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Sample records for fischer memorial great

  1. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York...

  2. The Great War and German Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leese, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Review essay on Jason Crouthamel, The Great War and German Memory. Society, Politics and Psychological Trauma, 1914-18 (2009) and Anton Kaes, Shell Shock Cinema: Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War (2009)......Review essay on Jason Crouthamel, The Great War and German Memory. Society, Politics and Psychological Trauma, 1914-18 (2009) and Anton Kaes, Shell Shock Cinema: Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War (2009)...

  3. Great war, ethics of Vidovdan, memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijaković Bogoljub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with a characterization of contemporaneity (dominance of the financial sector and high technology, politicization of economy, ideological use of culture and control of the capacity for thought and a brief analysis of expansionism (political, economic, cultural on the eve of the Great War, the author embarks on a more detailed description of the spiritual situation in the wake of the Great War: in philosophy, literature, art, as well as the national-political programmatic texts and war propaganda publications of German intellectuals of the time. The continuity of the Austro-Hungarian colonial policy towards the Balkans and Serbia culminates in instigating a preventive war against Serbia by the elites in Berlin and Vienna, which is of importance with regard to the question of responsibility for the war, guided by concrete aims of war in which causes for war are reflected. These war elites wanted to declare the assassination in Sarajevo as the cause of war, which in fact was a political assassination and tyrannicide. The freedom movement of democratic youth, Mlada Bosna (Young Bosnia, needs to be viewed in the European context as inspired by the Serbian tradition of the cult of Kosovo and the ethics of Vidovdan (St Vitus' Day which speaks both about the victim's sacrifice as sublimation of history and about just suffering as elements of identity. Historical memory suggests that historical responsibility is transgenerational. The epic proportions of Serbian suffering in the Great War have additionally encouraged the positing of the theme of St Vitus' Day Temple (Vidovdanski Hram as envisaged by Ivan Meštrović. The foundations of this idea were shaken by Miloš Crnjanski who, in his 'Lyrics of Ithaca', succeeds in returning to Vidovdan (St Vitus' Day the inexhaustible national power of validity. Because of enormous Serbian military and civilian casualties in recent history, the need to establish a Victim's Sacrifice Memorial, in our day

  4. Lewis and Fischer 344 rats as a model for genetic differences in spatial learning and memory: Cocaine effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fole, Alberto; Miguéns, Miguel; Morales, Lidia; González-Martín, Carmen; Ambrosio, Emilio; Del Olmo, Nuria

    2017-06-02

    Lewis (LEW) and Fischer 344 (F344) rats are considered a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction. We previously showed important differences in spatial learning and memory between them, but in contrast with previous experiments demonstrating cocaine-induced enhanced learning in Morris water maze (MWM) highly demanding tasks, the eight-arm radial maze (RAM) performance was not modified either in LEW or F344 rats after chronic cocaine treatment. In the present work, chronically cocaine-treated LEW and F344 adult rats have been evaluated in learning and memory performance using the Y-maze, two RAM protocols that differ in difficulty, and a reversal protocol that tests cognitive flexibility. After one of the RAM protocols, we quantified dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 neurons and compared it to animals treated with cocaine but not submitted to RAM. LEW cocaine treated rats showed a better performance in the Y maze than their saline counterparts, an effect that was not evident in the F344 strain. F344 rats significantly took more time to learn the RAM task and made a greater number of errors than LEW animals in both protocols tested, whereas cocaine treatment induced deleterious effects in learning and memory in the highly difficult protocol. Moreover, hippocampal spine density was cocaine-modulated in LEW animals whereas no effects were found in F344 rats. We propose that differences in addictive-like behavior between LEW and F344 rats could be related to differences in hippocampal learning and memory processes that could be on the basis of individual vulnerability to cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Landscapes of Memory and Forgetting: Memorialisation, Emotion and Tourism along Australia’s Great Ocean Road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Kerr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the history of the Great Ocean Road, described in its recent National Heritage listing as “Australia’s most famous coastal drive”. The road is unique in Australia as it was purposely constructed as a scenic tourist route and as a memorial to World War I servicemen. Over time the road’s memorial function was largely forgotten in public memory, overtaken by its fame as a tourist route. The history of the road’s setting, construction, promotion and interpretation reveals that it is a route which reflects changing, and sometimes conflicting, cultural preoccupations. Despite attempts to link its sublime setting and challenges of building the road with the heroic struggles of the servicemen in war; in spite of physical commemorative markers along the road; and in spite of the power and endurance of the “Anzac legend” in Australian culture, the connection did not resonate as intended. The road’s construction and subsequent interpretation illustrate the difficulty of inscribing “memory” onto a landscape with no prior connection to the events being memorialised. Its history reveals insights into the road’s cultural construction; tangible and intangible expressions of remembering and forgetting along the road; and the relationship between the road, landscape, memory and emotion.

  6. Near polygons and Fischer spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.E.; Cohen, A.M.; Hall, J.I.; Wilbrink, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we exploit the relations between near polygons with lines of size 3 and Fischer spaces to classify near hexagons with quads and with lines of size three. We also construct some infinite families of near polygons.

  7. “Remembering with advantages”: The memory of the Great War in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Holbrook

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Australian memory of the Great War has always been expressed most enthusiastically in the rituals of Anzac Day: an occasion that recognises the anniversary of the Australians’ first battle of the war in Turkey on 25 April 1915. In the decades after 1914–1918, the devastating effects of the war were assuaged in part by the pride that Australians felt in the fighting reputation of their soldiers. By the 1960s the rituals of Anzac were in noticeable decline. Young Australians were hostile to the values of the Great War generation and believed that the commemorative practices of Anzac Day glorified war. Despite the widespread belief that Anzac Day would die with the last of the old veterans, it has staged a remarkable resurgence. This can be explained by the remaking of the Anzac legend, from a myth anchored in British race patriotism and martial nationalism to one that speaks in the modern idiom of trauma, suffering and empathy. What remains of the original Anzac legend is the belief commonly held by contemporary Australians that their national consciousness was born at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915.

  8. Memory processing in great apes: the effect of time and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep

    2011-12-23

    Following encoding, memory remains temporarily vulnerable to disruption. Consolidation refers to offline time-dependent processes that continue after encoding and stabilize, transform or enhance the memory trace. Memory consolidation resulting from sleep has been reported for declarative and non-declarative memories in humans. We first investigated the temporal course of memory retrieval in chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans. We found that the amount of retrieved information was time dependent: apes' performance degraded after 1 and 2 h, stabilized after 4 h, started to increase after 8 and 12 h and fully recovered after 24 h. Second, we show that although memories during wakefulness were highly vulnerable to interference from events similar to those witnessed during the original encoding event, an intervening period of sleep not only stabilized apes' memories into more permanent ones but also protected them against interference.

  9. Remembering "A Great Fag": Visualizing Public Memory and the Construction of Queer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines how public memory is visualized in the statue to Canada's "gay pioneer," Alexander Wood. By analyzing three viewing positions of the statue--the official democratic memory, traditionalist countermemory, and camp countermemory--I argue each position enacts a distinct form of remembering Wood with implications for both…

  10. Twee Fischers, twee dramas: Die geheime Bloemfontein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Fischers, two plays: Die geheime Bloemfontein-konferensie [The secret Bloemfontein conference] (1938) and Die Bram Fischer waltz (2011). There is no better example within Afrikaner history where different generations of the same family played such extraordinary roles in the course of important historical events for ...

  11. Keeping track of time: evidence for episodic-like memory in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Haun, Daniel; Colmenares, Fernando; Call, Josep

    2010-03-01

    Episodic memory, as defined by Tulving, can be described in terms of behavioural elements (what, where and when information) but it is also accompanied by an awareness of one's past (chronesthesia) and a subjective conscious experience (autonoetic awareness). Recent experiments have shown that corvids and rodents recall the where, what and when of an event. This capability has been called episodic-like memory because it only fulfils the behavioural criteria for episodic memory. We tested seven chimpanzees, three orangutans and two bonobos of various ages by adapting two paradigms, originally developed by Clayton and colleagues to test scrub jays. In Experiment 1, subjects were fed preferred but perishable food (frozen juice) and less preferred but non-perishable food (grape). After the food items were hidden, subjects could choose one of them either after 5 min or 1 h. The frozen juice was still available after 5 min but melted after 1 h and became unobtainable. Apes chose the frozen juice significantly more after 5 min and the grape after 1 h. In Experiment 2, subjects faced two baiting events happening at different times, yet they formed an integrated memory for the location and time of the baiting event for particular food items. We also included a memory task that required no temporal encoding. Our results showed that apes remember in an integrated fashion what, where and when (i.e., how long ago) an event happened; that is, apes distinguished between different events in which the same food items were hidden in different places at different times. The temporal control of their choices was not dependent on the familiarity of the platforms where the food was hidden. Chimpanzees' and bonobos' performance in the temporal encoding task was age-dependent, following an inverted U-shaped distribution. The age had no effect on the performance of the subjects in the task that required no temporal encoding.

  12. Research Opportunities for Fischer-Tropsch Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was discovered in Germany in the 1920's and has been studied by every generation since that time. As technology and chemistry, in general, improved through the decades, new insights, catalysts, and technologies were added to the Fischer-Tropsch process, improving it and making it more economical with each advancement. Opportunities for improving the Fischer-Tropsch process and making it more economical still exist. This paper gives an overview of the present Fischer-Tropsch processes and offers suggestions for areas where a research investment could improve those processes. Gas-to-liquid technology, which utilizes the Fischer Tropsch process, consists of three principal steps: Production of synthesis gas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) from natural gas, the production of liquid fuels from syngas using a Fischer-Tropsch process, and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Each step will be studied for opportunities for improvement and areas that are not likely to reap significant benefits without significant investment

  13. Working Memory, Reasoning, and Task Switching Training: Transfer Effects, Limitations, and Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniqued, Pauline L; Allen, Courtney M; Kranz, Michael B; Johnson, Kathryn; Sipolins, Aldis; Dickens, Charles; Ward, Nathan; Geyer, Alexandra; Kramer, Arthur F

    2015-01-01

    Although some studies have shown that cognitive training can produce improvements to untrained cognitive domains (far transfer), many others fail to show these effects, especially when it comes to improving fluid intelligence. The current study was designed to overcome several limitations of previous training studies by incorporating training expectancy assessments, an active control group, and "Mind Frontiers," a video game-based mobile program comprised of six adaptive, cognitively demanding training tasks that have been found to lead to increased scores in fluid intelligence (Gf) tests. We hypothesize that such integrated training may lead to broad improvements in cognitive abilities by targeting aspects of working memory, executive function, reasoning, and problem solving. Ninety participants completed 20 hour-and-a-half long training sessions over four to five weeks, 45 of whom played Mind Frontiers and 45 of whom completed visual search and change detection tasks (active control). After training, the Mind Frontiers group improved in working memory n-back tests, a composite measure of perceptual speed, and a composite measure of reaction time in reasoning tests. No training-related improvements were found in reasoning accuracy or other working memory tests, nor in composite measures of episodic memory, selective attention, divided attention, and multi-tasking. Perceived self-improvement in the tested abilities did not differ between groups. A general expectancy difference in problem-solving was observed between groups, but this perceived benefit did not correlate with training-related improvement. In summary, although these findings provide modest evidence regarding the efficacy of an integrated cognitive training program, more research is needed to determine the utility of Mind Frontiers as a cognitive training tool.

  14. Working Memory, Reasoning, and Task Switching Training: Transfer Effects, Limitations, and Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniqued, Pauline L.; Ward, Nathan; Geyer, Alexandra; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Although some studies have shown that cognitive training can produce improvements to untrained cognitive domains (far transfer), many others fail to show these effects, especially when it comes to improving fluid intelligence. The current study was designed to overcome several limitations of previous training studies by incorporating training expectancy assessments, an active control group, and “Mind Frontiers,” a video game-based mobile program comprised of six adaptive, cognitively demanding training tasks that have been found to lead to increased scores in fluid intelligence (Gf) tests. We hypothesize that such integrated training may lead to broad improvements in cognitive abilities by targeting aspects of working memory, executive function, reasoning, and problem solving. Ninety participants completed 20 hour-and-a-half long training sessions over four to five weeks, 45 of whom played Mind Frontiers and 45 of whom completed visual search and change detection tasks (active control). After training, the Mind Frontiers group improved in working memory n-back tests, a composite measure of perceptual speed, and a composite measure of reaction time in reasoning tests. No training-related improvements were found in reasoning accuracy or other working memory tests, nor in composite measures of episodic memory, selective attention, divided attention, and multi-tasking. Perceived self-improvement in the tested abilities did not differ between groups. A general expectancy difference in problem-solving was observed between groups, but this perceived benefit did not correlate with training-related improvement. In summary, although these findings provide modest evidence regarding the efficacy of an integrated cognitive training program, more research is needed to determine the utility of Mind Frontiers as a cognitive training tool. PMID:26555341

  15. Working Memory, Reasoning, and Task Switching Training: Transfer Effects, Limitations, and Great Expectations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline L Baniqued

    Full Text Available Although some studies have shown that cognitive training can produce improvements to untrained cognitive domains (far transfer, many others fail to show these effects, especially when it comes to improving fluid intelligence. The current study was designed to overcome several limitations of previous training studies by incorporating training expectancy assessments, an active control group, and "Mind Frontiers," a video game-based mobile program comprised of six adaptive, cognitively demanding training tasks that have been found to lead to increased scores in fluid intelligence (Gf tests. We hypothesize that such integrated training may lead to broad improvements in cognitive abilities by targeting aspects of working memory, executive function, reasoning, and problem solving. Ninety participants completed 20 hour-and-a-half long training sessions over four to five weeks, 45 of whom played Mind Frontiers and 45 of whom completed visual search and change detection tasks (active control. After training, the Mind Frontiers group improved in working memory n-back tests, a composite measure of perceptual speed, and a composite measure of reaction time in reasoning tests. No training-related improvements were found in reasoning accuracy or other working memory tests, nor in composite measures of episodic memory, selective attention, divided attention, and multi-tasking. Perceived self-improvement in the tested abilities did not differ between groups. A general expectancy difference in problem-solving was observed between groups, but this perceived benefit did not correlate with training-related improvement. In summary, although these findings provide modest evidence regarding the efficacy of an integrated cognitive training program, more research is needed to determine the utility of Mind Frontiers as a cognitive training tool.

  16. Cognitive Ageing in Great Britain in the New Century: Cohort Differences in Episodic Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gindo Tampubolon

    Full Text Available Dementias in high income countries are set to be the third major burden of disease even as older people are increasingly required to think for themselves how to provide for their lives in retirement. Meanwhile the period of older age continues to extend with increase in life expectancy. This challenge demands an understanding of how cognition changes over an extended period in later life. But studying cognitive ageing in the population faces a difficulty from the fact that older respondents are liable to leave (attrite before study completion. This study tested three hypotheses: trajectories of cognitive ageing in Britain show an improvement beyond the age of 50; and they are lifted by secular improvement in cognition across cohorts; lastly they are susceptible to distortion due to attrition.Using the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, this paper studied trajectories of episodic memory of Britons aged 50-89 from 2002 to 2013 (N = 5931. Using joint models the analysis found that levels of episodic memory follow a curvilinear shape, not a steady decline, in later life. The findings also revealed secular improvement in cognitive ageing such that as a cohort is being replaced episodic memory levels in the population improve. The analysis lastly demonstrated that failure to simultaneously model attrition can produce distorted pictures of cognitive ageing.Old age in this century is not necessarily a period dominated by cognitive decline. In identifying behavioural factors associated with better cognitive ageing, such as social connections of traditional and online kinds, the paper raises possibilities of mustering an adequate response to the cognition challenge.

  17. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  18. Perspectiva sobre una Personalidad Senera: Carmen Fischer Ramirez (Perspective on a Singular Personality: Carmen Fischer Ramirez).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezeda, Dina Alarcon

    1992-01-01

    Traces the career of Carmen Fischer Ramirez, focusing on her work in improving early childhood education in Chile. Reviews her university career, work with the World Organization for Early Childhood Education, and major publications. (AC)

  19. Plesiophysa guadeloupensis ("Fischer" Mazé, 1883

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lobato Paraense

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A description is presented of the shell and anatomic characters of the planorbid mollusk Plesiophysa guadeloupensis ("Fischer" Mazé, 1883, based on topotypic specimens from a pond in Borricaud (Grande Terre, Guadeloupe. Comparison with previous descriptions of nominal species of Plesiophysa points to its identity with P. ornata (Haas, 1938, of which it is a senior synonym.

  20. Veronica sublobata M. Fischer in Nederland?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, de S.E.

    1968-01-01

    A form of Veronica hederifolia L. s. lat., clearly distinguishable from the well-known form of arable land and occurring in the Netherlands in woods, thickets or sometimes along roads is most possibly identical with V. sublobata M. Fischer. Knowledge of the chromosome number of the Dutch material is

  1. Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch syntheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, M.; Matsuda, K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been examined using high dose rate electron beams and Fe-Cu-diatomaceous earth catalyst. Yields of saturated hydrocarbons were found to increase by irradiation, but the yields of these compounds were decreased by raising reaction temperature without irradiation, suggesting the presence of radiation chemical process in catalytic reactions. (author)

  2. Fischer-Tropsch. A futuristic view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosloo, A.C. [Sasol Technology Research and Development, PO Box 1, 9570 Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2001-06-01

    Although the three processing steps that constitute the Fischer-Tropsch based Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology, namely syngas generation, syngas conversion and hydroprocessing, are all commercially proven and individually optimized, their combined use is not widely applied. In order to make the GTL technology more cost-effective, the focus must be on reducing both the capital and the operating costs of such a plant. Current developments in the area of syngas generation, namely oxygen transfer membranes and heat exchange reforming, have the potential to significantly reduce the capital cost and improve the thermal efficiency of a GTL plant. Further improvements in terms of the activity and selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst can also make a significant reduction in the operating cost of such a plant.

  3. Deactivation and Regeneration of Commercial Type Fischer-Tropsch Co-Catalysts—A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Erling Rytter; Anders Holmen

    2015-01-01

    Deactivation of commercially relevant cobalt catalysts for Low Temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) synthesis is discussed with a focus on the two main long-term deactivation mechanisms proposed: Carbon deposits covering the catalytic surface and re-oxidation of the cobalt metal. There is a great variety in commercial, demonstration or pilot LTFT operations in terms of reactor systems employed, catalyst formulations and process conditions. Lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to correlat...

  4. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  5. Interconversion of Fischer and Zig-Zag Projections Learning ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Stereochemistry, conforma- tional analysis, hands-on learn- ing, Fischer projections, zig-zag projection, C–C bond rotations. Interconversion of Fischer and Zig-Zag Projections. Learning Stereochemistry with the Help of Hands. Visualization of molecules in three dimensions is an important aspect of organic chemistry.

  6. 75 FR 68350 - Fischer, Thomas J.; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ID-6422-000] Fischer, Thomas J.; Notice of Filing October 29, 2010. Take notice that on October 29, 2010, Thomas J. Fischer filed an Application for Authorization to Hold Interlocking Positions as Director of Wisconsin Electric...

  7. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Development and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, G.; Rohde, M.; Mena Subiranas, A. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institut

    2006-07-01

    Production of synthetic hydrocarbons via Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis has the potential to produce high-value automotive fuels and petrochemicals from fossil and renewable sources. The availability of cheap natural gas and solid raw materials like coal and biomass has given momentum to synthesis technologies first developed in the mid-twentieth century. The present paper summarizes the fundamentals and describes some general aspects regarding driving forces, catalyst and reaction, synthesis reactor, and overall process. In this way, it indicates the context of present and future developments. Worldwide plant capacities will increase significantly in the next future, with natural gas favored as feedstock. Substitution of petroleum as well as production of improved products (like automotive fuels) are the most significant incentives. Energy loss and additional fossil CO{sub 2} emissions caused by the conversion process will be a problem in extended applications with fossil feedstocks. The current R and D activities worldwide, in all areas related to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, will contribute to further process improvements and extended applications. (orig.)

  8. Eli Fischer-Jørgensen, Eugeniu Coseriu et Louis Hjelmslev

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Viggo Bank

    2015-01-01

    Based on a correspondence between Eugenio Coseriu (1921-2002) and Eli Fischer-Jørgensen (1911-2010), the article discusses the importance of Louis Hjelmslev (1899-1965) for the development of the theory of Coseriu. In a letter dated 1955, Fischer-Jørgensen agrees with Coseriu in his criticism of ...... to be a slight change in Coseriu’s view on content substance. This way, the article aims to show that Fischer-Jørgensen played an important role as a critical mediator between Hjelmslev and Coseriu.......Based on a correspondence between Eugenio Coseriu (1921-2002) and Eli Fischer-Jørgensen (1911-2010), the article discusses the importance of Louis Hjelmslev (1899-1965) for the development of the theory of Coseriu. In a letter dated 1955, Fischer-Jørgensen agrees with Coseriu in his criticism...

  9. Atypical memory B cells are greatly expanded in individuals living in a malaria-endemic area1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Greta E; Crompton, Peter D.; Li, Shanping; Walsh, Laura A.; Moir, Susan; Traore, Boubacar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Pierce, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological observations in malaria endemic areas have long suggested a deficiency in the generation and maintenance of B cell memory to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) in individuals chronically reinfected with the parasite. Recently, a functionally and phenotypically distinct population of FCRL4+ hypo-responsive memory B cells (MBCs) was reported to be expanded in HIV-infected individuals with high viral loads. Here we provide evidence that a phenotypically similar atypical MBC population is significantly expanded in Pf-exposed Malian adults and children as young as two years of age as compared to healthy U.S. adult controls. The number of these atypical MBCs was higher in children with chronic asymptomatic Pf infections compared to uninfected children suggesting that the chronic presence of the parasite may drive expansion of these distinct MBCs. This is the first description of an atypical MBC phenotype associated with malaria. Understanding the origin and function of these MBCs could be important in informing the design of malaria vaccines. PMID:19592645

  10. Computer Games as a Tool for Implementation of Memory Policy (on the Example of Displaying Events of The Great Patriotic War in Video Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергей Игоревич Белов

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is devoted to the study of the practice of using computer games as a tool of the memory policy. The relevance of this study determines both the growth of the importance of video games as a means of forming ideas about the events of the past, and a low degree of study of this topic. As the goal of the author's research, the research is to identify the prospects for using computer games as an instrument for implementing the memory policy within the framework of the case of the events of the Great Patriotic War. The empirical base of the work was formed due to the generalization of the content of such video games as “Call of Duty 1”, “Call of Duty 14: WWII”, “Company of Heroes 2” and “Commandos 3: Destination Berlin”. The methodological base of the research is formed due to the involvement of elements of descriptive political analysis, the theory of operant conditioning B.F. Skinner and the concept of social identity H. Tajfel and J. Turner. The author comes to the conclusion that familiarization of users with the designated games contributes to the consolidation in the minds of users of negative stereotypes regarding the participation of the Red Army in the Great Patriotic War. The process of integration of negative images is carried out using the methods of operant conditioning. The integration of the system of negative images into the mass consciousness of the inhabitants of the post-Soviet space makes it difficult to preserve the remnants of Soviet political symbols and elements constructed on their basis identity. The author puts forward the hypothesis that in the case of complete desovietization of the public policy space in the states that emerged as a result of the collapse of the USSR, the task of revising the history of the Great Patriotic War will be greatly facilitated, and with the subsequent departure from the life of the last eyewitnesses of the relevant events, achieving this goal will be only a

  11. Cultural Memory on "Great" People in a "Small" Town: The Perception of King Alexander Karađorđević and Marshal Josip Broz Tito in the Cultural Memory of Samobor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Vojak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the thesis that ''history is written by the winners”, ''mainstream'' history can be under¬stood as the revised and politically instrumentalized means of a certain nation's ''cultural'' memory, which some consider to be a ''history of selective memo¬ri¬zation and selective forgetfulness''. Most approaches in con¬temporary Croatian historiography which are focu¬sed on the historical periods of monarchist and socialist Yugoslavia use national-level themes as their starting point. A similar preoccupation is also present in those historiographical approaches which are focused on the problems of analyzing and understanding how collective memories are constructed. However, our aim here is to move from the ''big'' themes to a ''small'' (local setting. In this context, Samobor, a small Croatian urban centre, is going to serve us as the basis for analyzing in which way two Yugoslav rulers – King Alexander Karađorđević and Marshal Josip Broz Tito – were perceived on the local level. By analyzing the relevant archival sources as well as contemporary periodicals, we seek to un¬der¬stand the ways in which local authorities and elites, from their position of social power and status, received the mentioned rulers during their visits, and in which ways did they honour and commemorate these high-profile guests. Through this analysis, we hope to gain a better understanding of the process of the creation of local social memory, the constitution of memorial and cul¬tural patterns, and their key cultural elements and me¬anings, which are often torn apart during periods of social and political upheaval, only to be reconstituted by recombining the same key cultural and social elements while simultaneously encompassing new actors. In other words, the focus of our analysis will be on tracing the collective memory of the population of Samobor to¬wards two ''great leaders''. Starting from the thesis that ''history is written by the winners

  12. Disposition of citral in male Fischer rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diliberto, J.J.; Usha, G.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    The disposition of citral, an essential oil occurring in many foods and fragrances, was studied in male Fischer rats after iv, po, and dermal treatments. The pattern of distribution and elimination was the same after iv or oral exposure. Urine was the major route of elimination of citral-derived radioactivity, followed by feces, 14 CO 2 , and expired volatiles. However, after dermal exposure, relatively less of the material was eliminated in the urine and more in the feces, suggesting a role for first-pass metabolism through the skin. Citral was almost completely absorbed orally; due to its extreme volatility, much of an applied dermal dose was lost. The citral remaining on the skin was fairly well absorbed. No effect of oral dose, from 5 to 500 mg/kg, was detected on disposition. Although the feces was a minor route of excretion, approximately 25% of the administered dose was eliminated via the bile within 4 hr of an iv dose. The metabolism of citral was both rapid and extensive. Within 5 min of an iv dose, no unmetabolized citral could be detected in the blood. Repeated exposure to citral resulted in an increase in biliary elimination, without any significant change in the pattern of urinary, fecal, or exhaled excretion. This suggests that citral may induce at least one pathway of its own metabolism. The rapid metabolism and excretion of this compound suggest that significant bioaccumulation of citral would not occur

  13. Centenary of the Battle of Vimy (france, 1917): Preserving the Memory of the Great War Through 3d Recording of the Maison Blanche Souterraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Prilaux, G.

    2017-08-01

    The Battle of Vimy Ridge was a military engagement between the Canadian Corps and the German Empire during the Great War (1914-1918). In this battle, Canadian troops fought as a single unit and won the day. It marked an important point in Canadian history as a nation. The year 2017 marks the centenary of this battle. In commemoration of this event, the Pas-de-Calais Departmental Council financed a 3D recording mission for one of the underground tunnels (souterraines) used as refuge by the Canadian soldiers several weeks prior to the battle. A combination of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and close-range photogrammetry techniques was employed in order to document not only the souterraine, but also the various carvings and graffitis created by the soldiers on its walls. The resulting point clouds were registered to the French national geodetic system, and then meshed and textured in order to create a precise 3D model of the souterraine. In this paper, the workflow taken during the project as well as several results will be discussed. In the end, the resulting 3D model was used to create derivative products such as maps, section profiles, and also virtual visit videos. The latter helps the dissemination of the 3D information and thus aids in the preservation of the memory of the Great War for Canada.

  14. Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wager, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will explore a response to traumatic victimisation which has divided the opinions of psychologists at an exponential rate. We will be examining amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse and the potential to recover these memories in adulthood. Whilst this phenomenon is generally accepted in clinical circles, it is seen as highly contentious amongst research psychologists, particularly experimental cognitive psychologists. The chapter will begin with a real case study of a wo...

  15. Principles of selectivity in Fischer-Tropsch SYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Institut

    2006-07-01

    The detailed selectivity of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with iron and cobalt as catalysts with high temporal resolution has been determined and used to derive the values of probability of chain growth, chain branching and olefin/paraffin molar ratio as a function of carbon number and time. Catalyst reassembling and self-organization of the Fischer-Tropsch regime are investigated. The basic principle of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, suppression of desorption of growing chains is disclosed. This frustration governs FT-synthesis of the otherwise different systems with iron and cobalt. The advanced characterization of sites and elementary reactions (specifically with cobalt) is thought to be a more realistic basis for future theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  16. Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  17. God has moved. Long live the God! / Rene Fischer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fischer, Rene

    2004-01-01

    Reklaamifirma Tank senine shveitslasest loovjuht Rene Fischer oma tööst ettevõttes, firma edukuse võimalikest põhjustest, olukorrast Baltimaade reklaamiturul, Läti reklaamifirma Bates/Red Cell loovjuhiks lahkumise põhjustest ning eesmärkidest uuel töökohal. Lisad: Other stuff; Technical data

  18. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syka, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 264, 1-2 (2010), s. 70-78 ISSN 0378-5955 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/07/1336; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Rat * Fischer 344 * Presbycusis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.428, year: 2010

  19. Alternative Fuel Research in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has recently constructed an Alternative Fuels Laboratory which is solely being used to perform Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactor studies, novel catalyst development and thermal stability experiments. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst screening experiments while focusing on reducing energy inputs, reducing CO2 emissions and increasing product yields within the F-T process. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which reacts syn-gas (a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), over the surface of a catalyst material which is then converted into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions1. These hydrocarbons can then be further processed into higher quality liquid fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The experiments performed in this laboratory will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics to focus on newly formulated catalysts, improved process conditions and enhanced catalyst activation methods. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor used solely for cobalt catalyst activation.

  20. Collagen changes in the cochlea of aged Fischer 344 rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buckiová, Daniela; Popelář, Jiří; Syka, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2006), s. 296-302 ISSN 0531-5565 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/04/1074; GA MZd NR8113; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Presbycusis * Rat * Fischer 344 strain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.930, year: 2006

  1. Liquefaction of syngas by fischer-tropsch process (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Saeed, M.M.; Riaz, M.; Khan, A.S.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch process is a set of chemical reactions that convert syngas into liquid hydrocarbons and is gaining attention under the background of the resource depletion leading to the price hike of the petroleum oil. The diesel fuel obtained from syngas by Fischer-Tropsch process seems to be of high quality and environmental friendly. The present study deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the production/synthesis of mineral diesel from syngas by Fischer-Tropsch process. The catalyst was prepared by coating cobalt nitrate on alumina followed by calcinations and characterization by analytical techniques such as BET, SEM/EDXA and X-Ray diffraction. For the conversion of syngas to liquid fuel, the fixed bed column technique was employed. Different operational parameters such as temperature of the column, flow rate and pressure of the syngas were studied. The product formed was verified by comparing the GC/FID spectrum of the synthesized mineral diesel with commercial sample by employing GC analysis. The qualitative results indicate the success of the Fischer-Tropsch process in the present study. (author)

  2. Niobia-supported Cobalt Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis niobia has been shown to be an attractive support for application in Fischer-Tropsch catalysis at industrially relevant conditions without apparent deactivation up to at least 200 hours of operation. This proves that the level of potentially poisoning contaminants is sufficiently low

  3. Simulation models and designs for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Process designs and economics were developed for three grass-roots indirect Fischer-Tropsch coal liquefaction facilities. A baseline and an alternate upgrading design were developed for a mine-mouth plant located in southern Illinois using Illinois No. 6 coal, and one for a mine-mouth plane located in Wyoming using Power River Basin coal. The alternate design used close-coupled ZSM-5 reactors to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. ASPEN process simulation models were developed for all three designs. These results have been reported previously. In this study, the ASPEN process simulation model was enhanced to improve the vapor/liquid equilibrium calculations for the products leaving the slurry bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors. This significantly improved the predictions for the alternate ZSM-5 upgrading design. Another model was developed for the Wyoming coal case using ZSM-5 upgrading of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor vapors. To date, this is the best indirect coal liquefaction case. Sensitivity studies showed that additional cost reductions are possible.

  4. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  5. Hermann Emil Fischer: Life and Achievements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in his studies and passed with distinction from high school in. 1869. Emil had great ... was impressed by Kekule's teaching, he moved in1872, along with his cousin Otto ..... killed himself as he could not bear the military training. The eldest son ...

  6. Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strege, Joshua; Snyder, Anthony; Laumb, Jason; Stanislowski, Joshua; Swanson, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing FischerTropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through

  7. Petroleum formation by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in plate tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szatmari, P. (Petrobras Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1989-08-01

    A somewhat speculative hypothesis of petroleum genesis in the upper lithosphere is proposed, based on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This hypothesis is distinct from both the organic (biogenic) model and the inorganic model of hydrocarbon degassing from the Earth's interior. The hypothesis presented in this paper proposes that petroleum liquids form by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on magnetite and hematite catalysts when carbon dioxide (derived by massive metamorphic or igneous decarbonation of subducted sedimentary carbonates) reacts with hydrogen generated by the serpentinization (in the absence of air) of shallow-mantle lithosphere and ophiolite thrust sheets. Oblique plate movements may favor hydrocarbon formation by creating deep faults that aid fluid flow and serpentinization. The world's richest oil provinces, including those of the Middle East, may be tentatively interpreted to have formed by this mechanism. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. [Urs Fischer: faux amis : documentation d'exposition

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Tiré du site internet des Musées d'art et d'histoire (www.ville-geneve.ch/mah): "Urs Fischer - Faux Amis propose une sélection inédite d'œuvres de la collection Dakis Joannou, présentée pour la première fois au Musée d'art et d'histoire de Genève. Conçue par le commissaire Massimiliano Gioni comme une synthèse inhabituelle entre une présentation monographique et une exposition de groupe, Faux Amis réunit un ensemble d'œuvres signées Urs Fischer (né en 1973), l'un des artistes suisses les plus...

  9. Moessbauer spectroscopic investigations of Fe/Mn-Fischer-Tropsch-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deppe, P.; Papp, H.; Rosenberg, M.

    1986-01-01

    The phase composition of Fe/Mn oxide catalysts of different compositions after 200 h of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have been investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, 77 K and 5 K. The final composition of the bulk catalysts depends strongly on the Mn content and the temperature of reduction before the synthesis. Catalytic activity and selectivity are partly correlated to this phase composition. (Auth.)

  10. Nonsmooth Newton method for Fischer function reformulation of contact force problems for interactive rigid body simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz, Morten; Niebe, Sarah Maria; Erleben, Kenny

    2009-01-01

    contact response. In this paper, we present a new approach to contact force determination. We reformulate the contact force problem as a nonlinear root search problem, using a Fischer function. We solve this problem using a generalized Newton method. Our new Fischer - Newton method shows improved...... qualities for specific configurations where the most widespread alternative, the Projected Gauss-Seidel method, fails. Experiments show superior convergence properties of the exact Fischer - Newton method....

  11. Risks and chances of an ecologically oriented energy industry. Revised version of the speech of the Hessian Minister for Environment, Energy and Federal Issues, Joschka Fischer (Die Gruenen), on the occasion of the IZE communication meeting 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuck, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1992 'Discussion Day' of the IZE, held under the motto 'Energy and Environment: Public Relations in the field of tension between economy and ecology', Joschka Fischer, the environment minister of Hessen, delivered an address that met with great attention. It resulted in a lively discussion of his theses with the attendants of the meeting. (orig./UA) [de

  12. Deactivation and Regeneration of Commercial Type Fischer-Tropsch Co-Catalysts—A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Rytter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of commercially relevant cobalt catalysts for Low Temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT synthesis is discussed with a focus on the two main long-term deactivation mechanisms proposed: Carbon deposits covering the catalytic surface and re-oxidation of the cobalt metal. There is a great variety in commercial, demonstration or pilot LTFT operations in terms of reactor systems employed, catalyst formulations and process conditions. Lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to correlate the deactivation mechanism with the actual process and catalyst design. It is well known that long term catalyst deactivation is sensitive to the conditions the actual catalyst experiences in the reactor. Therefore, great care should be taken during start-up, shutdown and upsets to monitor and control process variables such as reactant concentrations, pressure and temperature which greatly affect deactivation mechanism and rate. Nevertheless, evidence so far shows that carbon deposition is the main long-term deactivation mechanism for most LTFT operations. It is intriguing that some reports indicate a low deactivation rate for multi-channel micro-reactors. In situ rejuvenation and regeneration of Co catalysts are economically necessary for extending their life to several years. The review covers information from open sources, but with a particular focus on patent literature.

  13. The role of magnetite in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron catalysts from a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Pilot Plant run at different time-on-stream periods were carried out. Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction which accompanies the FT synthesis reaction over Fe-based catalysts. A correlation between the ratio of the occupancy of octahedral sites to the tetrahedral sites in magnetite to the WGS activity was found. Cation-deficient magnetite gave higher WGS activity as compared to the stoichiometric phase. (orig.)

  14. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-30

    The effects of copper on Fischer-Tropsch activity, selectivity and water-gas shift activity were studied over a wide range of syngas conversion. Three catalyst compositions were prepared for this study: (a) 100Fe/4.6Si/1.4K, (b) 100Fe/4.6Si/0.10Cu/1.4K and (c) 100Fe/4.6Si/2.0Cu/1.4K. The results are reported in Task 2. The literature review for cobalt catalysts is approximately 90% complete. Due to the size of the document, it has been submitted as a separate report labeled Task 6.

  15. Emil Fischer and the "art of chemical experimentation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    What did nineteenth-century chemists know? This essay uses Emil Fischer's classic study of the sugars in 1880s and 90s Germany to argue that chemists' knowledge was not primarily vested in the theories of valence, structure, and stereochemistry that have been the subject of so much historical and philosophical analysis of chemistry in this period. Nor can chemistry be reduced to a merely manipulative exercise requiring little or no intellectual input. Examining what chemists themselves termed the "art of chemical experimentation" reveals chemical practice as inseparable from its cognitive component, and it explains how chemists integrated theory with experiment through reason.

  16. Nothing Great Is Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Stansbie, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    A solo exhibition of 13 pieces of art work.\\ud \\ud Nothing Great is Easy is an exhibition of sculpture, film, drawing and photography that proposes reconstructed narratives using the sport of swimming and in particular the collective interaction and identity of the channel swimmer. The work utilises the processes, rituals/rules, language and the apparatus of sport.\\ud \\ud “Nothing great is easy” are the words on the memorial to Captain Matthew Webb who was the first man to swim the English ch...

  17. First report of the genus Coeliniaspis Fischer (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Alysiinae) from China and Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, M.-L.; Chen, J.-H.; Achterberg, van C.

    2017-01-01

    Coeliniaspis Fischer, 2010 (Braconidae, Alysiinae, Dacnusini) is recorded from China and Russia for the first time. Coeliniaspis insularis (Tobias, 1998) is reported from China (Fujian), redescribed and illustrated. A key to the species of the genus Coeliniaspis Fischer is added. Coeliniaspis

  18. Great Apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Cerveny, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia of great apes is often necessary to conduct diagnostic analysis, provide therapeutics, facilitate surgical procedures, and enable transport and translocation for conservation purposes. Due to the stress of remote delivery injection of anesthetic agents, recent studies have focused on oral delivery and/or transmucosal absorption of preanesthetic and anesthetic agents. Maintenance of the airway and provision of oxygen is an important aspect of anesthesia in great ape species. The provision of analgesia is an important aspect of the anesthesia protocol for any procedure involving painful stimuli. Opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often administered alone, or in combination to provide multi-modal analgesia. There is increasing conservation management of in situ great ape populations, which has resulted in the development of field anesthesia techniques for free-living great apes for the purposes of translocation, reintroduction into the wild, and clinical interventions.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10178 - Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized middle, C10-13-branched alkane fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10178 Distillates (Fischer-Tropsch... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as distillates (Fischer-Tropsch), hydroisomerized...

  20. Great Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    One of Dickens's most renowned and enjoyable novels, Great Expectations tells the story of Pip, an orphan boy who wishes to transcend his humble origins and finds himself unexpectedly given the opportunity to live a life of wealth and respectability. Over the course of the tale, in which Pip

  1. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  2. Lipid synthesis under hydrothermal conditions by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, T M; Ritter, G; Simoneit, B R

    1999-03-01

    Ever since their discovery in the late 1970's, mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal systems have received a great deal of attention as a possible site for the origin of life on Earth (and environments analogous to mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal systems are postulated to have been sites where life could have originated or Mars and elsewhere as well). Because no modern-day terrestrial hydrothermal systems are free from the influence of organic compounds derived from biologic processes, laboratory experiments provide the best opportunity for confirmation of the potential for organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. Here we report on the formation of lipid compounds during Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis from aqueous solutions of formic acid or oxalic acid. Optimum synthesis occurs in stainless steel vessels by heating at 175 degrees C for 2-3 days and produces lipid compounds ranging from C2 to > C35 which consist of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenes, n-alkanes and alkanones. The precursor carbon sources used are either formic acid or oxalic acid, which disproportionate to H2, CO2 and probably CO. Both carbon sources yield the same lipid classes with essentially the same ranges of compounds. The synthesis reactions were confirmed by using 13C labeled precursor acids.

  3. New perspectives in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using cobalt supported on mesoporous molecular sieves; Novas perspectivas na sintese de Fischer-Tropsch usando cobalto suportado em peneiras moleculares mesoporosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, M.J.B.; Silva, A.O.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Fernandes Junior, V.J.; Araujo, A.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2004-07-01

    The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid products via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is an important process in the generation of clean fuels of sulfur and nitrogen compounds. Catalysts based on iron are very used in the conventional process due its cheap manufacture price. Recently the use of cobalt as promoter gave good results. MCM-41 mesoporous materials were discovered by Mobil scientists in the nineties and ever since they have great successes as support and catalyst in several processes of the oil industry as catalytic cracking, reformer and hydrotreating. In this work are presented new alternatives for FTS with the use of cobalt supported on molecular sieves of the type MCM-41. A comparative study with the usual catalysts based on silica was accomplished with different levels of cobalt. (author)

  4. Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  5. Taani tahab meid ELi kutsuda / Mariann Fischer Boel ; interv. Marianne Mikko

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fischer Boel, Mariann

    2002-01-01

    Taani põllumajandusminister Mariann Fischer Boel vastab küsimustele Eesti soovitud piimakvoodi, EL-i tulevaste liikmesriikide otsetoetuste, Taanis maa ostmise, Eesti üliliberaalse majanduse ja sotsiaalse heaolu ühendamise võimaluse kohta

  6. Dvě ontologie české demokracie: T. G. Masaryk a J. L. Fischer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pauza, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2015), s. 233-245 ISSN 0015-1831 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Masaryk * Fischer * democracy * providence * order * structure * function * individuality * sociality * crisis Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  7. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.; Sun, Xiaohui; Dugulan, A. Iulian; van Hoof, Arno J.F.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM

  8. Synthesis gas solubility in Fischer-Tropsch slurry: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K.C.; Lin, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the phase equilibrium behavior of synthesis gases and products in a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor. A semi-flow apparatus has been designed and constructed for this purpose. Measurements have been made for hydrogen, cabon monoxide, methane, ethane, ethylene, and carbon dioxide in a heavy n-paraffin at temperatures from 100 to 300)degree)C and pressures 10 to 50 atm. Three n-paraffin waxes: n-eicosane (n-C/sub 20/), n-octacosane )n-C/sub 28/), and n-hexatriacontane (n-C/sub 36/), were studied to model the industrial wax. Solubility of synthesis gas mixtures of H/sub 2/ and CO in n-C/sub 28/ was also determined at two temperatures (200 and 300)degree)C) for each of three gas compositions (40.01, 50.01, and 66.64 mol%) of hydrogen). Measurements were extended to investigate the gas solubility in two industrial Fischer-Tropsch waxes: Mobilwax and SASOL wax. Observed solubility increases in the order: H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, CO/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, at a given temperature pressure, and in the same solvent. Solubility increases with increasing pressure for all the gases. Lighter gases H/sub 2/ and CO show increased solubility with increasing temperature, while the heavier gases CO/sub 2/, ethane, and ethylene show decreased solubility with increasing temperature. The solubility of methane, the intermediate gas, changes little with temperature, and shows a shallow minimum at about 200)degrees)C or somewhat above. Henry's constant and partial molal volume of the gas solute at infinite dilution are determinedfrom the gas solubility data. A correlation is developed from the experimental data in the form on an equation of state. A computer program has been prepared to implement the correlation. 19 refs., 66 figs., 39 tabs.

  9. Reduction and reoxidation of cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmen, Anne-Mette

    1996-12-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis involves the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce mainly hydrocarbons, water and carbon dioxide, but also alcohols, aldehydes and acids are formed. The distribution of these products is determined by the choice of catalyst and synthesis conditions. This thesis studies the reduction and reoxidation of 17%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 17%Co-1%Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by means of several characterization techniques. The effect of small amounts of Re on the reduction properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Co catalysts has been studied by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). An intimate mixture of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts showed a promoting effect of Re similar to that for co impregnated CoRe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A loose mixture of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} did not show any effect of Re on the reduction of Co. But a promoting effect was observed if the mixture had been pre-treated with Ar saturated with water before the TPR. It is suggested that Re promotes the reduction of Co oxide by hydrogen spillover. It is shown that a high temperature TPK peak at 1200K assigned to Co aluminate is mainly caused by the diffusion of Co ions during the TPR and not during calcination. The Co particle size measured by x-ray diffraction on oxidized catalysts decreased compared to the particle size on the calcined catalysts, while the dispersion measured by volumetric chemisorption decreased somewhat after the oxidation-reduction treatment. The role of water in the deactivation of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CoRe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Fischer-Tropsch catalysts has been extensively studied. There were significant differences in the reducibility of the phases formed for the two catalysts during exposure to H{sub 2}O/He. 113 refs., 76 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. HOLDING THE TORCH UP HIGH - A MEDICAL HISTORICAL EVALUATION OF SURGICAL ADVANCES DURING THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918, IN MEMORY OF THOSE THAT SERVED AND FELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, G

    2017-09-01

    "How wide and varied is the experience of the battlefield and how fertile the blood of warriors in raising good surgeons" Sir Clifford Allbutt (1898). With these sentiments of the medical lessons learned in war and conflict, with the background of the poem of "In Flanders Field", written by a doctor who had South African War connections, reasons (the Somme and third Ypres battles) will be given that this was indeed a "GREAT WAR" as the world history, weapons, strategy, tactics and wounding patterns had changed dramatically. These changes are still affecting all at present, as eventually the Second World War came from it, as well as the Cold "Third World" War. In this war most casualties were caused by bomb fragments and the figures were enormous. It was the war of massive troop movements (railroads), the Schlieffen plan, trench warfare, artillery, the machine guns, end of cavalry and the initiation of tanks, air warfare/reconnaissance and gas/chemical warfare. The surgical experiences of previous wars were obsolete. Urgent rethinking of surgical principles and protocols had to be devised, with the death rates of dying due to wounds, sepsis and tetanus exceeding 60 percent of all casualties. Abdominal wounds were treated conservatively, but soon there came advances in resuscitation, anaesthetics, aggressive wound and exploratory surgery, orthopaedics, plastic and reconstructive surgery, physiology, wound pathology and microbiology. All sides concentrated on ambulance stations, field hospitals and then rapid transfer to bigger referral and base hospitals. It seems that lessons learned where indeed exchanged (? by the Red Cross to all combatant medical personal). Even to the present day, frameworks of this are still used effectively (Vietnam War, Falklands War and our recent border wars). The lessons are well learned and the Torch is ours to hold up high! Copyright© Authors.

  11. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

    2003-09-29

    This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H{sup 2}O, CO{sub 2}, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions.

  12. Nanostructured Thin Films Obtained from Fischer Aminocarbene Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa E. Lazo-Jiménez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of four amphiphilic organometallic complexes with the general formula RC = M(CO5NH(CH215CH3, where R is a ferrocenyl 2(a-b or a phenyl 4(a-b group as a donor moiety and a Fischer carbene of chromium (0 or tungsten (0 as an acceptor group, are reported. These four push-pull systems formed Langmuir (L monolayers at the air-water interface, which were characterized by isotherms of surface pressure versus molecular area and compression/expansion cycles (hysteresis curves; Brewster angle microscopic images were also obtained. By using the Langmuir–Blodgett (LB method, molecular monolayers were transferred onto glass substrates forming Z-type multilayers. LB films were characterized through ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Results indicated that films obtained from 2b complex [(Ferrocenyl(hexadecylaminemethylidene] pentacarbonyl tungsten (0 are the most stable and homogeneous; due to their properties, these materials may be incorporated into organic electronic devices.

  13. {alpha},{beta}-Unsaturated Fischer carbene complexes as chemical multitalents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijere, A. de [Institut fuer Organische Chemie der George-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The well established reaction of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated Fischer carbenechromium complexes 6(R{sup 1} = H) with alkynes normally proceeds with carbonyl insertion to yield 4-alkoxyphenols 9. Led by the incidental formation of a cyclopentadiene 3 from certain {beta}-aminosubstituted complexes 6(X = NR{sub 2}{sup 3}, R{sup 1} = cPr) the authors have studied the influences of the nature of substituents (R{sup 1}, X on 6; R{sub L}, R{sub S} in the alkyne; R{sup 3} in the amino group), solvents, and temperature on the outcome of the reaction. Imino substitution on complexes 6 leads to 2H-pyrroles 1, a free primary amino group (X = NH{sub 2}) to pyridines 5, and bulky substituents R{sup 1} to cyclopenta[b]pyrans 8 with double insertion of an alkyne. Eventually, appropriate conditions have been developed which permit to selectively prepare either 3-alkoxy-5-(dialkylamino)cyclopentadienes 3 (as synthetic equivalents of cyclopentenones 4), 5-(dialkylaminomethylene)cyclopent-2-enones 7, 3-alkoxy-2-(1{prime}-morpholino-1{prime}-alkenyl)cyclopent-2-enones 10, and 2-acyl-3-(dialkylamino)cyclopent-2-enones 11 from easily accessible carbene complexes 6 (X = NR{sub 2}{sup 3}) in high yields. Mechanistic aspects and implications of these novel transformations will be discussed.

  14. The Fischer 344 rat as a model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Josef

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rising number of the aged human population all over the world, presbycusis is a phenomenon that deserves the increasing attention of the medical community as regards to prevention and treatment. This requires finding appropriate animal models for human presbycusis that will be useful in future experiments. Among the available rat strains, the Fischer 344 (F344) strain promises to serve as a model producing prompt and profound presbycusis. Hearing thresholds begin to increase in this strain during the first year of life; toward the end of the second year, the thresholds are very high. The threshold shifts progress independently in both ears. The rapid deterioration of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, with the majority of outer hair cells (OHC) being present and morphologically intact, is apparently produced by the disruption of prestin. The age-related changes within inner ear function are accompanied by deterioration of acoustical signal processing within central auditory system, mainly due to impaired GABA inhibition. The loss of GABA inhibition in old animals is expressed primarily in the inferior colliculus but is also present in the cochlear nuclei and the auditory cortex. Sound-evoked behavioral reactions are also impaired in old F344 rats. Taken together, the described characteristics of the aging F344 rat auditory system supports the idea that this strain may serve as a suitable model for studying the mechanisms of presbycusis, its prevention and treatment. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanostructured Thin Films Obtained from Fischer Aminocarbene Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Jiménez, Rosa E.; Ortega-Alfaro, M. Carmen; López-Cortés, José G.; Alvarez-Toledano, Cecilio; Chávez-Carvayar, José Á.; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; González-Torres, Maykel; Carreón-Castro, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of four amphiphilic organometallic complexes with the general formula RC = M(CO)5NH(CH2)15CH3, where R is a ferrocenyl 2(a-b) or a phenyl 4(a-b) group as a donor moiety and a Fischer carbene of chromium (0) or tungsten (0) as an acceptor group, are reported. These four push-pull systems formed Langmuir (L) monolayers at the air-water interface, which were characterized by isotherms of surface pressure versus molecular area and compression/expansion cycles (hysteresis curves); Brewster angle microscopic images were also obtained. By using the Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) method, molecular monolayers were transferred onto glass substrates forming Z-type multilayers. LB films were characterized through ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Results indicated that films obtained from 2b complex [(Ferrocenyl)(hexadecylamine)methylidene] pentacarbonyl tungsten (0) are the most stable and homogeneous; due to their properties, these materials may be incorporated into organic electronic devices. PMID:28773289

  16. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-01

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4). Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to(epsilon)(prime)-Fe(sub 2.2)C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2) and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4); however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94%(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2), deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4). No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2) and(epsilon)(prime)-Fe(sub 2.2)C

  17. Gas to liquids. Fischer Tropsch: what does the future hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, G.

    2005-01-01

    The process concerning the chemical transformation of natural gas into oil-based products (a so-called 'clean' diesel) known under the term GTL FT (Gas To Liquids - Fischer Tropsch) will turn a new page in its history with the start-up of a major unit in Qatar in 2006 Up until now only two GTL units were deployed, in the early 1990's (Moss as and Shell) without however resulting in the widespread expansion of this process. The technological breakthroughs achieved around the year 2000 combined with a favourable background context (concerning geopolitical tension, ears of oil production peaks, significant increases in the price of crude) now account for much of the interest shown in this solution. Consequently, outside Qatar, projects are also being looked at in various natural gas producing countries such as Nigeria or Algeria. It would be justified however to think that a new wave of natural gas recycling will gradually emerge as part of the global energy market. (author)

  18. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Lech Nowicki; Jiang Wang; Wen-Ping Ma

    2003-01-01

    This report covers the first year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H 2 O, CO 2 , linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we have completed one STSR test with precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany). This catalyst was initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. The catalyst was tested at 13 different sets of process conditions, and had experienced a moderate deactivation during the first 500 h of testing (decrease in conversion from 56% to 50% at baseline process conditions). The second STSR test has been initiated and after 270 h on stream, the catalyst was tested at 6 different sets of process conditions

  19. Overview of reactors for liquid phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Burtron H.

    2002-01-01

    The following overview is divided roughly into three sections. The first section covers the period from the late 1920s when the first liquid phase synthesis was first conducted until about 1960 when the interest in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) declined because of the renewed view of an abundance of petroleum at a low price. The second period includes the activity that resulted from the oil shortage due to the Arab embargo in 1972 and covers from about 1960 to 1985 when the period of gloomy projections for rapidly increasing prices for crude had faded away. The third section covers the period from when the interest in FTS was no longer driven by the projected supply and/or price of petroleum but by the desire to monetize stranded natural gas and/or terminate flaring the gas associated with petroleum production and other environmental concerns (1985 to date). These sections are followed by a brief overview of the current status of the scientific and engineering understanding of slurry bubble column reactors

  20. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Keogh, R.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low-or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  1. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  2. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragomir B. Bukur

    2004-01-01

    This report covers the second year of this three-year research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H 2 O, CO 2 , linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the second year of the project we completed the STSR test SB-26203 (275-343 h on stream), which was initiated during the first year of the project, and another STSR test (SB-28603 lasting 341 h). Since the inception of the project we completed 3 STSR tests, and evaluated catalyst under 25 different sets of process conditions. A precipitated iron catalyst obtained from Ruhrchemie AG (Oberhausen-Holten, Germany) was used in all tests. This catalyst was used initially in commercial fixed bed reactors at Sasol in South Africa. Also, during the second year we performed a qualitative analysis of experimental data from all three STSR tests. Effects of process conditions (reaction temperature, pressure, feed composition and gas space velocity) on water-gas-shift (WGS) activity and hydrocarbon product distribution have been determined

  3. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYSTHESIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2005-01-01

    This report covers the third year of this research grant under the University Coal Research program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (H 2 O, CO 2 , linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the reporting period we utilized experimental data from the STSR, that were obtained during the first two years of the project, to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations and estimate kinetic parameters. We used a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) with estimated values of binary interaction coefficients for the VLE calculations. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Occasional discrepancies (for some of the experimental data) between calculated and experimental values of the liquid phase composition were ascribed to experimental errors. The VLE calculations show that the vapor and the liquid are in thermodynamic equilibrium under reaction conditions. Also, we have successfully applied the Levenberg-Marquardt method (Marquardt, 1963) to estimate parameters of a kinetic model proposed earlier by Lox and Froment (1993b) for FTS on an iron catalyst. This kinetic model is well suited for initial studies where the main goal is to learn techniques for parameter estimation and statistical analysis of estimated values of model parameters. It predicts that the chain growth parameter (α) and olefin to paraffin ratio are independent of carbon number, whereas our experimental data show that they vary with the carbon number. Predicted molar flow

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukur, Dragomir B.; Lang, X.; Chokkaram, S.; Nowicki, L.; Wei, G.; Ding, Y.; Reddy, B.; Xiao, S.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the US will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Some of the F-T catalysts synthesized and tested at Texas A and M University under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89868 were more active than any other known catalysts developed for maximizing production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons (waxes). The objectives of the present contract were to demonstrate repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of preparation procedures of two of these catalysts on a laboratory scale. Improvements in the catalyst performance were attempted through the use of: (a) higher reaction pressure and gas space velocity to maximize the reactor productivity; (b) modifications in catalyst preparation steps; and (c) different pretreatment procedures. Repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of catalyst synthesis procedure have been successfully demonstrated in stirred tank slurry reactor tests. Reactor space-time-yield was increased up to 48% by increasing reaction pressure from 1.48 MPa to 2.17 MPa, while maintaining the gas contact time and synthesis gas conversion at a constant value. Use of calcination temperatures above 300 C, additional CaO promoter, and/or potassium silicate as the source of potassium promoter, instead of potassium bicarbonate, did not result in improved catalyst performance. By using different catalyst activation procedures they were able to increase substantially the catalyst activity, while maintaining low methane and gaseous hydrocarbon selectivities. Catalyst productivity in runs SA-0946 and SA-2186 was 0.71 and 0.86 gHC/g-Fe/h, respectively, and this represents 45-75% improvement in productivity relative to that achieved in Rheinpreussen's demonstration plant

  5. Strain differences of cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar-Imamichi and Fischer 344 rats: involvement of cadmium accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Takamure, Yasutaka; Shimada, Akinori; Yasutake, Akira; Waalkes, Michael P.; Imamura, Yorishige

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats have a strong resistance to cadmium (Cd)-induced lethality compared to other strains such as Fischer 344 (Fischer) rats. The present study was designed to establish biochemical and histological differences in Cd toxicity in WI and Fischer rats, and to clarify the mechanistic basis of these strain differences. A single Cd (4.5 mg/kg, s.c.) treatment caused a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase activity, indicative of hepatotoxicity, in Fischer rats, but did not in WI rats. This difference in hepatotoxic response to Cd was supported by pathological analysis. After treatment with Cd at doses of 3.0, 3.5 and 4.5 mg/kg, the hepatic and renal accumulation of Cd was significantly lower in the WI rats than in the Fischer rats, indicating a kinetic mechanism for the observed strain differences in Cd toxicity. Thus, the remarkable resistance to Cd-induced hepatotoxicity in WI rats is associated, at least in part, with a lower tissue accumulation of the metal. Hepatic and renal zinc (Zn) contents after administration were similarly lower in WI than in Fischer rats. When Zn was administered in combination with Cd to Fischer rats, it decreased Cd contents in the liver and kidney, and exhibited a significant protective effect against the toxicity of Cd. We propose the possibility that Zn transporter plays an important role in the strain difference of Cd toxicity in WI and Fischer rats

  6. Physiatrie and German maternal feminism: Dr. Anna Fischer-Dückelmann critiques academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Paulette

    2006-01-01

    Alternative medicine and reform strategies made Anna Fischer-Dückelmann a most controversial, notorious, and widely read women doctor before World War I. She published a dozen titles in 13 languages asserting that national well-being depended on maternal prowess. To her critics, Fischer-Dückelmann's commitment to medical self-help and practices of Physiatrie amounted to medical quackery. Her career has been largely unexamined, yet her feminist critiques and social concerns are not far removed from modern social medicine. For this pioneering doctor, treating physical and emotional ills and promoting the health of families were first steps toward healing the divisions of a world at war.

  7. Comprehensive characterisation of products from cobalt catalysed Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, M.C.; Bertoncini, F.; Hugues, F.; Forestiere, A. [IFP, Vernaison (France)

    2006-07-01

    Fischer-Tropsch reaction synthesis has been studied in presence of supported cobalt catalysts. The experimental work has been performed by using a slurry pilot plant. All the gaseous and liquid products, including by-products recovered in the water phase produced, have been analysed in order to determine the whole products distribution and the catalyst selectivity. Apart from paraffin which are the main products obtained via cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, olefins and oxygenates by-products present also their own distribution. These detailed data are available thanks to new dedicated analytical methods developed in IFP laboratories. (orig.)

  8. The role of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in solar nebula chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kress, ME; Tielens, AGGM

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, the iron/nickel catalyzed conversion of CO and H(2) to hydrocarbons, would have been the only thermally-driven pathway available in the solar nebula to convert CO into other forms of carbon. A major issue in meteoritics is to determine the origin of meteoritic organics:

  9. Heterosexual Persons' Perceptions Regarding Language Use in Counseling: Extending Dorland and Fischer (2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amanda D.; Waehler, Charles A.; Gray, Torie N.

    2013-01-01

    An important original study by Dorland and Fischer noted how the use of inclusive language can affect the therapeutic relationship positively for gay, lesbian, and bisexual clients. In this extension of that study with heterosexual participants ("N" = 179), there seemed to be low, but positive, salience of the language used by the…

  10. Fischer aminocarbene complexes of chromium and iron: Anomalous electrochemical reduction of p-carbonyl substituted derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoskovcová, I.; Zvěřinová, R.; Roháčová, J.; Dvořák, D.; Tobrman, T.; Záliš, Stanislav; Ludvík, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 19 (2011), s. 6853-6859 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : DFT calculations * electrochemistry * Fischer aminocarbene complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  11. Age-related changes in cochlear and brainstem auditory functions in Fischer 344 rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popelář, Jiří; Groh, Daniel; Pelánová, Jana; Canlon, B.; Syka, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 3 (2006), s. 490-500 ISSN 0197-4580 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/04/1074; GA MZd NR8113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Fischer 344 rats * Hearing threshold * Otoacoustic emissions Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.599, year: 2006

  12. Cobalt supported on carbon nanofibers as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts synthesis gas (H2/CO) over a heterogeneous catalyst into hydrocarbons. Generally, cobalt catalysts supported on oxidic carriers are used for the FT process, however it appears to be difficult to obtain and maintain fully reduced cobalt particles. To overcome

  13. Structure-performance relationships for supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschemann, T.O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33082712X

    2015-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) involves the heterogeneously catalyzed conversion of synthesis gas into water and hydrocarbons and offers a promising route for the synthesis of ultraclean fuels, chemicals and lubricants. The synthesis gas can be generated from different feedstocks, such as coal

  14. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1998-01-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)

  15. On the Deactivation of Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) process is an attractive way to obtain synthetic liquid fuel from alternative energy sources such as natural gas, coal or biomass. However, the deactivation of the catalyst, consisting of cobalt nanoparticles supported on TiO2, currently hampers the industrial

  16. The Great Recession was not so Great

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession is characterized by a GDP-decline that was unprecedented in the past decades. This paper discusses the implications of the Great Recession analyzing labor market data from 20 OECD countries. Comparing the Great Recession with the 1980s recession it is concluded that there is a

  17. Study of (Fe/HZM-5) catalyst be used in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: preparation and characterization; Estudo do catalisador (Fe/HZSM-5) a ser utilizado na sintese de Fischer-Tropsch: preparacao e caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga, Arthur C. [Universidade Estadual do Maranhao (UEMA0), MA (Brazil); Sousa, Bianca V. de; Lima, Wellington S.; Rodrigues, Meiry G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    In this work it was developed an iron catalyst supported on the ZSM-5 zeolite to be used in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS). The NH{sub 4}{sup +}ZSM-5 zeolitic support was submitted to the wet impregnation, using the 0.1 M of the Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.9H{sub 2}O solution to obtain the Fe/NH{sub 4}{sup +}ZSM-5 sample in the content of iron 5% wt. After, the material was submitted for the drying process and in the following, for the calcination one, obtaining the Fe/HZSM-5 form. The EDS characterization analyses showed that in the Fe/HZSM-5 sample the iron is in the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} form and that the impregnation and calcination processes did not cause significant exchanges in the zeolitic support framework. The results of the N{sub 2} physical adsorption of the 5% Fe/HZSM-5 showed the presence of the micropores and mesopores. From these results, the obtained material (5% Fe/HZSM-5) presents a great potential to be used like a catalyst in the FTS. (author)

  18. Kinetics of Slurry Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski; Lech Nowicki; Madhav Nayapati

    2006-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. Three STSR tests of the Ruhrchemie LP 33/81 catalyst were conducted to collect data on catalyst activity and selectivity under 25 different sets of process conditions. The observed decrease in 1-olefin content and increase in 2-olefin and n-paraffin contents with the increase in conversion are consistent with a concept that 1-olefins participate in secondary reactions (e.g. 1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization and readsorption), whereas 2-olefins and n-paraffins are formed in these reactions. Carbon number product distribution showed an increase in chain growth probability with increase in chain length. Vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations were made to check validity of the assumption that the gas and liquid phases are in equilibrium during FTS in the STSR. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values for the liquid-phase composition (for some of the experimental data) are ascribed to experimental errors in the amount of wax collected from the reactor, and the relative amounts of hydrocarbon wax and Durasyn 164 oil (start-up fluid) in the liquid samples. Kinetic parameters of four kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003; Van der Laan and Beenackers, 1998, 1999; and an extended kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers) were estimated from experimental data in the STSR tests. Two of these kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003) can predict a complete product distribution (inorganic species and hydrocarbons), whereas the kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) can

  19. Kinetics of Slurry Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski; Lech Nowicki; Madhav Nayapati

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. Three STSR tests of the Ruhrchemie LP 33/81 catalyst were conducted to collect data on catalyst activity and selectivity under 25 different sets of process conditions. The observed decrease in 1-olefin content and increase in 2-olefin and n-paraffin contents with the increase in conversion are consistent with a concept that 1-olefins participate in secondary reactions (e.g. 1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization and readsorption), whereas 2-olefins and n-paraffins are formed in these reactions. Carbon number product distribution showed an increase in chain growth probability with increase in chain length. Vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations were made to check validity of the assumption that the gas and liquid phases are in equilibrium during FTS in the STSR. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values for the liquid-phase composition (for some of the experimental data) are ascribed to experimental errors in the amount of wax collected from the reactor, and the relative amounts of hydrocarbon wax and Durasyn 164 oil (start-up fluid) in the liquid samples. Kinetic parameters of four kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003; Van der Laan and Beenackers, 1998, 1999; and an extended kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers) were estimated from experimental data in the STSR tests. Two of these kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003) can predict a complete product distribution (inorganic species and hydrocarbons), whereas the kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) can

  20. Decline of prefrontal cortical-mediated executive functions but attenuated delay discounting in aged Fischer 344 × brown Norway hybrid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caesar M; Vetere, Lauren M; Orsini, Caitlin A; McQuail, Joseph A; Maurer, Andrew P; Burke, Sara N; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that prefrontal cortex (PFC) function declines with age, aged individuals generally show an enhanced ability to delay gratification, as evident by less discounting of delayed rewards in intertemporal choice tasks. The present study was designed to evaluate relationships between 2 aspects of PFC-dependent cognition (working memory and cognitive flexibility) and intertemporal choice in young (6 months) and aged (24 months) Fischer 344 × brown Norway F1 hybrid rats. Rats were also evaluated for motivation to earn rewards using a progressive ratio task. As previously reported, aged rats showed attenuated discounting of delayed rewards, impaired working memory, and impaired cognitive flexibility compared with young. Among aged rats, greater choice of delayed reward was associated with preserved working memory, impaired cognitive flexibility, and less motivation to work for food. These relationships suggest that age-related changes in PFC and incentive motivation contribute to variance in intertemporal choice within the aged population. Cognitive impairments mediated by PFC are unlikely, however, to fully account for the enhanced ability to delay gratification that accompanies aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Male reproductive effects of octylphenol and estradiol in Fischer and Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossaini, Alireza; Dalgaard, Majken; Vinggaard, Anne

    2003-01-01

    to vehicle or 400 mg/kg bw of 4-tert-octylphenol administrated orally by gavage. Estradiol benzoate, at a dose of 40 mug/kg bw, was used as positive control agent. Treatment with estradiol benzoate decreased serum levels of testosterone, LH, FSH, inhibin and increased prolactin. Additionally, estradiol...... benzoate decreased the weight of all investigated reproductive organs, decreased sperm production and increased seminiferous tubular degeneration in both strains. More progressive effects on testis weight and histopathology were observed in the Fischer rats. Oral administration of octylphenol at 400 mg....../kg bw to both rat strains increased prolactin levels but had no effect on LH, FSH, testosterone or inhibin. In the octylphenol-treated Fischer rats the weights of the seminal vesicles and the levator ani/bulbocavernosus muscle were significantly decreased, whereas only the levator ani...

  2. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  3. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

  4. Nitrogen isotope fractionations in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and in the Miller-Urey reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Chan Kung; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M.H.; Clayton, R.N.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen isotope fractionations have been measured in Fischer-Tropsch and Miller-Urey reactions in order to determine whether these processes can account for the large 15 N/ 14 N ratios found in organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites. Polymeric material formed in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction was enriched in 15 N by only 3 promille relative to the starting material (NH 3 ). The 15 N enrichment in polymers from the Miller-Urey reaction was 10-12 promille. Both of these fractionations are small compared to the 80-90 promille differences observed between enstatite chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites. These large differences are apparently due to temporal or spatial variations in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in the solar nebula, rather than to fractionation during the production of organic compounds. (orig.)

  5. Una villa en Villa de Leyva, obra del arquitecto Guillermo Fischer Villa de Leyva, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Aschner Rosselli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde las impresiones que despierta una casa de recreo diseñada por Guillermo Fischer en Villa de Leyva se pretende una aproximación al significado y a la historia de la villa, entendida como tipología edilicia que responde a un determinado modo de habitar en el campo. En este escrito, se esbozan hipótesis con respecto a la relación estética y moral de la casa con preexistencias edilicias y con tradiciones sociales arraigadas y se describen los acercamientos y distanciamientos de la villa en relación con su contexto espacial y temporal. En la villa de Villa de Leyva atendemos a un despertar de la tipología, gracias a la atenta lectura de la historia y a la sensibilidad proyectual de su arquitecto Guillermo Fischer.

  6. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  7. Sprague-Dawley and Fischer Female Rats Differ in Acute Effects of Fluoxetine on Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, C.S.J.; Hiegel, C.; Uphouse, L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine, leads to sexual dysfunction in a substantial proportion of women. In studies with the Fischer inbred rat, the 5-HT1A receptor has been implicated in this sexual dysfunction. Whether this association with 5-HT1A receptors holds for other rat strains is not known. Aim The effects of acute fluoxetine on sexual behavior in two strains of rats that differ in their response to a 5-HT1A receptor agonist were examined. Whether the strain difference is comparable in naturally cycling and hormonally primed, ovariectomized rats was determined. Main Outcome Measures Lordosis to mount ratios, lordosis quality, and proceptive behaviors were quantified. Sprague-Dawley and Fischer females were compared on each of these measures. The IC50 for inhibition of lordosis behavior was determined. Methods Proestrous rats and ovariectomized rats, hormonally primed with estradiol benzoate and progesterone, were treated with varying doses of fluoxetine. Sexual behavior was examined before and after treatment with the SSRI. Results In both the intact and the hormonally-primed, ovariectomized model, Sprague-Dawley females were less sensitive to the effects of fluoxetine on sexual behavior. In both groups, fluoxetine showed dose-dependency in behavioral inhibition, but a higher dose was required for Sprague-Dawley than for Fischer females. Naturally cycling, proestrous rats required a higher dose of fluoxetine than hormonally-primed ovariectomized rats to produce significant inhibition of sexual behavior. Thus, the strain difference in the response to fluoxetine does not parallel strain differences in the response to a 5-HT1A receptor agonist. Conclusions Acute treatment with fluoxetine inhibits lordosis behavior in both Fischer and Sprague-Dawley females and the strain difference cannot be explained by reported strain differences in the response to a 5-HT1A receptor agonist. Fluoxetine’s inhibition of female rat

  8. Simple Modification of Karl-Fischer Titration Method for Determination of Water Content in Colored Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Tavčar; Erika Turk; Samo Kreft

    2012-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for water content determination is Karl-Fischer titration with electrometric detection, requiring specialized equipment. When appropriate equipment is not available, the method can be performed through visual detection of a titration endpoint, which does not enable an analysis of colored samples. Here, we developed a method with spectrophotometric detection of a titration endpoint, appropriate for moisture determination of colored samples. The reaction takes p...

  9. Effect of structural promoters on Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of biomass derived syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratibha Sharma; Thomas Elder; Leslie H. Groom; James J. Spivey

    2014-01-01

    Biomass gasification and subsequent conversion of this syngas to liquid hydrocarbons using Fischer–Tropsch (F–T) synthesis is a promising source of hydrocarbon fuels. However, biomass-derived syngas is different from syngas obtained from other sources such as steam reforming of methane. Specifically the H2/CO ratio is less than 1/1 and the CO

  10. Moessbauer investigations of the Fe-Cu-Mn catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanu, V.; Filoti, G.; Ilie, I.; Zamfirescu, E.

    1990-01-01

    In the selective process of the syngas conversion to synthetic gasoline a bifunctional catalytic system has to be used. It was obtained by combination a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with the HZSM-5 zeolite. The phase compositions of the precursor and the fresh catalyst were established as well as the optimum thermal treatment. The catalyst was reduced in pure H 2 or in a H 2 +CO mixture. The influence of the reduction and reaction conditions on the catalyst structure was investigated. (orig.)

  11. Influence of Reduction Promoters on Stability of Cobalt/g-Alumina Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Burtron H. Davis

    2014-01-01

    This focused review article underscores how metal reduction promoters can impact deactivation phenomena associated with cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts. Promoters can exacerbate sintering if the additional cobalt metal clusters, formed as a result of the promoting effect, are in close proximity at the nanoscale to other cobalt particles on the surface. Recent efforts have shown that when promoters are used to facilitate the reduction of small crystallites with the aim of increasing...

  12. Particle Size and Crystal Phase Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Xun Liu; Peng Wang; Wayne Xu; Emiel J.M. Hensen

    2017-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is an increasingly important approach for producing liquid fuels and chemicals via syngas—that is, synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen—generated from coal, natural gas, or biomass. In FTS, dispersed transition metal nanoparticles are used to catalyze the reactions underlying the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. Catalytic activity and selectivity are strongly correlated with the electronic and geometric structure of the nanoparticles, which...

  13. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Multicomponent Catalysts: What Can We Learn from Computer Simulations?

    OpenAIRE

    Fajin, Jose L. C.; Cordeiro, M. Natalia D. S.; Gomes, Jose R. B.

    2015-01-01

    In this concise review paper, we will address recent studies based on the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) of the density functional theory (DFT) and on the periodic slab approach devoted to the understanding of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process on transition metal catalysts. As it will be seen, this computational combination arises as a very adequate strategy for the study of the reaction mechanisms on transition metal surfaces under well-controlled conditions and allows separati...

  14. Fischer-Tropsch diesel production over calcium-promoted Co/alumina catalyst: Effect of reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.R. de la Osa; A. De Lucas; A. Romero; J.L. Valverde; P. Sanchez [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain). Chemical Engineering Department

    2011-05-15

    The effects of reaction conditions on the Fischer-Tropsch activity and product distribution of an alkali-earth metal promoted cobalt based catalyst were studied. The influence of the promoter on the reducibility and cobalt particle size was studied by different techniques, including N{sub 2} adsorption, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction, temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titrations. Experiments were carried out on a bench-scale fixed bed reactor and catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. It was observed that addition of a small amount of calcium oxide as a promoter (0.6 wt.%) improved the cobalt oxide reducibility and reduced the formation of cobalt-aluminate species. A positive correlation between basicity and particle size was observed. In terms of FTS results, CO conversion and C{sub 5}{sup +} selectivity were found to be enhanced by the addition of this promoter. It was important to note that the addition of calcium shifted the distribution to mainly C{sub 16}-C{sub 18} hydrocarbons fraction, which could be greatly considered for a diesel formulation. Furthermore, the variation of the reaction conditions seemed to influence product distribution in a lesser extent than unpromoted catalyst. Also, a displacement of hydrocarbon distribution to higher molecular weight with decreasing space velocity and temperature was observed. Moreover, the addition of calcium to the cobalt based catalyst was found to greatly maintain selectivity to C{sub 5}{sup +} for a wide range of H{sub 2}/CO molar ratios. 60 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Synthesis in situ of gold nanoparticles by a dialkynyl Fischer carbene complex anchored to glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, María Candelaria; Granados, Alejandro Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fischer carbene 1-W reacts via cycloaddition without Cu(I) with azide terminal surface. • This reaction on the surface is regioselective to internal triple bond of 1-W. • 1-W bound to glass surface produce AuNps in situ fixed to the surface. • This ability is independent of how 1-W is bonded to the surface. • This hybrid surface can be valuable as SERS substrate or in heterogeneous catalysis. - Abstract: In this work we present a detailed study of classic reactions such as “click reaction” and nucleophilic substitution reaction but on glass solid surface (slides). We used different reactive center of a dialkynylalcoxy Fischer carbene complex of tungsten(0) to be anchored to modified glass surface with amine, to obtain aminocarbene, and azide terminal groups. These cycloaddition reaction showed regioselectivity to internal triple bond of dialkynyl Fischer carbene complex without Cu(I) as catalyst. Anyway the carbene anchored was able to act as a reducing agent to produce in situ very stable gold nanoparticles fixed on surface. We showed the characterization of modified glasses by contact angle measurements and XPS. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, XPS, EDS and UV–vis. The modified glasses showed an important enhancement Raman-SERS. This simple, fast and robust method to create a polifunctional and hybrid surfaces can be valuable in a wide range of applications such as Raman-SERS substrates and other optical fields.

  16. Synthesis in situ of gold nanoparticles by a dialkynyl Fischer carbene complex anchored to glass surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolino, María Candelaria, E-mail: cbertolino@fcq.unc.edu.ar; Granados, Alejandro Manuel, E-mail: ale@fcq.unc.edu.ar

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Fischer carbene 1-W reacts via cycloaddition without Cu(I) with azide terminal surface. • This reaction on the surface is regioselective to internal triple bond of 1-W. • 1-W bound to glass surface produce AuNps in situ fixed to the surface. • This ability is independent of how 1-W is bonded to the surface. • This hybrid surface can be valuable as SERS substrate or in heterogeneous catalysis. - Abstract: In this work we present a detailed study of classic reactions such as “click reaction” and nucleophilic substitution reaction but on glass solid surface (slides). We used different reactive center of a dialkynylalcoxy Fischer carbene complex of tungsten(0) to be anchored to modified glass surface with amine, to obtain aminocarbene, and azide terminal groups. These cycloaddition reaction showed regioselectivity to internal triple bond of dialkynyl Fischer carbene complex without Cu(I) as catalyst. Anyway the carbene anchored was able to act as a reducing agent to produce in situ very stable gold nanoparticles fixed on surface. We showed the characterization of modified glasses by contact angle measurements and XPS. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, XPS, EDS and UV–vis. The modified glasses showed an important enhancement Raman-SERS. This simple, fast and robust method to create a polifunctional and hybrid surfaces can be valuable in a wide range of applications such as Raman-SERS substrates and other optical fields.

  17. Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Klingshirn, Christopher D.; Striebich, Richard; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

  18. Coupling of glycerol processing with Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for production of liquid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonetti, D.A.; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Kunkes, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid alkanes can be produced directly from glycerol by an integrated process involving catalytic conversion to H-2/CO gas mixtures (synthesis gas) combined with Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Synthesis gas can be produced at high rates and selectivities suitable for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (H-2/CO...... between 1.0 and 1.6) from concentrated glycerol feed solutions at low temperatures (548 K) and high pressures (1-17 bar) over a 10 wt% Pt-Re/C catalyst with an atomic Pt : Re ratio of 1 : 1. The primary oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates formed during conversion of glycerol to synthesis gas are ethanol...... in the liquid organic effluent stream and increasing the selectivity to C5+ alkanes by a factor of 2 ( from 0.30 to 0.60). Catalytic conversion of glycerol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were coupled in a two-bed reactor system consisting of a Pt-Re/C catalyst bed followed by a Ru/TiO2 catalyst bed...

  19. The Application of Moessbauer Emission Spectroscopy to Industrial Cobalt Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, J. van de; Berge, P. J. van; Craje, M. W. J.; Kraan, A. M. van der

    2002-01-01

    The application of Moessbauer emission spectroscopy to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for the gas-to-liquids process was investigated. It was shown that Moessbauer emission spectroscopy could be used to study the oxidation of cobalt as a deactivation mechanism of high loading cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Oxidation was observed under conditions that are in contradiction with the bulk cobalt phase thermodynamics. This can be explained by oxidation of small cobalt crystallites or by surface oxidation. The formation of re-reducible Co 3+ species was observed as well as the formation of irreducible Co 3+ and Co 2+ species that interact strongly with the alumina support. The formation of the different cobalt species depends on the oxidation conditions. Iron was used as a probe nuclide to investigate the cobalt catalyst preparation procedure. A high-pressure Moessbauer emission spectroscopy cell was designed and constructed, which creates the opportunity to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under realistic synthesis conditions.

  20. Fischer's Plants in folk beliefs and customs: a previously unknown contribution to the ethnobotany of the Polish-Lithuanian-Belarusian borderland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Monika; Klepacki, Piotr; Łuczaj, Łukasz

    2017-03-23

    Historical ethnobotanical studies are useful starting points for further diachronic analysis. The aim of this contribution is to present archival data from the Polish-Lithuanian-Belarusian borderland, which were collected by Adam Fischer, a Polish ethnographer from Lviv, in the 1930s. These data were originally gathered for publication in the first part of the Lexicon of Slavic beliefs and customs, dedicated to plant uses in traditional Slavonic culture. It was intended to be a joint international enterprise, but was never actually fulfilled. In this article we used information from historical Lithuania (the Great Duchy of Lithuania), nowadays a border region between Poland, Lithuania and Belarus. We applied cultural importance indices such as Use Value, Relative Importance value and Sørensen similarity coefficient, in order to compare our data with a western Ukraine data set from the same research framework. In total, 153 plant taxa were registered as used in peasant culture in the Polish-Lithuanian-Belarusian borderland in the 1930s. The species which achieved the highest Use Values were: Calendula officinalis, Cyanus segetum, Helichrysum arenarium, Betula sp., Prunella vulgaris, and Nuphar lutea or Lilium sp. The most salient use categories were medicinal, followed by food and home garden plants. The overall similarity to plants recorded in western Ukraine within the same project of Fischer's is quite low (46%), which may be explained by the partly different flora found in the regions, and a cultural discontinuity, revealed by the difference in species with the highest UV. Moreover, the field collaborators were different in the two regions and may have paid attention to different cultural spheres of use. The presented ethnobotanical data are a valuable contribution to the ethnobotany of Eastern Europe as a whole. In particular, the presented list of plants may be a rich source for future studies on the ethnobotany of the Polish diaspora in Lithuania, and

  1. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.

    2018-04-19

    Iron carbides are unmistakably associated with the active phase for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The formation of these carbides is highly dependent on the catalyst formulation, the activation method and the operational conditions. Because of this highly dynamic behavior, studies on active phase performance often lack the direct correlation between catalyst performance and iron carbide phase. For the above reasons, an extensive in situ Mössbauer spectroscopy study on highly dispersed Fe on carbon catalysts (Fe@C) produced through pyrolysis of a Metal Organic Framework was coupled to their FTS performance testing. The preparation of Fe@C catalysts via this MOF mediated synthesis allows control over the active phase formation and therefore provides an ideal model system to study the performance of different iron carbides. Reduction of fresh Fe@C followed by low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) conditions resulted in the formation of the ε′-Fe2.2C, whereas carburization of the fresh catalysts under high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization confirmed that the iron nanoparticle dispersion was preserved. The weight normalized activities (FTY) of χ-Fe5C2 and ε′-Fe2.2C are virtually identical, whilst it is found that ε′-Fe2.2C is a better hydrogenation catalyst than χ-Fe5C2. The absence of differences under subsequent HTFT experiments, where χ-Fe5C2 is the dominating phase, is a strong indication that the iron carbide phase is responsible for the differences in selectivity.

  2. Deposition and retention of 67Ga-labelled diesel particles in Fischer-344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Lopez, J.A.; Wolf, I.; Cheng, Y.S.; McClellan, R.O.

    1981-01-01

    Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose-only to 67 Ga radiolabeled diesel exhaust particles produced from a 1 cylinder engine and diluted 10:1 with filtered air. Volume median diameters of the particles were 0.14 to 0.16 μm measured using an electrical aerosol analyzer, a diffusion battery and a cascade impactor. Initial lung deposition was 7 +- 2% and 12 +- 2% in two separate experiments. Gallium-67 left the lung rapidly with a clearance half-time of about 10 days, indicating that the 67 Ga label dissociated from diesel particles

  3. Reversible alkyne insertion in the benzannulation reaction of Fischer carbene complexes with alkynes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.L.; Bos, M.E.; Wulff, W.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The benzannulation reaction of Fischer carbene complexes with alkynes to give phenols is highly regioselective with terminal alkynes, and reasonably regioselective with internal alkynes. This has been attributed to steric factors in intermediates, where one form is favored due to close contact between the R substituent and a cis-CO ligand. Whether alkyne insertion is kinetically or thermodynamically controlled has not been determined. The authors now have evidence from regioselectivity studies that alkyne insertion into the metal-carbon bond is reversible. Implications of these results and further mechanistic considerations will be presented.

  4. Synthetic production of fuels by the Fischer Tropsch reaction using iron catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cepeda, Rodrigo; Pacheco Ochoa, Luis

    2004-01-01

    A series of iron catalysts were prepared on three different types of supports: alumina and two activated carbons from eucalyptus woods and tagua seeds. Potassium was used as promoter and palladium was deposited by the excess wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by N 2 adsorption at 77 K, XRD and TPR analysis and evaluated as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The carbon supported catalysts favour the production of liquid hydrocarbons and decrease the aqueous phase. Those supported with alumina form gases and aqueous phase as the main products. The α p parameters of the Schulz-Flory distribution show hydrocarbons between gasoline and diesel

  5. Determination of water in nuclear materials by means of the Karl Fischer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.; Rocha, S.M.R.; Atalla, L.T.; Abrao, A.

    1987-06-01

    Karl Fischer Method was adapted for water determination in uranium coumpounds and substances of nuclear interest, by using a comercial equipment. The experimental conditions for the analysis of U 3 O 8 , UO 3 , UO 2 , UF 4 KFnHF and (NH 4 ) 4 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 were established. The influence of the agitation and contact time between sample and solvent, of the sample weight, of the reaction end point determination and of the sample granulometry on the precision and accuracy of results was also studied. (Author) [pt

  6. Macromolecules and Enzymes: The Geneva Heritage from Kurt H. Meyer and Edmond H. Fischer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmond H; Piguet, Alfred

    2009-12-01

    On the 26th May 2009, Edmond Fischer, winner with Ed Krebs of the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1992, and his colleague at the time of his research activities at the Ecole de chimie of the University of Geneva, Alfred Piguet, met with Andreas Hauser, Claude Piguet and Howard Riezman of the Section de chimie et biochimie of the University of Geneva to talk about how they became scientists under the impetus of Kurt H. Meyer and what became of them thereafter.

  7. Fischer Indole Synthesis in the Gas Phase, the Solution Phase, and at the Electrospray Droplet Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M; Ayrton, Stephen T; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-07-01

    Previous reports have shown that reactions occurring in the microdroplets formed during electrospray ionization can, under the right conditions, exhibit significantly greater rates than the corresponding bulk solution-phase reactions. The observed acceleration under electrospray ionization could result from a solution-phase, a gas-phase, or an interfacial reaction. This study shows that a gas-phase ion/molecule (or ion/ion) reaction is not responsible for the observed rate enhancement in the particular case of the Fischer indole synthesis. The results show that the accelerated reaction proceeds in the microdroplets, and evidence is provided that an interfacial process is involved. Graphical Abstract GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT TEXT HERE] -->.

  8. Effect of pre-heat treatment on a Fischer-Tropsch iron catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Ganguly, B.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Davis, B.; O'Brien, R.J.; Xu Liguang; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of heating the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/24 SiO 2 in two different atmospheres while ramping the temperature of the catalyst from room temperature to 280 C in 5.5 h prior to pretreatment of the catalyst. Preheating in H 2 /CO = 0.7 gave rise to an iron (Fe 2+ ) silicate, while preheating in helium resulted in the formation of ε'-carbide Fe 2.2 C. Iron oxides and χ-carbide Fe 5 C 2 were also formed in both preheat treatments. (orig.)

  9. Activity and selectivity control through periodic composition forcing over Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveston, P L; Hudgins, R R; Adesina, A A; Ross, G S; Feimer, J L

    1986-01-01

    Data collected under steady-state and periodic composition forcing of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over three commonly used catalysts demonstrate that both activity and selectivity can be changed by the latter operating mode. Synthesis of hydrocarbons up to C/sub 7/are favored at the expense of the higher carbon numbers for the Co catalyst, while for the Ru catalyst, only the C/sub 3/ and lower species are favored. Only methane production is stimulated with the Fe catalyst. Fe and Ru catalysts shift production from alkenes to alkanes. Transient data is interpreted in the paper.

  10. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was taken to be the ultimate formula of FT gasoline. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline...... vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...

  11. Determination of the water content in tetra-ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by the Karl Fischer reagent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisti, C.; Grigoletto, T.

    1990-08-01

    Two methods are compared for the determination of water content in tetra-ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by the Karl Fischer reagent method. In the first method it is Known that the carbonate reacts stoichiometrically with the iodine content of the Karl Fischer reagent in the same way it reacts with the water (mole of apparent H 2 O per mole of carbonate is produced). In this case, the carbonate content in the sample is determined and a suitable correction is applied to take into account the apparent water results. In the second method it is performed an extraction of the moisture by adding methanol to the sample in an independent flask. After the decantation, an aliquot of the clear supernatant methanol is taken for the determination of water content by the Karl Fischer reagent method. (author) [pt

  12. Memory architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A memory architecture is presented. The memory architecture comprises a first memory and a second memory. The first memory has at least a bank with a first width addressable by a single address. The second memory has a plurality of banks of a second width, said banks being addressable by components

  13. The Great Hedge of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moxham, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The 'Great Hedge of India', a 3 700 kilometre-long hedge installed by the British customs to safeguard the colonial salt tax system and avoid salt smuggling totally faded from both memory and records (e.g. maps) in less than a century. Roy Moxham found traces of the hedge in a book footnote and searched it for several years until he found its meagre remains. The speaker wrote a book about this quest. He said that this story reveals how things disappear when they are no longer useful and, especially, when they are linked to parts of history that are not deemed particularly positive (the hedge was a means of colonial power)

  14. Co-Zn-Al based hydrotalcites as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, C.L.; Pirola, C.; Boffito, D.C.; Di Fronzo, A. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica ed Elettrochimica; Di Michele, A. [Univ. degli Studi di Perugia (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Vivani, R.; Nocchetti, M.; Bastianini, M.; Gatto, S. [Univ. degli Studi di Perugia (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica

    2011-07-01

    Co-Zn-Al based hydrotalcites have been investigated as catalysts for the well-known Fischer- Tropsch synthesis. A series of ternary hydrotalcites in nitrate form was prepared with the urea method in order to obtain active catalysts for the above mentioned process. The thermal activation at 350 C gives raise to finely dispersed metallic Co on the mixed oxides, so resulting in retaining the metal distribution of the parent compounds. An optimization study concerning the amount of cobalt of the prepared catalysts (range 15-70% mol, metal based) and the reaction temperature (220-260 C) is reported. All the samples have been fully characterized (BET, ICP-OES, XRPD, TG-DTA, FT-IR, SEM and TEM) and tested in a laboratory pilot plant. Tests to evaluate the stability of these materials were carried out in stressed conditions concerning both the activation and the operating temperatures and pressures (up to 350 C and 2.0 MPa). The obtained results suggest the possibility of using synthetic hydrotalcites as suitable Co-based catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. (orig.)

  15. Abstraction of methyl from neutral Fischer-type carbene complexes: A new site for nucleophilic attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, L.M.; Atwood, J.D. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1997-02-04

    Reactions of Fischer-type carbene complexes, M(CO){sub 5}(C(OMe)pH) (M = Cr, W), with metal carbonyl anions (M`{sup -} = CpFe(CO){sub 2}{sup -@}, Re(CO){sub 5}{sup -}, Mn(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}{sup -}, Co(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup -}, Cp{sup *}Cr(CO){sub 3}{sup -}, CpMo(CO){sub 3}{sup -}) result in demethylation of the carbene complexes. The products are M(CO){sub 5}C(O)Ph{sup -} and M`-Me, characterized by infrared and NMR spectroscopy. A slower rate for reaction with W(CO){sub 5}(C(OEt)Ph) in comparison to the methyl analogue is consistent with nucleophilic attack of the metal carbonyl anion on the methyl of the methoxy group of the carbene. This is a new type of nucleophilic attack of a Fischer-type carbene. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry-phase reactors using Co/SBA-15 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J.J.; Lima, L.A.; Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica], e-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br; Fernandes, F.A.N. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFCE), CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this work is to describe the production of bifunctional catalysts using the incipient humidity method, producing catalysts with 15 wt.% cobalt supported in SBA-15 molecular sieve, to be applied in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The originality of this work is its focus on the use of a 15 wt.% Co/SBA-15 catalyst in FT synthesis in slurry reactors. The deposition of cobalt over SBA-15 support was accomplished by impregnation with a 0.1-M aqueous solution of cobalt nitrate. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was carried out with the catalyst at 240 deg C and 20 atm, under a COH{sub 2} atmosphere (molar ratio= 1), in a slurry reactor for 8 hours. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the calcined cobalt catalyst did not modify the structure of SBA-15, proving that Co was present under the form of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in the catalyst. The addition of cobalt in the SBA-15 decreased the specific superficial area of the molecular sieve. The 15 wt.% Co/SBA-15 catalyst had a 40% CO conversion rate and a high selectivity towards the production of C{sub 5}{sup +} (53.9% after 8 hours). (author)

  17. Kinetics of phototoxicity of Fischer's medium for L5178Y leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, F.M.; Ashland, G.; Capizzi, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The uncontrolled exposure of Fischer's medium to cool white fluorescent (CWF) light or other sources emitting near-ultraviolet or visible light absorbance by riboflavin is a crucial random variable in experiments which utilize L5178Y cells and this medium. The radiation effects of CWF light result in the rapid development of toxic photoproducts in the medium which are cytostatic at lower doses of radiation and cytotoxic at higher doses. After a 24-hr suspension in medium irradiated for 3 or 48 hr, the cloning efficiencies of cells subsequently plated in light-protected medium were 87 and 3%, respectively. The corresponding near-ultraviolet doses for these periods of exposure to CWF light were 0.22 x 10(4) for a 3-hr exposure and 3.47 x 10(4) J/sq m for a 48-hr exposure. Cells incubated in lightly irradiated medium resumed growth at nearly normal rates following a 24- to 48-hr period in which no increase in cell numbers occurred. Exposure of medium containing riboflavin, but not tryptophan or tyrosine, to CWF light also produces toxic medium. Tryptophan enhances riboflavin-induced phototoxicity, whereas tyrosine diminishes this effect. As photosusceptibility of this system is very high, Fischer's medium must be fully protected from all sources of light absorbable by riboflavin

  18. The effect of age on digoxin pharmacokinetics in Fischer-344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.L.; Owens, S.M.; Ruch, S.; Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Digoxin protein binding and pharmacokinetics were studied in 4-, 14-, and 25-month-old male Fischer-344 rats to determine if there were age-dependent changes in digoxin disposition. Serum protein binding did not differ among age groups. The average percentage unbound digoxin for all animals was 61.3 ± 5.3% (means ± SD, n = 15). For pharmacokinetic studies, [ 3 H]digoxin and 1 mg/kg unlabeled digoxin were administered as an intravenous bolus dose to animals from each age group. The [ 3 H]digoxin terminal elimination half-life was 2.0, 2.3, and 2.5 hr, respectively. The steady-state volume of distribution in the three age groups was 1.51, 1.49, and 1.27 liters/kg, respectively. Total body clearance for the three age groups was 14.2, 12.1, and 7.5 ml/min/kg, respectively. Analysis of variance of these data followed by Duncan's multiple range test indicated a significant decrease in clearance in the aged rats (25-month-old, p less than 0.05). This age-dependent decrease in clearance suggested that digoxin pharmacokinetics could be a significant factor in age-related alterations in digoxin cardiotoxicity in the rat, as it is in humans, and that the Fischer-344 rat could be a useful model for studies of digoxin pharmacokinetic changes with age

  19. Cerium Modified Pillared Montmorillonite Supported Cobalt Catalysts for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Ali, Z.; Abbas, S. M.; Hussain, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was accomplished over Al-pillared Montmorillonite supported 20 wt% Co modified with different weight% of cerium catalysts. These catalysts were prepared by impregnation method while structural characterizations of the prepared samples were performed by XRD, TPR, NH/sub 3/TPD, TGA, BET, XRF and SEM techniques. The Fischer Tropsch reaction was studied in fixed bed micro catalytic reactor at temperature range of 220, 260 and 275 degree C and at different pressure (1, 5 and 10 bars). From the activity results, it was found that by pillaring NaMMT with Al higher catalytic activity and lower methane selectivity of NaMMT was achieved. Furthermore, the results of FT synthesis reaction revealed that cerium incorporation increased the dispersion of Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ on the surface and consequently resulted in enhanced catalytic activity. Additionally, the C/sub 5/-C/sub 12/ hydrocarbons and methane selectivity increased while C/sub 22+/ hydrocarbons selectivity was decreased over cerium modified catalysts. Higher reaction temperature (>220 degree C) resulted in significant enhancement in CO conversion and methane selectivity. Though, increase in pressure from 1 to 10 bars eventually resulted in increase in C/sub 5+/ hydrocarbons and decrease in methane and C/sub 2/-C/sub 5/ hydrocarbons selectivity. (author)

  20. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Multicomponent Catalysts: What Can We Learn from Computer Simulations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. C. Fajín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this concise review paper, we will address recent studies based on the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA of the density functional theory (DFT and on the periodic slab approach devoted to the understanding of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process on transition metal catalysts. As it will be seen, this computational combination arises as a very adequate strategy for the study of the reaction mechanisms on transition metal surfaces under well-controlled conditions and allows separating the influence of different parameters, e.g., catalyst surface morphology and coverage, influence of co-adsorbates, among others, in the global catalytic processes. In fact, the computational studies can now compete with research employing modern experimental techniques since very efficient parallel computer codes and powerful computers enable the investigation of more realistic molecular systems in terms of size and composition and to explore the complexity of the potential energy surfaces connecting reactants, to intermediates, to products of reaction. In the case of the Fischer-Tropsch process, the calculations were used to complement experimental work and to clarify the reaction mechanisms on different catalyst models, as well as the influence of additional components and co-adsorbate species in catalyst activity and selectivity.

  1. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  2. The Next Great Generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Discusses ideas from a new book, "Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation," (by Neil Howe and William Strauss) suggesting that youth culture is on the cusp of a radical shift with the generation beginning with this year's college freshmen who are typically team oriented, optimistic, and poised for greatness on a global scale. Includes a…

  3. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Jingxiu; Torres Galvis, Hirsa; Koeken, Ard C J; Kirilin, Alexey; Dugulan, A Iulian; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; de Jong, Krijn P

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2-C4 olefins, which are

  4. Case 3018. Cervus gouazoubira Fischer, 1814 (currently Mazama gouazoubira; Mammalia, Artiodactyla): proposed conservation as the correct original spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this application is to conserve the spelling of the specific name of Cervus gouazoubira Fischer, 1814 for the brown brocket deer of South America (family Cervidae). This spelling, rather than the original gouazoubira, has been in virtually universal usage for almost 50 years.

  5. The formation and influence of carbon on cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts : an integrated review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, D.J.; Loosdrecht, van de J.; Saib, A.M.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Davis, B.H.; Occelli, M.L.; Speight, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts are the systems of choice for use in gas-to-liquid (GTL) processes. As with most catalysts, cobalt systems gradually lose their activity with increasing time on stream. There are various mechanisms that have been proposed for the deactivation of

  6. Reference test methods for total water in lint cotton by Karl Fischer Titration and low temperature distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a study of comparability of total water contents (%) of conditioned cottons by Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) and Low Temperature Distillation (LTD) reference methods, we demonstrated a match of averaged results based on a large number of replications and weighing the test specimens at the same tim...

  7. Reference method for total water in lint cotton by automated oven drying combined with volumetric Karl Fischer titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a preliminary study to measure total water in lint cotton we demonstrated that volumetric Karl Fischer Titration of moisture transported by a carrier gas from an attached small oven is more accurate than standard oven drying in air. The objective of the present study was to assess the measuremen...

  8. Effect of dietary galacto-oligosaccharides on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci and colorectal cancer in Fischer 344 rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, M.V.W.; Schoterman, H.C.; Bruijntjes, J.P.; Hollanders, V.M.H.; Woutersen, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS, Elix'or) on the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colorectal tumours in rats treated with azoxymethane (AOM). Two groups of 102 male Fischer 344 rats were injected twice with AOM to induce

  9. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-alkane, branched and linear. 721.10103 Section 721.10103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., branched and linear. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS No...

  10. Large-scale production of Fischer-Tropsch diesel from biomass. Optimal gasification and gas cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerrigter, H.; Van der Drift, A.

    2004-12-01

    The paper is presented in the form of copies of overhead sheets. The contents concern definitions, an overview of Integrated biomass gasification and Fischer Tropsch (FT) systems (state-of-the-art, gas cleaning and biosyngas production, experimental demonstration and conclusions), some aspects of large-scale systems (motivation, biomass import) and an outlook

  11. Effects of manganese oxide and sulphate on the olefin selectivity of iron catalysts in the Fischer Tropsch reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van W.L.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Kraan, van der A.M.; van der Baan, Hessel

    1982-01-01

    Although it has been claimed by various authors that the addition of manganese oxide, MnO, to an iron catalyst gives a marked increase in the olefin selectivity of iron catalysts, we have been unable to confirm these claims in Fischer Tropsch experiments at 513 K for an iron manganese oxide catalyst

  12. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  13. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  14. MEMORY MODULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  15. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Memory Matters KidsHealth / For Kids / Memory Matters What's in ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  16. Fe/MCM-41 sylilated catalyst: structural changes determination during the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengoa, J. F.; Fellenz, N. A.; Cagnoli, M. V.; Cano, L. A.; Gallegos, N. G.; Alvarez, A. M.; Marchetti, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Two Fe/MCM-41 systems, one of them sylilated, were obtained to be used as catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. They have more than 90% of the iron species located inside the support channels, leading to a narrow crystal size distribution accessible to reactive gases. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption, Moessbauer spectroscopy and Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy. Moessbauer spectroscopy allowed us to demonstrate that the catalytic active species were the same in both catalysts. The only difference between them was the surface hydrophobicity, which decreases the 'water gas shift reaction' in the sylilated catalyst. Besides, this solid is more active for hydrocarbon production, with a lower methane yield.

  17. Simple Modification of Karl-Fischer Titration Method for Determination of Water Content in Colored Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavčar, Eva; Turk, Erika; Kreft, Samo

    2012-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for water content determination is Karl-Fischer titration with electrometric detection, requiring specialized equipment. When appropriate equipment is not available, the method can be performed through visual detection of a titration endpoint, which does not enable an analysis of colored samples. Here, we developed a method with spectrophotometric detection of a titration endpoint, appropriate for moisture determination of colored samples. The reaction takes place in a sealed 4 ml cuvette. Detection is performed at 520 nm. Titration endpoint is determined from the graph of absorbance plotted against titration volume. The method has appropriate reproducibility (RSD = 4.3%), accuracy, and linearity (R 2 = 0.997). PMID:22567558

  18. Simple Modification of Karl-Fischer Titration Method for Determination of Water Content in Colored Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tavčar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used technique for water content determination is Karl-Fischer titration with electrometric detection, requiring specialized equipment. When appropriate equipment is not available, the method can be performed through visual detection of a titration endpoint, which does not enable an analysis of colored samples. Here, we developed a method with spectrophotometric detection of a titration endpoint, appropriate for moisture determination of colored samples. The reaction takes place in a sealed 4 ml cuvette. Detection is performed at 520 nm. Titration endpoint is determined from the graph of absorbance plotted against titration volume. The method has appropriate reproducibility (RSD=4.3%, accuracy, and linearity (2=0.997.

  19. Simple modification of karl-Fischer titration method for determination of water content in colored samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavčar, Eva; Turk, Erika; Kreft, Samo

    2012-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for water content determination is Karl-Fischer titration with electrometric detection, requiring specialized equipment. When appropriate equipment is not available, the method can be performed through visual detection of a titration endpoint, which does not enable an analysis of colored samples. Here, we developed a method with spectrophotometric detection of a titration endpoint, appropriate for moisture determination of colored samples. The reaction takes place in a sealed 4 ml cuvette. Detection is performed at 520 nm. Titration endpoint is determined from the graph of absorbance plotted against titration volume. The method has appropriate reproducibility (RSD = 4.3%), accuracy, and linearity (R(2) = 0.997).

  20. Moessbauer study of CO-precipitated Fischer-Tropsch iron catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Bukur, D.B.; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of precipitated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) iron catalysts, viz. 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/x SiO 2 , where x = 0, 8, 16, 24, 25, 40, or 100, have shown that reduction of the oxide precursor in CO gives rise to χ-carbide Fe 5 C 2 whose amount decreases with an increase of SiO 2 content. The χ-carbide is converted into magnetite Fe 3 O 4 while catalyzing the FT synthesis reaction. A correlation between FT activity and the content of χ-carbide in the catalysts was found, which indicated that χ-carbide is active for FT synthesis reaction. (orig.)

  1. Transient Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Reactor with a Fixed Bed of Catalyst Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analysis of small temperature disturbances in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor with a fixed bed of catalyst particles various scenarios of thermal instability were investigated. There are two possible scenarios of thermal instability of the reactor. First, thermal explosion may occur due to growth of temperature disturbances inside a catalytic granule. Second scenario connected with loss of thermal stability as a result of an initial increase in temperature in the reactor volume. The boundaries of thermal stability of the reactor were estimated by solving the eigenvalue problems for spherical catalyst particles and cylindrical reactor. Processes of diffusional resistance inside the catalytic granule and heat transfer from wall of the reactor tube are taken into account. Estimation of thermal stability area is compared with the results of numerical simulation of behavior of temperature and concentration of synthesis gas.

  2. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  3. Preparation of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts from cobalt/iron hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.H.; Boff, J.J.; Zarochak, M.F. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Compounds with the (hydrotalcites) have properties that make them attractive as precursors for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. A series of single-phase hydrotalcites with cobalt/iron atom ratios ranging from 75/25 to 25/75 has been synthesized. Mixed cobalt/iron oxides have been prepared from these hydrotalcites by controlled thermal decomposition. Thermal decomposition at temperatures below 600 {degrees}C typically produced a single-phase mixed metal oxide with a spinel structure. The BET surface areas of the spinal samples have been found to be as high as about 150 m{sup 2}/g. Appropriate reducing pretreatments have been developed for several of these spinels and their activity, selectivity, and activity and selectivity maintenance have been examined at 13 MPa in a fixed-bed microreactor.

  4. Fischer matrices of Dempwolff group $2^{5}{^{cdot}}GL(5,2$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Basheer Mohammed Basheer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In cite{Demp2} Dempwolff proved the existence of a group of theform $2^{5}{^{cdot}}GL(5,2$ (a non split extension of theelementary abelian group $2^{5}$ by the general linear group$GL(5,2$. This group is the second largest maximal subgroup of thesporadic Thompson simple group $mathrm{Th}.$ In this paper wecalculate the Fischer matrices of Dempwolff group $overline{G} =2^{5}{^{cdot}}GL(5,2.$ The theory of projective characters isinvolved and we have computed the Schur multiplier together with aprojective character table of an inertia factor group. The fullcharacter table of $overline{G}$ is then can be calculated easily.

  5. Alkali promotion effect in Fischer-Tropsch cobalt-alumina catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, O.L.; Tsapkina, M.V.; Davydov, P.E.; Kazantsev, R.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry; Belousova, O.S.; Lapidus, A.L. [Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Promoting Co-alumina Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts with alkali and alkaline-earth metals was studied. XRD, oxygen titration and CO chemisorption were used for the characterization of the catalysts. The best results in terms of catalyst selectivity and long-chain alkanes content in synthesized products were obtained with K-promoted catalyst. Catalytic performance strongly depends on K:Co atomic ratio as well as preparation procedure. Effect of K loading on selectivities is non-linear with extreme point at K:Co=0.01. Significant increase in C{sub 5+} selectivity of K-promoted catalyst may be explained as a result of strong CO adsorption on the catalyst surface, as was confirmed in CO chemisorption experiments. (orig.)

  6. Immobilised carbon nanotubes as carrier for Co-Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, J.; Rose, A.; Kiendl, I.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Curulla-Ferre, D. [Total S.A., Gas and Power, Paris La Defense (France)

    2011-07-01

    A possibility to immobilise carbon nanotubes (CNT) to make them applicable in a technical scale fixed bed reactor is studied. The approach to fabricate millimetre scale composites containing CNT presented in this work is to confine the nano-carbon in macro porous ceramic particles. Thus CNT were grown on the inner surface of silica and alumina pellets and spheres, respectively. Cobalt nano particles were successfully deposited on the carbon surface inside the two types of ceramic carriers and the systems were tested in Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The cobalt mass related activity of these novel catalysts is similar to a conventional system. The selectivities of the Co/CNT/ceramic composites were compared with non supported CNT and carbon nanofibres (CNF). (orig.)

  7. Morphology Changes of Co Catalyst Nanoparticles at the Onset of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høydalsvik, Kristin; Fløystad, Jostein B.; Voronov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles play an important role as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, which is an attractive route for production of synthetic fuels. It is of particular interest to understand the varying conversion rate during the first hours after introducing synthesis gas (H-2 and CO......) to the system. To this end, several in situ characterization studies have previously been done on both idealized model systems and commercially relevant catalyst nanoparticles, using bulk techniques, such as X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Since catalysis takes place at the surface...... of the cobalt particles, it is important to develop methods to gain surface-specific structural information under realistic processing conditions. We addressed this challenge using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), a technique exploiting the penetrating nature of X-rays to provide information about particle...

  8. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The described investigation was carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from...... vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...... found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT...

  9. Particle Size and Crystal Phase Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xun Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS is an increasingly important approach for producing liquid fuels and chemicals via syngas—that is, synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen—generated from coal, natural gas, or biomass. In FTS, dispersed transition metal nanoparticles are used to catalyze the reactions underlying the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. Catalytic activity and selectivity are strongly correlated with the electronic and geometric structure of the nanoparticles, which depend on the particle size, morphology, and crystallographic phase of the nanoparticles. In this article, we review recent works dealing with the aspects of bulk and surface sensitivity of the FTS reaction. Understanding the different catalytic behavior in more detail as a function of these parameters may guide the design of more active, selective, and stable FTS catalysts.

  10. Fischer 344 and Lewis Rat Strains as a Model of Genetic Vulnerability to Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40-60% of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore, the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis on differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neuron functionality. Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigation, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in understanding aberrant

  11. Aversive properties of negative incentive shifts in Fischer 344 and Lewis rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Adam; Johnson, Patrick; Stein, Jeff; Schlund, Michael; Williams, Dean C.

    2018-01-01

    Research on incentive contrast highlights that reward value is not absolute but rather is based upon comparisons we make to rewards we have received and expect to receive. Both human and nonhuman studies on incentive contrast show that shifting from a larger more-valued reward to a smaller less-valued reward is associated with long periods of nonresponding—a negative contrast effect. In this investigation, we used two different genetic rat strains, Fischer 344 and Lewis rats that putatively differ in their sensitivity to aversive stimulation, to assess the aversive properties of large-to-small reward shifts (negative incentive shifts). Additionally, we examined the extent to which increasing cost (fixed-ratio requirements) modulates negative contrast effects. In the presence of a cue that signaled the upcoming reward magnitude, lever pressing was reinforced with one of two different magnitudes of food (large or small). This design created two contrast shifts (small-to-large, large-to-small) and two shifts used as control conditions (small-to-small, large-to-large). Results showed a significant interaction between rat strain and cost requirements only during the negative incentive shift with the emotionally reactive Fischer 344 rats exhibiting significantly longer response latencies with increasing cost, highlighting greater negative contrast. These findings are more consistent with emotionality accounts of negative contrast and results of neurophysiological research that suggests shifting from a large to a small reward is aversive. Findings also highlight how subjective reward value and motivation is a product of gene-environment interactions. PMID:27864048

  12. Oral carcinogenicity study with nickel sulfate hexahydrate in Fischer 344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, Katherine E.; Bates, Hudson K.; Rush, Rusty E.; Oller, Adriana R.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, existing data on the oral carcinogenicity of nickel substances have been inconclusive. Yet, the assessment of oral carcinogenicity of nickel has serious scientific and regulatory implications. In the present study, nickel sulfate hexahydrate was administered daily to Fischer 344 rats by oral gavage for 2 years (104 weeks) at exposure levels of 10, 30 and 50 mg NiSO 4 ·6H 2 O/kg. This treatment produced a statistically significant reduction in body weight of male and female rats, compared to controls, in an exposure-related fashion at 30 and 50 mg/kg/day. An exposure-dependent increase in mortality was observed in female rats. However, the overall study survival rate (males and females) was at least 25 animals per group (compliant with OECD guidelines) in the treated animals. Daily oral administration of nickel sulfate hexahydrate did not produce an exposure-related increase in any common tumor type or an increase in any rare tumors. One tumor type was statistically increased in a nickel sulfate-treated group compared to the study controls (keratoacanthoma in the 10 mg NiSO 4 ·6H 2 O/kg/day males), but there was no exposure-response relationship for this common tumor type. This study achieved sufficient toxicity to reach the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) while maintaining a sufficiently high survival rate to allow evaluation for carcinogenicity. The present study indicated that nickel sulfate hexahydrate does not have the potential to cause carcinogenicity by the oral route of exposure in the Fischer 344 rat. Data from this and other studies demonstrate that inhalation is the only route of exposure that might cause concern for cancer in association with nickel exposures

  13. Fischer 344 and Lewis rat strains as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCadoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today it is well acknowledged that both nature and nurture play important roles in the genesis of psychopathologies, including drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors contribute for at least 40-60 % of the variation in liability to drug dependence. Human genetic studies suggest that multiple genes of small effect, rather than single genes, contribute to the genesis of behavioral psychopathologies. Therefore the use of inbred rat strains might provide a valuable tool to identify differences, linked to genotype, important in liability to addiction and related disorders. In this regard, Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats have been proposed as a model of genetic vulnerability to drug addiction, given their innate differences in sensitivity to the reinforcing and rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, as well their different responsiveness to stressful stimuli. This review will provide evidence in support of this model for the study of the genetic influence on addiction vulnerability, with particular emphasis to differences in mesolimbic dopamine (DA transmission, rewarding and emotional function. It will be highlighted that Lewis and Fischer 344 rats differ not only in several indices of DA transmission and adaptive changes following repeated drug exposure, but also in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis responsiveness, influencing not only the ability of the individual to cope with stressful events, but also interfering with rewarding and motivational processes, given the influence of corticosteroids on dopamine neurons functionality.Further differences between the two strains, as impulsivity or anxiousness, might contribute to their different proneness to addiction, and likely these features might be linked to their different DA neurotransmission plasticity. Although differences in other neurotransmitter systems might deserve further investigations, results from the reviewed studies might open new vistas in

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Channel Geometric Effect for Fischer-Tropsch Microchannel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Jonggeol; Jung, Ikhwan; Kshetrimayum, Krishnadash S.; Park, Seongho; Park, Chansaem; Han, Chonghun

    2014-01-01

    Driven by both environmental and economic reasons, the development of small to medium scale GTL(gas-to-liquid) process for offshore applications and for utilizing other stranded or associated gas has recently been studied increasingly. Microchannel GTL reactors have been preferred over the conventional GTL reactors for such applications, due to its compactness, and additional advantages of small heat and mass transfer distance desired for high heat transfer performance and reactor conversion. In this work, multi-microchannel reactor was simulated by using commercial CFD code, ANSYS FLUENT, to study the geometric effect of the microchannels on the heat transfer phenomena. A heat generation curve was first calculated by modeling a Fischer-Tropsch reaction in a single-microchannel reactor model using Matlab-ASPEN integration platform. The calculated heat generation curve was implemented to the CFD model. Four design variables based on the microchannel geometry namely coolant channel width, coolant channel height, coolant channel to process channel distance, and coolant channel to coolant channel distance, were selected for calculating three dependent variables namely, heat flux, maximum temperature of coolant channel, and maximum temperature of process channel. The simulation results were visualized to understand the effects of the design variables on the dependent variables. Heat flux and maximum temperature of cooling channel and process channel were found to be increasing when coolant channel width and height were decreased. Coolant channel to process channel distance was found to have no effect on the heat transfer phenomena. Finally, total heat flux was found to be increasing and maximum coolant channel temperature to be decreasing when coolant channel to coolant channel distance was decreased. Using the qualitative trend revealed from the present study, an appropriate process channel and coolant channel geometry along with the distance between the adjacent

  15. Reliability in the Location of Hindlimb Motor Representations in Fischer-344 Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shawn B.; Iliakova, Maria; Dunham, Caleb; Barbay, Scott; Arnold, Paul; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of the present study was to determine the feasibility of using a common laboratory rat strain for locating cortical motor representations of the hindlimb reliably. Methods Intracortical Microstimulation (ICMS) techniques were used to derive detailed maps of the hindlimb motor representations in six adult Fischer-344 rats. Results The organization of the hindlimb movement representation, while variable across individuals in topographic detail, displayed several commonalities. The hindlimb representation was positioned posterior to the forelimb motor representation and postero-lateral to the motor trunk representation. The areal extent of the hindlimb representation across the cortical surface averaged 2.00 +/− 0.50 mm2. Superimposing individual maps revealed an overlapping area measuring 0.35 mm2, indicating that the location of the hindlimb representation can be predicted reliably based on stereotactic coordinates. Across the sample of rats, the hindlimb representation was found 1.25–3.75 mm posterior to Bregma, with an average center location ~ 2.6 mm posterior to Bregma. Likewise, the hindlimb representation was found 1–3.25 mm lateral to the midline, with an average center location ~ 2 mm lateral to midline. Conclusions The location of the cortical hindlimb motor representation in Fischer-344 rats can be reliably located based on its stereotactic position posterior to Bregma and lateral to the longitudinal skull suture at midline. The ability to accurately predict the cortical localization of functional hindlimb territories in a rodent model is important, as such animal models are being used increasingly in the development of brain-computer interfaces for restoration of function after spinal cord injury. PMID:23725395

  16. Reliability in the location of hindlimb motor representations in Fischer-344 rats: laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shawn B; Iliakova, Maria; Dunham, Caleb; Barbay, Scott; Arnold, Paul; Nudo, Randolph J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the feasibility of using a common laboratory rat strain for reliably locating cortical motor representations of the hindlimb. Intracortical microstimulation techniques were used to derive detailed maps of the hindlimb motor representations in 6 adult Fischer-344 rats. The organization of the hindlimb movement representation, while variable across individual rats in topographic detail, displayed several commonalities. The hindlimb representation was positioned posterior to the forelimb motor representation and posterolateral to the motor trunk representation. The areal extent of the hindlimb representation across the cortical surface averaged 2.00 ± 0.50 mm(2). Superimposing individual maps revealed an overlapping area measuring 0.35 mm(2), indicating that the location of the hindlimb representation can be predicted reliably based on stereotactic coordinates. Across the sample of rats, the hindlimb representation was found 1.25-3.75 mm posterior to the bregma, with an average center location approximately 2.6 mm posterior to the bregma. Likewise, the hindlimb representation was found 1-3.25 mm lateral to the midline, with an average center location approximately 2 mm lateral to the midline. The location of the cortical hindlimb motor representation in Fischer-344 rats can be reliably located based on its stereotactic position posterior to the bregma and lateral to the longitudinal skull suture at midline. The ability to accurately predict the cortical localization of functional hindlimb territories in a rodent model is important, as such animal models are being increasingly used in the development of brain-computer interfaces for restoration of function after spinal cord injury.

  17. The role of zeolites in the deactivation of multifunctional fischer-tropsch synthesis catalysts: the interaction between HZSM-5 and Fe-based Ft-catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Zonetti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to produce gasoline directly from syngas, HZSM-5 can be added to the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. However, this catalytic system shows an important deactivation rate. Aiming at describing this phenomenon, Fe-based catalysts and physical mixtures containing these catalysts and HZSM-5 were employed in this reaction. All these systems were characterized using the following techniques: XRD, XPS, TPR and TPD of CO. This work shows that HZSM-5 interacts with the Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst during the reduction step, decreasing the Fe concentration on the catalytic surface and thus lowering the activity of the catalytic system in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

  18. The role of zeolites in the deactivation of multifunctional Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts: the interaction between HZSM-5 and Fe-based FT-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonetti, P.C.; Gaspar, A.B.; Mendes, F.M.T.; Appel, L.G.; Avillez, R. R. de; Sousa-Aguiar, E.F.

    2013-01-01

    In order to produce gasoline directly from syngas, HZSM-5 can be added to the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. However, this catalytic system shows an important deactivation rate. Aiming at describing this phenomenon, Fe-based catalysts and physical mixtures containing these catalysts and HZSM-5 were employed in this reaction. All these systems were characterized using the following techniques: XRD, XPS, TPR and TPD of CO. This work shows that HZSM-5 interacts with the Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst during the reduction step, decreasing the Fe concentration on the catalytic surface and thus lowering the activity of the catalytic system in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. (author)

  19. The role of zeolites in the deactivation of multifunctional Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts: the interaction between HZSM-5 and Fe-based FT-catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonetti, P.C.; Gaspar, A.B.; Mendes, F.M.T.; Appel, L.G., E-mail: lucia.appel@int.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia (INT/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Avillez, R. R. de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Sousa-Aguiar, E.F. [Centro de Pesquisa Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    In order to produce gasoline directly from syngas, HZSM-5 can be added to the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. However, this catalytic system shows an important deactivation rate. Aiming at describing this phenomenon, Fe-based catalysts and physical mixtures containing these catalysts and HZSM-5 were employed in this reaction. All these systems were characterized using the following techniques: XRD, XPS, TPR and TPD of CO. This work shows that HZSM-5 interacts with the Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst during the reduction step, decreasing the Fe concentration on the catalytic surface and thus lowering the activity of the catalytic system in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. (author)

  20. Carbon nanomaterials for non-volatile memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ethan C.; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Pop, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Carbon can create various low-dimensional nanostructures with remarkable electronic, optical, mechanical and thermal properties. These features make carbon nanomaterials especially interesting for next-generation memory and storage devices, such as resistive random access memory, phase-change memory, spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory and ferroelectric random access memory. Non-volatile memories greatly benefit from the use of carbon nanomaterials in terms of bit density and energy efficiency. In this Review, we discuss sp2-hybridized carbon-based low-dimensional nanostructures, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes and graphene, in the context of non-volatile memory devices and architectures. Applications of carbon nanomaterials as memory electrodes, interfacial engineering layers, resistive-switching media, and scalable, high-performance memory selectors are investigated. Finally, we compare the different memory technologies in terms of writing energy and time, and highlight major challenges in the manufacturing, integration and understanding of the physical mechanisms and material properties.

  1. The GREAT3 challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, H; Mandelbaum, R; Rowe, B

    2014-01-01

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 3 (GREAT3) challenge is an image analysis competition that aims to test algorithms to measure weak gravitational lensing from astronomical images. The challenge started in October 2013 and ends 30 April 2014. The challenge focuses on testing the impact on weak lensing measurements of realistically complex galaxy morphologies, realistic point spread function, and combination of multiple different exposures. It includes simulated ground- and space-based data. The details of the challenge are described in [1], and the challenge website and its leader board can be found at http://great3challenge.info and http://great3.projects.phys.ucl.ac.uk/leaderboard/, respectively

  2. The Great Mathematician Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Sabrina R.

    2013-01-01

    The Great Mathematician Project (GMP) introduces both mathematically sophisticated and struggling students to the history of mathematics. The rationale for the GMP is twofold: first, mathematics is a uniquely people-centered discipline that is used to make sense of the world; and second, students often express curiosity about the history of…

  3. What great managers do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Marcus

    2005-03-01

    Much has been written about the qualities that make a great manager, but most of the literature overlooks a fundamental question: What does a great manager actually do? While there are countless management styles, one thing underpins the behavior of all great managers. Above all, an exceptional manager comes to know and value the particular quirks and abilities of her employees. She figures out how to capitalize on her staffers' strengths and tweaks her environment to meet her larger goals. Such a specialized approach may seem like a lot of work. But in fact, capitalizing on each person's uniqueness can save time. Rather than encourage employees to conform to strict job descriptions that may include tasks they don't enjoy and aren't good at, a manager who develops positions for his staff members based on their unique abilities will be rewarded with behaviors that are far more efficient and effective than they would be otherwise. This focus on individuals also makes employees more accountable. Because staffers are evaluated on their particular strengths and weaknesses, they are challenged to take responsibility for their abilities and to hone them. Capitalizing on a person's uniqueness also builds a stronger sense of team. By taking the time to understand what makes each employee tick, a great manager shows that he sees his people for who they are. This personal investment not only motivates individuals but also galvanizes the entire team. Finally, this approach shakes up existing hierarchies, which leads to more creative thinking. To take great managing from theory to practice, the author says, you must know three things about a person: her strengths, the triggers that activate those strengths, and how she learns. By asking the right questions, squeezing the right triggers, and becoming aware of your employees' learning styles, you will discover what motivates each person to excel.

  4. Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García-Reidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reseña de Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, 2013, 298 pp. ISBN 9781611485172.

  5. Great magnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Yen Te Lee; Tang, F.; Gonzalez, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    The five largest magnetic storms that occurred between 1971 and 1986 are studied to determine their solar and interplanetary causes. All of the events are found to be associated with high speed solar wind streams led by collisionless shocks. The high speed streams are clearly related to identifiable solar flares. It is found that (1) it is the extreme values of the southward interplanetary magnetic fields rather than solar wind speeds that are the primary causes of great magnetic storms, (2) shocked and draped sheath fields preceding the driver gas (magnetic cloud) are at least as effective in causing the onset of great magnetic storms (3 of 5 events ) as the strong fields within the driver gas itself, and (3) precursor southward fields ahead of the high speed streams allow the shock compression mechanism (item 2) to be particularly geoeffective

  6. Metal-carbon nanosystem IR-PVA/Fe-Co for catalysis in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, A A; Dzidziguri, E L; Ivantsov, M I; Efimov, M N

    2016-01-01

    Metal-carbon nanosystems consisting of nanodimensional bimetallic particles of Fe- Co dispersed in a carbon matrix for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were studied. Prepared metal-carbon nanopowders samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was shown formation of FeCo nanoparticles with body-centered cubic structures started at 400 °C. FeCo nanoparticles have spherical form, the mean size is 7 - 12 nm and uniform distribution in a carbon matrix. The metal-carbon nanosystem demonstrates a catalytic activity in the Fischer- Tropsch synthesis. The maximum yield of liquid hydrocabons C 5+ was 92 g/m 3 while the selectivity for the target product - 35%. (paper)

  7. The great intimidators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2006-02-01

    After Disney's Michael Eisner, Miramax's Harvey Weinstein, and Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina fell from their heights of power, the business media quickly proclaimed thatthe reign of abrasive, intimidating leaders was over. However, it's premature to proclaim their extinction. Many great intimidators have done fine for a long time and continue to thrive. Their modus operandi runs counter to a lot of preconceptions about what it takes to be a good leader. They're rough, loud, and in your face. Their tactics include invading others' personal space, staging tantrums, keeping people guessing, and possessing an indisputable command of facts. But make no mistake--great intimidators are not your typical bullies. They're driven by vision, not by sheer ego or malice. Beneath their tough exteriors and sharp edges are some genuine, deep insights into human motivation and organizational behavior. Indeed, these leaders possess political intelligence, which can make the difference between paralysis and successful--if sometimes wrenching--organizational change. Like socially intelligent leaders, politically intelligent leaders are adept at sizing up others, but they notice different things. Those with social intelligence assess people's strengths and figure out how to leverage them; those with political intelligence exploit people's weaknesses and insecurities. Despite all the obvious drawbacks of working under them, great intimidators often attract the best and brightest. And their appeal goes beyond their ability to inspire high performance. Many accomplished professionals who gravitate toward these leaders want to cultivate a little "inner intimidator" of their own. In the author's research, quite a few individuals reported having positive relationships with intimidating leaders. In fact, some described these relationships as profoundly educational and even transformational. So before we throw out all the great intimidators, the author argues, we should stop to consider what

  8. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. Iwan [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  9. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical phase carbon dioxide: Recycle rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soti, Madhav

    With increasing oil prices and attention towards the reduction of anthropogenic CO2, the use of supercritical carbon dioxide for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) is showing promise in fulfilling the demand of clean liquid fuels. The evidence of consumption of carbon dioxide means that it need not to be removed from the syngas feed to the Fischer Tropsch reactor after the gasification process. Over the last five years, research at SIUC have shown that FTS in supercritical CO2reduces the selectivities for methane, enhances conversion, reduces the net CO2produces in the coal to liquid fuels process and increase the life of the catalyst. The research has already evaluated the impact of various operating and feed conditions on the FTS for the once through process. We believe that the integration of unreacted feed recycle would enhance conversion, increase the yield and throughput of liquid fuels for the same reactor size. The proposed research aims at evaluating the impact of recycle of the unreacted feed gas along with associated product gases on the performance of supercritical CO2FTS. The previously identified conditions will be utilized and various recycle ratios will be evaluated in this research once the recycle pump and associated fittings have been integrated to the supercritical CO2FTS. In this research two different catalysts (Fe-Zn-K, Fe-Co-Zn-K) were analyzed under SC-FTS in different recycle rate at 350oC and 1200 psi. The use of recycle was found to improve conversion from 80% to close to 100% with both catalysts. The experiment recycle rate at 4.32 and 4.91 was clearly surpassing theoretical recycle curve. The steady state reaction rate constant was increased to 0.65 and 0.8 min-1 for recycle rate of 4.32 and 4.91 respectively. Carbon dioxide selectivity was decreased for both catalyst as it was converting to carbon monoxide. Carbon dioxide consumption was increased from 0.014 to 0.034 mole fraction. This concluded that CO2is being used in the system and

  10. One-pot three-component synthesis of quinoxaline and phenazine ring systems using Fischer carbene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyabrata Roy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available One-pot three-component coupling of o-alkynylheteroaryl carbonyl derivatives with Fischer carbene complexes and dienophiles leading to the synthesis of quinoxaline and phenazine ring systems has been investigated. This involves the generation of furo[3,4-b]pyrazine and furo[3,4-b]quinoxaline as transient intermediates, which were trapped with Diels–Alder dienophiles. This is the first report on furo[3,4-b]pyrazine intermediates.

  11. Structure and Development of the Gametophytes of Philippine Cheilanthoid Ferns, III. Cheilanthes concolor (Langsdorff et Fischer R. Tryon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prescillano Zamora

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The gametophytes of Cheilanthes concolor (Langsdorff et Fischer R. Tryon from the Philippines (Quezon City are no different in pattern of development and in morphology from those from India with one possible notable difference, which is, that the gametophytes under report (which were grown from spores produced from 32-sporate sporangia are apogamous while those from India (sporangial type of source was not stated are sexual.

  12. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faizan Shareef

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of a synthesis method for cobalt catalyst supported on hydrotalcite material for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The hydrotalcite supported cobalt (HT-Co catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using various techniques like BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Fixed bed micro reactor was used to test the catalytic activity of prepared catalysts. The catalytic testing results demonstrated the performance of hydrotalcite based cobalt catalyst in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with high selectivity for liquid products. The effect of synthesis method on the activity and selectivity of catalyst was also discussed. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 3rd November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 9th March 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Sharif, M.S., Arslan, M., Iqbal, N., Ahmad, N., Noor, T. (2017. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12(3: 357-363 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.762.357-363

  13. The neurobiology of the human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietta, Pierluigi; Fietta, Pieranna

    2011-01-01

    Memory can be defined as the ability to acquire, process, store, and retrieve information. Memory is indispensable for learning, adaptation, and survival of every living organism. In humans, the remembering process has acquired great flexibility and complexity, reaching close links with other mental functions, such as thinking and emotions. Changes in synaptic connectivity and interactions among multiple neural networks provide the neurobiological substrates for memory encoding, retention, and consolidation. Memory may be categorized as short-term and long-term memory (according to the storage temporal duration), as implicit and explicit memory (with respect to the consciousness of remembering), as declarative (knowing that [fact]) and procedural (knowing how [skill]) memory, or as sensory (echoic, iconic and haptil), semantic, and episodic memory (according to the various remembering domains). Significant advances have been obtained in understanding memory neurobiology, but much remains to be learned in its cognitive, psychological, and phenomenological aspects.

  14. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  15. Idiopathic great saphenous phlebosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Jodati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Arterial sclerosis has been extensively described but reports on venous sclerosis are very sparse. Phlebosclerosis refers to the thickening and hardening of the venous wall. Despite its morphological similarities with arteriosclerosis and potential morbid consequences, phlebosclerosis has gained only little attention. We report a 72 year old male with paralysis and atrophy of the right leg due to childhood poliomyelitis who was referred for coronary artery bypass surgery. The great saphenous vein, harvested from the left leg, showed a hardened cord-like obliterated vein. Surprisingly, harvested veins from the atrophic limb were normal and successfully used for grafting.

  16. Great software debates

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, A

    2004-01-01

    The industry’s most outspoken and insightful critic explains how the software industry REALLY works. In Great Software Debates, Al Davis, shares what he has learned about the difference between the theory and the realities of business and encourages you to question and think about software engineering in ways that will help you succeed where others fail. In short, provocative essays, Davis fearlessly reveals the truth about process improvement, productivity, software quality, metrics, agile development, requirements documentation, modeling, software marketing and sales, empiricism, start-up financing, software research, requirements triage, software estimation, and entrepreneurship.

  17. Making Psychotherapy Great Again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric M

    2017-05-01

    Psychotherapy never stopped being as "great" as other treatments. This column explores the evidence base for both psychotherapy and medications, using depression as a specific example. The limitations are comparable for psychotherapy and medication, with much of the evidence based on small degrees of "statistically significant" rather than "clinically meaningful" change. Our field's biomedical emphasis leads to a false assumption that most patients present with single disorders, when comorbidity is the rule rather than the exception. This false assumption contributes to limitations in the evidence base and in our ability to treat patients optimally.

  18. Pyrolysis-GCMS Analysis of Solid Organic Products from Catalytic Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Darren R.; Yazzie, Cyriah A.; Burton, Aaron S.; Niles, Paul B.; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic synthesis of complex organic compounds in the early solar nebula that formed our solar system is hypothesized to occur via a Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis involving the reaction of hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases over metal and metal oxide catalysts. In general, at low temperatures (less than 200 C), FTT synthesis is expected to form abundant alkane compounds while at higher temperatures (greater than 200 C) it is expected to product lesser amounts of n-alkanes and greater amounts of alkene, alcohol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Experiments utilizing a closed-gas circulation system to study the effects of FTT reaction temperature, catalysts, and number of experimental cycles on the resulting solid insoluble organic products are being performed in the laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These experiments aim to determine whether or not FTT reactions on grain surfaces in the protosolar nebula could be the source of the insoluble organic matter observed in meteorites. The resulting solid organic products are being analyzed at NASA Johnson Space Center by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (PY-GCMS). PY-GCMS yields the types and distribution of organic compounds released from the insoluble organic matter generated from the FTT reactions. Previously, exploratory work utilizing PY-GCMS to characterize the deposited organic materials from these reactions has been reported. Presented here are new organic analyses using magnetite catalyst to produce solid insoluble organic FTT products with varying reaction temperatures and number of experimental cycles.

  19. Meteorites, Organics and Fischer-Tropsch Type Reaction: Production and Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Natasha M.; Burton, A. S.; Nurth, J. A., III

    2011-01-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about the relative importance about the various chemical reactions that fonned organics in the early solar system. One proposed method that has long been recognized as a potential source of organics is Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis. This process is commonly used in industry to produce fuels (i.e., complex hydrocarbons) by catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Hill and Nuth were the first to publish results of FTT experiments that also included Haber-Bosch (HB) processes (hydrogenation of nitrogen. Their findings included the production of nitrilebearing compounds as well as trace amounts of methyl amine. Previous experience with these reactions revealed that the organic coating deposited on the grains is also an efficient catalyst and that the coating is composed of insoluble organic matter (10M) and could be reminiscent of the organic matrix found in some meteorites. This current set of FTT-styled experiments tracks the evolution of a set of organics, amino acids, in detail.

  20. Silylated Co/SBA-15 catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Lihong; Jia Litao; Li Debao; Hou Bo; Wang Jungang; Sun Yuhan

    2011-01-01

    A series of silylated Co/SBA-15 catalysts were prepared via the reaction of surface Si-OH of SBA-15 with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) under anhydrous, vapor-phase conditions, and then characterized by FT-IR, N 2 physisorption, TG, XRD, and TPR-MS. The results showed that organic modification led to a silylated SBA-15 surface composed of stable hydrophobic Si-(CH 3 ) 3 species even after calcinations and H 2 reduction at 673 K. Furthermore, the hydrophobic surface strongly influenced both metal dispersion and reducibility. Compared with non-silylated Co/SBA, Co/S-SBA (impregnation after silylation) showed a high activity, due to the better cobalt reducibility on the hydrophobic support. However, S-Co/SBA (silylation after impregnation) had the lowest FT activity among all the catalysts, due to the lower cobalt reducibility along with the steric hindrance of grafted -Si(CH 3 ) 3 for the re-adsorption of α-olefins. -- Graphical abstract: The silylation of an SBA-15 before cobalt impregnation enhanced the reducibility of cobalt oxides on an SBA-15-supported cobalt catalyst and consequently increased the catalytic activity for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Display Omitted

  1. Determination of water traces in various organic solvents using Karl Fischer method under FIA conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantan, N; Frenzel, W; Küppers, S

    2000-05-31

    Flow injection methods utilising the Karl Fischer (KF) reaction with spectrophotometric and potentiometric detection are described for the determination of the trace water content in various organic solvents. Optimisation of the methods resulted in an accessible (linear) working range of 0.01-0.2% water for many solvents studied with a typical precision of 1-2% R.S.D. Only 50 mul of organic solvent was injected and the sampling frequency was about 120 samples per h. Since the slopes of the calibration curves were different for different solvents appropriate calibration was required. Problems associated with spectrophotometric detection and caused by refractive index changes were pointed out and a nested-loop configuration was proposed to overcome this kind of interference. The potentiometric method with a novel flow-through detector cell was shown to surpass the performance of spectrophotometric detection in any respect. The characteristics of the procedures developed made them well applicable for on-line monitoring of technical solvent distillations in an industrial plant.

  2. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Pokkunuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP- mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month and aged (21-month Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls and with GP (1.5% in drinking water and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions.

  3. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: influence of cobalt dispersion and titanium oxides promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azib, H

    1996-04-10

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of Sol-Gel preparation parameters which occur in silica supported cobalt catalysts synthesis. These catalysts are particularly used for the waxes production in natural gas processing. The solids have been characterized by several techniques: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), programmed temperature reduction (TPR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), Magnetism, thermodesorption of H{sub 2} (TPD). The results indicate that the control of the cobalt dispersion and oxide phases nature is possible by modifying Sol-Gel parameters. The catalytic tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were conducted on a pilot unit under pressure (20 atm) and suggested that turnover rates were independent of Co crystallite size, Co phases in the solids (Co deg., cobalt silicate) and titanium oxide promotion. On the other methane, the C{sub 3}{sup +} hydrocarbon selectivity is increased with increasing crystallite size. Inversely, the methane production is favoured by very small crystallites, cobalt silicate increase and titanium addition. However, the latter, used as a cobalt promoter, has a benefic effect on the active phase stability during the synthesis. (author). 149 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  4. Small-Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh K. [Southern Research Institute, Durham, NC (United States); McCabe, Kevin [Southern Research Institute, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The research project advanced coal-to-liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes by testing and validating Chevron’s highly selective and active cobalt-zeolite hybrid Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst to convert gasifier syngas predominantly to gasoline, jet fuel and diesel range hydrocarbon liquids, thereby eliminating expensive wax upgrading operations The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) operated by Southern Company (SC) at Wilsonville, Alabama served as the host site for the gasifier slip-stream testing/demonstration. Southern Research designed, installed and commissioned a bench scale skid mounted FT reactor system (SR-CBTL test rig) that was fully integrated with a slip stream from SC/NCCC’s transport integrated gasifier (TRIGTM). The test-rig was designed to receive up to 5 lb/h raw syngas augmented with bottled syngas to adjust the H2/CO molar ratio to 2, clean it to cobalt FT catalyst specifications, and produce liquid FT products at the design capacity of 2 to 4 L/day. It employed a 2-inch diameter boiling water jacketed fixed-bed heat-exchange FT reactor incorporating Chevron’s catalyst in Intramicron’s high thermal conductivity micro-fibrous entrapped catalyst (MFEC) packing to efficiently remove heat produced by the highly exothermic FT reaction.

  5. Greenhouse impact assessment of peat-based Fischer-Tropsch diesel life-cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkinen, Johanna; Soimakallio, Sampo; Maekinen, Tuula; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2010-01-01

    New raw materials for transportation fuels need to be introduced, in order to fight against climate change and also to cope with increasing risks of availability and price of oil. Peat has been recognised suitable raw material option for diesel produced by gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The energy content of Finnish peat reserves is remarkable. In this study, the greenhouse impact of peat-based FT diesel production and utilisation in Finland was assessed from the life-cycle point of view. In 100 year's time horizon the greenhouse impact of peat-based FT diesel is likely larger than the impact of fossil diesel. The impact can somewhat be lowered by producing peat from the agricultural peatland (strong greenhouse gas emissions from the decaying peatlayer are avoided) with new peat production technique, and utilising the produced biomass from the after-treatment area for diesel also. If diesel production is integrated with pulp and paper mill to achieve energy efficiency benefits and if the electricity demand can be covered by zero emission electricity, the greenhouse impact of peat-based FT diesel reduces to the level of fossil diesel when agricultural peatland is used, and is somewhat higher when forestry-drained peatland is used as raw material source.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch Cobalt Catalyst Activation and Handling Through Wax Enclosure Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer L. S.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2016-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which converts syn-gas, a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions. Cobalt based catalysts are used in F-T synthesis and are the focus of this paper. One key concern with handling cobalt based catalysts is that the active form of catalyst is in a reduced state, metallic cobalt, which oxidizes readily in air. In laboratory experiments, the precursor cobalt oxide catalyst is activated in a fixed bed at 350 ?C then transferred into a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with inert gas. NASA has developed a process which involves the enclosure of active cobalt catalyst in a wax mold to prevent oxidation during storage and handling. This improved method allows for precise catalyst loading and delivery into a CSTR. Preliminary results indicate similar activity levels in the F-T reaction in comparison to the direct injection method. The work in this paper was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  7. Important roles of Fischer-Tropsch synfuels in the global energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Takayuki; Yamaji, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the potential roles of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synfuels in the 21st century with a global energy model treating the entire fuel supply chain in detail. The major conclusions are the following. First, FT synfuels become a major alternative fuel regardless of CO 2 policy due to their low transportation costs and compatibility with existing petroleum infrastructure and vehicles. Secondly, the FT process brings stranded gas to world markets until around 2050. In a 550 ppm CO 2 stabilization case thereafter, producing FT synfuels from biomass, whose competitiveness is robust against its capital costs, and their interregional trade enable a worldwide diffusion of carbon-neutral fuels. This provides a significant source of income for developing regions, such as Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. Thirdly, FT synfuels play a crucial role in meeting the growing transportation energy demand and assuring diversified supplies of transportation fuels. Increasing portions of FT liquids are refined to FT-kerosene to be provided for the rapidly growing aviation sector in the second half of the century. Furthermore, upgrading FT-naphtha into FT-gasoline proves to be critically important. FT synfuels' participation could help the development in Africa through technological contributions of the South African leading companies in the world synfuel industry

  8. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, January--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction using advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design. Develop a process flow sheet simulation (PFS) model. This report summarizes the activities completed during the period December 23, 1992 through March 15, 1992. In Task 1, Baseline Design and Alternates, the following activities related to the tradeoff studies were completed: approach and basis; oxygen purity; F-T reactor pressure; wax yield; autothermal reformer; hydrocarbons (C{sub 3}/C{sub 4}s) recovery; and hydrogenrecovery. In Task 3, Engineering Design Criteria, activities were initiated to support the process tradeoff studies in Task I and to develop the environmental strategy for the Illinois site. The work completed to date consists of the development of the F-T reactor yield correlation from the Mobil dam and a brief review of the environmental strategy prepared for the same site in the direct liquefaction baseline study.Some work has also been done in establishing site-related criteria, in establishing the maximum vessel diameter for train sizing and in coping with the low H{sub 2}/CO ratio from the Shell gasifier. In Task 7, Project Management and Administration, the following activities were completed: the subcontract agreement between Amoco and Bechtel was negotiated; a first technical progress meeting was held at the Bechtel office in February; and the final Project Management Plan was approved by PETC and issued in March 1992.

  9. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Gerald P

    2012-09-18

    A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

  10. Structural equation modeling identifies markers of damage and function in the aging male Fischer 344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth A; Nichols, LaNita A; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Spagnoli, Sean; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Parrish, Alan R

    2016-06-01

    The male Fischer 344 rat is an established model to study progressive renal dysfunction that is similar, but not identical, to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans. These studies were designed to assess age-dependent alterations in renal structure and function at late-life timepoints, 16-24 months. Elevations in BUN and plasma creatinine were not significant until 24 months, however, elevations in the more sensitive markers of function, plasma cystatin C and proteinuria, were detectable at 16 and 18 months, respectively. Interestingly, cystatin C levels were not corrected by caloric restriction. Urinary Kim-1, a marker of CKD, was elevated as early as 16 months. Klotho gene expression was significantly decreased at 24 months, but not at earlier timepoints. Alterations in renal structure, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, were noted at 16 months, with little change from 18 to 24 months. Tubulointerstitial inflammation was increased at 16 months, and remained similar from 18 to 24 months. A SEM (structural equation modeling) model of age-related renal dysfunction suggests that proteinuria is a marker of renal damage, while urinary Kim-1 is a marker of both damage and function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that age-dependent nephropathy begins as early as 16 months and progresses rapidly over the next 8 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of mitochondrial DNA large deletion for the development of presbycusis in Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shankai; Yu, Zhiping; Sockalingam, Ravi; Bance, Manohar; Sun, Genlou; Wang, Jian

    2007-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss, or presbycusis, has been associated with large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in previous studies. However, the role of this mtDNA damage in presbycusis is still not clear because the deletion in inner ears has not been measured quantitatively and analyzed in parallel with the time course of presbycusis. In the present study, the deletion was quantified using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in male Fischer 344 rats of different ages. It was found that the deletion increased quickly during young adulthood and reached over 60% at 6 months of age. However, a significant hearing loss was not seen until after 12 months of age. The results suggest that the existence of the deletion per se does not necessarily imply cochlear damage, but rather a critical level of the accumulated deletion seems to precede the hearing loss. The long delay may indicate the involvement of mechanisms other than mtDNA deletion in the development of presbycusis.

  12. Dose patterns for 106RuO4 inhaled by Fischer-344 rats and Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkle, G.E.; Snipes, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    Ruthenium-106 is an abundant fission product radionuclide in the nuclear fuel cycle which has potential for release as ruthenium tetroxide. Ruthenium tetroxide is a vapor, diffuses rapidly through air and porous materials, is chemically reactive and is rapidly reduced by any organic material to the dioxide form. Current ICRP recommendations consider the lung and gastrointestinal tract as critical organs for inhaled particles of radioactive ruthenium. This study was designed to provide additional data needed to adequately assess the risk for humans potentially exposed to 106 Ru encountered in this vapor form. Fischer-344 rats and Beagle dogs were given a nose-only exposure to 106 RuO 4 vapor to determine its distribution and retention patterns. The largest percentage of the initial body burden was found in the nasopharyngeal region of the respiratory tract. Less than 1% of the initial body burden was deposited in the pulmonary region. Most of the 106 Ru was cleared via the feces. A biomathematical simulation model was developed to fit the tissue and excreta data from the rat. This model was used to assess the short-term and long-term risks after inhalation of 106 RuO 4 . The observed deposition, retention and dose patterns for ruthenium tetroxide indicate the nasopharyngeal region should be considered as a critical region when considering the consequences of human exposure to this vapor

  13. Development of the Fischer-Tropsch Process: From the Reaction Concept to the Process Book

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyer C.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The process development by IFP Energies nouvelles (IFPEN/ENI/Axens of a Fischer-Tropsch process is described. This development is based on upstream process studies to choose the process scheme, reactor technology and operating conditions, and downstream to summarize all development work in a process guide. A large amount of work was devoted to the catalyst performances on one hand and the scale-up of the slurry bubble reactor with dedicated complementary tools on the other hand. Finally, an original approach was implemented to validate both the process and catalyst on an industrial scale by combining a 20 bpd unit in ENI’s Sannazzaro refinery, with cold mock-ups equivalent to 20 and 1 000 bpd at IFPEN and a special “Large Validation Tool” (LVT which reproduces the combined effect of chemical reaction condition stress and mechanical stress equivalent to a 15 000 bpd industrial unit. Dedicated analytical techniques and a dedicated model were developed to simulate the whole process (reactor and separation train, integrating a high level of complexity and phenomena coupling to scale-up the process in a robust reliable base on an industrial scale.

  14. Effects of Caloric Restriction and Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Histochemistry in Aging Fischer 344 Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Lowenthal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of calorie restriction and exercise on hindlimb histochemistry and fiber type in Fischer 344 rats as they advanced from adulthood through senescence. At 10 months of age, animals were divided into sedentary fed ad libitum, exercise (18 m/min, 8% grade, 20 min/day, 5 days/week fed ad libitum, and calorie restricted by alternate days of feeding. Succinic dehydrogenase, myosin adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase at pH 9.4, nicotine adenonine dinucleotide reductase, and Periodic Acid Shiff histochemical stains were performed on plantaris and soleus muscles. The results indicated that aging resulted in a progressive decline in plantaris Type I muscle fiber in sedentary animals, while exercise resulted in maintenance of these fibers. The percent of plantaris Type II fibers increased between 10 and 24 months of age. Exercise also resulted in a small, but significant, increase in the percentage of plantaris Type IIa fibers at 24 months of age. The soleus fiber distribution for Type I fibers was unaffected by increasing age in all groups of animals. The implications of these results suggest the implementation of exercise as a lifestyle modification as early as possible.

  15. The effect of zirconium on cobalt catalyst in fischer-tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, GH.R.; Mahbob Basir, M.; Taeb, A.

    2003-01-01

    A series of 10 wt % Co/SiO 2 catalysts with different loading ratios of zirconia (0, 5, 10, 15, 20) has been prepared through an original pseudo sol-gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, SEM, and TPR experiments. The catalytic performance of the catalysts for the so-called fischer- tropsch synthesis was examined under H 2 /CO=2 at 230 d ig C and 8 bar in a fixed bed microreactor. By increasing zirconia, the Co-SiO 2 interaction decreases and is replaced by Co-Zr interaction which favours reduction of the catalyst at lower temperatures. While it leads to a higher degree of reduction and as increase in the metallic cobalt atoms on the surface. The activity of the promoted catalysts increases with the addition of zirconia (max. by a factor 2.5). The C 1 0 + selectivity increased with the addition of zirconia (from 42.3% in unpromoted catalyst to 68.8 % in the 20 % ZrO 2 promoted. This can be attributed to the higher amount of the surface Cobalt metal present and to the larger Cobalt particle size

  16. Effect of Drying Temperature on Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Prepared by Solvent Deficient Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Albretsen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solvent deficient precipitation (SDP method to produce nanoparticles was studied for its potential in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS catalysis. Using Fe(NO33·9H2O as the iron-containing precursor, this method produces ferrihydrite particles which are then dried, calcined, reduced, and carbidized to form the active catalytic phase for FTS. Six different drying profiles, including final drying temperatures ranging between 80 and 150°C, were used to investigate the effect of ammonium nitrate (AN, a major by-product of reaction between Fe(NO33·9H2O and NH4HCO3 in the SDP method. Since AN has two phase-transitions within this range of drying temperatures, three different AN phases can exist during the drying of the catalyst precursors. These AN phases, along with physical changes occurring during the phase transitions, may affect the pore structure and the agglomeration of ferrihydrite crystallites, suggesting possible reasons for the observed differences in catalytic performance. Catalysts dried at 130°C showed the highest FTS rate and the lowest methane selectivity. In general, better catalytic performance is related to the AN phase present during drying as follows: phase III > phase II > phase I. However, within each AN phase, lower drying temperatures led to better catalytic properties.

  17. Influence of Reduction Promoters on Stability of Cobalt/g-Alumina Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Jacobs

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This focused review article underscores how metal reduction promoters can impact deactivation phenomena associated with cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts. Promoters can exacerbate sintering if the additional cobalt metal clusters, formed as a result of the promoting effect, are in close proximity at the nanoscale to other cobalt particles on the surface. Recent efforts have shown that when promoters are used to facilitate the reduction of small crystallites with the aim of increasing surface Co0 site densities (e.g., in research catalysts, ultra-small crystallites (e.g., <2–4.4 nm formed are more susceptible to oxidation at high conversion relative to larger ones. The choice of promoter is important, as certain metals (e.g., Au that promote cobalt oxide reduction can separate from cobalt during oxidation-reduction (regeneration cycles. Finally, some elements have been identified to promote reduction but either poison the surface of Co0 (e.g., Cu, or produce excessive light gas selectivity (e.g., Cu and Pd, or Au at high loading. Computational studies indicate that certain promoters may inhibit polymeric C formation by hindering C-C coupling.

  18. Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the United States-Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzek, Tad W.; Croft, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    The United States has the world's largest coal reserves and Montana the highest potential for mega-mine development. Consequently, a large-scale effort to convert coal to liquids (CTL) has been proposed to create a major source of domestic transportation fuels from coal, and some prominent Montanans want to be at the center of that effort. We calculate that the energy efficiency of the best existing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process applied to average coal in Montana is less than 1/2 of the corresponding efficiency of an average crude oil refining process. The resulting CO 2 emissions are 20 times (2000%) higher for CTL than for conventional petroleum products. One barrel of the FT fuel requires roughly 800 kg of coal and 800 kg of water. The minimum energy cost of subsurface CO 2 sequestration would be at least 40% of the FT fuel energy, essentially halving energy efficiency of the process. We argue therefore that CTL conversion is not the most valuable use for the coal, nor will it ever be, as long as it is economical to use natural gas for electric power generation. This finding results from the low efficiency inherent in FT synthesis, and is independent of the monumental FT plant construction costs, mine construction costs, acute lack of water, and the associated environmental impacts for Montana

  19. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of production since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase FTS. The separation problem is further compounded by catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. Existing pilot-scale equipment was modified to include a filtration test apparatus. After undergoing an extensive plant shakedown period, filtration tests with cross-flow filter modules using simulant FTS wax slurry were conducted. The focus of these early tests was to find adequate mixtures of polyethylene wax to simulate FTS wax. Catalyst particle size analysis techniques were also developed. Initial analyses of the slurry and filter permeate particles will be used by the research team to design improved filter media and cleaning strategies.

  20. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  1. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Final technical report: Project 6464

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukur, D.B.; Ledakowicz, S.; Koranne, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [and others

    1994-02-28

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the United States will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer Tropsch (FT) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Texas A&M University (TAMU) with sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Center for Energy and Mineral Resources at TAMU, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., has been working on development of improved iron FT catalysts and characterization of hydrodynamic parameters in two- and three-phase bubble columns with FT derived waxes. Our previous studies have provided an improved understanding of the role of promoters (Cu and K), binders (silica) and pretreatment procedures on catalyst activity, selectivity and longevity (deactivation). The objective of the present contract was to develop improved catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and higher selectivity to liquid fuels and wax. This was accomplished through systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and variations in catalyst composition (promoters and binders). The major accomplishments and results in each of these two main areas of research are summarized here.

  2. Biosyngas Fischer. Tropsch conversion by high Fe loaded supported catalysts prepared with ultrasound and microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirola, C.; Di Fronzo, A.; Boffito, D.C.; Bianchi, C. [Milano Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica; Di Michele, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Catalysts with iron high loading of 30 wt%, promoted with K (2.0 wt%) and Cu (3.75 wt%), have been synthesized according to three different methods: (1) the traditional impregnation method (TR); (2) Ultrasound (US) assisted TR method; (3) Microwave (MW) assisted TR method. All the samples have been fully characterized by BET, ICP/OES, XRPD, TG-DTA, FT-IR, TPR, SEM and TEM and tested in a laboratory pilot plant for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis working at 220 C and 20 bar. The results of the catalysts characterization indicated that the morphology of the samples strongly depends on the method of preparation. The best FTS results in term of C{sub 2+} yield (41%) has been obtained using MW with a good value of the selectivity towards heavy hydrocarbons, while in term of CO conversion (58%), using US. The samples prepared with non-traditional methods show FTS better results, probably due to a more wide and uniform distribution of Fe in the medium during the synthesis phase. (orig.)

  3. The role of palladium in iron based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts prepared by flame spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnermann, M.; Zielasek, V.; Baeumer, M. [Bremen Univ. (DE). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry (IAPC); Pokhrei, S.; Maedler, L. [Bremen Univ. (DE). Foundation Inst. of Materials Science (IWT); Thiel, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufactoring Technology and Applied Materials Research, Bremen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) is a novel technique for the fabrication of nanostructured catalysts with far-reaching options to control structure and composition even in cases where complex composites need to be prepared. In this study, we took advantage of this technique to synthesize highly dispersed pure and Pd-doped iron oxide nanoparticles and investigated them as Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts. By systematically varying the Pd content over a large range from 0.1 wt % to 10 wt %, we were able to directly analyze the influence of the Pd content on activity and selectivity. In addition to catalytic measurements, the structure and composition of the particles were characterized before and after these measurements, using transmission electron microscopy, adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The comparison revealed, on the one hand, that small Pd clusters (diameter: 1-2 nm) evolve from initially homogeneously distributed Pd and, on the other hand, that the iron oxide transforms into iron carbides depending on the Pd content. The presence of Pd influences the particle size in the pristine samples (8 - 11 nm), resulting in specific surface areas that increase as the Pd content increases. However, after activation and reaction the specific surface areas become similar due to partial agglomeration and sintering. In a fixed bed FT reaction test, enhanced FT activity was observed with increasing Pd content while the selectivity shifts to longer chain hydrocarbons, mainly paraffins. (orig.)

  4. Emissions from Road Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer Tropsch Based Diesel and Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, U; Lundorf, P; Ivarsson, A; Schramm, J [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Rehnlund, B [Atrax Energi AB (Sweden); Blinge, M [The Swedish Transport Institute (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    The described results were carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was supposed to be very similar, in many ways, to FT fuel. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline vehicle.

  5. Monetization of Nigeria coal by conversion to hydrocarbon fuels through Fischer-Tropsch process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguejiofor, G.C. [Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Given the instability of crude oil prices and the disruptions in crude oil supply chains, this article offers a complementing investment proposal through diversification of Nigeria's energy source and dependence. Therefore, the following issues were examined and reported: A comparative survey of coal and hydrocarbon reserve bases in Nigeria was undertaken and presented. An excursion into the economic, environmental, and technological justifications for the proposed diversification and roll-back to coal-based resource was also undertaken and presented. The technology available for coal beneficiation for environmental pollution control was reviewed and reported. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and its advances into Sasol's slurry phase distillate process were reviewed. Specifically, the adoption of Sasol's advanced synthol process and the slurry phase distillate process were recommended as ways of processing the products of coal gasification. The article concludes by discussing all the above-mentioned issues with regard to value addition as a means of wealth creation and investment.

  6. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick C. Joyce; Mark C. Thies

    1999-03-31

    The objective of this research project was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, is to be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Aspen Plus{trademark} was used to perform process simulation studies on the proposed extraction process, with Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RKS) being used for the thermodynamic property model. In summary, we have made comprehensive VLE measurements for short alkane + long alkane systems over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, dramatically increasing the amount of high-quality data available for these simple, yet highly relevant systems. In addition, our work has demonstrated that, surprisingly, no current thermodynamic model can adequately predict VLE behavior for these systems. Thus, process simulations (such as those for our proposed SCF extraction process) that incorporate these systems can currently only give results that are qualitative at best. Although significant progress has been made in the past decade, more experimental and theoretical work remain to be done before the phase equilibria of asymmetric alkane mixtures can be predicted with confidence.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Cognitive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrow, Bernard; Aragon, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Regarding the workings of the human mind, memory and pattern recognition seem to be intertwined. You generally do not have one without the other. Taking inspiration from life experience, a new form of computer memory has been devised. Certain conjectures about human memory are keys to the central idea. The design of a practical and useful "cognitive" memory system is contemplated, a memory system that may also serve as a model for many aspects of human memory. The new memory does not function like a computer memory where specific data is stored in specific numbered registers and retrieval is done by reading the contents of the specified memory register, or done by matching key words as with a document search. Incoming sensory data would be stored at the next available empty memory location, and indeed could be stored redundantly at several empty locations. The stored sensory data would neither have key words nor would it be located in known or specified memory locations. Sensory inputs concerning a single object or subject are stored together as patterns in a single "file folder" or "memory folder". When the contents of the folder are retrieved, sights, sounds, tactile feel, smell, etc., are obtained all at the same time. Retrieval would be initiated by a query or a prompt signal from a current set of sensory inputs or patterns. A search through the memory would be made to locate stored data that correlates with or relates to the prompt input. The search would be done by a retrieval system whose first stage makes use of autoassociative artificial neural networks and whose second stage relies on exhaustive search. Applications of cognitive memory systems have been made to visual aircraft identification, aircraft navigation, and human facial recognition. Concerning human memory, reasons are given why it is unlikely that long-term memory is stored in the synapses of the brain's neural networks. Reasons are given suggesting that long-term memory is stored in DNA or RNA

  9. Salam Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, Carlo

    1997-01-01

    by T.W.B. KIBBLE / Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London. Recollections of Abdus Salam at Imperial College I shall give a personal account of Professor Salam's life and work from the perspective of a colleague at Imperial College, concentrating particularly but not exclusively on the period leading up to the discovery of the electro-weak theory. If necessary I could perhaps give more detail, but only once I have given more thought to what ground I shall cover. by Sheldon Lee GLASHOW / Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. Memories of Abdus Salam. My interactions with Abdus Salam, weak as they have been, extended over five decades. I regret that we never once collaborated in print or by correspondence. I visited Abdus only twice in London and twice again in Trieste, and met him at the occasional conference or summer school. Our face-to-face encounters could be counted on one's fingers and toes, but we became the best of friends. Others will discuss Abdus as an inspiring teacher, as a great scientist,...

  10. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive

  11. Great Britain at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    From 14 to 16 November 2006 Administration Building, Bldg. 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09.30 - 17.30 Fifteen companies will present their latest technologies at the 'Great Britain at CERN' exhibition. British industry will exhibit products and technologies related to the field of particle physics. The main fields represented will be computing technologies, electrical engineering, electronics, mechanical engineering, vacuum & low temperature technologies and particle detectors. The exhibition is organised by BEAMA Exhibitions (the British Electrotechnical and Allied Manufacturers Association). Below you will find: a list of the exhibitors. A detailed programme will be available in due course: from your Departmental secretariat, from the Reception information desk, Building 33, at the exhibition itself. A detailed list of the companies is available at the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm LIST OF EXHIBITORS 3D Metrics Almat...

  12. Great Britain at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    From 14 to 16 November 2006 Administration Building, Bldg. 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09.30 - 17.30 Fifteen companies will present their latest technologies at the 'Great Britain at CERN' exhibition. British industry will exhibit products and technologies related to the field of particle physics. The main fields represented will be computing technologies, electrical engineering, electronics, mechanical engineering, vacuum & low temperature technologies and particle detectors. The exhibition is organised by BEAMA Exhibitions (the British Electrotechnical and Allied Manufacturers Association). Below you will find: a list of the exhibitors. A detailed programme will be available in due course: from your Departmental secretariat, from the Reception information desk, Building 33, at the exhibition itself. A detailed list of the companies is available at the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm LIST OF EXHIBITORS 3D Metrics Alma...

  13. Memory Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  14. Eavesdropping on Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2017-01-03

    For more than four decades, I have been studying human memory. My research concerns the malleable nature of memory. Information suggested to an individual about an event can be integrated with the memory of the event itself, so that what actually occurred, and what was discussed later about what may have occurred, become inextricably interwoven, allowing distortion, elaboration, and even total fabrication. In my writings, classes, and public speeches, I've tried to convey one important take-home message: Just because someone tells you something in great detail, with much confidence, and with emotion, it doesn't mean that it is true. Here I describe my professional life as an experimental psychologist, in which I've eavesdropped on this process, as well as many personal experiences that may have influenced my thinking and choices.

  15. Matter and memory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergson, Henri

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of the last century," Walter Benjamin wrote, "philosophy has made a series of attempts to lay hold of the 'true' experience as opposed to the kind that manifests itself in the standardized, denatured life of the civilized masses. It is customary to classify these efforts under the heading of a philosophy of life. Towering above this literature is Henri Bergson's early monumental work, Matter and Memory."Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Bergson's work represents one of the great twentieth-century investigations into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Arguably Bergson's most significant book, Matter and Memory is essential to an understanding of his philosophy and its legacy.This new edition includes an annotated bibliography prepared by Bruno Paradis.Henri Bergson (1859-1941) was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1927. His works include Time and Free Will, An Introduction to Metaphysics, Creative Evolution, and The Creative Mind.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H 2 ) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H 2 /CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Recently, fundamental understanding of physical attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried Fe-based catalyst having aps of 70 mm with high attrition resistance. This Fe-based attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H 2 /CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C 5 + selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of <5%. However, further development of the catalyst is needed to address the chemical attrition due to phase changes that any Fe-catalyst goes through potentially causing internal stresses within the particle and resulting in weakening, spalling or cracking. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (i) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high alpha iron

  17. Disposition of 1,2,3-trichloropropane in the Fischer 344 rat: conventional and physiological pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volp, R.F.; Sipes, I.G.; Falcoz, C.; Carter, D.E.; Gross, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the disposition of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP), [14C]-TCP was administered iv to male Fischer 344 rats. Unchanged TCP and total radiolabel were determined in tissues and excreta at varying intervals after administration. The compound was distributed and eliminated rapidly. Initial and terminal half-lives of unchanged TCP in the blood were 0.29 and 23 hr. Adipose tissue accumulated 37% of the dose within 15 min and retained more of the dose than any other tissue until 4 hr; most (69%) of the radiolabel in adipose tissue through 4 hr was unchanged TCP. After 4 hr, the liver contained the largest fraction of the dose, primarily as metabolites. Thus TCP disappeared from adipose tissue while metabolites appeared in liver and other tissues. Excretion was nearly complete (90% of the dose) in 24 hr and was predominantly via the urine (47% of the dose). Expiration was the only route by which unchanged TCP (5% of the dose) was excreted. In addition, 25% of the dose was expired as carbon dioxide. There were numerous other metabolites, none accounting for more than 10% of the dose. Nonvolatile metabolites were longer lived than the parent compound. On the basis of high water solubility, reaction with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene, and diminished radiolabel in bile of glycidol-treated rats, glutathione conjugation is suggested as an important metabolic route for TCP. A physiological pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the time course of trichloropropane concentration in tissues. The model demonstrates the possibility of using physiological and pharmacokinetic data to predict concentration-time relations for toxic compounds

  18. Disposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid dimethylamine by Fischer 344 rats dosed orally and dermally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, O.; Ritter, L.; Caron, J.; Somers, D.

    1989-01-01

    The dimethylamine salt of 14C-ring-labeled 2,4-D was administered to Fischer 344 rats orally (1 and 0.4 mg/kg body weight) and dermally (10 mg/kg body weight). Absorption, distribution, and elimination were determined from 14C-labeled 2,4-D in blood, tissues, and excreta. Quantitatively, most of the orally administered dose (94-96%) became systemically available within 6 h. Following dermal administration 10% of the dose became systemically available over 72 h. However, peak concentrations in blood and kidneys were achieved within 30 min of dosing by either route. By 1.5 h after dosing, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys had decreased in both the orally dosed and dermally dosed animals. Between 2 and 8 h, the blood, muscle, liver and kidney concentrations in dermally dosed animals maintained a plateau while urinary excretion increased, presumably due to continued absorption of 2,4-D from the skin. The concentrations in orally dosed animals continued to decrease. Following 7 h of dermal exposure, skin cleansing removed about 63% of the applied dose; about 17% of the applied dose remained at the site of dermal dosing. At 8 h, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys of dermally dosed animals began to decrease, most likely a result of the removal of the reservoir on the skin. However, 2,4-D continued to be absorbed from skin site, resulting in a slower decline of the 2,4-D concentrations in these tissues over remainder of the 72-h study period. By comparison, in animals that had been orally dosed, the absorbed dose was almost completely excreted within 24 h

  19. Epistatic Effects Contribute to Variation in BMD in Fischer 344 × Lewis F2 Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Daniel L; Liu, Lixiang; Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Econs, Michael J; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H

    2008-01-01

    To further delineate the factors underlying the complex genetic architecture of BMD in the rat model, a genome screen for epistatic interactions was conducted. Several significant interactions were identified, involving both previously identified and novel QTLs. Introduction The variation in several of the risk factors for osteoporotic fracture, including BMD, has been shown to be caused largely by genetic differences. However, the genetic architecture of BMD is complex in both humans and in model organisms. We have previously reported quantitative trait locus (QTL) results for BMD from a genome screen of 595 female F2 progeny of Fischer 344 and Lewis rats. These progeny also provide an excellent opportunity to search for epistatic effects, or interaction between genetic loci, that contribute to fracture risk. Materials and Methods Microsatellite marker data from a 20-cM genome screen was analyzed along with weight-adjusted BMD (DXA and pQCT) phenotypic data using the R/qtl software package. Genotype and phenotype data were permuted to determine a genome-wide significance threshold for the epistasis or interaction LOD score corresponding to an α level of 0.01. Results and Conclusions Novel loci on chromosomes 12 and 15 showed a strong epistatic effect on total BMD at the femoral midshaft by pQCT (LOD = 5.4). A previously reported QTL on chromosome 7 was found to interact with a novel locus on chromosome 20 to affect whole lumbar BMD by pQCT (LOD = 6.2). These results provide new information regarding the mode of action of previously identified rat QTLs, as well as identifying novel loci that act in combination with known QTLs or with other novel loci to contribute to the risk factors for osteoporotic fracture. PMID:17907919

  20. Epistatic effects contribute to variation in BMD in Fischer 344 x Lewis F2 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Daniel L; Liu, Lixiang; Alam, Imranul; Sun, Qiwei; Econs, Michael J; Foroud, Tatiana; Turner, Charles H

    2008-01-01

    To further delineate the factors underlying the complex genetic architecture of BMD in the rat model, a genome screen for epistatic interactions was conducted. Several significant interactions were identified, involving both previously identified and novel QTLs. The variation in several of the risk factors for osteoporotic fracture, including BMD, has been shown to be caused largely by genetic differences. However, the genetic architecture of BMD is complex in both humans and in model organisms. We have previously reported quantitative trait locus (QTL) results for BMD from a genome screen of 595 female F(2) progeny of Fischer 344 and Lewis rats. These progeny also provide an excellent opportunity to search for epistatic effects, or interaction between genetic loci, that contribute to fracture risk. Microsatellite marker data from a 20-cM genome screen was analyzed along with weight-adjusted BMD (DXA and pQCT) phenotypic data using the R/qtl software package. Genotype and phenotype data were permuted to determine a genome-wide significance threshold for the epistasis or interaction LOD score corresponding to an alpha level of 0.01. Novel loci on chromosomes 12 and 15 showed a strong epistatic effect on total BMD at the femoral midshaft by pQCT (LOD = 5.4). A previously reported QTL on chromosome 7 was found to interact with a novel locus on chromosome 20 to affect whole lumbar BMD by pQCT (LOD = 6.2). These results provide new information regarding the mode of action of previously identified rat QTLs, as well as identifying novel loci that act in combination with known QTLs or with other novel loci to contribute to the risk factors for osteoporotic fracture.

  1. Life cycle assessment of climate impact of Fischer-Tropsch diesel based on peat and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Kristina; Hagberg, Linus

    2009-02-15

    By combining biomass gasification and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis it is possible to produce biodiesel. Vapo is investigating the possibilities for a plant where a mixture of different biomass fractions and peat would be used as raw material. In this study the climate impact of such synthetic diesel is calculated in terms of radiative forcing. The calculations show that the following parameters have large impact on the results: the emission factors associated with external power demand (purchased electricity) the use of carbon capture and storage the time perspective used in the analysis the raw material mix (amount of peat vs. amount of forest residues) the reference scenario for the peat production (type of peatland) All the FT-diesel scenarios with a peat input of 90% will have higher climate impact than fossil diesel after 100 years, except when CCS is applied and Swedish electricity mix is assumed for the external power demand. In order to have lower climate impact than conventional diesel after 100 years, the peat input must be significantly lower than the biomass input. Substantial reductions of the climate impact can be achieved by applying CCS. With CCS, all peat based FT-diesel scenarios (except the ones based on 90% peat) result in lower climate impact than fossil diesel after both 100 and 300 years. For scenarios with marginal electricity, the reductions are 50-84% after 100 years compared to conventional diesel. For scenarios with Swedish electricity mix the reductions are 100-135% (i.e. zero or negative radiative forcing). The scenarios in this study are based on the assumption that the biodiesel refinery is located close to a harbour so that transportation of captured CO{sub 2} to a storage site can be made by ship. An inland location would require truck transport or pipelines and the cost, infrastructure and logistics for this might not be feasible

  2. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao Duvvuri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low, 650°C (medium and 731°C (high. The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1% while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%.

  3. Dietary fat composition influences tissue lipid profile and gene expression in Fischer-344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Albert L; Hintze, Korry J; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Ward, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    The AIN-76A diet causes fatty liver in rodents when fed for long periods of time. The aim of this study was to utilize fatty acid analysis and transcriptomics to investigate the effects of different fat sources in the AIN-76A diet on tissue lipid profiles and gene expression in male, weanling Fischer-344 rats. Animals were fed isocaloric diets that differed only in the fat source: (1) corn oil (CO) (2) anhydrous milk fat (AMF), and (3) AMF supplemented with 10% phospholipids from the milk fat globule membrane (AMF-MFGM). There were no differences in food intake, body weight, growth rate, or body fat composition among the groups, and the fatty acid compositions of red blood cells (RBC), plasma, muscle, and visceral adipose tissues reflected the dietary fat sources. Modifying the fat source resulted in 293 genes differentially regulated in skeletal muscle, 1,124 in adipose, and 831 in liver as determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Although tissue fatty acid profiles mostly reflected the diet, there were several quantitative differences in lipid classes in the liver and plasma. The AMF diet resulted in the highest level of hepatic triacylglycerols, but the lowest level in plasma. The CO diet resulted in significant accumulation of hepatic unesterified fatty acids and decreased DGAT expression and activity, a potential trigger for steatohepatitis. These results indicate that the fatty acid composition and presence of polar lipids in the AIN-76A diets have significant effects on lipid partitioning, gene expression, and potentially the development of liver pathology.

  4. Dietary milk fat globule membrane reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci in Fischer-344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Dallin R; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Ward, Robert E; Cambell, Jesse; Young, Michael J; Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry J

    2010-02-24

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is a biopolymer composed primarily of membrane proteins and lipids that surround the fat globules in milk. Although it is considered to have potential as a bioactive ingredient, few feeding studies have been conducted to measure its potential benefits. The aim of this investigation was to determine if dietary MFGM confers protection against colon carcinogenesis compared to diets containing corn oil (CO) or anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Male, weanling Fischer-344 rats were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments that differed only in the fat source: (1) AIN-76A diet, corn oil; (2) AIN-76A diet, AMF; and (3) AIN-76A diet, 50% MFGM, 50% AMF. Each diet contained 50 g/kg diet of fat. With the exception of the fat source, diets were formulated to be identical in macro and micro nutrient content. Animals were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine once per week at weeks 3 and 4, and fed experimental diets for a total of 13 weeks. Over the course of the study dietary treatment did not affect food consumption, weight gain or body composition. After 13 weeks animals were sacrificed, colons were removed and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were counted by microscopy. Rats fed the MFGM diet (n = 16) had significantly fewer ACF (20.9 +/- 5.7) compared to rats fed corn oil (n = 17) or AMF (n = 16) diets (31.3 +/- 9.5 and 29.8 +/- 11.4 respectively; P < 0.05). Gene expression analysis of colonic mucosa did not reveal differential expression of candidate colon cancer genes, and the sphingolipid profile of the colonic mucosa was not affected by diet. While there were notable and significant differences in plasma and red blood cell lipids, there was no relationship to the cancer protection. These results support previous findings that dietary sphingolipids are protective against colon carcinogenesis yet extend this finding to MFGM, a milk fat fraction available as a food ingredient.

  5. Sexual dimorphism in development of kidney damage in aging Fischer-344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Jennifer M; Akinsiku, Oladele; Moningka, Natasha C; Jerzewski, Katie; Baylis, Chris; LeBlanc, Amanda J; Kang, Lori S; Sindler, Amy L; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2012-08-01

    Aging kidneys exhibit slowly developing injury and women are usually protected compared with men, in association with maintained renal nitric oxide. Our purpose was to test 2 hypotheses: (1) that aging intact Fischer-344 (F344) female rats exhibit less glomerular damage than similarly aged males, and (2) that loss of female ovarian hormones would lead to greater structural injury and dysregulation of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in aging F344 rat kidneys. We compared renal injury in F344 rats in intact, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized with estrogen replaced young (6 month) and old (24 month) female rats with young and old intact male rats and measured renal protein abundance of NOS isoforms and oxidative stress. There was no difference in age-dependent glomerular damage between young or old intact male and female F344 rats, and neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement affected renal injury; however, tubulointerstitial injury was greater in old males than in old females. These data suggest that ovarian hormones do not influence these aspects of kidney aging in F344 rats and that the greater tubulointerstitial injury is caused by male sex. Old males had greater kidney cortex NOS3 abundance than females, and NOS1 abundance (alpha and beta isoforms) was increased in old males compared with both young males and old females. NOS abundance was preserved with age in intact females, ovariectomy did not reduce NOS1 or NOS3 protein abundance, and estrogen replacement did not uniformly elevate NOS proteins, suggesting that estrogens are not primary regulators of renal NOS abundance in this strain. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent superoxide production and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity were increased in aging male rat kidneys compared with females, which could compromise renal nitric oxide production and/or bioavailability. The kidney damage expressed in aging F344 rats is fairly mild and is not related to loss of renal cortex NOS3

  6. Maternal environment alters social interactive traits but not open-field behavior in Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2008-10-01

    Although it is recognized that the genetic background governs behavioral phenotypes, environmental factors also play a critical role in the development of various behavioral processes. The maternal environment has a major impact on pups, and the cross-fostering procedure is used to determine the influence of early life experiences. The present study examined the influence of maternal environment on behavioral traits in inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats. F344/DuCrlCrlj and Wistar (Crlj:WI) pups were fostered from postnatal day 1 as follows: Wistar pups raised by Wistar dams, F344 raised by Wistar, Wistar raised by F344, and F344 raised by F344. At 10 weeks of age, rats were randomly assigned to an open-field test and social interaction test. In the open-field test, irrespective of the rearing conditions, the activity during the first 1 min was significantly lower in F344 rats than in Wistar rats. Latency to the onset of movement showed no difference between groups. In the social interaction test, the recognition performance during the first 1 min in F344 raised by F344 was significantly shorter than that in the other groups. The onset of recognition to a novel social partner in F344 raised by F344 was significantly delayed, and the delay disappeared upon cross-fostering by Wistar dams. These results raise the possibility that the behavioral phenotype of F344 rats results from the interplay of genetic factors and maternal environment during early life, and that F344 rats are a strain with high susceptibility to rearing conditions for the formation of their emotionality.

  7. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a two-phase reactor with presaturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wache, W. [Bayernoil Raffineriegesellschaft mbH, Ingolstadt (Germany); Datsevich, L.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    In industry, the Fischer-Tropsch (FTS) synthesis is mostly carried out in multiphase slurry or multitubular reactors (MTR), where gaseous reactants and liquid products (hydrocarbons up to waxes) are contacted in the presence of a solid catalyst. Such reactors are characterized by a complex temperature control, necessity of gas recycling, complicated design and problematic scale-up. A new alternative to conventional FTS-processes is the presaturated-one-liquid-phase (POLF) technology. The basic principle of this concept is a recirculation of the liquid phase, in which a gaseous reactant(s) is (are) solved before entering the fixed-bed reactor. In a simple column reactor, this technology ensures the effective heat removal and intensive fluid-solid mass transfer. In comparison to conventional reactors, the plant design is very simple, the temperature control is uncomplicated and there is no danger of any runaways. That results in lower investment and operation costs as well as in higher reliability. The experiments show that the conversion of CO and the product distribution of hydrocarbons are practically independent on the mode of operation (two- or three-phase system). However, in the lab-scale apparatus, water is accumulated in the loop, which leads to a loss of the catalyst activity (due to Fe-carbonate). In a technical process, the water accumulation in a loop can be eluded by taking an oil free of water from the oil work-up unit. Our experiments with the removal of water from the stream by a zeolite demonstrate a much promising applicability of the POLF process to the industrial FTS. (orig.)

  8. Thermodynamic optimization of biomass gasification for decentralized power generation and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buragohain, Buljit; Mahanta, Pinakeswar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, biomass gasification has emerged as a viable option for decentralized power generation, especially in developing countries. Another potential use of producer gas from biomass gasification is in terms of feedstock for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis - a process for manufacture of synthetic gasoline and diesel. This paper reports optimization of biomass gasification process for these two applications. Using the non-stoichometric equilibrium model (SOLGASMIX), we have assessed the outcome of gasification process for different combinations of operating conditions. Four key parameters have been used for optimization, viz. biomass type (saw dust, rice husk, bamboo dust), air or equivalence ratio (AR = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1), temperature of gasification (T = 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 o C), and gasification medium (air, air-steam 10% mole/mole mixture, air-steam 30%mole/mole mixture). Performance of the gasification process has been assessed with four measures, viz. molar content of H 2 and CO in the producer gas, H 2 /CO molar ratio, LHV of producer gas and overall efficiency of gasifier. The optimum sets of operating conditions for gasifier for FT synthesis are: AR = 0.2-0.4, Temp = 800-1000 o C, and gasification medium as air. The optimum sets of operating conditions for decentralized power generation are: AR = 0.3-0.4, Temp = 700-800 o C with gasification medium being air. The thermodynamic model and methodology presented in this work also presents a general framework, which could be extended for optimization of biomass gasification for any other application.

  9. How to make Fischer-Tropsch catalyst scale-up fully reliable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L.; Heraud, J.P.; Forret, A.; Gazarian, J. [IFP Energies nouvelles, Solaize (France); Cornaro, U. [Eni S.p.A., San Donato Milanese (Italy). R and M Div.; Carugati, A. [Eni S.p.A., San Donato Milanese (Italy). E and P Div.

    2011-07-01

    Several players use Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and technologies industrially [1,2] or declare to be ready for industrial application [e.g. 3]. Present R and D aims to further increase capacities per train [4] or improve catalyst selectivity towards middle distillates [5]. For transforming promising laboratory results into industrial reality, representative catalyst testing is of particular importance for slurry bubble column FT. In the Italian eni's refinery of Sannazzaro, a 20 BPD slurry bubble column pilot plant has cumulated more than 20,000 hours time on stream in different campaigns. Non reactive slurry bubble columns corresponding to reactor capacities between 20 BPD and 1000 BPD permitted to determine the profiles for gas hold up and liquid velocities as a function of gas flow, catalyst loading, reactor diameter and internals. A hydrodynamic model based on those data led to design a Large Validation Tool, which can reproduce under reaction conditions a high mechanical stress on the catalyst equivalent to the one experienced in an industrial 15000 BPD reactor. While those tools have proven to be efficient for developing an industrial scale FT catalyst [3], they predict today in a representative manner fines formation, activity and selectivity of improved catalysts and / or for optimization of operation conditions to increase the capacity per train. We compare the here presented approach to others. We have found that it is mandatory to combine chemical stress from the reaction products with mechanical stress as experienced in an industrial slurry bubble column, in order to evaluate in a reliable way catalyst performance stability and fines formation. The potential of improvements are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Metabolism and disposition of ethylene carbonate in male Fischer 344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, T.R. Jr.; Schumann, A.M.; Langvardt, P.W.; Rusek, T.F.; Watanabe, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) has a toxicity profile which resembles that of ethylene glycol (EG). To determine whether the toxicity of EC could be explained on the basis of its metabolism to EG, male Fischer 344 rats were given 200 mg/kg of uniformly labeled [ 14 C]EC in water by gavage and the disposition of the radiolabel was then followed for 72 hr. EC was rapidly metabolized, with approximately 57 and 27% of the administered dose eliminated in the expired air as 14CO2 and in the urine, respectively; the remainder was found in the carcass. Separation of the urinary metabolites using liquid chromatography revealed a single radioactive peak. This metabolite was unequivocally identified as ethylene glycol via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with the aid of 13C enrichment of the EC dose. Measurement of whole blood levels of EC and EG in rats given 200 mg/kg of EC by gavage revealed blood levels of EG approximately 100-fold higher than the levels of EC in these same animals, with a half-life of EG in blood of 2 hr, indicating rapid conversion of EC to EG. In a separate group of animals administered an equimolar dose of [ 14 C]EG (141 mg/kg), approximately 37% of the dose was expired as 14 CO 2 and 42% was excreted in the urine as parent compound. When expressed on the basis of the ethanediol moiety, the disposition of EC was identical to that of EG. In view of the rapid and extensive biotransformation of EC to EG and the similarity of the existing (though limited) toxicity data base of EC compared to EG, utilization of the extensive EG systemic toxicity data base for assessing the safety of EC appears justified

  11. Toxicity of inhaled 239PuO2 in Fischer 344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redman, H.C.; Boecker, B.B.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Griffith, W.C.; Guilmette, R.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Scott, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on the biological effects of inhaled particles of 239 PuO 2 have been initiated in the Fischer 344 rat. To obtain information on the importance of homogeneity or nonhomogeneity of radiation dose to the lung, young adult (84 +- 7 days) animals have been exposed to monodisperse aerosols (sigma/sub g/ 239 PuO 2 of 1.0 and 2.8 μm aerodynamic diameter (AD). To determine the effects of age at exposure, aged rats (600 to 660 days) have been exposed to monodisperse aerosols of 239 PuO 2 of 1.0 μm aerodynamic diameter. To date, 480 young adult rats have been exposed to 239 PuO 2 : 240 rats to 1.0 μm AD particles and 240 rats to 2.85 μm AD particles. The projected exposure level ranged from 0.012 to 0.115 μCi/kg body weight. One hundred sixty rats were sham-exposed and maintained as controls. Also, 240 aged rats have been exposed to date to 1.0 μm AD particles of 239 PuO 2 . The projected activity level ranged from 0.012 to 0.115 μCi/kg body weight. Eighty rats were sham-exposed and maintained as controls. In addition, a serial sacrifice study to determine radiation-dose pattern in rats resulting from the inhalation of these monodisperse aerosols of 239 PuO 2 has been initiated in the young adult rat

  12. Using the Web To Explore the Great Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of Web sites that focus on the Great Depression. Includes the American Experience, American Memory, the National Archives and Records Administration, and the New Deal Network Web sites. Offers additional sites covering topics such as the Jersey homesteads and labor history. (CMK)

  13. Declarative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Wim J; Blokland, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Declarative Memory consists of memory for events (episodic memory) and facts (semantic memory). Methods to test declarative memory are key in investigating effects of potential cognition-enhancing substances--medicinal drugs or nutrients. A number of cognitive performance tests assessing declarative episodic memory tapping verbal learning, logical memory, pattern recognition memory, and paired associates learning are described. These tests have been used as outcome variables in 34 studies in humans that have been described in the literature in the past 10 years. Also, the use of episodic tests in animal research is discussed also in relation to the drug effects in these tasks. The results show that nutritional supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids has been investigated most abundantly and, in a number of cases, but not all, show indications of positive effects on declarative memory, more so in elderly than in young subjects. Studies investigating effects of registered anti-Alzheimer drugs, cholinesterase inhibitors in mild cognitive impairment, show positive and negative effects on declarative memory. Studies mainly carried out in healthy volunteers investigating the effects of acute dopamine stimulation indicate enhanced memory consolidation as manifested specifically by better delayed recall, especially at time points long after learning and more so when drug is administered after learning and if word lists are longer. The animal studies reveal a different picture with respect to the effects of different drugs on memory performance. This suggests that at least for episodic memory tasks, the translational value is rather poor. For the human studies, detailed parameters of the compositions of word lists for declarative memory tests are discussed and it is concluded that tailored adaptations of tests to fit the hypothesis under study, rather than "off-the-shelf" use of existing tests, are recommended.

  14. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  15. Dual-functional Memory and Threshold Resistive Switching Based on the Push-Pull Mechanism of Oxygen Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yi-Jen; Chao, Shih-Chun; Lien, Der-Hsien; Wen, Cheng-Yen; He, Jr-Hau; Lee, Si-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The combination of nonvolatile memory switching and volatile threshold switching functions of transition metal oxides in crossbar memory arrays is of great potential for replacing charge-based flash memory in very-large-scale integration. Here, we

  16. Evidence and possible mechanism for the permanent decline in tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neuronal activity after chronic estradiol administration in Fischer 233 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschall, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine if the decline in tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neuronal function observed during chronic estradiol-17-β (E 2 ) administration persisted after E 2 was removed. Ovariectomized (OVX) Fischer 344 rats were implanted with an E 2 -containing Silastic capsule for 4 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight and serum prolactin was greatly increased at the end of the E 2 treatment, that persisted 4 and 26 weeks after E 2 was withdrawn. Ag the end of E 2 treatment and 4 weeks after E 2 was withdrawn, TIDA function, as evaluated by electrical stimulation of median eminence tissue in vitro after allowing for uptake of 3 H-DA, was decreased compared to OVX controls. In an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which E 2 results in a permanent decline in TIDA function, F344 rats were given daily bromocryptine injections in addition to a 30-day E 2 treatment. TIDA neuronal release was reduced in both E 2 and E 2 and bromocryptine treated groups. However, by 30 days after discontinuing treatment only rats given E 2 alone showed a persistent decline in TIDA function. Since permanent damage to hypothalamic neurons by an enlarged AP was speculated to be the result of E 2 treatment, neurons which regulate other AP hormones may also be damaged. To evaluate this possibility, pulsatile release of prolactin, growth hormone (GH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was evaluated in OVX control rats, chronically E 2 -treated rats, and rats 120 days after chronic E 2 treatment. Only the frequency of prolactin pulses, but not the frequency of GH and LH pulses, was reduced in rats 120 days after E 2 treatment. This suggests selectivity in the hypothalamic damage produced by the enlarged AP

  17. Carbon-14 studies on the role of oxygen-containing compounds in the reaction mechanism of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    In this work the behaviour of organic oxygen compounds has been studied in the reaction mechanism of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using the tracer method. As an oxygen carrying tracer materials i-propanole (2- 14 C), acetone (2- 14 C) and ethanole (1- 14 C) have been added to the synthesis gas. The synthesis experiments are performed under standard conditions: The synthesis products are separated in suitable fractions and then studied by gas- and radio-gaschromatography. As a result the C-number distributions of the synthesis products are obtained as a function of concentration (weight %, mol %) and radioactivity (activity %). On this basis the relative molar activities have been calculated for certain compounds and fractions. Adding i-propanole- 14 C a great part of the tracer compound is transformed to acetone- 14 C, however adding acetone- 14 C to the synthesis gas a large amount of i-propanole- 14 C is produced. The main hydrocarbon reaction product from i-propanol and acetone is propane. Besides propane also propene is produced with equal molar radioactivity. This indicates that the formation of adsorbed oxygen compounds, as they may also be produced by chemisorption from alcohols or carbonyle compounds, is the first step in the formation of hydrocarbons by hydrogenolytic separation of oxygen. Comparing the results obtained with ethanole- 14 C and i-propanole- 14 C as a tacer material, for ethane an essentially lower molar activity is obtained when adding ethanole- 14 C compared with propane when adding i-propanole- 14 C. This corresponds with a particularly low desorption probability at the C 2 -hydrocarbon level. (orig./HK) [de

  18. Dilemmas of 19th-century Liberalism among German Academic Chemists: Shaping a National Science Policy from Hofmann to Fischer, 1865-1919.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2015-04-01

    This paper's primary goal is to compare the personalities, values, and influence of August Wilhelm Hofmann and Emil Fischer as exemplars and acknowledged leaders of successive generations of the German chemical profession and as scientists sharing a 19th-century liberal, internationalist outlook from the German wars of unification in the 1860s to Fischer's death in 1919 in the aftermath of German defeat in World War I. The paper will consider the influence of Hofmann and Fischer on the shaping of national scientific institutions in Germany, from founding of the German Chemical Society in 1867 to the first institutes of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society founded in 1911, their academic leadership in other areas including the shaping of a successful academic-industrial symbiosis in organic chemistry, and finally their response to war as a force disruptive of scientific internationalism. All of these developments posed serious dilemmas, exacerbated by emerging strains of nationalism and anti-Semitism in German society. Whereas Hofmann's lifework came to a relatively successful end in 1892, Fischer was not so fortunate, as the war brought him heavy responsibilities and terrible personal losses, but with no German victory and no peace of reconciliation--a bleak end for Fischer and the 19th-century liberal ideals that had inspired him.

  19. Review: The Great Gatsby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia de Jesus Sales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A presente resenha busca discutir a tradução de The Great Gatsby para o contexto brasileiro. Diversas traduções foram feitas, em diversas épocas e com repercussão positiva no contexto brasileiro. Para o presente estudo, foi observada a tradução de Vanessa Bárbara, de 2011. Nesse sentido, o aspecto biográficos do autor e a forma como se apresentam os personagens na obra são fatores de cotejamento na obra original e na tradução brasileira. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896 – 1940 é famoso por ter em suas obras traços biográficos, algo que certamente influencia o leitor que adentra a sua obra. Quanto à recepção de O Grande Gatsby no contexto brasileiro, há que se considerar que O Grande Gatsby teve diversas traduções no Brasil. Depois dessa tradução de Vanessa Bárbara, em 2011, outras três vieram em 2013, juntamente com o filme. Há que considerar os aspectos comerciais embutidos nessas traduções e que muito corroboram para o resultado final. Prova disso são as capas, que são sempre diferenciadas em cada edição lançada. O tradutor nem sempre pode opinar sobre questões como estas. A tradução, a meu ver, é uma obra de qualidade, visto que a tradutora buscou ser fiel, sem dificultar a interpretação da obra para o leitor.

  20. Review: The Great Gatsby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia de Jesus Sales

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A presente resenha busca discutir a tradução de The Great Gatsby para o contexto brasileiro. Diversas traduções foram feitas, em diversas épocas e com repercussão positiva no contexto brasileiro. Para o presente estudo, foi observada a tradução de Vanessa Bárbara, de 2011. Nesse sentido, o aspecto biográficos do autor e a forma como se apresentam os personagens na obra são fatores de cotejamento na obra original e na tradução brasileira. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896 – 1940 é famoso por ter em suas obras traços biográficos, algo que certamente influencia o leitor que adentra a sua obra. Quanto à recepção de O Grande Gatsby no contexto brasileiro, há que se considerar que O Grande Gatsby teve diversas traduções no Brasil. Depois dessa tradução de Vanessa Bárbara, em 2011, outras três vieram em 2013, juntamente com o filme. Há que considerar os aspectos comerciais embutidos nessas traduções e que muito corroboram para o resultado final. Prova disso são as capas, que são sempre diferenciadas em cada edição lançada. O tradutor nem sempre pode opinar sobre questões como estas. A tradução, a meu ver, é uma obra de qualidade, visto que a tradutora buscou ser fiel, sem dificultar a interpretação da obra para o leitor.

  1. A balanced memory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Roudi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how working memory--the ability to store information at intermediate timescales, like tens of seconds--is implemented in realistic neuronal networks. The most likely candidate mechanism is the attractor network, and a great deal of effort has gone toward investigating it theoretically. Yet, despite almost a quarter century of intense work, attractor networks are not fully understood. In particular, there are still two unanswered questions. First, how is it that attractor networks exhibit irregular firing, as is observed experimentally during working memory tasks? And second, how many memories can be stored under biologically realistic conditions? Here we answer both questions by studying an attractor neural network in which inhibition and excitation balance each other. Using mean-field analysis, we derive a three-variable description of attractor networks. From this description it follows that irregular firing can exist only if the number of neurons involved in a memory is large. The same mean-field analysis also shows that the number of memories that can be stored in a network scales with the number of excitatory connections, a result that has been suggested for simple models but never shown for realistic ones. Both of these predictions are verified using simulations with large networks of spiking neurons.

  2. Effect of Lanthanum as a Promoter on Fe-Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron-Cobalt catalyst is well known from both operational and economical aspects for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Effort to increase the efficiency of this kind of catalyst is an important research topic. In this work, the effect of lanthanum on characteristic behavior, conversion and selectivity of a Fe-Co/SiO2 Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was studied. The Fe-Co-La/SiO2 Catalysts were prepared using an incipient wetness impregnation method. These catalysts were then characterized by XRF-EDAX, BET and TPR techniques, and their performance were evaluated in a lab-scale reactor at 250ºC, H2/CO = 1.8 of molar ratio, 16 barg pressure and GHSV=600 h-1. TPR analysis showed that the addition of La lowered the reduction temperature of Fe-Co catalyst, and due to a lower temperature, the sintering of the catalyst can be mitigated. Furthermore, from the micro reactor tests (about 4 days, it was found that lanthanum promoted catalyst had higher selectivity toward hydrocarbons, and lower selectivity toward CO2.Received: 8th July 2013; Revised: 18th November 2013; Accepted: 1st December 2013[How to Cite: Abbasi, A., Ghasemi, M., Sadighi, S. (2014. Effect of Lanthanum as a Promoter on Fe-Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (1: 23-27. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5142.23-27][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5142.23-27

  3. Effect of the Polymeric Stabilizer in the Aqueous Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyzed by Colloidal Cobalt Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Delgado

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of small and well defined cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical reduction of cobalt salts in water using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and using various polymeric stabilizers. The obtained nanocatalysts of similar mean diameters (ca. 2.6 nm were fully characterized and tested in the aqueous phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (AFTS. Interestingly, the nature and structure of the stabilizers used during the synthesis of the CoNPs affected the reduction degree of cobalt and the B-doping of these NPs and consequently, influenced the performance of these nanocatalysts in AFTS.

  4. Rate and selectivity modification in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over charcoal supported molybdenum by forced concentration cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dun, J.W.; Gulari, E.

    1985-01-01

    Forced concentration cycling of the feed between pure CO and pure H/sub 2/ was used to successfully change both the selectivities and reactivities of promoted and unpromoted charcoal supported molybdenum catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. It was found that with the unpromoted catalyst the rate enhancement increases with temperature and selectivity shifts towards methane. At the lower temperatures concentration cycling increases selectivity to ethane and higher hydrocarbons to levels only achievable with promised catalysts. Periodic operation with the potassium promoted catalyst results in small rate enhancements but the olefin to paraffin ratio is dramatically changed without changing the carbon number distribution

  5. Great Lakes Environmental Database (GLENDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Great Lakes Environmental Database (GLENDA) houses environmental data on a wide variety of constituents in water, biota, sediment, and air in the Great Lakes area.

  6. Memory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sisse

    by cultural forms, often specifically by the concept of memory in philosophy, sociology and psychology, while Danish design traditionally has been focusing on form and function with frequent references to the forms of nature. Alessi's motivation for investigating the concept of memory is that it adds......Mind and Matter - Nordik 2009 Conference for Art Historians Design Matters Contributed Memory design BACKGROUND My research concerns the use of memory categories in the designs by the companies Alessi and Georg Jensen. When Alessi's designers create their products, they are usually inspired...... a cultural dimension to the design objects, enabling the objects to make an identity-forming impact. Whether or not the concept of memory plays a significant role in Danish design has not yet been elucidated fully. TERMINOLOGY The concept of "memory design" refers to the idea that design carries...

  7. Disputed Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , individual and political discourse and electronic social media. Analyzing memory disputes in various local, national and transnational contexts, the chapters demonstrate the political power and social impact of painful and disputed memories. The book brings new insights into current memory disputes...... in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. It contributes to the understanding of processes of memory transmission and negotiation across borders and cultures in Europe, emphasizing the interconnectedness of memory with emotions, mediation and politics....... century in the region. Written by an international group of scholars from a diversity of disciplines, the chapters approach memory disputes in methodologically innovative ways, studying representations and negotiations of disputed pasts in different media, including monuments, museum exhibitions...

  8. Main Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Boncz, Peter; Liu, Lei; Özsu, M.

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractPrimary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random Access Memory (RAM), to indicate that load/store instructions can access data at any location at the same cost, is usually implemented using DRAM chips, which are connected to the CPU and other per...

  9. Striking a Memory the Right Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrick, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The author has strong childhood memories of sitting on the ledge of an open fireplace after a bath on a cold winter's evening. While the logs crackled and sizzled, he and his brothers would toast their pajamas on the screen and slowly dress themselves before bed. Those are good memories for him. So it was with great joy that he recently bought a…

  10. OF THE GREAT TEMPLE OF BEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Denker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Great Temple of Bel in Palmyra was a unique edifice which had blended the well established lines of Greco-Roman architecture with the art and taste of the Orient. With the gilded bronze capitals of its 41 Corinthian columns it was the product of enormous effort and budget. It was the gem of a remarkable epoch of wealthy Palmyra and mighty Roma. With its splendidly decorated adyta ceilings it became a source of inspiration and imagination for Western architecture and decorative arts. While continuing to captivate the World, it was leveled and vanished as a grim result of conflict based vandalism. The aim of this work is to piece together this, the most eloquent and stupendous monument of the Roman East, from its ruins and reconstruct it as it was once extant. Its loss is irreplacable, but its photo-realistic reconstruction can offer some solace by waking the memories of the great temple as in the past. The lost reality of the Great Temple of Bel is revived here by digitally constructing its “ghost images".

  11. Hydroprocessing of Fischer-Tropsch biowaxes to second-generation biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schablitzky, Harald Walter; Hafner, C. [OMV Refining and Marketing, Centre of Excellence-Fuels, Innovation and Quality, Schwechat (Austria); Lichtscheidl, J.; Hutter, K. [OMV Refining and Marketing, New Technology, Schwechat (Austria); Rauch, R. [Bioenergy, Graz (Austria); Hofbauer, H. [Bioenergy, Graz (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-03-15

    Upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) biowaxes to second-generation biofuels via hydroprocessing is the final step for increasing the fuel amount of the overall biomass conversion route: gasification of lignocellulosic biomass, FT synthesis, and hydroprocessing. The typical FT product portfolio consists of high molecular weight paraffinic waxes as the main product and FT fuels in the diesel and naphtha boiling range. OMV's objective and contribution to the project focus on achieving coprocessing of FT biowaxes with fossil feedstock using existing hydrotreating plants of crude oil refineries. Various test runs have been examined with a conventional refining catalyst under mild conditions (380-390 C, 5.8 MPa; WHSV, 0.7-1.3 h{sup -1}) in a pilot plant. Pure FT biowax is converted to gases, fuels, and an oil/waxy residue in a fixed-bed reactor with a porous catalyst layer technology. The presence of hydrogen in the reaction chamber reduces the fast deactivation of the catalyst caused by the formation of a coke layer around the catalyst particle surface and saturates cracked hydrocarbon fragments. Another approach is the creation of synthetic biodiesel components with excellent fuel properties for premium fuel application. Basically, premium diesel fuel differs from standard diesel quality by cetane number and cold flow properties. Hydroprocessed synthetic biodiesel (HPFT diesel) has compared to conventional diesel advantages in many aspects. Depending on the catalyst selected, premium diesel quality can be obtained by shifting cold flow operability properties of HPFT fuels to a range capable even under extreme cold conditions. In addition, a high-quality kerosene fraction is obtained to create bio jet fuels with an extremely deep freezing point, as low as -80 C. The isomerization degree, as well as the carbon number distribution of high paraffinic profile, and the branching degree have a major impact on the cold flow properties and cetane number. FT diesel has

  12. PROGRESS TOWARDS MODELING OF FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-11-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  13. Characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using quantitative diffraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansker, Linda Denise

    This study presents the results of the ex-situ characterization of working iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (F-TS) catalysts, reacted hundreds of hours at elevated pressures, using a new quantitative x-ray diffraction analytical methodology. Compositions, iron phase structures, and phase particle morphologies were determined and correlated with the observed reaction kinetics. Conclusions were drawn about the character of each catalyst in its most and least active state. The identity of the active phase(s) in the Fe F-TS catalyst has been vigorously debated for more than 45 years. The highly-reduced catalyst, used to convert coal-derived syngas to hydrocarbon products, is thought to form a mixture of oxides, metal, and carbides upon pretreatment and reaction. Commonly, Soxhlet extraction is used to effect catalyst-product slurry separation; however, the extraction process could be producing irreversible changes in the catalyst, contributing to the conflicting results in the literature. X-ray diffraction doesn't require analyte-matrix separation before analysis, and can detect trace phases down to 300 ppm/2 nm; thus, working catalyst slurries could be characterized as-sampled. Data were quantitatively interpreted employing first principles methods, including the Rietveld polycrystalline structure method. Pretreated catalysts and pure phases were examined experimentally and modeled to explore specific behavior under x-rays. Then, the working catalyst slurries were quantitatively characterized. Empirical quantitation factors were calculated from experimental data or single crystal parameters, then validated using the Rietveld method results. In the most active form, after pretreatment in H 2 or in CO at Pambient, well-preserved working catalysts contained significant amounts of Fe7C3 with trace alpha-Fe, once reaction had commenced at elevated pressure. Amounts of Fe3O 4 were constant and small, with carbide dpavg 65 wt%, regardless of pretreatment gas and pressure, with

  14. Moessbauer study of iron-carbide growth and Fischer-Tropsch activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to establish a correlation between the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) activity of an iron-based catalyst and the catalyst phase during FT synthesis. The nature of iron phases formed during activation and FT synthesis is influenced by the nature of the gas and pressure apart from other parameters like temperature, flow rate etc., used for activation. Moessbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts subjected to pretreatment at two different pressures in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been carried out. Studies on UCI 1185-57 (64%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/5%CuO/1%K{sub 2}O/30% Kaolin) catalyst indicate that activation of the catalyst in CO at 12 atms. leads to the formation of 100% magnetite and the magnetite formed gets rapidly converted to at least 90% of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation of the catalyst in synthesis gas at 12 atms. leads to formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and it gets sluggishly converted to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C during activation and both continue to grow slowly during FT synthesis. FT activity is found to be poor. Pretreatment of the catalyst, 100fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a low pressure of 1 atms. in syngas gave rise to the formation of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and good FT activity. On the other hand, pretreatment of the catalyst, 100Fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a relatively high pressure of 12 atms. in syngas did not give rise to the formation any carbide and FT activity was poor.

  15. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS. FOURTH ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukur, Dragomir B.; Froment, Gilbert F.; Olewski, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight

  16. Indústria, ordenamento do território e transportes – a contribuição de André Fischer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Breitbach

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Indústria, ordenamento do território e transportes – a contribuição de André Fischer, Organização Olga Lúcia C. Firkowski e Eliseu S. Sposito, Editora Expressão Popular, 2008, 160 p.Este livro é uma iniciativa conjunta dos Programas de Pós-Graduação em Geografia da Universidade Federal do Paraná e da Universidade Estadual Paulista/Presidente Prudente. Conforme os organizadores, a intenção foi publicar um livro que homenageasse André Fischer e, para tanto, foram reunidos diversos textos escrit...

  17. Comparison between amperometric and true potentiometric end-point detection in the determination of water by the Karl Fischer method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, A

    1974-06-01

    A rapid and sensitive method using true potentiometric end-point detection has been developed and compared with the conventional amperometric method for Karl Fischer determination of water. The effect of the sulphur dioxide concentration on the shape of the titration curve is shown. By using kinetic data it was possible to calculate the course of titrations and make comparisons with those found experimentally. The results prove that the main reaction is the slow step, both in the amperometric and the potentiometric method. Results obtained in the standardization of the Karl Fischer reagent showed that the potentiometric method, including titration to a preselected potential, gave a standard deviation of 0.001(1) mg of water per ml, the amperometric method using extrapolation 0.002(4) mg of water per ml and the amperometric titration to a pre-selected diffusion current 0.004(7) mg of water per ml. Theories and results dealing with dilution effects are presented. The time of analysis was 1-1.5 min for the potentiometric and 4-5 min for the amperometric method using extrapolation.

  18. Techno-economic performance analysis of bio-oil based Fischer-Tropsch and CHP synthesis platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kok Siew; Sadhukhan, Jhuma

    2011-01-01

    The techno-economic potential of the UK poplar wood and imported oil palm empty fruit bunch derived bio-oil integrated gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (BOIG-FT) systems for the generation of transportation fuels and combined heat and power (CHP) was investigated. The bio-oil was represented in terms of main chemical constituents, i.e. acetic acid, acetol and guaiacol. The compositional model of bio-oil was validated based on its performance through a gasification process. Given the availability of large scale gasification and FT technologies and logistic constraints in transporting biomass in large quantities, distributed bio-oil generations using biomass pyrolysis and centralised bio-oil processing in BOIG-FT system are technically more feasible. Heat integration heuristics and composite curve analysis were employed for once-through and full conversion configurations, and for a range of economies of scale, 1 MW, 675 MW and 1350 MW LHV of bio-oil. The economic competitiveness increases with increasing scale. A cost of production of FT liquids of 78.7 Euro/MWh was obtained based on 80.12 Euro/MWh of electricity, 75 Euro/t of bio-oil and 116.3 million Euro/y of annualised capital cost. -- Highlights: → Biomass to liquid process and gas to liquid process synthesis. → Biorefinery economic analysis. → Pyrolysis oil to biofuel. → Gasification and Fischer-Tropsch. → Process integration, pinch analysis and energy efficiency.

  19. Techno-economic assessment of integrating methanol or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a South African sugar mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Abdul M; Farzad, Somayeh; Görgens, Johann F

    2015-05-01

    This study considered an average-sized sugar mill in South Africa that crushes 300 wet tonnes per hour of cane, as a host for integrating methanol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, through gasification of a combined flow of sugarcane trash and bagasse. Initially, it was shown that the conversion of biomass to syngas is preferably done by catalytic allothermal gasification instead of catalytic autothermal gasification. Thereafter, conventional and advanced synthesis routes for both Methanol and Fischer-Tropsch products were simulated with Aspen Plus® software and compared by technical and economic feasibility. Advanced FT synthesis satisfied the overall energy demands, but was not economically viable for a private investment. Advanced methanol synthesis is also not viable for private investment since the internal rate of return was 21.1%, because it could not provide the steam that the sugar mill required. The conventional synthesis routes had less viability than the corresponding advanced synthesis routes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of hydrogen production via coupling of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane in GTL technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour, M.R.; Bahmanpour, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a thermally-coupled reactor containing the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction in the exothermic side and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane in the endothermic side has been modified using a hydrogen perm-selective membrane as the shell of the reactor to separate the produced hydrogen from the dehydrogenation process. Permeated hydrogen enters another section called permeation side to be collected by Argon, known as the sweep gas. This three-sided reactor has been optimized using differential evolution (DE) method to predict the conditions at which the reactants' conversion and also the hydrogen recovery yield would be maximized. Minimizing the CO 2 and CH 4 yield in the reactor's outlet as undesired products is also considered in the optimization process. To reach this goal, optimal initial molar flow rate and inlet temperature of three sides as well as pressure of the exothermic side have been calculated. The obtained results have been compared with the conventional reactor data of the Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), the membrane dual - type reactor suggested for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and the membrane coupled reactor presented for methanol synthesis. The comparison shows acceptable enhancement in the reactor's performance and that the production of hydrogen as a valuable byproduct should also be considered.

  1. An investigation of the physical and chemical changes occuring in a Fischer-Tropsch fixed bed catalyst during hydrocarbon synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvenhage, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Deactivation studies: making use of fixed bed reactors, wet chemical analysis, surface area, pore volume determinations and X-ray diffraction spectrometry, scanning electron microscope spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques; were performed on a low temperature iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. It was revealed that this catalyst is mainly deactivated by sulphur poisoning, oxidation of the catalytic reactive phases, sintering of the iron crystallites and to a lesser extent deactivation through fouling of the catalytic surface by carbonaceous deposits. It was found that the top entry section of the catalyst bed deactivated relatively fast, the bottom exit section also deactivated, but not as fast as the top section. The central portion of the catalyst bed was least affected. Sulphur contaminants in the feed gas, even though present in only minute quantities, results in a loss of catalyst performance of the top section of the catalyst bed, while water, produced as a product from the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxidized and sintered the catalyst over the bottom section of the catalyst bed. 88 figs., 7 tabs., 224 refs

  2. Manipulations of attention dissociate fragile visual short-term memory from visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Lamme, Victor A F

    2011-05-01

    People often rely on information that is no longer in view, but maintained in visual short-term memory (VSTM). Traditionally, VSTM is thought to operate on either a short time-scale with high capacity - iconic memory - or a long time scale with small capacity - visual working memory. Recent research suggests that in addition, an intermediate stage of memory in between iconic memory and visual working memory exists. This intermediate stage has a large capacity and a lifetime of several seconds, but is easily overwritten by new stimulation. We therefore termed it fragile VSTM. In previous studies, fragile VSTM has been dissociated from iconic memory by the characteristics of the memory trace. In the present study, we dissociated fragile VSTM from visual working memory by showing a differentiation in their dependency on attention. A decrease in attention during presentation of the stimulus array greatly reduced the capacity of visual working memory, while this had only a small effect on the capacity of fragile VSTM. We conclude that fragile VSTM is a separate memory store from visual working memory. Thus, a tripartite division of VSTM appears to be in place, comprising iconic memory, fragile VSTM and visual working memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Insight on Biomass Supply and Feedstock Definition for Fischer-Tropsch Based BTL Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coignac, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Process chains of thermo chemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass through gasification and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (known as BTL) represent promising alternatives for biofuels production. Since biomass is heterogeneous and not homogeneously spread over territories, one of the major technological stakes of the project is to develop a flexible industrial chain capable of co-treating the widest possible range of biomass and fossil fuel feedstock. The present study aims at characterizing biomass diversity (availability and potentials by area, cost and mineral composition) by carrying out a state of the art, as a preliminary step in order to define a series of biomass to be tested in the demonstration plant and therefore define specifications for the process. Fifty different biomass were considered for their bio-energy application potential and were finally classified into four categories: agricultural by-products, dedicated energy crops, (Very) Short Rotation Coppice ((V)SRC) and forestry biomass. Biomass availability and potentials were investigated by the mean of a literature review of past and current projects (e.g. RENEW project, Biomass Energy Europe Project, etc.) and scientific articles. Most collected data are technical potentials, meaning that they take into account biophysical limits of crops and forests, technological possibilities, competition with other land uses and ecological constraints (e.g. natural reserves). Results show various emerging markets: North and South America have considerable amounts of agricultural by-products, forest residues, and large land areas which could be dedicated to energy crops; Africa shows relevant possibilities to grow Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) and energy crops; Russia has large available quantities of agricultural by-products and forest residues, as well as little valuable land where energy crops and SRC could be grown, and Asia shows relevant amounts of forest residues and possibilities of growing SRC, as well

  4. Collaging Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  5. Memory Magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas G.; Nowak, Norman

    This paper outlines several "tricks" that aid students in improving their memories. The distinctions between operational and figural thought processes are noted. Operational memory is described as something that allows adults to make generalizations about numbers and the rules by which they may be combined, thus leading to easier memorization.…

  6. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... barbiturates or ( hypnotics ) ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) (most often short-term memory loss) Epilepsy that is not well controlled Illness that ... appointment. Medical history questions may include: Type of memory loss, such as short-term or long-term Time pattern, such as how ...

  7. Episodic Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  8. Flavor Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, Jos; Köster, Ep

    2016-01-01

    Odor, taste, texture, temperature, and pain all contribute to the perception and memory of food flavor. Flavor memory is also strongly linked to the situational aspects of previous encounters with the flavor, but does not depend on the precise recollection of its sensory features as in vision and

  9. Main Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); L. Liu (Lei); M. Tamer Özsu

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractPrimary storage, presently known as main memory, is the largest memory directly accessible to the CPU in the prevalent Von Neumann model and stores both data and instructions (program code). The CPU continuously reads instructions stored there and executes them. It is also called Random

  10. Digital Extension of Music Memory Music as a Collective Cultural Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrije Buzarovski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Artistic works represent a very important part of collective cultural memory. Every artistic work, by definition, can confirm its existence only through the presence in collective cultural memory. The migration from author’s individual memory to common collective cultural memory forms the cultural heritage. This equally applies to tangible and intangible cultural artifacts. Being part of collective cultural memory, music reflects the spatial (geographic and temporal (historic dimensions of this memory. Until the appearance of written signs (scores music was preserved only through collective cultural memory. Scores have facilitated further distribution of music artifacts. The appearance of different means for audio, and later audio/video recordings have greatly improved the distribution of music. The transition from analog to digital recording and carriers has been a revolutionary step which substantially extended the chances for the survival of music artifacts in collective memory.

  11. Accessing memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Doe Hyun; Muralimanohar, Naveen; Chang, Jichuan; Ranganthan, Parthasarathy

    2017-09-26

    A disclosed example method involves performing simultaneous data accesses on at least first and second independently selectable logical sub-ranks to access first data via a wide internal data bus in a memory device. The memory device includes a translation buffer chip, memory chips in independently selectable logical sub-ranks, a narrow external data bus to connect the translation buffer chip to a memory controller, and the wide internal data bus between the translation buffer chip and the memory chips. A data access is performed on only the first independently selectable logical sub-rank to access second data via the wide internal data bus. The example method also involves locating a first portion of the first data, a second portion of the first data, and the second data on the narrow external data bus during separate data transfers.

  12. Hummingbirds have a greatly enlarged hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Brian J; Day, Lainy B; Wilkening, Steven R; Wylie, Douglas R; Saucier, Deborah M; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2012-08-23

    Both field and laboratory studies demonstrate that hummingbirds (Apodiformes, Trochilidae) have exceptional spatial memory. The complexity of spatial-temporal information that hummingbirds must retain and use daily is probably subserved by the hippocampal formation (HF), and therefore, hummingbirds should have a greatly expanded HF. Here, we compare the relative size of the HF in several hummingbird species with that of other birds. Our analyses reveal that the HF in hummingbirds is significantly larger, relative to telencephalic volume, than any bird examined to date. When expressed as a percentage of telencephalic volume, the hummingbird HF is two to five times larger than that of caching and non-caching songbirds, seabirds and woodpeckers. This HF expansion in hummingbirds probably underlies their ability to remember the location, distribution and nectar content of flowers, but more detailed analyses are required to determine the extent to which this arises from an expansion of HF or a decrease in size of other brain regions.

  13. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer

  14. Wabash Valley Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Coal to Fischer Tropsch Jet Fuel Conversion Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jayesh [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Hess, Fernando [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Horzen, Wessel van [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Williams, Daniel [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Peevor, Andy [JM Davy, London (United Kingdom); Dyer, Andy [JM Davy, London (United Kingdom); Frankel, Louis [Canonsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This reports examines the feasibility of converting the existing Wabash Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant into a liquid fuel facility, with the goal of maximizing jet fuel production. The fuels produced are required to be in compliance with Section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007 §526) lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions requirements, so lifecycle GHG emissions from the fuel must be equal to or better than conventional fuels. Retrofitting an existing gasification facility reduces the technical risk and capital costs associated with a coal to liquids project, leading to a higher probability of implementation and more competitive liquid fuel prices. The existing combustion turbine will continue to operate on low cost natural gas and low carbon fuel gas from the gasification facility. The gasification technology utilized at Wabash is the E-Gas™ Technology and has been in commercial operation since 1995. In order to minimize capital costs, the study maximizes reuse of existing equipment with minimal modifications. Plant data and process models were used to develop process data for downstream units. Process modeling was utilized for the syngas conditioning, acid gas removal, CO2 compression and utility units. Syngas conversion to Fischer Tropsch (FT) liquids and upgrading of the liquids was modeled and designed by Johnson Matthey Davy Technologies (JM Davy). In order to maintain the GHG emission profile below that of conventional fuels, the CO2 from the process must be captured and exported for sequestration or enhanced oil recovery. In addition the power utilized for the plant’s auxiliary loads had to be supplied by a low carbon fuel source. Since the process produces a fuel gas with sufficient energy content to power the plant’s loads, this fuel gas was converted to hydrogen and exported to the existing gas turbine for low carbon power production. Utilizing low carbon fuel gas and

  15. Memory Reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubrich, Josue; Nader, Karim

    2018-01-01

    Scientific advances in the last decades uncovered that memory is not a stable, fixed entity. Apparently stable memories may become transiently labile and susceptible to modifications when retrieved due to the process of reconsolidation. Here, we review the initial evidence and the logic on which reconsolidation theory is based, the wide range of conditions in which it has been reported and recent findings further revealing the fascinating nature of this process. Special focus is given to conceptual issues of when and why reconsolidation happen and its possible outcomes. Last, we discuss the potential clinical implications of memory modifications by reconsolidation.

  16. Olfactory Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Robitsek, R. Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Odor-recognition memory in rodents may provide a valuable model of cognitive aging. In a recent study we used signal detection analyses to distinguish odor recognition based on recollection versus that based on familiarity. Aged rats were selectively impaired in recollection, with relative sparing of familiarity, and the deficits in recollection were correlated with spatial memory impairments. These results complement electro-physiological findings indicating age-associated deficits in the ability of hippocampal neurons to differentiate contextual information, and this information-processing impairment may underlie the common age-associated decline in olfactory and spatial memory. PMID:19686208

  17. Stereoisomeric products of electrochemical reduction of heterocyclic Fischer aminocarbene Cr(0) complexes. Development of the electrochemistry-mass spectrometry tandem approach using biphasic (acetonitrile-hexane) preparative electrolysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Metelková, R.; Hoskovcová, I.; Polášek, Miroslav; Urban, Jiří; David, T.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 162, APR 2015 (2015), s. 17-23 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0727 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fischer aminocarbene complexes biphasic electrolysis * EC-MS * HPLC-NMR Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.803, year: 2015

  18. Bulk and surface structure of a NixFe/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by Moessbauer, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, E.; Kraan, A.M. van der; Geus, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Deposition precipitation of a stoichiometric nickel-ironcyanide complex onto a alumina support and subsequent calcination and reduction has resulted in the formation of a homogeneous metallic alloy which exhibits activity for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. During hydrocarbon synthesis conditions only a fraction of the metallic phase is converted in a phase which is most likely a thermally unstable (nickel-)iron carbide. (orig.)

  19. Six-flow operations for catalyst development in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis : Bridging the gap between high-throughput experimentation and extensive product evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.; Jansma, H.; Bosma, D.; Boshuizen, B.; Makkee, M.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.

    2013-01-01

    Design and operation of a “six-flow fixed-bed microreactor” setup for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is described. The unit consists of feed and mixing, flow division, reaction, separation, and analysis sections. The reactor system is made of five heating blocks with individual temperature

  20. Two months make a difference in spatial orientation learning in very old hybrid Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (FBNF1) rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staay, van der F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Age-related changes in cognitive performance may be more pronounced in the period near or exceeding the median life span. Therefore, we compared the acquisition of a Morris water escape task by two groups of very old Fischer344 × Brown Norway hybrid rats. The mean age difference between the two

  1. Attention-based Memory Selection Recurrent Network for Language Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Da-Rong; Chuang, Shun-Po; Lee, Hung-yi

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) have achieved great success in language modeling. However, since the RNNs have fixed size of memory, their memory cannot store all the information about the words it have seen before in the sentence, and thus the useful long-term information may be ignored when predicting the next words. In this paper, we propose Attention-based Memory Selection Recurrent Network (AMSRN), in which the model can review the information stored in the memory at each previous time ...

  2. What Caused the Great Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jean; O'Driscoll, Timothy G.

    2007-01-01

    Economists and historians have struggled for almost 80 years to account for the American Great Depression, which began in 1929 and lasted until the early years of World War II. In this article, the authors discuss three major schools of thought on the causes of the Great Depression and the long failure of the American economy to return to full…

  3. Multiferroic Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amritendu Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroism implies simultaneous presence of more than one ferroic characteristics such as coexistence of ferroelectric and magnetic ordering. This phenomenon has led to the development of various kinds of materials and conceptions of many novel applications such as development of a memory device utilizing the multifunctionality of the multiferroic materials leading to a multistate memory device with electrical writing and nondestructive magnetic reading operations. Though, interdependence of electrical- and magnetic-order parameters makes it difficult to accomplish the above and thus rendering the device to only two switchable states, recent research has shown that such problems can be circumvented by novel device designs such as formation of tunnel junction or by use of exchange bias. In this paper, we review the operational aspects of multiferroic memories as well as the materials used for these applications along with the designs that hold promise for the future memory devices.

  4. Color Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pate, Monica; Raclariu, Ana-Maria; Strominger, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A transient color flux across null infinity in classical Yang-Mills theory is considered. It is shown that a pair of test `quarks' initially in a color singlet generically acquire net color as a result of the flux. A nonlinear formula is derived for the relative color rotation of the quarks. For weak color flux the formula linearizes to the Fourier transform of the soft gluon theorem. This color memory effect is the Yang-Mills analog of the gravitational memory effect.

  5. A combined in situ XAS-XRPD-Raman study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a carbon supported Co catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Dehghan, Roya; Johnsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst, supported on a carbon nanofibers/carbon felt composite (Co/CNF/CF) was studied in situ at realistic conditions. The catalyst was monitored by Xray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (HR-XRPD) and Raman...... spectroscopy, while changes in the gas phase were observed by mass spectrometry (MS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to characterise the catalyst. The catalyst has a bimodal particle size distribution and exhibits a high deactivation rate. During the in situ study the catalyst appears...... to reduce further at the induction period of FTS, while crystallite growth is been detected in the same period. At steady state FTS the amount of metallic Co is constant. A change in the volumetric flow towards higher conversions did not affect the degree of reduction or the crystallite size of the catalyst...

  6. To the biology of the Damalacantha vacca (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846 (Orthoptera: Tettigonnidae: Bradyporinae with the description of eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Temreshev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a new data on the biology and fecundity of the grasshopper Damalacantha vacca (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846, a rare species of the Orthopterans, listed in the Red Book of the Republic of Kazakhstan. Earlier in the literature it was noted that this species eats saltwort (Salsola. When the Damalacantha vacca was kept in the cage, in addition to plant foods (except for Amaranthaceae and Chenopodiaceae plants, cereals, mostly spikelets and young leaves, and thinly sliced pieces of various vegetables - cabbage, potatoes, carrots were eaten, and animals (dead grasshoppers, flies and butterflies - Owlet moths. Egg laying by females carried out in batches of 5-6 pieces per soil, with preference given to areas with compacted soil, permeated with interlaced plant roots. Fecundity of two females, who made a full clutch, was 49 and 54 eggs, respectively. For the first time the description of the egg is given and the structure of the chorion.

  7. Effect of Surface Modification by Chelating Agents on Fischer- Tropsch Performance of Co/SiO{sub 2} Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambal, Ashish S.; Kugler, Edwin L.; Gardner, Todd H.; Dadyburjor, Dady B.

    2013-11-14

    The silica support of a Co-based catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was modified by the chelating agents (CAs) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the modification, characterization of the fresh and spent catalysts show reduced crystallite sizes, a better-dispersed Co₃O₄ phase on the calcined samples, and increased metal dispersions for the reduced samples. The CA-modified catalysts display higher CO conversions, product yields, reaction rates and rate constants. The improved FT performance of CA-modified catalysts is attributed to the formation of stable complexes with Co. The superior performance of the EDTA-modified catalyst in comparison to the NTA-modified catalyst is due to the higher affinity of the former for complex formation with Co ions.

  8. Preparation, characterization and testing of SiC-based catalytic sponges as structured catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudry, A.; Schaub, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Solid sponges (open-cell foams) may be used as catalyst support, due to favorable thermal properties and low pressure drop. As an example, they may lead to improved temperature control in Fischer-Tropsch applications, if compared to fixed beds of catalyst particles. The aim of this study was to develop and test a wet method for impregnating ceramic foam materials with a CoRe/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Defined catalyst layers were generated on 20 ppi SiC-sponges. Resulting catalytic activities are nearly identical to those of the corresponding powder catalyst material. The difference observed can be explained by either mass transfer limitation or backmixing in the fixed bed configuration used. (orig.)

  9. Evidence for H2/D2 isotope effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over supported ruthenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellner, C.S.; Bell, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using D 2 rather than H 2 during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated using alumina- and silica-supported Ru catalysts. For the alumina-supported catalysts, the rate of CD 4 formation was 1.4 to 1.6 times faster than the formation of CH 4 . A noticeable isotope effect was also observed for higher molecular weight products. The magnitude of the isotope effects observed using the silica-supported catalyst was much smaller than that found using the alumina-supported catalysts. The formation of olefins relative to paraffins was found to be higher when H 2 rather than D 2 was used, independent of the catalyst support. The observed isotope effects are explained in terms of a mechanism for CO hydrogenation and are shown to arise from a complex combination of the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects associated with elementary processes occurring on the catalyst surface

  10. Studies of carbon deposition and consumption on Ru/TiO2 during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, G.; Bell, A.T.; Duncan, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Isotropic tracer techniques have been used to characterize the dynamics of carbon deposition on the surface of a Ru/TiO 2 catalyst during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structure of the deposited carbon. Elemental carbon, designated C/sub α/ is formed very rapidly, whereas alkyl carbon, designated C/sub β/ accumulates much more slowly. The influence of catalyst reduction on temperature, reaction conditions, and time under reaction conditions on the surface concentrations and reactivity of C/sub α/ and C/sub β/ will be discussed. It will be shown that C/sub β/ progressively becomes less reactive and may be the precursor to the formation of graphitic carbon

  11. A preliminary plant design study for the production of diesel from coal via fischer-tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamil, M.; Saleem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pakistan's reliance on conventional means of producing energy has proven to be an inadequate strategy for overcoming it. The situation direly demands diversification of our energy resources not only to overcome current fiasco but also in planning for future. Among the other alternative sources, coal is the main source for producing cheaper electricity being available as huge reserves. This paper presents the preliminary plant design and cost estimation for the production of diesel from coal via coal gasification and fischer-Tropschs synthesis. Prelimnary design calculations and cost estimation are presented along with underlying assumptions. The results reveal that the diesel produced from this process might be cheaper than the crude oil based diesel. (author)

  12. Characterization of catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy: An application to the study of Fischer-Tropsch, hydrotreating and super Claus catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Boellaard, E.; Craje, M.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is an excellent in-situ technique for the identification of phases present in catalysts. Applied to metallic iron catalysts used in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction it reveals a detailed picture of the carburization process and provides insight into the relation between the properties of the catalytic material and its activity. The influence of a support and the effect of alloying iron with an (in)active metal on the catalytic performance is discussed for Fe, Cu-Fe and Ni-Fe systems. In addition, Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for the identification of 'Co-sulfide' species present in sulfided Co and CoMo catalysts applied in one of the largest chemical processes in the world, the hydrotreatment of crude oil. A structural model is proposed. Finally, the contribution of Moessbauer spectroscopic studies to the development of a new catalyst for cleaning of Claus tail gas via selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Effect of pretreatment temperature on catalytic performance of the catalysts derived from cobalt carbonyl cluster in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byambasuren O

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The monometallic cobalt-based catalysts were prepared by pretreating the catalysts derived from carbonyl cluster precursor (CO6Co2CC(COOH2 supported on γ-Al2O3 with hydrogen at 180, 220, and 260°C respectively. The temperature effect of the pretreatments on the structure evolution of cluster precursors and the catalytic performance of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T synthesis was investigated. The pretreated catalyst at 220°C with unique phase structure exhibited best catalytic activity and selectivity among three pretreated catalysts. Moreover, the catalysts exhibited high dispersion due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the cluster precursor and γ-Al2O3 support.

  14. Fischer-344 Tp53-knockout rats exhibit a high rate of bone and brain neoplasia with frequent metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Hansen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the Tp53 tumor suppressor gene are the most commonly seen genetic alterations in cancer, and germline mutations in Tp53 predispose individuals to a variety of early-onset cancers. Development of appropriate translational animal models that carry mutations in Tp53 and recapitulate human disease are important for drug discovery, biomarker development and disease modeling. Current Tp53 mouse and rat models have significant phenotypic and genetic limitations, and often do not recapitulate certain aspects of human disease. We used a marker-assisted speed congenic approach to transfer a well-characterized Tp53-mutant allele from an outbred rat to the genetically inbred Fischer-344 (F344 rat to create the F344-Tp53tm1(EGFP-PacQly/Rrrc (F344-Tp53 strain. On the F344 genetic background, the tumor spectrum shifted, with the primary tumor types being osteosarcomas and meningeal sarcomas, compared to the hepatic hemangiosarcoma and lymphoma identified in the original outbred stock model. The Fischer model is more consistent with the early onset of bone and central nervous system sarcomas found in humans with germline Tp53 mutations. The frequency of osteosarcomas in F344-Tp53 homozygous and heterozygous animals was 57% and 36%, respectively. Tumors were highly representative of human disease radiographically and histologically, with tumors found primarily on long bones with frequent pulmonary metastases. Importantly, the rapid onset of osteosarcomas in this promising new model fills a current void in animal models that recapitulate human pediatric osteosarcomas and could facilitate studies to identify therapeutic targets.

  15. The effect of dietary administration of Disperse Blue 1 on the urinary system of the Fischer 344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, C M; Squire, R A

    1986-04-01

    Disperse Blue 1 (containing 50% lignosulphonate dispersants) was fed to Fischer 344 rats at dietary levels of 0.01 and 0.1% for 19 months and at 1.0% for 6 months. Fischer 344 rats were also given the dye by gavage at 1 g/kg for 1-3 days or in the diet at 0.5 or 1% for 4 days, and corresponding dietary levels of the colouring without dispersant were also fed for 4 days. Bladders and kidneys were examined after the 1-4 day treatments, in animals dying or killed from month 6 to termination (19 months) in the chronic study and in those killed at wk 5, 9 and 17. At the latter three times, autoradiography following injection of tritiated thymidine showed increased DNA synthesis in the urothelium of high-dose rats, but no other increased labelling in any group. Bladder lesions were seen only at the 1.0% level, epithelial erosion with adhering dye particles being seen by day 4, calculi and hyperplasia by wk 5 and squamous metaplasia by wk 9. The calculi contained more dye in males than in females and more calcium in females. By month 6, dye particles were embedded in the bladder wall, with some evidence of histiocyte accumulation in their vicinity. Two papillomas and one carcinoma, but no leiomyosarcomas, were diagnosed. The earliest tumours, two papillomas, were detected at wk 17. Tumour incidence following surgical removal of calculus was about double that in rats not subjected to surgery and the incidence of normal bladders at month 19 was higher in the latter group. Compound-related effects in the kidneys--inflammation, pelvic epithelial hyperplasia and tubular degeneration and regeneration with interstitial fibrosis--were seen only in the high-dose group. Dye present in the tubules and renal pelvis persisted in many rats for a year after cessation of treatment.

  16. Preparation, surface characterization and performance of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst of cobalt supported on silica nanosprings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kengne, Blaise-Alexis Fouetio; Alayat, Abdulbaset M.; Luo, Guanqun; McDonald, Armando G.; Brown, Justin; Smotherman, Hayden; McIlroy, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Determined that the reduction of Co nanoparticles on silica nanosprings 200 °C higher than the reduction temperature of Co in a solgel support. • The high reduction temperature of Co supported on silica nanosprings is attributed to the heat transfer properties of the nanosprings due to their high surface area. Co-silica nanospring Fischer-Tropsch catalyst can be used to produce drop in fuels such as JP-4. - Abstract: The reduction of cobalt (Co) catalyst supported on silica nanosprings for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has been monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compared to FT catalytic activity. The cobalt is present in the starting catalyst as a Co 3 O 4 spinel phase. A two-step reduction of Co 3 O 4 to CoO and then to Co 0 is observed, which is consistent with the results of H 2 -temperature programmed reduction. During the reduction the two steps occur concurrently. The deconvolution of the Co 2p core level state for the catalyst reduced at 385 °C and 1.0 × 10 −6 Torr of H 2 revealed signatures of Co 0 , CoO, and Co 3 O 4 . The reduction saturates at a Co o concentration of approximately 41% after 20 h, which correlates with the activity and lifetime of the catalyst during FTS testing. Conversely, at 680 °C and 10 Torr of H 2 , the catalyst is completely reduced after 10 h. The evolution of the Co d-band at the Fermi level in the valence band XPS spectrum definitively verifies the metallic phase of Co. FTS evaluation of the Co/NS catalyst reduced at 609 °C showed higher production rate (3-fold) of C 6 -C 17 hydrocarbons than the catalyst reduced at 409 °C and is consistent with the XPS analysis.

  17. Sperm mRNA transcripts are indicators of sub-chronic low dose testicular injury in the Fischer 344 rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Pacheco

    Full Text Available Current human reproductive risk assessment methods rely on semen and serum hormone analyses, which are not easily comparable to the histopathological endpoints and mating studies used in animal testing. Because of these limitations, there is a need to develop universal evaluations that reliably reflect male reproductive function. We hypothesized that toxicant-induced testicular injury can be detected in sperm using mRNA transcripts as indicators of insult. To test this, we exposed adult male Fischer 344 rats to low doses of model testicular toxicants and classically characterized the testicular injury while simultaneously evaluating sperm mRNA transcripts from the same animals. Overall, this study aimed to: 1 identify sperm transcripts altered after exposure to the model testicular toxicant, 2,5-hexanedione (HD using microarrays; 2 expand on the HD-induced transcript changes in a comprehensive time course experiment using qRT-PCR arrays; and 3 test these injury indicators after exposure to another model testicular toxicant, carbendazim (CBZ. Microarray analysis of HD-treated adult Fischer 344 rats identified 128 altered sperm mRNA transcripts when compared to control using linear models of microarray analysis (q<0.05. All transcript alterations disappeared after 3 months of post-exposure recovery. In the time course experiment, time-dependent alterations were observed for 12 candidate transcripts selected from the microarray data based upon fold change and biological relevance, and 8 of these transcripts remained significantly altered after the 3-month recovery period (p<0.05. In the last experiment, 8 candidate transcripts changed after exposure to CBZ (p<0.05. The two testicular toxicants produced distinct molecular signatures with only 4 overlapping transcripts between them, each occurring in opposite directions. Overall, these results suggest that sperm mRNA transcripts are indicators of low dose toxicant-induced testicular injury in the rat.

  18. [I don't want to be eternally imprisoned in the cage of my own self . . .". assumptions about the relationship between Sigmund Freud and his juvenile patient Arthur Fischer-Colbrie (1895-1968)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The Austrian writer A. Fischer-Colbrie underwent an analysis with Freud in 1915-16 and then again in 1919. Based on his literary estate, this article tries to shed some light on the biographical background and the precipitating factors of his mental problems. When the cure had to be interrupted because of the young man's military service, Freud sustained an unusual correspondence with him that reflected his efforts to maintain their therapeutic contact. At the same time his letters witness Fischer-Colbrie's burgeoning literary talents.--An appendix presents Freud's letters to Fischer-Colbrie, edited and annotated by Michael Schröter.

  19. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NOAA-GLERL and its partners conduct innovative research on the dynamic environments and ecosystems of the Great Lakes and coastal regions to provide information for...

  20. What Caused the Great Recession?

    OpenAIRE

    Homburg, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines five possible explanations for the Great Recession of 2008 and 2009, using data for the United States and the eurozone. Of these five hypotheses, four are not supported by the data, while the fifth appears reasonable.

  1. Arthroscopy of the great toe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frey, C.; van Dijk, C. N.

    1999-01-01

    The few available reports of arthroscopic treatment of the first MTP joint in the literature indicate favorable outcome. However, arthroscopy of the great toe is an advanced technique and should only be undertaken by experienced surgeons

  2. The Sixth Great Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagler, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Five past great mass extinctions have occurred during Earth's history. Humanity is currently in the midst of a sixth, human-induced great mass extinction of plant and animal life (e.g., Alroy 2008; Jackson 2008; Lewis 2006; McDaniel and Borton 2002; Rockstrom et al. 2009; Rohr et al. 2008; Steffen, Crutzen, and McNeill 2007; Thomas et al. 2004;…

  3. Model studies of secondary hydrogenation in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by cobalt catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaserud, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Mass transfer effects are very important in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In order to study the FT synthesis without the influence of any transport limitations, cobalt foils have been used as model catalysts. The effect of pretreatment (number of calcinations and different reduction times) for cobalt foil catalysts at 220 {sup o}C, 1 bar and H{sub 2}/CO = 3 has been studied in a microreactor. The foils were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the catalytic activity of the cobalt foil increases with the number of pretreatments possibly due to an increase in the surface area of the cobalt foil. The SEM results support the assumption that the surface area of the cobalt foil increases with the number of pretreatments. The reduction time was also found to influence the catalytic activity of the cobalt foil. Highest activity was obtained using a reduction time of only five min (compared to one and thirty min). The decrease in activity after reduction for thirty min compared to five min was suggested to be due to restructuring of the surface of the cobalt foil and a reduction time of only 1 min was not enough to reduce the cobalt foil sufficiently. Time of reduction did also influence the product distribution. Increased reduction time resulted in a lower selectivity to light products and increased selectivity to heavier components. The paraffin/olefin ratio increased with increasing CO-conversion also for cobalt foils. The paraffin/olefin ratio also increased when the reduction period of the cobalt foil was increased at a given CO-conversion. Hydrogenation of propene to propane has been studied as a model reaction for secondary hydrogenation of olefins in the FT synthesis. The study has involved promoted and unpromoted cobalt FT catalysts supported on different types of supports and also unsupported cobalt. Hydrogenation of propene was carried out at 120 {sup o}C, 1.8 bar and H{sub 2}/C{sub 3}H{sub 6} 6 in a fixed bed microreactor. The rate

  4. Architectural design and simulation of a virtual memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, G.; Chu, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Virtual memory is an imaginary main memory with a very large capacity which the programmer has at his disposal. It greatly contributes to the solution of the dynamic storage allocation problem. The architectural design of a virtual memory is presented which implements by hardware the idea of queuing and scheduling the page requests to a paging drum in such a way that the access of the paging drum is increased many times. With the design, an increase of up to 16 times in page transfer rate is achievable when the virtual memory is heavily loaded. This in turn makes feasible a great increase in the system throughput.

  5. Famous puzzles of great mathematicians

    CERN Document Server

    Petković, Miodrag S

    2009-01-01

    This entertaining book presents a collection of 180 famous mathematical puzzles and intriguing elementary problems that great mathematicians have posed, discussed, and/or solved. The selected problems do not require advanced mathematics, making this book accessible to a variety of readers. Mathematical recreations offer a rich playground for both amateur and professional mathematicians. Believing that creative stimuli and aesthetic considerations are closely related, great mathematicians from ancient times to the present have always taken an interest in puzzles and diversions. The goal of this

  6. Holographic memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Berg, R.H.; Hvilsted, Søren

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic...

  7. Sharing Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Nielsen, Emil Byskov; Nielsen, Jonathan Bernstorff

    2018-01-01

    in which it was to be contextualized and through a close partnership between aphasics and their caretakers. The underlying design methodology for the MemoryBook is Participatory Design manifested through the collaboration and creations by two aphasic residents and one member of the support staff. The idea...

  8. Memory consolidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takashima, A.; Bakker, I.; Schmid, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    In order to make use of novel experiences and knowledge to guide our future behavior, we must keep large amounts of information accessible for retrieval. The memory system that stores this information needs to be flexible in order to rapidly incorporate incoming information, but also requires that

  9. Skilled Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-06

    Woodworth, R. S. Experimental Psychology. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1938. Yates, F. A. The art of memory. London: Rutledge and Kegan Paul, 1966. 50...Group 1 Psychologist (TAEG) ON! Branch Office Dept. of the Navy 1030 East Green Street Orlando, FL 32813 Pasadena, CA 91101 1 Dr. Richard Sorensen I

  10. Not explicit but implicit memory is influenced by individual perception style

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, Kyoko; Tsushima, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    Not only explicit but also implicit memory has considerable influence on our daily life. However, it is still unclear whether explicit and implicit memories are sensitive to individual differences. Here, we investigated how individual perception style (global or local) correlates with implicit and explicit memory. As a result, we found that not explicit but implicit memory was affected by the perception style: local perception style people more greatly used implicit memory than global percept...

  11. Ruthenium Modification on Mn and Zr-Modified Co/SiO2 Catalysts for Slurry-Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Miyazawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of Ru to Mn and Zr-modified Co/SiO2 catalysts, while applying different preparation orders and loading amounts, was investigated as a means of enhancing the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction. The coimpregnation of Zr/SiO2 with Co, Mn and Ru gave the most attractive catalytic properties. This can be attributed to the higher dispersion of Co metal resulting from the coimpregnation of Co and Mn as well as enhanced reducibility due to the presence of Ru. The addition of a moderate amount of Ru together with the appropriate order of addition affected both the Co reducibility and the catalytic activity, primarily because of increased reducibility. The addition of even 0.1 wt.% Ru resulted in an obvious enhancement of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity.

  12. Making a Great First Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Managers and business owners often base hiring decisions on first impressions. That is why it is so important to teach students to make a great first impression--before they go on that first job interview. Managers do not have unrealistic expectations, they just want to hire people who they believe can develop into valuable employees. A nice…

  13. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Project goals, project tasks, progress on tasks, and problems encountered are described and discussed for each of the studies that make up the Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project for Yucca Mountain. These studies are: Paleobotany, Paleofauna, Geomorphology, and Transportation. Budget summaries are also given for each of the studies and for the overall project

  14. The Great Books and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an introductory economics course in which all of the reading material is drawn from the Great Books of Western Civilization. Explains the rationale and mechanics of the course. Includes an annotated course syllabus that details how the reading material relates to the lecture material. (RLH)

  15. Great tit hatchling sex ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.; Mateman, A.C.; Visser, J.

    1996-01-01

    The sex of Great Tit Parus major nestlings was determined using PCR RAPDs. Because this technique requires minute amounts of DNA, chicks could be sampled soon (0-2d) after hatching, before any nestling mortality occurred. The proportion of males among 752 chicks hatching in 102 broods (98.9% of

  16. The Great Gatsby. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Ken

    Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that adapting part of a novel into a dramatic reading makes students more intimate with the author's intentions and craft; and that a part of a novel may lend itself to various oral interpretations. The main activity…

  17. Great Basin wildlife disease concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ Mason

    2008-01-01

    In the Great Basin, wildlife diseases have always represented a significant challenge to wildlife managers, agricultural production, and human health and safety. One of the first priorities of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Division of Fish and Wildlife Services was Congressionally directed action to eradicate vectors for zoonotic disease, particularly rabies, in...

  18. Structural brain correlates of associative memory in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nina; Laukka, Erika J; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Bäckman, Lars; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2015-09-01

    Associative memory involves binding two or more items into a coherent memory episode. Relative to memory for single items, associative memory declines greatly in aging. However, older individuals vary substantially in their ability to memorize associative information. Although functional studies link associative memory to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC), little is known about how volumetric differences in MTL and PFC might contribute to individual differences in associative memory. We investigated regional gray-matter volumes related to individual differences in associative memory in a sample of healthy older adults (n=54; age=60years). To differentiate item from associative memory, participants intentionally learned face-scene picture pairs before performing a recognition task that included single faces, scenes, and face-scene pairs. Gray-matter volumes were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry region-of-interest (ROI) analyses. To examine volumetric differences specifically for associative memory, item memory was controlled for in the analyses. Behavioral results revealed large variability in associative memory that mainly originated from differences in false-alarm rates. Moreover, associative memory was independent of individuals' ability to remember single items. Older adults with better associative memory showed larger gray-matter volumes primarily in regions of the left and right lateral PFC. These findings provide evidence for the importance of PFC in intentional learning of associations, likely because of its involvement in organizational and strategic processes that distinguish older adults with good from those with poor associative memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation, surface characterization and performance of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst of cobalt supported on silica nanosprings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kengne, Blaise-Alexis Fouetio [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Alayat, Abdulbaset M. [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3006 (United States); Luo, Guanqun [Department of Forest, Rangeland & Fire Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States); McDonald, Armando G. [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3006 (United States); Department of Forest, Rangeland & Fire Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States); Brown, Justin; Smotherman, Hayden [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); McIlroy, David N., E-mail: dmcilroy@uidaho.edu [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Determined that the reduction of Co nanoparticles on silica nanosprings 200 °C higher than the reduction temperature of Co in a solgel support. • The high reduction temperature of Co supported on silica nanosprings is attributed to the heat transfer properties of the nanosprings due to their high surface area. Co-silica nanospring Fischer-Tropsch catalyst can be used to produce drop in fuels such as JP-4. - Abstract: The reduction of cobalt (Co) catalyst supported on silica nanosprings for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has been monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compared to FT catalytic activity. The cobalt is present in the starting catalyst as a Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel phase. A two-step reduction of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} to CoO and then to Co{sup 0} is observed, which is consistent with the results of H{sub 2}-temperature programmed reduction. During the reduction the two steps occur concurrently. The deconvolution of the Co 2p core level state for the catalyst reduced at 385 °C and 1.0 × 10{sup −6} Torr of H{sub 2} revealed signatures of Co{sup 0}, CoO, and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The reduction saturates at a Co{sup o} concentration of approximately 41% after 20 h, which correlates with the activity and lifetime of the catalyst during FTS testing. Conversely, at 680 °C and 10 Torr of H{sub 2}, the catalyst is completely reduced after 10 h. The evolution of the Co d-band at the Fermi level in the valence band XPS spectrum definitively verifies the metallic phase of Co. FTS evaluation of the Co/NS catalyst reduced at 609 °C showed higher production rate (3-fold) of C{sub 6}-C{sub 17} hydrocarbons than the catalyst reduced at 409 °C and is consistent with the XPS analysis.

  20. Fischer's Lexicon of Slavic beliefs and customs: a previously unknown contribution to the ethnobotany of Ukraine and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Monika; Łuczaj, Łukasz; Typek, Joanna

    2015-12-24

    Historical ethnobotanical studies are important, even if they are only descriptive, because they help to throw light on the missing chains needed for diachronic analysis. However, the documentation of traditional uses of plants in some countries, e.g. Ukraine, is still fragmentary. The aim of this contribution is to fill the gap and present a portion of the data set, from western Ukraine, which was collected by Adam Fischer, a Polish ethnographer from Lviv, in the 1930s. These data were originally gathered to be published in the first part of the Lexicon of Slavic beliefs and customs, dedicated to plant uses in traditional Slavonic culture. The idea of writing the Lexicon arose in 1929 during the I Congress of Slavic Philologists in Prague and was intended to be a joint international enterprise, but has never actually been fulfilled. In this article we used information from south-eastern Poland at that time - nowadays western Ukraine, collected in four provinces, 11 counties and 28 localities by Fischer's collaborators. The majority of the information was accompanied by voucher specimens, which were determined by botanists at the Jan Kazimierz University. These data are still unpublished and stored on filecards in the archives of the Polish Ethnological Society in Wrocław, Poland. In our analysis we applied two indices: one to measure general plant versatility - Use Value, and another regarding medicinal plants - Relative Importance Value. In total, 179 plant taxa used in peasant culture in the western Ukraine in the 1930s were registered. The species which achieved the highest Use Values were: Achillea millefolium, Allium sativum, Vinca minor, Hypericum sp. and Juniperus communis. Among the collected plant names, Polish names dominate (59%) over clearly Ukrainian and Ruthenian ones (31%). The remaining 10% of names were of unclear origin or could have been used by both groups. The most salient use categories were medicinal, followed by ritual - chiefly plants

  1. Geologic and hydrostratigraphic map of the Anhalt, Fischer, and Spring Branch 7.5-minute quadrangles, Blanco, Comal, and Kendall Counties, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allan K.; Robert R. Morris,

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the geology and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity Groups in the Anhalt, Fischer, and Spring Branch 7.5-minute quadrangles, Blanco, Comal, and Kendall Counties, Texas. The hydrostratigraphy was defined based on variations in the amount and type of porosity of each lithostratigraphic unit, which varies depending on the unit’s original depositional environment, lithology, structural history, and diagenesis.

  2. FeRu/TiO2 and Fe/TiO2 catalysts after reduction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Nonnekens, R.C.H.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of TiO 2 -supported bimetallic FeRu catalysts with different Fe:Ru ratios (infinity; 10:1; 3:1; 1:1; 1:3) has been studied by means of in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy. The influence of reduction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the state of iron in the FeRu/TiO 2 catalysts is derived. (Auth.)

  3. Six-flow operations for catalyst development in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Bridging the gap between high-throughput experimentation and extensive product evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sartipi, S.; Jansma, H.; Bosma, D.; Boshuizen, B.; Makkee, M.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.

    2013-01-01

    Design and operation of a “six-flow fixed-bed microreactor” setup for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is described. The unit consists of feed and mixing, flow division, reaction, separation, and analysis sections. The reactor system is made of five heating blocks with individual temperature controllers, assuring an identical isothermal zone of at least 10 cm along six fixed-bed microreactor inserts (4?mm inner diameter). Such a lab-scale setup allows running six experiments in parallel, under...

  4. Consumo de Pinus taeda (Pinaceae) pelo rato-de-espinho Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer) (Echimyidae) em plantações no Sul do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Gislene L.; Faria-Correa, Mariana A.; Cunha, Adriano S.; Freitas, Thales R. O.

    2007-01-01

    Feeding damage caused by Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer, 1814) (Echimyidae) is documented for a Pinus taeda Linnaeus (Pinaceae) plantation located in Cambará do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Under laboratory conditions, feeding acceptance of P. taeda trunk sections was tested with positive results for E. spinosus, but not for other three co-occurring sigmodontine rodents: Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913, Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers, 1818) and Delomys dorsalis (Hensel, 1872).Esse...

  5. Reactions of Fischer carbene complexes with Electron-deficient olefins: Scope and limitations of this route to donor-acceptor-substituted cyclopropanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienand, A.; Reissig, H.U. (Inst. fuer Organische Chemie der Technischen Hochschule Darmstadt (West Germany))

    1990-12-01

    The Fischer carbene complex ((CO){sub 5}Cr{double bond}C(OMe)Ph) (1) is able to transfer its carbene ligand to a variety of electron-deficient olefins and provides donor-acceptor-substituted cyclopropanes in good yields. Apt activating groups with respect to the alkene are ester, amide, nitrile, sulfone, and dialkyl phosphonate functions. Methyl vinyl ketone (19) affords products in low yield that may arise from an intermediate cyclopropane derivative. Phenyl vinyl sulfoxide (24) mainly acts as an oxidizing agent, transforming 1 into methyl benzoate. for olefin 24 and {alpha}-(N-methylanilino)acrylonitrile the authors found products that should be formed on an olefin metathesis pathway. The methyl-substituted carbene complex 48 also affords the expected donor-acceptor-substituted cyclopropanes; however, acyclic isomers are formed in higher amounts. The molybdenum and tungsten complexes 55 and 56, respectively, also furnish cyclopropane derivatives, but the yields are lower than with the chromium compound 1. Disubstituted olefins and complex 1 still give the cyclopropanes in moderate yields, while all trisubstituted and most of the difunctionalized alkenes do not react with this Fischer carbene complex. The cyclopropanes synthesized can be deprotonated and alkylated or transformed into ring-opened products. These model reactions demonstrate the synthetic potentials of donor-acceptor-substituted cyclopropanes prepared via Fischer carbene complexes.

  6. Concrete Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the presence of Atlantikwall bunkers in amateur holiday snapshots and discusses the ambiguous role of the bunker site in visual cultural memory. Departing from my family’s private photo collection from twenty years of vacationing at the Danish West coast, the different mundane...... and poetic appropriations and inscriptions of the bunker site are depicted. Ranging between overlooked side presences and an overwhelming visibility, the concrete remains of fascist war architecture are involved in and motivate different sensuous experiences and mnemonic appropriations. The article meets...... the bunkers’ changing visuality and the cultural topography they both actively transform and are being transformed by through juxtaposing different acts and objects of memory over time and in different visual articulations....

  7. X-ray physico-chemical imaging during activation of cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Andrew M.; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Price, Stephen W. T.; Senecal, Pierre; Vamvakeros, Antonios; Paterson, James

    2017-11-01

    The imaging of catalysts and other functional materials under reaction conditions has advanced significantly in recent years. The combination of the computed tomography (CT) approach with methods such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) now enables local chemical and physical state information to be extracted from within the interiors of intact materials which are, by accident or design, inhomogeneous. In this work, we follow the phase evolution during the initial reduction step(s) to form Co metal, for Co-containing particles employed as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts; firstly, working at small length scales (approx. micrometre spatial resolution), a combination of sample size and density allows for transmission of comparatively low energy signals enabling the recording of `multimodal' tomography, i.e. simultaneous XRF-CT, XANES-CT and XRD-CT. Subsequently, we show high-energy XRD-CT can be employed to reveal extent of reduction and uniformity of crystallite size on millimetre-sized TiO2 trilobes. In both studies, the CoO phase is seen to persist or else evolve under particular operating conditions and we speculate as to why this is observed. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Providing sustainable catalytic solutions for a rapidly changing world'.

  8. Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

    2003-03-15

    The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high.

  9. Performance characterization of CNTs and γ-Al2O3 supported cobalt catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Sardar; Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Catalysts were prepared via a wet impregnation method. Different physicochemical properties of the samples were revealed by transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (H 2 -TPR) and carbon dioxide desorption (CO 2 -desorption). Fischer-Tropsch reaction (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 220°C and 1 atm, with H 2 /CO = 2v/v and space velocity, SV of 12L/g.h for 5 h. Various characterization techniques revealed that there was a stronger interaction between Co and Al 2 O 3 support compared to that of CNTs support. CNTs support increased the reducibility and decreased Co particle size. A significant increase in % CO conversion and FTS reaction rate was observed over CNTs support compared to that of Co/Al 2 O 3 . Co/CNTs resulted in higher C 5+ hydrocarbons selectivity compared to that of Co/Al 2 O 3 catalyst. CNTs are a better support for Co compared to Al 2 O 3

  10. ANÁLISE MORFOLÓGICA DO APARELHO UNGUEAL DO VEADO-CATINGUEIRO (Mazama gouazoubira, Fischer, 1814 (Artiodactyla, Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenna Cardoso Rezende

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The species studied in this research is known as gray brocketdeer. Two Mazama gouazoubira (Fischer, 1814 adult exemplars, donated to the Laboratory of Anatomy of Domestic and Wild Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo University, were preserved in formaldehyde (10%. There are four ungulas or hulls on each member and they protect the distal end of the limb, covering the distal phalanx. The angle of the hoof was measured and samples of the digits were processed for light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In macroscopy, the length of the dorsal wall of the hoof measured approximately 2.5 cm, the angle formed at the step was 35° for the forelimb and 33° for the hindlimb. In microscopy, we could visualize the outer stratum as a very thin layer (141.5 μm, the middle stratum, composed of keratin tubular pigment, which is the main support structure of the wall of the hull, and the inner layer containing parallel slides in a longitudinal distribution, which is important to connect the hoof wall to the dorsal and lateral surface of the distal phalanx. The data from the ungular apparatus of the deers studied may help to elucidate the growth and identification of the footprints of these animals.

  11. Anthocyanin-Rich Juice Lowers Serum Cholesterol, Leptin, and Resistin and Improves Plasma Fatty Acid Composition in Fischer Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Graf

    Full Text Available Obesity and obesity-associated diseases e.g. cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes are spread worldwide. Anthocyanins are supposed to have health-promoting properties, although convincing evidence is lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of anthocyanins on several risk factors for obesity-associated diseases. Therefore, Fischer rats were fed anthocyanin-rich grape-bilberry juice or an anthocyanin-depleted control juice for 10 weeks. Intervention with anthocyanin-rich grape-bilberry juice reduced serum cholesterol and tended to decrease serum triglycerides. No effects were seen for serum non-esterified fatty acids, glucose, and insulin. Anthocyanin-rich grape-bilberry juice intervention reduced serum leptin and resistin, but showed no influence on serum adiponectin and secretion of adipokines from mesenteric adipose tissue. Furthermore, anthocyanin-rich grape-bilberry juice increased the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids and decreased the amount of saturated fatty acids in plasma. These results indicate that anthocyanins possess a preventive potential for obesity-associated diseases.

  12. Effect of long-term caloric restriction on brain monoamines in aging male and female Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolta, M G; Holson, R; Duffy, P; Hart, R W

    1989-05-01

    The present study examines the changes in central monoamines and their metabolites in aged male and female rats after long-term caloric restriction. Fischer 344 rats of both sexes (n = 5-10/group) were maintained on one of two dietary regimens: ad libitum NIH 31 diet or 60% by weight of the ad lib. intake (restricted), supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Animals received these diets from the age of 14 weeks until killed at 22.25 months of age. Caudate nucleus (CN), hypothalamus (HYPO), olfactory bulb (OB) and nucleus accumbens (NA) were assayed for content of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA) and its metabolites (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC, and homovanillic acid, HVA) and serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) using HPLC/EC. Relative to the ad lib. group, restricted rats of both sex showed significant decreases in NE content in CN, HYPO and OB. DA and 5-HT content were decreased significantly in the CN and HYPO. No significant changes were found in the levels of DA metabolites in all brain regions studied. While the 5-HIAA level was significantly reduced in the HYPO and NA of the female restricted rats, it was increased several-fold in the OB of the male restricted animals. These preliminary results suggest that long-term caloric restriction alters brain monoamine concentrations, an effect which may in turn modify the normal rate of aging.

  13. Pathological Outcomes in Kidney and Brain in Male Fischer Rats Given Dietary Ochratoxin A, Commencing at One Year of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, Peter G.; Nolan, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant renal carcinoma, manifest in morbid ageing rats, is the striking component of an otherwise silent response after about nine months of exposure to ochratoxin A in the first year of life (daily intake ~100-250 µg/kg body weight). Reasons for the long latency are unclear, as is whether there would be a similar carcinogenic response if toxin exposure started at one year of age. Therefore, 24 male Fischer rats were given 100 µg ochratoxin A as a daily dietary contaminant for 35 weeks from age 50 weeks. Plasma ochratoxin A concentration reached a maximum value of ~8 µg/mL within one month of starting the toxin regimen. No renal carcinomas occurred. Four renal adenomas, two of which were only microscopic, were found among the six rats surviving for 110 weeks. The findings raise new questions about a difference between young adults and mature adults in sensitivity of male rats to the ochratoxin A-induced DNA damage necessary for renal carcinogenesis. A pilot histological study of perfuse-fixed brains of the toxin-treated rats showed no gross abnormalities, correlating with the consistent absence of behavioral or neurological disorders from chronic ochratoxin A exposure regimens in the range 100-250 µg/kg/day during the second half of life. Reasoned questioning concerning ochratoxin A as a neurotoxic mycotoxin is made. PMID:22069628

  14. Pathological Outcomes in Kidney and Brain in Male Fischer Rats Given Dietary Ochratoxin A, Commencing at One Year of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Mantle

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Malignant renal carcinoma, manifest in morbid ageing rats, is the striking component of an otherwise silent response after about nine months of exposure to ochratoxin A in the first year of life (daily intake ~100–250 µg/kg body weight. Reasons for the long latency are unclear, as is whether there would be a similar carcinogenic response if toxin exposure started at one year of age. Therefore, 24 male Fischer rats were given 100 µg ochratoxin A as a daily dietary contaminant for 35 weeks from age 50 weeks. Plasma ochratoxin A concentration reached a maximum value of ~8 µg/mL within one month of starting the toxin regimen. No renal carcinomas occurred. Four renal adenomas, two of which were only microscopic, were found among the six rats surviving for 110 weeks. The findings raise new questions about a difference between young adults and mature adults in sensitivity of male rats to the ochratoxin A-induced DNA damage necessary for renal carcinogenesis. A pilot histological study of perfuse-fixed brains of the toxin-treated rats showed no gross abnormalities, correlating with the consistent absence of behavioral or neurological disorders from chronic ochratoxin A exposure regimens in the range 100–250 µg/kg/day during the second half of life. Reasoned questioning concerning ochratoxin A as a neurotoxic mycotoxin is made.

  15. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-21

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  16. Raising distillate selectivity and catalyst life time in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by using a novel dual-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavasoli, A.; Sadaghiani, K.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In a novel dual bed reactor Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied by using two diff rent cobalt catalysts. An alkali-promoted cobalt catalyst was used in the first bed of a fixed-bed reactor followed by a Raiment promoted cobalt catalyst in the second bed. The activity, product selectivity and accelerated deactivation of the system were assessed and compared with a conventional single bed reactor system. The methane selectivity in the dual-bed reactor was about 18.9% less compared to that of the single-bed reactor. The C 5+ selectivity for the dual-bed reactor was 10.9% higher than that of the single-bed reactor. Accelerated deactivation of the catalysts in the dual-bed reactor was 42% lower than that of the single-bed reactor. It was revealed that the amount of catalysts activity recovery after regeneration at 400 d eg C in the dual-bed system is higher than that of the single-bed system

  17. Effect of Manganese Promotion on Al-Pillared Montmorillonite Supported Cobalt Nanoparticles for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Hussain, S. T.; Abbas, S. M.; Khan, Y.; Muhammad, B.; Ali, N.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Mn-promotion on high surface area Al-pillared montmorillonite (AlMMT) supported Co nanoparticles prepared by hydrothermal method have been investigated. A series of different weight% Mn-promoted Co nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by XRD, TPR, TGA, BET and SEM techniques. An increase in the surface area of MMT is observed with Al-pillaring. Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity of the as prepared catalysts was studied in a fixed bed micro reactor at 225 .deg. C, H 2 /CO = 2 and at 1 atm pressure. The data showed that by the addition of Mn the selectivity of C 1 dropped drastically while that of C 2 -C 12 hydrocarbons increased significantly over all the Mn-promoted Co/AlMMT catalysts. The C 13 -C 20 hydrocarbons remained almost same for all the catalysts while the selectivity of C 21+ long chain hydrocarbons decreased considerably with the addition of Mn. The catalyst with 3.5%Mn showed lowest C 21+ and highest C 2 -C 12 hydrocarbons selectivity due to cracking of long chain hydrocarbons over acidic sites of MMT

  18. From Nanoparticles to Process An Aberration Corrected TEM Study of Fischer Tropsch Catalysts at Various Steps of the Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braidy, N.; Blanchard, J.; Abatzoglou, N.; Andrei, C.

    2011-01-01

    χThe nanostructure of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Fe carbides are investigated using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plasma-generated Fe carbides are analyzed just after synthesis, following reduction via a H2 treatment step and once used as FT catalyst and deactivated. The as-produced nanoparticles (NPs) are seen to be abundantly covered with graphitic and amorphous carbon. Using the extended information limit from the spherical aberration-corrected TEM, the NPs could be indexed as a mixture of NPs in the θ-Fe 3 C and χ-Fe 5 C 2 phases. The reduction treatment exposed the NPs by removing most of the carbonaceous speSubscript textcies while retaining the χ-Fe 5 C 2 . Fe-carbides NPs submitted to conditions typical to FT synthesis develop a Fe3O4 shell which eventually consumes the NPs up to a point where 3-4 nm residual carbide is left at the center of the particle. Subscript textVarious mechanisms explaining the formation of such a microstructure are discussed. (author)

  19. Stress Alters the Discriminative Stimulus and Response Rate Effects of Cocaine Differentially in Lewis and Fischer Inbred Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese A. Kosten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress enhances the behavioral effects of cocaine, perhaps via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity. Yet, compared to Fischer 344 (F344 rats, Lewis rats have hyporesponsive HPA axis function and more readily acquire cocaine self-administration. We hypothesized that stress would differentially affect cocaine behaviors in these strains. The effects of three stressors on the discriminative stimulus and response rate effects of cocaine were investigated. Rats of both strains were trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg from saline using a two-lever, food-reinforced (FR10 procedure. Immediately prior to cumulative dose (1, 3, 10 mg/kg cocaine test sessions, rats were restrained for 15-min, had 15-min of footshock in a distinct context, or were placed in the shock-paired context. Another set of F344 and Lewis rats were tested similarly except they received vehicle injections to test if stress substituted for cocaine. Most vehicle-tested rats failed to respond after stressor exposures. Among cocaine-tested rats, restraint stress enhanced cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects in F344 rats. Shock and shock-context increased response rates in Lewis rats. Stress-induced increases in corticosterone levels showed strain differences but did not correlate with behavior. These data suggest that the behavioral effects of cocaine can be differentially affected by stress in a strain-selective manner.

  20. Comparison of PM emissions from a commercial jet engine burning conventional, biomass, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D

    2011-12-15

    Rising fuel costs, an increasing desire to enhance security of energy supply, and potential environmental benefits have driven research into alternative renewable fuels for commercial aviation applications. This paper reports the results of the first measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from a CFM56-7B commercial jet engine burning conventional and alternative biomass- and, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T)-based fuels. PM emissions reductions are observed with all fuels and blends when compared to the emissions from a reference conventional fuel, Jet A1, and are attributed to fuel properties associated with the fuels and blends studied. Although the alternative fuel candidates studied in this campaign offer the potential for large PM emissions reductions, with the exception of the 50% blend of F-T fuel, they do not meet current standards for aviation fuel and thus cannot be considered as certified replacement fuels. Over the ICAO Landing Takeoff Cycle, which is intended to simulate aircraft engine operations that affect local air quality, the overall PM number-based emissions for the 50% blend of F-T fuel were reduced by 34 ± 7%, and the mass-based emissions were reduced by 39 ± 7%.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch diesel production in a well-to-wheel perspective: A carbon, energy flow and cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Vliet, Oscar P.R.; Faaij, Andre P.C.; Turkenburg, Wim C.

    2009-01-01

    We calculated carbon and energy balances and costs of 14 different Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuel production plants in 17 complete well-to-wheel (WTW) chains. The FT plants can use natural gas, coal, biomass or mixtures as feedstock. Technical data, and technological and economic assumptions for developments for 2020 were derived from the literature, recalculating to 2005 euros for (capital) costs. Our best-guess WTW estimates indicate BTL production costs break even when oil prices rise above $75/bbl, CTL above $60/bbl and GTL at $36/bbl. CTL, and GTL without carbon capture and storage (CCS), will emit more CO 2 than diesel from conventional oil. Driving on fuel from GTL with CCS may reduce GHG emissions to around 123 g CO 2 /km. Driving on BTL may cause emissions of 32-63 g CO 2 /km and these can be made negative by application of CCS. It is possible to have net climate neutral driving by combining fuels produced from fossil resources with around 50% BTL with CCS, if biomass gasification and CCS can be made to work on an industrial scale and the feedstock is obtained in a climate-neutral manner. However, the uncertainties in these numbers are in the order of tens of percents, due to uncertainty in the data for component costs, variability in prices of feedstocks and by-products, and the GHG impact of producing biomass. (author)

  2. Treadwell Memorial

    OpenAIRE

    Downey, Frances K

    2015-01-01

    This is a memorial to gold mining in Southeast Alaska. The structure takes visitors from the Treadwell trail onto the edge of a popular local beach, reclaiming a forgotten place that was once the largest gold mine in the world. A tangible tribute to this obscure period of history, this building kindles a connection between artifacts and the community. It is a liminal space, connecting ocean and mountain, past and present, civilization and wilderness. An investigation of the Treadwell Gold...

  3. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  4. A stacked memory device on logic 3D technology for ultra-high-density data storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Hong, Augustin J; Kim, Sung Min; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Song, Emil B; Hwang, Yongha; Xiu, Faxian; Galatsis, Kosmas; Chui, Chi On; Candler, Rob N; Wang, Kang L; Choi, Siyoung; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, a novel three-dimensional (3D) memory chip architecture of stacked-memory-devices-on-logic (SMOL) achieving up to 95% of cell-area efficiency by directly building up memory devices on top of front-end CMOS devices. In order to realize the SMOL, a unique 3D Flash memory device and vertical integration structure have been successfully developed. The SMOL architecture has great potential to achieve tera-bit level memory density by stacking memory devices vertically and maximizing cell-area efficiency. Furthermore, various emerging devices could replace the 3D memory device to develop new 3D chip architectures.

  5. A stacked memory device on logic 3D technology for ultra-high-density data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Hong, Augustin J; Kim, Sung Min; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Song, Emil B; Hwang, Yongha; Xiu, Faxian; Galatsis, Kosmas; Chui, Chi On; Candler, Rob N; Wang, Kang L [Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Choi, Siyoung; Moon, Joo-Tae, E-mail: hbt100@ee.ucla.edu [Advanced Technology Development Team and Process Development Team, Memory R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-24

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, a novel three-dimensional (3D) memory chip architecture of stacked-memory-devices-on-logic (SMOL) achieving up to 95% of cell-area efficiency by directly building up memory devices on top of front-end CMOS devices. In order to realize the SMOL, a unique 3D Flash memory device and vertical integration structure have been successfully developed. The SMOL architecture has great potential to achieve tera-bit level memory density by stacking memory devices vertically and maximizing cell-area efficiency. Furthermore, various emerging devices could replace the 3D memory device to develop new 3D chip architectures.

  6. What's Working in Working Memory Training? An Educational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Wiemers, Elizabeth A.; Melby-Lervåg, Monica; Hulme, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Working memory training programs have generated great interest, with claims that the training interventions can have profound beneficial effects on children's academic and intellectual attainment. We describe the criteria by which to evaluate evidence for or against the benefit of working memory training. Despite the promising results of initial…

  7. Estimating and Forecasting Generalized Fractional Long Memory Stochastic Volatility Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Peiris (Shelton); M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years fractionally differenced processes have received a great deal of attention due to its flexibility in financial applications with long memory. This paper considers a class of models generated by Gegenbauer polynomials, incorporating the long memory in stochastic volatility

  8. Learning and the Great Moderation

    OpenAIRE

    Bullard, James B.; Singh, Aarti

    2009-01-01

    We study a stylized theory of the volatility reduction in the U.S. after 1984 - the Great Moderation - which attributes part of the stabilization to less volatile shocks and another part to more difficult inference on the part of Bayesian households attempting to learn the latent state of the economy. We use a standard equilibrium business cycle model with technology following an unobserved regime-switching process. After 1984, according to Kim and Nelson (1999a), the variance of U.S. macroec...

  9. Pricing regulations in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoletti, G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the structure and functions of Great Britain's essential electric power regulatory authority institutionalized by the 1989 British Electricity Act, i.e., the Office of Electricity Regulation, OFFER, and the responsibilities and tasks of the head of OFFER -the Director General of Electricity Supply (DGES). In particular, with regard to the latter, the paper describes how the DGES works together with regional electricity commissions to ensure the respect, by the various utilities, of consumer price caps and compliance with overall quality of service standards, as well as, to oversee 'pooling' activities by producers and distributors

  10. Pricing regulations in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoletti, G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the structure and functions of Great Britain's essential electric power regulatory authority institutionalized by the 1989 British Electricity Act, i.e., the Office of Electricity Regulation, OFFER, and the responsibilities and tasks of the head of OFFER - the Director General of Electricity Supply (DGES). In particular, with regard to the latter, the paper describes how the DGES works together with regional electricity commissions to ensure the respect, by the various utilities, of consumer price caps and compliance with overall quality of service standards, as well as, to oversee 'pooling' activities by producers and distributors

  11. What killed Alexander the Great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    The cause of the death of the Macedonian King, Alexander the Great, at Babylon in 323 BC has excited interest and conjecture throughout the ages. The information available in the surviving ancient sources, none of which is contemporaneous, has been reviewed and compared with modern knowledge as set out in several well-known recent surgical texts. The ancient sources record epic drinking by the Macedonian nobility since at least the time of Phillip II, Alexander's father. Alexander's sudden illness and death is likely to have resulted from a surgical complication of acute alcoholic excess.

  12. Commanders of the Great Victory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Dmitriyevich Borshchov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The honorary title of «commander» as well as the «admiral» is granted to a military or naval figure on the basis of public recognition of his personal contribution to the success of actions. Generals are usually individuals with creative thinking, the ability to foresee the development of military events. Generals usually have such personality traits as a strong will and determination, rich combat experience, credibility and high organizational skills. In an article dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Soviet victory in the Great War examines the experience of formation and practice of the most talent-ed Soviet military leaders.

  13. Artsimovich memorial lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.

    2003-01-01

    After half a century of work, mastering on earth thermonuclear fusion to produce energy is becoming a realistic challenge: despite its scientific and technological complexity, considerable progress has been obtained without encountering insurmountable roadblocks. Such progress is due for a great part to all the pioneers, as Academician Lev Andreevich Artsimovich, who, with their talents and a visionary mind, internationally promoted the civil use of thermonuclear fusion, a source which could help to face the long term energy demand. To honour their faith and their investment in this challenge which would solve humankind energy needs on a millenary scale, I will try in this Artsimovich Memorial Lecture to: situate the fusion contribution in the future energy mix contemplated today ; survey the state of the art of fusion physics and technology fields, giving some examples; underline the next priority, to study a burning plasma, launching the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as soon as possible

  14. Transactional Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Tim; Rajwar, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The advent of multicore processors has renewed interest in the idea of incorporating transactions into the programming model used to write parallel programs.This approach, known as transactional memory, offers an alternative, and hopefully better, way to coordinate concurrent threads. The ACI(atomicity, consistency, isolation) properties of transactions provide a foundation to ensure that concurrent reads and writes of shared data do not produce inconsistent or incorrect results. At a higher level, a computation wrapped in a transaction executes atomically - either it completes successfullyand

  15. Great apes prefer cooked food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobber, Victoria; Hare, Brian; Wrangham, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The cooking hypothesis proposes that a diet of cooked food was responsible for diverse morphological and behavioral changes in human evolution. However, it does not predict whether a preference for cooked food evolved before or after the control of fire. This question is important because the greater the preference shown by a raw-food-eating hominid for the properties present in cooked food, the more easily cooking should have been adopted following the control of fire. Here we use great apes to model food preferences by Paleolithic hominids. We conducted preference tests with various plant and animal foods to determine whether great apes prefer food items raw or cooked. We found that several populations of captive apes tended to prefer their food cooked, though with important exceptions. These results suggest that Paleolithic hominids would likewise have spontaneously preferred cooked food to raw, exapting a pre-existing preference for high-quality, easily chewed foods onto these cooked items. The results, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that the control of fire preceded cooking by a significant period.

  16. Studying The Great Russian Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Torkunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article revises an established view of Russian Revolution as two separate events - February Revolution and October Revolution. The author supports the concept of the «Great Russian Revolution», which unites these two events in a single process of revolutionary development. The author draws attention to the following advantages of the concept under consideration. First, it conceptualizes the revolution as a process contingent of a local and global historical context. In this sense, the revolution is presented as the transition of society to the modern stage of development, meaning the transition to modernity. Second, revolutionary events in Russia are considered from the point of view of the evolution of the spatial and socioeconomic distribution and rearrangement of key social groups: peasantry, elites, national and ethnic minorities. Third, it takes into account the personal factor in the revolutionary events, the influence of individual personalities on escalation or the reduction of socio-political tensions. Fourth, it draws attention to the fact that revolutions imply the use of various forms of political violence. Each revolution is characterized by a unique correlation of forms and intensity of political violence. Finally, it gives a normative assessment of the Revolution, encouraging a national discussion on the results and consequences of this great event.

  17. Speaker's voice as a memory cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Speaker's voice occupies a central role as the cornerstone of auditory social interaction. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that speaker's voice constitutes an integral context cue in auditory memory. Investigation into the nature of voice representation as a memory cue is essential to understanding auditory memory and the neural correlates which underlie it. Evidence from behavioral and electrophysiological studies suggest that while specific voice reinstatement (i.e., same speaker) often appears to facilitate word memory even without attention to voice at study, the presence of a partial benefit of similar voices between study and test is less clear. In terms of explicit memory experiments utilizing unfamiliar voices, encoding methods appear to play a pivotal role. Voice congruency effects have been found when voice is specifically attended at study (i.e., when relatively shallow, perceptual encoding takes place). These behavioral findings coincide with neural indices of memory performance such as the parietal old/new recollection effect and the late right frontal effect. The former distinguishes between correctly identified old words and correctly identified new words, and reflects voice congruency only when voice is attended at study. Characterization of the latter likely depends upon voice memory, rather than word memory. There is also evidence to suggest that voice effects can be found in implicit memory paradigms. However, the presence of voice effects appears to depend greatly on the task employed. Using a word identification task, perceptual similarity between study and test conditions is, like for explicit memory tests, crucial. In addition, the type of noise employed appears to have a differential effect. While voice effects have been observed when white noise is used at both study and test, using multi-talker babble does not confer the same results. In terms of neuroimaging research modulations, characterization of an implicit memory effect

  18. Intentionally fabricated autobiographical memories

    OpenAIRE

    Justice, LV; Morrison, CM; Conway, MA

    2017-01-01

    Participants generated both autobiographical memories (AMs) that they believed to be true and intentionally fabricated autobiographical memories (IFAMs). Memories were constructed while a concurrent memory load (random 8-digit sequence) was held in mind or while there was no concurrent load. Amount and accuracy of recall of the concurrent memory load was reliably poorer following generation of IFAMs than following generation of AMs. There was no reliable effect of load on memory generation ti...

  19. STRUKTUR DAN PROSES MEMORI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bhinnety

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes structures and processes of human memory system according to the modal model. Sensory memory is described as the first system to store information from outside world. Short‐term memory, or now called working memory, represents a system characterized by limited ability in storing as well as retrieving information. Long‐term memory on the hand stores information larger in amount and longer than short‐term memory

  20. STRUKTUR DAN PROSES MEMORI

    OpenAIRE

    Bhinnety, Magda

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes structures and processes of human memory system according to the modal model. Sensory memory is described as the first system to store information from outside world. Short‐term memory, or now called working memory, represents a system characterized by limited ability in storing as well as retrieving information. Long‐term memory on the hand stores information larger in amount and longer than short‐term memory

  1. Structural, Synaptic, and Epigenetic Dynamics of Enduring Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossama Khalaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our memories are the records of the experiences we gain in our everyday life. Over time, they slowly transform from an initially unstable state into a long-lasting form. Many studies have been investigating from different aspects how a memory could persist for sometimes up to decades. In this review, we highlight three of the greatly addressed mechanisms that play a central role for a given memory to endure: the allocation of the memory to a given neuronal population and what brain areas are recruited for its storage; the structural changes that underlie memory persistence; and finally the epigenetic control of gene expression that might regulate and support memory perseverance. Examining such key properties of a memory is essential towards a finer understanding of its capacity to last.

  2. Structural, Synaptic, and Epigenetic Dynamics of Enduring Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Ossama; Gräff, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Our memories are the records of the experiences we gain in our everyday life. Over time, they slowly transform from an initially unstable state into a long-lasting form. Many studies have been investigating from different aspects how a memory could persist for sometimes up to decades. In this review, we highlight three of the greatly addressed mechanisms that play a central role for a given memory to endure: the allocation of the memory to a given neuronal population and what brain areas are recruited for its storage; the structural changes that underlie memory persistence; and finally the epigenetic control of gene expression that might regulate and support memory perseverance. Examining such key properties of a memory is essential towards a finer understanding of its capacity to last. PMID:26933513

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R G; Wiens, A N

    1975-10-01

    Recent research on the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory is critically reviewed. Despite some inconsistent findings, unilateral nondominant ECT appears to affect verbal memory less than bilateral ECT. Adequate research on multiple monitored ECT is lacking. With few exceptions, the research methodologies for assessing memory have been inadequate. Many studies have confounded learning with retention, and only very recently has long term memory been adequately studied. Standardized assessment procedures for short term and long term memory are needed, in addition to more sophisticated assessment of memory processes, the duration of memory loss, and qualitative aspects of memories.

  4. Effect of culture media on virulence of Hirsutella thompsonii (Fischer) (Deuteromycetes) to control Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) (Acari: Tenuipalpidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi-Zalaf, Luciana S.; Alves, Sergio B.; Vieira, Solange A.

    2008-01-01

    The virulence of Hirsutella thompsonii (Fischer) to Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) was evaluated in laboratory, grown on complete and solid culture media (MC-S); complete and liquid culture media (MC-L); rice (APC) and powdered rice (APC-SM). Adults were confined to arenas prepared with citrus leaves in acrylic dishes containing water-agar. Conidial suspensions were prepared at different concentration (3.2 x 10 5 to 1 x 10 7 spores/ml) and applied on mites to establish the table curve-response on fourth day. For field evaluation, adults were maintained in arenas prepared with fruits which were placed in plants. In this test, four treatments were tried: H. thompsonii cultured on rice (APC) at two concentrations (20 kg/ha and 10 kg/ha), H. thompsonii produced by liquid fermentation (MC-L) (5 L/ha) and control (sterile water). Adult survival, number of eggs and nymphs per fruit were observed 10 and 20 days after the fungus application. The lowest LC 25 value calculated was from pathogen produced in MC-S (1.9 x 10 5 conidia/ml).The LC 25 values calculated to APC and APC-SM did not differ statistically. The LC 25 values to MC-L and MC-S were 1.9 x 10 6 infective cells/ml and 2.2 x 10 5 conidia/ml. In the fi eld, concentration and time to death differed between treatments and control. The applications resulted in reduction of adult survival and number of eggs. (author)

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2011-12-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory was established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective of reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions are performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime, which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer. Our team is developing a research tool to aid in understanding the physicochemical processes occurring in the SBCR. A robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) consisting of thirteen species, which are CO reactant, H2 reactant, hydrocarbon product, and H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid plus catalyst is outlined. Mechanistic submodels for interfacial momentum transfer in the churn-turbulent flow regime are incorporated, along with bubble breakup/coalescence and two-phase turbulence submodels. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield. The model includes heat generation produced by the exothermic chemical reaction, as well as heat removal from a constant temperature heat exchanger. A property method approach is employed to incorporate vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) in a robust manner. Physical and thermodynamic properties as functions of changes in both pressure and temperature are obtained from VLE calculations performed external to the CMFD solver. The novelty of this approach is in its simplicity, as well as its

  6. Strain difference of cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in inbred Wistar-Imamichi and Fischer 344 rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Narumi, Rika [Kumamoto University, Faculty of Education, Kumamoto (Japan); Nagano, Masaaki; Yasutake, Akira [National Institute for Minamata Disease, Biochemistry Section, Kumamoto (Japan); Waalkes, Michael P. [National Cancer Institute at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Inorganic Carcinogenesis Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Imamura, Yorishige [Kumamoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Previously, we reported that Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats are highly resistant to cadmium (Cd)-induced lethality and hepatotoxicity compared to Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Since the testes are one of the most sensitive organs to acute Cd toxicity, we examined possible strain-related differences in Cd-induced testicular toxicity between inbred WI and F344 rats. Rats were treated with a single dose of 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg Cd/kg, as CdCl{sub 2}, sc and killed 24 h later. Cd at doses of 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg induced severe testicular hemorrhage, as assessed by pathological and testis hemoglobin content, in F344 rats, but not WI rats. After Cd treatment (2.0 mg/kg), the testicular Cd content was significantly lower in WI rats than in the F344 rats, indicating a toxiokinetic mechanism for the observed strain difference. Thus, the remarkable resistance to Cd-induced testicular toxicity in WI rats is associated, at least in part, with lower testicular accumulation of Cd. When zinc (Zn; 10 mg/kg, sc) was administered in combination with Cd (2.0 mg/kg) to F344 rats, the Cd-induced increase in testicular hemoglobin content, indicative of hemorrhage, was significantly reduced. Similarly, the testicular Cd content was significantly decreased with Zn co-treatment compared to Cd treatment alone. Thus, it can be concluded that the testicular Cd accumulation partly competes with Zn transport systems and that these systems may play an important role in the strain-related differences in Cd-induced testicular toxicity between WI and F344 rats. (orig.)

  7. Incentivizing wood-based Fischer-Tropsch diesel through financial policy instruments: An economic assessment for Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Stromman, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate a select set of financial incentive instruments that can be employed by the Norwegian government for encouraging early investment and production experience in wood-based Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) technologies as a means to accelerate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) stemming from road-based transport. We start by performing an economic analysis of FTD produced from Norwegian forest biomass at a pioneer commercial plant in Norway, followed with a cost growth analysis to estimate production costs after uncertainty in early plant performance and capital cost estimates are considered. Results after the cost growth analysis imply that the initial production cost estimates for a pioneer producer may be underestimated by up to 30%. Using the revised estimate we then assess, through scenarios, how various financial support mechanisms designed to encourage near-term investment would affect production costs over a range of uncertain future oil prices. For all policy scenarios considered, we evaluate trade-offs between the levels of public expenditure, or subsidy, and private investor profitability. When considering the net present value of the subsidy required to incentivize commercial investment during a future of low oil prices, we find that GHG mitigation via wood-FTD is likely to be considered cost-ineffective. However, should the government expect that mean oil prices in the coming two decades will hover between $97 and 127/bbl, all the incentive policies considered would likely spur investment at net present values ≤$-100/tonne-fossil-CO 2 -equivalent avoided.

  8. Ototoxic potential of JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel following subacute inhalation exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Laurence D; Gearhart, Caroline A; Fulton, Sherry

    2010-07-01

    This study was undertaken to identify the ototoxic potential of two jet fuels presented alone and in combination with noise. Rats were exposed via a subacute inhalation paradigm to JP-8 jet fuel, a kerosene-based fuel refined from petroleum, and a synthetic fuel produced by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process. Although JP-8 contains small ( approximately 5%) concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons some of which known to be ototoxic, the synthetic fuel does not. The objectives of this study were to identify a lowest observed adverse effect level and a no observed adverse effect level for each jet fuel and to provide some preliminary, but admittedly, indirect evidence concerning the possible role of the aromatic hydrocarbon component of petroleum-based jet fuel on hearing. Rats (n = 5-19) received inhalation exposure to JP-8 or to FT fuel for 4 h/day on five consecutive days at doses of 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/m(3). Additional groups were exposed to various fuel concentrations followed by 1 h of an octave band of noise, noise alone, or no exposure to fuel or noise. Significant dose-related impairment in the distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) was seen in subjects exposed to combined JP-8 plus noise exposure when JP-8 levels of at least 1000 mg/m(3) were presented. No noticeable impairment was observed at JP-8 levels of 500 mg/m(3) + noise. In contrast to the effects of JP-8 on noise-induced hearing loss, FT exposure had no effect by itself or in combination with noise exposure even at the highest exposure level tested. Despite an observed loss in DPOAE amplitude seen only when JP-8 and noise were combined, there was no loss in auditory threshold or increase in hair cell loss in any exposure group.

  9. Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Sfanos, Karen S.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Nelson, William G.; Brayton, Cory; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevented by dietary consumption of whole tomato + broccoli powders. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 45) were randomized into the following treatment groups: control (AIN93G diet), PhIP (200 ppm in AIN93G diet for the first 20 weeks of the study), or tomato + broccoli + PhIP (mixed in AIN93G diet at 10% each and fed with PhIP for 20 weeks, and then without PhIP for 32 weeks). Study animals were monitored for 52 weeks and were euthanized as necessary based on a set of criteria for health status and tumor burden. Although there appeared to be some hepatic and intestinal toxicity due to the combination of PhIP and tomato + broccoli, these rodents had improved survival and reduced incidence and/or severity of PhIP-induced neoplastic lesions compared to the PhIP-alone treated group. Rats eating tomato + broccoli exhibited a marked decrease in the number and size of cribiform prostatic intraepitheilial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (cribiform PIN/CIS) lesions and in the incidence of invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas and skin carcinomas. Although the apparent toxic effects of combined PhIP and tomato + broccoli need additional study, the results of this study support the hypothesis that a diet rich in tomato and broccoli can reduce or prevent dietary carcinogen-induced cancers. PMID:24312188

  10. Gypsum karst in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In Great Britain the most spectacular gypsum karst development is in the Zechstein gypsum (late Permian mainly in north-eastern England. The Midlands of England also has some karst developed in the Triassic gypsum in the vicinity of Nottingham. Along the north-east coast, south of Sunderland, well-developed palaeokarst, with magnificent breccia pipes, was produced by dissolution of Permian gypsum. In north-west England a small gypsum cave system of phreatic origin has been surveyed and recorded. A large actively evolving phreatic gypsum cave system has been postulated beneath the Ripon area on the basis of studies of subsidence and boreholes. The rate of gypsum dissolution here, and the associated collapse lead to difficult civil engineering and construction conditions, which can also be aggravated by water abstraction.

  11. Great-Britain at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Laignel

    2004-01-01

    From 23 to 25 November 2004 Administration Building Bldg 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09.30 - 17.30 Twenty five companies will present their latest technology at the "Great-Britain at CERN" exhibition. British industry will exhibit products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. The main subjects are: electrical engineering, electronics, mechanical engineering, vacuum & low temperatures technologies, particles detectors and telecommunications. The exhibition is organised by BEAMA Exhibitions, The British Electrotechnical and Allied Manufacturer's Association There follows : the list of exhibitors. A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Departemental secretariat, the reception information desk, Building 33, the exhibition. A detailed list of firms is available under the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm 1 Accles & Pollock 2 A S Scientific Products Ltd 3 C...

  12. What makes a ‘National’ War Memorial? The Case of the Australian Ex-Prisoners of War Memorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan Grant

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Ex-Prisoners of War Memorial was unveiled in Ballarat to great fanfare in February 2004. Struggling to overcome serious setbacks in order to raise the necessary funds to construct the $2 million memorial over more than a period of four years, the memorial, listing the names of all Australian prisoners of war from all conflicts was judged by the Federal Government to be nothing but a ‘local’ memorial rather than a ‘national’ memorial. The article investigates whether this issue is at all associated with the ambiguity and difficulty of incorporating prisoners of war into the Anzac legend or whether there were other factors at hand deciding the official ‘national’ status of the first war memorial to list the names of all Australian prisoners of war. The importance of this issue reveals how government bureaucracy and party politics can influence the future and potential public significance of a war memorial.

  13. Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Bryce A. Richardson; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original...

  14. The origin of 'Great Walls'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.

    2009-01-01

    A new semi-analytical model that explains the formation and sizes of the 'great walls' - the largest structures observed in the universe is suggested. Although the basis of the model is the Zel'dovich approximation it has been used in a new way very different from the previous studies. Instead of traditional approach that evaluates the nonlinear density field it has been utilized for identification of the regions in Lagrangian space that after the mapping to real or redshift space (depending on the kind of structure is studied) end up in the regions where shell-crossing occurs. The set of these regions in Lagrangian space form the progenitor of the structure and after the mapping it determines the pattern of the structure in real or redshift space. The particle trajectories have crossed in such regions and the mapping is no longer unique there. The progenitor after mapping makes only one stream in the multi-stream flow regions therefore it does not comprise all the mass. Nevertheless, it approximately retains the shape of the structure. The progenitor of the structure in real space is determined by the linear density field along with two non-Gaussian fields derived from the initial potential. Its shape in Eulerian space is also affected by the displacement field. The progenitor of the structure in redshift space also depends on these fields but in addition it is strongly affected by two anisotropic fields that determine the pattern of great walls as well as their huge sizes. All the fields used in the mappings are derived from the linear potential smoothed at the current scale of nonlinearity which is R nl = 2.7 h −1 Mpc for the adopted parameters of the ΛCDM universe normalized to σ 8 = 0.8. The model predicts the existence of walls with sizes significantly greater than 500 h −1 Mpc that may be found in sufficiently large redshift surveys

  15. The Great Warming Brian Fagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Great Warming is a journey back to the world of a thousand years ago, to the Medieval Warm Period. Five centuries of irregular warming from 800 to 1250 had beneficial effects in Europe and the North Atlantic, but brought prolonged droughts to much of the Americas and lands affected by the South Asian monsoon. The book describes these impacts of warming on medieval European societies, as well as the Norse and the Inuit of the far north, then analyzes the impact of harsh, lengthy droughts on hunting societies in western North America and the Ancestral Pueblo farmers of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. These peoples reacted to drought by relocating entire communities. The Maya civilization was much more vulnerable that small-scale hunter-gatherer societies and subsistence farmers in North America. Maya rulers created huge water storage facilities, but their civilization partially collapsed under the stress of repeated multiyear droughts, while the Chimu lords of coastal Peru adapted with sophisticated irrigation works. The climatic villain was prolonged, cool La Niñalike conditions in the Pacific, which caused droughts from Venezuela to East Asia, and as far west as East Africa. The Great Warming argues that the warm centuries brought savage drought to much of humanity, from China to Peru. It also argues that drought is one of the most dangerous elements in today’s humanly created global warming, often ignored by preoccupied commentators, but with the potential to cause over a billion people to starve. Finally, I use the book to discuss the issues and problems of communicating multidisciplinary science to the general public.

  16. Black Liquor Gasification with Motor Fuel Production - BLGMF II - A techno-economic feasibility study on catalytic Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for synthetic diesel production in comparison with methanol and DME as transport fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbom, Tomas; Berglin, Niklas; Loegdberg, Sara [Nykomb Synergetics AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-06-15

    The present project presents additional results to the former BLGMF project, which investigate Black Liquor Gasification with Motor Fuels (BLGMF) production. The objectives were to investigate, based on the KAM 2 program Ecocyclic Pulp Mill (2,000 ADt/day of pulp) the feasibility of synthetic fuels production. Specifically the route to Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels is investigated as comparison to earlier work on methanol/DME. As modern kraft pulp mills have a surplus of energy, they could become key suppliers of renewable fuels. It is thus of great interest to convert the spent cooking product 'black liquor' to an energy carrier of high value. The resulting biomass-to-fuel energy efficiency when only biomass is used as an external energy source was 43% for FTD or 65% for FT products compared with 66% for methanol and 67% for DME. The FTD calculation is considerably more complicated and based on assumptions, therefore the uncertainty is higher. Would the diesel be taken out with a T95% of 320 deg C the FTD efficiency would be 45%. FT synthesis also opens up a possibility to produce e.g. lube oils from waxes produced. The total net FT-products output equals 4115 barrels/day. The FTD production cost is calculated as the energy share of the total production cost and assumes an offset of naphtha covering its own costs, where it is essential that it finds a market. Assuming same petrol (methanol) and diesel (DME, FTD) costs for the consumer the payback time were 2.6, 2.9 and 3.4 years with an IRR of 40%, 45% and 30%, respectively. In conclusion, there are necessary resources and potential for large-scale methanol (or DME, FTD) production and substantial economic incentive for making plant investments and achieving competitive product revenues.

  17. Detailed sensory memory, sloppy working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, I.G.; Vandenbroucke, A.R.E.; Scholte, H.S.; Lamme, V.A.F.

    2010-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) enables us to actively maintain information in mind for a brief period of time after stimulus disappearance. According to recent studies, VSTM consists of three stages - iconic memory, fragile VSTM, and visual working memory - with increasingly stricter capacity

  18. Episodic memory, semantic memory, and amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, L R; Zola, S M

    1998-01-01

    Episodic memory and semantic memory are two types of declarative memory. There have been two principal views about how this distinction might be reflected in the organization of memory functions in the brain. One view, that episodic memory and semantic memory are both dependent on the integrity of medial temporal lobe and midline diencephalic structures, predicts that amnesic patients with medial temporal lobe/diencephalic damage should be proportionately impaired in both episodic and semantic memory. An alternative view is that the capacity for semantic memory is spared, or partially spared, in amnesia relative to episodic memory ability. This article reviews two kinds of relevant data: 1) case studies where amnesia has occurred early in childhood, before much of an individual's semantic knowledge has been acquired, and 2) experimental studies with amnesic patients of fact and event learning, remembering and knowing, and remote memory. The data provide no compelling support for the view that episodic and semantic memory are affected differently in medial temporal lobe/diencephalic amnesia. However, episodic and semantic memory may be dissociable in those amnesic patients who additionally have severe frontal lobe damage.

  19. The effects of subchronic acrylamide exposure on gene expression, neurochemistry, hormones, and histopathology in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of male Fischer 344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, J.F.; Latendresse, J.R.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Muskhelishvili, L.; Warbritton, A.R.; Thomas, M.; Tareke, E.; McDaniel, L.P.; Doerge, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines possible evidence for disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis from 14 days of repeated exposure of male Fischer 344 rats to doses of AA that range from one that is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure (2.5 mg/kg/d), an intermediate dose (10 mg/kg/d), and a high dose (50 mg/kg/d) that is neurotoxic for this exposure time. The endpoints selected include: serum levels of thyroid and pituitary hormones; target tissue expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis, release, and receptors; neurotransmitters in the CNS that affect hormone homeostasis; and histopathological evaluation of target tissues. These studies showed virtually no evidence for systematic alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and do not support hormone dysregulation as a plausible mechanism for AA-induced thyroid cancer in the Fischer 344 rat. Specifically, there were no significant changes in: 1) mRNA levels in hypothalamus or pituitary for TRH, TSH, thyroid hormone receptor α and β, as well 10 other hormones or releasing factors; 2) mRNA levels in thyroid for thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodide symporter, or type I deiodinases; 3) serum TSH or T3 levels (T4 was decreased at high dose only); 4) dopaminergic tone in the hypothalamus and pituitary or importantly 5) increased cell proliferation (Mki67 mRNA and Ki-67 protein levels were not increased) in thyroid or pituitary. These negative findings are consistent with a genotoxic mechanism of AA carcinogenicity based on metabolism to glycidamide and DNA adduct formation. Clarification of this mechanistic dichotomy may be useful in human cancer risk

  20. Optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  1. Synthesis of Fischer carbene complexes of iridium by C-H bond activation of methyl and cyclic ethers: Evidence for reversible {alpha}-hydrogen migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, H.F.; Arndtsen, B.A.; Burger, P.; Bergman, R.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-03-13

    We report here a mild and versatile route to Fischer carbene complexes of iridium via the activation of C-H bonds of methyl and cyclic ethers, along with our preliminary studies of this rare family of carbene complexes. Theoretical studies suggest that {alpha}-hydrogen migrations can be kinetically favorable if a coordinatively unsaturated species can be accessed. Thus, the lability of the triflate ligand presumably facilitates this process. Further evidence for the rapidity, as well as reversibility, of this rearrangement was obtained by NMR analysis. 20 refs.

  2. Lump Kinetic Analysis of Syngas Composition Effect on Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Cobalt and Cobalt-Rhenium Alumina Supported Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Tristantini

    2016-03-01

    Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 10th February 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2016 How to Cite: Tristantini, D., Suwignjo, R.K. (2016. Lump Kinetic Analysis of Syngas Composition Effect on Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Cobalt and Cobalt-Rhenium Alumina Supported Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 84-92. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.424.84-92 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.424.84-92

  3. Effect of K promoter on the structure and catalytic behavior of supported iron-based catalysts in fischer-tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. M Farias

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of K addition on the performance of supported Fe catalysts for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS were studied in a slurry reactor at 240 to 270ºC, 2.0 to 4.0 MPa and syngas H2/CO = 1.0. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, H2 temperature programmed reduction, X - ray diffraction, X - ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and dispersive X - ray spectroscopy. A strong interaction was observed between Fe and K, which inhibited the reduction of Fe catalyst. Addition of potassium increased the production of heavy hydrocarbons (C20+.

  4. Fischer-Tropsch Performance of an SiO2-Supported Co-Based Catalyst Prepared by Hydrogen Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Tingjun; Huang Chengdu; Lv Jing; Li Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst was prepared by hydrogen dielectric-barrier discharge (H 2 -DBD) plasma. Compared to thermal hydrogen reduction, H 2 -DBD plasma treatment can not only fully decompose the cobalt precursor but also partially reduce the cobalt oxides at lower temperature and with less time. The effect of the discharge atmosphere on the property of the plasma-prepared catalyst and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity was studied. The results indicate that H 2 -DBD plasma treatment is a promising alternative for preparing Co/SiO 2 catalysts from the viewpoint of energy savings and efficiency

  5. Dreams and Despair: The Early Years of the Great Depression in Gary, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Historian, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Based on official reports, newspapers, the memories of citizens, and historical studies, a description of Gary, Indiana during the Great Depression shows how many people in Gary were affected by the Depression. Gary began to grow rapidly beginning in 1906 with the organization of two steel companies. Black, European, and Mexican immigrants came to…

  6. The Mind and Brain of Short-Term Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Jonides, John; Lewis, Richard L.; Nee, Derek Evan; Lustig, Cindy A.; Berman, Marc G.; Moore, Katherine Sledge

    2008-01-01

    The past 10 years have brought near-revolutionary changes in psychological theories about short-term memory, with similarly great advances in the neurosciences. Here, we critically examine the major psychological theories (the “mind”) of short-term memory and how they relate to evidence about underlying brain mechanisms. We focus on three features that must be addressed by any satisfactory theory of short-term memory. First, we examine the evidence for the architecture of short-term memory, w...

  7. The heart and great vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condon, V.

    1985-01-01

    Heart disease is the fifth most common cause of death in infants and children (preceded by anoxic and hypoxic conditions, gross congenital malformations, accidental death, and immaturity). Of all the cardiac lesions, congenital heart disease (CHD) makes up the gross majority, accounting for approximately 90% of all cardiac deaths. Approximately two-thirds of all infants who die from CHD do so within the first year of life; of these, approximately one-third die within the first month. The most common cause of death in the first month is hypoplastic left heart syndrome and lesions associated with it, i.e., aortic atresia/critical aortic stenosis and mitral atresia/critical mitral stenosis. Severe coarctation of the aorta (coarctation syndrome) and transposition of the great arteries are the other most important causes of death in this age group. CHD occurs as a familial condition in approximately 1-4% of cases; ventricular septal defects, patent ductus arteriosus, and atrial septal defect are particularly common forms. Parental age plays an important role, with a significantly increased risk of CHD in infants of mothers over 39 years of age. Patent ductus arteriosus is more prevalent in firstborn children, particularly those born prematurely to young mothers. Environmental factors, such as exposure to teratogenic agents, have also been shown to increase the incidence of CHD. Children with various syndromes also have increased incidence of CHD. Down syndrome is a classic example, as are other trisomies

  8. Tipping Points, Great and Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Foster

    2010-12-01

    The Forum by Jordan et al. [2010] addressed environmental problems of various scales in great detail, but getting the critical message through to the formulators of public policies requires going back to basics, namely, that exponential growth (of a population, an economy, or most anything else) is not sustainable. When have you heard any politician or economist from anywhere across the ideological spectrum say anything other than that more growth is essential? There is no need for computer models to demonstrate “limits to growth,” as was done in the 1960s. Of course, as one seeks more details, the complexity of modeling will rapidly outstrip the capabilities of both observation and computing. This is common with nonlinear systems, even simple ones. Thus, identifying all possible “tipping points,” as suggested by Jordan et al. [2010], and then stopping just short of them, is impractical if not impossible. The main thing needed to avoid environmental disasters is a bit of common sense.

  9. Memory, microprocessor, and ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    System Timing. ROM/PROM/EPROM. SRAM. Embedded Memory. Flash Memories. Dynamic Random Access Memory. Low-Power Memory Circuits. Timing and Signal Integrity Analysis. Microprocessor Design Verification. Microprocessor Layout Method. Architecture. ASIC Design. Logic Synthesis for Field Programmable Gate Array (EPGA) Technology. Testability Concepts and DFT. ATPG and BIST. CAD Tools for BIST/DFT and Delay Faults.

  10. Infant Visual Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.

    2004-01-01

    Visual recognition memory is a robust form of memory that is evident from early infancy, shows pronounced developmental change, and is influenced by many of the same factors that affect adult memory; it is surprisingly resistant to decay and interference. Infant visual recognition memory shows (a) modest reliability, (b) good discriminant…

  11. Nanoscale memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Andy; Deen, Jamal; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Meyyappan, M

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects for the use of nanomaterials and devices in memory technology. First, the status and continuing scaling trends of the flash memory are discussed. Then, a detailed discussion on technologies trying to replace flash in the near-term is provided. This includes phase change random access memory, Fe random access memory and magnetic random access memory. The long-term nanotechnology prospects for memory devices include carbon-nanotube-based memory, molecular electronics and memristors based on resistive materials such as TiO 2 . (topical review)

  12. Natural disasters between memory and oblivion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, M.; La Longa, F.; Lanza, T.

    2012-04-01

    The last decades of the twentieth century and the beginning of the new millennium have been marked by a strong focus on the past and, consequently, a proliferation of studies on memory. Perhaps this great attention to memory implies a new way of thinking and experiencing time and space, two categories that deeply changed by the phenomenon of cultural globalization (Huyssen, 2003). If it is true that with new technologies, space and time have been dramatically compressed, it is also true that the horizons of our imagination have expanded to dimensions of space and time which are able to cross the boundaries of a locally circumscribed vision. So our past and our memory no longer have clear and delimited boundaries which were established by a tradition with local and national roots within specific geographical borders. The revival of studies on memory has included large Italian catastrophes occurred in the last centuries. Several initiatives, researches, exhibitions and commemorations wanted to remember these great catastrophes of our country. What is the relationship between these initiatives and the reduction of risk? What relationships are there between memory, forgetting and risk? On the issue of risk reduction the provocative phrase of Pierre Nora fits well: "We talk about memory because it no longer exists "? (Pierre Nora, Les Lieux de mémoire, Gallimard 1997). A direction to work on is indicated by Aleida Assmann (1999) that associates the idea of crisis of memory with the crisis of "living memory", that is linked to the disappearance of the eyewitnesses of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century. When the generations who lived through L'Aquila earthquake on 6 April 2009 will die, the memory of the earthquake will vanish with them? To answer these questions and to propose communication and educational strategies capable of persisting the passage of generations, this work explores an interdisciplinary point of view, which takes into account recent

  13. Visual memory needs categories

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Henrik; Poom, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Capacity limitations in the way humans store and process information in working memory have been extensively studied, and several memory systems have been distinguished. In line with previous capacity estimates for verbal memory and memory for spatial information, recent studies suggest that it is possible to retain up to four objects in visual working memory. The objects used have typically been categorically different colors and shapes. Because knowledge about categories is stored in long-t...

  14. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  15. Memory: sins and virtues

    OpenAIRE

    Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Memory plays an important role in everyday life but does not provide an exact and unchanging record of experience: research has documented that memory is a constructive process that is subject to a variety of errors and distortions. Yet these memory “sins” also reflect the operation of adaptive aspects of memory. Memory can thus be characterized as an adaptive constructive process, which plays a functional role in cognition but produces distortions, errors, or illusions as a consequence of d...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  17. Enhanced anaerobic degradation of Fischer-Tropsch wastewater by integrated UASB system with Fe-C micro-electrolysis assisted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexin; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Li, Kun; Xu, Hao; Fang, Fang; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong

    2016-12-01

    Coupling of the Fe-C micro-electrolysis (IC-ME) into the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) was developed for enhanced Fischer-Tropsch wastewater treatment. The COD removal efficiency and methane production in R 3 with IC-ME assisted both reached up to 80.6 ± 1.7% and 1.38 ± 0.11 L/L·d that higher than those values in R 1 with GAC addition (63.0 ± 3.4% and 0.95 ± 0.09 L/L·d) and R 2 with ZVI addition (74.5 ± 2.8% and 1.21 ± 0.09 L/L·d) under the optimum HRT (5 d). The Fe corrosion as electron donor reduced the ORP values and stimulated the activities of hydrogenotrophic methanogens to lower H 2 partial pressure in R 2 and R 3 . Additionally, Fe 2+ as by-product of iron corrosion, its presence could effectively increase the percentage of protein content in tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (TB-EPS) to promote better bioflocculation, increasing to 90.5 mg protein/g·VSS (R 2 ) and 106.3 mg protein/g·VSS (R 3 ) while this value in R1 was simply 56.6 mg protein/g·VSS. More importantly, compared with R 1 , the excess accumulation of propionic acid and butyric acid in system was avoided. The macroscopic galvanic cells around Fe-C micro-electrolysis carriers in R 3 , that larger than microscopic galvanic cells in R 2 , further accelerate to transfer the electrons from anodic Fe to cathodic carbon that enhance interspecies hydrogen transfer, making the decomposition of propionic acid and butyric acid more thermodynamically feasible, finally facilitate more methane production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transposition of the great arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castela Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposition of the great arteries (TGA, also referred to as complete transposition, is a congenital cardiac malformation characterised by atrioventricular concordance and ventriculoarterial (VA discordance. The incidence is estimated at 1 in 3,500–5,000 live births, with a male-to-female ratio 1.5 to 3.2:1. In 50% of cases, the VA discordance is an isolated finding. In 10% of cases, TGA is associated with noncardiac malformations. The association with other cardiac malformations such as ventricular septal defect (VSD and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is frequent and dictates timing and clinical presentation, which consists of cyanosis with or without congestive heart failure. The onset and severity depend on anatomical and functional variants that influence the degree of mixing between the two circulations. If no obstructive lesions are present and there is a large VSD, cyanosis may go undetected and only be perceived during episodes of crying or agitation. In these cases, signs of congestive heart failure prevail. The exact aetiology remains unknown. Some associated risk factors (gestational diabetes mellitus, maternal exposure to rodenticides and herbicides, maternal use of antiepileptic drugs have been postulated. Mutations in growth differentiation factor-1 gene, the thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein-2 gene and the gene encoding the cryptic protein have been shown implicated in discordant VA connections, but they explain only a small minority of TGA cases. The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography, which also provides the morphological details required for future surgical management. Prenatal diagnosis by foetal echocardiography is possible and desirable, as it may improve the early neonatal management and reduce morbidity and mortality. Differential diagnosis includes other causes of central neonatal cyanosis. Palliative treatment with prostaglandin E1 and balloon atrial septostomy are usually

  19. Comparative study of regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions during NEDC in a light-duty diesel engine fuelled with Fischer Tropsch and biodiesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Vicente; Lujan, Jose M.; Pla, Benjamin; Linares, Waldemar G. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    In this study, regulated and unregulated gaseous emissions and fuel consumption with five different fuels were tested in a 4-cylinder, light-duty diesel EURO IV typically used for the automotive vehicles in Europe. Three different biodiesel fuels obtained from soybean oil, rapeseed oil and palm oil, a Fischer Tropsch fuel and an ultra low sulphur diesel were studied. The test used was the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), this allowed tests to be carried out on an engine warmed up beforehand to avoid the effect of cold starts and several tests a day. Regulated emissions of NO{sub X}, CO, HC and CO{sub 2} were measured for each fuel. Unburned Hydrocarbon Speciation and formaldehyde were also measured in order to determine the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) of the gaseous emissions. Pollutants were measured without the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) to gather data about raw emissions. When biodiesel was used, increases in regulated and unregulated emissions were observed and also significant increases in engine fuel consumption. The use of Fischer Tropsch fuel, however, caused lower regulated and unregulated emissions and fuel consumption than diesel. (author)

  20. The Natural History of Pneumonic Tularemia in Female Fischer 344 Rats after Inhalational Exposure to Aerosolized Francisella tularensis Subspecies tularensis Strain SCHU S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Dekonenko, Alexander; Hahn, Andrew C; Wu, Terry H

    2017-02-01

    The inbred Fischer 344 rat is being evaluated for testing novel vaccines and therapeutics against pneumonic tularemia. Although primary pneumonic tularemia in humans typically occurs by inhalation of aerosolized bacteria, the rat model has relied on intratracheal inoculation of organisms because of safety and equipment issues. We now report the natural history of pneumonic tularemia in female Fischer 344 rats after nose-only inhalational exposure to lethal doses of aerosolized Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis, strain SCHU S4. Our results are consistent with initial uptake of aerosolized SCHU S4 from the nasal cavity, lungs, and possibly the gastrointestinal tract. Bacteremia with hematogenous dissemination was first detected 2 days after exposure. Shortly thereafter, the infected rats exhibited fever, tachypnea, and hypertension that persisted for 24 to 36 hours and then rapidly decreased as animals succumbed to infection between days 5 and 8 after exposure. Tachycardia was observed briefly, but only after the core body temperature and blood pressure began to decrease as the animals were near death. Initial neutrophilic and histiocytic inflammation in affected tissues became progressively more fibrinous and necrotizing over time. At death, as many as 10 10 colony-forming units were found in the lungs, spleen, and liver. Death was attributed to sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Overall, the pathogenesis of pneumonic tularemia in the female F344 rat model appears to replicate the disease in humans. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of repeated light-dark phase shifts on voluntary ethanol and water intake in male and female Fischer and Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Clark, James W; Fixaris, Michael C; Belanger, Gabriel V; Foster, James A

    2010-05-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate reciprocal interactions between excessive alcohol (ethanol) intake and dysregulation of circadian biological rhythms. Thus, chronic alcohol intake leads to widespread circadian disruption in both humans and experimental animals, while in turn, chronobiological disruption has been hypothesized to promote or sustain excessive alcohol intake. Nevertheless, the effects of circadian disruption on voluntary ethanol intake have not been investigated extensively, and prior studies have reported both increased and decreased ethanol intake in rats maintained under "shift-lag" lighting regimens mimicking those experienced by shift workers and transmeridian travelers. In the present study, male and female inbred Fischer and Lewis rats were housed in running wheel cages with continuous free-choice access to both water and 10% (vol/vol) ethanol solution and exposed to repeated 6-h phase advances of the daily light-dark (LD) cycle, whereas controls were kept under standard LD 12:12 conditions. Shift-lag lighting reduced overall ethanol and water intake, and reduced ethanol preference in Fischer rats. Although contrary to the hypothesis that circadian disruption would increase voluntary ethanol intake, these results are consistent with our previous report of reduced ethanol intake in selectively bred high-alcohol-drinking (HAD1) rats housed under a similar lighting regimen. We conclude that chronic circadian disruption is a form of chronobiological stressor that, like other stressors, can either increase or decrease ethanol intake, depending on a variety of poorly understood variables. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cosmic Reason of Great Glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, Alexander; Murtazov, Andrey

    The origin of long-time and global glaciations in the past of our planet, which have been named «great», is still not clear. Both the advance of glaciers and their subsequent melting must be connected with some energy consuming processes. There is a powerful energy source permanently functioning throughout the Earth’s history - the solar radiation. The equality of the incoming shortwave solar energy and the transformed long-wave energy emitted by the Earth provides for the whole ecosphere’s sustainable evolution. Great glaciations might be caused by space body falls into the world oceans. If the body is large enough, it can stir waters down to the bottom. The world waters are part of the global heat transfer from the planet’s equator to its poles (nowadays, mostly to the North Pole). The mixing of the bottom and surface waters breaks the circulation of flows and they stop. The termination of heat transfer to the poles will result in an icecap at high latitudes which in its turn will decrease the total solar heat inflow to the planet and shift the pole ice boarder to the equator. This positive feedback may last long and result in long-time glaciations. The oceanic currents will remain only near the equator. The factor obstructing the global cooling is the greenhouse effect. Volcanic eruptions supply a lot of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. When due to the increased albedo the planet receives less solar heat, plants bind less carbon oxide into biomass and more of it retains in the atmosphere. Therefore, the outflow of heat from the planet decreases and glaciations does not involve the whole planet. The balance established between the heat inflow and heat losses is unstable. Any imbalance acts as a positive feed-back factor. If the volcanic activity grows, the inflow of the carbon dioxide into the atmosphere will cause its heating-up (plants will fail to reproduce themselves quickly enough to utilize the carbonic acid). The temperature growth will lead to

  3. Insect olfactory coding and memory at multiple timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Stopfer, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Insects can learn, allowing them great flexibility for locating seasonal food sources and avoiding wily predators. Because insects are relatively simple and accessible to manipulation, they provide good experimental preparations for exploring mechanisms underlying sensory coding and memory. Here we review how the intertwining of memory with computation enables the coding, decoding, and storage of sensory experience at various stages of the insect olfactory system. Individual parts of this system are capable of multiplexing memories at different timescales, and conversely, memory on a given timescale can be distributed across different parts of the circuit. Our sampling of the olfactory system emphasizes the diversity of memories, and the importance of understanding these memories in the context of computations performed by different parts of a sensory system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Organizational memory: from expectations memory to procedural memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organizational memory is not just the stock of knowledge about how to do things, but also of expectations of organizational members vis-à-vis each other and the organization as a whole. The central argument of this paper is that this second type of organizational memory -organizational expectations

  5. Visual Memories Bypass Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Ilona M; Watanabe, Yurika L; Kibbe, Melissa M; Ling, Sam

    2018-05-01

    How distinct are visual memory representations from visual perception? Although evidence suggests that briefly remembered stimuli are represented within early visual cortices, the degree to which these memory traces resemble true visual representations remains something of a mystery. Here, we tested whether both visual memory and perception succumb to a seemingly ubiquitous neural computation: normalization. Observers were asked to remember the contrast of visual stimuli, which were pitted against each other to promote normalization either in perception or in visual memory. Our results revealed robust normalization between visual representations in perception, yet no signature of normalization occurring between working memory stores-neither between representations in memory nor between memory representations and visual inputs. These results provide unique insight into the nature of visual memory representations, illustrating that visual memory representations follow a different set of computational rules, bypassing normalization, a canonical visual computation.

  6. Stochastic memory: getting memory out of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Alexander; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2011-03-01

    Memory circuit elements, namely memristors, memcapacitors and meminductors, can store information without the need of a power source. These systems are generally defined in terms of deterministic equations of motion for the state variables that are responsible for memory. However, in real systems noise sources can never be eliminated completely. One would then expect noise to be detrimental for memory. Here, we show that under specific conditions on the noise intensity memory can actually be enhanced. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of a memristor in which the addition of white noise into the state variable equation improves the memory and helps the operation of the system. We discuss under which conditions this effect can be realized experimentally, discuss its implications on existing memory systems discussed in the literature, and also analyze the effects of colored noise. Work supported in part by NSF.

  7. Detailed Sensory Memory, Sloppy Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sligte, Ilja G.; Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R. E.; Scholte, H. Steven; Lamme, Victor A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) enables us to actively maintain information in mind for a brief period of time after stimulus disappearance. According to recent studies, VSTM consists of three stages - iconic memory, fragile VSTM, and visual working memory - with increasingly stricter capacity limits and progressively longer lifetimes. Still, the resolution (or amount of visual detail) of each VSTM stage has remained unexplored and we test this in the present study. We presented people with a...

  8. Combining individual memory & collective memory? : Classics Illustrated’s representation of World War II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees

    WWII is widely remembered and represented. Keeping the memories of this international conflict alive, both within academic and popular history writing, occurred largely within various national frameworks. On the one hand, in the immediate post-war world many stories appeared about the great events

  9. Detailed sensory memory, sloppy working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sligte, Ilja G; Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2010-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) enables us to actively maintain information in mind for a brief period of time after stimulus disappearance. According to recent studies, VSTM consists of three stages - iconic memory, fragile VSTM, and visual working memory - with increasingly stricter capacity limits and progressively longer lifetimes. Still, the resolution (or amount of visual detail) of each VSTM stage has remained unexplored and we test this in the present study. We presented people with a change detection task that measures the capacity of all three forms of VSTM, and we added an identification display after each change trial that required people to identify the "pre-change" object. Accurate change detection plus pre-change identification requires subjects to have a high-resolution representation of the "pre-change" object, whereas change detection or identification only can be based on the hunch that something has changed, without exactly knowing what was presented before. We observed that people maintained 6.1 objects in iconic memory, 4.6 objects in fragile VSTM, and 2.1 objects in visual working memory. Moreover, when people detected the change, they could also identify the pre-change object on 88% of the iconic memory trials, on 71% of the fragile VSTM trials and merely on 53% of the visual working memory trials. This suggests that people maintain many high-resolution representations in iconic memory and fragile VSTM, but only one high-resolution object representation in visual working memory.

  10. Je me souviens de tout, Richard (Rolands Kalniņš, Studio de Riga, 1967 : une manifestation précoce d'une mémoire concurrente de la Grande Guerre patriotique I Remember Everything, Richard (Rolands Kalniņš, Riga Film Studio, 1967: A Precocious Manifestation of a Competing Memory with the Great Patriotic War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Denis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually said that the memory of the war period had been completely reversed in the former Soviet borderlands since the collapse of the USSR, turning former “traitors” into heroes or victims. However, attempts to set up a new approach of the Nazi occupation and collaboration are rooted in the “Thaw” period. I remember everything, Richard – dealing with the Latvian legion, started to be considered in 1957. That coincided both with the massive return of the Latvian deportees from Siberia, and with a renewal of trials against war criminals. Produced only in 1966, the film reflected the social tensions going along with the sensitive topic, and presented a point of view far more nuanced than the official figure of the “Latvian traitor” imposed during the Stalinist period. Based on interviews, archival material and film analysis, this article aims at understanding through the film-making process the connection between the deep changes of the political meaning of the war period, and the social composition of film production.

  11. Effects of mild cognitive impairment on emotional scene memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, J D; Dimsdale-Zucker, H R; Flannery, S; Budson, A E; Kensinger, E A

    2017-02-01

    Young and older adults experience benefits in attention and memory for emotional compared to neutral information, but this memory benefit is greatly diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Little is known about whether this impairment arises early or late in the time course between healthy aging and AD. This study compared memory for positive, negative, and neutral items with neutral backgrounds between patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy older adults. We also used a divided attention condition in older adults as a possible model for the deficits observed in MCI patients. Results showed a similar pattern of selective memory for emotional items while forgetting their backgrounds in older adults and MCI patients, but MCI patients had poorer memory overall. Dividing attention during encoding disproportionately reduced memory for backgrounds (versus items) relative to a full attention condition. Participants performing in the lower half on the divided attention task qualitatively and quantitatively mirrored the results in MCI patients. Exploratory analyses comparing lower- and higher-performing MCI patients showed that only higher-performing MCI patients had the characteristic scene memory pattern observed in healthy older adults. Together, these results suggest that the effects of emotion on memory are relatively well preserved for patients with MCI, although emotional memory patterns may start to be altered once memory deficits become more pronounced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in Groundwater Flow and Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations at the Fischer and Porter Superfund Site, Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    The 38-acre Fischer and Porter Company Superfund Site is in Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pa. Historically, as part of the manufacturing process, trichloroethylene (TCE) degreasers were used for parts cleaning. In 1979, the Bucks County Health Department detected TCE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water from the Fischer and Porter on-site supply wells and nearby public-supply wells. The Fischer and Porter Site was designated as a Superfund Site and placed on the National Priorities List in September 1983. A 1984 Record of Decision for the site required the Fischer and Porter Company to pump and treat groundwater contaminated by VOCs from three on-site wells at a combined rate of 75 gallons per minute to contain groundwater contamination on the property. Additionally, the Record of Decision recognized the need for treatment of the water from two nearby privately owned supply wells operated by the Warminster Heights Home Ownership Association. In 2004, the Warminster Heights Home Ownership Association sold its water distribution system, and both wells were taken out of service. The report describes changes in groundwater levels and contaminant concentrations and migration caused by the shutdown of the Warminster Heights supply wells and presents a delineation of the off-site groundwater-contamination plume. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted this study (2006-09) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The Fischer and Porter Site and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Stockton Formation of Late Triassic age. The rocks are chiefly interbedded arkosic sandstone and siltstone. The Stockton aquifer system is comprised of a series of gently dipping lithologic units with different hydraulic properties. A three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model was developed for the site on the basis of rock cores and borehole geophysical logs. The model was simplified by combining individual lithologic

  13. Short-term global warming mitigation costs of fischer-tropsch diesel production and policy scenarios in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Stroemman, Anders Hammer

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Increasing the supply of advanced biofuels like synthetic diesel produced from woody biomass require attractive investment environments so that novel technologies are deployed and technological learning can lead to reduced production costs and accelerated market diffusion. Technology-specific biofuel policy designed to minimize perceived risk may encourage shortterm investment into those biofuels offering superior environmental benefits - particularly climate mitigation benefits - thereby leading to steeper learning curves and deeper greenhouse gas (GHG) emission cuts over the medium- and long-term horizon. We perform both a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and an economic analysis of Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) produced from Norwegian forest biomass at an 'nth' commercial plant (a plant with the same technologies that have been employed in previous commercial plants). This is followed with a cost growth analysis in order to derive production costs likely to be borne by pioneer commercial plants in Norway in the short-term (2016). LCA results are used to calculate shortterm GHG mitigation costs. We then assess, through scenarios, how various policy measures and financial support mechanisms would reduce production costs for incentivizing short-term investment and expediting commercial deployment in Norway. Because 'top-down' or 'market pull' biofuel support policy like excise tax exemptions or carbon taxes do not directly encourage investment into specific biofuel technologies like wood-FTD in the short term, we choose to analyze three 'bottom-up' or 'market push' policy scenarios to assess their effects on reducing levelized unit production costs. These include a Capital Grant, a low-interest Loan Guarantee, a Corporate Tax Credit, and a Feedstock Credit scenario. Under the Capital Grant scenario, we assess the change in levelized production and thus GHG abatement costs when a 50% capital grant (TCI) is

  14. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  15. Memory rehabilitation for the working memory of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Shokoufeh; Zare, Hossein; Etemadifar, Masoud; Taher Neshatdoost, Hamid

    2018-05-01

    The main cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis (MS) affect the working memory, processing speed, and performances that are in close interaction with one another. Cognitive problems in MS are influenced to a lesser degree by disease recovery medications or treatments,but cognitive rehabilitation is considered one of the promising methods for cure. There is evidence regarding the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for MS patients in various stages of the disease. Since the impairment in working memory is one of the main MS deficits, a particular training that affects this cognitive domain can be of a great value. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation on the working memory performance of MS patients. Sixty MS patients with cognitive impairment and similar in terms of demographic characteristics, duration of disease, neurological problems, and mental health were randomly assigned to three groups: namely, experimental, placebo, and control. Patients' cognitive evaluation incorporated baseline assessments immediately post-intervention and 5 weeks post-intervention. The experimental group received a cognitive rehabilitation program in one-hour sessions on a weekly basis for 8 weeks. The placebo group received relaxation techniques on a weekly basis; the control group received no intervention. The results of this study showed that the cognitive rehabilitation program had a positive effect on the working memory performance of patients with MS in the experimental group. These results were achieved in immediate evaluation (post-test) and follow-up 5 weeks after intervention. There was no significant difference in working memory performance between the placebo group and the control group. According to the study, there is evidence for the effectiveness of a memory rehabilitation program for the working memory of patients with MS. Cognitive rehabilitation can improve working memory disorders and have a positive effect on the

  16. Prospective memory, working memory, retrospective memory and self-rated memory performance in persons with intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Levén, Anna; Lyxell, Björn; Andersson, Jan; Danielsson, Henrik; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between prospective memory, working memory, retrospective memory and self-rated memory capacity in adults with and without intellectual disability. Prospective memory was investigated by means of a picture-based task. Working memory was measured as performance on span tasks. Retrospective memory was scored as recall of subject performed tasks. Self-ratings of memory performance were based on the prospective and retrospective mem...

  17. Main Memory DBMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); L. Liu (Lei); M. Tamer Özsu

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractA main memory database system is a DBMS that primarily relies on main memory for computer data storage. In contrast, normal database management systems employ hard disk based persisntent storage.

  18. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... be evaluated by a health professional. What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  19. Memory and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory and Aging Losing keys, misplacing a wallet, or forgetting someone’s name are common experiences. But for people nearing or over age 65, such memory lapses can be frightening. They wonder if they ...

  20. Tracing Cultural Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    by their encounters – to address a question that thirty years of ground - breaking research into memory has not yet sufficiently answered: What can we learn about the dynamics of cultural memory by examining mundane accounts of touristic encounters with sites of memory? From Blaavand Beach in Western Denmark......We encounter, relate to and make use of our past and that of others in multifarious and increasingly mobile ways. Tourism is one of the main paths for encountering sites of memory. This thesis examines tourists’ creative appropriations of sites of memory – the objects and future memories inspired...... of memory. They highlight the role of mundane uses of the past and indicate the need for cross - disciplinary research on the visual and on memory...

  1. Memory loss after electroconvulsive treatment--may the sudden alleviation of depression-inducing memories explain patient despair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, John E

    2011-12-01

    Electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) has developed over 70 years to a modern, effective way of lifting depressive moods. Memory loss after electroconvulsive treatment is the only remaining relevant criticism of the treatment modality when considering the overall rate of remission from this treatment compared to all other treatment modalities. A depressive state impedes memory. After treatment memory improves on several qualities of cognition. However, comparing a person's memory ability from the months before depression started to the level after a course of ECT is never done, of obvious reasons. There are great clinical difficulties explaining who would develop memory problems, regardless of stimulation techniques, age or sex of the patient. The memory loss seen in some patients undergoing electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) is not explained by the treatment alone. After ECT unpleasant memories are disclosed rapidly and the patient may unconsciously try to defend herself by extending memory repression to other areas of memory. This may be unrelated to treatment modality, number of sessions or severity of depression. Psychological factors may partly explain why some patients unfold memory problems when the depression is rapidly lifted, rather than the treatment modality itself. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) as Alternative to a Conventional Activated Sludge System Followed by Ultrafiltration (CAS-UF) for the Treatment of Fischer-Tropsch Reaction Water from Gas-to-Liquids Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurinonyte, Judita; Meulepas, Roel J.W.; Brink, van den Paula; Temmink, Hardy

    2017-01-01

    The potential of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system to treat Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction water from gas-to-liquids (GTL) industries was investigated and compared with the current treatment system: a conventional activated sludge system followed by an ultrafiltration (CAS-UF) unit. The MBR and

  3. Emotional Memory Persists Longer than Event Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition…

  4. Music, memory and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. PMID:18710596

  5. Attending to auditory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jacqueline F; Moscovitch, Morris; Alain, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Attention to memory describes the process of attending to memory traces when the object is no longer present. It has been studied primarily for representations of visual stimuli with only few studies examining attention to sound object representations in short-term memory. Here, we review the interplay of attention and auditory memory with an emphasis on 1) attending to auditory memory in the absence of related external stimuli (i.e., reflective attention) and 2) effects of existing memory on guiding attention. Attention to auditory memory is discussed in the context of change deafness, and we argue that failures to detect changes in our auditory environments are most likely the result of a faulty comparison system of incoming and stored information. Also, objects are the primary building blocks of auditory attention, but attention can also be directed to individual features (e.g., pitch). We review short-term and long-term memory guided modulation of attention based on characteristic features, location, and/or semantic properties of auditory objects, and propose that auditory attention to memory pathways emerge after sensory memory. A neural model for auditory attention to memory is developed, which comprises two separate pathways in the parietal cortex, one involved in attention to higher-order features and the other involved in attention to sensory information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Saving Malta's music memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Maltese music is being lost. Along with it Malta loses its culture, way of life, and memories. Dr Toni Sant is trying to change this trend through the Malta Music Memory Project (M3P) http://www.um.edu.mt/think/saving-maltas-music-memory-2/

  7. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  8. Generation and Context Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Lozito, Jeffrey P.; Rosner, Zachary A.

    2006-01-01

    Generation enhances memory for occurrence but may not enhance other aspects of memory. The present study further delineates the negative generation effect in context memory reported in N. W. Mulligan (2004). First, the negative generation effect occurred for perceptual attributes of the target item (its color and font) but not for extratarget…

  9. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  10. 'Great Power Style' in China's Economic Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    China’s ascendance attracts concern, even though Beijing claims to be a responsible great power and tries to demonstrate its ‘great power style’ in economic diplomacy. This article therefore discusses the following questions: to what extent does the current notion and practice of Chinese ‘great...... power style’ in economic diplomacy comply with, or differ from, the criteria of benign hegemony; and what are the major constraining factors? Conceptually, China’s ‘great power style’ is rooted in ancient Chinese political philosophy and institution, but it highly resembles the Western notion of benign...

  11. A STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO SILICA DUST FOR SIX MONTHS AT CONCENTRATIONS OF 0, 2, 10 OR 20 MG / M3.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUTZMAN,R.S.

    1984-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to relate the results of a series of functional tests to the compositional and structural alterations in the rat lung induced by subchronic exposure to silica dust. Fischer-344 rats were exposed for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 6 months to either 0, 2, 10, or 20 mg SiO{sub 2}/m{sup 3}. The general appearance of the exposed rats was not different from that of the controls. Interestingly, female rats exposed to silica dust, at all tested concentrations, gained more weight than the controls. The lung weight and the lung-to-body weight ratio was greater in the male rats exposed to the highest concentration of silica dust.

  12. Appraisal of the Fischer-DiPasquale-Wheaton (FDW real estate model and development of an integrated property and asset market model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Du Toit

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a concise overview of the development of an integrated property and asset market model (IPAMM for South African property markets, utilising the Pretoria office market as case study. The IPAMM simulates the interrelationships between property and asset markets in a diagrammatic quadrant model configuration. The Fischer-DiPasquale-Wheaton (FDW real estate model, arguably the most advanced diagrammatic quadrant real estate model available at present, served as basis for the development of IPAMM. IPAMM is essentially a regression model based on a system of stochastic equations that captures the interrelationships between property and asset markets. The model advances beyond mere conceptualisation of these relationships to a quantified interpretation and application of the theoretical premises that represent the micro-foundations of economic behaviour in property and asset markets.

  13. Performance of Cobalt-Based Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts Using Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma as an Alternative to Thermal Calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Suli; Huang Chengdu; Lv Jing; Li Zhenhua

    2012-01-01

    Co-based catalysts were prepared by using dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma as an alternative method to conventional thermal calcination. The characterization results of N 2 -physisorption, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the catalysts prepared by DBD plasma had a higher specific surface area, lower reduction temperature, smaller particle size and higher cobalt dispersion as compared to calcined catalysts. The DBD plasma method can prevent the sintering and aggregation of active particles on the support due to the decreased treatment time (0.5 h) at lower temperature compared to the longer thermal calcination at higher temperature (at 500° C for 5 h). As a result, the catalytic performance of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on DBD plasma treated Co/SiO 2 catalyst showed an enhanced activity, C 5+ selectivity and catalytic stability as compared to the conventional thermal calcined Co/SiO 2 catalyst.

  14. Development of an Innovative XRD-DRIFTS Prototype Allowing Operando Characterizations during Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Cobalt-Based Catalysts under Representative Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalbert Julien

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An original system combining both X-Ray Diffraction and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was developed with the aim to characterize Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in relevant reaction conditions. The catalytic properties of a model PtCo/silica catalyst tested with this prototype have shown to be in the same range of those obtained in similar conditions with classical fixed-bed reactors. No bulk cobalt oxidation nor sintering were observed on operando XRD patterns. The formation of linear carbonyls and adsorbed hydrocarbons species at the surface of the catalyst was observed on operando DRIFT spectra. The surface of the catalyst was also suspected to be covered with carbon species inducing unfavorable changes in selectivity.

  15. Aging influences multiple indices of oxidative stress in the heart of the Fischer 344/NNia x Brown Norway/BiNia rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shinichi; Rice, Kevin M; Kakarla, Sunil; Katta, Anjaiah; Desai, Devashish H; Walker, Ernest M; Wehner, Paulette; Blough, Eric R

    2007-01-01

    We report the influence of aging on multiple markers of oxidative-nitrosative stress in the heart of adult (6-month), aged (30-month) and very aged (36-month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSd x Brown Norway/BiNia (F344/NXBN) rats. Compared to adult (6-month) hearts, indices of oxidative (superoxide anion [O2*-], 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE]) and nitrosative (protein nitrotyrosylation) stress were 34.1 +/- 28.1%, 186 +/- 28.1% and 94 +/- 5.8% higher, respectively, in 36-month hearts and these findings were highly correlated with increases in left ventricular wall thickness (r > 0.669; r > 0.710 and P lead to age-associated alterations in cardiac oxidative stress.

  16. ECT and memory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, L R

    1977-09-01

    The author reviews several studies that clarify the nature of the memory loss associated with ECT. Bilateral ECT produced greater anterograde memory loss than right unilateral ECT and more extensive retrograde amnesia than unilateral ECT. Reactivating memories just before ECT did not produce amnesia. Capacity for new learning recovered substantially by several months after ECT, but memory complaints were common in individuals who had received bilateral ECT. Other things being equal, right unilateral ECT seems preferable to bilateral ECT because the risks to memory associated with unilateral ECT are smaller.

  17. Determination of memory performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopych, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    Within the scope of testing statistical hypotheses theory a model definition and a computer method for model calculation of widely used in neuropsychology human memory performance (free recall, cued recall, and recognition probabilities), a model definition and a computer method for model calculation of intensities of cues used in experiments for testing human memory quality are proposed. Models for active and passive traces of memory and their relations are found. It was shown that autoassociative memory unit in the form of short two-layer artificial neural network with (or without) damages can be used for model description of memory performance in subjects with (or without) local brain lesions

  18. Quantum random access memory

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    A random access memory (RAM) uses n bits to randomly address N=2^n distinct memory cells. A quantum random access memory (qRAM) uses n qubits to address any quantum superposition of N memory cells. We present an architecture that exponentially reduces the requirements for a memory call: O(log N) switches need be thrown instead of the N used in conventional (classical or quantum) RAM designs. This yields a more robust qRAM algorithm, as it in general requires entanglement among exponentially l...

  19. A psychopharmacological aspects of human emotional memory for emotional material.

    OpenAIRE

    Brignell, C. M.

    2004-01-01

    It is often assumed that emotional events are remembered in great clarity and detail. This thesis begins with a review of the literature on memory enhancement by emotional material. This enhancement may involve mechanisms that are psychologically and neurobiologically distinct from the mechanisms usually employed in memory for neutral material, such as modulation of consolidation by emotional arousal via noradrenaline action in the amygdala. Theoretically, pharmacological manipulation of nora...

  20. Enhancing the properties of Fischer-Tropsch fuel produced from syngas over Co/SiO2 catalyst: Lubricity and Calorific Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doustdar, O.; Wyszynski, M. L.; Mahmoudi, H.; Tsolakis, A.

    2016-09-01

    Bio-fuel produced from renewable sources is considered the most viable alternatives for the replacement of mineral diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. There are several options for biomass derived fuels production involving chemical, biological and thermochemical processes. One of the best options is Fischer Tropsch Synthesis, which has an extensive history of gasoline and diesel production from coal and natural gas. FTS fuel could be one of the best solutions to the fuel emission due to its high quality. FTS experiments were carried out in 16 different operation conditions. Mini structured vertical downdraft fixed bed reactor was used for the FTS. Instead of Biomass gasification, a simulated N2 -rich syngas cylinder of, 33% H2 and 50% N2 was used. FT fuels products were analyzed in GCMS to find the hydrocarbon distributions of FT fuel. Calorific value and lubricity of liquid FT product were measured and compared with commercial diesel fuel. Lubricity has become an important quality, particularly for biodiesel, due to higher pressures in new diesel fuel injection (DFI) technology which demands better lubrication from the fuel and calorific value which is amount of energy released in combustion paly very important role in CI engines. Results show that prepared FT fuel has desirable properties and it complies with standard values. FT samples lubricities as measured by ASTM D6079 standard vary from 286μm (HFRR scar diameter) to 417μm which are less than limit of 520μm. Net Calorific value for FT fuels vary from 9.89 MJ/kg to 43.29 MJ/kg, with six of the samples less than EN 14213 limit of 35MJ/kg. Effect of reaction condition on FT fuel properties was investigated which illustrates that in higher pressure Fischer-Tropsch reaction condition liquid product has better properties.

  1. Memory dynamics under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  2. Detailed sensory memory, sloppy working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja G Sligte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual short-term memory (VSTM enables us to actively maintain information in mind for a brief period of time after stimulus disappearance. According to recent studies, VSTM consists of three stages - iconic memory, fragile VSTM, and visual working memory - with increasingly stricter capacity limits and progressively longer lifetimes. Still, the resolution (or amount of visual detail of each VSTM stage has remained unexplored and we test this in the present study. We presented people with a change detection task that measures the capacity of all three forms of VSTM, and we added an identification display after each change trial that required people to identify the pre-change object. Accurate change detection plus pre-change identification requires subjects to have a high-resolution representation of the pre-change object, whereas change detection or identification only can be based on the hunch that something has changed, without exactly knowing what was presented before. We observed that people maintained 6.1 objects in iconic memory, 4.6 objects in fragile VSTM and 2.1 objects in visual working memory. Moreover, when people detected the change, they could also identify the pre-change object on 88 percent of the iconic memory trials, on 71 percent of the fragile VSTM trials and merely on 53 percent of the visual working memory trials. This suggests that people maintain many high-resolution representations in iconic memory and fragile VSTM, but only one high-resolution object representation in visual working memory.

  3. NAND flash memory technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Aritome, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses basic and advanced NAND flash memory technologies, including the principle of NAND flash, memory cell technologies, multi-bits cell technologies, scaling challenges of memory cell, reliability, and 3-dimensional cell as the future technology. Chapter 1 describes the background and early history of NAND flash. The basic device structures and operations are described in Chapter 2. Next, the author discusses the memory cell technologies focused on scaling in Chapter 3, and introduces the advanced operations for multi-level cells in Chapter 4. The physical limitations for scaling are examined in Chapter 5, and Chapter 6 describes the reliability of NAND flash memory. Chapter 7 examines 3-dimensional (3D) NAND flash memory cells and discusses the pros and cons in structure, process, operations, scalability, and performance. In Chapter 8, challenges of 3D NAND flash memory are dis ussed. Finally, in Chapter 9, the author summarizes and describes the prospect of technologies and market for the fu...

  4. Great Expectations for Middle School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    During the Great Recession, 2008 to 2010, school systems scrambled to balance budgets, and the ratio of counselors to students became even larger. To make matters worse, the Great Recession had a major impact on cuts in educational funding. Budget cutbacks tend to occur where the public will be least likely to notice. The loss of teachers and the…

  5. Great Books. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Great Books" is a program that aims to improve the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of students in kindergarten through high school. The program is implemented as a core or complementary curriculum and is based on the Shared Inquiry[TM] method of learning. The purpose of "Great Books" is to engage students in…

  6. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H; Kidd, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...

  7. Libraries Achieving Greatness: Technology at the Helm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Scott P.

    2009-01-01

    Libraries have been around for thousands of years. Many of them are considered great because of their magnificent architecture or because of the size of their collections. This paper offers ten case studies of libraries that have used technology to achieve greatness. Because almost any library can implement technology, a library does not have to…

  8. Recensie "The Great Reset" : Richard Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy van Dalm

    2010-01-01

    Like the Great Depression and the Long Depression before it, experts have viewed prolonged economic downturns as crises. In The Great Reset , bestselling author Richard Florida argues that we should instead see the recent recession as an opportunity to create entirely new ways of working and living

  9. Stochastic memory: Memory enhancement due to noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Alexander; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    There are certain classes of resistors, capacitors, and inductors that, when subject to a periodic input of appropriate frequency, develop hysteresis loops in their characteristic response. Here we show that the hysteresis of such memory elements can also be induced by white noise of appropriate intensity even at very low frequencies of the external driving field. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of memory resistor realized by TiO2 thin films sandwiched between metallic electrodes and discuss under which conditions this effect can be observed experimentally. We also discuss its implications on existing memory systems described in the literature and the role of colored noise.

  10. Memory impairment among people who are homeless: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Naomi; Roy, Sylvain; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment may interfere with an individual's ability to function independently in the community and may increase the risk of becoming and remaining homeless. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on memory deficits among people who are homeless in order to gain a better understanding of its nature, causes and prevalence. Studies that measured memory functioning as an outcome among a sample of homeless persons were included. Data on sampling, outcome measures, facet of memory explored and prevalence of memory impairment were extracted from all selected research studies. Included studies were evaluated using a critical appraisal process targetted for reviewing prevalence studies. Eleven studies were included in the review. Verbal memory was the most commonly studied facet of memory. Potential contributing factors to memory deficits among persons who are homeless were explored in seven studies. Memory deficits were common among the samples of homeless persons studied. However, there was a great deal of variation in the methodology and quality of the included studies. Conceptualisations of "homelessness" also differed across studies. There is a need for more controlled research using validated neuropsychological tools to evaluate memory impairment among people who are homeless.

  11. Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, Mónica; Hoskote, Aparna; Chadwick, Martin J; Dzieciol, Anna M; Gadian, David G; Chong, Kling; Banks, Tina; de Haan, Michelle; Baldeweg, Torsten; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8-16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of the great arteries, had sustained significant neonatal cyanosis but were otherwise neurodevelopmentally normal. As predicted, the cohort had significant bilateral reduction of hippocampal volumes relative to the volumes of 64 normal controls. They also had significant, yet selective, impairment of episodic memory as measured by standard tests of memory, despite relatively normal levels of intelligence, academic attainment, and verbal fluency. Across the cohort, degree of memory impairment was correlated with degree of hippocampal atrophy suggesting that even as early as neonatal life no other structure can fully compensate for hippocampal injury and its special role in serving episodic long term memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Final report: January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronauer, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory carried out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry-specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it was desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It was desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The original goal was to produce shape-selective catalysts that had the potential to limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' This cage would also restrict their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity and strength was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. Since there was no improvement, the program plan was modified as discussed below. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for

  13. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Final report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

    2011-04-11

    Argonne National Laboratory carried out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry-specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it was desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It was desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The original goal was to produce shape-selective catalysts that had the potential to limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' This cage would also restrict their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity and strength was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. Since there was no improvement, the program plan was modified as discussed below. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those

  14. The contributions of handedness and working memory to episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aparna; Christman, Stephen D; Propper, Ruth E

    2016-11-01

    Past studies have independently shown associations of working memory and degree of handedness with episodic memory retrieval. The current study takes a step ahead by examining whether handedness and working memory independently predict episodic memory. In agreement with past studies, there was an inconsistent-handed advantage for episodic memory; however, this advantage was absent for working memory tasks. Furthermore, regression analyses showed handedness, and complex working memory predicted episodic memory performance at different times. Results are discussed in light of theories of episodic memory and hemispheric interaction.

  15. Memory for speech and speech for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, J L; Kutz, K J

    1975-03-01

    Thirty kindergarteners, 15 who substituted /w/ for /r/ and 15 with correct articulation, received two perception tests and a memory test that included /w/ and /r/ in minimally contrastive syllables. Although both groups had nearly perfect perception of the experimenter's productions of /w/ and /r/, misarticulating subjects perceived their own tape-recorded w/r productions as /w/. In the memory task these same misarticulating subjects committed significantly more /w/-/r/ confusions in unspoken recall. The discussion considers why people subvocally rehearse; a developmental period in which children do not rehearse; ways subvocalization may aid recall, including motor and acoustic encoding; an echoic store that provides additional recall support if subjects rehearse vocally, and perception of self- and other- produced phonemes by misarticulating children-including its relevance to a motor theory of perception. Evidence is presented that speech for memory can be sufficiently impaired to cause memory disorder. Conceptions that restrict speech disorder to an impairment of communication are challenged.

  16. Bark consumption by the spiny rat Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer (Echimyidae on a Pinus taeda Linnaeus (Pinaceae plantation in South Brazil Consumo de Pinus taeda (Pinaceae pelo rato-de-espinho Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer (Echimyidae em plantações no Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislene L. Gonçalves

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Feeding damage caused by Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer, 1814 (Echimyidae is documented for a Pinus taeda Linnaeus (Pinaceae plantation located in Cambará do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Under laboratory conditions, feeding acceptance of P. taeda trunk sections was tested with positive results for E. spinosus, but not for other three co-occurring sigmodontine rodents: Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913, Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers, 1818 and Delomys dorsalis (Hensel, 1872.Esse estudo documenta os danos causados por Euryzygomatomys spinosus (G. Fischer, 1814 em plantações de Pinus taeda Linnaeus (Pinaceae localizadas em Cambará do Sul, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Em laboratório foi testada positivamente a utilização de troncos de Pinus como recurso por E. spinosus, mas não para os outros roedores sigmodontíneos ocorrentes na área: Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913, Oligoryzomys nigripes (Olfers, 1818 e Delomys dorsalis (Hensel, 1872.

  17. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  18. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-16

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L2(1) parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L2(1) parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  19. Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Randall M.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Clapp, David; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Léonard, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) are a valuable resource, both within their native range in the North Pacific rim and in the Great Lakes basin. Understanding their value from a biological and economic perspective in the Great Lakes, however, requires an understanding of changes in the ecosystem and of management actions that have been taken to promote system stability, integrity, and sustainable fisheries. Pacific salmonine introductions to the Great Lakes are comprised mainly of Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead and have accounted for 421, 177, and 247 million fish, respectively, stocked during 1966-2007. Stocking of Pacific salmonines has been effective in substantially reducing exotic prey fish abundances in several of the Great Lakes (e.g., lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario). The goal of our evaluation was to highlight differences in management strategies and perspectives across the basin, and to evaluate policies for Pacific salmonine management in the Great Lakes. Currently, a potential conflict exists between Pacific salmonine management and native fish rehabilitation goals because of the desire to sustain recreational fisheries and to develop self-sustaining populations of stocked Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes. We provide evidence that suggests Pacific salmonines have not only become naturalized to the food webs of the Great Lakes, but that their populations (specifically Chinook salmon) may be fluctuating in concert with specific prey (i.e., alewives) whose populations are changing relative to environmental conditions and ecosystem disturbances. Remaining questions, however, are whether or not “natural” fluctuations in predator and prey provide enough “stability” in the Great Lakes food webs, and even more importantly, would a choice by managers to attempt to reduce the severity of predator-prey oscillations be antagonistic to native fish restoration efforts. We argue that, on each of the Great Lakes, managers are pursuing

  20. Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Great Lakes Mussel Watch(2009-2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Following the inception of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) to address the significant environmental issues plaguing the Great Lakes region, the...

  1. Credit spread variability in U.S. business cycles: the Great Moderation versus the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Hylton Hollander; Guangling Liu

    2014-01-01

    This paper establishes the prevailing financial factors that influence credit spread variability, and its impact on the U.S. business cycle over the Great Moderation and Great Recession periods. To do so, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium framework with a central role of financial intermediation and equity assets. Over the Great Moderation and Great Recession periods, we find an important role for bank market power (sticky rate adjustments and loan rate markups) on credit spread variab...

  2. Credit spread variability in U.S. business cycles: The Great Moderation versus the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Hylton Hollander and Guangling Liu

    2014-01-01

    This paper establishes the prevailing financial factors that influence credit spread variability, and its impact on the U.S. business cycle over the Great Moderation and Great Recession periods. To do so, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium framework with a central role of financial intermediation and equity assets. Over the Great Moderation and Great Recession periods, we find an important role for bank market power (sticky rate adjustments and loan rate markups) on credit spread variab...

  3. Practice makes imperfect: Working memory training can harm recognition memory performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Laura E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trumbo, Michael C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haass, Michael J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hunter, Michael A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silva, Austin [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stevens-Adams, Susan M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bunting, Michael F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Center for Advanced Study of Language; O?Rourke, Polly [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Center for Advanced Study of Language

    2016-07-05

    There is a great deal of debate concerning the benefits of working memory (WM) training and whether that training can transfer to other tasks. Although a consistent finding is that WM training programs elicit a short-term near-transfer effect (i.e., improvement in WM skills), results are inconsistent when considering persistence of such improvement and far transfer effects. In this study, we compared three groups of participants: a group that received WM training, a group that received training on how to use a mental imagery memory strategy, and a control group that received no training. Although the WM training group improved on the trained task, their posttraining performance on nontrained WM tasks did not differ from that of the other two groups. In addition, although the imagery training group’s performance on a recognition memory task increased after training, the WM training group’s performance on the task decreased after training. Participants’ descriptions of the strategies they used to remember the studied items indicated that WM training may lead people to adopt memory strategies that are less effective for other types of memory tasks. Our results indicate that WM training may have unintended consequences for other types of memory performance.

  4. I. Introduction The main objective of this paper is to argue that Augustine's analysis of the concept of memory and self-deception in Confessions, Book X, would greatly benefit from the hierarchical argumentative and explanatory schema he himself employs to discuss the relation between the senses, the inner sense, and reason in perception. First I present a brief overview of Augustine's account of memory in the Confessions. Then I discuss two argumentative and explanatory schemata Augustine often employs in order to explain mental phenomena; the first one has to do with finding analogies between the human mind and the Holy Trinity (for man is supposed to be created as an image of God), and the second one has to do with distinguishing normative levels between mental faculties. I then argue that both of these schemata can be fruitfully applied to the several functions of the mind that can be found in Augustine's account of memory; and while he does apply the first explanatory schema to the concept of memory in a later work (On the Trinity) he does not do the same with the second one. I argue also that Augustine's discussion of self-deception (also found in Confessions X) would benefit too from the distinction between different normative levels within the functions of memory. Finally, I answer two possible objections to the idea of applying the hierarchical normative-explanatory schema to the Augustinian analysis of memory and the ethics of self-deception. II. Augustine's search for God in the memory Augustine's inquiry on memory in Confessions X, is guided by a more fundamental question, one about the nature of the search for God. The question Augustine poses is: "What do I love when I love you [my God]?" (Confessions X.6) This question leads Augustine to think that if he truly loves God, as he believes he does, then he must be able to recognize within himself a true image of God. Augustine describes the progress of his search for God. He writes he has searched for

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Parra Dorantes

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to argue that Augustine’s analysis of the concept of memory in Confessions, Book X, would greatly benefit from the hierarchical argumentative and explanatory schema he himself employs in other works to discuss the relation between the senses, the inner sense, and reason in perception. A brief overview of Augustine’s account of memory in the Confessions is presented, followed by a discussion of two argumentative and explanatory schemata Augustine often emplo...

  5. 75 FR 6354 - NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants under the Great Lakes Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ...-04] RIN 0648-ZC10 NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants under the Great Lakes... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of funding availability; Date... on January 19, 2010. That notice announced the NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project...

  6. Intentionally fabricated autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Lucy V; Morrison, Catriona M; Conway, Martin A

    2018-02-01

    Participants generated both autobiographical memories (AMs) that they believed to be true and intentionally fabricated autobiographical memories (IFAMs). Memories were constructed while a concurrent memory load (random 8-digit sequence) was held in mind or while there was no concurrent load. Amount and accuracy of recall of the concurrent memory load was reliably poorer following generation of IFAMs than following generation of AMs. There was no reliable effect of load on memory generation times; however, IFAMs always took longer to construct than AMs. Finally, replicating previous findings, fewer IFAMs had a field perspective than AMs, IFAMs were less vivid than AMs, and IFAMs contained more motion words (indicative of increased cognitive load). Taken together, these findings show a pattern of systematic differences that mark out IFAMs, and they also show that IFAMs can be identified indirectly by lowered performance on concurrent tasks that increase cognitive load.

  7. Shape memory polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-08-29

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  8. Time for memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This article is a continuous dialogue on memory triggered by Brockmeier’s (2010) article. I drift away from the conventionalization of the archive as a spatial metaphor for memory in order to consider the greater possibility of “time” for conceptualizing memory. The concept of time is central...... in terms of autobiographical memory. The second category of time is discussed, drawing on Augustine and Bergson amongst others. Bergson’s notion of duration has been considered as a promising concept for a better understanding of autobiographical memory. Psychological phenomena such as autobiographical...... memory should embrace not only spatial dimension, but also a temporal dimension, in which a constant flow of irreversible time, where multiplicity, momentarily, dynamic stability and becoming and emergence of novelty can be observed....

  9. Shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  10. Zone memories and pseudorandom addressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, D.; Mirizzi, N.; Stella, R.; Visaggio, G.

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative comparison between zone memories, pseudorandom addressed memories and an alternative special purpose memory (spread zone memory) in which the distance between any two transformed descriptors, at first adjacent, is independent of the descriptors pair and results the maximum one is presented. This memory has not been particularly considered at present in spite of its efficiency and its simple implementation

  11. The Great Recession and confidence in homeownership

    OpenAIRE

    Anat Bracha; Julian Jamison

    2013-01-01

    Confidence in homeownership shifts for those who personally experienced real estate loss during the Great Recession. Older Americans are confident in the value of homeownership. Younger Americans are less confident.

  12. Great Lakes CoastWatch Node

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CoastWatch is a nationwide National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) program within which the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)...

  13. The Making of a Great Captain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weibel, Theodore G

    2006-01-01

    ... judgement. This paper examines the hypothesis that Great Captains are a product of their families, are highly educated from an early age, possess the qualities of a genius, encounter grand life experiences...

  14. Thirty years of great ape gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael; Call, Josep

    2018-02-21

    We and our colleagues have been doing studies of great ape gestural communication for more than 30 years. Here we attempt to spell out what we have learned. Some aspects of the process have been reliably established by multiple researchers, for example, its intentional structure and its sensitivity to the attentional state of the recipient. Other aspects are more controversial. We argue here that it is a mistake to assimilate great ape gestures to the species-typical displays of other mammals by claiming that they are fixed action patterns, as there are many differences, including the use of attention-getters. It is also a mistake, we argue, to assimilate great ape gestures to human gestures by claiming that they are used referentially and declaratively in a human-like manner, as apes' "pointing" gesture has many limitations and they do not gesture iconically. Great ape gestures constitute a unique form of primate communication with their own unique qualities.

  15. Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site (SGP-ARM) is the oldest and largest of DOE's Arm sites. It was established in 1992. It consists of...

  16. Theodosius Dohzhansky: A Great Inspirer 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the direct personal influence of some of these great scientists on their peers and successors is re~atively small. A very small number of scientists ... studying the evolutionary genetics of speciation in Drosophila. --------~--------43. RESONANCE I ...

  17. Great Lakes rivermouths: a primer for managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Larson, James; Seelbach, Paul; Pebbles, Victoria; Larson, James; Seelbach, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Between the North American Great Lakes and their tributaries are the places where the confluence of river and lake waters creates a distinct ecosystem: the rivermouth ecosystem. Human development has often centered around these rivermouths, in part, because they provide a rich array of ecosystem services. Not surprisingly, centuries of intense human activity have led to substantial pressures on, and alterations to, these ecosystems, often diminishing or degrading their ecological functions and associated ecological services. Many Great Lakes rivermouths are the focus of intense restoration efforts. For example, 36 of the active Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs) are rivermouths or areas that include one or more rivermouths. Historically, research of rivermouth ecosystems has been piecemeal, focused on the Great Lakes proper or on the upper reaches of tributaries, with little direct study of the rivermouth itself. Researchers have been divided among disciplines, agencies and institutions; and they often work independently and use disparate venues to communicate their work. Management has also been fragmented with a focus on smaller, localized, sub-habitat units and socio-political or economic elements, rather than system-level consideration. This Primer presents the case for a more holistic approach to rivermouth science and management that can enable restoration of ecosystem services with multiple benefits to humans and the Great Lakes ecosystem. A conceptual model is presented with supporting text that describes the structures and processes common to all rivermouths, substantiating the case for treating these ecosystems as an identifiable class.1 Ecological services provided by rivermouths and changes in how humans value those services over time are illustrated through case studies of two Great Lakes rivermouths—the St. Louis River and the Maumee River. Specific ecosystem services are identified in italics throughout this Primer and follow definitions described

  18. Understanding Great Earthquakes in Japan's Kanto Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Reiji; Curewitz, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Third International Workshop on the Kanto Asperity Project; Chiba, Japan, 16-19 February 2008; The 1703 (Genroku) and 1923 (Taisho) earthquakes in Japan's Kanto region (M 8.2 and M 7.9, respectively) caused severe damage in the Tokyo metropolitan area. These great earthquakes occurred along the Sagami Trough, where the Philippine Sea slab is subducting beneath Japan. Historical records, paleoseismological research, and geophysical/geodetic monitoring in the region indicate that such great earthquakes will repeat in the future.

  19. The diverse impacts of the great recession

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto Nakajima

    2013-01-01

    The Great Recession had a large negative impact on the U.S. economy. Asset prices, most notably stock and house prices, declined substantially, resulting in a loss in wealth for many American households. In this article, Makoto Nakajima documents how diverse households were affected in a variety of dimensions during the Great Recession, in particular between 2007 and 2009, using newly available data from the 2007-2009 Survey of Consumer Finances. He discusses why it is important to look at th...

  20. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    J?ncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...