nematoda (Contracaecum larvae), Cestoda (bothriocephalid, larval cyclophyllid), Copepoda (Lamproglena hemprichii), pentastomid, Myxosporea (Myxobolus sp.,) and unicellular ciliate parasites (Trichodina sp., Tetrahymena sp., and unidentified). Annulotrema sp. 1 was observed in all fish and had the highest prevalence, mean intensity and abundance. The fish organs infected were gills, skin, fin, body cavity, stomach, intestines, mesentery, liver, kidney, brain cavity and swim bladder. No parasites were observed in the muscle, eyes and blood. The distribution of the parasites was highest in the gills and lowest in the brain cavity and swimbladder. Bothriocephalids, pentastomes and Trichodina sp. were not observed in male fish. Sex was not related to the intensity of parasites. The results of the study showed that H. vittatus has a richer parasite community than other previous investigated alestids. Pentastomes, Myxobolus sp., Trichodina sp., Tetrahymena sp. and bothriocephalid cestodes are new records for H. vittatus in Zimbabwe.

  14. Survey of parasites in threatened stocks of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon by examination of wet tissues and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jayde A; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Peterson, Tracy S; Rodnick, Kenneth J; Kent, Michael L

    2011-12-01

    We are conducting studies on the impacts of parasites on Oregon coastal coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kistuch). An essential first step is documenting the geographic distribution of infections, which may be accomplished by using different methods for parasite detection. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to (1) identify parasite species infecting these stocks of coho salmon and document their prevalence, density, and geographic distribution; (2) assess the pathology of these infections; and (3) for the first time, determine the sensitivity and specificity of histology for detecting parasites compared with examining wet preparations for muscle and gill infections. We examined 576 fry, parr, and smolt coho salmon in total by histology. The muscle and gills of 219 of these fish also were examined by wet preparation. Fish were collected from 10 different locations in 2006-2007. We identified 21 different species of parasites in these fish. Some parasites, such as Nanophyetus salmincola and Myxobolus insidiosus, were common across all fish life stages from most basins. Other parasites, such as Apophallus sp., were more common in underyearling fish than smolts and had a more restricted geographic distribution. Additional parasites commonly observed were as follows: Sanguinicola sp., Trichodina truttae , Epistylis sp., Capriniana piscium, and unidentified metacercariae in gills; Myxobolus sp. in brain; Myxidium salvelini and Chloromyxum majori in kidney; Pseudocapillaria salvelini and adult digenean spp. in the intestine. Only a few parasites, such as the unidentified gill metacercariae, elicted overt pathologic changes. Histology had generally poor sensitivity for detecting parasites; however, it had relatively good specificity. We recommend using both methods for studies or monitoring programs requiring a comprehensive assessment of parasite identification, enumeration, and parasite-related pathology.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSES CONCERNING PARASITIC DIVERSITY OF COMMON CARP AND KOI CARP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA RADU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiments carried on ponds of CCDP Nucet, researches being axled on comparative and comprehensive analysis of pathologic incidences on common and Japanese carp. This researches present theoretical and empirical convenience, because allow to elaborate of prophylaxis and disease control on. The ichthyo-pathologic exam was carried on for 271 exemplars of common carp, subspecies Cyprinus carpio carpio and 31 exemplars of ornamental carp (koi carp. There were identified 30 species of allogenic parasites, 9 species of parasites characteristic for carp as well as some common species of parasites with broad dissemination on cultured fish. All analyzed exemplars of showed parasitic infestation, but with a different extent of extensively and intensively. The most important epidemiologic factors from the analyzed ponds that increase the parasitic invasions were represented by the presence of infested fish, rearing in policulture of species and ages, as well as by the high density, water quality, thermic and flow fluctuations.

  16. [Lernaeenicus vorax Richiardi, 1877. Parasitic copepod of Sciaenides from the Gulf of Tunis (Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktari, M H; Chakroun, N

    1981-01-01

    The study of the Tunis bay Sciaenidae has made it possible to point out the presence of a parasite Copepod Lernaeenicus vorax Richiardi, 1877 with a more important parasitism in argyrosomus regius (11.5 %) and Umbrina cirrosa (9.2 %) in Sciaena umbra (0.6 %). The parasites, chiefly one per host, get fixed on the right side or on the left one preferably at the level of the fish's fins. Among Umbrina cirrosa the juveniles ones have proved to be more parasitic (82,13 %) than the adults one (17,85 %).

  17. Protozoan and metazoan parasites of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus cultured in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson Pantoja MF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study describes the parasitic fauna and relative condition factor (Kn in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. (Cichlidae from fish farms in the State of Amapá. Material and methods. 123 fish from four fish farms in the state of Amapá, Brazil were necropsied for parasitological and Kn analysis. Results. 64.2% of the examined fish, had the gills infected with Cichlidogyrus tilapiae Paperna, 1960 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae; Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 (Protozoa: Ciliophora, Trichodina Ehrenberg, 1830 and Paratrichodina africana Kazubski & El-Tantawy, 1986 (Protozoa: Trichodinidae. The highest prevalence found corresponded to Monogenoidea C. tilapiae while the lowest corresponded to Trichodinidae. However, I. multifiliis was the parasite that presented the greatest intensity and abundance. The differences found in the infection rates of the different fish farms due to causes further discussed. The parasitism did not influence the relative condition factor (Kn of fish. This was the first record of P. africana in Brazil and occurred in the Eastern Amazon. Conclusions. In Brazil, Lamproglena sp. is an emerging parasite in the Southern and Southeastern regions, but this crustacean was not found in the Nile tilapia in the State of Amapá. The parasitic infections in Nile tilapia farmed in Brazil are caused by protozoan, monogenoidea, crustacea and digenea species, and the regional differences on their prevalence and intensity rates are discussed in this study.

  18. Fish health and fish quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian

    Aquaculture is an expanding worldwide industry producing an increasing amount of fish every year. The quality of the fish meat is dependent upon many biological and non-biological factors. Infectious diseases are known to cause bleedings and damage of the muscle tissue that may lead to scarring...... are poorly described in fish. The present work in this thesis focused on: 1) examination of potential changes in the quality regarding texture of the muscle tissue in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after previous infection with the bacterial pathogens Yersinia ruckeri and Vibrio anguillarum; 2...... of these studies showed that previous infections by Yersinia ruckeri and Vibrio anguillarum gave rise to subsequent changes regarding textural quality parameters in fresh fish meat, while no differences were seen for cold-smoked meat from the same fish. The texture in previous infected fish was less flaky and less...

  19. Parasite fauna of wild and cultured dusky-grouper Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834 from Ubatuba, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Roumbedakis

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying and quantifying the parasites of wild and cultured dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus. During a year and thereby all four seasons, 20 wild and 20 cultured groupers were examined for the presence of parasites, except in the last season, in which 19 wild and 20 cultured fish were examined, totalling 159 groupers analysed from Ubatuba, southeastern Brazil. Prevalence, mean intensity of infection, mean abundance and mean relative dominance were calculated. Five species of parasites were identified in fish from both origins: Pseudorhabdosynochus beverleyburtonae (Monogenea, Neobenedenia melleni (Monogenea, Pseudempleurosoma sp. (Monogenea, Helicometrina nimia (Digenea and larvae of Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda. The prevalence of ectoparasites, in most cases, was higher than endoparasites. The most abundant parasite was the monogenea Pseudorhabdosynochus beverleyburtonae in both wild and cultured fish, along all seasons. Neobenedenia melleni was observed in wild and cultured fish in all seasons, with a gradual increase in the number of parasites from the coldest to the hottest seasons, with the highest prevalence and mean intensity in the summer. Helicometrina nimia was found in all seasons in both wild and cultured fish, except for summer, where its presence was detected only in wild fish. Pseudempleurosoma sp. and larvae of Contracaecum sp. showed low prevalence occurring in wild and cultured fish in the autumn and spring, respectively. This study revealed high intensities of potentially pathogenic parasites that could favour disease outbreaks in culture conditions.

  20. In vitro leukocyte response of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to helminth parasite antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Frederik; Rahn, Anna K; Dittmar, Janine; Erin, Noémie; Rieger, Jennifer K; Haase, David; Samonte-Padilla, Irene E; Lange, Joseph; Jakobsen, Per J; Hermida, Miguel; Fernández, Carlos; Kurtz, Joachim; Bakker, Theo C M; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Kalbe, Martin; Scharsack, Jörn P

    2014-01-01

    Helminth parasites of teleost fish have evolved strategies to evade and manipulate the immune responses of their hosts. Responsiveness of fish host immunity to helminth antigens may therefore vary depending on the degree of host-parasite counter-adaptation. Generalist parasites, infective for a number of host species, might be unable to adapt optimally to the immune system of a certain host species, while specialist parasites might display high levels of adaptation to a particular host species. The degree of adaptations may further differ between sympatric and allopatric host-parasite combinations. Here, we test these hypotheses by in vitro exposure of head kidney leukocytes from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to antigens from parasites with a broad fish host range (Diplostomum pseudospathaceum, Triaenophorus nodulosus), a specific fish parasite of cyprinids (Ligula intestinalis) and parasites highly specific only to a single fish species as second intermediate host (Schistocephalus pungitii, which does not infect G. aculeatus, and Schistocephalus solidus, infecting G. aculeatus). In vitro responses of stickleback leukocytes to S. solidus antigens from six European populations, with S. solidus prevalence from parasites and among specialists, from parasites that do not infect G. aculeatus to a G. aculeatus-infecting species. Generalist parasites seem to maintain their ability to infect different host species at the costs of relatively higher immunogenicity compared to specialist parasites. In a comparison of sympatric and allopatric combinations of stickleback leukocytes and antigens from S. solidus, magnitudes of in vitro responses were dependent on the prevalence of the parasite in the population of origin, rather than on sympatry. Antigens from Norwegian (prevalence 30-50%) and Spanish (40-66%) S. solidus induced generally higher in vitro responses compared to S. solidus from two German (<1%) populations. Likewise, leukocytes from

  1. Redescription and phylogenetic position of Myxobolus aeglefini and Myxobolus platessae n. comb. (Myxosporea), parasites in the cartilage of some North Atlantic marine fishes, with notes on the phylogeny and classification of the Platysporina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsbakk, Egil; Kristmundsson, Árni; Albano, Marco; Brown, Paul; Freeman, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Myxobolus 'aeglefini' Auerbach, 1906 was originally described from cranial cartilage of North sea haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), but has subsequently been recorded from cartilaginous tissues of a range of other gadoid hosts, from pleuronectids and from lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus) in the North Atlantic and from a zoarcid fish in the Japan Sea (Pacific). We obtained partial small-subunit rDNA sequences of Myxobolus 'aeglefini' from gadoids and pleuronectids from Norway and Iceland. The sequences from gadoids and pleuronectids represented two different genotypes, showing 98.2% identity. Morphometric studies on the spores from selected gadids and pleuronectids revealed slight but statistically significant differences in spore dimensions associated with the genotypes, the spores from pleuronectids were thicker and with larger polar capsules. We identify the morpho- and genotype from gadoids with Myxobolus 'aeglefini' sensu Auerbach, and the one from pleuronectids with Sphaerospora platessae Woodcock, 1904 as Myxobolus platessae n. comb. The latter species was originally described from Irish Sea plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). Myxobolus albi Picon et al., 2009 described from the common goby Pomatoschistus microps in Scotland is a synonym of M. 'aeglefini'. The Pacific Myxobolus 'aeglefini' represents a separate species, showing only 97.4-97.6% identity to the Atlantic species. In phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rDNA sequences, these and some related marine chondrotropic Myxobolus spp. form a distinct well supported group. This clusters with freshwater and marine myxobolids and Triangula and Cardimyxobolus species, in a basal clade in the phylogeny of the Platysporina. Members of family Myxobilatidae, Ortholinea spp. (currently Ortholineidae) and sequences of some other urinary system infecting myxosporeans form a well supported clade among members of the suborder Platysporina. Based on phylogenetic analyses, we propose the following changes to the

  2. An annotated list of species of the Proteocephalus Weinland, 1858 aggregate sensu de Chambrier et al. (2004) (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea), parasites of fishes in the Palaearctic Region, their phylogenetic relationships and a key to their identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomás; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Skeríková, Andrea; Shimazu, Takeshi; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2007-06-01

    A list and key to the identification of valid species of tapeworms of the Proteocephalus Weinland, 1858 aggregate sensu de Chambrier et al. (2004), i.e. species of the genus occurring in fresh- and brackish-water fishes in the Palaearctic Region, are provided, with data on their hosts and geographical distribution. Instead of 32 taxa listed by Schmidt (1986) and subsequent authors, only the following 14 species are considered to be valid: P. ambiguus (Dujardin, 1845) (type-species); P. cernuae (Gmelin, 1790); P. filicollis (Rudolphi, 1802); P. fluviatilis Bangham, 1925; P. gobiorum Dogiel & Bychowsky, 1939; P. longicollis (Zeder, 1800); P. macrocephalus (Creplin, 1825); P. midoriensis Shimazu, 1990; P. percae (Müller, 1780); P. plecoglossi Yamaguti, 1934; P. sagittus (Grimm, 1872); P. tetrastomus (Rudolphi, 1810); P. thymalli (Annenkova-Chlopina, 1923); and P. torulosus (Batsch, 1786). An analysis of sequences of the nuclear genes (ITS2 and V4 region of 18S rDNA) revealed the following phylogenetic relationships for these taxa: P. torulosus ((P. midoriensis, P. sagittus) (P. fluviatilis (P. filicollis, P. gobiorum, P. macrocephalus)) (P. cernuae, P. plecoglossi, P. tetrastomus ((P. longicollis, P. percae) (P. ambiguus, P. thymalli)))). P. pronini Rusinek, 2001 from grayling Thymallus arcticus nigrescens is synonymised with P. thymalli. P. esocis La Rue, 1911 is apparently invalid but its conspecificity with either P. percae or P. longicollis could not be confirmed due to the absence of the scolex in the holotype and the unavailability of other material for morphological and molecular studies. P. osculatus (Goeze, 1782) has recently been transferred to Glanitaenia de Chambrier, Mariaux, Vaucher & Zehnder, 2004. The validity of the genus is supported by the position of G. osculata within the Proteocephalidea, based on molecular data, as well as its morphology and nature of the definitive host (the European wels Silurus glanis). P. hemispherous Rahemo & Al

  3. Molecular characterization of muscle-parasitizing didymozoid from a chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Niichiro; Okamoto, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    Didymozoids found in the muscles of marine fish are almost always damaged because they are usually found after being sliced. Therefore, identifying muscle-parasitizing didymozoids is difficult because of the difficulty in collecting non-damaged worms and observing their organs as key points for morphological identification. Moreover, muscle-parasitizing didymozoids are not easily found because they parasitize at the trunk muscles. Therefore, muscle-parasitizing didymozoid classification has not progressed because there are few opportunities to detect them. Our recent report was the first to describe the usefulness of sequencing analysis for discrimination among muscle-parasitizing didymozoids. Recently, we found a didymozoid in the trunk muscle of a chub mackerel Scomber japonicus. The present study genetically compares the present isolate with other muscle-parasitizing didymozoids. The present isolate differs markedly from the previously unidentified didymozoid from an Atlantic mackerel S. scombrus by phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA. It also differs from other muscle-parasitizing didymozoids from other host species based on phylogenetic analyses of 18S, 28S rDNAs, and coxI loci. These results suggest that sequencing analysis is useful for the discrimination of muscle-parasitizing didymozoids. Combining the present data with earlier data for sequencing analysis, muscle-parasitizing didymozoids from seven marine fish species were classified as seven species. We proposed appellations for six distinct muscle-parasitizing didymozoids for future analysis: sweetlips fish type from Diagramma pictum and Plectorhinchus cinctus, red sea bream type from Pagrus major, flying fish type from Cypselurus heterurus, Atlantic mackerel type from Scomber scombrus, chub mackerel type from S. japonicus, and purple rockcod type from Epinephelus cyanopodus.

  4. Internal parasites of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raś-Noryńska, Małgorzata; Sokół, Rajmund

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a growing number of exotic reptiles are kept as pets. The aim of this study was to determine the species of parasites found in reptile patients of veterinary practices in Poland. Fecal samples obtained from 76 lizards, 15 turtles and 10 snakes were examined by flotation method and direct smear stained with Lugol's iodine. In 63 samples (62.4%) the presence of parasite eggs and oocysts was revealed. Oocysts of Isospora spp. (from 33% to 100% of the samples, depending on the reptilian species) and Oxyurids eggs (10% to 75%) were predominant. In addition, isolated Eimeria spp. oocysts and Giardia intestinalis cysts were found, as well as Strongylus spp. and Hymenolepis spp. eggs. Pet reptiles are often infected with parasites, some of which are potentially dangerous to humans. A routine parasitological examination should be done in such animals.

  5. Foodborne protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David

    2005-08-25

    This report addresses Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Cyclospora, and more briefly, Toxoplasma as the main parasitic protozoa of concern to food production worldwide. Other parasitic protozoa may be spread in food or water but are not considered as great a risk to food manufacture. The protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have proven potential to cause waterborne and foodborne disease. Toxoplasma gondii has been considered a risk in specific cases, but humans are not its primary host. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are widespread in the environment, particularly the aquatic environment, and major outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis have occurred as a result of contaminated drinking water. Large outbreaks of waterborne cyclosporiasis have not been identified. Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have potential significance in the preparation and consumption of fresh produce and in catering practice, in which ready-to-eat foods may be served that have not received heat treatment. None of the three organisms Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora has been shown to be a problem for heat processed food or tap water that has undergone appropriate treatment at a water treatment works. All three are sensitive to standard pasteurisation techniques. Although humans are not a primary host for T. gondii, the potential exists for both waterborne and foodborne toxoplasmosis. Parasitic protozoa do not multiply in foods, but they may survive in or on moist foods for months in cool, damp environments. Their ecology makes control of these parasites difficult. For general control of parasitic protozoa in the food chain, the following steps are necessary: - Follow good hygienic practice in food service and catering industries.- Minimise dissemination of cysts and oocysts in the farming environment and via human waste management.- Include these microorganisms in Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plans of water suppliers, industries or sectors

  6. Vaccines for fish in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerset, Ingunn; Krossøy, Bjørn; Biering, Eirik; Frost, Petter

    2005-02-01

    Vaccination plays an important role in large-scale commercial fish farming and has been a key reason for the success of salmon cultivation. In addition to salmon and trout, commercial vaccines are available for channel catfish, European seabass and seabream, Japanese amberjack and yellowtail, tilapia and Atlantic cod. In general, empirically developed vaccines based on inactivated bacterial pathogens have proven to be very efficacious in fish. Fewer commercially available viral vaccines and no parasite vaccines exist. Substantial efficacy data are available for new fish vaccines and advanced technology has been implemented. However, before such vaccines can be successfully commercialized, several hurdles have to be overcome regarding the production of cheap but effective antigens and adjuvants, while bearing in mind environmental and associated regulatory concerns (e.g., those that limit the use of live vaccines). Pharmaceutical companies have performed a considerable amount of research on fish vaccines, however, limited information is available in scientific publications. In addition, salmonids dominate both the literature and commercial focus, despite their relatively small contribution to the total volume of farmed fish in the world. This review provides an overview of the fish vaccines that are currently commercially available and some viewpoints on how the field is likely to evolve in the near future.

  7. Prevalence of copepod parasite (Lernaeenicus polynemi infestation on Eleutheronema tetradactylum from Pazhayar coastal waters, southeast coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazhanivel Bharadhirajan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence and mean intensity of copepod parasite Lernaeenicus polynemi infestation on Eleutheronema tetradactylum from Pazayar, Tamil Nadu, southeast coast of India. Methods: The fish was collected from Pazhayar landing centre from January to December 2012 and their biometric measurements were examined. Toal number of infected fish and total number of parasites were recorded. Results: Higher prevalence and mean intensity of infestation of 35.23% and 3.1 were respectively reported during monsoon season of 2012. The parasitic infestations were scattered over the entire body of the host and targeted the different internal organs such as liver and the dorsal aorta. The highest intensity was reported to be 66 parasites in a single host. Conclusions: Due to the heavy parasitic attack the fish will suffer and its economical value or the marketability may reduce.

  8. Nematomorph parasites indirectly alter the food web and ecosystem function of streams through behavioural manipulation of their cricket hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Egusa, T.; Fukushima, K.; Oda, T.; Ohte, N.; Tokuchi, Naoko; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Murakami, Isaya; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Nematomorph parasites manipulate crickets to enter streams where the parasites reproduce. These manipulated crickets become a substantial food subsidy for stream fishes. We used a field experiment to investigate how this subsidy affects the stream community and ecosystem function. When crickets were available, predatory fish ate fewer benthic invertebrates. The resulting release of the benthic invertebrate community from fish predation indirectly decreased the biomass of benthic algae and slightly increased leaf break-down rate. This is the first experimental demonstration that host manipulation by a parasite can reorganise a community and alter ecosystem function. Nematomorphs are common, and many other parasites have dramatic effects on host phenotypes, suggesting that similar effects of parasites on ecosystems might be widespread.

  9. Correlation of parasites with growth of yellow perch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Véronique B; Glémet, Hélène; Ferland-Raymond, Bastien; Gendron, Andrée D; Marcogliese, David J

    2012-06-01

    The possible influence of parasites on the short-term and long-term growth and condition of yellow perch Perca flavescens was examined by investigating correlations between parasite abundance and specific growth variables. The following parasites were enumerated in age-1 yellow perch collected from Lake St. Pierre in June 2008: Apophallus brevis, Diplostomum spp., Ichthyocotylurus spp., Tylodelphys scheuringi, Phyllodistomum superbum, and Raphidascaris acus. Short-term growth was estimated using RNA/DNA ratios and long-term growth via the total length and condition as measured by the Fulton index. No correlation was found between parasite abundance and short-term growth, but a negative influence of combined infections of T. scheuringi and P. superbum on long-term growth was detected. In addition, the abundance of Ichthyocotylurus spp. was positively correlated with the condition of the yellow perch. Together these results suggest that limited or subtle pathogenic effects in juvenile fish are not discernable in recent growth but only in long-term growth indices. Furthermore, in future studies examination of parasite effects on fish growth should account for multiple infections.

  10. Cessation of a salmon decline with control of parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Peacock, Stephanie J.

    2013-04-01

    The resilience of coastal social-ecological systems may depend on adaptive responses to aquaculture disease outbreaks that can threaten wild and farm fish. A nine-year study of parasitic sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) and pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) from Pacific Canada indicates that adaptive changes in parasite management on salmon farms have yielded positive conservation outcomes. After four years of sea lice epizootics and wild salmon population decline, parasiticide application on salmon farms was adapted to the timing of wild salmon migrations. Winter treatment of farm fish with parasiticides, prior to the out-migration of wild juvenile salmon, has reduced epizootics of wild salmon without significantly increasing the annual number of treatments. Levels of parasites on wild juvenile salmon significantly influence the growth rate of affected salmon populations, suggesting that these changes in management have had positive outcomes for wild salmon populations. These adaptive changes have not occurred through formal adaptive management, but rather, through multi-stakeholder processes arising from a contentious scientific and public debate. Despite the apparent success of parasite control on salmon farms in the study region, there remain concerns about the long-term sustainability of this approach because of the unknown ecological effects of parasticides and the potential for parasite resistance to chemical treatments. © 2013 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Influence of alkalinity and hardness on copper sulfate toxicity to various fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper sulfate treatments are currently used to control parasites (mainly Ich) on fish and fungus (Saprolegnia) on fish eggs. This compound has also been used in the past to control columnaris on fish, although antibiotics are the common treatment now. In our lab’s efforts to gain an FDA-approval ...

  12. Parasitic infections of Piaractus mesopotamicus and hybrid (P. mesopotamicus xPiaractus brachypomus cultured in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Franceschini

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the occurrence of parasitic infections in the “pacu” fish Piaractus mesopotamicus and the “patinga” hybrid (P. mesopotamicus x Piaractus brachypomus in the northwest of São Paulo State, Brazil. Fish from the following three fish farms were evaluated every two months: A, a hatchery and larviculture farm (n = 16 pacu / n = 19 patinga, B, a growout farm (n = 35 patinga and C, a fee-fishing property (n = 28 pacu / n = 7 patinga. Thirty-five fish from each property were collected from February 2010 to February 2011 and subjected to parasitological analysis. The parasites found were the following:Mymarothecium viatorum, Anacanthorus penilabiatus, Notozothecium janauachensis (Dactylogyridae, Monogenea,Trichodina spp., Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Chilodonella sp. (Protozoa, Myxobolus spp.,Henneguya spp. (Myxozoa, Rondonia rondoni, Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda, and Dolops carvalhoi(Crustacea. Of the fish examined, 62.9% from “A” and 100% from “B” and “C” were infested with at least one parasite species. Pacu fish (n = 44 showed a higher susceptibility to Anacanthorus penilabiatus infestations, whereas patinga (n = 61 were more susceptible to Mymarothecium viatorum (p < 0.05. Appropriate fish handling (nutrition, transport and storage, in conjunction with monitoring of water quality, can reduce the stress to which the farmed fish are exposed and is essential for pathogen control.

  13. Food-borne parasitic zoonoses in China: perspective for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Ren-Li; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2008-04-01

    Food-borne parasitic zoonoses (FBPZs) cause death and serious diseases in humans and animals worldwide, and are of both public health significance and socioeconomic importance. The FBPZ problem is severe in mainland China, where approximately 150 million people are suffering from FBPZs and more people are at risk. Here, the current status of the FBPZ problem in mainland China is reviewed and strategies and measures for effective control of FBPZs are proposed. Major parasitic zoonoses transmitted through consumption of infected or contaminated meat, fish, plants and/or water will be discussed.

  14. On biomass of parasitic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, J H [Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China); Mo, L-F [School of Information Engineering, Zhejiang Forestry College, Lin' an 311300, Zhejiang (China)], E-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    An extremely simple and elementary but rigorous derivation of maximal biomass of parasitic plants is given using an assumption that metabolic rate of the parasite should not be larger than that of its host organ.

  15. On biomass of parasitic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J. H.; Mo, L.-F.

    2008-02-01

    An extremely simple and elementary but rigorous derivation of maximal biomass of parasitic plants is given using an assumption that metabolic rate of the parasite should not be larger than that of its host organ

  16. Enteric parasites and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Cimerman

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on the importance of intestinal parasites in patients with AIDS, showing relevant data in the medical literature, with special emphasis on epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of enteroparasitosis, especially cryptosporidiasis, isosporiasis, microsporidiasis and strongyloidiasis. DESIGN: Narrative review.

  17. Parasites and the skin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... remind you of those rare and wonderful infestations that you might never see. ... from a burrow, mounted on a glass slide. The findings are ... Parasitic infections may be confined to the skin or may have skin involvement as part ...

  18. Parasites and Foodborne Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called "Crypto", is a one-celled, microscopic shelled parasite and a significant cause of waterborne and foodborne illness worldwide. It is found in the intestines of many herd animals including cows, sheep, goats, deer, and elk. The illness could be intestinal, ...

  19. Ungulate malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Thomas J.; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  20. Potential Hazards in Smoke-Flavored Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hong; JIANG Jie; LI Donghua

    2008-01-01

    Smoking is widely used in fish processing for the color and flavor. Smoke flavorings have evolved as a successful alter- native to traditional smoking. The hazards of the fish products treated by liquid-smoking process are discussed in this review. The smoke flavoring is one important ingredient in the smoke-flavored fish. This paper gives the definition of smoke flavorings and the hazard of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) residue in the smoke flavorings on the market. It gives also an assessment of chemical hazards such as carcinogenic PAHs, especially Benzo-[a]pyrene, as well as biological hazards such as Listeria monocyto- genes, Clostridium botulinum, histamine and parasites in smoke-flavored fish. The limitations in regulations or standards are dis- cussed. Smoke flavored fish have lower content of PAHs as compared with the traditional smoking techniques if the PAHs residue in smoke flavorings is controlled by regulations or standards.

  1. One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, You Fish!

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine; Timmons, Maryellen; Medders, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The recreational fishing activity presented in this article provides a hands-on, problem-based experience for students; it unites biology, math, economics, environmental policy, and population dynamics concepts. In addition, the activity allows students to shape environmental policy in a realistic setting and evaluate their peers' work. By…

  2. Control of parasites in cultured marine finfishes in Southeast Asia--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, L T

    1997-10-01

    Mariculture in Southeast Asia began in the 1970s and expanded rapidly during the 1980s, with the commercial hatchery production of the seabass Lates calcarifer. Other important cultured species were Epinephelus coioides, Epinephelus malabaricus, Lutjanus johni, and Lutjanus argentimaculatus. Intensification in the polyculture of these species and the large-scale international movement of fingerlings or juveniles, as well as the rapid expansion and concentration of fish farms, have caused severe problems resulting from parasitic infections. Infections in maricultured fish are predominantly caused by monoxenous parasites, in particular the capsalid and diplectanid monogeneans. Heteroxenous blood parasites also successfully maintained transmission in the culture system despite their requirement for an intermediate host. Prophylactic chemical treatments helped to reduce parasitic infection but did not eliminate them and once introduced into the floating netcage culture system, these parasites managed to maintain their transmission successfully. Despite the current lack of information regarding the biology of many parasites affecting cultured marine fishes, it nevertheless is possible to develop methodologies to produce an integrated health management system specifically designed to the needs of the mariculture practiced in the Southeast Asian region. This system is important and should include a sequence of prophylaxes, adequate nutrition, sanitation, immunization and an effective system of marketing for farmed fishes.

  3. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  4. Endohelminth parasites of the freshwater fish Zoogoneticus purhepechus (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae from two springs in the Lower Lerma River, Mexico Endohelmintos parásitos del pez dulceacuícola Zoogoneticus purhepechus (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae en dos manantiales de la cuenca del río Lerma bajo, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Martínez-Aquino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the helminthological record of the viviparous fish species Zoogoneticus purhepechus, 72 individuals were collected from 2 localities, La Luz spring (n= 45 and Los Negritos spring (n= 27, both in the lower Lerma River, in Michoacán state, Mexico. Twelve helminth taxa were recovered, 5 adults (the digeneans Margotrema bravoae and Phyllodistomum sp., the cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, the nematode Rhabdochona lichtenfelsi and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus cf. bulbocolli, and 7 larvae (the metacercariae of Clinostomum complanatum, the cysticercoid of Cyclophyllidea, the nematodes Rhabdochona sp., Eustrongylides sp., Contracaecum sp. and Spiroxys sp., and the cysthacanth of Polymorphus brevis. Of these, R. lichtenfelsi was the most prevalent and abundant species at La Luz spring with 15.6% and 0.33 individuals per analyzed host. The remaining species were relatively more rare and infrequent. The helminth parasite community of Z. purhepechus at Los Negritos spring was remarkably poor and abundance was very low. The omnivorous feeding habits, the position of the host species in the food web, and the environmental characteristics of each locality are suggested as the main factors determining the helminth parasite communities in this freshwater fish.Se examinaron 72 individuos del pez vivíparo Zoogoneticus purhepechus para establecer el registro helmintológico de la especie. Los huéspedes se recolectaron de los manantiales La Luz (n= 45 y Los Negritos (n= 27, ubicados en la porción baja del río Lerma, en el estado de Michoacán, México. El registro helmintológico consta de 12 especies, incluyendo como adultos los digéneos Margotrema bravoae y Phyllodistomum sp., el céstodo Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, el nemátodo Rhabdochona lichtenfelsi, y el acantocéfalo Pomphorhynchus cf. bulbocolli. Además, como estadios larvarios, se encontraron las metacercarias de Clinostomum complanatum, el cisticercoide de

  5. Rapid evolution of parasite resistance in a warmer environment: insights from a large scale field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Gonzalez, Fernando; Sundström, L Fredrik; Schmid, Marian; Björklund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to have major effects on host-parasite dynamics, with potentially enormous consequences for entire ecosystems. To develop an accurate prognostic framework, theoretical models must be supported by empirical research. We investigated potential changes in host-parasite dynamics between a fish parasite, the eyefluke Diplostomum baeri, and an intermediate host, the European perch Perca fluviatilis, in a large-scale semi-enclosed area in the Baltic Sea, the Biotest Lake, which since 1980 receives heated water from a nuclear power plant. Two sample screenings, in two consecutive years, showed that fish from the warmer Biotest Lake were now less parasitized than fish from the Baltic Sea. These results are contrasting previous screenings performed six years after the temperature change, which showed the inverse situation. An experimental infection, by which perch from both populations were exposed to D. baeri from the Baltic Sea, revealed that perch from the Baltic Sea were successfully infected, while Biotest fish were not. These findings suggest that the elevated temperature may have resulted, among other outcomes, in an extremely rapid evolutionary change through which fish from the experimental Biotest Lake have gained resistance to the parasite. Our results confirm the need to account for both rapid evolutionary adaptation and biotic interactions in predictive models, and highlight the importance of empirical research in order to validate future projections.

  6. Parasitic infections in juveniles of Arapaima gigas (Schinz, 1822) cultivated in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Patrick Mathews; Delgado, John Paul Mathews; Orbe, Rosa Ismińo

    2013-01-01

    The paiche, Arapaima gigas represents a socio-economically important species in the Peruvian Amazon, and actually an intensive production for human consumption has emerged during the last years. Therefore, more studies are required in fish farming development, especially concerning populations of parasites that affect fish production yields. Eighty specimens of paiche collected between September and October of 2011 from semi-intensive fish farm in Loreto State, Peru, were examined for their helminthic parasites. Five species were recorded parasitizing A. gigas: Dawestrema cycloancistrium and Dawestrema cycloancistrioides (Monogenea) on gills, Trichodina sp. (Protozoa) on the skin, Caballerotrema arapaimense (Trematoda) in stomachs and Philometra senticosa (Nematoda) in the swim bladder. Highest prevalence was recorded for D. cycloancistrium (100.0%), D. cycloancistrioides (83.0%) and Trichodina sp. (50.0%) and highest values of mean intensity and mean abundance were recorded for D. cycloancistrium (260) parasites per individual. The results confirm the necessity of constant monitoring of fish, seeking the diagnosis and timely control of infestations with parasites, in order to eradicate the mortality of the host that leads unviable the fish farming intended for human consumption.

  7. ANALISA TINGKAT PREVALENSI DAN DERAJAT INFEKSI PARASIT PADA IKAN KERAPU MACAN (Ephinephilus fuscoguttatus DI LOKASI BUDIDAYA BERBEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzuki Musyaffak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish is the potential protein source for human. People consumption of fish requires attention related to whether the fish is safe to consume. This research is aimed at finding kind of parasite attack Groupers (E. fuscoguttatus and the prevalence and the infection level in the different farming location. The research method used that is by taking Groupers size between 10 cm - 35 cm as many  fish from all population in each location with the assumption of percentage the prevalence used was 10%. Sample then analyzed for amount and type of parasite attacked and determined level of prevalence and degree of parasite infection. Result showed the type of parasite attack Groupers are Anasakis sp., Diphyllobothrium sp., Caligus sp., Diplectanum sp., Ergasillus sp., and Argulus sp. The different location of farming didn’t influence the parasite prevalence degree in Groupers. It is known that in location 1 in Lamongan, the prevalence level is 60% and the amount of fish attacked is 12, while in location 2 which is in Situbondo regency the prevalence degree is 50% with 10 fish attacked. t-test result showed that the level of infection degree did not differ perhaps because of the water condition quality between two location was relatively similar and still in the normal category, and also farmers have known the farming techniques well. Key Words : Prevalence, Degree of parasite infection, Groupers

  8. microRNAs in parasites and parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong; Cai, Xuepeng; Bradley, Janette E

    2013-03-01

    miRNAs, a subclass of small regulatory RNAs, are present from ancient unicellular protozoans to parasitic helminths and parasitic arthropods. The miRNA-silencing mechanism appears, however, to be absent in a number of protozoan parasites. Protozoan miRNAs and components of their silencing machinery possess features different from other eukaryotes, providing some clues on the evolution of the RNA-induced silencing machinery. miRNA functions possibly associate with neoblast biology, development, physiology, infection and immunity of parasites. Parasite infection can alter host miRNA expression that can favor both parasite clearance and infection. miRNA pathways are, thus, a potential target for the therapeutic control of parasitic diseases.

  9. Fighting fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, E.; Guerrini, V.; Rinaldi, S.; Schaeffer, G.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce new combinatorial structures, called fighting fish, that generalize directed convex polyominoes by allowing them to branch out of the plane into independent substructures. On the one hand the combinatorial structure of fighting fish appears to be particularly rich: we show that their generating function with respect to the perimeter and number of tails is algebraic, and we conjecture a mysterious multivariate equidistribution property with the left ternary trees introduced by Del Lungo et al On the other hand, fighting fish provide a simple and natural model of random branching surfaces which displays original features: in particular, we show that the average area of a uniform random fighting fish with perimeter 2n is of order n 5/4: to the best of our knowledge this behaviour is non-standard and suggests that we have identified a new universality class of random structures. Dedicated to Tony Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  10. Rocinela signata (Isopoda: Aegidae parasitizing the gills of the spotted goatfish Pseudupeneus maculatus (Actinopterygii: Mullidae in Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCAS CARDOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Parasitic isopods of fishes usually show wide distribution and low host specificity. This study investigated the occurrence of gill parasites in 120 specimens of spotted goatfish Pseudupeneus maculatus, marine fish of great economic importance for fishery community. The fish were captured monthly in the Coast of Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil, between October 2012 and September 2013. Eleven isopods were found and identified as Rocinela signata. We observed lower infections in the gills of P. maculatus (prevalence 8.3%, mean intensity 1.6±0.3 and mean abundance 0.1±0.3 when compared to other studies of different host fishes from geographically close locations. This parasite has been reported from a wide variety of fish species, not only in Brazil, but also in the eastern Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. This is the first report of R. signata in spotted goatfish.

  11. Role of parasites in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandong, B M; Ngbea, J A; Raymond, Vhriterhire

    2013-01-01

    In areas of parasitic endemicity, the occurrence of cancer that is not frequent may be linked with parasitic infection. Epidemiological correlates between some parasitic infections and cancer is strong, suggesting a strong aetiological association. The common parasites associated with human cancers are schistosomiasis, malaria, liver flukes (Clonorchis sinenses, Opistorchis viverrini). To review the pathology, literature and methods of diagnosis. Literature review from peer reviewed Journals cited in PubMed and local journals. Parasites may serve as promoters of cancer in endemic areas of infection.

  12. An ecological and comparative analysis of parasites in juvenile Mugil liza (Pisces, Mugilidae from two sites in Samborombón bay, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Montes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mugil liza Valenciennes, 1836 is an economically important food fish and has been recommended for aquaculture in South America. A total of 278 fishes were collected in the spring and summer of 2009 and 2010. These fish were sorted into sample groups according to their size class. We used Bayesian statistics and 95% credible intervals for each parameter tested were calculated. Fish studied harbored a total of 15 different species of parasites. Diversity of parasite species found on Mugil liza was greatest at the S.R.C. collection site, but evidenced a lower species richness than at A.R. site. The 1st size fishes of both sites evidenced greater parasite diversity than either 2nd or 3rd size fish. Differences observed could be explained by the different use of habitat types at the two sites or differential susceptibility to infection by parasites. The dominance of D. fastigatainfluenced observed results of lower community diversity indexes. New works elucidating different parasite life cycles within juvenile and adults ofM. liza in Argentina, promise to be important for determining the risk of the parasitism by zoonotic metacercariae A. (P. longa and use of this fish as food and an economic resource, and the possible use of mullet parasites in other promising fields as indicators of biodiversity, and/ or water contamination.

  13. Ocorrência e aspectos ecológicos de metazoários parasitos de peixes do Lago do Parque do Ingá, Maringá, Estado do Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.507 Occurrence and ecological aspects of the metazoan fish parasites from Ingá lake, Maringá, Paraná State - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Haruko Machado

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nenhum estudo de peixes e parasitos foi realizado, até o momento, no Lago do Parque do Ingá que sofre influências antrópicas desde seu represamento, em 1970. Este trabalho analisou alguns aspectos ecológicos dos parasitos metazoários dos peixes deste lago. Dos peixes analisados, (69,5% estavam parasitados por pelo menos uma espécie de parasito. Foram encontrados 1.372 parasitos pertencentes à Nematoda (larvas e Platyhelminthes (Monogenea e Cestoda, sendo estes os mais prevalentes e numerosos. O encontro de larvas de cestóides em Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus confirma a importância destas espécies como participantes de níveis tróficos intermediários. A maior abundância de T. rendalli e O. niloticus, no local, pode ser um fator determinante no recrutamento de parasitos. O parasito aproveita-se das espécies de hospedeiros mais abundantes para garantir o desenvolvimento de seu ciclo de vida e também por serem os mais disponíveis à predação pelas aves piscívoras ali presentes, o que torna o local de grande importância para a sustentação do ciclo de vida desses parasitos. A baixa diversidade de endoparasitos coletados pode ser justificada pela presença de metais pesados – Cu e Pb – no sedimento, o que deve estar interferindo no desenvolvimento dos invertebrados, possíveis hospedeiros intermediários.Ingá lake was dammed in 1970 and, since then, no study on fish and parasites had been done, but it has suffered anthropic influences. This study analyzed some ecological aspects of the metazoan parasites form this lake. From analyzed fish, 69.5% had at least one species of parasite. Among them, 1.372 parasites were found, prevailing Nematoda (larvae and Platyhelminthes (Monogenea and Cestoda. The discovery of cestode larvae in Tilapia rendalli and Oreochromis nitolicus confirms the importance of these species as participants of intermediate trophic levels. The great number of Tilapia rendalli and Oreochromis

  14. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohammad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Ascariasis, Giardiasis, Entamoeba-histolytica, Tinea, Strongyloidiasis, Ancylostoma, and Trichocephaliasis. The highest prevalence rate belonged to Giardiasis with 14.4% and the lowest one belonged to Tinea and Ancylostoma with 0.2%. The prevalence rate in rural area was significantly lower than urban area (p<0.0001.

  15. Parasitic castration, growth, and sex steroids in the freshwater bonefish Cyphocharax gilbert (Curimatidae infested by Riggia paranensis (Cymothoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuza R. W. Lima

    Full Text Available Cyphocharax gilbert shows parasitic castration when infested by the crustacean Riggia paranensis, being unable to reproduce. Fish were sampled in the middle rio Itabapoana, Brazil, to study the prevalence of parasitism, growth, and sex steroid concentrations, considering the body size, sex, and reproductive condition of specimens. Most of the fish analyzed were infested (56.0%. The presence of two lines on the scales was more frequent among infested fish (22.0% than among fish without parasites (12.0% for females and 10.0% for males. The occurrence of three lines on the scales was rare (3.5% among infested and 2.0% among females without parasites. These results suggest that growth of the host is faster than that of non infested fish. The serum concentrations of sex steroids from fish without parasites varied at different gonadal development stages (17 beta-estradiol: 60.0 to 976.7 pg/ml; total testosterone: 220.0 to 3,887.7 pg/ml. All infested fish had lower levels of the two sex steroids and undeveloped gonads. Sex steroids levels in infested females were close to those in females at post-spawning stages. Total testosterone concentrations of infested males were below those of males at early gonadal maturation stage. These results suggest that R. paranensis reduces the reproductive capacity of C. gilbert by affecting the host endocrine system.

  16. Host preference of an introduced 'generalist' parasite for a non-native host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Victor M; Hendry, Andrew P; Rolshausen, Gregor; Torchin, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    Parasites can invade new ecosystems if they are introduced with their native hosts or if they successfully infect and colonise new hosts upon arrival. Here, we ask to what extent an introduced parasite demonstrates specialisation among novel host species. Infection surveys across three field sites in Gatun Lake, Panama, revealed that the invasive peacock bass, Cichla monoculus, was more commonly infected by the introduced trematode parasite Centrocestus formosanus than were three other common cichlid fishes. Laboratory infection experiments were conducted to determine whether parasitism might be driven by differential encounter/exposure to parasites or by differential infection susceptibility/preference across different host species. These experiments were performed by controlling for parasite exposure in single host (compatibility) experiments and in mixed host (preference) experiments. In all cases, the peacock bass exhibited higher infection rates with viable metacercariae relative to the other potential fish hosts. Our experiments thus support that an introduced generalist parasite shows apparent specialisation on a specific novel host. Further studies are needed to determine whether these patterns of specialisation are the result of local adaptation following invasion by the parasite.

  17. Virginia ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and brackishwater fish species in Virginia. Vector polygons in this data...

  18. Hawaii ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, marine, estuarine, and native stream fish species in coastal Hawaii. Vector polygons in this data...

  19. Alabama ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and freshwater fish species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  20. Louisiana ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for freshwater (inland) fish species in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent water-bodies and other...

  1. The Bass Parasites of Oneida Lake, 80 Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Eric F; Whipps, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    A survey of largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) parasite communities in Oneida Lake, New York, was conducted in the summer of 2012 and compared to an earlier survey conducted by Van Cleave and Mueller during the summers of 1929 to 1931. The component helminth communities between surveys were 31% similar in composition for largemouth and 28% similar for smallmouth bass. Between species, the component helminth communities were considerably more similar in the present survey (71%) than in the survey conducted by Van Cleave and Mueller (47%). Seven species reported by Van Cleave and Mueller were present in this survey and 21 species are new records for the bass of Oneida Lake. Van Cleave and Mueller did not report prevalence values for several taxa (Monogenea, Copepoda, Myxozoa, and a Trichodina sp.) that were important for separation of parasite infracommunities in species space for both bass species. These parasites represented 28% of all species found in the current survey and may be ecologically important. Several species of parasites exhibited differences in prevalence between surveys. Two species (Rhipidocotyle papillosa and Crepidostomum cornutum) were absent from this survey but were reported as common in the 1929-1931 survey and almost certainly represent extirpations that coincide with the loss of their native bivalve hosts from Oneida Lake. Other differences in the parasite communities may also be explained by the ecological disturbances in Oneida Lake over the past 81 yr. The changes in bass parasite communities between surveys emphasize the importance of recognizing the historical nature of parasite communities, especially in ecosystems with a history of large-scale changes. Most importantly our findings suggest that, similar to trends observed in free-living freshwater biotic communities, anthropogenic ecosystem disturbances may homogenize fish parasite communities.

  2. Stable Transfection of the Diplomonad Parasite Spironucleus salmonicida

    OpenAIRE

    Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Einarsson, Elin; Staffan G Svärd

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbes are highly diverse, and many lineages remain poorly studied. One such lineage, the diplomonads, a group of binucleate heterotrophic flagellates, has been studied mainly due to the impact of Giardia intestinalis, an intestinal, diarrhea-causing parasite in humans and animals. Here we describe the development of a stable transfection system for use in Spironucleus salmonicida, a diplomonad that causes systemic spironucleosis in salmonid fish. We designed vectors in cassette ...

  3. Parasites as valuable stock markers for fisheries in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, R J G; Moore, B R

    2015-01-01

    Over 30 studies in Australasia, East Asia and the Pacific Islands region have collected and analysed parasite data to determine the ranges of individual fish, many leading to conclusions about stock delineation. Parasites used as biological tags have included both those known to have long residence times in the fish and those thought to be relatively transient. In many cases the parasitological conclusions have been supported by other methods especially analysis of the chemical constituents of otoliths, and to a lesser extent, genetic data. In analysing parasite data, authors have applied multiple different statistical methodologies, including summary statistics, and univariate and multivariate approaches. Recently, a growing number of researchers have found non-parametric methods, such as analysis of similarities and cluster analysis, to be valuable. Future studies into the residence times, life cycles and geographical distributions of parasites together with more robust analytical methods will yield much important information to clarify stock structures in the area.

  4. Nematodes parasitizing Trachurus trachurus (L.) and Boops boops (L.) from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichalal, Keltoum; Ramdane, Zouhir; Ider, Djamila; Kacher, Mohammed; Iguerouada, Mokrane; Trilles, Jean-Paul; Courcot, Luci; Amara, Rachid

    2015-11-01

    A total of 455 Boops boops (Linnaeus, 1758) and 953 Trachurus trachurus Linnaeus, 1758 from the east coast of Algeria were examined for their parasitic Nematoda. Two hundred ninety-five specimens of larval stages L3 and L4 were collected from the peritoneal cavity of these two examined fishes. Photonic and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) studies were performed on these larvae specimens in order to characterize their morphology. Two different species of Nematoda (Anisikidae) were identified: Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) and Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802). These two parasitic species were reported for the first time on T. trachurus and B. boops from the eastern coast of Algeria. These parasites were attached on different organs in the abdominal cavity (particularly on ovaries and testes). The infestation rate changed according to the month and the host size. The parasitism did not show a significant negative impact on the condition of the examined fishes.

  5. Introduction and spread of non-native parasites with Silurus glanis L. (Teleostei: Siluridae) in UK fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, A J; Britton, J R; Davies, G D; Shinn, A P; Williams, C F

    2012-12-01

    Despite growing concern of the ecological risks posed by the European catfish Siluris glanis L. in freshwater fisheries, little information exists on the parasite fauna of this silurid catfish in Britain. Parasitological examinations of released S. glanis from four still-water fisheries in England revealed the presence of Thaparocleidus vistulensis (Siwak, 1932) and Ergasilus sieboldi (Nordmann, 1832), both non-native parasites, the latter known to be an important fish pathogen. This represents the first record of T. vistulensis from British freshwater fish. The human-assisted movement of S. glanis between UK recreational still-water fisheries provides a clear avenue for the introduction and spread of non-native parasites.

  6. Parasitism perturbs the mucosal microbiome of Atlantic Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, M. S.; Leadbeater, S.; Garcia, C.; Sylvain, F.-E.; Custodio, M.; Ang, K. P.; Powell, F.; Carvalho, G. R.; Creer, S.; Elliot, J.; Derome, N.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between parasite, host and host-associated microbiota are increasingly understood as important determinants of disease progression and morbidity. Salmon lice, including the parasitic copepod Lepeophtheirus salmonis and related species, are perhaps the most important problem facing Atlantic Salmon aquaculture after feed sustainability. Salmon lice parasitize the surface of the fish, feeding off mucus, scales and underlying tissue. Secondary bacterial infections are a major source of associated morbidity. In this study we tracked the diversity and composition of Salmo salar skin surface microbiota throughout a complete L. salmonis infection cycle among 800 post-smolts as compared to healthy controls. Among infected fish we observed a significant reduction in microbial richness (Chao1, P = 0.0136), raised diversity (Shannon, P < 7.86e-06) as well as highly significant destabilisation of microbial community composition (Pairwise Unifrac, beta-diversity, P < 1.86e-05; P = 0.0132) by comparison to controls. While undetectable on an individual level, network analysis of microbial taxa on infected fish revealed the association of multiple pathogenic genera (Vibrio, Flavobacterium, Tenacibaculum, Pseudomonas) with high louse burdens. We discuss our findings in the context of ecological theory and colonisation resistance, in addition to the role microbiota in driving primary and secondary pathology in the host. PMID:28266549

  7. Fishing Access Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department maintains developed fishing access areas. These sites provide public access to waters in Vermont for shore fishing...

  8. [A preliminary study of parasite diversity in the anadromous Kamchatkan mikizha Parasalmo mykiss mykiss (Osteichthyes: Salmoniformes: Salmonidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, S G; Kuzishchin, K V; Gruzdeva, M A

    2005-01-01

    The study of parasites associated with the anadromous mikizha from several rivers of the Western Kamchatka has revealed 44 parasite species. The majority of parasites (59%) belong to marine and estuarine-marine species. Lecithophyllum bothryophorum, Echinorhynchus leidyi and plerocercoids of the family Litobothriidae were found for the first time in anadromous fish entering into Asian continental watersheds. It has been revealed that only a few specimens of the anadromous mikizha feed in fresh waters. Most of feeding fish consume a minor amount of food, and this feeding is occasional. Young forms of intestinal parasites of the freshwater and estuarine-freshwater groups (Neoechinorhynchus spp., Crepidostomum spp., Cucullanus truttae, Eubothrium salvelinf) come into anadromous fishes mainly before their entering in fresh waters.

  9. Nutrition and parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, R L; Holmes, P H

    1996-01-01

    This overview focuses on the interaction between nutritional status and gastrointestinal nematode infection in ruminants and considers: (i) the influence of the parasite on host metabolism; and (ii) the effect of host nutrition on the establishment and survival of parasite populations, the development of the host-immune response and the pathophysiology of infection. Gastrointestinal nematodes reduce voluntary feed intake and efficiency of feed utilisation, a key feature being an increased endogenous loss of protein into the gastrointestinal tract. Overall there is movement of protein from productive processes into repair of the gastrointestinal tract, synthesis of plasma proteins and mucoprotein production. Although reduction in feed intake is a major factor contributing to the reduced performance of parasitised ruminants, the underlying mechanisms of the anorexia are poorly understood. Supplementation of the diet with additional protein does not appear to affect initial establishment of nematode infections but the pathophysiological consequences are generally more severe on lower planes of protein nutrition. The main effect of protein supplementation is to increase the rate of acquisition of immunity and increase resistance to reinfection and this has been associated with an enhanced cellular immune response in the gastrointestinal mucosa. The unresponsiveness of the young lamb can be improved by dietary protein supplementation. Recent trials have shown that growing sheep offered a free choice between a low and a high protein ration are able to modify their diet selection in order to alleviate the increase in protein requirements which result from gastrointestinal nematode infection. Studies on the influence of nutrition on the expression of genotype have shown that the benefits of a superior genotype are not lost on a low protein diet whereas a high protein diet can partially emeliorate the disadvantages of an inferior genotype. In addition to dietary protein

  10. Parasites as biological tags in marine fisheries research: European Atlantic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, K; Hemmingsen, W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the use of parasites as biological tags for stock identification and to follow migrations of marine fish, mammals and invertebrates in European Atlantic waters are critically reviewed and evaluated. The region covered includes the North, Baltic, Barents and White Seas plus Icelandic waters, but excludes the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Each fish species or ecological group of species is treated separately. More parasite tag studies have been carried out on Atlantic herring Clupea harengus than on any other species, while cod Gadus morhua have also been the subject of many studies. Other species that have been the subjects of more than one study are: blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou, whiting Merlangius merlangus, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, Norway pout Trisopterus esmarkii, horse mackerel Trachurus trachurus and mackerel Scomber scombrus. Other species are dealt with under the general headings redfishes, flatfish, tunas, anadromous fish, elasmobranchs, marine mammals and invertebrates. A final section highlights how parasites can be, and have been, misused as biological tags, and how this can be avoided. It also reviews recent developments in methodology and parasite genetics, considers the potential effects of climate change on the distributions of both hosts and parasites, and suggests host-parasite systems that should reward further research.

  11. Marine parasites as biological tags in South American Atlantic waters, current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantatore, D M P; Timi, J T

    2015-01-01

    Many marine fisheries in South American Atlantic coasts (SAAC) are threatened by overfishing and under serious risk of collapsing. The SAAC comprises a diversity of environments, possesses a complex oceanography and harbours a vast biodiversity that provide an enormous potential for using parasites as biological tags for fish stock delineation, a prerequisite for the implementation of control and management plans. Here, their use in the SAAC is reviewed. Main evidence is derived from northern Argentine waters, where fish parasite assemblages are dominated by larval helminth species that share a low specificity, long persistence and trophic transmission, parasitizing almost indiscriminately all available fish species. The advantages and constraints of such a combination of characteristics are analysed and recommendations are given for future research. Shifting the focus from fish/parasite populations to communities allows expanding the concept of biological tags from local to regional scales, providing essential information to delineate ecosystem boundaries for host communities. This new concept arose as a powerful tool to help the implementation of ecosystem-based approaches to fisheries management, the new paradigm for fisheries science. Holistic approaches, including parasites as biological tags for stock delineation will render valuable information to help insure fisheries and marine ecosystems against further depletion and collapse.

  12. Inventarisasi Cacing Parasitik pada Ikan Kembung di Perairan Teluk Banten dan Pelabuhan Ratu (THE HELMINTH PARASITES INVENTORY OF RASTRELLIGER SP. FROM BANTEN BAY AND PELABUHAN RATU BAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forcep Rio Indaryanto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of health and disease in a fish is important as parasitism plays a central role in fishbiology. Parasitism is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the marine environment and it is probable that allmarine fishes are infected with parasites. The aims of the research were to inventory the helminth parasitesof Rastrelliger sp. from Banten Bay and Pelabuhan Ratu Bay. As many as 25–30 of fish samples werecollected using gill net and examined for helminth parasites. The helminth parasitic calculated intensityand prevalence. The helminth parasites of Rastrelliger sp. were found Lechitocladium angustiovum (digenea:Hemiuridae, Lecitochirium sp. (digenea: Hemiuridae, Prodistomum orientalis (digenea: Lepocreadiidaeand Anisakis typica (nematodes: Anisakidae, with 90.12% of prevalence. L. angustonum was dominancehelminth parasites found in fish. There was no difference on parasites found in R. kanagurta and R.brachysoma wich were of Restrellinger genus. The location not appear have no significant after on helminthparasitic infection as they have a same genetic stock. Anisakis species in Java sea have a same genetipewith Anisakis typical and was not zoonotic parasite categories.

  13. [Emerging parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel Galluzzo, C; Wagner, N; Michel, Y; Jackson, Y; Chappuis, F

    2014-05-07

    Travels, migration and circulation of goods facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases often unrecognized outside endemic areas. Most of emerging infections are of viral origin. Muscular Sarcocystis infection, an acute illness acquired during short trips to Malaysia, and Chagas disease, a chronic illness with long incubation period found among Latin American migrants, are two very different examples of emerging parasitic diseases. The former requires a preventive approach for travelers going to Malaysia and must be brought forth when they return with fever, myalgia and eosinophilia, while the latter requires a proactive attitude to screen Latin American migrant populations that may face difficulties in accessing care.

  14. Do bacteria, not fish, produce 'fish kairomone'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringelberg, J.; Van Gool, E.

    1998-01-01

    Fish-associated chemicals enhance phototactic downward swimming in Daphnia. If perch were treated with the antibiotic ampicillin, this enhancement was significantly decreased. Therefore, not fish, but bacteria associated with fish, seem to produce this kairomone. [KEYWORDS: Diel vertical migration;

  15. Study on parasitic helminths infecting three fish species from Koka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 145 (46.0%) African catfish (Clarias gariepinus), and 73 (23.2%) Nile tilapia ... significant (P>0.05) relationship between infections and size (body length) categories. ... was detected in 11.34% of B. intermedius from intestine and body cavity.

  16. Factors determining parasite community richness and species composition in black snook Centropomus nigrescens (Centropomidae) from coastal lagoons in Guerrero, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante-González, Juan; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Rojas-Herrera, Agustín; Gil Guerrero, Salvador

    2010-06-01

    Species richness and composition were determined for parasite communities in the black snook Centropomus nigrescens collected from five coastal lagoons in the Guerrero state, Mexico. A total of 354 fish were collected between December 2007 and November 2008. Twenty-four species of parasite were identified: 2 monogeneans, 12 digeneans, 4 acanthocephalans, 1 cestode, 4 nematodes, and 1 pentastomid. The communities consisted mainly of autogenic parasites, and all were dominated by the digenean Paracrytogonimus yamagutii. Community species composition was similar among lagoons, although the influence of local conditions prevented them from being identical. Host traits such as predator feeding habits, body size, and vagility contributed to parasite community structure and species composition.

  17. Parasites of wild cod postlarvae (Gadus morhua L.) in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Jesper; Kania, Per W.; Skovgaard, Alf

    gadoid species in the North Atlantic and has been the subject of several parasitological studies. Past research is however primarily concentrated around adult or juvenile fish and our knowledge concerning the larval stage is very sparse. This is in spite of the general belief that at this stage, fish...... Hysterothylacium aduncum, 5 trematodes (1 Lecithaster levinseni, 4 Hemiurus) and 5 individuals of a tetraphyllidean plerocercoid cestode larva. Intensity, abundance and prevalence will be presented as well as area of infection. Brief introduction to the parasites and known literature on the parasitic effect...

  18. Unexpected hosts: imaging parasitic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Carnero, Pablo; Hernández Mateo, Paula; Martín-Garre, Susana; García Pérez, Ángela; Del Campo, Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    Radiologists seldom encounter parasitic diseases in their daily practice in most of Europe, although the incidence of these diseases is increasing due to migration and tourism from/to endemic areas. Moreover, some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain European regions, and immunocompromised individuals also pose a higher risk of developing these conditions. This article reviews and summarises the imaging findings of some of the most important and frequent human parasitic diseases, including information about the parasite's life cycle, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment. We include malaria, amoebiasis, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis, clonorchiasis, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, ascariasis, anisakiasis, dracunculiasis, and strongyloidiasis. The aim of this review is to help radiologists when dealing with these diseases or in cases where they are suspected. Teaching Points • Incidence of parasitic diseases is increasing due to migratory movements and travelling. • Some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain regions in Europe. • Parasitic diseases can have complex life cycles often involving different hosts. • Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential for patient management in parasitic diseases. • Radiologists should be able to recognise and suspect the most relevant parasitic diseases.

  19. Environmental Parasitology. Interactions between parasites and pollutants in the aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sures B.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing number of papers showing how parasitism and pollution can interact with each other in aquatic organisms. Among the variety of investigated aspects especially the combined effects of pollution and simultaneous infection on the health of aquatic hosts (molluscs, crustaceans, fish, mammals is of considerable interest. Effects of pollution on the occurrence and distribution of parasites is another interesting field of “Environmental Parasitology” attracting increasing attention. This mini-review presents some promising examples of interdisciplinary studies paying attention to the fact that under natural conditions no organism will only be affected by either parasites or pollution.

  20. [Dynamics of parasite communities in an age series of Arctic Cisco Coregonus migratorius (Georgi, 1775)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarov, Zh N; Pronin, N M

    2013-01-01

    Parasite communities of Arctic cisco from Chivyrkui Bay of Lake Baikal have been analyzed at levels of a host individual (infracommunity), a individual age group of a host-(assemblages of infracommunities), and a host population (component community). Significant positive correlations of parameters of species richness (number of parasite species, Margalef and Menhinick indices) with the age of Arctic cisco were recorded only at the level of parasite inffacommunities. The absence of linear positive correlations between the parameters of species richness and the age of Arctic cisco at the level of assemblages of parasite infracommunities were revealed for the first time for fish of Lake Baikal. The peculiarity of the dynamics of parasite communities of. Arctic cisco is determined by specific features of the host physiology and ecology, primarily by the age dynamics of the feeding spectrum.

  1. Sperm transfer in monogenean (platyhelminth) parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearn, Graham; Whittington, Ian

    2015-12-01

    There are three major groups of parasitic platyhelminths (flatworms). The digeneans and cestodes are endoparasites, while the monogeneans are ectoparasites mostly on the gills or skin of fishes. Monogeneans are hermaphrodite and, with the exception of the gyrodactylids, mostly protandrous, the male reproductive system maturing before the female system. Their ectoparasitic life-style provides unique opportunities to observe the reproductive biology of living platyhelminths, opportunities restricted in digeneans and cestodes by their endoparasitic habits. Moreover, the male copulatory organs (MCOs) of monogeneans are of special interest because of their perplexing diversity, ranging from sclerotised penis tubes, many with accessory sclerites, to cirruses and genital atrium armature (hooks and spines). The relatively few accounts in the literature of mating in monogeneans are reproduced in this review, together with consideration of the following aspects of sperm transfer: structure and function of MCOs; self-insemination; spermatophores and pseudospermatophores; "hypodermic" and transtegumental insemination; tissue fusion; glands associated with MCOs and vaginae; finding a mating partner.

  2. Parasitism and calfhood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlich, H; Douvres, F W

    1977-02-01

    That animals can and do acquire an effective immunity against helminth parasites has been demonstrated extensively experimentally, and the fact that domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, and horses become adults while maintaining good health in spite of constant exposure to reinfection long has suggested that immunity must be important to such survival. Although our attempts to date to vaccinate calves against helminth parasites have either failed or been unsatisfactory because of the pathosis induced by the experimental vaccines, the results are not surprising or discouraging. In contrast to the long history of immunization research on bacterial and viral diseases, only within a relatively short time have serious efforts been directed at exploiting hostal immunity for prevention and control of helminthic diseases. Unlike the comparatively simple structures of viruses and bacteria, helminths are complex multicellular animals with vast arrays of antigens and complicated physiological and immunological interactions with their hosts. Much more fundamental information on helminth-bovine interactions, on helminth antigens, and on cattle antibody systems must be developed before progress on control of cattle helminths by vaccination can be meaningful.

  3. [Anisakidosis a marine parasitic zoonosis: unknown or emerging in Peru?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Rufino; Del Pilar, María; Altamirano, Trillo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to show the experimental studies carried out on the biological cycle, culture, pathogenicity of the anisakidae nematode larvae and to disseminate the information regarding current epidemy and the probable emergence of anisakidosis in Peru, and in addition, to propose measures of prevention and control, as well as the perspective and need for investigation. The studies of experimental pathogenicity in cats, dos, and hamsters are incomplete. Eight cases of acute human anisakidosis have been reported (5 confirmed and 3 unconfirmed). It is probable that it emerges during the "El Niño" Weather Phenomenon; however, during normal conditions it is probably due to the increase of raw fish consumption and other factors. In the coast of Peru, five and four fishes of direct human consumption are parasited by the Anisakis simplex and Anisakis physeteris larva, respectively, and two fishes are parasited by the Pseudoterranova decipiens. The main host for the Anisakis simplex is the dolphin (Delphinus delphia), but the Contracaecum osculatum is hosted by the sea lion: Otaria byronia and Arctocephalus australis, P. decipiens parasita a O. byronia. Eviscerating the fish would be most adequate prevention method to lessen the risk of human infection. There is evidence that anisakidosis is an underestimated zoonosis in Peru, and that it is probably and emerging disease. Therefore, its presence is to be suspected in patients with the prototype clinical syndrome.

  4. The Fishing Cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雅飞; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 A cat goes fishing every day. He wants to eat fish, but he can't catch any fish. One day, he goes to the river as usual. Suddenly, a fish comes out. He catches the fish and putsthe fish in the basket. He's very happy, but he forgest to put the lid on the basket.

  5. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Christine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  6. Two types of parasitic assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurgec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that consonant harmony and parasitic vowel harmony are more similar than previously assumed. I provide a unified and restrictive analysis of parasitic assimilation using feature spreading constraints. In particular, I attribute the differences between the attested and unattested patterns to two types of markedness constraints—alignment and agreement.

  7. Fish gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, Gokhan; Regenstein, Joe M

    2010-01-01

    Gelatin is a multifunctional ingredient used in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and photographic films as a gelling agent, stabilizer, thickener, emulsifier, and film former. As a thermoreversible hydrocolloid with a narrower gap between its melting and gelling temperatures, both of which are below human body temperature, gelatin provides unique advantages over carbohydrate-based gelling agents. Gelatin is mostly produced from pig skin, and cattle hides and bones. Some alternative raw materials have recently gained attention from both researchers and the industry not just because they overcome religious concerns shared by Jews and Muslims but also because they provide, in some cases, technological advantages over mammalian gelatins. Fish skins from a number of fish species are among the other sources that have been comprehensively studied as sources for gelatin production. Fish skins have a significant potential for the production of high-quality gelatin with different melting and gelling temperatures over a much wider range than mammalian gelatins, yet still have a sufficiently high gel strength and viscosity. Gelatin quality is industrially determined by gel strength, viscosity, melting or gelling temperatures, the water content, and microbiological safety. For gelatin manufacturers, yield from a particular raw material is also important. Recent experimental studies have shown that these quality parameters vary greatly depending on the biochemical characteristics of the raw materials, the manufacturing processes applied, and the experimental settings used for quality control tests. In this review, the gelatin quality achieved from different fish species is reviewed along with the experimental procedures used to determine gelatin quality. In addition, the chemical structure of collagen and gelatin, the collagen-gelatin conversion, the gelation process, and the gelatin market are discussed.

  8. Fish hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  9. Parasitic zoonotic diseases in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Altintas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Zoonoses and zoonotic diseases are becoming more common and they are now receiving increased attention across the world. Zoonotic parasites are found in a wide variety of protozoa, cestodes, nematodes, trematodes and arthropods worldwide and many zoonotic parasites have assumed an important role. The importance of some parasitic zoonoses has increased in recent years due to the fact that they can be agents of opportunistic infections. Although a number of zoonotic parasites are often found and do cause serious illnesses in Turkey, some are more common and these diseases are more important as they cause serious public health problems, such as leishmaniasis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, echinococcosis, trichinellosis and toxocariasis. Information on these zoonotic diseases is provided here as these are the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases in Turkey.

  10. Regulatory T Cells and Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP. Velavan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human host encounters a wide array of parasites; however, the crucial aspect is the failure of the host immune system to clear these parasites despite antigen recognition. In the recent past, a new immunological concept has emerged, which provides a framework to better understand several aspects of host susceptibility to parasitic infection. It is widely believed that parasites are able to modulate the magnitude of effector responses by inducing regulatory T cell (Tregs population and several studies have investigated whether this cell population plays a role in balancing protective immunity and pathogenesis during parasite infection. This review discusses the several mechanism of Treg-mediated immunosuppression in the human host and focuses on the functional role of Tregs and regulatory gene polymorphisms in infectious diseases.

  11. Navigating parasite webs and parasite flow: emerging and re-emerging parasitic zoonoses of wildlife origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Lydden

    2005-10-01

    Wildlife are now recognised as an important source of emerging human pathogens, including parasites. This paper discusses the linkages between wildlife, people, zoonotic parasites and the ecosystems in which they co-exist, revisits definitions for 'emerging' and 're-emerging', and lists zoonotic parasites that can be acquired from wildlife including, for some, estimates of the associated global human health burdens. The paper also introduces the concepts of 'parasite webs' and 'parasite flow', provides a context for parasites, relative to other infectious agents, as causes of emerging human disease, and discusses drivers of disease emergence and re-emergence, especially changes in biodiversity and climate. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Caribbean and the southern United States, Baylisascaris procyonis in California and Georgia, Plasmodium knowlesi in Sarawak, Malaysia, Human African Trypanosomiasis, Sarcoptes scabiei in carnivores, and Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Toxoplasma in marine ecosystems are presented as examples of wildlife-derived zoonotic parasites of particular recent interest. An ecological approach to disease is promoted, as is a need for an increased profile for this approach in undergraduate and graduate education in the health sciences. Synergy among scientists and disciplines is identified as critical for the study of parasites and parasitic disease in wildlife populations. Recent advances in techniques for the investigation of parasite fauna of wildlife are presented and monitoring and surveillance systems for wildlife disease are discussed. Some of the limitations inherent in predictions for the emergence and re-emergence of infection and disease associated with zoonotic parasites of wildlife are identified. The importance of public awareness and public education in the prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic infection and disease are emphasised. Finally, some thoughts for the future are presented.

  12. [Parasitic factor and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamidullin, R I; Aglullin, I R; Rakhmanin, Iu A; Pogorel'tsev, V I; Khamidullin, A R; Galkina, I V; Khamidullin, I R; Sultanaeva, E G

    2011-01-01

    There is opinion in the literature as to that liver trematode infections, such as opisthorchiasis, clonorchiasis, fascioliasis, and metorchiasis, can induce cancer of the liver pancreas, intestine - this all is clinically observed. The authors were the first in world practice to show the development of a hepatic blastomatous process in animals (albino rats, cats) with opisthorchiasis in 13%; cancer developed in 28 and 56% with the use of a hepatotropic carcinogen and combined (opisthorchiasis + a carcinogen) exposure, respectively. Throughout his life, a human being can easily catch these trematodes that have carcinogenic activity and these diseases concurrent with household and food carcinogens can give rise to tumors in the liver pancreas and intestine. Timely diagnosis and specific anthelmintic therapy are necessary to prevent parasitic cancer.

  13. Nutrition and health of aquaculture fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Teles, A

    2012-02-01

    Under intensive culture conditions, fish are subject to increased stress owing to environmental (water quality and hypoxia) and health conditions (parasites and infectious diseases). All these factors have negative impacts on fish well-being and overall performance, with consequent economic losses. Though good management practices contribute to reduce stressor effects, stress susceptibility is always high under crowded conditions. Adequate nutrition is essential to avoid deficiency signs, maintain adequate animal performance and sustain normal health. Further, it is becoming evident that diets overfortified with specific nutrients [amino acids, essential fatty acids (FAs), vitamins or minerals] at levels above requirement may improve health condition and disease resistance. Diet supplements are also being evaluated for their antioxidant potential, as fish are potentially at risk of peroxidative attack because of the large quantities of highly unsaturated FAs in both fish tissues and diets. Functional constituents other than essential nutrients (such as probiotics, prebiotics and immunostimulants) are also currently being considered in fish nutrition aiming to improve fish growth and/or feed efficiency, health status, stress tolerance and resistance to diseases. Such products are becoming more and more important for reducing antibiotic utilization in aquafarms, as these have environmental impacts, may accumulate in animal tissues and increase bacterial resistance. This study reviews knowledge of the effect of diet nutrients on health, welfare and improvement of disease resistance in fish.

  14. PARASITES, DISEASES AND DEFORMITIES OF COBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewen McLean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobia, Rachycentron canadum, is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Order Perciformes and as a warm–water fish is to be found in tropical and subtropical waters. The species has been reported in eastern Mediterranean waters and it is likely that in this particular case, cobia are lessespian. Cobia has been farmed in Taiwan since the early 1990s and today nascent cobia aquaculture operations operate throughout South East and Eastern Asia, in Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as well as in the United States. Many other nations are presently considering adopting cobia as a new species for aquaculture. Production by aquaculture experienced a 7000–fold increase from 1995 to 2005. The increased interest in the species has evolved due in large part to its many excellent characteristics which include good growth, with production of 6 kg live weight fish being possible over a year–long production cycle. Cobia are accepting of pond, net pens and recirculation–based culture; their fillet quality is high and meat delectable; They readily take formulated feeds and respond well to alternate proteins in their diets. Like other species new to aquaculture however, enlarged farming activities have been accompanied by increased incidence of commonly–encountered and emerging diseases. As an aid to current and potential producers as well as researchers, the following provides an overview of the published literature on cobia diseases, parasites and physical deformities.

  15. Mercury concentration in the freshwater bonefish Cyphocharax gilbert (Curimatidae and its parasite the crustacean Riggia paranensis (Cymothoidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora C. Lins

    Full Text Available Fish parasites can accumulate heavy metals reaching higher concentrations than the host and may affect the host's bioaccumulation. The present study compared total mercury concentration in the liver and muscle of Cyphocharax gilbert and in the parasite Riggia paranensis sampled in the middle Itabapoana River, Brazil, also considering the reproductive stages of both fish and parasite. Mean concentrations of mercury in muscle of fish varied from 20.8 ng.g-1 in mature females to 38.1 ng.g-1 in post-spawning females. The mean concentrations in fish liver varied from 60.9 ng/g in post-spawning females to 110.4 ng.g-1 in infested males. The mean concentration of mercury in parasites varied from 26.2 ng.g-1 in specimens carrying early embryo to 39.5 ng.g-1 in specimens with eggs. Positive and significant associations (P<0.05 were found between the total mercury concentrations in parasites and muscle of host (both females and males, and between concentrations in parasites and in the liver of male hosts. These results suggest that R. paranensis can be used to indicate mercury levels in edible parts of C. gilbert.

  16. Data on the parasite fauna of the European common carp Cyprinus carpio carpio and Asian common carp Cyprinus carpio haematopterus support an Asian ancestry of the species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Molnár

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The common carp subspecies (Cyprinus carpio carpio has been regarded as an autochtonous species of Europe. Evidence obtained by comparing the parasite fauna of the European and the Asian subspecies (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus establish that such fish in the Far East harbour a significantly richer array of parasite species, and were the exclusive hosts of most of the specific parasites, including all monogenean and myxosporean spp., until recent intensive fish translocations from the Far East. I therefore propose that the common carp originated in the Far-East. The commoncarp would have originally inhabited only the Far East freshwaters, arriving in Europe in the Middle Ages by anthropogenic transfers. During the long trip from China to Europe, the common carp lost its original parasite fauna. In its new habitat, it acquired some parasite from the crucian carp, Carassius carassius, a closely related fish. Infection of the European subspecies with the Asian parasites that had been lost in Europe recommenced only in the middle of the last century, when the Amur wild carp and the coloured carp variations became introduced to Europe. The examination of the parasite fauna of fishes is an excellent tool for surveying the origin of fishes.

  17. Cryptobiosis and its control in North American fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, P T

    2001-05-01

    Cryptobiosis is caused by the haemoflagellates Cryptobia bullocki and Cryptobia salmositica. These parasites infect food fishes (e.g. flounders, salmon) on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America and clinical signs of the disease include anaemia, and abdominal distention with ascites. The virulent factor in salmonid cryptobiosis, caused by C. salmositica, is a secretory metalloprotease (200 kDa). Fish mortality may be up to 100% in the absence of treatment, consequently strategies have been developed to protect them from disease/mortality. A single dose of a live vaccine protects fish for at least 2 years, and it is via the production of complement-fixing antibodies, enhanced phagocytosis and cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Inhibition of the parasite's cysteine protease by a monoclonal antibody reduces multiplication, infectivity and survival of the parasite. Consequently, the recombinant cysteine protease (49 kDa) of the parasite will be tested as a potential vaccine. The trypanocidal drug, isometamidium chloride (1.0 mg/kg), is effective (therapeutic and prophylactic) against C. salmositica in chinook salmon. Its efficacy is significantly enhanced if it is conjugated either to a monoclonal antibody or to polyclonal antibodies from immune fish. Selective breeding of Cryptobia-resistant brook charr (innate resistance to infection) is possible, and the resistant factor(s) is controlled by a dominant Mendelian locus. In these resistant charr the parasite is lysed via the alternate pathway of complement activation (innate immunity to infection). There are also Cryptobia-tolerant charr, fish that are susceptible to infection but have no clinical disease (innate resistance to disease). In these fish, one of the natural anti-proteases, alpha2-macroglobulin, neutralises the metalloprotease secreted by C. salmositica. Production of transgenic Cryptobia-tolerant salmon is an option to vaccination and or chemotherapy. Also, transgenic pathogen-tolerant animals may

  18. Parasites in algae mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd William Lane

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry.

  19. First study on parasites of Hemibrycon surinamensis (Characidae, a host from the eastern Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Danielle Figueiredo Guimarães Hoshino

    Full Text Available This study was the first investigation of communities and infracommunities of parasites of Hemibrycon surinamensis. All the fish collected in a tributary of the Amazon river were parasitized by one or more parasite species. The Brillouin diversity index (HB was 0.46 ± 0.28 and the mean species richness was 3.5 ± 1.2 parasites per host. A total of 14,734 parasites were collected, including Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Piscinoodinium pillulare (Protozoa; Jainus hexops and Tereancistrum sp. (Monogenoidea; Ergasilus turucuyus and Argulus sp. (Crustacea; metacercariae of Derogenidae gen. sp.; metacercariae and adults of Genarchella genarchella (Digenea; and Cucullanus larvae and Contracaecum larvae (Nematoda. The dominant parasite was I. multifiliis, followed by P. pillulare. The parasites showed aggregated dispersion, except for E. turucuyus, which had random dispersion. The condition factor (Kn indicated that the parasitism levels had not affected host body condition. The high levels of infection observed were due to host behavior, and this was discussed. This was the first report of I. multifiliis, P. pillulare, Argulus sp., E. turucuyus, G. genarchella, J. hexops and Tereancistrum sp. in H. surinamensis, and it expanded the occurrence of E. turucuyus and G. genarchella to the eastern Amazon region.

  20. Fish Tales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical

  1. Fish Immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashoof, Sara; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell receptor and secreted antibody are at the nexus of humoral adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize what is known of the immunoglobulin genes of jawed cartilaginous and bony fishes. We focus on what has been learned from genomic or cDNA sequence data, but where appropriate draw upon protein, immunization, affinity and structural studies. Work from major aquatic model organisms and less studied comparative species are both included to define what is the rule for an immunoglobulin isotype or taxonomic group and what exemplifies an exception. PMID:27879632

  2. Recovery of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida from ulcerated fish from the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, T.; Tabolina, I; Bezgachina, T.V.

    1999-01-01

    Ulcerated fish of six different species were collected during the BMB/ICES Sea-going Workshop "Fish Diseases and Parasites in the Baltic Sea", 25 November to 8 December 1994, and examined for bacteriological infections. Atypical Aeromonas salmonicida strains were isolated from the majority of the......, well-defined biotype of A. salmonicida. (C) 1999 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea....

  3. Parasites on parasites: coupled fluctuations in stacked contact processes

    CERN Document Server

    Court, Steven J; Allen, Rosalind J

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for host-parasite dynamics which incorporates both vertical and horizontal transmission as well as spatial structure. Our model consists of stacked contact processes (CP), where the dynamics of the host is a simple CP on a lattice while the dynamics of the parasite is a secondary CP which sits on top of the host-occupied sites. In the simplest case, where infection does not incur any cost, we uncover a novel effect: a nonmonotonic dependence of parasite prevalence on host turnover. Inspired by natural examples of hyperparasitism, we extend our model to multiple levels of parasites and identify a transition between the maintenance of a finite and infinite number of levels, which we conjecture is connected to a roughening transition in models of surface-growth.

  4. [Tissular alterations and defence reactions in cymothoids parasited teleosteans (Crustacea - Isopoda - blood sucking) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romestand, B; Janicot, M; Trilles, J P

    1977-01-01

    Some tissual alterations of the parasitic microbiotope are shown in fishes harbouring Cymothoidae (blood-sucking Isopods). These alterations consist mainly in a hypertrophied epidermis and a deeply disturbed conjunctive tissue; moreover, it can be observed an important production of mucus on the tegument surface and a rush of blood cells (lymphocytes, eosenophilic granulated cells) and of cells of histiocytary origin (giant multinucleated cells).

  5. The dynamics of neutrophils in zebrafish (Danio rerio) during infection with the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2016-01-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a ciliated protozoan parasite infecting the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Neutrophils are attracted to the infection sites, as a part of the innate immune response. In this study a transgenic line of zebrafish (Tg(MPO:GFP)i114) with GFP-tagged neutrophils...

  6. First identification of eggs of the Asian fish tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda: Bothriocephalidea) in human stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yera, Hélène; Kuchta, Roman; Brabec, Jan; Peyron, François; Dupouy-Camet, Jean

    2013-06-01

    We report the first case of egg isolation of the Asian fish tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Bothriocephalidea) from human stool. A male patient from Saint Laurent du Maroni (French Guiana) presenting abdominal pain was examined in France for the diagnosis of intestinal parasites. Diphyllobothrium-like eggs were observed in his stool. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of rDNA and COI genes showed that the eggs observed belong to a bothriocephalidean cestode B. acheilognathi. The adult life stages of B. acheilognathi cestodes are known as invasive parasites of a wide spectrum of fish; however, they have not been described to parasitize any mammals. This human infection seems to be accidental and represents a parasite passage through human intestine after the consumption of an infected fish host. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Monogeneans of West African cichlid fish: evolution and cophylogenetic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mendlová

    Full Text Available The goals of this paper were to investigate phylogenetic and evolutionary patterns of cichlid fish from West Africa and their Cichlidogyrus and Scutogyrus monogenean parasites, to uncover the presence of host-parasite cospeciation and to assess the level of morphological adaptation in parasites. This required the following steps, each one representing specific objectives of this paper: (1 to build phylogenetic trees for Cichlidogyrus and Scutogyrus species based on ribosomal DNA sequences, (2 to investigate phylogenetic relationships within West African cichlid fish based on the analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome b DNA sequences, (3 to investigate host-parasite cophylogenetic history to gain clues on parasite speciation process, and (4 to investigate the link between the morphology of the attachment apparatus and parasite phylogeny. Phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyletic origin of the Cichlidogyrus/Scutogyrus group, and suggested that Cichlidogyrus is polyphyletic and that Scutogyrus is monophyletic. The phylogeny of Cichlidae supported the separation of mouthbrooders and substrate-brooders and is consistent with the hypothesis that the mouthbrooding behavior of Oreochromis and Sarotherodon evolved from substrate-brooding behavior. The mapping of morphological characters of the haptor onto the parasite phylogenetic tree suggests that the attachment organ has evolved from a very simple form to a more complex one. The cophylogenetic analyses indicated a significant fit between trees using distance-based tests, but no significant cospeciation signal using tree-based tests, suggesting the presence of parasite duplications and host switches on related host species. This shed some light on the diversification process of Cichlidogyrus species parasitizing West African cichlids.

  8. Fishing activities

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    Oberle, Ferdinand; Puig, Pere; Martin, Jacobo; Micallef, Aaron; Krastel, Sebastian; Savini, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    Unlike the major anthropogenic changes that terrestrial and coastal habitats underwent during the last centuries such as deforestation, river engineering, agricultural practices or urbanism, those occurring underwater are veiled from our eyes and have continued nearly unnoticed. Only recent advances in remote sensing and deep marine sampling technologies have revealed the extent and magnitude of the anthropogenic impacts to the seafloor. In particular, bottom trawling, a fishing technique consisting of dragging a net and fishing gear over the seafloor to capture bottom-dwelling living resources has gained attention among the scientific community, policy makers and the general public due to its destructive effects on the seabed. Trawling gear produces acute impacts on biota and the physical substratum of the seafloor by disrupting the sediment column structure, overturning boulders, resuspending sediments and imprinting deep scars on muddy bottoms. Also, the repetitive passage of trawling gear over the same areas creates long-lasting, cumulative impacts that modify the cohesiveness and texture of sediments. It can be asserted nowadays that due to its recurrence, mobility and wide geographical extent, industrial trawling has become a major force driving seafloor change and affecting not only its physical integrity on short spatial scales but also imprinting measurable modifications to the geomorphology of entire continental margins.

  9. Deep Fish.

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    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  10. Community of protozoans and metazoans parasitizing Auchenipterus nuchalis (Auchenipteridae, a catfish from the Brazilian Amazon

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    Marcos Tavares Dias

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first study on parasite diversity in Auchenipterus nuchalis Spix & Agassiz, 1829 (Auchenipteridae. In 31 fish caught in a tributary of the Amazon River, 10,708 parasites were collected, such as Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Piscinoodinium pilullare, Cosmetocleithrum striatuli, metacercariae of Posthodiplostomum sp, and larvae and adults of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus inopinatus. These parasite species showed aggregated dispersion, except for C. striatuli, which had a uniform dispersion. The component community of parasites showed a low Brillouin diversity (0.67 ± 0.27, low species richness (3.5 ± 0.8 and low evenness (0.43 ± 0.17, and it was characterized by the presence of species with high prevalence and abundance. Protozoan species were the prevalent parasites, which may be a consequence of the host’s mode of life, while the low presence of endoparasites in A. nuchalis suggests that this fish may occupy an intermediate trophic level in the food web. These data represent the first record of such parasite species for this host.

  11. Synanthropic birds and parasites.

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    Dipineto, Ludovico; Borrelli, Luca; Pepe, Paola; Fioretti, Alessandro; Caputo, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Rinaldi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the parasitologic findings for 60 synanthropic bird carcasses recovered in the Campania region of southern Italy. Birds consisted of 20 yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis), 15 rock pigeons (Columba livia), 15 common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), and 10 carrion crows (Corvus corone). Each carcass was examined to detect the presence of ectoparasites and then necropsied to detect helminths. Ectoparasites occurred in 100% of the birds examined. In particular, chewing lice were recovered with a prevalence of 100%, whereas Pseudolynchia canariensis (Hippoboscidae) were found only in pigeons with a prevalence of 80%. Regarding endoparasites, a total of seven helminth species were identified: three nematodes (Ascaridia columbae, Capillaria columbae, Physaloptera alata), one cestoda (Raillietina tetragona), one trematoda (Cardiocephalus longicollis), and two acanthocephalans (Centrorhynchus globocaudatus and Centrorhynchus buteonis). The findings of the present study add data to the parasitologic scenario of synanthropic birds. This is important because parasitic infection can lead to serious health problems when combined with other factors and may affect flying performance and predatory effectiveness.

  12. Parasites in pet reptiles

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    2011-01-01

    Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles), belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (4)) of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3%) of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (6)) of endoparasites in 252 (76.1%) of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1) and Protozoa (2)) of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5%) animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners. PMID:21624124

  13. MENGENAL PARASIT FILARIA

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    Tri Ramadhani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis atau kaki gajah adalah penyakit menular yang disebabkan karena infeksi cacing filaria yang hidup disaluran dan kelenjar getah bening (limfe serta menyebabkan gejala akut, kronis. Filariasis mulai dikenal di Indonesia tahun 1889 sejak Haga dan Van Eecke menemukan kasus pembesaran scrotum di Jakarta. Penyakit tersebut dapat menular kepada orang lain dengan perantara gigitan nyamuk. Seluruh wilayah Indonesia berpotensi untuk terjangkitnya penyakit tersebut, hal ini mengingat cacing sebagai penyebabnya dan nyamuk penularnya tersebar luas. Keadaan ini didukung oleh kerusakan lingkungan, seperti banjir, penebangan hutan dan lainnya yang memperluas tempat berkembangbiaknya nyamuk. Meskipun filariasis tidak mematikan secara langsung, dengan adanya demam dan bisul-bisul (abses yang hilang timbul, dan gejala menahun berupa pembesaran/elefantiasis yang merupakan cacat menetap akan sangat mengganggu. Secara ekonomis keadaan tersebut sangat merugikan, karena mengurangi produktivitas masyarakat, serta diperlukan biaya pengobatan dan perawatan yang tidak mudah dan tidak murah.Di Indonesia filariasis limfatik di sebabkan oleh tiga spesies cacing filaria yaitu Brugia ma