WorldWideScience

Sample records for first-principle molecular dynamics

  1. First-principles molecular dynamics for metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, G.W.; Qian, G.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    A Car-Parrinello-type first-principles molecular-dynamics approach capable of treating the partial occupancy of electronic states that occurs at the Fermi level in a metal is presented. The algorithms used to study metals are both simple and computationally efficient. We also discuss the connection between ordinary electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations as well as the role of Brillouin-zone sampling. This extension should be useful not only for metallic solids but also for solids that become metals in their liquid and/or amorphous phases

  2. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

  3. Next generation extended Lagrangian first principles molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N

    2017-08-07

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] is formulated for general Hohenberg-Kohn density-functional theory and compared with the extended Lagrangian framework of first principles molecular dynamics by Car and Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)]. It is shown how extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics overcomes several shortcomings of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, while improving or maintaining important features of Car-Parrinello simulations. The accuracy of the electronic degrees of freedom in extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, with respect to the exact Born-Oppenheimer solution, is of second-order in the size of the integration time step and of fourth order in the potential energy surface. Improved stability over recent formulations of extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is achieved by generalizing the theory to finite temperature ensembles, using fractional occupation numbers in the calculation of the inner-product kernel of the extended harmonic oscillator that appears as a preconditioner in the electronic equations of motion. Material systems that normally exhibit slow self-consistent field convergence can be simulated using integration time steps of the same order as in direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, but without the requirement of an iterative, non-linear electronic ground-state optimization prior to the force evaluations and without a systematic drift in the total energy. In combination with proposed low-rank and on the fly updates of the kernel, this formulation provides an efficient and general framework for quantum-based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  5. First-principles and classical molecular dynamics study of threshold displacement energy in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimirov, P.V. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Borodin, V.A., E-mail: Borodin_VA@nrcki.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Beryllium is a functional material of future fusion reactors. • The threshold displacement energy by fast particles is studied. • Classical and first principles simulations are used. - Abstract: Beryllium selected as a neutron multiplier material for the tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor should withstand high doses of fast neutron irradiation. The damage produced by irradiation is usually evaluated assuming that the number of atomic displacements to the threshold displacement energy, E{sub d}, which is considered as an intrinsic material parameter. In this work the value of E{sub d} for hcp beryllium is estimated simultaneously from classical and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Quite similar quantitative pictures of defect production are observed in both simulation types, though the predicted displacement threshold values seem to be approximately two times higher in the first-principles approach. We expect that, after more detailed first-principles investigations, this approach can be used for scaling the damage prediction predictions by classical molecular dynamics, opening a way for more consistent calculations of displacement damage in materials.

  6. First-principles molecular dynamics simulation study on electrolytes for use in redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Tsuchida, Eiji; Tokuda, Kazuya; Ootsuka, Jun; Saito, Yoshihiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Results of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations carried out to investigate structural aspects of electrolytes for use in a redox flow battery are reported. The electrolytes studied here are aqueous sulfuric acid solutions where its property is of importance for dissolving redox couples in redox flow battery. The simulation results indicate that structural features of the acid solutions depend on the concentration of sulfuric acid. Such dependency arises from increase of proton dissociation from sulfuric acid.

  7. Hierarchical Coupling of First-Principles Molecular Dynamics with Advanced Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevgen, Emre; Giberti, Federico; Sidky, Hythem; Whitmer, Jonathan K; Galli, Giulia; Gygi, Francois; de Pablo, Juan J

    2018-05-14

    We present a seamless coupling of a suite of codes designed to perform advanced sampling simulations, with a first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) engine. As an illustrative example, we discuss results for the free energy and potential surfaces of the alanine dipeptide obtained using both local and hybrid density functionals (DFT), and we compare them with those of a widely used classical force field, Amber99sb. In our calculations, the efficiency of first-principles MD using hybrid functionals is augmented by hierarchical sampling, where hybrid free energy calculations are initiated using estimates obtained with local functionals. We find that the free energy surfaces obtained from classical and first-principles calculations differ. Compared to DFT results, the classical force field overestimates the internal energy contribution of high free energy states, and it underestimates the entropic contribution along the entire free energy profile. Using the string method, we illustrate how these differences lead to different transition pathways connecting the metastable minima of the alanine dipeptide. In larger peptides, those differences would lead to qualitatively different results for the equilibrium structure and conformation of these molecules.

  8. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy of Liquid Water through "First-Principles" Many-Body Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medders, Gregory R; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful technique to probe the structure and dynamics of water. However, deriving an unambiguous molecular-level interpretation of the experimental spectral features remains a challenge due to the complexity of the underlying hydrogen-bonding network. In this contribution, we present an integrated theoretical and computational framework (named many-body molecular dynamics or MB-MD) that, by systematically removing uncertainties associated with existing approaches, enables a rigorous modeling of vibrational spectra of water from quantum dynamical simulations. Specifically, we extend approaches used to model the many-body expansion of interaction energies to develop many-body representations of the dipole moment and polarizability of water. The combination of these "first-principles" representations with centroid molecular dynamics simulations enables the simulation of infrared and Raman spectra of liquid water under ambient conditions that, without relying on any ad hoc parameters, are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. Importantly, since the many-body energy, dipole, and polarizability surfaces employed in the simulations are derived independently from accurate fits to correlated electronic structure data, MB-MD allows for a systematic analysis of the calculated spectra in terms of both electronic and dynamical contributions. The present analysis suggests that, while MB-MD correctly reproduces both the shifts and the shapes of the main spectroscopic features, an improved description of quantum dynamical effects possibly combined with a dissociable water potential may be necessary for a quantitative representation of the OH stretch band.

  9. First principles molecular dynamics of metal/water interfaces under bias potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Luana; Brandimarte, Pedro; Rocha, Alexandre; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of the water-metal system at an atomic level is extremely important in electrocatalysts for fuel cells, photocatalysis among other systems. The question of the interface energetics involves a detailed study of the nature of the interactions between water-water and water-substrate. A first principles description of all components of the system is the most appropriate methodology in order to advance understanding of electrochemically processes. In this work we describe, using first principles molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of a combined surface(Au and Pd)/water system both in the presence and absence of an external bias potential applied to the electrodes, as one would come across in electrochemistry. This is accomplished using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods (NEGF), thus accounting for the fact that one is dealing with an out-of-equilibrium open system, with and without van der Waals interactions. DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871.

  10. First-principles molecular dynamics study of Al/Alq3 interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Takeuchi et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of Al deposition on tris (8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3 layers to investigate atomic geometries and electronic properties of Al/Alq3 interfaces. Al atoms were ejected to Alq3 one by one with the kinetic energy of 37.4 kJ/mol, which approximately corresponds to the average kinetic energy of Al at the boiling temperature of metal Al. The first Al atom interacts with two of the three O atoms of meridional Alq3. Following Al atoms interact with Alq3 rather weakly and they tend to aggregate each other to form Al clusters. During the deposition process, Alq3 was not broken and its molecular structure remained essentially intact. At the interface, weak bonds between deposited Al atoms and N and C atoms were formed. The projected density of states (PDOS onto the Alq3 molecular orbitals shows gap states in between the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs, which were experimentally observed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS and metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES. Our results show that even though the Alq3 molecular structure is retained, weak N–Al and C–Al bonds induce gap states.

  11. First principles calculations of thermal conductivity with out of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    The prediction of the thermal properties of solids and liquids is central to numerous problems in condensed matter physics and materials science, including the study of thermal management of opto-electronic and energy conversion devices. We present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at non equilibrium conditions. Our formulation is based on a generalization of the approach to equilibrium technique, using sinusoidal temperature gradients, and it only requires calculations of first principles trajectories and atomic forces. We discuss results and computational requirements for a representative, simple oxide, MgO, and compare with experiments and data obtained with classical potentials. This work was supported by MICCoM as part of the Computational Materials Science Program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science , Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under Grant DOE/BES 5J-30.

  12. Equilibration and analysis of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William; Gygi, François

    2018-03-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations based on density functional theory are becoming increasingly popular for the description of liquids. In view of the high computational cost of these simulations, the choice of an appropriate equilibration protocol is critical. We assess two methods of estimation of equilibration times using a large dataset of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water. The Gelman-Rubin potential scale reduction factor [A. Gelman and D. B. Rubin, Stat. Sci. 7, 457 (1992)] and the marginal standard error rule heuristic proposed by White [Simulation 69, 323 (1997)] are evaluated on a set of 32 independent 64-molecule simulations of 58 ps each, amounting to a combined cumulative time of 1.85 ns. The availability of multiple independent simulations also allows for an estimation of the variance of averaged quantities, both within MD runs and between runs. We analyze atomic trajectories, focusing on correlations of the Kohn-Sham energy, pair correlation functions, number of hydrogen bonds, and diffusion coefficient. The observed variability across samples provides a measure of the uncertainty associated with these quantities, thus facilitating meaningful comparisons of different approximations used in the simulations. We find that the computed diffusion coefficient and average number of hydrogen bonds are affected by a significant uncertainty in spite of the large size of the dataset used. A comparison with classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005 model confirms that the variability of the diffusivity is also observed after long equilibration times. Complete atomic trajectories and simulation output files are available online for further analysis.

  13. High-Performance First-Principles Molecular Dynamics for Predictive Theory and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Galli, Giulia [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Schwegler, Eric [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-03

    This project focused on developing high-performance software tools for First-Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) simulations, and applying them in investigations of materials relevant to energy conversion processes. FPMD is an atomistic simulation method that combines a quantum-mechanical description of electronic structure with the statistical description provided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This reliance on fundamental principles allows FPMD simulations to provide a consistent description of structural, dynamical and electronic properties of a material. This is particularly useful in systems for which reliable empirical models are lacking. FPMD simulations are increasingly used as a predictive tool for applications such as batteries, solar energy conversion, light-emitting devices, electro-chemical energy conversion devices and other materials. During the course of the project, several new features were developed and added to the open-source Qbox FPMD code. The code was further optimized for scalable operation of large-scale, Leadership-Class DOE computers. When combined with Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) calculations, this infrastructure was used to investigate structural and electronic properties of liquid water, ice, aqueous solutions, nanoparticles and solid-liquid interfaces. Computing both ionic trajectories and electronic structure in a consistent manner enabled the simulation of several spectroscopic properties, such as Raman spectra, infrared spectra, and sum-frequency generation spectra. The accuracy of the approximations used allowed for direct comparisons of results with experimental data such as optical spectra, X-ray and neutron diffraction spectra. The software infrastructure developed in this project, as applied to various investigations of solids, liquids and interfaces, demonstrates that FPMD simulations can provide a detailed, atomic-scale picture of structural, vibrational and electronic properties of complex systems

  14. Oxidation of InP nanowires: a first principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwanger, Mailing; Schoenhalz, Aline L; Dos Santos, Cláudia L; Piquini, Paulo

    2016-11-16

    InP nanowires are candidates for optoelectronic applications, and as protective capping layers of III-V core-shell nanowires. Their surfaces are oxidized under ambient conditions which affects the nanowire physical properties. The majority of theoretical studies of InP nanowires, however, do not take into account the oxide layer at their surfaces. In this work we use first principles molecular dynamics electronic structure calculations to study the first steps in the oxidation process of a non-saturated InP nanowire surface as well as the properties of an already oxidized surface of an InP nanowire. Our calculations show that the O 2 molecules dissociate through several mechanisms, resulting in incorporation of O atoms into the surface layers. The results confirm the experimental observation that the oxidized layers become amorphous but the non-oxidized core layers remain crystalline. Oxygen related bonds at the oxidized layers introduce defective levels at the band gap region, with greater contributions from defects involving In-O and P-O bonds.

  15. Understanding Lithium Solvation and Diffusion through Topological Analysis of First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Harsh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gyulassy, Attila [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ong, Mitchell [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Draeger, Erik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pask, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bremer, Peer -Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-27

    The performance of lithium-ion batteries is strongly influenced by the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, which depends on the speed at which Li ions migrate across the cell and relates to their solvation structure. The choice of solvent can greatly impact, both, the solvation and diffusivity of Li ions. In this work, we present our application of the topological techniques to extract and predict such behavior in the data generated by the first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of Li ions in an important organic solvent -ethylene carbonate. More specifically, we use the scalar topology of the electron charge density field to analyze the evolution of the solvation structures. This allows us to derive a parameter-free bond definition for lithium-oxygen bonds, to provide a quantitative measure for bond strength, and to understand the regions of influence of each atom in the simulation. This has provided new insights into how and under what conditions certain bonds may form and break. As a result, we can identify and, more importantly, predict, unstable configurations in solvation structures. This can be very useful in understanding when small changes to the atoms' movements can cause significantly different bond structures to evolve. Ultimately, this promises to allow scientists to explore lithium ion solvation and diffusion more systematically, with the aim of new insights and potentially accelerating the calculations themselves.

  16. Magnetic materials at finite temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbach, Markus; Perera, Meewanage Dilina N.; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M.; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles-derived simulations.

  17. Tunable hydrogen separation in porous graphene membrane: first-principle and molecular dynamic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yehan; Xue, Qingzhong; Liu, Zilong; Shan, Meixia; Ling, Cuicui; Wu, Tiantian; Li, Xiaofang

    2014-06-11

    First-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation are employed to investigate the hydrogen purification performance of two-dimensional porous graphene material (PG-ESX). First, the pore size of PG-ES1 (3.2775 Å) is expected to show high selectivity of H2 by DFT calculation. Then MD simulations demonstrate the hydrogen purification process of the PG-ESX membrane. The results indicate that the selectivity of H2 over several other gas molecules that often accompany H2 in industrial steam methane reforming or dehydrogenation of alkanes (such as N2, CO, and CH4) is sensitive to the pore size of the membrane. PG-ES and PG-ES1 membranes both exhibit high selectivity for H2 over other gases, but the permeability of the PG-ES membrane is much lower than the PG-ES1 membrane because of the smaller pore size. The PG-ES2 membrane with bigger pores demonstrates low selectivity for H2 over other gases. Energy barrier and electron density have been used to explain the difference of selectivity and permeability of PG-ESX membranes by DFT calculations. The energy barrier for gas molecules passing through the membrane generally increase with the decreasing of pore sizes or increasing of molecule kinetic diameter, due to the different electron overlap between gas and a membrane. The PG-ES1 membrane is far superior to other carbon membranes and has great potential applications in hydrogen purification, energy clean combustion, and making new concept membrane for gas separation.

  18. Molecular dynamics of polarizable point dipole models for molten NaI. Comparison with first principles simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trullàs J.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of molten NaI at 995 K have been carried out using polarizable ion models based on rigid ion pair potentials to which the anion induced dipole polarization is added. The polarization is added in such a way that point dipoles are induced on the anions by both local electric field and deformation short-range damping interactions that oppose the electrically induced dipole moments. The structure and self-diffusion results are compared with those obtained by Galamba and Costa Cabral using first principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics simulations and using classical molecular dynamics of a shell model which allows only the iodide polarization

  19. First principles molecular dynamics insight into acid-base chemistry of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Microscopic knowledge on the interfaces between clay minerals (2:1- and 1:1-type) and water is critical for both understanding natural processes and guiding development of advanced hybrid materials. Due to the unique layered structures of clay minerals, their surfaces are usually grouped into basal surfaces and edge surfaces (i.e. broken surfaces). Thanks to previous studies, structures and properties of basal surfaces have been well recognized: these surfaces are terminated with siloxanes and surface Si-O six-member rings normally act as the adsorbing sites of cations. In contrast, edge surfaces are more complicated structures and have more subtle chemical properties. On these surfaces, there are a lot of dangling bonds and under ambient conditions they are usually saturated by chemically adsorbed waters. These edge groups are usually amphoteric, which is responsible to the pH dependent behaviors of many interfacial processes, such as cations complexing. For example, adsorption of heavy metal cations (e.g. Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ ) on clay basal surfaces is through cation exchange mechanism and that is hardly influenced by environmental pH. In contrast, it has been well accepted that the adsorption on edge surfaces is pH-dependent. The ubiquitous isomorphic substitutions further increase the complexity of their interfacial chemistry. Due to the high heterogeneity and rather small sizes, it is quite difficult to reveal the complex interfacial chemistry with experiments alone. FPMD method (first principles molecular dynamics), a combination of density functional theory and molecular dynamics, can provide valuable information. With FPMD [1, 2] and free-energy calculation techniques [3, 4], we investigated the microscopic structures and acid chemistry of these clay-water interfaces [5, 6]. According to systematic simulations, the following has been achieved. (1) Acidity of interlayer waters. The simulations show

  20. Computational challenges of large-scale, long-time, first-principles molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, P R C

    2008-01-01

    Plane wave density functional calculations have traditionally been able to use the largest available supercomputing resources. We analyze the scalability of modern projector-augmented wave implementations to identify the challenges in performing molecular dynamics calculations of large systems containing many thousands of electrons. Benchmark calculations on the Cray XT4 demonstrate that global linear-algebra operations are the primary reason for limited parallel scalability. Plane-wave related operations can be made sufficiently scalable. Improving parallel linear-algebra performance is an essential step to reaching longer timescales in future large-scale molecular dynamics calculations

  1. Semiclassical Monte Carlo: A first principles approach to non-adiabatic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Wang, Ruixi; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Modeling the dynamics of photophysical and (photo)chemical reactions in extended molecular systems is a new frontier for quantum chemistry. Many dynamical phenomena, such as intersystem crossing, non-radiative relaxation, and charge and energy transfer, require a non-adiabatic description which incorporate transitions between electronic states. Additionally, these dynamics are often highly sensitive to quantum coherences and interference effects. Several methods exist to simulate non-adiabatic dynamics; however, they are typically either too expensive to be applied to large molecular systems (10's-100's of atoms), or they are based on ad hoc schemes which may include severe approximations due to inconsistencies in classical and quantum mechanics. We present, in detail, an algorithm based on Monte Carlo sampling of the semiclassical time-dependent wavefunction that involves running simple surface hopping dynamics, followed by a post-processing step which adds little cost. The method requires only a few quantities from quantum chemistry calculations, can systematically be improved, and provides excellent agreement with exact quantum mechanical results. Here we show excellent agreement with exact solutions for scattering results of standard test problems. Additionally, we find that convergence of the wavefunction is controlled by complex valued phase factors, the size of the non-adiabatic coupling region, and the choice of sampling function. These results help in determining the range of applicability of the method, and provide a starting point for further improvement

  2. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study on Helium- filled Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusta, M K; Prasetiyo, I; Saputro, A G; Dipojono, H K; Maezono, R

    2016-01-01

    Investigation on carbon nanotube (CNT) filled by Helium (He) atoms is conducted using Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation. It reveals that He atom is repelled by CNT's wall and find its stable position at the tube center. Vibrational analysis on modes corespond to radial inward and outward breathing movement of CNT shows that He filling tends to pull the CNT wall in inward direction. Furthermore, examination on C-C stretch mode reveals that the existence of He improve the stiffness of CNT's wall. Molecular dynamics calculations which are done on (3,3) and (5,5) nanotube with 0.25 gr/cm 3 and 0.5 gr/cm 3 He density at 300 K and 1500 K confirms the increase of stiffness of CNT wall by interaction with He atoms. Effects of variation of chirality, temperature and He density on CNT wall stiffness is also reported. (paper)

  3. First Principles Molecular Dynamics Study of Catalysis for Polyolefins: the Ziegler-Natta Heterogeneous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Parrinello

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We review part of our recent ab initio molecular dynamics study on the Ti-based Ziegler-Natta supported heterogeneous catalysis of α-olefins. The results for the insertion of ethylene in the metal-carbon bond are discussed as a fundamental textbook example of polymerization processes. Comparison with the few experimental data available has shown that simulation can reproduce activation barriers and the overall energetics of the reaction with sufficient accuracy. This puts these quantum dynamical simulations in a new perspective as a virtual laboratory where the microscopic picture of the catalysis, which represents an important issue that still escapes experimental probes, can be observed and understood. These results are then discussed in comparison with a V-based catalyst in order to figure out analogies and differences with respect to the industrially more successful Tibased systems.

  4. First-Principles Quantum Dynamics of Singlet Fission: Coherent versus Thermally Activated Mechanisms Governed by Molecular π Stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene; Olivier, Yoann; Beljonne, David

    2015-09-01

    Singlet excitons in π -stacked molecular crystals can split into two triplet excitons in a process called singlet fission that opens a route to carrier multiplication in photovoltaics. To resolve controversies about the mechanism of singlet fission, we have developed a first principles nonadiabatic quantum dynamical model that reveals the critical role of molecular stacking symmetry and provides a unified picture of coherent versus thermally activated singlet fission mechanisms in different acenes. The slip-stacked equilibrium packing structure of pentacene derivatives is found to enhance ultrafast singlet fission mediated by a coherent superexchange mechanism via higher-lying charge transfer states. By contrast, the electronic couplings for singlet fission strictly vanish at the C2 h symmetric equilibrium π stacking of rubrene. In this case, singlet fission is driven by excitations of symmetry-breaking intermolecular vibrations, rationalizing the experimentally observed temperature dependence. Design rules for optimal singlet fission materials therefore need to account for the interplay of molecular π -stacking symmetry and phonon-induced coherent or thermally activated mechanisms.

  5. Modeling of amorphous SiCxO6/5 by classical molecular dynamics and first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ningbo; Zhang, Miao; Zhou, Hongming; Xue, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) presents excellent performance for high temperature and lithium-ion battery applications. Current experiments have provided some information on nano-structure of SiCO, while it is very challenging for experiments to take further insight into the molecular structure and its relationship with properties of materials. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) based on empirical potential and first principle calculation were combined to investigate amorphous SiCxO6/5 ceramics. The amorphous structures of SiCO containing silicon-centered mix bond tetrahedrons and free carbon were successfully reproduced. The calculated radial distribution, angular distribution and Young’s modulus were validated by current experimental data, and more details on molecular structure were discussed. The change in the slope of Young’s modulus is related to the glass transition temperature of the material. The proposed modeling approach can be used to predict the properties of SiCO with different compositions.

  6. Effect of temperature on compact layer of Pt electrode in PEMFCs by first-principles molecular dynamics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Chen, Changfeng, E-mail: chen_c_f@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Yu, Haobo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Lu, Guiwu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The structures of water compact layer on Pt(111) at different temperature were calculated. • The feature of chemical bond between water molecules and Pt (111) surface was discussed with temperature increased. • Temperature dependence of electrical strengths and capacitances of compact layer on Pt (111) surface was calculated. - Abstract: Formation of the double-layer electric field and capacitance of the water-metal interface is of significant interest in physicochemical processes. In this study, we perform first- principles molecular dynamics simulations on the water/Pt(111) interface to investigate the temperature dependence of the compact layer electric field and capacitance based on the calculated charge densities. On the Pt (111) surface, water molecules form ice-like structures that exhibit more disorder along the height direction with increasing temperature. The O−H bonds of more water molecules point toward the Pt surface to form Pt−H covalent bonds with increasing temperature, which weaken the corresponding O−H bonds. In addition, our calculated capacitance at 300 K is 15.2 mF/cm{sup 2}, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. As the temperature increases from 10 to 450 K, the field strength and capacitance of the compact layer on Pt (111) first increase and then decrease slightly, which is significant for understanding the water/Pt interface from atomic level.

  7. Different dynamic behaviors of the dissociation and recombination reactions in a model calculation of polyethylene by first-principles steered molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Ozawa, Nobuki; Chazeau, Laurent; Cavaillé, Jean-Yves; Kubo, Momoji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the different dynamics of dissociation and recombination processes. • Hydrogen at the chain ends collides each other in the recombination process. • Dissociation and recombination processes take different pathway. - Abstract: We investigate the different dynamics of the stress-induced dissociation and recombination reactions in a model of polyethylene by a first-principles molecular dynamics simulation at the B3LYP/6-31g(d) level. The dissociation under external forces acting on the chemical reaction site at 300 K follows the same pathway as the one calculated by the static first-principles method because it has a similar activation barrier to that of the static first-principles calculation. On the other hand, in the recombination process, thermal fluctuations causes collisions between hydrogen atoms at the chain ends. Furthermore, when external forces do not directly act on the chemical reaction site, two different dissociation processes are observed. On the other hand, recombination process is not observed due to rarely contact of the radical carbon. These results indicate that dissociation and recombination dynamics are very different, showing the importance of the dynamic calculation.

  8. Vitreous Anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) at High Pressure: A First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D. B.; Karki, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the high abundance of silicates and aluminosilicates inside the earth, their corresponding melts are likely to be one of the key transport agents in the chemical and thermal evolution of our planet and therefore, have long been the subject of investigations. Experimentally, in-situ melt properties of these materials, particularly at high pressure-temperature conditions are extremely difficult to constrain and the corresponding glass phases are considered as analogs. This, however, prohibits one-to-one comparison between the properties of silicate melt and its corresponding glass. With the aim to enable such comparison, we investigate the equation of state and structural properties of CaAl2Si2O8 glass at 300 K as a function of pressure up to 160 GPa from first principles molecular dynamics simulation results. Our results show that at ambient pressure: (i) Si's remain mostly (> 95%) under tetrahedral oxygen surroundings, (ii) unlike anorthite crystal, presence of high coordination (> 4) Al's with 30% abundance, (iii) and significant presence of both non bridging (8%) and triply (17%) coordinated oxygen. In the 0-10 GPa interval, mainly topological changes occur in the Si-O (also Al-O to some extent) surroundings in the cold compressed case in comparison to smooth increase in the average bond distance and coordination in the hot compressed case. Further compression results in gradual increases in: mean coordination, proportion of O-triclusters and increasing appearance of tetrahedral oxgyens, with Si-O (Al-O) reaching 6 (6.5) and O-T > 3 (T=Si and Al) at the highest compression. Due to the absence of kinetic barrier, the hot compressed glasses consistently produce greater densities and higher coordination numbers than the cold compression cases. Decompressed glasses show irreversible compaction along with retention of high coordination species when decompressed from > 10 GPa and degree of irreversibility depends on the peak pressure of decompression. These

  9. Silver in geological fluids from in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Roux, Jacques; Ferlat, Guillaume; Jonchiere, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2013-04-01

    The molecular structure and stability of species formed by silver in aqueous saline solutions typical of hydrothermal settings were quantified using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, quantum-chemical modeling of near-edge absorption spectra (XANES) and extended fine structure spectra (EXAFS), and first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD). Results show that in nitrate-bearing acidic solutions to at least 200 °C, silver speciation is dominated by the hydrated Ag+ cation surrounded by 4-6 water molecules in its nearest coordination shell with mean Ag-O distances of 2.32 ± 0.02 Å. In NaCl-bearing acidic aqueous solutions of total Cl concentration from 0.7 to 5.9 mol/kg H2O (m) at temperatures from 200 to 450 °C and pressures to 750 bar, the dominant species are the di-chloride complex AgCl2- with Ag-Cl distances of 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and Cl-Ag-Cl angle of 160 ± 10°, and the tri-chloride complex AgCl32- of a triangular structure and mean Ag-Cl distances of 2.60 ± 0.05 Å. With increasing temperature, the contribution of the tri-chloride species decreases from ˜50% of total dissolved Ag in the most concentrated solution (5.9m Cl) at 200 °C to less than 10-20% at supercritical temperatures for all investigated solutions, so that AgCl2- becomes by far the dominant Ag-bearing species at conditions typical of hydrothermal-magmatic fluids. Both di- and tri-chloride species exhibit outer-sphere interactions with the solvent as shown by the detection, using FPMD modeling, of H2O, Cl-, and Na+ at distances of 3-4 Å from the silver atom. The species fractions derived from XAS and FPMD analyses, and total AgCl(s) solubilities, measured in situ in this work from the absorption edge height of XAS spectra, are in accord with thermodynamic predictions using the stability constants of AgCl2- and AgCl32- from Akinfiev and Zotov (2001) and Zotov et al. (1995), respectively, which are based on extensive previous AgCl(s) solubility measurements. These data

  10. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchy, M.; Kachmar, A.; Micoulaut, M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As x Se 1-x (0.10 First Principles Molecular Dynamics. Within the above range of compositions, thresholds, and anomalies are found in the behavior of reciprocal and real space properties that can be correlated to the experimental location of the Boolchand intermediate phase in these glassy networks, observed at 0.27 dynamical atomic-scale fingerprints for the onset of rigidity within the network, while also providing a much more complex picture than the one derived from mean-field approaches of stiffness transitions

  11. Structural, dynamic, electronic, and vibrational properties of flexible, intermediate, and stressed rigid As-Se glasses and liquids from first principles molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauchy, M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1593 (United States); Kachmar, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Micoulaut, M., E-mail: mmi@lptl.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-11-21

    The structural, vibrational, electronic, and dynamic properties of amorphous and liquid As{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} (0.10 First Principles Molecular Dynamics. Within the above range of compositions, thresholds, and anomalies are found in the behavior of reciprocal and real space properties that can be correlated to the experimental location of the Boolchand intermediate phase in these glassy networks, observed at 0.27 dynamical atomic-scale fingerprints for the onset of rigidity within the network, while also providing a much more complex picture than the one derived from mean-field approaches of stiffness transitions.

  12. Structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of high-density amorphous silicon: a first-principles molecular-dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Tetsuya

    2009-05-21

    We report a first-principles study of the structural, electronic, and dynamical properties of high-density amorphous (HDA) silicon, which was found to be formed by pressurizing low-density amorphous (LDA) silicon (a normal amorphous Si) [T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 055503 (2004); P. F. McMillan, M. Wilson, D. Daisenberger, and D. Machon, Nature Mater. 4, 680 (2005)]. Striking structural differences between HDA and LDA are revealed. The LDA structure holds a tetrahedral network, while the HDA structure contains a highly distorted tetrahedral network. The fifth neighboring atom in HDA tends to be located at an interstitial position of a distorted tetrahedron composed of the first four neighboring atoms. Consequently, the coordination number of HDA is calculated to be approximately 5 unlike that of LDA. The electronic density of state (EDOS) shows that HDA is metallic, which is consistent with a recent experimental measurement of the electronic resistance of HDA Si. We find from local EDOS that highly distorted tetrahedral configurations enhance the metallic nature of HDA. The vibrational density of state (VDOS) also reflects the structural differences between HDA and LDA. Some of the characteristic vibrational modes of LDA are dematerialized in HDA, indicating the degradation of covalent bonds. The overall profile of the VDOS for HDA is found to be an intermediate between that for LDA and liquid Si under pressure (high-density liquid Si).

  13. Dopamine and Caffeine Encapsulation within Boron Nitride (14,0) Nanotubes: Classical Molecular Dynamics and First Principles Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toral, Dolores; González-Melchor, Minerva; Rivas-Silva, Juan F; Meneses-Juárez, Efraín; Cano-Ordaz, José; H Cocoletzi, Gregorio

    2018-06-07

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are developed to investigate the dopamine and caffeine encapsulation within boron nitride (BN) nanotubes (NT) with (14,0) chirality. Classical MD studies are done at canonical and isobaric-isothermal conditions at 298 K and 1 bar in explicit water. Results reveal that both molecules are attracted by the nanotube; however, only dopamine is able to enter the nanotube, whereas caffeine moves in its vicinity, suggesting that both species can be transported: the first by encapsulation and the second by drag. Findings are analyzed using the dielectric behavior, pair correlation functions, diffusion of the species, and energy contributions. The DFT calculations are performed according to the BLYP approach and applying the atomic base of the divided valence 6-31g(d) orbitals. The geometry optimization uses the minimum-energy criterion, accounting for the total charge neutrality and multiplicity of 1. Adsorption energies in the dopamine encapsulation indicate physisorption, which induces the highly occupied molecular orbital-lower unoccupied molecular orbital gap reduction yielding a semiconductor behavior. The charge redistribution polarizes the BNNT/dopamine and BNNT/caffeine structures. The work function decrease and the chemical potential values suggest the proper transport properties in these systems, which may allow their use in nanobiomedicine.

  14. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  15. Challenges in first-principles NPT molecular dynamics of soft porous crystals: A case study on MIL-53(Ga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigis, Volker; Belkhodja, Yacine; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Boutin, Anne

    2014-08-01

    Soft porous crystals present a challenge to molecular dynamics simulations with flexible size and shape of the simulation cell (i.e., in the NPT ensemble), since their framework responds very sensitively to small external stimuli. Hence, all interactions have to be described very accurately in order to obtain correct equilibrium structures. Here, we report a methodological study on the nanoporous metal-organic framework MIL-53(Ga), which undergoes a large-amplitude transition between a narrow- and a large-pore phase upon a change in temperature. Since this system has not been investigated by density functional theory (DFT)-based NPT simulations so far, we carefully check the convergence of the stress tensor with respect to computational parameters. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of dispersion interactions and test two different ways of incorporating them into the DFT framework. As a result, we propose two computational schemes which describe accurately the narrow- and the large-pore phase of the material, respectively. These schemes can be used in future work on the delicate interplay between adsorption in the nanopores and structural flexibility of the host material.

  16. Rock-salt structure lithium deuteride formation in liquid lithium with high-concentrations of deuterium: a first-principles molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of lithium’s possible use as a first wall material in a fusion reactor, a fundamental understanding of the interactions between liquid lithium (Li) and deuterium (D) is important. We predict structural and dynamical properties of liquid Li samples with high concentrations of D, as derived from first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid Li samples with four concentrations of inserted D atoms (LiDβ , β =0.25 , 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) are studied at temperatures ranging from 470 to 1143 K. Densities, diffusivities, pair distribution functions, bond angle distribution functions, geometries, and charge transfer between Li and D atoms are calculated and analyzed. The analysis suggests liquid-solid phase transitions can occur at some concentrations and temperatures, forming rock-salt LiD within liquid Li. We also observe formation of some D2 molecules at high D concentrations.

  17. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  18. Extended application of Kohn-Sham first-principles molecular dynamics method with plane wave approximation at high energy—From cold materials to hot dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei, E-mail: weikang@pku.edu.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Hongwei [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T., E-mail: xthe@iapcm.ac.cn [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2016-04-15

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of electronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of mixtures of plasmas composed of heterogeneous ions, high-Z dense plasmas, lowering of ionization potentials, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, and opacities, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  19. Molecular electronics: insight from first-principles transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about the atomic arrangement and transport channels.

  20. Structure of amorphous GeSe{sub 9} by neutron diffraction and first-principles molecular dynamics: Impact of trajectory sampling and size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Sébastien; Massobrio, Carlo [Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Bouzid, Assil [Chaire de Simulation à l’Echelle Atomique (CSEA), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, Kye Yeop; Han, Seungwu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Zeidler, Anita; Salmon, Philip S. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-28

    The structure of glassy GeSe{sub 9} was investigated by combining neutron diffraction with density-functional-theory-based first-principles molecular dynamics. In the simulations, three different models of N = 260 atoms were prepared by sampling three independent temporal trajectories, and the glass structures were found to be substantially different from those obtained for models in which smaller numbers of atoms or more rapid quench rates were employed. In particular, the overall network structure is based on Se{sub n} chains that are cross-linked by Ge(Se{sub 4}){sub 1/2} tetrahedra, where the latter are predominantly corner as opposed to edge sharing. The occurrence of a substantial proportion of Ge–Se–Se connections does not support a model in which the material is phase separated into Se-rich and GeSe{sub 2}-rich domains. The appearance of a first-sharp diffraction peak in the Bhatia-Thornton concentration-concentration partial structure factor does, however, indicate a non-uniform distribution of the Ge-centered structural motifs on an intermediate length scale.

  1. Structures, energetics, vibrational spectra of NH4+ (H2O)(n=4,6) clusters: Ab initio calculations and first principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, S; Singh, Jiten N; Park, Mina; Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Kwang S

    2008-06-28

    Important structural isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(n=4,6) have been studied by using density functional theory, Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory, and coupled-cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The zero-point energy (ZPE) correction to the complete basis set limit of the CCSD(T) binding energies and free energies is necessary to identify the low energy structures for NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(n=4,6) because otherwise wrong structures could be assigned for the most probable structures. For NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(6), the cage-type structure, which is more stable than the previously reported open structure before the ZPE correction, turns out to be less stable after the ZPE correction. In first principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations around 100 K, the combined power spectrum of three lowest energy isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(4) and two lowest energy isomers of NH(4) (+)(H(2)O)(6) explains each experimental IR spectrum.

  2. First-principles quantum molecular dynamics study of Ti x Zr1-x N(111)/SiN y heterostructures and comparison with experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, Volodymyr; Veprek, Stan; Pogrebnjak, Alexander; Postolnyi, Bogdan

    2014-04-01

    The heterostructures of five monolayers B1-Ti x Zr 1- x N(111), x = 1.0, 0.6, 0.4 and 0.0 (where B1 is a NaCl-type structure) with one monolayer of a Si 3 N 4 -like Si 2 N 3 interfacial layer were investigated by means of first-principles quantum molecular dynamics and a structure optimization procedure using the Quantum ESPRESSO code. Slabs consisting of stoichiometric TiN and ZrN and random, as well as segregated, B1-Ti x Zr 1- x N(111) solutions were considered. The calculations of the B1-Ti x Zr 1- x N solid solutions, as well as of the heterostructures, showed that the pseudo-binary TiN-ZrN system exhibits a miscibility gap. The segregated heterostructures in which Zr atoms surround the Si y N z interface were found to be the most stable. For the Zr-rich heterostructures, the total energy of the random solid solution was lower compared to that of the segregated one, whereas for the Ti-rich heterostructures the opposite tendency was observed. Hard and super hard Zr-Ti-Si-N coatings with thicknesses from 2.8 to 3.5 μ m were obtained using a vacuum arc source with high frequency stimulation. The samples were annealed in a vacuum and in air at 1200 °C. Experimental investigations of Zr-Ti-N, Zr-Ti-Si-N and Ti-Si-N coatings with different Zr, Ti and Si concentrations were carried out for comparison with results obtained from Ti x Zr 1 - x N(111)/SiN y systems. During annealing, the hardness of the best series samples was increased from (39.6 ± 1.4) to 53.6 GPa, which seemed to indicate that a spinodal segregation along grain interfaces was finished. A maximum hardness of 40.8 GPa before and 55 GPa after annealing in air at 500 °C was observed for coatings with a concentration of elements of Si≽ (7-8) at.%, Ti ≽ 22 at.% and Zr ⩽ 70 at.%.

  3. First-Principles Lattice Dynamics Method for Strongly Anharmonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Terumasa; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We review our recent development of a first-principles lattice dynamics method that can treat anharmonic effects nonperturbatively. The method is based on the self-consistent phonon theory, and temperature-dependent phonon frequencies can be calculated efficiently by incorporating recent numerical techniques to estimate anharmonic force constants. The validity of our approach is demonstrated through applications to cubic strontium titanate, where overall good agreement with experimental data is obtained for phonon frequencies and lattice thermal conductivity. We also show the feasibility of highly accurate calculations based on a hybrid exchange-correlation functional within the present framework. Our method provides a new way of studying lattice dynamics in severely anharmonic materials where the standard harmonic approximation and the perturbative approach break down.

  4. Molecular Electronics: Insight from First-Principles Transport Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect...

  5. [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3: synthesis, crystal structure, and speciation in liquid ammonia solution by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidy, Patrick; Bühl, Michael; Kraus, Florian

    2015-04-28

    Pentaammine dioxido uranium(VI) dibromide ammonia (1/1), [UO2(NH3)5]Br2·NH3, was synthesized in the form of yellow crystals by the reaction of uranyl bromide, UO2Br2, with dry liquid ammonia. The compound crystallizes orthorhombic in space group Cmcm and is isotypic to [UO2(NH3)5]Cl2·NH3 with a = 13.2499(2), b = 10.5536(1), c = 8.9126(1) Å, V = 1246.29(3) Å(3) and Z = 4 at 123 K. The UO2(2+) cation is coordinated by five ammine ligands and the coordination polyhedron can be best described as pentagonal bipyramid. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are reported for [UO2(NH3)5](2+) in the gas phase and in liquid NH3 solution (using the BLYP density functional). According to free-energy simulations, solvation by ammonia has only a small effect on the uranyl-NH3 bond strength.

  6. Can Excited State Electronic Coherence Be Tuned via Molecular Structural Modification? A First-Principles Quantum Electronic Dynamics Study of Pyrazolate-Bridged Pt(II) Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingerfelt, David B.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Radler, Joseph J.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Kim, Pyosang; Castellano, Felix N.; Chen, Lin X.; Li, Xiaosong

    2017-02-24

    Materials and molecular systems exhibiting long-lived electronic coherence can facilitate coherent transport, opening the door to efficient charge and energy transport beyond traditional methods. Recently, signatures of a possible coherent, recurrent electronic motion were identified in femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy experiments on a binuclear platinum complex, where a persistent periodic beating in the transient absorption signal’s anisotropy was observed. In this study, we investigate the excitonic dynamics that underlie the suspected electronic coherence for a series of binuclear platinum complexes exhibiting a range of interplatinum distances. Results suggest that the long-lived coherence can only result when competitive electronic couplings are in balance. At longer Pt-Pt distances, the electronic couplings between the two halves of the binuclear system weaken, and exciton localization and recombination is favored on short time scales. For short Pt-Pt distances, electronic couplings between the states in the coherent superposition are stronger than the coupling with other excitonic states, leading to long-lived coherence.

  7. NH4(+) Resides Inside the Water 20-mer Cage As Opposed to H3O(+), Which Resides on the Surface: A First Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Singh, N Jiten; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-11-08

    Experimental vibrational predissociation spectra of the magic NH4(+)(H2O)20 clusters are close to those of the magic H3O(+)(H2O)20 clusters. It has been assumed that the geometric features of NH4(+)(H2O)20 clusters might be close to those of H3O(+)(H2O)20 clusters, in which H3O(+) resides on the surface. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with density functional theory calculations are performed to generate the infrared spectra of the magic NH4(+)(H2O)20 clusters. In comparison with the experimental vibrational predissociation spectra of NH4(+)(H2O)20, we find that NH4(+) is inside the cage structure of NH4(+)(H2O)20 as opposed to on the surface structure. This shows a clear distinction between the structures of NH4(+)(H2O)20 and H3O(+)(H2O)20 as well as between the hydration phenomena of NH4(+) and H3O(+).

  8. Structure and Ionic Conductivity of Li2S-P2S5 Glass Electrolytes Simulated with First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi eBaba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium thiophosphate-based materials are attractive as solid electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium batteries because glass or glass-ceramic structures of these materials are associated with very high conductivity. In this work, we modeled lithium thiophosphates with amorphous structures and investigated Li+ mobilities by using molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory (DFT-MD. The structures of xLi2S-(100 - xP2S5 (x = 67, 70, 75, and 80 were created by randomly identifying appropriate compositions of Li+, PS43-, P2S74-, and S2- and then annealing them with DFT-MD calculations. Calculated relative stabilities of the amorphous structures with x = 67, 70, and 75 relative to crystals with the same compositions were 0.04, 0.12, and 0.16 kJ/g, respectively. The implication is that these amorphous structures are metastable. There was good agreement between calculated and experimental structure factors determined from X-ray scattering. The differences between the structure factors of amorphous structures were small, except for the first sharp diffraction peak, which was affected by the environment between Li and S atoms. Li+ diffusion coefficients obtained from DFT-MD calculations at various temperatures for picosecond simulation times were on the order of 10-3 - 10-5 Angstrom2/ps. Ionic conductivities evaluated by the Nernst-Einstein relationship at 298.15 K were on the order of 10-5 S/cm. The ionic conductivity of the amorphous structure with x = 75 was the highest among the amorphous structures because there was a balance between the number density and diffusibility of Li+. The simulations also suggested that isolated S atoms suppress Li+ migration.

  9. Structure and Ionic Conductivity of Li2S–P2S5 Glass Electrolytes Simulated with First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiumi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium thiophosphate-based materials are attractive as solid electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium batteries because glass or glass-ceramic structures of these materials are associated with very high conductivity. In this work, we modeled lithium thiophosphates with amorphous structures and investigated Li + mobilities by using molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory (DFT-MD). The structures of xLi 2 S–(100 − x)P 2 S 5 (x = 67, 70, 75, and 80) were created by randomly identifying appropriate compositions of Li + , PS 4 3− ,P 2 S 7 4− , and S 2− and then annealing them with DFT-MD calculations. Calculated relative stabilities of the amorphous structures with x = 67, 70, and 75 to crystals with the same compositions were 0.04, 0.12, and 0.16 kJ/g, respectively. The implication is that these amorphous structures are metastable. There was good agreement between calculated and experimental structure factors determined from X-ray scattering. The differences between the structure factors of amorphous structures were small, except for the first sharp diffraction peak, which was affected by the environment between Li and S atoms. Li + diffusion coefficients obtained from DFT-MD calculations at various temperatures for picosecond simulation times were on the order of 10 −3 –10 −5 Å 2 /ps. Ionic conductivities evaluated by the Nernst–Einstein relationship at 298.15 K were on the order of 10 −5 S/cm. The ionic conductivity of the amorphous structure with x = 75 was the highest among the amorphous structures because there was a balance between the number density and diffusibility of Li + . The simulations also suggested that isolated S atoms suppress Li + migration.

  10. Structure and Ionic Conductivity of Li{sub 2}S–P{sub 2}S{sub 5} Glass Electrolytes Simulated with First-Principles Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiumi, E-mail: yoshiumi_kawamura@mail.toyota.co.jp [Toyota Motor Corporation, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2016-06-02

    Lithium thiophosphate-based materials are attractive as solid electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium batteries because glass or glass-ceramic structures of these materials are associated with very high conductivity. In this work, we modeled lithium thiophosphates with amorphous structures and investigated Li{sup +} mobilities by using molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory (DFT-MD). The structures of xLi{sub 2}S–(100 − x)P{sub 2}S{sub 5} (x = 67, 70, 75, and 80) were created by randomly identifying appropriate compositions of Li{sup +}, PS{sub 4}{sup 3−},P{sub 2}S{sub 7}{sup 4−}, and S{sup 2−} and then annealing them with DFT-MD calculations. Calculated relative stabilities of the amorphous structures with x = 67, 70, and 75 to crystals with the same compositions were 0.04, 0.12, and 0.16 kJ/g, respectively. The implication is that these amorphous structures are metastable. There was good agreement between calculated and experimental structure factors determined from X-ray scattering. The differences between the structure factors of amorphous structures were small, except for the first sharp diffraction peak, which was affected by the environment between Li and S atoms. Li{sup +} diffusion coefficients obtained from DFT-MD calculations at various temperatures for picosecond simulation times were on the order of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Å{sup 2}/ps. Ionic conductivities evaluated by the Nernst–Einstein relationship at 298.15 K were on the order of 10{sup −5} S/cm. The ionic conductivity of the amorphous structure with x = 75 was the highest among the amorphous structures because there was a balance between the number density and diffusibility of Li{sup +}. The simulations also suggested that isolated S atoms suppress Li{sup +} migration.

  11. First-principles molecular dynamics investigation of thermal and mechanical stability of the TiN(001)/AlN and ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, V.I.; Veprek, S.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Shevchenko, V.I.; Leszczynski, J.; Gorb, L.; Hill, F.

    2014-01-01

    First-principles quantum molecular dynamics investigations of TiN(001)/AlN and ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures with one and two monolayers (1 ML and 2 ML) of AlN interfacial layers were carried out in the temperature range of 0–1400 K with subsequent static relaxation. It is shown that the epitaxially stabilized cubic B1-AlN interfacial layers are preserved in all TiN(001)/AlN heterostructures over the whole temperature range. In the ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures, the B1-AlN(001) interfacial layer exists at 0 K, but it transforms into a distorted one at 10 K consisting of tetrahedral AlN 4 , octahedral AlN 6 , and AlN 5 units. The thermal stability of the interfaces was investigated by studying the phonon dynamic stability of the B1-AlN phase with different lattice parameters. The calculations showed that the B1-AlN interface should be unstable in ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures and nanocomposites, and in those based on transition metal nitrides with lattice parameters larger than 4.4 Å. Electronic band structure calculations showed that energy gap forms around the Fermi energy for all interfaces. The formation of the interfacial AlN layer in TiN and ZrN crystals reduces their ideal tensile and shear strengths. Upon tensile load, decohesion occurs between Ti (Zr) and N atoms adjacent to the 1 ML AlN interfacial layer, whereas in the case of 2 ML AlN it occurs inside the TiN and ZrN slabs. The experimentally reported strength enhancement in the TiN/AlN and ZrN/AlN heterostructures is attributed to impeding effect of the interfacial layer on the plastic flow. - Highlights: • First-principles quantum molecular dynamics studies were conducted. • TiN- and ZrN-based heterostructures with one and two AlN interfacial layers. • Stability and structural transformation between 0 and 1400 K have been calculated. • Stress–strain relationships and ideal strengths determined. • Systems which may form stable superhard heterostructures are identified

  12. First-principles molecular dynamics investigation of thermal and mechanical stability of the TiN(001)/AlN and ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivashchenko, V.I., E-mail: ivash@ipms.kiev.ua [Institute of Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Krzhyzhanosky str. 3, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Veprek, S., E-mail: stan.veprek@lrz.tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Turchi, P.E.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (L-352), P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Shevchenko, V.I. [Institute of Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Krzhyzhanosky str. 3, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Leszczynski, J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); Gorb, L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States); U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Hill, F. [U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    First-principles quantum molecular dynamics investigations of TiN(001)/AlN and ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures with one and two monolayers (1 ML and 2 ML) of AlN interfacial layers were carried out in the temperature range of 0–1400 K with subsequent static relaxation. It is shown that the epitaxially stabilized cubic B1-AlN interfacial layers are preserved in all TiN(001)/AlN heterostructures over the whole temperature range. In the ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures, the B1-AlN(001) interfacial layer exists at 0 K, but it transforms into a distorted one at 10 K consisting of tetrahedral AlN{sub 4}, octahedral AlN{sub 6}, and AlN{sub 5} units. The thermal stability of the interfaces was investigated by studying the phonon dynamic stability of the B1-AlN phase with different lattice parameters. The calculations showed that the B1-AlN interface should be unstable in ZrN(001)/AlN heterostructures and nanocomposites, and in those based on transition metal nitrides with lattice parameters larger than 4.4 Å. Electronic band structure calculations showed that energy gap forms around the Fermi energy for all interfaces. The formation of the interfacial AlN layer in TiN and ZrN crystals reduces their ideal tensile and shear strengths. Upon tensile load, decohesion occurs between Ti (Zr) and N atoms adjacent to the 1 ML AlN interfacial layer, whereas in the case of 2 ML AlN it occurs inside the TiN and ZrN slabs. The experimentally reported strength enhancement in the TiN/AlN and ZrN/AlN heterostructures is attributed to impeding effect of the interfacial layer on the plastic flow. - Highlights: • First-principles quantum molecular dynamics studies were conducted. • TiN- and ZrN-based heterostructures with one and two AlN interfacial layers. • Stability and structural transformation between 0 and 1400 K have been calculated. • Stress–strain relationships and ideal strengths determined. • Systems which may form stable superhard heterostructures are identified.

  13. First principles based multiparadigm modeling of electronic structures and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai

    enabling the tunability of CBO. We predict that Na further improves the CBO through electrostatically elevating the valence levels to decrease the CBO, explaining the observed essential role of Na for high performance. Moreover we find that K leads to a dramatic decrease in the CBO to 0.05 eV, much better than Na. We suggest that the efficiency of CIGS devices might be improved substantially by tuning the ratio of Na to K, with the improved phase stability of Na balancing phase instability from K. All these defects reduce interfacial stability slightly, but not significantly. A number of exotic structures have been formed through high pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and room temperature). Here we use dispersion-corrected DFT (PBE-ulg flavor) to predict that above 60 GPa the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a 1D polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03-0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable non-planar trans-polymer, accompanied by possible electronic structure transitions. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validate the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a new type of conducting polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions. Modeling non-adiabatic electron dynamics has been a long-standing challenge for computational chemistry and materials science, and the eFF method presents a cost-efficient alternative. However, due to the deficiency of FSG representation, eFF is limited to low-Z elements with

  14. Determination of structure and properties of molecular crystals from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Until recently, it had been impossible to predict structures of molecular crystals just from the knowledge of the chemical formula for the constituent molecule(s). A solution of this problem has been achieved using intermolecular force fields computed from first principles. These fields were developed by calculating interaction energies of molecular dimers and trimers using an ab initio method called symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on density-functional theory (DFT) description of monomers [SAPT(DFT)]. For clusters containing up to a dozen or so atoms, interaction energies computed using SAPT(DFT) are comparable in accuracy to the results of the best wave function-based methods, whereas the former approach can be applied to systems an order of magnitude larger than the latter. In fact, for monomers with a couple dozen atoms, SAPT(DFT) is about equally time-consuming as the supermolecular DFT approach. To develop a force field, SAPT(DFT) calculations are performed for a large number of dimer and possibly also trimer configurations (grid points in intermolecular coordinates), and the interaction energies are then fitted by analytic functions. The resulting force fields can be used to determine crystal structures and properties by applying them in molecular packing, lattice energy minimization, and molecular dynamics calculations. In this way, some of the first successful determinations of crystal structures were achieved from first principles, with crystal densities and lattice parameters agreeing with experimental values to within about 1%. Crystal properties obtained using similar procedures but empirical force fields fitted to crystal data have typical errors of several percent due to low sensitivity of empirical fits to interactions beyond those of the nearest neighbors. The first-principles approach has additional advantages over the empirical approach for notional crystals and cocrystals since empirical force fields can only be

  15. First-principles study of the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P., E-mail: ss_zhaop@ujn.edu.c [School of Science, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu, D.S. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Physics, Jining University, Qufu 273155 (China); Wang, P.J.; Zhang, Z. [School of Science, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Fang, C.F.; Ji, G.M. [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-02-15

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch. The molecule that comprises the switch can be converted between the hydroquinone (HQ) and anthraquinone (AQ) forms via redox reactions. The transmission spectra of these two forms are remarkably distinctive. Our results show that the current through the HQ form is significantly larger than that through the AQ form, which suggests that this system has attractive potential application in future molecular switch technology.

  16. First-principles study of the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Liu, D.S.; Wang, P.J.; Zhang, Z.; Fang, C.F.; Ji, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the electronic transport properties of the anthraquinone-based molecular switch. The molecule that comprises the switch can be converted between the hydroquinone (HQ) and anthraquinone (AQ) forms via redox reactions. The transmission spectra of these two forms are remarkably distinctive. Our results show that the current through the HQ form is significantly larger than that through the AQ form, which suggests that this system has attractive potential application in future molecular switch technology.

  17. First-principles studies of PETN molecular crystal vibrational frequencies under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Warren; Zhao, Jijun

    2005-07-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the PETN molecular crystal were calculated using the first-principles CRYSTAL03 program which employs an all-electron LCAO approach and calculates analytic first derivatives of the total energy with respect to atomic displacements. Numerical second derivatives were used to enable calculation of the vibrational frequencies at ambient pressure and under various states of compression. Three different density functionals, B3LYP, PW91, and X3LYP were used to examine the effect of the exchange-correlation functional on the vibrational frequencies. The pressure-induced shift of the vibrational frequencies will be presented and compared with experiment. The average deviation with experimental results is shown to be on the order of 2-3%, depending on the functional used.

  18. Charge transport in organic molecular semiconductors from first principles: The bandlike hole mobility in a naphthalene crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nien-En; Zhou, Jin-Jian; Agapito, Luis A.; Bernardi, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Predicting charge transport in organic molecular crystals is notoriously challenging. Carrier mobility calculations in organic semiconductors are dominated by quantum chemistry methods based on charge hopping, which are laborious and only moderately accurate. We compute from first principles the electron-phonon scattering and the phonon-limited hole mobility of naphthalene crystal in the framework of ab initio band theory. Our calculations combine GW electronic bandstructures, ab initio electron-phonon scattering, and the Boltzmann transport equation. The calculated hole mobility is in very good agreement with experiment between 100 -300 K , and we can predict its temperature dependence with high accuracy. We show that scattering between intermolecular phonons and holes regulates the mobility, though intramolecular phonons possess the strongest coupling with holes. We revisit the common belief that only rigid molecular motions affect carrier dynamics in organic molecular crystals. Our paper provides a quantitative and rigorous framework to compute charge transport in organic crystals and is a first step toward reconciling band theory and carrier hopping computational methods.

  19. Oxygen plasma etching of graphene: A first-principles dynamical inspection of the reaction mechanisms and related activation barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi; Dept. of Applied Physics Team; Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Strasbourg (IPCMS) Collaboration; Department Of Materials Engineering Science Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plasma etching is a crucial step in the fabrication of electronic circuits and has recently received a renovated interest in view of the realization of carbon-based nanodevices. In an attempt at unraveling the atomic-scale details and to provide guidelines for the control of the etching processes mechanisms, we inspected the possible reaction pathways via reactive first principles simulations. These processes involve breaking and formation of several chemical bonds and are characterized by different free-energy barriers. Free-energy sampling techniques (metadynamics and blue moon), used to enhance the standard Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, provide us a detailed microscopic picture of the etching of graphene surfaces and a comprehensive scenario of the activation barriers involved in the various steps. MEXT, Japan - contract N. 22104005

  20. Mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of Al-3wt%Mg from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rong [Chongqing Jiaotong Univ., Chongqing (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Tang, Bin [Chongqing City Management College, Chongqing (China). Inst. of Finance and Trade; Gao, Tao [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of Al-3wt%Mg have been investigated using the first-principles method. The calculated structural parameter is in good agreement with previous works. Results for the elastic modulus, stress-strain relationships, ideal tensile and shear strengths are presented. Al-3wt%Mg is found to have larger moduli and higher strengths than Al, which is consistent with its exploitation in Al precipitate-hardening mechanisms. The partial density of states (PDOS) show that the partly covalent-like bonding through Al p-Mg s hybridization is the origin of excellent mechanical properties of Al-3wt%Mg. The phonon dispersion curves indicate that Al-3wt%Mg is dynamically stable at ambient pressure and 0 K. Furthermore, the Helmholtz free energy ΔF, the entropy S, the constant-volume specific heat C{sub V} and the phonon contribution to the internal energy ΔE are predicted using the phonon density of states. We expect that our work can provide useful guidance to help with the performance of Al-3wt%Mg.

  1. Mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of Al-3wt%Mg from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Rong; Tang, Bin; Gao, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of Al-3wt%Mg have been investigated using the first-principles method. The calculated structural parameter is in good agreement with previous works. Results for the elastic modulus, stress-strain relationships, ideal tensile and shear strengths are presented. Al-3wt%Mg is found to have larger moduli and higher strengths than Al, which is consistent with its exploitation in Al precipitate-hardening mechanisms. The partial density of states (PDOS) show that the partly covalent-like bonding through Al p-Mg s hybridization is the origin of excellent mechanical properties of Al-3wt%Mg. The phonon dispersion curves indicate that Al-3wt%Mg is dynamically stable at ambient pressure and 0 K. Furthermore, the Helmholtz free energy ΔF, the entropy S, the constant-volume specific heat C_V and the phonon contribution to the internal energy ΔE are predicted using the phonon density of states. We expect that our work can provide useful guidance to help with the performance of Al-3wt%Mg.

  2. Interlayer Structures and Dynamics of Arsenate and Arsenite Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxides: A First Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by using first principles simulation techniques, we explored the basal spacings, interlayer structures, and dynamics of arsenite and arsenate intercalated Layered double hydroxides (LDHs. Our results confirm that the basal spacings of NO3−-LDHs increase with layer charge densities. It is found that Arsenic (As species can enter the gallery spaces of LDHs with a Mg/Al ratio of 2:1 but they cannot enter those with lower charge densities. Interlayer species show layering distributions. All anions form a single layer distribution while water molecules form a single layer distribution at low layer charge density and a double layer distribution at high layer charge densities. H2AsO4− has two orientations in the interlayer regions (i.e., one with its three folds axis normal to the layer sheets and another with its two folds axis normal to the layer sheets, and only the latter is observed for HAsO42−. H2AsO3− orientates in a tilt-lying way. The mobility of water and NO3− increases with the layer charge densities while As species have very low mobility. Our simulations provide microscopic information of As intercalated LDHs, which can be used for further understanding of the structures of oxy-anion intercalated LDHs.

  3. Si(111)-7 x 7: First-principles study of dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stich, I.; Kohanoff, J.; Terakura, K.

    1995-12-01

    We present a large-scale fully ab initio molecular dynamics study of dynamical properties of the Takayanagi reconstructed Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The simulation reproduces well the experimentally determined features of the phonon spectra and clarifies their nature and origin. Correlations are found between these dynamical properties and elements of the local electronic structure of the adatom dangling bonds. We find evidence for important anharmonic effects of below room temperature. Use of non-traditional signal-processing methods allows for a considerable insight into the details of the dynamics from a short-duration molecular dynamics trajectory. Results of this analysis significantly extend/modify the results of the previous studies based on more simplified models. (author). 29 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  4. First-principles study of lattice dynamics, structural phase transition, and thermodynamic properties of barium titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huai-Yong; Zhao, Ying-Qin; Lu, Qing [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Zeng, Zhao-Yi [Chongqing Normal Univ. (China). College of Physics and Electronic Engineering; Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research; Cheng, Yan [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Physics; Sichuan Univ., Chengdu (China). Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education

    2016-11-01

    Lattice dynamics, structural phase transition, and the thermodynamic properties of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) are investigated by using first-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT). It is found that the GGA-WC exchange-correlation functional can produce better results. The imaginary frequencies that indicate structural instability are observed for the cubic, tetragonal, and orthorhombic phases of BaTiO{sub 3} and no imaginary frequencies emerge in the rhombohedral phase. By examining the partial phonon density of states (PDOSs), we find that the main contribution to the imaginary frequencies is the distortions of the perovskite cage (Ti-O). On the basis of the site-symmetry consideration and group theory, we give the comparative phonon symmetry analysis in four phases, which is useful to analyze the role of different atomic displacements in the vibrational modes of different symmetry. The calculated optical phonon frequencies at Γ point for the four phases are in good agreement with other theoretical and experimental data. The pressure-induced phase transition of BaTiO{sub 3} among four phases and the thermodynamic properties of BaTiO{sub 3} in rhombohedral phase have been investigated within the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA). The sequence of the pressure-induced phase transition is rhombohedral → orthorhombic → tetragonal → cubic, and the corresponding transition pressure is 5.17, 5.92, 6.65 GPa, respectively. At zero pressure, the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub V}, heat capacity C{sub V}, Grueneisen parameter γ, and bulk modulus B of the rhombohedral phase BaTiO{sub 3} are estimated from 0 K to 200 K.

  5. First-principles studies on the adsorption of molecular oxygen on Ba(110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.F.; Xue Xinlian; Li Pinglin; Li Xinjian; Jia Yu

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of O 2 on Ba(110) surface is studied with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our calculations predict that O 2 may prefer to dissociative adsorption on Ba(110) surface without obvious barrier. Also our results do not support the model of charge transfer from the surface to the molecule as a bond breaking mechanism. Instead, the increasing hybridization between O 2 orbitals and the d states of Ba(110) surface may play an important role in the dissociation adsorption

  6. Dynamical Dimension to the Hofmeister Series: Insights from First-Principles Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bekcioglu-Neff, G.; Allolio, Christoph; Desmukh, Y. S.; Hansen, M. R.; Sebastiani, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 8 (2016), s. 1166-1173 ISSN 1439-4235 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Hofmeister series * hydrogen bonds * ion pairs * molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2016

  7. Dynamical coupling in Pb(Zr,Ti)O.sub.3./sub. solid solutions from first principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, D.; Weerasinghe, J.; Bellaiche, L.; Hlinka, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2011), "020301-1"-"020301-4" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : first-principles * ferroelectric * PZT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevB.83.020301

  8. First principles study of NH3 molecular adsorption on LiH (100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaoxia; Chen Yuhong; Dong Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of NH 3 on LiH (100) crystal surfaces was studied by first principles method. The preferred adsorption sites, adsorption energy, dissociation energy and electronic structure of the LiH (100)/NH 3 systems were calculated separately. It is found that chemical adsorption happened mainly when NH 3 molecules are on the LiH (100) crystal surfaces. When NH 3 is adsorbed on the Li top site, NH 2 is formed on the LiH (100) crystal surfaces after loss of H atom, the calculated adsorption energy, 0.511 eV, belongs to strong chemical adsorption, then the interaction is strongest. The interaction between NH 2 and the neighboring Li, H are ionic. The covalent bonds are formed between N and H atoms in NH 2 . One H 2 molecule is formed by another H atom in NH 3 and H atom from LiH (100) crystal sur- faces. The covalent bonds are formed between H and H atoms in H 2 . (authors)

  9. Lattice dynamics and thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride via first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting; Chen, Wen-Qi; Hu, Cui-E.; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Chen, Qi-Feng

    2018-04-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride (LiF) is accurately computed from a first-principles approach based on an iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Real-space finite-difference supercell approach is employed to generate the second- and third-order interatomic force constants. The related physical quantities of LiF are calculated by the second- and third- order potential interactions at 30 K-1000 K. The calculated lattice thermal conductivity 13.89 W/(m K) for LiF at room temperature agrees well with the experimental value, demonstrating that the parameter-free approach can furnish precise descriptions of the lattice thermal conductivity for this material. Besides, the Born effective charges, dielectric constants and phonon spectrum of LiF accord well with the existing data. The lattice thermal conductivities for the iterative solution of BTE are also presented.

  10. Electron transport in dipyridazine and dipyridimine molecular junctions: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Sweta

    2018-05-01

    We present density functional theory-nonequilibrium Green’s function method for electron transport of dipyridazine and dipyridimine molecular junctions with gold, copper and nickel electrodes. Our investigation reveals that the junctions formed with gold and copper electrodes bridging dipyridazine molecule through thiol anchoring group enhance current as compared to the junctions in which the molecule and electrode were coupled directly. Further, nickel electrode displays weak decrease of current with increase of voltage at about 1.2 V. The result is fully rationalized by means of the distribution of molecular orbitals as well as shift in molecular energy levels and HOMO-LUMO gap with applied bias voltage. Our findings are compared with theoretical and experimental results available for other molecular junctions. Present results predict potential avenues for changing the transport behavior by not only changing the electrodes, but also the position of nitrogen atom and type of anchoring-atom that connect molecule and electrodes, thus extending applications of dipyridazine and dipyridimine molecule in future integrated circuits.

  11. Pseudo-extravasation rate constant of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI determined from pharmacokinetic first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Varallyay, Csanad G; Gahramanov, Seymur; Fu, Rongwei; Rooney, William D; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) is widely used to obtain informative perfusion imaging biomarkers, such as the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). The related post-processing software packages for DSC-MRI are available from major MRI instrument manufacturers and third-party vendors. One unique aspect of DSC-MRI with low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast reagent (CR) is that CR molecules leak into the interstitium space and therefore confound the DSC signal detected. Several approaches to correct this leakage effect have been proposed throughout the years. Amongst the most popular is the Boxerman-Schmainda-Weisskoff (BSW) K 2 leakage correction approach, in which the K 2 pseudo-first-order rate constant quantifies the leakage. In this work, we propose a new method for the BSW leakage correction approach. Based on the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the data, the commonly adopted R 2 * expression accounting for contributions from both intravascular and extravasating CR components is transformed using a method mathematically similar to Gjedde-Patlak linearization. Then, the leakage rate constant (K L ) can be determined as the slope of the linear portion of a plot of the transformed data. Using the DSC data of high-molecular-weight (~750 kDa), iron-based, intravascular Ferumoxytol (FeO), the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the new paradigm is empirically validated. The primary objective of this work is to empirically demonstrate that a linear portion often exists in the graph of the transformed data. This linear portion provides a clear definition of the Gd CR pseudo-leakage rate constant, which equals the slope derived from the linear segment. A secondary objective is to demonstrate that transformed points from the initial transient period during the CR wash-in often deviate from the linear trend of the linearized graph. The inclusion of these points will have a negative impact on the accuracy of the leakage

  12. First-principle investigations on the structural dynamics of Ti2GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.J.; Li, J.; Linghu, R.F.; Cheng, X.L.; Yang, X.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Our calculated lattice parameter of Ti 2 GaN shows that c axis is always stiffer than a axis. •The elastic constants investigations demonstrated that the Ti 2 GaN is meta-stable between 350 and 600 GPa. •We observed an abnormal c-axis expansion behavior within 350–600 GPa resulting from the expansion of the Ti–Ti bond length and the increase of the Ti–Ti bond populations. •Study on the density of states we found that the Ti s and p electrons shift towards higher energies with pressure. -- Abstract: We report a first-principle study on the elastic and electronic properties of the nanolaminate Ti 2 GaN. Our calculated lattice parameter shows that c axis is always stiffer than a axis. The elastic constants investigations demonstrated that Ti 2 GaN is stable over a wide pressure range of 0–1000 GPa with the only exception of 350–600 GPa owing to the elastic softening. The softening behaviors of the Young’s and shear moduli are also found in the same pressure range of 350–600 GPa, indicating a structural metastability. Investigation on the axial compressibility we observed an abnormal c-axis expansion behavior within a pressure range of 350–600 GPa, resulting from the expansion of the Ti–Ti bond length and the increase of the Ti–Ti bond population. Study on the density of states (DOSs) we found that the Ti s and Ti p electrons shift towards higher energies with pressure

  13. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyshevsky, Roman V; Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2016-02-19

    This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  14. Molecular Theory of Detonation Initiation: Insight from First Principles Modeling of the Decomposition Mechanisms of Organic Nitro Energetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Tsyshevsky

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a concept, which assumes that thermal decomposition processes play a major role in defining the sensitivity of organic energetic materials to detonation initiation. As a science and engineering community we are still far away from having a comprehensive molecular detonation initiation theory in a widely agreed upon form. However, recent advances in experimental and theoretical methods allow for a constructive and rigorous approach to design and test the theory or at least some of its fundamental building blocks. In this review, we analyzed a set of select experimental and theoretical articles, which were augmented by our own first principles modeling and simulations, to reveal new trends in energetic materials and to refine known existing correlations between their structures, properties, and functions. Our consideration is intentionally limited to the processes of thermally stimulated chemical reactions at the earliest stage of decomposition of molecules and materials containing defects.

  15. Dynamical instability, strong anharmonicity and electron-phonon coupling in KOs2O6: First-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Jiafa; Li, Bin; He, Junqi

    2017-09-01

    First-principles pseudopotential calculations on phonon and electronic properties of β -pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6 are performed. The imaginary soft-phonon modes with a special double-well potential for the lowest Eu(1) mode and the second lowest T1u(1) mode are reported, which indicates the dynamical instability in KOs2O6. However, the double wells are too small to induce a structural phase transformation in KOs2O6. The strong anharmonicity especially for K T2g(1) phonon mode is got, which is approved to be from the strong electron-phonon coupling that supports the superconductivity in KOs2O6.

  16. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics of rhombohedral BiAlO_3 from first-principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczkowski, J.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, dynamical (zone-center phonon modes and Born effective charge tensors), and ferroelectric properties of the rhombohedral BiAlO_3 were calculated within various exchange-correlation functionals. The standard local-density (LDA) and generalized gradient (GGA) approximations, and nonlocal hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) were used. We have also performed the electronic structure calculations with meta-GGA Tran-Blaha functional. BiAlO_3 is indirect band gap semiconductor with the value of band gap: 2.87 eV (GGA), 4.14 eV (HSE), and 3.78 eV (TB-mBJ). The calculated spontaneous polarization is 81 μC/cm"2 (87 μC/cm"2) for GGA (HSE). The vibrational spectrum including LO-TO splitting was calculated within GGA. The zone-center phonon modes with LO-TO splitting for BiAlO_3 were compared with those in isostructural BiFeO_3. - Highlights: • Electronic structure of the rhombohedral phase of BiAlO_3 were calculated. • Structural, elastic, dynamical, and ferroelectric properties were investigated. • Calculations were done within GGA, hybrid HSE, and TB-mBJ functionals. • The lattice dynamics with LO-TO splitting were investigated within GGA functional.

  17. First-principles study of hydrogen-bonded molecular conductor κ -H3(Cat-EDT-TTF/ST)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Seo, Hitoshi; Kato, Reizo; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study hydrogen-bonded molecular conductors synthesized recently, κ -H3(Cat-EDT-TTF) 2 and its diselena analog, κ -H3(Cat-EDT-ST) 2, by first-principles density functional theory calculations. In these crystals, two H(Cat-EDT-TTF/ST) units share a hydrogen atom with a short O-H-O hydrogen bond. The calculated band structure near the Fermi level shows a quasi-two-dimensional character with a rather large interlayer dispersion due to the absence of insulating layers, in contrast with conventional molecular conductors. We discuss effective low-energy models based on H(Cat-EDT-TTF/ST) units and its dimers, respectively, where the microscopic character of the orbitals composing them are analyzed. Furthermore, we find a stable structure which is different from the experimentally determined structure, where the shared hydrogen atom becomes localized to one of the oxygen atoms, in which charge disproportionation between the two types of H(Cat-EDT-TTF) units is associated. The calculated potential energy surface for the H atom is very shallow near the minimum points; therefore the probability of the H atom can be delocalized between the two O atoms.

  18. First-principles electron dynamics control simulation of diamond under femtosecond laser pulse train irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Wang Feng; Li Xin; Yuan Yanping; Xiao Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Lu Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional is applied to simulate the nonlinear electron-photon interactions during shaped femtosecond laser pulse train ablation of diamond. Effects of the key pulse train parameters such as the pulse separation, spatial/temporal pulse energy distribution and pulse number per train on the electron excitation and energy absorption are discussed. The calculations show that photon-electron interactions and transient localized electron dynamics can be controlled including photon absorption, electron excitation, electron density, and free electron distribution by the ultrafast laser pulse train. (paper)

  19. First principles study on structural, lattice dynamical and thermal properties of BaCeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingping; Ding, Jinwen; He, Min

    2017-09-01

    BaCeO3 exhibits impressive application potentials on solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte, hydrogen separation membrane and photocatalyst, owing to its unique ionic and electronic properties. In this article, the electronic structures, phonon spectra and thermal properties of BaCeO3 in orthorhombic, rhombohedral and cubic phases are investigated based on density functional theory. Comparisons with reported experimental results are also presented. The calculation shows that orthorhombic structure is both energetically and dynamically stable under ground state, which is supported by the experiment. Moreover, charge transfer between cations and anions accompanied with phase transition is observed, which is responsible for the softened phonon modes in rhombohedral and cubic phases. Besides, thermal properties are discussed. Oxygen atoms contribute most to the specific heat. The calculated entropy and specific heat at constant pressure fit well with the experimental ones within the measured temperature range.

  20. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Gupta, Sanjay D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  1. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta D. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumarsinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar 364001 (India); Gupta, Sanjay D. [V. B. Institute of Science, Department of Physics, C. U. Shah University, Wadhwan City - 363030, Surendranagar (India); Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: prafullaj@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India)

    2014-05-28

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  2. First principles analysis of lattice dynamics for Fe-based superconductors and entropically-stabilized phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Modern calculations are becoming an essential, complementary tool to inelastic x-ray scattering studies, where x-rays are scattered inelastically to resolve meV phonons. Calculations of the inelastic structure factor for any value of Q assist in both planning the experiment and analyzing the results. Moreover, differences between the measured data and theoretical calculations help identify important new physics driving the properties of novel correlated systems. We have used such calculations to better and more e ciently measure the phonon dispersion and elastic constants of several iron pnictide superconductors. This dissertation describes calculations and measurements at room temperature in the tetragonal phase of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and LaFeAsO. In both cases, spin-polarized calculations imposing the antiferromagnetic order present in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase dramatically improves the agreement between theory and experiment. This is discussed in terms of the strong antiferromagnetic correlations that are known to persist in the tetragonal phase. In addition, we discuss a relatively new approach called self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics (SCAILD), which goes beyond the harmonic approximation to include phonon-phonon interactions and produce a temperature-dependent phonon dispersion. We used this technique to study the HCP to BCC transition in beryllium.

  3. Study on the interactions of Ag nanoparticles with low molecular weight organic matter using first principles calculations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nyangiwe, Nangamso N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available with natural organic matter (NOMs) and ENPs inherent physicochemical properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT), classical lattice dynamics (CLD), and quantum mechanical calculations based on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory were applied...

  4. First principles, market failures and endogenous obsolescence: the dynamic approach to capacity mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst

    2014-11-01

    The theoretical benchmark model arguing that competitive energy-only markets with VOLL pricing can provide sufficient levels of capacity is a coherent starting point also for discussions about capacity remuneration mechanisms (CRMs). Two types of market imperfection, both stemming from the non-storability of electricity and the resultant inelasticity of demand, however require qualification of the benchmark model and can justify CRMs. The first type of market imperfection relates to the existence of security-of-supply externalities as involuntary curbs on demand under VOLL-pricing create disutility beyond the private non-consumption of electricity. In interconnected economies, utility does not only depend on individual electricity consumption but also on the smooth consumption of others. These externalities are captured in the difference between voluntary and involuntary demand response. The second type of market imperfection relates to the asymmetric incentives for investors under imperfect information. Due to the inelasticity of demand and the lumpiness of generating equipment, investors in markets for non-storable goods will err on the side of caution, under-investing at the margin rather than over-investing. There exists thus not an intrinsic, general case but a time- and context-specific case for CRMs depending on the shape of the load-curve, the elasticity of demand and the availability of flexibility resources. The choice of mechanism will depend on the number of hours of potential capacity short-falls and the resulting capital-intensity of the technologies most apt to respond to them. Most importantly, well-designed CRMs will set in motion the very structural dynamics towards more elastic demand, a development that might one day make them obsolete and render the theoretical benchmark model applicable again. CRMs thus require transparent and pre-announced review mechanisms at regular intervals. (authors)

  5. First-principles study on electronic, optic, elastic, dynamic and thermodynamic properties of RbH compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulebaglan Sinem Erden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed first-principles calculations to obtain the electronic, optical, elastic, lattice-dynamical and thermodynamic properties of RbH compound with rock salt structure. The ground-state properties, i.e., the lattice constant and the band gap were investigated using a plane wave pseudopotential method within density functional theory. The calculated lattice constant, bulk modulus, energy band gap and elastic constants are reported and compared with previous theoretical and experimental results. Our calculated results and the previous results which are obtained from literature are in a good agreement. Moreover, real and imaginary parts of complex dielectric function, reflectivity spectrum, absorption, extinction coefficient and loss function as a function of photon energy and refractive index with respect to photon wavelength were calculated. In addition, temperature dependent thermodynamic properties such as Helmholtz free energy, internal energy, entropy and specific heat have been studied.

  6. Electronic structure and lattice dynamics of CaPd3B studied by first-principles methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Ahuja, Rajeev; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01

    Using first-principles methods, we have studied the electronic structure and lattice dynamics of CaPd 3 B and compared them to isostructural MgNi 3 C. CaPd 3 B possesses less electronic states at the Fermi level, but more phonon modes at low frequencies, than MgNi 3 C. According to the phonon density of states, low frequency acoustic modes are dominated by Pd states, corresponding to Ni in MgNi 3 C. Furthermore, these Pd modes show soft phonons, which may be significant for second-order phase transitions. Based on the comparison to MgNi 3 C, we suggest that the properties of these two compounds may be similar

  7. Prediction of Low-Thermal-Conductivity Compounds with First-Principles Anharmonic Lattice-Dynamics Calculations and Bayesian Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Koji; Chaput, Laurent; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-11-01

    Compounds of low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) are essential for seeking thermoelectric materials with high conversion efficiency. Some strategies have been used to decrease LTC. However, such trials have yielded successes only within a limited exploration space. Here, we report the virtual screening of a library containing 54 779 compounds. Our strategy is to search the library through Bayesian optimization using for the initial data the LTC obtained from first-principles anharmonic lattice-dynamics calculations for a set of 101 compounds. We discovered 221 materials with very low LTC. Two of them even have an electronic band gap <1 eV , which makes them exceptional candidates for thermoelectric applications. In addition to those newly discovered thermoelectric materials, the present strategy is believed to be powerful for many other applications in which the chemistry of materials is required to be optimized.

  8. Elastic, dynamical, and electronic properties of LiHg and Li3Hg: First-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Hao, Chun-Mei; Huang, Hong-Mei; Li, Yan-Ling

    2018-04-01

    The elastic, dynamical, and electronic properties of cubic LiHg and Li3Hg were investigated based on first-principles methods. The elastic constants and phonon spectral calculations confirmed the mechanical and dynamical stability of the materials at ambient conditions. The obtained elastic moduli of LiHg are slightly larger than those of Li3Hg. Both LiHg and Li3Hg are ductile materials with strong shear anisotropy as metals with mixed ionic, covalent, and metallic interactions. The calculated Debye temperatures are 223.5 K and 230.6 K for LiHg and Li3Hg, respectively. The calculated phonon frequency of the T2 g mode in Li3Hg is 326.8 cm-1. The p states from the Hg and Li atoms dominate the electronic structure near the Fermi level. These findings may inspire further experimental and theoretical study on the potential technical and engineering applications of similar alkali metal-based intermetallic compounds.

  9. A first principles calculations of structural, electronic, magnetic and dynamical properties of mononitrides FeN and CoN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, Himadri R.; Mankad, Venu; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present spin dependent bandstructure, structural and magnetic moment of FeN/CoN. ► The PDC, PHDOS, spin effect on phonons suggests ZB is preferred at ambient pressure. ► Spin calculation offers an opportunity to understand the role of spin on phonons. - Abstract: Using first principles density functional theoretical calculations, the present paper reports a systematic nonspin and spin polarized total energy calculations of the lattice dynamical and a number of other properties such as band structure, structural and magnetic moment of two mononitrides FeN and CoN. The phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states in the case of FeN and CoN have been determined for the first time and discussed. The structural and dynamical calculations suggest that the zinc blende structure is preferred at ambient pressure for both compounds. The rocksalt FeN has a nonzero magnetic moment while for FeN in zinc blende phase, it is either zero or very small. The zinc blende phase for both compounds is nonmagnetic. The spin calculation offers an intensive opportunity to understand the role of spin on the phonon properties of two mononitrides. Majority of the modes are sensitive to the effect of spin due to the modification of lattice constant. In this work we reveal that spin modifies the interionic interactions and local structure and leads to a flexible lattice which can be used for the functional materials design.

  10. First-principles model potentials for lattice-dynamical studies: general methodology and example of application to ferroic perovskite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdeł, Jacek C; Hermet, Patrick; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Ghosez, Philippe; Íñiguez, Jorge

    2013-07-31

    We present a scheme to construct model potentials, with parameters computed from first principles, for large-scale lattice-dynamical simulations of materials. We mimic the traditional solid-state approach to the investigation of vibrational spectra, i.e., we start from a suitably chosen reference configuration of the compound and describe its energy as a function of arbitrary atomic distortions by means of a Taylor series. Such a form of the potential-energy surface is general, trivial to formulate for any material, and physically transparent. Further, such models involve clear-cut approximations, their precision can be improved in a systematic fashion, and their simplicity allows for convenient and practical strategies to compute/fit the potential parameters. We illustrate our scheme with two challenging cases in which the model potential is strongly anharmonic, namely, the ferroic perovskite oxides PbTiO3 and SrTiO3. Studying these compounds allows us to better describe the connection between the so-called effective-Hamiltonian method and ours (which may be seen as an extension of the former), and to show the physical insight and predictive power provided by our approach-e.g., we present new results regarding the factors controlling phase-transition temperatures, novel phase transitions under elastic constraints, an improved treatment of thermal expansion, etc.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide from First-Principles Lattice Dynamics – a Comparative Study with Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Wohlwend, Jennifer L.; Roy, Ajit K.; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-01-01

    Wurtzite Zinc-Oxide (w-ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconductor that holds promise in power electronics applications, where heat dissipation is of critical importance. However, large discrepancies exist in the literature on the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO. In this paper, we determine the thermal conductivity of w-ZnO using first-principles lattice dynamics and compare it to that of wurtzite Gallium-Nitride (w-GaN) – another important wide bandgap semiconductor with the same crystal structure and similar atomic masses as w-ZnO. However, the thermal conductivity values show large differences (400 W/mK of w-GaN vs. 50 W/mK of w-ZnO at room temperature). It is found that the much lower thermal conductivity of ZnO originates from the smaller phonon group velocities, larger three-phonon scattering phase space and larger anharmonicity. Compared to w-GaN, w-ZnO has a smaller frequency gap in phonon dispersion, which is responsible for the stronger anharmonic phonon scattering, and the weaker interatomic bonds in w-ZnO leads to smaller phonon group velocities. The thermal conductivity of w-ZnO also shows strong size effect with nano-sized grains or structures. The results from this work help identify the cause of large discrepancies in w-ZnO thermal conductivity and will provide in-depth understanding of phonon dynamics for the design of w-ZnO-based electronics. PMID:26928396

  12. A first principles study of phase stability, bonding, electronic and lattice dynamical properties of beryllium chalcogenides at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabhi, Shweta; Mankad, Venu; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First principles calculations are performed for BeS, BeSe and BeTe in B3, B8 and B1 phases. • They are indirect wide band gap semiconductors stable in B3 phase at ambient condition. • Phonon calculations at ambient and high pressure are reported. • The NiAs phase is dynamically stable at high pressure. - Abstract: The present paper reports a detailed and systematic theoretical study of structural, mechanical, electronic, vibrational and thermodynamical properties of three beryllium chalcogenides BeS, BeSe and BeTe in zinc blende, NiAs and rock salt phases by performing ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory. The calculated value of lattice constants and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and found to agree reasonably well. These compounds are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with a partially ionic contribution in all considered three phases. The zinc blende phase of these chalcogenides is found stable at ambient condition and phase transition from zinc blende to NiAs structure is found to occur. The bulk modulus, its pressure derivative, anisotropic factor, Poission’s ratio, Young’s modulus for these are also calculated and discussed. The phonon dispersion curves of these beryllium chalcogenides in zinc blende phase depict their dynamical stability in this phase at ambient condition. We have also estimated the temperature variation of specific heat at constant volume, entropy and Debye temperature for these compounds in zinc blende phase. The variation of lattice-specific heat with temperature obeys the classical Dulong–Petit’s law at high temperature, while at low-temperature it obeys the Debye’s T 3 law

  13. First-principles approach to the dynamic magnetoelectric couplings for the non-reciprocal directional dichroism in BiFeO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Fishman, Randy S; Kézsmáki, István

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complicated magnetic and crystallographic structures of BiFeO 3 , its magnetoelectric (ME) couplings and microscopic model Hamiltonian remain poorly understood. By employing a first-principles approach, we uncover all possible ME couplings associated with the spin-current (SC) and exchange-striction (ES) polarizations, and construct an appropriate Hamiltonian for the long-range spin-cycloid in BiFeO 3 . First-principles calculations are used to understand the microscopic origins of the ME couplings. We find that inversion symmetries broken by ferroelectric and antiferroelectric distortions induce the SC and the ES polarizations, which cooperatively produce the dynamic ME effects in BiFeO 3 . A model motivated by first principles reproduces the absorption difference of counter-propagating light beams called non-reciprocal directional dichroism. The current paper focuses on the spin-driven (SD) polarizations produced by a dynamic electric field, i.e. the dynamic ME couplings. Due to the inertial properties of Fe, the dynamic SD polarizations differ significantly from the static SD polarizations. Our systematic approach can be generally applied to any multiferroic material, laying the foundation for revealing hidden ME couplings on the atomic scale and for exploiting optical ME effects in the next generation of technological devices such as optical diodes. (paper)

  14. Dynamic properties of liquid metals and their free surface with first principles molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    González del Río, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Esta tesis presenta un estudio exhaustivo de las propiedades dinámicas de los metales líquidos utilizando la Teoría del Funcional de la Densidad en sus dos formulaciones, Kohn-Sham y Hohenberg-Kohn. En primer lugar, se presenta un nuevo método para la construcción de pseudopotenciales locales junto con algunas aplicaciones. Acto seguido, se estudian las propiedades de varios sistemas líquidos 'bulk' mono- y multi- componentes. La teoría de Acoplamiento de Modos se aplica en el estudio del com...

  15. Towards a Molecular Scale Understanding of Surface Chemistry and Photocatalysis on Metal Oxides: Surface Science Experiments and First Principles Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, Ulrike [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2015-01-29

    This project has provided an increased understanding of molecular processes and structure-activity relationships in photocatalytic systems. This could ultimately lead to guidelines on how to make TiO2-based photocatalytic systems more efficient. This directly relates to the Program’s mission to develop a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions that pertain to environmental remediation and pollution control; energy production (photoelectrochemical and production of hydrogen); and novel materials synthesis.

  16. First-principles study of the structural and dynamic properties of the liquid and amorphous Li–Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Han-Hsin; Kuo, Chin-Lung, E-mail: chinlung@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lu, Jian-Ming [National Center for High-Performance Computing, Tainan 74147, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-21

    We have performed density functional theory calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the structures and dynamic properties of the liquid and amorphous Li{sub x}Si alloys over a range of composition from x = 1.0 − 4.8. Our results show that Si atoms can form a variety of covalently bonded polyanions with diverse local bonding structures in the liquid alloys. Like in c-LiSi, Si atoms can form a continuous bond network in liquid Li{sub 1.0}Si at 1050 K, while it gradually disintegrates into many smaller Si polyanions as the Li content increases in the alloys. The average sizes of Si polyanions in these liquid alloys were found to be relatively larger than those in their crystalline counterparts, which can even persist in the highly lithiated Li{sub 4.81}Si alloy at 1500 K. Our results also show that amorphous Li{sub x}Si alloys have similar local bonding structures but a largely increased short-range order as compared to their liquid counterparts. The differences between the average coordination number of each atomic pair in amorphous solids and that in the liquids are less than 1.1. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that Li and Si atoms can exhibit very distinct dynamic behaviors in the liquids and their diffusivities appear to be largely dependent on the chemical composition of the alloys. The diffusivity of Li was found to increase with the Li content in the alloys primarily because of the reduced interactions between Li and Si atoms, while the Si diffusivity also increases due to the gradual disintegration of the strongly interconnected Si bond network. The diffusivity of Li in amorphous Li{sub x}Si was predicted to lie in the range between 10{sup −7} and 10{sup −9} cm{sup 2}/s at 300 K, which is more than 20-fold larger than that of Si over the composition range considered. Our calculations further show that the diffusivities of both Li and Si can increase by two orders of magnitude as x increases from 1.0 to 3.57 in amorphous Li

  17. First-principles simulations of heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2017-11-01

    Advances in understanding heat transport in solids were recently reported by both experiment and theory. However an efficient and predictive quantum simulation framework to investigate thermal properties of solids, with the same complexity as classical simulations, has not yet been developed. Here we present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at close to equilibrium conditions, which only requires calculations of first-principles trajectories and atomic forces, thus avoiding direct computation of heat currents and energy densities. In addition the method requires much shorter sequential simulation times than ordinary molecular dynamics techniques, making it applicable within density functional theory. We discuss results for a representative oxide, MgO, at different temperatures and for ordered and nanostructured morphologies, showing the performance of the method in different conditions.

  18. First-principles approach to the dynamic magnetoelectric couplings for the non-reciprocal directional dichroism in BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kézsmáki, István; Fishman, Randy S.

    2016-04-01

    Due to the complicated magnetic and crystallographic structures of BiFeO3, its magnetoelectric (ME) couplings and microscopic model Hamiltonian remain poorly understood. By employing a first-principles approach, we uncover all possible ME couplings associated with the spin-current (SC) and exchange-striction (ES) polarizations, and construct an appropriate Hamiltonian for the long-range spin-cycloid in BiFeO3. First-principles calculations are used to understand the microscopic origins of the ME couplings. We find that inversion symmetries broken by ferroelectric and antiferroelectric distortions induce the SC and the ES polarizations, which cooperatively produce the dynamic ME effects in BiFeO3. A model motivated by first principles reproduces the absorption difference of counter-propagating light beams called non-reciprocal directional dichroism. The current paper focuses on the spin-driven (SD) polarizations produced by a dynamic electric field, i.e. the dynamic ME couplings. Due to the inertial properties of Fe, the dynamic SD polarizations differ significantly from the static SD polarizations. Our systematic approach can be generally applied to any multiferroic material, laying the foundation for revealing hidden ME couplings on the atomic scale and for exploiting optical ME effects in the next generation of technological devices such as optical diodes. This manuscript has been written by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan.

  19. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaofan; Tong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation

  20. Dynamic modeling and predictive control in solid oxide fuel cells first principle and data-based approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Biao; Murshed, A K M Monjur

    2012-01-01

    The high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is identified as one of the leading fuel cell technology contenders to capture the energy market in years to come. However, in order to operate as an efficient energy generating system, the SOFC requires an appropriate control system which in turn requires a detailed modelling of process dynamics. Introducting state-of-the-art dynamic modelling, estimation, and control of SOFC systems, this book presents original modelling methods and brand new results as developed by the authors. With comprehensive coverage and bringing together many

  1. Electronic band structure, optical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of cesium chloride (CsCl from first-principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingol Suat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric structural optimization, electronic band structure, total density of states for valence electrons, density of states for phonons, optical, dynamical, and thermodynamical features of cesium chloride have been investigated by linearized augmented plane wave method using the density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation. Ground state properties of cesium chloride are studied. The calculated ground state properties are consistent with experimental results. Calculated band structure indicates that the cesium chloride structure has an indirect band gap value of 5.46 eV and is an insulator. From the obtained phonon spectra, the cesium chloride structure is dynamically stable along the various directions in the Brillouin zone. Temperature dependent thermodynamic properties are studied using the harmonic approximation model.

  2. High-pressure lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of zinc-blende BN from first-principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huanyou; Xu Hui; Wang Xianchun; Jiang Chunzhi

    2009-01-01

    The density function perturbation theory (DFPT) is employed to study the lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties (with quasiharmonic approximation) of zinc-blende BN. First we discuss the structural properties and compare the phonon spectrum with available Raman scattering experiments. Thereafter using the calculated phonon dispersions we obtain the PTV equation of state from the free energy. Our results for the above properties are generally speaking in good agreement with experiments and with similar theoretical calculations. Owing to the anharmonic effect at high temperature, the calculated linear thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) are low to experimental data.

  3. Lattice dynamics, thermodynamics and elastic properties of C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuan-Kai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shi, Siqi, E-mail: sqshi@shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shen, Jian-Yun [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Shang, Shun-Li [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Yao, Mei-Yi, E-mail: yaomeiyi@shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Zi-Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Since Zr-Fe-Sn is one of the key ternary systems for cladding and structural materials in nuclear industry, it is of significant importance to understand physicochemical properties related to Zr-Fe-Sn system. In order to design the new Zr alloys with advanced performance by CALPHAD method, the thermodynamic model for the lower order systems is required. In the present work, first-principles calculations are employed to obtain phonon, thermodynamic and elastic properties of Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} with C22 structure and the end-members (C22-Zr{sub 6}FeFe{sub 2}, C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnFe{sub 2}) in the model of (Zr){sub 6}(Fe, Sn){sub 2}(Fe, Sn){sub 1}. It is found that the imaginary phonon modes are absent for C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2}, indicating they are dynamically stable, while the other two end-members are unstable. Gibbs energies of C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2} and C22-Zr{sub 6}SnSn{sub 2} are obtained from the quasiharmonic phonon approach and can be added in the thermodynamic database: Nuclearbase. The C22-Zr{sub 6}FeSn{sub 2}’s single-crystal elasticity tensor components along with polycrystalline bulk, shear and Young’s moduli are computed with a least-squares approach based upon the stress tensor computed from first-principles method. The results indicate that distortion is more difficult in the directions normal the c-axis than along to it.

  4. First-principles calculations of dynamical and thermodynamic properties of cuprite doped with silver (Cu2(1‑x)Ag2xO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musari, A. A.; Joubert, D. P.; Adebayo, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    Cuprite (Cu2O) is a solid mineral and a compound whose simplicity of preparation, non toxic nature, low band gap and its abundance has made it a prospective candidate for the realisation of low cost photovoltaic applications. The present work successfully dopes Cuprite with Ag ({{{Cu}}}2(1-{{x})}{{{Ag}}}2{{x}}{{O}}) at different concentrations x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1, their first-principle calculations of their electronic, dynamical and thermodynamic properties have been investigated extensively within the generalised gradient approximation. Direct band gap energies at {{Γ }} are predicted for all the studied systems. A small bowing parameter for lattice constants ba and bulk modulus bB of 0.4245 \\mathring{{A}} and 0.8747 GPa were obtained when compared to Vegard’s law. The results of phonon dispersion when x = 0 and 1 indicate stability, these agree with available theoretical and experimental results while negative frequencies observed along the Brillouin zone for the doped systems when x = 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 imply that they are dynamically unstable. The thermodynamic properties between 0 to 800 K were determined using the calculated phonon density of states within the harmonic approximation and the values of the specific heat capacity at constant volume at ambient temperature and the temperature at which lattice vibrations and thermal motion of electrons contribute to the constant volume specific heat capacity are presented for all the systems.

  5. First-principles dynamics treatment of light emission in collisions between alkali-metal atom and noble-gas atom collisions at 10keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B.; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A.

    2006-12-01

    Collision-induced light emission during the interaction of an alkali-metal atom and a noble-gas atom is treated within a first-principles, or direct, dynamics approach that calculates a time-dependent electric dipole for the whole system, and spectral emission cross sections from its Fourier transform. These cross sections are very sensitive to excited diatomic potentials and a source of information on their shape. The coupling between electronic transitions and nuclear motions is treated with atomic pseudopotentials and an electronic density matrix coupled to trajectories for the nuclei. A recently implemented pseudopotential parametrization scheme is used here for the ground and excited states of the LiHe system, and to calculate state-to-state dipole moments. To verify the accuracy of our new parameters, we recalculate the integral cross sections for the LiHe system in the keV energy regime and obtain agreement with other results from theory and experiment. We further present results for the emission spectrum from 10keV Li(2s)+He collisions, and compare them to experimental values available in the region of light emitted at 300-900nm .

  6. The structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of chalcopyrite semiconductor BeGeAs{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, Yasemin Oe. [Gazi University Teknikokullar, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Evecen, Meryem; Aldirmaz, Emine [Amasya University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Amasya (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    First-principles calculations for the structural, elastic, electronic and vibrational properties of BeGeAs{sub 2} with chalcopyrite structure have been reported in the frame work of the density functional theory. The calculated ground state properties are in good agreement with the available data. By considering the electronic band structure and electronic density of states calculation, it is found that this compound is a semiconductor which confirmed the previous work. Single-crystal elastic constants and related properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, shear modulus and bulk modulus have been predicted using the stress-finite strain technique. It can be seen from the calculated elastic constants that this compound is mechanically stable in the chalcopyrite structure. Pressure dependences of elastic constants and band gap are also reported. Finally, the phonon dispersion curves and total and partial density of states were calculated and discussed. The calculated phonon frequencies BeGeAs{sub 2} are positive, indicating the dynamical stability of the studied compound. (orig.)

  7. First-principles quantum molecular calculations of structural and mechanical properties of TiN/SiNx heterostructures, and the achievable hardness of the nc-TiN/SiNx nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, V.I.; Veprek, S.; Argon, A.S.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Gorb, L.; Hill, F.; Leszczynski, J.

    2015-01-01

    TiN/SiN x heterostructures with one monolayer of the interfacial SiN x have been investigated in the framework of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations in the temperature range of 0 to 1400 K with subsequent static relaxation. The atomic configurations, thermal stability and stress–strain relations have been calculated. Among the heterostructures studied, only the TiN(111)/SiN/TiN(111) and TiN(111)/Si 2 N 3 /TiN(111) ones are thermally stable. Upon tensile load, decohesion occurs between the Ti−N bonds adjacent to the SiN x interfacial layer for TiN(001)/SiN/TiN(001) and TiN(111)/Si 2 N 3 /TiN(111) heterostructures, and inside the TiN slab for TiN(001)/Si 3 N 4 /TiN(001) and TiN(110)/SiN/TiN(110) ones. Upon shear, failure occurs in TiN near the interfaces in all the heterostructures, except for the TiN(001)/Si 3 N 4 /TiN(001) one, for which the plastic flow occurs inside the TiN slab. Based on these results we estimate the maximum achievable hardness of nc-TiN/Si 3 N 4 nanocomposites free of impurities to be about 170 GPa. - Highlights: • Interface stability in TiN/SiN x heterostructures at T ≤ 1400 K is studied by quantum molecular dynamics. • Ideal decohesion and shear strengths of the heterostructures have been calculated. • Achievable hardness of nc-TiN/Si 3 N 4 -like nanocomposites of about 170 GPa is calculated. • Experimentally achieved lower hardness is limited by flaws, such as oxygen impurities

  8. First-principles quantum molecular calculations of structural and mechanical properties of TiN/SiN{sub x} heterostructures, and the achievable hardness of the nc-TiN/SiN{sub x} nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivashchenko, V.I., E-mail: ivash@ipms.kiev.ua [Institute of Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Krzhyzhanosky Str. 3, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Veprek, S., E-mail: stan.veprek@lrz.tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Argon, A.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Turchi, P.E.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (L-352), P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gorb, L. [Badger Technical Services, LLC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Hill, F. [U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Leszczynski, J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    TiN/SiN{sub x} heterostructures with one monolayer of the interfacial SiN{sub x} have been investigated in the framework of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations in the temperature range of 0 to 1400 K with subsequent static relaxation. The atomic configurations, thermal stability and stress–strain relations have been calculated. Among the heterostructures studied, only the TiN(111)/SiN/TiN(111) and TiN(111)/Si{sub 2}N{sub 3}/TiN(111) ones are thermally stable. Upon tensile load, decohesion occurs between the Ti−N bonds adjacent to the SiN{sub x} interfacial layer for TiN(001)/SiN/TiN(001) and TiN(111)/Si{sub 2}N{sub 3}/TiN(111) heterostructures, and inside the TiN slab for TiN(001)/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/TiN(001) and TiN(110)/SiN/TiN(110) ones. Upon shear, failure occurs in TiN near the interfaces in all the heterostructures, except for the TiN(001)/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/TiN(001) one, for which the plastic flow occurs inside the TiN slab. Based on these results we estimate the maximum achievable hardness of nc-TiN/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites free of impurities to be about 170 GPa. - Highlights: • Interface stability in TiN/SiN{sub x} heterostructures at T ≤ 1400 K is studied by quantum molecular dynamics. • Ideal decohesion and shear strengths of the heterostructures have been calculated. • Achievable hardness of nc-TiN/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-like nanocomposites of about 170 GPa is calculated. • Experimentally achieved lower hardness is limited by flaws, such as oxygen impurities.

  9. Disordered crystals from first principles I: Quantifying the configuration space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Thomas D.; Prodan, Emil

    2018-04-01

    This work represents the first chapter of a project on the foundations of first-principle calculations of the electron transport in crystals at finite temperatures. We are interested in the range of temperatures, where most electronic components operate, that is, room temperature and above. The aim is a predictive first-principle formalism that combines ab-initio molecular dynamics and a finite-temperature Kubo-formula for homogeneous thermodynamic phases. The input for this formula is the ergodic dynamical system (Ω , G , dP) defining the thermodynamic crystalline phase, where Ω is the configuration space for the atomic degrees of freedom, G is the space group acting on Ω and dP is the ergodic Gibbs measure relative to the G-action. The present work develops an algorithmic method for quantifying (Ω , G , dP) from first principles. Using the silicon crystal as a working example, we find the Gibbs measure to be extremely well characterized by a multivariate normal distribution, which can be quantified using a small number of parameters. The latter are computed at various temperatures and communicated in the form of a table. Using this table, one can generate large and accurate thermally-disordered atomic configurations to serve, for example, as input for subsequent simulations of the electronic degrees of freedom.

  10. Interplay of stereoelectronic and enviromental effects in tuning the structural and magnetic properties of a prototypical spin probe: further insights from a first principle dynamical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Michele; Cimino, Paola; De Angelis, Filippo; Barone, Vincenzo

    2006-04-05

    The nitrogen isotropic hyperfine coupling constant (hcc) and the g tensor of a prototypical spin probe (di-tert-butyl nitroxide, DTBN) in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of an integrated computational approach including Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical calculations involving a discrete-continuum embedding. The quantitative agreement between computed and experimental parameters fully validates our integrated approach. Decoupling of the structural, dynamical, and environmental contributions acting onto the spectral observables allows an unbiased judgment of the role played by different effects in determining the overall experimental observables and highlights the importance of finite-temperature vibrational averaging. Together with their intrinsic interest, our results pave the route toward more reliable interpretations of EPR parameters of complex systems of biological and technological relevance.

  11. First-principles calculations of novel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifeng

    Computational material simulation is becoming more and more important as a branch of material science. Depending on the scale of the systems, there are many simulation methods, i.e. first-principles calculation (or ab-initio), molecular dynamics, mesoscale methods and continuum methods. Among them, first-principles calculation, which involves density functional theory (DFT) and based on quantum mechanics, has become to be a reliable tool in condensed matter physics. DFT is a single-electron approximation in solving the many-body problems. Intrinsically speaking, both DFT and ab-initio belong to the first-principles calculation since the theoretical background of ab-initio is Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and both are aimed at solving the Schrodinger equation of the many-body system using the self-consistent field (SCF) method and calculating the ground state properties. The difference is that DFT introduces parameters either from experiments or from other molecular dynamic (MD) calculations to approximate the expressions of the exchange-correlation terms. The exchange term is accurately calculated but the correlation term is neglected in HF. In this dissertation, DFT based first-principles calculations were performed for all the novel materials and interesting materials introduced. Specifically, the DFT theory together with the rationale behind related properties (e.g. electronic, optical, defect, thermoelectric, magnetic) are introduced in Chapter 2. Starting from Chapter 3 to Chapter 5, several representative materials were studied. In particular, a new semiconducting oxytelluride, Ba2TeO is studied in Chapter 3. Our calculations indicate a direct semiconducting character with a band gap value of 2.43 eV, which agrees well with the optical experiment (˜ 2.93 eV). Moreover, the optical and defects properties of Ba2TeO are also systematically investigated with a view to understanding its potential as an optoelectronic or transparent conducting material. We find

  12. Doping of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metals in covalent-organic frameworks for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations and molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jianhui; Cao, Dapeng; Wang, Wenchuan; Smit, Berend

    2010-07-27

    We use the multiscale simulation approach, which combines the first-principles calculations and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, to comprehensively study the doping of a series of alkali (Li, Na, and K), alkaline-earth (Be, Mg, and Ca), and transition (Sc and Ti) metals in nanoporous covalent organic frameworks (COFs), and the effects of the doped metals on CO2 capture. The results indicate that, among all the metals studied, Li, Sc, and Ti can bind with COFs stably, while Be, Mg, and Ca cannot, because the binding of Be, Mg, and Ca with COFs is very weak. Furthermore, Li, Sc, and Ti can improve the uptakes of CO2 in COFs significantly. However, the binding energy of a CO2 molecule with Sc and Ti exceeds the lower limit of chemisorptions and, thus, suffers from the difficulty of desorption. By the comparative studies above, it is found that Li is the best surface modifier of COFs for CO2 capture among all the metals studied. Therefore, we further investigate the uptakes of CO2 in the Li-doped COFs. Our simulation results show that at 298 K and 1 bar, the excess CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 409 and 344 mg/g, which are about eight and four times those in the nondoped ones, respectively. As the pressure increases to 40 bar, the CO2 uptakes of the Li-doped COF-102 and COF-105 reach 1349 and 2266 mg/g at 298 K, respectively, which are among the reported highest scores to date. In summary, doping of metals in porous COFs provides an efficient approach for enhancing CO2 capture.

  13. Influence of the van der Waals interaction in the dissociation dynamics of N{sub 2} on W(110) from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Gondre, L. [Institut UTINAM-CNRS UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Juaristi, J. I. [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Blanco-Rey, M. [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Díez Muiño, R.; Alducin, M. [Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián (Spain)

    2015-02-21

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations, we investigate the role of the van der Waals (vdW) interaction in the dissociative adsorption of N{sub 2} on W(110). Hitherto, existing classical dynamics calculations performed on six-dimensional potential energy surfaces based on density functional theory (DFT), and the semi-local PW91 and RPBE [Hammer et al. Phys. Rev. B 59, 7413 (1999)] exchange-correlation functionals were unable to fully describe the dependence of the initial sticking coefficient on the molecular beam incidence conditions as found in experiments. N{sub 2} dissociation on W(110) was shown to be very sensitive not only to short molecule-surface distances but also to large distances where the vdW interaction, not included in semilocal-DFT, should dominate. In this work, we perform a systematic study on the dissociative adsorption using a selection of existing non-local functionals that include the vdW interaction (vdW-functionals). Clearly, the inclusion of the non-local correlation term contributes in all cases to correct the unrealistic energy barriers that were identified in the RPBE at large molecule-surface distances. Among the tested vdW-functionals, the original vdW-DF by Dion et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] and the ulterior vdW-DF2 give also an adequate description of the N{sub 2} adsorption energy and energy barrier at the transition state, i.e., of the properties that are commonly used to verify the quality of any exchange-correlation functional. However, the results of our AIMD calculations, which are performed at different incidence conditions and hence extensively probe the multi-configurational potential energy surface of the system, do not seem as satisfactory as the preliminary static analysis suggested. When comparing the obtained dissociation probabilities with existing experimental data, none of the used vdW-functionals seems to provide altogether an adequate description of the N{sub 2}/W(110) interaction at

  14. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H., E-mail: shmushrif@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2015-05-14

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu{sub n} where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH{sub 3} and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH{sub x} (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH{sub x} have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  15. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-01-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu n where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH 3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH x (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH x have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters

  16. First-principles study of the electronic transport properties in (GaAs)n (n=2–4) nanocluster-based molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Daoli; Xu, Yuanlan; Zhang, Jianbing; Miao, Xiangshui

    2012-01-01

    In this program the geometric structures and electronic transport properties of a series of (GaAs) n (n=2,3,4) clusters are comparatively studied using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) combined with density functional theory (DFT). It is find that all the GaAs nanocluster-based molecular junctions show metallic behavior at low biases ([−2 V,2 V]) while negative differential resistance (NDR) appears at a certain high bias range. Our calculation shows that the current of (GaAs) 3 nanocluster-based molecular junction is almost the smallest at any bias. The mechanisms of the current–voltage characteristics of all the three molecular junctions are proposed.

  17. Credibility is the first principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beecher, William

    2002-01-01

    The first principle of an effective public affairs program on nuclear energy is credibility. If credibility is lacking, no matter how artful the message, it will not be persuasive. There has long been a problem in the United States. For years much of the industry followed the practice, when there was an event at a nuclear power plant that resulted in an unplanned release of radioactivity, to tell the public there was 'no release' if in fact the release was below the technical specifications of what the NRC mandates as being safe. The NRC is a safety regulator. It can tell nuclear power plant operators what to do, or not do, when it comes to safety, but doesn't have the right to tell them what to say to the public. The example of an emergency exercise and the NRC press release on that occasion showed the direction how companies could be influenced to behave in order to prevent such avoidably negative news coverage, i.e. attaining credibility when public anxiety is concerned

  18. B40 fullerene as a highly sensitive molecular device for NH3 detection at low bias: a first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bin; Dong, Huilong; Du, Chunmiao; Hou, Tingjun; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of small molecules (NH 3 , N 2 , H 2 and CH 4 ) on all-boron fullerene B 40 is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) for its potential application in the field of single-molecular gas sensors. The high adsorption energies (−1.09 to −0.75 eV) of NH 3 on different adsorption sites of the B 40 surface indicate that NH 3 strongly chemisorbs to B 40 . The charge transfer induced by the NH 3 adsorption results in a modification of the density of states (DOS) of B 40 near the Fermi level, and therefore changes its electronic transport properties. For all possible adsorption sites, the adsorption of NH 3 exclusively leads to a decrease of the conductance of B 40 . Taking into consideration that the non-polar gas molecules (e.g. N 2 , H 2 and CH 4 ) are only physisorbed and show negligible effect on the conductance properties of B 40 , we would expect that B 40 can be used as a single-molecular gas sensor to distinguish NH 3 from non-polar gas molecules at low bias. (paper)

  19. First Principles Based Reactive Atomistic Simulations to Understand the Effects of Molecular Hypervelocity Impact on Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, A.; Cheng, M-J; Cvicek, V.; Beegle, Luther W.; Hodyss, R.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the predicted impact of species such as ice-water, CO2, CH4, and NH3, on oxidized titanium, as well as HC species on diamond surfaces. These simulations provide the dynamics of product distributions during and after a hypervelocity impact event, ionization fractions, and dissociation probabilities for the various species of interest as a function of impact velocity (energy). We are using these results to determine the relevance of the fragmentation process to Cassini INMS results, and to quantify its effects on the observed spectra.

  20. Structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, F. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio (USA)); Chiarotti, G.L. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi del Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Padriciano 99, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)); Car, R. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Institut Romard de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Parrinello, M. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1991-09-15

    We have generated a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and provide new insight into the microscopic structure of this material. The calculation lends support to models in which monohydride complexes are prevalent, and indicates a strong tendency of hydrogen to form small clusters.

  1. Semiclassical universe from first principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2004-01-01

    Causal Dynamical Triangulations in four dimensions provide a backgroundindependent definition of the sum over space-time geometries in nonperturbative quantum gravity. We show that the macroscopic four-dimensional world which emerges in the Euclidean sector of this theory is a bounce which

  2. Pressure dependence of elastic and dynamical properties of zinc-blende ZnS and ZnSe from first principle calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Y. Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The density-functional theory (DFT and density-functional perturbation theory (DFPT are employed to study the pressure dependence of elastic and dynamical properties of zinc-blende ZnS and ZnSe. The calculated elastic constants and phonon spectra from 0 GPa to 15 GPa are compared with the available experimental data. Generally, our calculated values are overestimated with experimental data, but agree well with recent other theoretical values. The discrepancies with experimental data are due to the use of local density approximation (LDA and effect of temperature. In this work, in order to compare with experimental data, we calculated and discussed the pressure derivatives of elastic constants, the pressure dependence of dynamical effect charge, and mode Grüneisen parameter at Γ.

  3. Semiclassical universe from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjorn, J.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2005-01-01

    Causal dynamical triangulations in four dimensions provide a background-independent definition of the sum over space-time geometries in non-perturbative quantum gravity. We show that the macroscopic four-dimensional world which emerges in the Euclidean sector of this theory is a bounce which satisfies a semiclassical equation. After integrating out all degrees of freedom except for a global scale factor, we obtain the ground state wave function of the universe as a function of this scale factor

  4. The Structural, Dielectric, Lattice Dynamical and Thermodynamic Properties of Zinc-Blende CdX (X=S, Se, Te) from First-Principles Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shi-Quan; Li Jun-Yu; Cheng Xin-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The structural, dielectric, lattice dynamical and thermodynamic properties of zinc-blende CdX (X=S, Se, Te) are studied by using a plane-wave pseudopotential method within the density-functional theory. Our calculated lattice constants and bulk modulus are compared with the published experimental and theoretical data. In addition, the Born effective charges, electronic dielectric tensors, phonon frequencies, and longitudinal optical-transverse optical splitting are calculated by the linear-response approach. Some of the characteristics of the phonon-dispersion curves for zinc-blende CdX (X=S, Se, Te) are summarized. What is more, based on the lattice dynamical properties, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of CdX (X=S, Se, Te) and analyze the temperature dependences of the Helmholtz free energy F, the internal energy E, the entropy S and the constant-volume specific heat C_v. The results show that the heat capacities for CdTe, CdSe, and CdS approach approximately to the Petit-Dulong limit 6R. (paper)

  5. First-principles investigations on structural, elastic, dynamical, and thermal properties of earth-abundant nitride semiconductor CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ying-Qin; Liu, Lei; Cheng, Yan [Sichuan Univ. (China). College of Physical Science and Technology; Hu, Cui E. [Chongqing Normal Univ. (China). College of Physics and Electronic Engineering; Cai, Ling-Cang [CAEP, Mianyang (China). National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research

    2017-04-01

    We presented a detailed first-principal calculation to study the structural, elastic, dynamical, and thermal properties of a new synthetic ternary zinc nitride semiconductors CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} using the generalised gradient approximation (GGA) method. The obtained lattice parameters of CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} at 0 K and 0 GPa are in good agreement with the experimental data and other theoretical findings. The pressure dependences of the elastic constants C{sub ij} together with other derived mechanical properties of CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} compound have also been systematically investigated. The results reveal that CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} is mechanically stable up to 20 GPa. The calculated the phonon curves and phonon density of states under different pressures indicate that the CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} compound maintains its dynamical stability up to 20 GPa. An analysis in terms of the irreducible representations of group theory obtained the optical vibration modes of this system, and we obtained the frequencies of the optical vibrational modes at Γ points together with the atoms that contributed to these vibrations of CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2}. Meanwhile, the pressure dependencies of the frequencies Raman-active and IR-active modes at 0-20 GPa have been studied. The quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) was applied to calculate the thermal properties of CaZn{sub 2}N{sub 2} as functions of pressures and temperatures such as the heat capacity, thermal expansions, the entropy, and Grueneisen parameter γ.

  6. Liquid Water from First Principles: Validation of Different Sampling Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, C J; Kuo, W; Siepmann, J; McGrath, M J; Vondevondele, J; Sprik, M; Hutter, J; Parrinello, M; Mohamed, F; Krack, M; Chen, B; Klein, M

    2004-05-20

    A series of first principles molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for liquid water to assess the validity and reproducibility of different sampling approaches. These simulations include Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations using the program CPMD with different values of the fictitious electron mass in the microcanonical and canonical ensembles, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics using the programs CPMD and CP2K in the microcanonical ensemble, and Metropolis Monte Carlo using CP2K in the canonical ensemble. With the exception of one simulation for 128 water molecules, all other simulations were carried out for systems consisting of 64 molecules. It is found that the structural and thermodynamic properties of these simulations are in excellent agreement with each other as long as adiabatic sampling is maintained in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations either by choosing a sufficiently small fictitious mass in the microcanonical ensemble or by Nos{acute e}-Hoover thermostats in the canonical ensemble. Using the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Troullier-Martins or Goedecker-Teter-Hutter pseudopotentials, simulations at a fixed density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and a temperature close to 315 K yield a height of the first peak in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function of about 3.0, a classical constant-volume heat capacity of about 70 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, and a self-diffusion constant of about 0.1 Angstroms{sup 2}/ps.

  7. GPU based acceleration of first principles calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, H; Tsumuraya, K; Aoki, M; Iitaka, T

    2010-01-01

    We present a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated simulations of first principles electronic structure calculations. The FFT, which is the most time-consuming part, is about 10 times accelerated. As the result, the total computation time of a first principles calculation is reduced to 15 percent of that of the CPU.

  8. Lattice dynamics, phase transition, and tunable fundamental band gap of photovoltaic (K,Ba)(Ni,Nb)O3 -δ ceramics from spectral measurements and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanqian; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yuyun; Jiang, Kai; Gong, Shijing; Hu, Zhigao; Zhou, Zhiyong; Dong, Xianlin; Chu, Junhao

    2018-03-01

    Ferroelectrics have long been recognized as one of the candidate class of materials for applications in photovoltaic devices. Recently, ferroelectric perovskite (K,Ba) (Ni,Nb) O3 -δ has been successfully synthesized and demonstrated to have a near-optimal band gap (1.39 eV), exhibiting good photovoltaic performance. However, the connection between the structural order-disorder transformation, electronic structure, bulk photovoltaic, and photocatalytic properties remains not well understood. Here, we investigate the phase transition evolutions of lead-free [KNbO3]1-x[BaNi1/2Nb1/2O3 -δ] x (KBNNO x , x =0 -0.5 ) ceramics via x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering, and computational evidences. The lattice dynamics and the origin of the successive rhombohedral→orthorhombic→tetragonal→cubic phase transitions have been systemically explored based on temperature-dependent XRD peak positions and phonon modes under different geometries. Moreover, the differences in the phase transition temperature and interior structure between the solid solution x =0.2 and the end member x =0 highlight local and nonlocal characteristics, which are helpful for understanding the photovoltaic mechanisms. Additionally, the robust photocatalytic decoloration effect on methylene blue can further confirm the photon-generated carrier behavior in the partly structural disordered orthorhombic phase. This identification of structural phases, combined with the ability to perform photocatalytic decoloration, give some insights on promising oxide applications as semiconducting ferroelectric absorbers and carrier-separating layers in photocatalytic or photovoltaic devices.

  9. A first-principles study of phase transitions in ultrathin films of BaTiO 3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We determine the effects of film thickness, epitaxial strain and the nature of electrodes on ferroelectric phase transitions in ultrathin films of BaTiO3 using a first-principles effective Hamiltonian in classical molecular dynamics simulations. We present results for polarization and dielectric properties as a function of temperature ...

  10. Monolayer II-VI semiconductors: A first-principles prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Chen, Nian-Ke; Zhang, S. B.; Li, Xian-Bin

    A systematic study of 32 honeycomb monolayer II-VI semiconductors is carried out by first-principles methods. It appears that BeO, MgO, CaO, ZnO, CdO, CaS, SrS, SrSe, BaTe, and HgTe honeycomb monolayers have a good dynamic stability which is revealed by phonon calculations. In addition, from the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of other unstable candidates, we also find two extra monolayers dynamically stable, which are tetragonal BaS and orthorhombic HgS. The honeycomb monolayers exist in form of either a planar perfect honeycomb or a low-buckled 2D layer, all of which possess a band gap and most of them are in the ultraviolet region. Interestingly, the dynamically stable SrSe has a gap near visible light, and displays exotic electronic properties with a flat top of the valence band, and hence has a strong spin polarization upon hole doping. The honeycomb HgTe has been reported to achieve a topological nontrivial phase under appropriate in-plane tensile strain and spin-orbital coupling (SOC). Some II-VI partners with less than 5% lattice mismatch may be used to design novel 2D heterojunction devices. If synthesized, potential applications of these 2D II-VI families could include optoelectronics, spintronics, and strong correlated electronics. Distinguished Student (DS) Program of APS FIP travel funds.

  11. Toward control of the metal-organic interfacial electronic structure in molecular electronics: a first-principles study on self-assembled monolayers of pi-conjugated molecules on noble metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Georg; Romaner, Lorenz; Zojer, Egbert; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2007-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organic molecules provide an important tool to tune the work function of electrodes in plastic electronics and significantly improve device performance. Also, the energetic alignment of the frontier molecular orbitals in the SAM with the Fermi energy of a metal electrode dominates charge transport in single-molecule devices. On the basis of first-principles calculations on SAMs of pi-conjugated molecules on noble metals, we provide a detailed description of the mechanisms that give rise to and intrinsically link these interfacial phenomena at the atomic level. The docking chemistry on the metal side of the SAM determines the level alignment, while chemical modifications on the far side provide an additional, independent handle to modify the substrate work function; both aspects can be tuned over several eV. The comprehensive picture established in this work provides valuable guidelines for controlling charge-carrier injection in organic electronics and current-voltage characteristics in single-molecule devices.

  12. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl- + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl-) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  13. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: Multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike self-consistent field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein–Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple S N 2 reaction (Cl − + CH 3 Cl → ClCH 3 + Cl − ) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF

  14. A hybrid framework of first principles molecular orbital calculations and a three-dimensional integral equation theory for molecular liquids: multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike self-consistent field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kentaro; Kasahara, Kento; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi

    2015-07-07

    In this study, we reported the development of a new quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-type framework to describe chemical processes in solution by combining standard molecular-orbital calculations with a three-dimensional formalism of integral equation theory for molecular liquids (multi-center molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MC-MOZ) method). The theoretical procedure is very similar to the 3D-reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) approach. Since the MC-MOZ method is highly parallelized for computation, the present approach has the potential to be one of the most efficient procedures to treat chemical processes in solution. Benchmark tests to check the validity of this approach were performed for two solute (solute water and formaldehyde) systems and a simple SN2 reaction (Cl(-) + CH3Cl → ClCH3 + Cl(-)) in aqueous solution. The results for solute molecular properties and solvation structures obtained by the present approach were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by other hybrid frameworks and experiments. In particular, the results of the proposed approach are in excellent agreements with those of 3D-RISM-SCF.

  15. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING AND FIRST-PRINCIPLES CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, P; Abrikosov, I; Burton, B; Fries, S; Grimvall, G; Kaufman, L; Korzhavyi, P; Manga, R; Ohno, M; Pisch, A; Scott, A; Zhang, W

    2005-12-15

    The increased application of quantum mechanical-based methodologies to the study of alloy stability has required a re-assessment of the field. The focus is mainly on inorganic materials in the solid state. In a first part, after a brief overview of the so-called ab initio methods with their approximations, constraints, and limitations, recommendations are made for a good usage of first-principles codes with a set of qualifiers. Examples are given to illustrate the power and the limitations of ab initio codes. However, despite the ''success'' of these methodologies, thermodynamics of complex multi-component alloys, as used in engineering applications, requires a more versatile approach presently afforded within CALPHAD. Hence, in a second part, the links that presently exist between ab initio methodologies, experiments, and CALPHAD approach are examined with illustrations. Finally, the issues of dynamical instability and of the role of lattice vibrations that still constitute the subject of ample discussions within the CALPHAD community are revisited in the light of the current knowledge with a set of recommendations.

  16. First-principles study of point-defect production in Si and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windl, W.; Lenosky, T.J.; Kress, J.D.; Voter, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have calculated the displacement-threshold energy E(d) for point-defect production in Si and SiC using empirical potentials, tight-binding, and first-principles methods. They show that -- depending on the knock-on direction -- 64-atom simulation cells can be sufficient to allow a nearly finite-size-effect-free calculation, thus making the use of first-principles methods possible. They use molecular dynamics (MD) techniques and propose the use of a sudden approximation which agrees reasonably well with the MD results for selected directions and which allows estimates of Ed without employing an MD simulation and the use of computationally demanding first-principles methods. Comparing the results with experiment, the authors find the full self-consistent first-principles method in conjunction with the sudden approximation to be a reliable and easy method to predict E d . Furthermore, they have examined the temperature dependence of E d for C in SiC and found it to be negligible

  17. First principles study of lithium insertion in bulk silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Wenhui; Zhang, Qianfan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-01

    Si is an important anode material for the next generation of Li ion batteries. Here the energetics and dynamics of Li atoms in bulk Si have been studied at different Li concentrations on the basis of first principles calculations. It is found

  18. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  19. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present new results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition...

  20. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  1. Molecular dynamics for fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, H.; Schnack, J.

    2000-02-01

    The time-dependent variational principle for many-body trial states is used to discuss the relation between the approaches of different molecular dynamics models to describe indistinguishable fermions. Early attempts to include effects of the Pauli principle by means of nonlocal potentials as well as more recent models which work with antisymmetrized many-body states are reviewed under these premises. (orig.)

  2. Constructing first-principles phase diagrams of amorphous LixSi using machine-learning-assisted sampling with an evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artrith, Nongnuch; Urban, Alexander; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2018-06-01

    The atomistic modeling of amorphous materials requires structure sizes and sampling statistics that are challenging to achieve with first-principles methods. Here, we propose a methodology to speed up the sampling of amorphous and disordered materials using a combination of a genetic algorithm and a specialized machine-learning potential based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). We show for the example of the amorphous LiSi alloy that around 1000 first-principles calculations are sufficient for the ANN-potential assisted sampling of low-energy atomic configurations in the entire amorphous LixSi phase space. The obtained phase diagram is validated by comparison with the results from an extensive sampling of LixSi configurations using molecular dynamics simulations and a general ANN potential trained to ˜45 000 first-principles calculations. This demonstrates the utility of the approach for the first-principles modeling of amorphous materials.

  3. Analytic representation for first-principles pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, P.K.; Cohen, M.L.; Zunger, A.

    1980-01-01

    The first-principles pseudopotentials developed by Zunger and Cohen are fit with a simple analytic form chosen to model the main physical properties of the potentials. The fitting parameters for the first three rows of the Periodic Table are presented, and the quality of the fit is discussed. The parameters reflect chemical trends of the elements. We find that a minimum of three parameters is required to reproduce the regularities of the Periodic Table. Application of these analytic potentials is also discussed

  4. First principles study of AlBi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrani, B.; Achour, H.; Louhibi, S.; Tebboune, A.; Sekkal, N.

    2008-05-01

    Using the first principles method of the full potential linear augmented plane waves (FPLAPW), the structural and the electronic properties of AlBi are investigated. It is found that this compound has a small and direct semiconducting gap at Γ. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the dependences of the volume, the bulk modulus, the variation of the thermal expansion α, as well as the Debye temperature θ D and the heat capacity C v are successfully obtained in the whole range from 0 to 30 GPa and temperature range from 0 to 1200 K. (author)

  5. Boron Fullerenes: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Szwacki Nevill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA family of unusually stable boron cages was identified and examined using first-principles local-density functional method. The structure of the fullerenes is similar to that of the B12icosahedron and consists of six crossing double-rings. The energetically most stable fullerene is made up of 180 boron atoms. A connection between the fullerene family and its precursors, boron sheets, is made. We show that the most stable boron sheets are not necessarily precursors of very stable boron cages. Our finding is a step forward in the understanding of the structure of the recently produced boron nanotubes.

  6. Unravelling charge carrier dynamics in protonated g-C3N4 interfaced with carbon nanodots as co-catalysts toward enhanced photocatalytic CO2 reduction: A combined experimental and first-principles DFT study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wee-Jun Ong; Lutfi Kurnianditia Putri; Yoong-Chuen Tan; Lling-Lling Tan; Neng Li; Yun Hau Ng; Xiaoming Wen; Siang-Piao Chai

    2017-01-01

    In this work,we demonstrated the successful construction of metal-free zerodimensional/two-dimensional carbon nanodot (CND)-hybridized protonated g-C3N4 (pCN) (CND/pCN) heterojunction photocatalysts by means of electrostatic attraction.We experimentally found that CNDs with an average diameter of 4.4 nm were uniformly distributed on the surface of pCN using electron microscopy analysis.The CND/pCN-3 sample with a CND content of 3 wt.% showed the highest catalytic activity in the CO2 photoreduction process under visible and simulated solar light.Thisprocess results in the evolution of CH4 and CO.The total amounts of CH4 and CO generated by the CND/pCN-3 photocatalyst after 10 h of visible-light activity were found to be 29.23 and 58.82 μmol·gcatalyst-1,respectively.These values were 3.6 and 2.28 times higher,respectively,than the amounts generated when using pCN alone.The corresponding apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) was calculated to be 0.076%.Furthermore,the CND/pCN-3 sample demonstrated high stability and durability after four consecutive photoreaction cycles,with no significant decrease in the catalytic activity.The significant improvement in the photoactivity using CND/pCN-3 was attributed to the synergistic interaction between pCN and CNDs.This synergy allows the effective migration of photoexcited electrons from pCN to CNDs via wellcontacted heterojunction interfaces,which retards the charge recombination.This was confirmed by photoelectrochemical measurements,and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence analyses.The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations were consistent with our experimental results,and showed that the work function of CNDs (5.56 eV) was larger than that of pCN (4.66 eV).This suggests that the efficient shuttling of electrons from the conduction band of pCN to CNDs hampers the recombination of electron-hole pairs.This significantly increased the probability of free charge carriers reducing CO2 to CH4

  7. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  8. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  9. First-principles study of complex material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lixin

    This thesis covers several topics concerning the study of complex materials systems by first-principles methods. It contains four chapters. A brief, introductory motivation of this work will be given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, I will give a short overview of the first-principles methods, including density-functional theory (DFT), planewave pseudopotential methods, and the Berry-phase theory of polarization in crystallines insulators. I then discuss in detail the locality and exponential decay properties of Wannier functions and of related quantities such as the density matrix, and their application in linear-scaling algorithms. In Chapter 3, I investigate the interaction of oxygen vacancies and 180° domain walls in tetragonal PbTiO3 using first-principles methods. Our calculations indicate that the oxygen vacancies have a lower formation energy in the domain wall than in the bulk, thereby confirming the tendency of these defects to migrate to, and pin, the domain walls. The pinning energies are reported for each of the three possible orientations of the original Ti--O--Ti bonds, and attempts to model the results with simple continuum models are discussed. CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) has attracted a lot of attention recently because it was found to have an enormous dielectric response over a very wide temperature range. In Chapter 4, I study the electronic and lattice structure, and the lattice dynamical properties, of this system. Our first-principles calculations together with experimental results point towards an extrinsic mechanism as the origin of the unusual dielectric response.

  10. The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-03-01

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS has been generalized in order to simulate a variety of NONEQUILIBRIUM systems. This generalization has been achieved by adopting microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress. Some of the problems already treated include rapid plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, strong shockwaves simulation, and far-from-equilibrium phase transformations. Continuing advances in technique and in the modeling of interatomic forces, coupled with qualitative improvements in computer hardware, are enabling such simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  11. Obtaining the electrostatic screening from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaviv, N.J.; Shaviv, G.

    2003-01-01

    We derive the electrostatic screening effect from first principles and show the basic properties of the screening process. We in particular show that under the conditions prevailing in the Sun the number of particles in the Debye sphere is of the order of unity. Consequently; fluctuations play a dominant role in the screening process. The fluctuations lead to an effective time dependent potential. Particles with low kinetic energy lose on the average energy to the plasma and vice versa with high energy particles. We derive general conditions on the screening energy and show under what conditions the Salpeter approximation is obtained. The connection between the screening and relaxation processes in the plasma is exposed

  12. Primordial Black Holes from First Principles (Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Casey; Bloomfield, Jolyon; Moss, Zander; Russell, Megan; Face, Stephen; Guth, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Given a power spectrum from inflation, our goal is to calculate, from first principles, the number density and mass spectrum of primordial black holes that form in the early universe. Previously, these have been calculated using the Press- Schechter formalism and some demonstrably dubious rules of thumb regarding predictions of black hole collapse. Instead, we use Monte Carlo integration methods to sample field configurations from a power spectrum combined with numerical relativity simulations to obtain a more accurate picture of primordial black hole formation. We demonstrate how this can be applied for both Gaussian perturbations and the more interesting (for primordial black holes) theory of hybrid inflation. One of the tools that we employ is a variant of the BBKS formalism for computing the statistics of density peaks in the early universe. We discuss the issue of overcounting due to subpeaks that can arise from this approach (the ``cloud-in-cloud'' problem). MIT UROP Office- Paul E. Gray (1954) Endowed Fund.

  13. First principles pharmacokinetic modeling: A quantitative study on Cyclosporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mošat', Andrej; Lueshen, Eric; Heitzig, Martina

    2013-01-01

    renal and hepatic clearances, elimination half-life, and mass transfer coefficients, to establish drug biodistribution dynamics in all organs and tissues. This multi-scale model satisfies first principles and conservation of mass, species and momentum.Prediction of organ drug bioaccumulation...... as a function of cardiac output, physiology, pathology or administration route may be possible with the proposed PBPK framework. Successful application of our model-based drug development method may lead to more efficient preclinical trials, accelerated knowledge gain from animal experiments, and shortened time-to-market...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs

  15. First principles studies of multiferroic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Ederer, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Multiferroics, materials where spontaneous long-range magnetic and dipolar orders coexist, represent an attractive class of compounds, which combine rich and fascinating fundamental physics with a technologically appealing potential for applications in the general area of spintronics. Ab initio calculations have significantly contributed to recent progress in this area, by elucidating different mechanisms for multiferroicity and providing essential information on various compounds where these effects are manifestly at play. In particular, here we present examples of density-functional theory investigations for two main classes of materials: (a) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by hybridization or purely structural effects, with BiFeO 3 as the prototype material, and (b) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by correlation effects and is strongly linked to electronic degrees of freedom such as spin-, charge-, or orbital-ordering, with rare-earth manganites as prototypes. As for the first class of multiferroics, first principles calculations are shown to provide an accurate qualitative and quantitative description of the physics in BiFeO 3 , ranging from the prediction of large ferroelectric polarization and weak ferromagnetism, over the effect of epitaxial strain, to the identification of possible scenarios for coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic order. For the second class of multiferroics, ab initio calculations have shown that, in those cases where spin-ordering breaks inversion symmetry (e.g. in antiferromagnetic E-type HoMnO 3 ), the magnetically induced ferroelectric polarization can be as large as a few μC cm -2 . The examples presented point the way to several possible avenues for future research: on the technological side, first principles simulations can contribute to a rational materials design, aimed at identifying spintronic materials that exhibit ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at or above room temperature. On the

  16. Towards a mulitphase equation of state of Carbon from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Alfredo; Benedict, Lorin; Schwegler, Eric

    2007-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculation had become one of the most useful tools to investigate properties of materials. Unfortunately these atomistic detailed results are rarely reused in calculations at a higher level of description, such as fluid dynamics and finite elements calculations. In this talk we present a concrete example showing the way that first principles results can be expressed in a way that is useful for hydrodynamics calculations, in particular we show how to build a analytic equation of state for Carbon that involves solid (diamond and BC8) and liquid phases. Applications of this newly obtained equation of state will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  17. First principle study of sodium decorated graphyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Utpal, E-mail: utpalchemiitkgp@yahoo.com [Assam University, Silchar (India); Bhattacharya, Barnali [Assam University, Silchar (India); Seriani, Nicola [The Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • Presence of Na decreases the stability of the system. • Na-decorated graphyne compounds are metallic and might be used in electronics. • The sodium-adsorbed graphyne can be used as electrodes in Na-ion battery. - Abstract: We present first-principles calculations of the electronic properties of Na-decorated graphyne. This structure of the graphyne family is a direct band gap semiconductor with a band gap of 0.44 eV in absence of sodium, but Na-decorated graphyne compounds are metallic, and can then be employed as carbon-based conductors. Metallization is due to charge donation from sodium to carbon. Pristine graphyne is more stable than Na-decorated graphyne, therefore is seems probable that, if this material should be employed as electrode in Na-ion batteries, it would lead to the formation of metallic sodium rather than well dispersed sodium ions. On the other side, this property might be useful if graphyne is employed in water desalination. Finally, the abrupt change from a semiconducting to a metallic state in presence of a small amount of sodium might be exploited in electronics, e.g. for the production of smooth metal–semiconductor interfaces through spatially selective deposition of sodium.

  18. Phases of Ca from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, S L; Marcus, P M

    2009-01-01

    Structures and properties of many of the phases of Ca under pressure are calculated from first principles by a systematic procedure that minimizes total energy E with respect to structure under the constraint of constant volume V. The minima of E are followed on successive sweeps of lattice parameters for 11 of 14 Bravais symmetries for one-atom-per-cell structures. The structures include the four orthorhombic phases. Also included are the hexagonal close-packed and cubic diamond phases with two atoms per primitive cell. No uniquely orthorhombic phases are found; all one-atom orthorhombic phases over a mega-bar pressure range are identical to higher-symmetry phases. The simple cubic phase is shown to be stable where it is the ground state. The number of distinct one-atom phases reduces to five plus the two two-atom phases. For each of these phases the Gibbs free energy at pressure p, G(p), is calculated for a non-vibrating lattice; the functions G(p) give the ground state at each p, the relative stabilities of all phases and the thermodynamic phase transition pressures for all phase transitions over a several-megabar range.

  19. Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI) Cost Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Mary Alice

    2010-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) began operating Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) under the Safeguards First Principle Initiative (SFPI), a risk-based and cost-effective program, in December 2006. The NTS SFPI Comprehensive Assessment of Safeguards Systems (COMPASS) Model is made up of specific elements (MC and A plan, graded safeguards, accounting systems, measurements, containment, surveillance, physical inventories, shipper/receiver differences, assessments/performance tests) and various sub-elements, which are each assigned effectiveness and contribution factors that when weighted and rated reflect the health of the MC and A program. The MC and A Cost Model, using an Excel workbook, calculates budget and/or actual costs using these same elements/sub-elements resulting in total costs and effectiveness costs per element/sub-element. These calculations allow management to identify how costs are distributed for each element/sub-element. The Cost Model, as part of the SFPI program review process, enables management to determine if spending is appropriate for each element/sub-element.

  20. First-principles calculations of mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Karthik

    First-principles calculations can be a powerful predictive tool for studying, modeling and understanding the fundamental scattering mechanisms impacting carrier transport in materials. In the past, calculations have provided important qualitative insights, but numerical accuracy has been limited due to computational challenges. In this talk, we will discuss some of the challenges involved in calculating electron-phonon scattering and carrier mobility, and outline approaches to overcome them. Topics will include the limitations of models for electron-phonon interaction, the importance of grid sampling, and the use of Gaussian smearing to replace energy-conserving delta functions. Using prototypical examples of oxides that are of technological importance-SrTiO3, BaSnO3, Ga2O3, and WO3-we will demonstrate computational approaches to overcome these challenges and improve the accuracy. One approach that leads to a distinct improvement in the accuracy is the use of analytic functions for the band dispersion, which allows for an exact solution of the energy-conserving delta function. For select cases, we also discuss direct quantitative comparisons with experimental results. The computational approaches and methodologies discussed in the talk are general and applicable to other materials, and greatly improve the numerical accuracy of the calculated transport properties, such as carrier mobility, conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. This work was performed in collaboration with B. Himmetoglu, Y. Kang, W. Wang, A. Janotti and C. G. Van de Walle, and supported by the LEAST Center, the ONR EXEDE MURI, and NSF.

  1. The density functional theory and the charged fluid molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Zerah, G.

    1993-01-01

    Car and Parrinello had the idea of combining the density functional theory (Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham) to the 'molecular dynamics' numerical modelling method, in order to simulate metallic or co-valent solids and liquids from the first principles. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified version of this method ab initio, applicable to classical and quantal charged systems. The method is illustrated with recent results on charged colloidal suspensions and highly correlated electron-proton plasmas. 1 fig., 21 refs

  2. Adsorption of organic molecules on mineral surfaces studied by first-principle calculations: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Yang, Yong; Shu, Xin; Wang, Yanwei; Ran, Qianping

    2018-04-09

    First-principle calculations, especially by the density functional theory (DFT) methods, are becoming a power technique to study molecular structure and properties of organic/inorganic interfaces. This review introduces some recent examples on the study of adsorption models of organic molecules or oligomers on mineral surfaces and interfacial properties obtained from first-principles calculations. The aim of this contribution is to inspire scientists to benefit from first-principle calculations and to apply the similar strategies when studying and tailoring interfacial properties at the atomistic scale, especially for those interested in the design and development of new molecules and new products. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Novel Natural Convection Heat Sink Design Concepts From First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES by Derek E. Fletcher June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Garth Hobson Second Reader...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NOVEL NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES Derek E. Fletcher Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Southwestern

  4. Fraction of boroxol rings in vitreous boron oxide from a first-principles analysis of Raman and NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2005-09-23

    We determine the fraction f of B atoms belonging to boroxol rings in vitreous boron oxide through a first-principles analysis. After generating a model structure of vitreous B2O3 by first-principles molecular dynamics, we address a large set of properties, including the neutron structure factor, the neutron density of vibrational states, the infrared spectra, the Raman spectra, and the 11B NMR spectra, and find overall good agreement with corresponding experimental data. From the analysis of Raman and 11B NMR spectra, we yield consistently for both probes a fraction f of approximately 0.75. This result indicates that the structure of vitreous boron oxide is largely dominated by boroxol rings.

  5. A molecular dynamics approach to barrodiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James; Marciante, Mathieu; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Unexpected phenomena in the reaction rates for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules have led to a renewed interest in the thermo-dynamically driven diffusion process for the past 10 years, often described collectively as barodiffusion. In the current context, barodiffusion would manifest as a process that separates ions of differing mass and charge ratios due to pressure and temperature gradients set-up through shock structures in the capsule core. Barrodiffusion includes additional mass transfer terms that account for the irreversible transport of species due to gradients in the system, both thermodynamic and electric e.g, i = - ρD [ ∇c +kp ∇ln(pi) +kT(i) ∇ln(Ti) +kt(e) ∇ln(Te) +eke/Ti ∇ϕ ] . Several groups have attacked this phenomena using continuum scale models and supplemented with kinetic theory to derive coefficients for the different diffusion terms based on assumptions about the collisional processes. In contrast, we have applied a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to this system to gain a first-principle understanding of the rate kinetics and to assess the accuracy of the differin

  6. Molecular dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, J A; Pachter, R

    1997-02-01

    A model of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), with a retinal chromophore attached, has been derived for a molecular dynamics simulation. A method for determining atomic coordinates of several ill-defined strands was developed using a structure prediction algorithm based on a sequential Kalman filter technique. The completed structure was minimized using the GROMOS force field. The structure was then heated to 293 K and run for 500 ps at constant temperature. A comparison with the energy-minimized structure showed a slow increase in the all-atom RMS deviation over the first 200 ps, leveling off to approximately 2.4 A relative to the starting structure. The final structure yielded a backbone-atom RMS deviation from the crystallographic structure of 2.8 A. The residue neighbors of the chromophore atoms were followed as a function of time. The set of persistent near-residue neighbors supports the theory that differences in pKa values control access to the Schiff base proton, rather than formation of a counterion complex.

  7. Next Generation Extended Lagrangian Quantum-based Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre, Christian

    2017-06-01

    A new framework for extended Lagrangian first-principles molecular dynamics simulations is presented, which overcomes shortcomings of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, while maintaining important advantages of the unified extended Lagrangian formulation of density functional theory pioneered by Car and Parrinello three decades ago. The new framework allows, for the first time, energy conserving, linear-scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, which is necessary to study larger and more realistic systems over longer simulation times than previously possible. Expensive, self-consinstent-field optimizations are avoided and normal integration time steps of regular, direct Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics can be used. Linear scaling electronic structure theory is presented using a graph-based approach that is ideal for parallel calculations on hybrid computer platforms. For the first time, quantum based Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation is becoming a practically feasible approach in simulations of +100,000 atoms-representing a competitive alternative to classical polarizable force field methods. In collaboration with: Anders Niklasson, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-01-01

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF 4 )

  9. First principles study of the optical contrast in phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravati, S; Parrinello, M [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI Campus, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, 6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Bernasconi, M, E-mail: marco.bernasconi@mater.unimib.i [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via R Cozzi 53, I-20125, Milano (Italy)

    2010-08-11

    We study from first principles the optical properties of the phase change materials Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST), GeTe and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} in the crystalline phase and in realistic models of the amorphous phase generated by quenching from the melt in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations reproduce the strong optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases measured experimentally and exploited in optical data storage. It is demonstrated that the optical contrast is due to a change in the optical matrix elements across the phase change in all the compounds. It is concluded that the reduction of the optical matrix elements in the amorphous phases is due to angular disorder in p-bonding which dominates the amorphous network in agreement with previous proposals (Huang and Robertson 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 081204) based on calculations on crystalline models.

  10. Glass polymorphism in amorphous germanium probed by first-principles computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G.; Celino, M.; Iesari, F.; Di Cicco, A.

    2016-01-01

    The low-density (LDA) to high-density (HDA) transformation in amorphous Ge at high pressure is studied by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations in the framework of density functional theory. Previous experiments are accurately reproduced, including the presence of a well-defined LDA-HDA transition above 8 GPa. The LDA-HDA density increase is found to be about 14%. Pair and bond-angle distributions are obtained in the 0-16 GPa pressure range and allowed us a detailed analysis of the transition. The local fourfold coordination is transformed in an average HDA sixfold coordination associated with different local geometries as confirmed by coordination number analysis and shape of the bond-angle distributions.

  11. Introduction to First-Principles Electronic Structure Methods: Application to Actinide Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepeis, J E

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction for non-experts to first-principles electronic structure methods that are widely used in condensed-matter physics. Particular emphasis is placed on giving the appropriate background information needed to better appreciate the use of these methods to study actinide and other materials. Specifically, I describe the underlying theory sufficiently to enable an understanding of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods. I also explain the meaning of commonly used terminology, including density functional theory (DFT), local density approximation (LDA), and generalized gradient approximation (GGA), as well as linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO), linear augmented plane wave (LAPW), and pseudopotential methods. I also briefly discuss methodologies that extend the basic theory to address specific limitations. Finally, I describe a few illustrative applications, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations and studies of surfaces, impurities, and defects. I conclude by addressing the current controversy regarding magnetic calculations for actinide materials

  12. Thermal conductivity of hexagonal Si and hexagonal Si nanowires from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya-Moreno, Martí; Aramberri, Hugo; Seijas-Bellido, Juan Antonio; Cartoixà, Xavier; Rurali, Riccardo

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the thermal conductivity, κ, of the recently synthesized hexagonal diamond (lonsdaleite) Si using first-principles calculations and solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation. We find values of κ which are around 40% lower than in the common cubic diamond polytype of Si. The trend is similar for [111] Si nanowires, with reductions of the thermal conductivity that are even larger than in the bulk in some diameter range. The Raman active modes are identified, and the role of mid-frequency optical phonons that arise as a consequence of the reduced symmetry of the hexagonal lattice is discussed. We also show briefly that popular classic potentials used in molecular dynamics might not be suited to describe hexagonal polytypes, discussing the case of the Tersoff potential.

  13. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed

  14. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohan, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.) [pt

  15. First-Principles Thermodynamics of Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    thermal and zero-point energy ( ZPE ) effects on the crystalline environment [8]. By including vdW, thermal, and ZPE effects into DFT (DFT+vdW+T...by their relation to experiment (triangles) pure DFT over-predicts, while DFT+vdW under-predicts the EOSs. Only when temperature and ZPE effects...crystals with ZPE effects still included. To get a sense of how the vdW damping function might affect the calculation of the dynamical matrix, the

  16. Chern-Simons theory from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    A review is made of the main properties of the Chern-Simons field theory. These include the dynamical mass generation to the photon without a Higgs field, the statistical transmutation of charged particles coupled to it and the natural appearance of a transverse conductivity. A review of standard theories proposed for the Quantum Hall Effect which use the Chern-Simons term is also made, emphasizing the fact that this terms is put in an artificial manner. A physical origin for the Chern-Simons term is proposed, starting from QED in 3+1 D with the topological term and imposing that the motion of charged matter is restricted to an infinite plane. (author). 12 refs

  17. First-principles investigations on ionization and thermal conductivity of polystyrene for inertial confinement fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, S. X., E-mail: shu@lle.rochester.edu; Goncharov, V. N.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) methods based on the density functional theory, we have performed first-principles investigations of the ionization and thermal conductivity of polystyrene (CH) over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.5 to 100 g/cm{sup 3} and T = 15 625 to 500 000 K). The ionization data from orbital-free molecular-dynamics calculations have been fitted with a “Saha-type” model as a function of the CH plasma density and temperature, which gives an increasing ionization as the CH density increases even at low temperatures (T < 50 eV). The orbital-free molecular dynamics method is only used to gauge the average ionization behavior of CH under the average-atom model in conjunction with the pressure-matching mixing rule. The thermal conductivities (κ{sub QMD}) of CH, derived directly from the Kohn–Sham molecular-dynamics calculations, are then analytically fitted with a generalized Coulomb logarithm [(lnΛ){sub QMD}] over a wide range of plasma conditions. When compared with the traditional ionization and thermal conductivity models used in radiation–hydrodynamics codes for inertial confinement fusion simulations, the QMD results show a large difference in the low-temperature regime in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic deuterium–tritium targets with CH ablators on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility using the QMD-derived ionization and thermal conductivity of CH have predicted ∼20% variation in target performance in terms of hot-spot pressure and neutron yield (gain) with respect to traditional model simulations.

  18. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition, that ethane dissociates significantly into molecular and/or atomic hydrogen and some long alkane chains, has been systematically studied by analyzing the optical conductivity spectra, pair correlation functions, electronic density of states, and charge density distribution of fluid ethane.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the coordination sphere of trivalent lanthanum in a highly concentrated LiCl aqueous solution: A combined classical and ab initio approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuilleumier, R.; Petit, L.; Maldivi, P.; Adamo, C.

    2008-01-01

    The first coordination sphere of trivalent lanthanum in a highly concentrated (14 M) lithium chloride solution is studied with a combination of classical molecular dynamics and density functional theory based first principle molecular dynamics. This method enables us to obtain a solvation shell of La 3+ containing 2 chloride ions and 6 water molecules. After refinement using first principle molecular dynamics, the resulting cation-water and cation-anion distances are in very good agreement with experiment. The 2 Cl - and the 6 water molecules arrange in a square anti-prism around La 3+ . Exchange of water molecules was also observed in the first-principle simulation, with an intermediate structure comprising 7 water molecules stable for 2.5 ps. Finally, evaluation of dipole moments using maximally localized Wannier functions shows a substantial polarization of the chloride anions and the water molecules in the first solvation shell of trivalent lanthanum. (authors)

  20. Molecular dynamics study of interstitial-solute interactions in irradiated Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, N.V.; Lam, N.Q.; Dagens, L.; Adda, Y.

    1981-11-01

    The stable configurations and binding energies of interstitial and di-interstitial-solute complexes in Al-Be, Al-Ca, Al-K, Al-Li, Al-Mg and Al-Zn alloys were calculated using the molecular dynamics technique in conjunction with interatomic potentials derived entirely from theoretical considerations and not fitted to any experimental data. All the results reported in this work are thus of first-principles nature

  1. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wave packet calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule

  2. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  3. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni 3 Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  4. Crystal structure of Earth's inner core: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S. G.; Schultz, A. J.; Zurek, E.; Kofke, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Since the detection of the Earth's solid inner core (IC) by Lehmann in 1936, its composition and crystal structure (which are essential to understand Earth's evolution) have been controversial. While seismological measurements (e.g. PREM) can give a robust estimation of the density, pressure, and elasticity of the IC, they cannot be directly used to determine its composition and/or crystal structure. Experimentally, reaching the extreme IC conditions ( 330 GPa and 6000 K) and getting reliable measurements is very challenging. First-principles calculations provide a viable alternative that can work as a powerful investigative tool. Although several attempts have been made to assess phase stability at IC conditions computationally, they often use a low level of theory for electronic structure (e.g., classical force-field), adopt approximate methods (e.g., quasiharmonic approximation, fixed hcp-c/a), or do not consider finite-size effects. The study of phase stability using accurate first-principles methods is hampered in part by the difficulty of computing the free energy (FE), the central thermodynamic quantity that determines stability, while including anharmonic and finite-size effects. Additional difficulty related to the IC in particular is introduced by the dynamical instability of one of the IC candidate structures (bcc) at low temperature. Recently [1-3], we introduced a novel method (denoted as "harmonically mapped averaging", or HMA) to efficiently measure anharmonic properties (e.g. FE, pressure, elastic modulus) by molecular simulation, yielding orders of magnitude CPU speedup compared to conventional methods. We have applied this method to the hcp candidate phase of iron at the IC conditions, obtaining first-principles anharmonic FE values with unprecedented accuracy and precision [4]. We have now completed and report HMA calculations to assess the phase stability of all IC candidate phases (fcc/hcp/bcc). This knowledge is the prerequisite for

  5. First-principle calculations of structural, electronic, optical, elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S CHEDDADI

    2017-11-28

    Nov 28, 2017 ... First-principle calculations on the structural, electronic, optical, elastic and thermal properties of the chalcopyrite ... The Kohn–Sham equations were solved using the ... RMTKmax = 7 was used for all the investigated systems,.

  6. First principles study of lithium insertion in bulk silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Wenhui

    2010-09-23

    Si is an important anode material for the next generation of Li ion batteries. Here the energetics and dynamics of Li atoms in bulk Si have been studied at different Li concentrations on the basis of first principles calculations. It is found that Li prefers to occupy an interstitial site as a shallow donor rather than a substitutional site. The most stable position is the tetrahedral (Td) site. The diffusion of a Li atom in the Si lattice is through a Td-Hex-Td trajectory, where the Hex site is the hexagonal transition site with an energy barrier of 0.58 eV. We have also systematically studied the local structural transition of a LixSi alloy with x varying from 0 to 0.25. At low doping concentration (x = 0-0.125), Li atoms prefer to be separated from each other, resulting in a homogeneous doping distribution. Starting from x = 0.125, Li atoms tend to form clusters induced by a lattice distortion with frequent breaking and reforming of Si-Si bonds. When x ≥ 0.1875, Li atoms will break some Si-Si bonds permanently, which results in dangling bonds. These dangling bonds create negatively charged zones, which is the main driving force for Li atom clustering at high doping concentration. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Development of a quantum chemical molecular dynamics tribochemical simulator and its application to tribochemical reaction dynamics of lubricant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, T; Tsuboi, H; Hatakeyama, N; Endou, A; Miyamoto, A; Miura, R; Takaba, H; Suzuki, A; Kubo, M

    2010-01-01

    Tribology at the atomistic and molecular levels has been theoretically studied by a classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. However, this method inherently cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics because it does not consider the electrons in nature. Although the first-principles based MD method has recently been used for understanding the chemical reaction dynamics of several molecules in the tribology field, the method cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system including solid surfaces and interfaces due to its huge computation costs. On the other hand, we have developed a quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator on the basis of a hybrid tight-binding quantum chemical/classical MD method. In the simulator, the central part of the chemical reaction dynamics is calculated by the tight-binding quantum chemical MD method, and the remaining part is calculated by the classical MD method. Therefore, the developed tribochemical simulator realizes the study on tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system, which cannot be treated by using the conventional classical MD or the first-principles MD methods. In this paper, we review our developed quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator and its application to the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a few lubricant additives

  8. Thomas-Fermi molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerouin, J.; Pollock, E.L.; Zerah, G.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional density-functional molecular-dynamics code is developed for the Thomas-Fermi density functional as a prototype for density functionals using only the density. Following Car and Parrinello [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)], the electronic density is treated as a dynamical variable. The electronic densities are verified against a multi-ion Thomas-Fermi algorithm due to Parker [Phys. Rev. A 38, 2205 (1988)]. As an initial application, the effect of electronic polarization in enhancing ionic diffusion in strongly coupled plasmas is demonstrated

  9. Symmetry of quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the current state-of-art in describing quantum molecular dynamics based on symmetry principles alone. This qualitative approach is of particular interest as the only method currently available for a broad and topical class of problems in the internal dynamics of molecules. Besides, a molecule is a physical system whose collective internal motions are geometrically structured, and its perturbation theory description requires a symmetry analysis of this structure. The nature of the geometrical symmetry groups crucial for the closed formulation of the qualitative approach is discussed [ru

  10. Conformation analysis of trehalose. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnamaira, M.C.; Howard, E.I.; Grigera, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Conformational analysis of the disaccharide trehalose is done by molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics. In spite of the different force fields used in each case, comparison between the molecular dynamics trajectories of the torsional angles of glycosidic linkage and energy conformational map shows a good agreement between both methods. By molecular dynamics it is observed a moderate mobility of the glycosidic linkage. The demands of computer time is comparable in both cases. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  11. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2012-01-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear “pasta”, i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid–gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures. (author)

  12. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Gentaro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid-gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures.

  13. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  14. First Principle simulations of electrochemical interfaces - a DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Rizwan

    for the whole system to qualify as a proper electrochemical interface. I have also contributed to the model, which accounts for pH in the first principle electrode-electrolyte interface simulations. This is an important step forward, since electrochemical reaction rate and barrier for charge transfer can......In this thesis, I have looked beyond the computational hydrogen electrode (CHE) model, and focused on the first principle simulations which treats the electrode-electrolyte interfaces explicitly. Since obtaining a realistic electrode-electrolyte interface was difficult, I aimed to address various...... challenges regarding first principle electrochemical interface modeling in order to bridge the gap between the model interface used in simulations and real catalyst at operating conditions. Atomic scale insight for the processes and reactions that occur at the electrochemical interface presents a challenge...

  15. Reliability evaluation of thermophysical properties from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mauro; Fries, Suzana G; Dal Corso, Andrea; Kürmann, Fritz; Hickel, Tilmann; Neugebauer, Jürg

    2014-08-20

    Thermophysical properties, such as heat capacity, bulk modulus and thermal expansion, are of great importance for many technological applications and are traditionally determined experimentally. With the rapid development of computational methods, however, first-principles computed temperature-dependent data are nowadays accessible. We evaluate various computational realizations of such data in comparison to the experimental scatter. The work is focussed on the impact of different first-principles codes (QUANTUM ESPRESSO and VASP), pseudopotentials (ultrasoft and projector augmented wave) as well as phonon determination methods (linear response and direct force constant method) on these properties. Based on the analysis of data for two pure elements, Cr and Ni, consequences for the reliability of temperature-dependent first-principles data in computational thermodynamics are discussed.

  16. First-principles approach to noncollinear magnetism: Towards spin dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, S.; Dewhurst, J.K.; Ambrosch-Draxl, C.

    2007-01-01

    A description of noncollinear magnetism in the framework of spin-density functional theory is presented for the exact exchange energy functional which depends explicitly on two-component spinor orbitals. The equations for the effective Kohn-Sham scalar potential and magnetic field are derived...

  17. Introduction to Molecular Dynamics and Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Danny

    2012-01-01

    We first introduce classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We discuss their main constituents - the interatomic potentials, the boundary conditions, and the integrators - and the discuss the various ensembles that can be sampled. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of MD, specifically in terms of time and length-scales. We then move on to discuss accelerated MD (AMD) methods, techniques that were designed to circumvent the timescale limitations of MD for rare event systems. The different methods are introduced and examples of use given.

  18. Water Wires in Aqueous Solutions from First-Principles Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bekcioglu, G.; Allolio, Christoph; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 10 (2015), s. 4053-4060 ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : excited-state proton * initio molecular dynamics * temperature ionic liquids Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.187, year: 2015

  19. Insights into the ammonia synthesis from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    -properties, such as apparent activation energies and reaction orders, are calculated from the first-principles model. Our analysis shows that the reaction order of N-2 is unity under all considered conditions, whereas the reaction orders of H-2 and NH3 depend on reaction conditions. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......A new set of measurements is used to further test a recently published first-principles model for the ammonia (NH3) synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst. A direct comparison shows an overall good agreement in NH3 productivity between the model and the experiment. In addition, macro...

  20. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  1. Laser Controlled Molecular Orientation Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, O.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular orientation is a challenging control issue covering a wide range of applications from reactive collisions, high order harmonic generation, surface processing and catalysis, to nanotechnologies. The laser control scenario rests on the following three steps: (i) depict some basic mechanisms producing dynamical orientation; (ii) use them both as computational and interpretative tools in optimal control schemes involving genetic algorithms; (iii) apply what is learnt from optimal control to improve the basic mechanisms. The existence of a target molecular rotational state combining the advantages of efficient and post-pulse long duration orientation is shown. A strategy is developed for reaching such a target in terms of a train of successive short laser pulses applied at predicted time intervals. Each individual pulse imparts a kick to the molecule which orients. Transposition of such strategies to generic systems is now under investigation

  2. Transition metal decorated graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer: A first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jie; Xu, Ming-Chun; Hu, Shu-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal (TM) atoms have been extensively employed to decorate the two-dimensional materials, endowing them with promising physical properties. Here, we have studied the adsorption of TM atoms (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) on graphene-like zinc oxide monolayer (g-ZnO) and the substitution of Zn by TM using first-principles calculations to search for the most likely configurations when TM atoms are deposited on g-ZnO. We found that when a V atom is initially placed on the top of Zn atom, V will squeeze out Zn from the two-dimensional plane then substitute it, which is a no barrier substitution process. For heavier elements (Cr to Co), although the substitution configurations are more stable than the adsorption ones, there is an energy barrier for the adsorption-substitution transition with the height of tens to hundreds meV. Therefore, Cr to Co prefers to be adsorbed on the hollow site or the top of oxygen, which is further verified by the molecular dynamics simulations. The decoration of TM is revealed to be a promising approach in terms of tuning the work function of g-ZnO in a large energy range.

  3. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Nissan Research Center, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., 1 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8523 (Japan); Otani, Minoru [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ozaki, Taisuke [Research Center for Simulation Science (RCSS), Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF{sub 4})

  4. Toward a Monte Carlo program for simulating vapor-liquid phase equilibria from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M; Siepmann, J I; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; Vandevondele, J; Sprik, M; Hutter, J; Mohamed, F; Krack, M; Parrinello, M

    2004-10-20

    Efficient Monte Carlo algorithms are combined with the Quickstep energy routines of CP2K to develop a program that allows for Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical, isobaric-isothermal, and Gibbs ensembles using a first principles description of the physical system. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo techniques and pre-biasing using an inexpensive approximate potential are employed to increase the sampling efficiency and to reduce the frequency of expensive ab initio energy evaluations. The new Monte Carlo program has been validated through extensive comparison with molecular dynamics simulations using the programs CPMD and CP2K. Preliminary results for the vapor-liquid coexistence properties (T = 473 K) of water using the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals, a triple-zeta valence basis set augmented with two sets of d-type or p-type polarization functions, and Goedecker-Teter-Hutter pseudopotentials are presented. The preliminary results indicate that this description of water leads to an underestimation of the saturated liquid density and heat of vaporization and, correspondingly, an overestimation of the saturated vapor pressure.

  5. Electrical conductivity in oxygen-deficient phases of tantalum pentoxide from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, Robert J.; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Thompson, Aidan P.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    We apply first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, ab-initio molecular dynamics, and the Kubo-Greenwood formula to predict electrical conductivity in Ta 2 O x (0 ≤ x ≤ 5) as a function of composition, phase, and temperature, where additional focus is given to various oxidation states of the O monovacancy (V O n ; n = 0,1+,2+). In the crystalline phase, our DFT calculations suggest that V O 0 prefers equatorial O sites, while V O 1+ and V O 2+ are energetically preferred in the O cap sites of TaO 7 polyhedra. Our calculations of DC conductivity at 300 K agree well with experimental measurements taken on Ta 2 O x thin films (0.18 ≤ x ≤ 4.72) and bulk Ta 2 O 5 powder-sintered pellets, although simulation accuracy can be improved for the most insulating, stoichiometric compositions. Our conductivity calculations and further interrogation of the O-deficient Ta 2 O 5 electronic structure provide further theoretical basis to substantiate V O 0 as a donor dopant in Ta 2 O 5 . Furthermore, this dopant-like behavior is specific to the neutral case and not observed in either the 1+ or 2+ oxidation states, which suggests that reduction and oxidation reactions may effectively act as donor activation and deactivation mechanisms, respectively, for V O n in Ta 2 O 5

  6. First-principles study of amorphous Ga4Sb6Te3 phase-change alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Assil; Gabardi, Silvia; Massobrio, Carlo; Boero, Mauro; Bernasconi, Marco

    2015-05-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations within the density functional theory framework were performed to generate amorphous models of the Ga4Sb6Te3 phase change alloy by quenching from the melt. We find that Ga-Sb and Ga-Te are the most abundant bonds with only a minor amount of Sb-Te bonds participating to the alloy network. Ga and four-coordinated Sb atoms present a tetrahedral-like geometry, whereas three-coordinated Sb atoms are in a pyramidal configuration. The tetrahedral-like geometries are similar to those of the crystalline phase of the two binary compounds GaTe and GaSb. A sizable fraction of Sb-Sb bonds is also present, indicating a partial nanoscale segregation of Sb. Despite the fact that the composition Ga4Sb6Te3 lies on the pseudobinary Ga Sb -Sb2Te3 tie line, the amorphous network can be seen as a mixture of the two binary compounds GaTe and GaSb with intertwined elemental Sb.

  7. First-principles determination of the K-conductivity pathways in KAlO2

    KAUST Repository

    Peskov, Maxim; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of novel fast ion-conducting materials requires an accurate description of the ionic diffusion. The tiling method proposed by Blatov and coworkers, based on geometric characteristics, is a viable alternative to molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to build models of the pathway system in crystal structures; however, the reliability is limited. Using first-principles simulations, we calculate the potential barriers of the ionic migration between voids in the structure of KAlO2 with local framework distortions and compare the results with those of the tiling method. We estimate the potential barriers for complex ion-conducting channels including several hopping distances. The effect of Coulomb interaction between charge carriers located in adjacent pathways on the potential barriers is discussed, and the effects of the framework flexibility are analyzed. Quantitative results on the potential barriers of ionic diffusion in a crystal structure and its dependence on the shape of the channels are important for assessing the potential of a specific compound. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  8. Thermal Conductivities in Solids from First Principles: Accurate Computations and Rapid Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity κ at high temperatures has remained elusive. Boltzmann transport techniques that account for anharmonicity perturbatively become inaccurate under such conditions. Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) techniques using the Green-Kubo (GK) formalism capture the full anharmonicity, but can become prohibitively costly to converge in time and size. We developed a formalism that accelerates such GK simulations by several orders of magnitude and that thus enables its application within the limited time and length scales accessible in ab initio MD. For this purpose, we determine the effective harmonic potential occurring during the MD, the associated temperature-dependent phonon properties and lifetimes. Interpolation in reciprocal and frequency space then allows to extrapolate to the macroscopic scale. For both force-field and ab initio MD, we validate this approach by computing κ for Si and ZrO2, two materials known for their particularly harmonic and anharmonic character. Eventually, we demonstrate how these techniques facilitate reasonable estimates of κ from existing MD calculations at virtually no additional computational cost.

  9. Band Offsets at the Interface between Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarolimek, K.; Hazrati, E.; de Groot, R. A.; de Wijs, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    The band offsets between crystalline and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a -Si ∶H ) are key parameters governing the charge transport in modern silicon heterojunction solar cells. They are an important input for macroscopic simulators that are used to further optimize the solar cell. Past experimental studies, using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and capacitance-voltage measurements, have yielded conflicting results on the band offset. Here, we present a computational study on the band offsets. It is based on atomistic models and density-functional theory (DFT). The amorphous part of the interface is obtained by relatively long DFT first-principles molecular-dynamics runs at an elevated temperature on 30 statistically independent samples. In order to obtain a realistic conduction-band position the electronic structure of the interface is calculated with a hybrid functional. We find a slight asymmetry in the band offsets, where the offset in the valence band (0.29 eV) is larger than in the conduction band (0.17 eV). Our results are in agreement with the latest XPS measurements that report a valence-band offset of 0.3 eV [M. Liebhaber et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 031601 (2015), 10.1063/1.4906195].

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms doped blue phosphorene: First-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Hui [Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Hongxia [College of Mathematics, Physics and Information Science, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316000 (China); Du, Xiaobo [Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yan, Yu, E-mail: yanyu@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the geometrical structure, electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutionally doped blue phosphorene with a series of nonmetallic atoms, including F, Cl, B, N, C, Si and O. The calculated formation energies and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that F, Cl, B, N, C, Si and O doped blue phosphorene are stable. Moreover, the substitutional doping of F, Cl, B and N cannot induce the magnetism in blue phosphorene due to the saturation or pairing of the valence electron of dopant and its neighboring P atoms. In contrast, ground states of C, Si and O doped blue phosphorene are spin-polarized and the magnetic moments induced by a doping atom are all 1.0 μ{sub B}, which is attributed to the appearance of an unpaired valence electron of C and Si and the formation of a nonbonding 3p electron of a neighboring P atom around O. Furthermore, the magnetic coupling between the moments induced by two C, Si and O are found to be long-range anti-ferromagnetic and the origin of the coupling can be attributed to the p–p hybridization interaction involving polarized electrons. - Highlights: • F, Cl, B, N, C, Si and O doped blue phosphorene are stable. • Substitutional doping of C, Si and O can produce the magnetism in blue phosphorene. • Magnetic coupling between two C, Si and O is long-range anti-ferromagnetic.

  11. First-principles determination of the K-conductivity pathways in KAlO2

    KAUST Repository

    Peskov, Maxim

    2015-04-30

    Investigation of novel fast ion-conducting materials requires an accurate description of the ionic diffusion. The tiling method proposed by Blatov and coworkers, based on geometric characteristics, is a viable alternative to molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to build models of the pathway system in crystal structures; however, the reliability is limited. Using first-principles simulations, we calculate the potential barriers of the ionic migration between voids in the structure of KAlO2 with local framework distortions and compare the results with those of the tiling method. We estimate the potential barriers for complex ion-conducting channels including several hopping distances. The effect of Coulomb interaction between charge carriers located in adjacent pathways on the potential barriers is discussed, and the effects of the framework flexibility are analyzed. Quantitative results on the potential barriers of ionic diffusion in a crystal structure and its dependence on the shape of the channels are important for assessing the potential of a specific compound. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  12. First-principles photoemission spectroscopy in DNA and RNA nucleobases from Koopmans-compliant functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Linh; Borghi, Giovanni; Ferretti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    The determination of spectral properties of the DNA and RNA nucleobases from first principles can provide theoretical interpretation for experimental data, but requires complex electronic-structure formulations that fall outside the domain of applicability of common approaches such as density-functional theory. In this work, we show that Koopmans-compliant functionals, constructed to enforce piecewise linearity in energy functionals with respect to fractional occupation-i.e., with respect to charged excitations-can predict not only frontier ionization potentials and electron affinities of the nucleobases with accuracy comparable or superior with that of many-body perturbation theory and high-accuracy quantum chemistry methods, but also the molecular photoemission spectra are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental ultraviolet photoemsision spectroscopy data. The results highlight the role of Koopmans-compliant functionals as accurate and inexpensive quasiparticle approximations to the spectral potential, which transform DFT into a novel dynamical formalism where electronic properties, and not only total energies, can be correctly accounted for.

  13. Non-metallic dopant modulation of conductivity in substoichiometric tantalum pentoxide: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Robert J.; Fox, Brian P.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2017-06-01

    We apply density-functional theory calculations to predict dopant modulation of electrical conductivity (σo) for seven dopants (C, Si, Ge, H, F, N, and B) sampled at 18 quantum molecular dynamics configurations of five independent insertion sites into two (high/low) baseline references of σo in amorphous Ta2O5, where each reference contains a single, neutral O vacancy center (VO0). From this statistical population (n = 1260), we analyze defect levels, physical structure, and valence charge distributions to characterize nanoscale modification of the atomistic structure in local dopant neighborhoods. C is the most effective dopant at lowering Ta2Ox σo, while also exhibiting an amphoteric doping behavior by either donating or accepting charge depending on the host oxide matrix. Both B and F robustly increase Ta2Ox σo, although F does so through elimination of Ta high charge outliers, while B insertion conversely creates high charge O outliers through favorable BO3 group formation, especially in the low σo reference. While N applications to dope and passivate oxides are prevalent, we found that N exacerbates the stochasticity of σo we sought to mitigate; sensitivity to the N insertion site and some propensity to form N-O bond chemistries appear responsible. We use direct first-principles predictions of σo to explore feasible Ta2O5 dopants to engineer improved oxides with lower variance and greater repeatability to advance the manufacturability of resistive memory technologies.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Yaldram, K.; Ahmad, W.; Khan, M.K.; Rehman, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics study using the embedded atom potential to examine the equilibrium bulk properties of Ag. We calculate the total energy and the lattice parameters as a function of temperature. From these we determine the specific heat and linear coefficient of thermal expansion. The comparison with experimental results of these two quantities is found to be excellent. We have also calculated the mean square displacement of the atoms in the three directions. As expected because of symmetry the displacements in the three directions are comparable and increase with increasing temperature. (author) 5 figs

  15. Thermopower switching by magnetic field: first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Achilles, Steven; Sandratskii, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    We present first-principles studies of the thermopower of the organometallic V4Bz5 molecule attached between Co electrodes with noncollinear magnetization directions. Different regimes in the formation of the noncollinear magnetic state of the molecule lead to a remarkable nonmonotonous dependence...

  16. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, whi...

  17. First principles calculation of two dimensional antimony and antimony arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Sharad Babu, E-mail: sbpillai001@gmail.com; Narayan, Som; Jha, Prafulla K. [Department. of Physics, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Dabhi, Shweta D. [Department of Physics, Maharaja Krishnakumarsinhji Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar-364001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    This work focuses on the strain dependence of the electronic properties of two dimensional antimony (Sb) material and its alloy with As (SbAs) using density functional theory based first principles calculations. Both systems show indirect bandgap semiconducting character which can be transformed into a direct bandgap material with the application of relatively small strain.

  18. Towards first principles modeling of electrochemical electrode-electrolyte interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malte; Björketun, Mårten; Hansen, Martin Hangaard

    2015-01-01

    We present a mini-perspective on the development of first principles modeling of electrochemical interfaces. We show that none of the existing methods deal with all the thermodynamic constraints that the electrochemical environment imposes on the structure of the interface. We present two...

  19. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 5. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal properties of lead chalcogenides PbS, PbSe and PbTe compounds. N Boukhris H Meradji S Amara Korba S Drablia S Ghemid F El Haj Hassan. Volume 37 Issue 5 August 2014 pp 1159-1166 ...

  20. First-principle calculations of the structural, electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First-principle calculations were performed to study the structural, electronic, thermodynamic and thermal properties of ... functional theory (DFT) combined with the quasi-harmonic .... is consistent with Vegard's law which assumes that the lat- tice constant varies .... reflects a charge-transfer effect which is due to the different.

  1. First-principles prediction of liquid/liquid interfacial tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Bennetzen, M.V.; Klamt, A.

    2014-01-01

    of groundwater aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents to drug delivery and a host of industrial processes. Here, we present a model for predicting interfacial tension from first principles using density functional theory calculations. Our model requires no experimental input and is applicable to liquid...

  2. First-principle study of nanostructures of functionalized graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present first-principle calculations of 2D nanostructures of graphene functionalized with hydrogen and fluorine, respectively, in chair conformation. The partial density of states, band structure, binding energy and transverse displacement of C atoms due to functionalization (buckling) have been calculated within the ...

  3. Temperature-dependent dielectric function of germanium in the UV–vis spectral range: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.Y.; Liu, L.H.; Tan, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    The study of temperature dependence of thermophysical parameter dielectric function is key to understanding thermal radiative transfer in high-temperature environments. Limited by self-radiation and thermal oxidation, however, it is difficult to directly measure the high-temperature dielectric function of solids with present experimental technologies. In this work, we implement two first-principles methods, the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT), to study the temperature dependence of dielectric function of germanium (Ge) in the UV–vis spectral range in order to provide data of high-temperature dielectric function for radiative transfer study in high-temperature environments. Both the two methods successfully predict the temperature dependence of dielectric function of Ge. Moreover, the good agreement between the calculated results of the AIMD approach and experimental data at 825 K enables us to predict the high-temperature dielectric function of Ge with the AIMD method in the UV–vis spectral range. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of dielectric function of germanium (Ge) is investigated with two first-principles methods. • The temperature effect on dielectric function of Ge is discussed. • The high-temperature dielectric function of Ge is predicted

  4. Communication: Towards first principles theory of relaxation in supercooled liquids formulated in terms of cooperative motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Karl F

    2014-10-14

    A general theory of the long time, low temperature dynamics of glass-forming fluids remains elusive despite the almost 20 years since the famous pronouncement by the Nobel Laureate P. W. Anderson, "The deepest and most interesting unsolved problem in solid state theory is probably the theory of the nature of glass and the glass transition" [Science 267, 1615 (1995)]. While recent work indicates that Adam-Gibbs theory (AGT) provides a framework for computing the structural relaxation time of supercooled fluids and for analyzing the properties of the cooperatively rearranging dynamical strings observed in low temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the heuristic nature of AGT has impeded general acceptance due to the lack of a first principles derivation [G. Adam and J. H. Gibbs, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 139 (1965)]. This deficiency is rectified here by a statistical mechanical derivation of AGT that uses transition state theory and the assumption that the transition state is composed of elementary excitations of a string-like form. The strings are assumed to form in equilibrium with the mobile particles in the fluid. Hence, transition state theory requires the strings to be in mutual equilibrium and thus to have the size distribution of a self-assembling system, in accord with the simulations and analyses of Douglas and co-workers. The average relaxation rate is computed as a grand canonical ensemble average over all string sizes, and use of the previously determined relation between configurational entropy and the average cluster size in several model equilibrium self-associating systems produces the AGT expression in a manner enabling further extensions and more fundamental tests of the assumptions.

  5. Communication: Towards first principles theory of relaxation in supercooled liquids formulated in terms of cooperative motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Karl F., E-mail: freed@uchicago.edu [James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, 929 East 57 Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    A general theory of the long time, low temperature dynamics of glass-forming fluids remains elusive despite the almost 20 years since the famous pronouncement by the Nobel Laureate P. W. Anderson, “The deepest and most interesting unsolved problem in solid state theory is probably the theory of the nature of glass and the glass transition” [Science 267, 1615 (1995)]. While recent work indicates that Adam-Gibbs theory (AGT) provides a framework for computing the structural relaxation time of supercooled fluids and for analyzing the properties of the cooperatively rearranging dynamical strings observed in low temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the heuristic nature of AGT has impeded general acceptance due to the lack of a first principles derivation [G. Adam and J. H. Gibbs, J. Chem. Phys. 43, 139 (1965)]. This deficiency is rectified here by a statistical mechanical derivation of AGT that uses transition state theory and the assumption that the transition state is composed of elementary excitations of a string-like form. The strings are assumed to form in equilibrium with the mobile particles in the fluid. Hence, transition state theory requires the strings to be in mutual equilibrium and thus to have the size distribution of a self-assembling system, in accord with the simulations and analyses of Douglas and co-workers. The average relaxation rate is computed as a grand canonical ensemble average over all string sizes, and use of the previously determined relation between configurational entropy and the average cluster size in several model equilibrium self-associating systems produces the AGT expression in a manner enabling further extensions and more fundamental tests of the assumptions.

  6. Transport and first-principles study of novel thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hang

    Thermoelectric materials can recover waste industrial heat and convert it to electricity as well as provide efficient local cooling of electronic devices. The efficiency of such environmentally responsible and exceptionally reliable solid state energy conversion is determined by the dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT = alpha2 sigmaT/kappa, where alpha is the Seebeck coefficient, sigma is the electrical conductivity, kappa is the thermal conductivity, and T is the absolute temperature. The goal of the thesis is to (i) illustrate the physics to achieve high ZT of advanced thermoelectric materials and (ii) explore fundamental structure and transport properties in novel condensed matter systems, via an approach combining comprehensive experimental techniques and state-of-the-art first-principles simulation methods. Thermo-galvanomagnetic transport coefficients are derived from Onsager's reciprocal relations and evaluated via solving Boltzmann transport equation using Fermi-Dirac statistics, under the relaxation time approximation. Such understanding provides insights on enhancing ZT through two physically intuitive and very effective routes: (i) improving power factor PF = alpha2sigma; and (ii) reducing thermal conductivity kappa, as demonstrated in the cases of Mg2Si1-xSnx solid solution and Ge/Te double substituted skutterudites CoSb3(1-x)Ge1.5x Te1.5x, respectively. Motivated by recent theoretical predictions of enhanced thermoelectric performance in highly mismatched alloys, ZnTe:N molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) films deposited on GaAs (100) substrates are carefully examined, which leads to a surprising discovery of significant phonon-drag thermopower (reaching 1-2 mV/K-1) at ~13 K. Further systematic study in Bi2Te3 MBE thin films grown on sapphire (0001) and/or BaF2 (111) substrates, reveal that the peak of phonon drag can be tuned by the choice of substrates with different Debye temperatures. Moreover, the detailed transport and structure studies of Bi2-xTl xTe3

  7. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  8. A methodology to aid in the design of naval steels: Linking first principles calculations to mesoscale modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanos, G.; Geltmacher, A.B.; Lewis, A.C.; Bingert, J.F.; Mehl, M.; Papaconstantopoulos, D.; Mishin, Y.; Gupta, A.; Matic, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of a multidisciplinary effort at the Naval Research Laboratory aimed at developing a computationally-based methodology to assist in the design of advanced Naval steels. This program uses multiple computational techniques ranging from the atomistic length scale to continuum response. First-principles electronic structure calculations using density functional theory were employed, semi-empirical angular dependent potentials were developed based on the embedded atom method, and these potentials were used as input into Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. Experimental techniques have also been applied to a super-austenitic stainless steel (AL6XN) to provide experimental input, guidance, verification, and enhancements to the models. These experimental methods include optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and serial sectioning in conjunction with computer-based three-dimensional reconstruction and quantitative analyses. The experimental results are also used as critical input into mesoscale finite element models of materials response

  9. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500 0 K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  10. Color molecular dynamics for dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    We propose a microscopic approach for quark many-body system based on molecular dynamics. Using color confinement and one-gluon exchange potentials together with meson exchange potentials between quarks, we construct nucleons and nuclear/quark matter. Dynamical transition between confinement and deconfinement phases are studied at high baryon density with this molecular dynamics simulation. (author)

  11. Xenon Defects in Uranium Dioxide From First Principles and Interatomic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander

    In this thesis, we examine the defect energetics and migration energies of xenon atoms in uranium dioxide (UO2) from first principles and interatomic potentials. We also parameterize new, accurate interatomic potentials for xenon and uranium dioxide. To achieve accurate energetics and provide a foundation for subsequent calculations, we address difficulties in finding consistent energetics within Hubbard U corrected density functional theory (DFT+U). We propose a method of slowly ramping the U parameter in order to guide the calculation into low energy orbital occupations. We find that this method is successful for a variety of materials. We then examine the defect energetics of several noble gas atoms in UO2 for several different defect sites. We show that the energy to incorporate large noble gas atoms into interstitial sites is so large that it is energetically favorable for a Schottky defect cluster to be created to relieve the strain. We find that, thermodynamically, xenon will rarely ever be in the interstitial site of UO2. To study larger defects associated with the migration of xenon in UO 2, we turn to interatomic potentials. We benchmark several previously published potentials against DFT+U defect energetics and migration barriers. Using a combination of molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band calculations, we find a new, low energy migration pathway for xenon in UO2. We create a new potential for xenon that yields accurate defect energetics. We fit this new potential with a method we call Iterative Potential Refinement that parameterizes potentials to first principles data via a genetic algorithm. The potential finds accurate energetics for defects with relatively low amounts of strain (xenon in defect clusters). It is important to find accurate energetics for these sorts of low-strain defects because they essentially represent small xenon bubbles. Finally, we parameterize a new UO2 potential that simultaneously yields accurate vibrational properties

  12. The vibrational spectrum of the hydrated alanine-leucine peptide in the amide region from IR experiments and first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Irtaza; Donati, Luca; Stensitzki, Till; Keller, Bettina G.; Heyne, Karsten; Imhof, Petra

    2018-04-01

    We have combined infrared (IR) experiments with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in solution at finite temperature to analyse the vibrational signature of the small floppy peptide Alanine-Leucine. IR spectra computed from first-principles MD simulations exhibit no distinct differences between conformational clusters of α -helix or β -sheet-like folds with different orientations of the bulky leucine side chain. All computed spectra show two prominent bands, in good agreement with the experiment, that are assigned to the stretch vibrations of the carbonyl and carboxyl group, respectively. Variations in band widths and exact maxima are likely due to small fluctuations in the backbone torsion angles.

  13. Electrical properties of improper ferroelectrics from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Massimiliano; Fennie, Craig J.; Ghosez, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We study the interplay of structural and polar distortions in hexagonal YMnO3 and short-period PbTiO3/SrTiO3 (PTO/STO) superlattices by means of first-principles calculations at constrained electric displacement field D. We find that in YMnO3 the tilts of the oxygen polyhedra produce a robustly polar ground state, which persists at any choice of the electrical boundary conditions. Conversely, in PTO/STO the antiferrodistortive instabilities alone do not break inversion symmetry, and open-circuit boundary conditions restore a nonpolar state. We suggest that this qualitative difference naturally provides a route to rationalizing the concept of “improper ferroelectricity” from the point of view of first-principles theory. We discuss the implications of our arguments for the design of novel multiferroic materials with enhanced functionalities and for the symmetry analysis of the phase transitions.

  14. Diffusion in thorium carbide: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, 1025, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, 1025, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM–CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, 1650, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    The prediction of the behavior of Th compounds under irradiation is an important issue for the upcoming Generation-IV nuclear reactors. The study of self-diffusion and hetero-diffusion is a central key to fulfill this goal. As a first approach, we obtained, by means of first-principles methods, migration and activation energies of Th and C atoms self-diffusion and diffusion of He atoms in ThC. We also calculate diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature. - Highlights: • Diffusion in thorium carbide by means of first-principles calculations is studied. • The most favorable migration event is a C atom moving through a C-vacancy aided path. • Calculated C atoms diffusion coefficients agree very well with the experimental data. • For He, the energetically most favorable migration path is through Th-vacancies.

  15. Can the Tafel equation be derived from first principles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    A century ago, Tafel disapproved the attempts to derive the empirical equation named after him by thermodynamic methods. He noted that his observations referred to irreversible electrochemical reactions, where thermodynamics is inapplicable. This statement seems to remain valid until today. Indeed, it is impossible as yet to predict the kinetic parameters for chemical processes by determining rate constants and reaction orders from 'first principles', unless strictly specialized and, to a great extent, artificial models are developed. Nevertheless, in this paper an attempt to derive the kinetic law of mass action from 'first principles' is made in macroscopic formulation. It has turned out to be possible owing to the methods of thermodynamics of irreversible processes that were unknown in Tafel's time

  16. A first-principle for the nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Vadakkan, Kunjumon

    2016-01-01

    Higher brain functions such as perception and memory are first-person internal sensations whose mechanisms can have options to concurrently activate motor neurons for behavioral action. By setting up all the required constraints using available information from different levels, a theoretical examination from a first-person frame of reference led to the derivation of a first-principle of the structure-function units. These units operate in synchrony with the synaptically-connected neural circ...

  17. Molecular dynamics of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-02-01

    We derive Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities of a nematic liquid crystal. The derivation is based on the application of a Gaussian constraint algorithm that makes the director angular velocity of a liquid crystal a constant of motion. Setting this velocity equal to zero means that a director-based coordinate system becomes an inertial frame and that the constraint torques do not do any work on the system. The system consequently remains in equilibrium. However, one generates a different equilibrium ensemble. The great advantage of this ensemble is that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals, whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. This facilitates the numerical evaluation of the viscosities by molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic...

  19. First principle chemical kinetics in zeolites: the methanol-to-olefin process as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Speybroeck, Veronique; De Wispelaere, Kristof; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; Vandichel, Matthias; Hemelsoet, Karen; Waroquier, Michel

    2014-11-07

    To optimally design next generation catalysts a thorough understanding of the chemical phenomena at the molecular scale is a prerequisite. Apart from qualitative knowledge on the reaction mechanism, it is also essential to be able to predict accurate rate constants. Molecular modeling has become a ubiquitous tool within the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Herein, we review current computational procedures to determine chemical kinetics from first principles, thus by using no experimental input and by modeling the catalyst and reacting species at the molecular level. Therefore, we use the methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process as a case study to illustrate the various theoretical concepts. This process is a showcase example where rational design of the catalyst was for a long time performed on the basis of trial and error, due to insufficient knowledge of the mechanism. For theoreticians the MTO process is particularly challenging as the catalyst has an inherent supramolecular nature, for which not only the Brønsted acidic site is important but also organic species, trapped in the zeolite pores, must be essentially present during active catalyst operation. All these aspects give rise to specific challenges for theoretical modeling. It is shown that present computational techniques have matured to a level where accurate enthalpy barriers and rate constants can be predicted for reactions occurring at a single active site. The comparison with experimental data such as apparent kinetic data for well-defined elementary reactions has become feasible as current computational techniques also allow predicting adsorption enthalpies with reasonable accuracy. Real catalysts are truly heterogeneous in a space- and time-like manner. Future theory developments should focus on extending our view towards phenomena occurring at longer length and time scales and integrating information from various scales towards a unified understanding of the catalyst. Within this respect molecular

  20. The electronic and optical properties of warm dense nitrous oxide using quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yujuan; Wang Cong; Zhang Ping

    2012-01-01

    First-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory have been used to study the electronic and optical properties of fluid nitrous oxide under extreme conditions. Systematic descriptions of pair-correlation function, atomic structure, and the charge density distribution are used to investigate the dissociation of fluid nitrous oxide. The electrical and optical properties are derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is found that the nonmetal-metal transition for fluid nitrous oxide can be directly associated to the dissociation and has significant influence on the optical properties of the fluid.

  1. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  2. Partial Molar Volumes of Aqua Ions from First Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Bruneval, Fabien; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2017-08-08

    Partial molar volumes of ions in water solution are calculated through pressures obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The correct definition of pressure in charged systems subject to periodic boundary conditions requires access to the variation of the electrostatic potential upon a change of volume. We develop a scheme for calculating such a variation in liquid systems by setting up an interface between regions of different density. This also allows us to determine the absolute deformation potentials for the band edges of liquid water. With the properly defined pressures, we obtain partial molar volumes of a series of aqua ions in very good agreement with experimental values.

  3. First principles simulation of amorphous InSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Jan H.; Kühne, Thomas D.; Gabardi, Silvia; Bernasconi, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory have been performed to generate a model of amorphous InSb by quenching from the melt. The resulting network is mostly tetrahedral with a minor fraction (10%) of atoms in a fivefold coordination. The structural properties are in good agreement with available x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure data and confirm the proposed presence of a sizable fraction of homopolar In-In and Sb-Sb bonds whose concentration in our model amounts to about 20% of the total number of bonds.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of Mg2Si and Mg2Ge investigated by first principles method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hanfu; Jin, Hao; Chu, Weiguo; Guo, Yanjun

    2010-01-01

    The lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of Mg 2 Si and Mg 2 Ge are studied based on the first principles calculations. We obtain the phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states spectra using the density functional perturbation theory with local density approximations. By employing the quasi-harmonic approximation, we calculate the temperature dependent Helmholtz free energy, bulk modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat, Debye temperature and overall Grueneisen coefficient. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data and previous theoretical studies. The thermal conductivities of both compounds are then estimated with the Slack's equation. By carefully choosing input parameters, especially the acoustic Debye temperature, we find that the calculated thermal conductivities agree fairly well with the experimental values above 80 K for both compounds. This demonstrates that the lattice thermal conductivity of simple cubic semiconductors may be estimated with satisfactory accuracy by combining the Slack's equation with the necessary thermodynamics parameters derived completely from the first principles calculations.

  5. Molecular dynamics for irradiation driven chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    A new molecular dynamics (MD) approach for computer simulations of irradiation driven chemical transformations of complex molecular systems is suggested. The approach is based on the fact that irradiation induced quantum transformations can often be treated as random, fast and local processes...... that describe the classical MD of complex molecular systems under irradiation. The proposed irradiation driven molecular dynamics (IDMD) methodology is designed for the molecular level description of the irradiation driven chemistry. The IDMD approach is implemented into the MBN Explorer software package...... involving small molecules or molecular fragments. We advocate that the quantum transformations, such as molecular bond breaks, creation and annihilation of dangling bonds, electronic charge redistributions, changes in molecular topologies, etc., could be incorporated locally into the molecular force fields...

  6. Engineering drawing from first principles using AutoCAD

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, Dennis E

    1998-01-01

    Engineering Drawing From First Principles is a guide to good draughting for students of engineering who need to learn how to produce technically accurate and detailed designs to British and International Standards. Written by Dennis Maguire, an experienced author and City and Guilds chief examiner, this text is designed for use on Further Education and University courses where a basic understanding of draughtsmanship and CAD is necessary. Although not written as an AutoCAD tutor, the book will be a useful introduction to good CAD practice.Part of the Revision and Self-Assessmen

  7. First-principles study of Frenkel pair recombination in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shi-Yao; Jin, Shuo; Li, Yu-Hao; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The recombination of one Frenkel pair in tungsten has been investigated through first-principles simulation. Two different recombination types have been identified: instantaneous and thermally activated. The small recombination barriers for thermally activated recombination cases indicate that recombination can occur easily with a slightly increased temperature. For both of the two recombination types, recombination occurs through the self-interstitial atom moving towards the vacancy. The recombination process can be direct or through replacement sequences, depending on the vertical distance between the vacancy and the 〈1 1 1〉 line of self-interstitial atom pair.

  8. First Principles Simulation of a Ceramic/ Metal Interface with Misfit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedek, R.; Alavi, A.; Seidman, D. N.; Yang, L. H.; Muller, D. A.; Woodward, C.

    2000-01-01

    The relaxed atomic structure of a model ceramic/metal interface, {222}MgO/Cu , is simulated, including lattice constant mismatch, using first principles local-density functional theory plane wave pseudopotential methods. The 399-atom computational unit cell contains 36 O and 49 Cu atoms per layer in accordance with the 7/6 ratio of MgO to Cu lattice constants. The atomic layers on both sides of the interface warp to optimize the local bonding. The interface adhesive energy is calculated. The interface electronic structure is found to vary appreciably with the local environment. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  9. First principle study of cubic ScGaN ternaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adli, W.; Mecheref, R.; Sekkal, N.; Tair, F.; Amrani, B.

    2008-08-01

    The electronic properties of the Sc x Ga1- x N ternary alloy are investigated. The transition from rocksalt (B1) to zinc blende (B3) structure is found to occur rapidly after incorporating just a small fraction (less than 1%) of Ga. In the present paper, the first principles method the full potential linear muffin-tin orbitals method (FPLMTO) in its atomic sphere approximation (ASA) coupled to the technique of the empty spheres is employed. Our results concerning the electronic properties are different from those reported in literature. (author)

  10. Parallelization for first principles electronic state calculation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Oguchi, Tamio.

    1997-03-01

    In this report we study the parallelization for First principles electronic state calculation program. The target machines are NEC SX-4 for shared memory type parallelization and FUJITSU VPP300 for distributed memory type parallelization. The features of each parallel machine are surveyed, and the parallelization methods suitable for each are proposed. It is shown that 1.60 times acceleration is achieved with 2 CPU parallelization by SX-4 and 4.97 times acceleration is achieved with 12 PE parallelization by VPP 300. (author)

  11. First principles investigation of structural, vibrational and thermal properties of black and blue phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Khalil, R. M.; Ahmad, Javed; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Bukhari, Syed Hamad; Tufiq Jamil, M.; Tehreem, Tuba; Nissar, Umair

    2018-05-01

    In this investigation, structural, dynamical and thermal properties of black and blue phosphorene (P) are presented through the first principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). These DFT calculations depict that due to the approximately same values of ground state energy at zero Kelvin and Helmholtz free energy at room-temperature, it is expected that both structures can coexist at transition temperature. Lattice dynamics of both phases were investigated by using the finite displacement supercell approach. It is noticed on the basis of harmonic approximation thermodynamic calculations that the blue phase is thermodynamically more stable than the black phase above 155 K.

  12. Electrical conductivity in oxygen-deficient phases of tantalum pentoxide from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondi, Robert J., E-mail: rjbondi@sandia.gov; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Thompson, Aidan P.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Marinella, Matthew J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    We apply first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, ab-initio molecular dynamics, and the Kubo-Greenwood formula to predict electrical conductivity in Ta{sub 2}O{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 5) as a function of composition, phase, and temperature, where additional focus is given to various oxidation states of the O monovacancy (V{sub O}{sup n}; n = 0,1+,2+). In the crystalline phase, our DFT calculations suggest that V{sub O}{sup 0} prefers equatorial O sites, while V{sub O}{sup 1+} and V{sub O}{sup 2+} are energetically preferred in the O cap sites of TaO{sub 7} polyhedra. Our calculations of DC conductivity at 300 K agree well with experimental measurements taken on Ta{sub 2}O{sub x} thin films (0.18 ≤ x ≤ 4.72) and bulk Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} powder-sintered pellets, although simulation accuracy can be improved for the most insulating, stoichiometric compositions. Our conductivity calculations and further interrogation of the O-deficient Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} electronic structure provide further theoretical basis to substantiate V{sub O}{sup 0} as a donor dopant in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Furthermore, this dopant-like behavior is specific to the neutral case and not observed in either the 1+ or 2+ oxidation states, which suggests that reduction and oxidation reactions may effectively act as donor activation and deactivation mechanisms, respectively, for V{sub O}{sup n} in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  13. First-principles calculation of electronic energy level alignment at electrochemical interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Yavar T.; Payami, Mahmoud, E-mail: mpayami@aeoi.org.ir

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Using DFT calculation, level shifts of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO at the interfaces with MeCN and DMF are determined. • Level shifts are obtained using potential difference between the surfaces of asymmetric slabs. • Solvent molecules give an up-shift to the levels that varies with coverage. • MD simulations show that at room temperatures the surface is not fully covered by the solvent molecules. - Abstract: Energy level alignment at solid–solvent interfaces is an important step in determining the properties of electrochemical systems. The positions of conduction and valence band edges of a semiconductor are affected by its environment. In this study, using first-principles DFT calculation, we have determined the level shifts of the semiconductors TiO{sub 2} and ZnO at the interfaces with MeCN and DMF solvent molecules. The level shifts of semiconductor are obtained using the potential difference between the clean and exposed surfaces of asymmetric slabs. In this work, neglecting the effects of present ions in the electrolyte solution, we have shown that the solvent molecules give rise to an up-shift for the levels, and the amount of this shift varies with coverage. It is also shown that the shapes of density of states do not change sensibly near the gap. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interface have shown that at room temperatures the semiconductor surface is not fully covered by the solvent molecules, and one must use intermediate values in an static calculations.

  14. First-principles calculations of K-shell X-ray absorption spectra for warm dense nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zi; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectrum is a powerful tool for atomic structure detection on warm dense matter. Here, we perform first-principles molecular dynamics and X-ray absorption spectrum calculations on warm dense nitrogen along a Hugoniot curve. From the molecular dynamics trajectory, the detailed atomic structures are examined for each thermodynamical condition. The K-shell X-ray absorption spectrum is calculated, and its changes with temperature and pressure along the Hugoniot curve are discussed. The warm dense nitrogen systems may contain isolated nitrogen atoms, N 2 molecules, and nitrogen clusters, which show quite different contributions to the total X-ray spectrum due to their different electron density of states. The changes of X-ray spectrum along the Hugoniot curve are caused by the different nitrogen structures induced by the temperature and the pressure. Some clear signatures on X-ray spectrum for different thermodynamical conditions are pointed out, which may provide useful data for future X-ray experiments.

  15. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled by th...

  16. First Principles Investigations of Technologically and Environmentally Important Nano-structured Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujata

    In the course of my PhD I have worked on a broad range of problems using simulations from first principles: from catalysis and chemical reactions at surfaces and on nanostructures, characterization of carbon-based systems and devices, and surface and interface physics. My research activities focused on the application of ab-initio electronic structure techniques to the theoretical study of important aspects of the physics and chemistry of materials for energy and environmental applications and nano-electronic devices. A common theme of my research is the computational study of chemical reactions of environmentally important molecules (CO, CO2) using high performance simulations. In particular, my principal aim was to design novel nano-structured functional catalytic surfaces and interfaces for environmentally relevant remediation and recycling reactions, with particular attention to the management of carbon dioxide. We have studied the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO), both in the presence and absence of hydrogen, on graphitic edges. Using first-principles calculations we have studied several reactions of CO with carbon nanostructures, where the active sites can be regenerated by the deposition of carbon decomposed from the reactant (CO) to make the reactions self-sustained. Using statistical mechanics, we have also studied the conditions under which the conversion of CO to graphene and carbon dioxide is thermodynamically favorable, both in the presence and in the absence of hydrogen. These results are a first step toward the development of processes for the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of CO in a hydrogen atmosphere. We have elucidated the atomic scale mechanisms of activation and reduction of carbon dioxide on specifically designed catalytic surfaces via the rational manipulation of the surface properties that can be achieved by combining transition metal thin films on oxide

  17. First-Principles Vibrational Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of β -Guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Taverna, D.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, E.

    2017-07-01

    A general approach to model vibrational electron energy loss spectra obtained using an electron beam positioned away from the specimen is presented. The energy-loss probability of the fast electron is evaluated using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) of the dielectric response of the specimen. The validity of the method is assessed using recently measured anhydrous β -guanine, an important molecular solid used by animals to produce structural colors. The good agreement between theory and experiments lays the basis for a quantitative interpretation of this spectroscopy in complex systems.

  18. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Lunasin | Singh | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Molecular Dynamics Study of Lunasin. ... profile of lunasin,using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the time scale of 300 ns. ... Keywords: Lunasin, molecular dynamics, amber, CLASICO, α-helix, β-turn, PTRAJ, RGD, RMSD ...

  19. Prospects for first-principle calculations of scintillator properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1999-01-01

    Several scintillation processes can be modeled from first principles using quantum chemistry cluster calculations and recently available high-performance computers. These processes include the formation of excitons and trapping centers, the diffusion of ionization energy (electrons and holes) through a host crystal, and the efficient capture of these carriers by an activator atom to form a luminous, non-quenched excited state. As examples of such calculations, results are presented for (1) hole transport in the known scintillator host crystal CsI, (2) hole trapping in the non-scintillator PbF 2 , (3) hole transport in the experimentally unexplored PbF 4 , and (4) the electronic nature of excited states of CsI : Tl and CsI : Na

  20. Multiphysics modeling using COMSOL a first principles approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Roger W

    2011-01-01

    Multiphysics Modeling Using COMSOL rapidly introduces the senior level undergraduate, graduate or professional scientist or engineer to the art and science of computerized modeling for physical systems and devices. It offers a step-by-step modeling methodology through examples that are linked to the Fundamental Laws of Physics through a First Principles Analysis approach. The text explores a breadth of multiphysics models in coordinate systems that range from 1D to 3D and introduces the readers to the numerical analysis modeling techniques employed in the COMSOL Multiphysics software. After readers have built and run the examples, they will have a much firmer understanding of the concepts, skills, and benefits acquired from the use of computerized modeling techniques to solve their current technological problems and to explore new areas of application for their particular technological areas of interest.

  1. Heating electrons with ion irradiation: A first-principles approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruneda, J.M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Arnau, A.; Juaristi, J.I.; Artacho, E.

    2009-01-01

    Using time-dependent density functional theory we calculate from first-principles the rate of energy transfer from a moving charged particle to the electrons in an insulating material. The behavior of the electronic stopping power in LiF (a wide band gap insulator) versus projectile velocity displays an effective threshold velocity of 8.2 Bohr/asec for the proton, consistent with recent experimental observations. The calculated proton/antiproton stopping power ratio is 2.4 at velocities slightly above the threshold (16.5 Bohr/asec) as compared to the experimental value of 2.1. The approximations introduced in this new non-perturbative methodology are discussed, and results on the velocity dependence of the stopping power, the locality of the energy transfer, and other characteristics of the host material are presented.

  2. Electronic Stopping Power in LiF from First Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruneda, J. M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Arnau, A.; Juaristi, J. I.; Artacho, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory we calculate from first principles the rate of energy transfer from a moving proton or antiproton to the electrons of an insulating material, LiF. The behavior of the electronic stopping power versus projectile velocity displays an effective threshold velocity of ∼0.2 a.u. for the proton, consistent with recent experimental observations, and also for the antiproton. The calculated proton/antiproton stopping-power ratio is ∼2.4 at velocities slightly above the threshold (v∼0.4 a.u.), as compared to the experimental value of 2.1. The projectile energy loss mechanism is observed to be extremely local

  3. The first principle calculation of two-dimensional Dirac materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin

    2017-12-01

    As the size of integrated device becoming increasingly small, from the last century, semiconductor industry is facing the enormous challenge to break the Moore’s law. The development of calculation, communication and automatic control have emergent expectation of new materials at the aspect of semiconductor industrial technology and science. In spite of silicon device, searching the alternative material with outstanding electronic properties has always been a research point. As the discovery of graphene, the research of two-dimensional Dirac material starts to express new vitality. This essay studied the development calculation of 2D material’s mobility and introduce some detailed information of some approximation method of the first principle calculation.

  4. Point defects in thorium nitride: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    Thorium and its compounds (carbides and nitrides) are being investigated as possible materials to be used as nuclear fuels for Generation-IV reactors. As a first step in the research of these materials under irradiation, we study the formation energies and stability of point defects in thorium nitride by means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory. We focus on vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs and Schottky defects. We found that N and Th vacancies have almost the same formation energy and that the most energetically favorable defects of all studied in this work are N interstitials. These kind of results for ThN, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically.

  5. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2014-01-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure

  6. Point defects in thorium nitride: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2016-01-01

    Thorium and its compounds (carbides and nitrides) are being investigated as possible materials to be used as nuclear fuels for Generation-IV reactors. As a first step in the research of these materials under irradiation, we study the formation energies and stability of point defects in thorium nitride by means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory. We focus on vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs and Schottky defects. We found that N and Th vacancies have almost the same formation energy and that the most energetically favorable defects of all studied in this work are N interstitials. These kind of results for ThN, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically.

  7. Exploring the nucleon structure from first principles of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Cundy, N.; Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2010-04-15

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is generally assumed to be the fundamental theory underlying nuclear physics. In recent years there is progress towards investigating the nucleon structure from first principles of QCD. Although this structure is best revealed in Deep Inelastic Scattering, a consistent analysis has to be performed in a fully non-perturbative scheme. The only known method for this purpose are lattice simulations. We first sketch the ideas of Monte Carlo simulations in lattice gauge theory. Then we comment in particular on the issues of chiral symmetry and operator mixing. Finally we present our results for the Bjorken variable of a single quark, and for the second Nachtmann moment of the nucleon structure functions. (orig.)

  8. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  9. First principles study of α and δ-Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattaraj, Debabrata; Dash, Smruti

    2017-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of α-and δ-Pu has been investigated using state of the art first principles method. All the calculations have been performed using a plane wave based pseudopotential method under the framework of spin polarized density functional theory. The effect of relativistic spin-orbit interactions on these properties has been investigated. The calculated lattice parameters are found to be within ±1% of the experimental data. The cohesive energy of α-and δ-Pu are calculated to be -3.125 and -3.126 eV/atom. The nature of chemical bonding present in those phases of Pu is depicted by calculated density of states spectra. (author)

  10. First principles studies of electron tunneling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    A first principles study of electronic tunneling along the chain of seven Fe/S clusters in respiratory complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain, is described. The broken-symmetry states of the Fe/S metal clusters calculated at both DFT and semi-empirical ZINDO levels were utilized to examine both the extremely weak electronic couplings between Fe/S clusters and the tunneling pathways, which provide a detailed atomistic-level description of the charge transfer process in the protein. One-electron tunneling approximation was found to hold within a reasonable accuracy, with only a moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. The method is demonstrated to be able to calculate accurately the coupling matrix elements as small as 10−4 cm−1. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences of multiple tunneling pathways. PMID:25383312

  11. First-principles modeling of magnetic misfit interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties of interfaces with large lattice mismatch, choosing Pt/Co and Au/Co as prototypes. For our first-principles calculations, we reduce the lattice mismatch to 0.2% by constructing Moiré supercells. Our results show that the roughness and atomic density, and thus the magnetic properties, depend strongly on the substrate and thickness of the Co slab. An increasing thickness leads to the formation of a Co transition layer at the interface, especially for Pt/Co due to strong Pt-Co interaction. A Moiré supercell with a transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces.

  12. Predicting catalysis: Understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Baerends, E.J.; Biczysko, M.

    2006-01-01

    . Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully......Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state...... for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations...

  13. Exploring the nucleon structure from first principles of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Cundy, N.; Goeckeler, M.

    2010-04-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is generally assumed to be the fundamental theory underlying nuclear physics. In recent years there is progress towards investigating the nucleon structure from first principles of QCD. Although this structure is best revealed in Deep Inelastic Scattering, a consistent analysis has to be performed in a fully non-perturbative scheme. The only known method for this purpose are lattice simulations. We first sketch the ideas of Monte Carlo simulations in lattice gauge theory. Then we comment in particular on the issues of chiral symmetry and operator mixing. Finally we present our results for the Bjorken variable of a single quark, and for the second Nachtmann moment of the nucleon structure functions. (orig.)

  14. First-principles modeling of magnetic misfit interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsiuk, Sergii

    2013-08-16

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties of interfaces with large lattice mismatch, choosing Pt/Co and Au/Co as prototypes. For our first-principles calculations, we reduce the lattice mismatch to 0.2% by constructing Moiré supercells. Our results show that the roughness and atomic density, and thus the magnetic properties, depend strongly on the substrate and thickness of the Co slab. An increasing thickness leads to the formation of a Co transition layer at the interface, especially for Pt/Co due to strong Pt-Co interaction. A Moiré supercell with a transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces.

  15. Quantum theory from first principles an informational approach

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Quantum theory is the soul of theoretical physics. It is not just a theory of specific physical systems, but rather a new framework with universal applicability. This book shows how we can reconstruct the theory from six information-theoretical principles, by rebuilding the quantum rules from the bottom up. Step by step, the reader will learn how to master the counterintuitive aspects of the quantum world, and how to efficiently reconstruct quantum information protocols from first principles. Using intuitive graphical notation to represent equations, and with shorter and more efficient derivations, the theory can be understood and assimilated with exceptional ease. Offering a radically new perspective on the field, the book contains an efficient course of quantum theory and quantum information for undergraduates. The book is aimed at researchers, professionals, and students in physics, computer science and philosophy, as well as the curious outsider seeking a deeper understanding of the theory.

  16. First-principles study of dielectric properties of cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takenori; Momida, Hiroyoshi; Hamada, Tomoyuki; Uda, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Takahisa

    2005-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the dielectric properties of fluorite CeO 2 as well as hexagonal and cubic Ce 2 O 3 by using first-principles pseudopotentials techniques within the local density approximation. Calculated electronic and lattice dielectric constants of CeO 2 are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. For Ce 2 O 3 , the hexagonal phase has a lattice dielectric constant comparable to that of CeO 2 , whereas the cubic phase has a much smaller one. We have concluded that the enhancement of the dielectric constant in CeO 2 epitaxially grown on Si is not due to its lattice expansion experimentally observed nor regular formation of oxygen vacancies in CeO 2

  17. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, G., E-mail: gerardo@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re{sub 3}N and Re{sub 2}N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials

  18. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, G.; Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. ► The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. ► The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. ► The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. ► The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re 3 N and Re 2 N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials within binary nitride chemistry.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of ferroelectric domain formation by oxygen vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; You, Jeong Ho; Chen, Jinghong; Yeo, Changdong

    2018-05-01

    An oxygen vacancy, known to be detrimental to ferroelectric properties, has been investigated numerically for the potential uses to control ferroelectric domains in films using molecular dynamics simulations based on the first-principles effective Hamiltonian. As an electron donor, an oxygen vacancy generates inhomogeneous electrostatic and displacement fields which impose preferred polarization directions near the oxygen vacancy. When the oxygen vacancies are placed at the top and bottom interfaces, the out-of-plane polarizations are locally developed near the interfaces in the directions away from the interfaces. These polarizations from the interfaces are in opposite directions so that the overall out-of-plane polarization becomes significantly reduced. In the middle of the films, the in-plane domains are formed with containing 90° a 1/a 2 domain walls and the films are polarized along the [1 1 0] direction even when no electric field is applied. With oxygen vacancies placed at the top interface only, the films exhibit asymmetric hysteresis loops, confirming that the oxygen vacancies are one of the possible sources of ferroelectric imprint. It has been qualitatively demonstrated that the domain structures in the imprint films can be turned on and off by controlling an external field along the thickness direction. This study shows qualitatively that the oxygen vacancies can be utilized for tuning ferroelectric domain structures in films.

  20. Tutorial: Determination of thermal boundary resistance by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi; Hu, Ming

    2018-05-01

    Due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of nanostructured components in microelectronics and other advanced devices, the thermal resistance at material interfaces can strongly affect the overall thermal behavior in these devices. Therefore, the thermal boundary resistance, R, must be taken into account in the thermal analysis of nanoscale structures and devices. This article is a tutorial on the determination of R and the analysis of interfacial thermal transport via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to reviewing the commonly used equilibrium and non-equilibrium MD models for the determination of R, we also discuss several MD simulation methods which can be used to understand interfacial thermal transport behavior. To illustrate how these MD models work for various interfaces, we will show several examples of MD simulation results on thermal transport across solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces. The advantages and drawbacks of a few other MD models such as approach-to-equilibrium MD and first-principles MD are also discussed.

  1. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  2. Molecular dynamics for reactions of heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.P.J.; Brongersma, H.H.; Santen, van R.A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of Molecular Dynamics, and numerical integration techniques, system initialization, boundary conditions, force representation, statistics, system size, and simulations duration are discussed. Examples from surface science are used to illustrate the pros and cons of the method.

  3. molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and quantum chemical calculations for the adsorption of [2-(2-Henicos-10- .... electronic properties of molecule clusters, surfaces and ... The local reactivity was analyzed by determining the.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori; Takagi, Fumiko; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We

  5. Dynamical processes in atomic and molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogurtsov, Gennadi

    2012-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics underlie a basis for our knowledge of fundamental processes in nature and technology and in such applications as solid state physics, chemistry and biology. In recent years, atomic and molecular physics has undergone a revolutionary change due to great achievements in computing and experimental techniques. As a result, it has become possible to obtain information both on atomic and molecular characteristics and on dynamics of atomic and molecular processes. This e-book highlights the present state of investigations in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Rece

  6. Stability, electronic and thermodynamic properties of aluminene from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Junhui; Yu, Niannian; Xue, Kanhao; Miao, Xiangshui

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We have predicted two NEW stable phases of atomic layer aluminum, buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene. • We have revealed the electronic structures and bonding characteristics of aluminene. • Thermodynamic properties of aluminene were investigated based on phonon properties. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the structure stability and electronic properties of both buckled and 8-Pmmn phase aluminene. Phonon dispersion analysis reveals that the buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene are dynamically stable. The band structure shows that both the buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene exhibit metallic behavior. Finally, the thermodynamic properties are investigated based on phonon properties.

  7. Stability, electronic and thermodynamic properties of aluminene from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Junhui [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Yu, Niannian [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Xue, Kanhao, E-mail: xkh@hust.edu.cn [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Miao, Xiangshui [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • We have predicted two NEW stable phases of atomic layer aluminum, buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene. • We have revealed the electronic structures and bonding characteristics of aluminene. • Thermodynamic properties of aluminene were investigated based on phonon properties. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the structure stability and electronic properties of both buckled and 8-Pmmn phase aluminene. Phonon dispersion analysis reveals that the buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene are dynamically stable. The band structure shows that both the buckled and 8-Pmmn aluminene exhibit metallic behavior. Finally, the thermodynamic properties are investigated based on phonon properties.

  8. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-TR-8234 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations by DeCarlos E...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8234● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2015–30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualizing Energy on Target

  9. Interactions between low energy electrons and DNA: a perspective from first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; McAllister, Maeve; Tribello, Gareth A.; Gu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    studying these phenomena. Hence, a special place in this Topical Review is occupied by our recent first-principles molecular dynamics simulations that address the issue of how the environment favours or prevents LEEs from causing damage to DNA. We finish by summarising the conclusions achieved so far, and by suggesting a number of possible directions for further study.

  10. Calculations of thermodynamic properties of PuO{sub 2} by the first-principles and lattice vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minamoto, Satoshi [Energy and Industrial Systems Department, ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation, Kasumigaseki 3-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-6080 (Japan)], E-mail: satoshi.minamoto@ctc-g.co.jp; Kato, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2145-2 Narita-chou, Oarai-chou, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    Plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) is a key compound of mixed oxide fuel (MOX fuel). To predict the thermal properties of PuO{sub 2} at high temperature, it is important to understand the properties of MOX fuel. In this study, thermodynamic properties of PuO{sub 2} were evaluated by coupling of first-principles and lattice dynamics calculation. Cohesive energy was estimated from first-principles calculations, and the contribution of lattice vibration to total energy was evaluated by phonon calculations. Thermodynamic properties such as volume thermal expansion, bulk modulus and specific heat of PuO{sub 2} were investigated up to 1500 K.

  11. Calculations of thermodynamic properties of PuO2 by the first-principles and lattice vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masato; Konashi, Kenji; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ) is a key compound of mixed oxide fuel (MOX fuel). To predict the thermal properties of PuO 2 at high temperature, it is important to understand the properties of MOX fuel. In this study, thermodynamic properties of PuO 2 were evaluated by coupling of first-principles and lattice dynamics calculation. Cohesive energy was estimated from first-principles calculations, and the contribution of lattice vibration to total energy was evaluated by phonon calculations. Thermodynamic properties such as volume thermal expansion, bulk modulus and specific heat of PuO 2 were investigated up to 1500 K

  12. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  13. Pattern recognition in molecular dynamics. [FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, W H; Schieve, W C [Texas Univ., Austin (USA)

    1977-07-01

    An algorithm for the recognition of the formation of bound molecular states in the computer simulation of a dilute gas is presented. Applications to various related problems in physics and chemistry are pointed out. Data structure and decision processes are described. Performance of the FORTRAN program based on the algorithm in cooperation with the molecular dynamics program is described and the results are presented.

  14. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungen, Ch. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  15. Lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation of complex materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplot, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we briefly review the lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation techniques, as used for complex ionic and molecular solids, and demonstrate a number of applications through examples of our work. These computational studies, along with experiments, have provided microscopic insight into the structure and dynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamical properties of a variety of materials including fullerene, high temperature superconducting oxides and geological minerals as a function of pressure and temperature. The computational techniques also allow the study of the structures and dynamics associated with disorder, defects, surfaces, interfaces etc. (author)

  16. First Principles Modeling of Phonon Heat Conduction in Nanoscale Crystalline Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, Sandip; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    of optical phonons, and (2) by developing a suite of numerical algorithms for solution of the BTE for phonons. The suite of numerical algorithms includes Monte Carlo techniques and deterministic techniques based on the Discrete Ordinates Method and the Ballistic-Diffusive approximation of the BTE. These methods were applied to calculation of thermal conductivity of silicon thin films, and to simulate heat conduction in multi-dimensional structures. In addition, thermal transport in silicon nanowires was investigated using two different first principles methods. One was to apply the Green-Kubo formulation to an equilibrium system. The other was to use Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD). Results of MD simulations showed that the nanowire cross-sectional shape and size significantly affects the thermal conductivity, as has been found experimentally. In summary, the project clarified the role of various phonon modes - in particular, optical phonon - in non-equilibrium transport in silicon. It laid the foundation for the solution of the BTE in complex three-dimensional structures using deterministic techniques, paving the way for the development of robust numerical tools that could be coupled to existing device simulation tools to enable coupled electro-thermal modeling of practical electronic/optoelectronic devices. Finally, it shed light on why the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires is so sensitive to its cross-sectional shape.

  17. A generalized Poisson solver for first-principles device simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost, E-mail: joost.vandevondele@mat.ethz.ch [Nanoscale Simulations, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Brück, Sascha; Luisier, Mathieu [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Electronic structure calculations of atomistic systems based on density functional theory involve solving the Poisson equation. In this paper, we present a plane-wave based algorithm for solving the generalized Poisson equation subject to periodic or homogeneous Neumann conditions on the boundaries of the simulation cell and Dirichlet type conditions imposed at arbitrary subdomains. In this way, source, drain, and gate voltages can be imposed across atomistic models of electronic devices. Dirichlet conditions are enforced as constraints in a variational framework giving rise to a saddle point problem. The resulting system of equations is then solved using a stationary iterative method in which the generalized Poisson operator is preconditioned with the standard Laplace operator. The solver can make use of any sufficiently smooth function modelling the dielectric constant, including density dependent dielectric continuum models. For all the boundary conditions, consistent derivatives are available and molecular dynamics simulations can be performed. The convergence behaviour of the scheme is investigated and its capabilities are demonstrated.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: First principles studies of multiferroic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picozzi, Silvia; Ederer, Claude

    2009-07-01

    Multiferroics, materials where spontaneous long-range magnetic and dipolar orders coexist, represent an attractive class of compounds, which combine rich and fascinating fundamental physics with a technologically appealing potential for applications in the general area of spintronics. Ab initio calculations have significantly contributed to recent progress in this area, by elucidating different mechanisms for multiferroicity and providing essential information on various compounds where these effects are manifestly at play. In particular, here we present examples of density-functional theory investigations for two main classes of materials: (a) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by hybridization or purely structural effects, with BiFeO3 as the prototype material, and (b) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by correlation effects and is strongly linked to electronic degrees of freedom such as spin-, charge-, or orbital-ordering, with rare-earth manganites as prototypes. As for the first class of multiferroics, first principles calculations are shown to provide an accurate qualitative and quantitative description of the physics in BiFeO3, ranging from the prediction of large ferroelectric polarization and weak ferromagnetism, over the effect of epitaxial strain, to the identification of possible scenarios for coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic order. For the second class of multiferroics, ab initio calculations have shown that, in those cases where spin-ordering breaks inversion symmetry (e.g. in antiferromagnetic E-type HoMnO3), the magnetically induced ferroelectric polarization can be as large as a few µC cm-2. The examples presented point the way to several possible avenues for future research: on the technological side, first principles simulations can contribute to a rational materials design, aimed at identifying spintronic materials that exhibit ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at or above room temperature. On the

  19. Intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit torques from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geranton, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    This thesis attempts to shed light on the microscopic mechanisms underlying the current-induced magnetic torques in ferromagnetic heterostructures. We have developed first principles methods aiming at the accurate and effcient calculation of the so-called spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in magnetic thin films. The emphasis of this work is on the impurity-driven extrinsic SOTs. The main part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a formalism for the calculation of the SOTs within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) method. The impurity-induced transitions rates are obtained from first principles and their effect on transport properties is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. The developed formalism provides a mean to compute the SOTs beyond the conventional constant relaxation time approximation. We first apply our formalism to the investigation of FePt/Pt and Co/Cu bilayers in the presence of defects and impurities. Our results hint at a crucial dependence of the torque on the type of disorder present in the films, which we explain by a complex interplay of several competing Fermi surface contributions to the SOT. Astonishingly, specific defect distributions or doping elements lead respectively to an increase or a sign change of the torque, which can not be explained on the basis of simple models. We also compute the intrinsic SOT induced by electrical and thermal currents within the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. Motivated by recent experimental works, we then investigate the microscopic origin of the SOT in a Ag_2Bi-terminated Ag film grown on ferromagnetic Fe(110). We find that the torque in that system can not be explained solely by the spin-orbit coupling in the Ag_2Bi alloy, and instead results from the spin-orbit coupling in all regions of the film.Finally, we predict a large SOT in Fe/Ge bilayers and suggest that semiconductor substrates might be a promising alternative to heavy metals for the development of SOT-based magnetic

  20. Exact results and open questions in first principle functional RG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Some aspects of the functional RG (FRG) approach to pinned elastic manifolds (of internal dimension d) at finite temperature T > 0 are reviewed and reexamined in this much expanded version of Le Doussal (2006) . The particle limit d = 0 provides a test for the theory: there the FRG is equivalent to the decaying Burgers equation, with viscosity ν ∼ T-both being formally irrelevant. An outstanding question in FRG, i.e. how temperature regularizes the otherwise singular flow of T = 0 FRG, maps to the viscous layer regularization of inertial range Burgers turbulence (i.e. to the construction of the inviscid limit). Analogy between Kolmogorov scaling and FRG cumulant scaling is discussed. First, multi-loop FRG corrections are examined and the direct loop expansion at T > 0 is shown to fail already in d = 0, a hierarchy of ERG equations being then required (introduced in Balents and Le Doussal (2005) ). Next we prove that the FRG function R(u) and higher cumulants defined from the field theory can be obtained for any d from moments of a renormalized potential defined in an sliding harmonic well. This allows to measure the fixed point function R(u) in numerics and experiments. In d = 0 the beta function (of the inviscid limit) is obtained from first principles to four loop. For Sinai model (uncorrelated Burgers initial velocities) the ERG hierarchy can be solved and the exact function R(u) is obtained. Connections to exact solutions for the statistics of shocks in Burgers and to ballistic aggregation are detailed. A relation is established between the size distribution of shocks and the one for droplets. A droplet solution to the ERG functional hierarchy is found for any d, and the form of R(u) in the thermal boundary layer is related to droplet probabilities. These being known for the d = 0 Sinai model the function R(u) is obtained there at any T. Consistency of the ε=4-d expansion in one and two loop FRG is studied from first principles, and connected to shock and

  1. Intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit torques from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geranton, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    This thesis attempts to shed light on the microscopic mechanisms underlying the current-induced magnetic torques in ferromagnetic heterostructures. We have developed first principles methods aiming at the accurate and effcient calculation of the so-called spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in magnetic thin films. The emphasis of this work is on the impurity-driven extrinsic SOTs. The main part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a formalism for the calculation of the SOTs within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) method. The impurity-induced transitions rates are obtained from first principles and their effect on transport properties is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. The developed formalism provides a mean to compute the SOTs beyond the conventional constant relaxation time approximation. We first apply our formalism to the investigation of FePt/Pt and Co/Cu bilayers in the presence of defects and impurities. Our results hint at a crucial dependence of the torque on the type of disorder present in the films, which we explain by a complex interplay of several competing Fermi surface contributions to the SOT. Astonishingly, specific defect distributions or doping elements lead respectively to an increase or a sign change of the torque, which can not be explained on the basis of simple models. We also compute the intrinsic SOT induced by electrical and thermal currents within the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. Motivated by recent experimental works, we then investigate the microscopic origin of the SOT in a Ag{sub 2}Bi-terminated Ag film grown on ferromagnetic Fe(110). We find that the torque in that system can not be explained solely by the spin-orbit coupling in the Ag{sub 2}Bi alloy, and instead results from the spin-orbit coupling in all regions of the film.Finally, we predict a large SOT in Fe/Ge bilayers and suggest that semiconductor substrates might be a promising alternative to heavy metals for the development of SOT

  2. First Principles Modeling and Interpretation of Ionization-Triggered Charge Migration in Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Adam; Hernandez, Sam; Mauger, Francois; Abanador, Paul; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Ken; Lopata, Ken

    Modeling attosecond coherent charge migration in molecules is important for understanding initial steps of photochemistry and light harvesting processes. Ionization triggered hole migration can be difficult to characterize and interpret as the dynamics can be convoluted with excited states. Here, we introduce a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) approach for modeling such dynamics from first principles. To isolate the specific hole dynamics from excited states, Fourier transform analysis and orbital occupations are used to provide a spatial hole representation in the frequency domain. These techniques are applied to hole transfer across a thiophene dimer as well as core-hole triggered valence motion in nitrosobenzene. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award No. DE-SC0012462.

  3. First-Principle Characterization for Singlet Fission Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chou-Hsun; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2015-05-21

    The electronic coupling for singlet fission, an important parameter for determining the rate, has been found to be too small unless charge-transfer (CT) components were introduced in the diabatic states, mostly through perturbation or a model Hamiltonian. In the present work, the fragment spin difference (FSD) scheme was generalized to calculate the singlet fission coupling. The largest coupling strength obtained was 14.8 meV for two pentacenes in a crystal structure, or 33.7 meV for a transition-state structure, which yielded a singlet fission lifetime of 239 or 37 fs, generally consistent with experimental results (80 fs). Test results with other polyacene molecules are similar. We found that the charge on one fragment in the S1 diabatic state correlates well with FSD coupling, indicating the importance of the CT component. The FSD approach is a useful first-principle method for singlet fission coupling, without the need to include the CT component explicitly.

  4. A first principle approach for encapsulated type composite detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, R

    2012-01-01

    A first principle approach is presented for modeling a composite detector consisting of several high-purity germanium detector modules. Without making assumptions, if we consider the full energy peak counts from single and multiple detector module interactions, and the decomposition of background counts to counts corresponding to the escaping γ-rays and counts for γ-rays which could be recovered in addback mode, it is observed that the addback mode of a composite detector could be described in terms of four probability amplitudes only. Expressions for peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios are obtained. Considering details of the scattering and absorption processes in a composite detector, a formalism is introduced for understanding the probability amplitudes. Detailed investigation has been performed on the effect of shape and size of composite detectors on peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios. In accordance with isoperimetric inequality for hexagonal shapes, we have discussed about the optimal design of detector layout for extremely large values of detector modules. Using experimental data on relative single crystal efficiency, addback factor and peak-to-total ratio at 1332 keV for cluster detector, the peak-to-total and peak-to-background ratios have been calculated for several composite detectors.

  5. First principles studies of complex oxide surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, Claudine; Finocchi, Fabio; Goniakowski, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Oxides enter our everyday life and exhibit an impressive variety of physical and chemical properties. The understanding of their behaviour, which is often determined by the electronic and atomic structures of their surfaces and interfaces, is a key question in many fields, such as geology, environmental chemistry, catalysis, thermal coatings, microelectronics, and bioengineering. In the last decade, first principles methods, mainly those based on the density functional theory, have been frequently applied to study complex oxide surfaces and interfaces, complementing the experimental observations. In this work, we discuss some of these contributions, with emphasis on several issues that are especially important when dealing with oxides: the local electronic structure at interfaces, and its connection with chemical reactivity; the charge redistribution and the bonding variations, in relation to screening properties; and the possibility of bridging the gap between model and real systems by taking into account the chemical environments and the effect of finite temperatures, and by performing simulations on systems of an adequate (large) size

  6. Safeguards First Principles Initiative at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was selected as a test bed for the Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI). The implementation of the SFPI is evaluated using the system effectiveness model and the program is managed under an approved MC and A Plan. The effectiveness model consists of an evaluation of the critical elements necessary to detect, deter, and/or prevent the theft or diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The modeled results indicate that the MC and A program established under this variance is still effective, without creating unacceptable risk. Extensive performance testing is conducted through the duration of the pilot to ensure the protection system is effective and no material is at an unacceptable risk. The pilot was conducted from January 1, 2007, through May 30, 2007. This paper will discuss the following activities in association with SFPI: (1) Development of Timeline; (2) Crosswalk of DOE Order and SFPI; (3) Peer Review; (4) Deviation; (5) MC and A Plan and Procedure changes; (6) Changes implemented at NTS; (7) Training; and (8) Performance Test

  7. Thermophysical properties of paramagnetic Fe from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Hossein; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.

    2017-12-01

    A computationally efficient, yet general, free-energy modeling scheme is developed based on first-principles calculations. Finite-temperature disorder associated with the fast (electronic and magnetic) degrees of freedom is directly included in the electronic structure calculations, whereas the vibrational free energy is evaluated by a proposed model that uses elastic constants to calculate average sound velocity of the quasiharmonic Debye model. The proposed scheme is tested by calculating the lattice parameter, heat capacity, and single-crystal elastic constants of α -, γ -, and δ -iron as functions of temperature in the range 1000-1800 K. The calculations accurately reproduce the well-established experimental data on thermal expansion and heat capacity of γ - and δ -iron. Electronic and magnetic excitations are shown to account for about 20% of the heat capacity for the two phases. Nonphonon contributions to thermal expansion are 12% and 10% for α - and δ -Fe and about 30% for γ -Fe. The elastic properties predicted by the model are in good agreement with those obtained in previous theoretical treatments of paramagnetic phases of iron, as well as with the bulk moduli derived from isothermal compressibility measurements [N. Tsujino et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 375, 244 (2013), 10.1016/j.epsl.2013.05.040]. Less agreement is found between theoretically calculated and experimentally derived single-crystal elastic constants of γ - and δ -iron.

  8. Automated first-principles mapping for phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marc; Maintz, Stefan; Dronskowski, Richard

    2017-04-05

    Plotting materials on bi-coordinate maps according to physically meaningful descriptors has a successful tradition in computational solid-state science spanning more than four decades. Equipped with new ab initio techniques introduced in this work, we generate an improved version of the treasure map for phase-change materials (PCMs) as introduced previously by Lencer et al. which, other than before, charts all industrially used PCMs correctly. Furthermore, we suggest seven new PCM candidates, namely SiSb 4 Te 7 , Si 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , SiAs 2 Te 4 , PbAs 2 Te 4 , SiSb 2 Te 4 , Sn 2 As 2 Te 5 , and PbAs 4 Te 7 , to be used as synthetic targets. To realize aforementioned maps based on orbital mixing (or "hybridization") and ionicity coordinates, structural information was first included into an ab initio numerical descriptor for sp 3 orbital mixing and then generalized beyond high-symmetry structures. In addition, a simple, yet powerful quantum-mechanical ionization measure also including structural information was introduced. Taken together, these tools allow for (automatically) generating materials maps solely relying on first-principles calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Leptogenesis from first principles in the resonant regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Kartavtsev, Alexander; Hohenegger, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    The lepton asymmetry generated by the out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos with a quasi-degenerate mass spectrum is resonantly enhanced. In this work, we study this scenario within a first-principle approach. The quantum field theoretical treatment is applicable for mass splittings of the order of the width of the Majorana neutrinos, for which the enhancement is maximally large. The non-equilibrium evolution of the mixing Majorana neutrino fields is described by a formal analytical solution of the Kadanoff-Baym equations, that is obtained by neglecting the back-reaction. Based on this solution, we derive approximate analytical expressions for the generated asymmetry and compare them to the Boltzmann result. We find that the resonant enhancement obtained from the Kadanoff-Baym approach is smaller compared to the Boltzmann approach, due to additional contributions that describe coherent transitions between the Majorana neutrino species. We also discuss corrections to the masses and widths of the degenerate pair of Majorana neutrinos that are relevant for very small mass splitting, and compare the approximate analytical result for the lepton asymmetry with numerical results. (orig.)

  10. Defect ordering in aliovalently doped cubic zirconia from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogicevic, A.; Wolverton, C.; Crosbie, G.M.; Stechel, E.B.

    2001-01-01

    Defect ordering in aliovalently doped cubic-stabilized zirconia is studied using gradient corrected density-functional calculations. Intra- and intersublattice ordering interactions are investigated for both cation (Zr and dopant ions) and anion (oxygen ions and vacancies) species. For yttria-stabilized zirconia, the crystal structure of the experimentally identified, ordered compound δ-Zr 3 Y 4 O 12 is established, and we predict metastable zirconia-rich ordered phases. Anion vacancies repel each other at short separations, but show an energetic tendency to align as third-nearest neighbors along directions. Calculations with divalent (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and trivalent (Y, Sc, B, Al, Ga, In) oxides show that anion vacancies prefer to be close to the smaller of the cations (Zr or dopant ion). When the dopant cation is close in size to Zr, the vacancies show no particular preference, and are thus less prone to be bound preferentially to any particular cation type when the vacancies traverse such oxides. This ordering tendency offers insight into the observed high conductivity of Y 2 O 3 - and Sc 2 O 3 -stabilized zirconia, as well as recent results using, e.g., lanthanide oxides. The calculations point to In 2 O 3 as a particularly promising stabilizer for high ionic conductivity. Thus we are able to directly link (thermodynamic) defect ordering to (kinetic) ionic conductivity in cubic-stabilized zirconia using first-principles atomistic calculations

  11. Leptogenesis from first principles in the resonant regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kartavtsev, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohenegger, Andreas [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    The lepton asymmetry generated by the out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy Majorana neutrinos with a quasi-degenerate mass spectrum is resonantly enhanced. In this work, we study this scenario within a first-principle approach. The quantum field theoretical treatment is applicable for mass splittings of the order of the width of the Majorana neutrinos, for which the enhancement is maximally large. The non-equilibrium evolution of the mixing Majorana neutrino fields is described by a formal analytical solution of the Kadanoff-Baym equations, that is obtained by neglecting the back-reaction. Based on this solution, we derive approximate analytical expressions for the generated asymmetry and compare them to the Boltzmann result. We find that the resonant enhancement obtained from the Kadanoff-Baym approach is smaller compared to the Boltzmann approach, due to additional contributions that describe coherent transitions between the Majorana neutrino species. We also discuss corrections to the masses and widths of the degenerate pair of Majorana neutrinos that are relevant for very small mass splitting, and compare the approximate analytical result for the lepton asymmetry with numerical results. (orig.)

  12. Accurate line intensities of methane from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Andrei V.; Rey, Michael; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report first-principle theoretical predictions of methane spectral line intensities that are competitive with (and complementary to) the best laboratory measurements. A detailed comparison with the most accurate data shows that discrepancies in integrated polyad intensities are in the range of 0.4%-2.3%. This corresponds to estimations of the best available accuracy in laboratory Fourier Transform spectra measurements for this quantity. For relatively isolated strong lines the individual intensity deviations are in the same range. A comparison with the most precise laser measurements of the multiplet intensities in the 2ν3 band gives an agreement within the experimental error margins (about 1%). This is achieved for the first time for five-atomic molecules. In the Supplementary Material we provide the lists of theoretical intensities at 269 K for over 5000 strongest transitions in the range below 6166 cm-1. The advantage of the described method is that this offers a possibility to generate fully assigned exhaustive line lists at various temperature conditions. Extensive calculations up to 12,000 cm-1 including high-T predictions will be made freely available through the TheoReTS information system (http://theorets.univ-reims.fr, http://theorets.tsu.ru) that contains ab initio born line lists and provides a user-friendly graphical interface for a fast simulation of the absorption cross-sections and radiance.

  13. Quasiballistic heat removal from small sources studied from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Bjorn; Mingo, Natalio

    2018-01-01

    Heat sources whose characteristic dimension R is comparable to phonon mean free paths display thermal resistances that exceed conventional diffusive predictions. This has direct implications to (opto)electronics thermal management and phonon spectroscopy. Theoretical analyses have so far limited themselves to particular experimental configurations. Here, we build upon the multidimensional Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) to derive universal expressions for the apparent conductivity suppression S (R ) =κeff(R ) /κbulk experienced by radially symmetric 2D and 3D sources. In striking analogy to cross-plane heat conduction in thin films, a distinct quasiballistic regime emerges between ballistic (κeff˜R ) and diffusive (κeff≃κbulk ) asymptotes that displays a logarithmic dependence κeff˜ln(R ) in single crystals and fractional power dependence κeff˜R2 -α in alloys (with α the Lévy superdiffusion exponent). Analytical solutions and Monte Carlo simulations for spherical and circular heat sources in Si, GaAs, Si0.99Ge0.01 , and Si0.82Ge0.18 , all carried out from first principles, confirm the predicted generic tendencies. Contrary to the thin film case, common approximations like kinetic theory estimates κeff≃∑Sωgreyκω and modified Fourier temperature curves perform relatively poorly. Up to threefold deviations from the BTE solutions for sub-100 nm sources underline the need for rigorous treatment of multidimensional nondiffusive transport.

  14. Multipole moments of water molecules in clusters and ice Ih from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, E.R.; Xantheas, S.S.; Jonsson, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated molecular multipole moments for water molecules in clusters and in ice Ih by partitioning the charge density obtained from first principles calculations. Various schemes for dividing the electronic charge density among the water molecules were used. They include Bader close-quote s zero flux surfaces and Voronoi partitioning schemes. A comparison was also made with an induction model including dipole, dipole-quadrupole, quadrupole-quadrupole polarizability and first hyperpolarizability as well as fixed octopole and hexadecapole moments. We have found that the different density partitioning schemes lead to widely different values for the molecular multipoles, illustrating how poorly defined molecular multipoles are in clusters and condensed environments. For instance, the magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in ice Ih ranges between 2.3 D and 3.1 D depending on the partitioning scheme used. Within each scheme, though, the value for the molecular dipole moment in ice is larger than in the hexamer. The magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in the clusters shows a monotonic increase from the gas phase value to the one in ice Ih, with the molecular dipole moment in the water ring hexamer being smaller than the one in ice Ih for all the partitioning schemes used. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Rectification effect about vacuum separating carbon nanotube bundle predicted by first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Y., E-mail: minshiyi@gmail.com [School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, 226007 (China); Fang, J.H.; Zhong, C.G. [School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, 226007 (China); Yao, K.L. [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2012-05-07

    For the molecular spintronics transport systems, we propose that the spin current rectifier can be constructed using the nonmagnetic lead. The proposal is confirmed according to the first-principles study of the transport characteristics of a vacuum separating (15,0) carbon nanotube bundle where only one zigzag edge is hydrogenated. The strong rectification effect for spin (charge) current is obtained in the case of the magnetic parallel (anti-parallel) configuration of two zigzag edges. Our investigations indicate that such device can be used as the spin filter and the counterpart of the p–n junction in the field of molecular electronics. -- Highlights: ► We propose that nonmagnetic leads can construct spin current rectifier. ► We propose a spin diode and a filter using CNT. ► The spin and charge current all have the rectification effect in the one-dimensional spin diode.

  16. Deep Potential Molecular Dynamics: A Scalable Model with the Accuracy of Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linfeng; Han, Jiequn; Wang, Han; Car, Roberto; E, Weinan

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a scheme for molecular simulations, the deep potential molecular dynamics (DPMD) method, based on a many-body potential and interatomic forces generated by a carefully crafted deep neural network trained with ab initio data. The neural network model preserves all the natural symmetries in the problem. It is first-principles based in the sense that there are no ad hoc components aside from the network model. We show that the proposed scheme provides an efficient and accurate protocol in a variety of systems, including bulk materials and molecules. In all these cases, DPMD gives results that are essentially indistinguishable from the original data, at a cost that scales linearly with system size.

  17. Wavelet Analysis for Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Our method takes as input the topology and sparsity of the bonding structure of a molecular system, and returns a hierarchical set of system-specific...problems, such as modeling crack initiation and propagation, or interfacial phenomena. In the present work, we introduce a wavelet-based approach to extend...Several functional forms are common for angle poten- tials complicating not only implementation but also choice of approximation. In all cases, the

  18. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical......Molecular machines, or molecular motors, are small biophysical devices that perform a variety of essential metabolic processes such as DNA replication, protein synthesis and intracellular transport. Typically, these machines operate by converting chemical energy into motion and mechanical work. Due...... mechanics. The first part focuses on noninteracting molecular machines described by a paradigmatic continuum model with the aim of comparing and contrasting such a description to the one offered by the widely used discrete models. Many molecular motors, for example, kinesin involved in cellular cargo...

  19. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  20. Risk reduction and the privatization option: First principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Jones, D.W.; Russell, M.; Cummings, R.C.; Valdez, G.; Duemmer, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) faces a challenging mission. To increase efficiency, EM is undertaking a number of highly innovative initiatives--two of which are of particular importance to the present study. One is the 2006 Plan, a planning and budgeting process that seeks to convert the clean-up program from a temporally and fiscally open-ended endeavor to a strictly bounded one, with firm commitments over a decade-long horizon. The second is a major overhauling of the management and contracting practices that define the relationship between the Department and the private sector, aimed at cost reduction by increasing firms' responsibilities and profit opportunities and reducing DOE's direct participation in management practices and decisions. The goal of this paper is to provide an independent perspective on how EM should create new management practices to deal with private sector partners that are motivated by financial incentives. It seeks to ground this perspective in real world concerns--the background of the clean-up effort, the very difficult technical challenges it faces, the very real threats to environment, health and safety that have now been juxtaposed with financial drivers, and the constraints imposed by government's unique business practices and public responsibilities. The approach is to raise issues through application of first principles. The paper is targeted at the EM policy officer who must implement the joint visions of the 2006 plan and privatization within the context of the tradeoff between terminal risk reduction and interim risk management

  1. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Braden, E-mail: goddard.braden@gmail.com [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Charlton, William [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Peerani, Paolo [European Commission, EC-JRC-ITU, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (∼0.2 wt% {sup 235}U) to high enriched (>20 wt% {sup 235}U); compositions consisting of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, UO{sub 2}, UF{sub 6}, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since {sup 235}U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the {sup 235}U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the “known standard” method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact {sup 235}U sample masses.

  2. Risk reduction and the privatization option: First principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Jones, D.W.; Russell, M. [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cummings, R.C.; Valdez, G. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Duemmer, C.L. [Hull, Duemmer and Garland (United States)

    1997-06-25

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) faces a challenging mission. To increase efficiency, EM is undertaking a number of highly innovative initiatives--two of which are of particular importance to the present study. One is the 2006 Plan, a planning and budgeting process that seeks to convert the clean-up program from a temporally and fiscally open-ended endeavor to a strictly bounded one, with firm commitments over a decade-long horizon. The second is a major overhauling of the management and contracting practices that define the relationship between the Department and the private sector, aimed at cost reduction by increasing firms` responsibilities and profit opportunities and reducing DOE`s direct participation in management practices and decisions. The goal of this paper is to provide an independent perspective on how EM should create new management practices to deal with private sector partners that are motivated by financial incentives. It seeks to ground this perspective in real world concerns--the background of the clean-up effort, the very difficult technical challenges it faces, the very real threats to environment, health and safety that have now been juxtaposed with financial drivers, and the constraints imposed by government`s unique business practices and public responsibilities. The approach is to raise issues through application of first principles. The paper is targeted at the EM policy officer who must implement the joint visions of the 2006 plan and privatization within the context of the tradeoff between terminal risk reduction and interim risk management.

  3. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  4. Molecular dynamics and diffusion a compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David

    2013-01-01

    The molecular dynamics technique was developed in the 1960s as the outgrowth of attempts to model complicated systems by using either a) direct physical simulation or (following the great success of Monte Carlo methods) by b) using computer techniques. Computer simulation soon won out over clumsy physical simulation, and the ever-increasing speed and sophistication of computers has naturally made molecular dynamics simulation into a more and more successful technique. One of its most popular applications is the study of diffusion, and some experts now even claim that molecular dynamics simulation is, in the case of situations involving well-characterised elements and structures, more accurate than experimental measurement. The present double volume includes a compilation (over 600 items) of predicted solid-state diffusion data, for all of the major materials groups, dating back nearly four decades. The double volume also includes some original papers: "Determination of the Activation Energy for Formation and ...

  5. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Nanofluidic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano Rodriguez, Harvey Alexander

    of such devices. Computational nanofluidics complements experimental studies by providing detailed spatial and temporal information of the nanosystem. In this thesis, we conduct molecular dynamics simulations to study basic nanoscale devices. We focus our studies on the understanding of transport mechanism...... to drive fluids and solids at the nanoscale. Specifically, we present the results of three different research projects. Throughout the first part of this thesis, we include a comprenhensive introduction to computational nanofluidics and to molecular simulations, and describe the molecular dynamics...... in opposite direction to the imposed thermal gradient also we measure higher velocities as higher thermal gradients are imposed. Secondly, we present an atomistic analysis of a molecular linear motor fabricated of coaxial carbon nanotubes and powered by thermal gradients. The MD simulation results indicate...

  6. Vibrational and mechanical properties of single layer MXene structures: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Uğur; Özden, Ayberk; Perkgöz, Nihan K.; Ay, Feridun; Sevik, Cem

    2016-08-01

    MXenes, carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides of early transition metals are the new members of two dimensional materials family given with a formula of {{{M}}}n+1 X n . Recent advances in chemical exfoliation and CVD growth of these crystals together with their promising performance in electrochemical energy storage systems have triggered the interest in these two dimensional structures. In this work, we employ first principles calculations for n = 1 structures of Sc, Ti, Zr, Mo and Hf pristine MXenes and their fully surface terminated forms with F and O. We systematically investigated the dynamical and mechanical stability of both pristine and fully terminated MXene structures to determine the possible MXene candidates for experimental realization. In conjunction with an extensive stability analysis, we report Raman and infrared active mode frequencies for the first time, providing indispensable information for the experimental elaboration of MXene field. After determining dynamically stable MXenes, we provide their phonon dispersion relations, electronic and mechanical properties.

  7. Molecular dynamics modeling of polymer flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyden, M.R.; Brown, J.E.; Lomakin, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were used to identify factors which promote char formation during the thermal degradation of polymers. Computer movies based on these simulations, indicate that cross-linked model polymers tend to undergo further cross-linking when burned, eventually forming a high molecular weight, thermally stable char. This paper reports that the prediction was confirmed by char yield measurements made on γ and e - -irradiated polyethylene and chemically cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate)

  8. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  9. Theory and application of quantum molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng Hui Zhang, John

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a detailed presentation of modern quantum theories for treating the reaction dynamics of small molecular systems. Its main focus is on the recent development of successful quantum dynamics theories and computational methods for studying the molecular reactive scattering process, with specific applications given in detail for a number of benchmark chemical reaction systems in the gas phase and the gas surface. In contrast to traditional books on collision in physics focusing on abstract theory for nonreactive scattering, this book deals with both the development and the appli

  10. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  11. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  12. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.; Self, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD 3 OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  13. First-principles study of the Pd–Si system and Pd(001)/SiC(001) hetero-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, P.E.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ivashchenko, V.I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU), Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-11-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of the Pd(001)/3C–SiC(001) nano-layered structure were carried out at different temperatures ranging from 300 to 2100 K. Various PdSi (Pnma, Fm3m, P6m2, Pm3m), Pd2Si (P6⁻2m, P63/mmc, P3m1, P3⁻1m) and Pd3Si (Pnma, P6322, Pm3m, I4/mmm) structures under pressure were studied to identify the structure of the Pd/Si and Pd/C interfaces in the Pd/SiC systems at high temperatures. It was found that a large atomic mixing at the Pd/Si interface occurred at 1500–1800 K, whereas the Pd/C interface remained sharp even at the highest temperature of 2100 K. At the Pd/C interface, voids and a graphite-like clustering were detected. Palladium and silicon atoms interact at the Pd/Si interface to mostly form C22-Pd2Si and D011-Pd3Si fragments, in agreement with experiment.

  14. Cs adsorption mechanism on clay minerals based on material sciences using synchrotron radiation and first principle calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Toru; Ikeda, Takashi; Matsumura, Daiju; Machida, Masahiko; Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive Cs released from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident is one of the important sources to increase air dose rate in environment, and thus the local and Japanese governments are still promoting the decontamination project in the contaminated area in Fukushima. On this backgrounds, in this study, 'the comprehensive researches', i.e., the elucidation of Cs speciation through the structural and electronic structural studies in clay minerals for supporting to develop the promising volume reduction methods of soil wastes (we will not touch the chemical treatment, wet classification, incineration, and alkaline fusion methods in this article) and the evaluation of Cs stability in soil wastes over mid- to long-term period, and the field investigation for elucidation of seasonal variation of bottom soil of agricultural reservoir in litate village on considering the features of local soil in Fukushima, have been performed. In this article, we introduce a part of the results obtaining by the synchrotron based X-ray analysis and the first principle molecular dynamics simulation methods. (author)

  15. First-principles modeling of titanate/ruthenate superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junquera, Javier

    2013-03-01

    The possibility to create highly confined two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) at oxide interfaces has generated much excitement during the last few years. The most widely studied system is the 2DEG formed at the LaO/TiO2 polar interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, where the polar catastrophe at the interface has been invoked as the driving force. More recently, partial or complete delta doping of the Sr or Ti cations at a single layer of a SrTiO3 matrix has also been used to generate 2DEG. Following this recipe, we report first principles characterization of the structural and electronic properties of (SrTiO3)5/(SrRuO3)1 superlattices, where all the Ti of a given layer have been replaced by Ru. We show that the system exhibits a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas extremely confined to the 4 d orbitals of Ru in the SrRuO3 layer, a fact that is independent of the level of correlation included in the simulations. For hybrid functionals or LDA+U, every interface in the superlattice behaves as minority-spin half-metal ferromagnet, with a magnetic moment of μ = 2.0 μB/SrRuO3 unit. The shape of the electronic density of states, half metallicity and magnetism are explained in terms of a simplified tight-binding model, considering only the t2 g orbitals plus (i) the bi-dimensionality of the system, and (ii) strong electron correlations. Possible applications are discussed, from their eventual role in thermoelectric applications to the possible tuning of ferromagnetic properties of the 2DEG with the polarization of the dielectric. Work done in collaboration with P. García, M. Verissimo-Alves, D. I. Bilc, and Ph. Ghosez. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes.'' The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources, technical expertise and assistance provided by the BSC/RES.

  16. Development of molecular dynamics potential for uranium silicide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianguo; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    Use of uranium–silicide (U-Si) in place of uranium dioxide (UO2) is one of the promising concepts being proposed to increase the accident tolerance of nuclear fuels. This is due to a higher thermal conductivity than UO2 that results in lower centerline temperatures. U-Si also has a higher fissile density, which may enable some new cladding concepts that would otherwise require increased enrichment limits to compensate for their neutronic penalty. However, many critical material properties for U-Si have not been determined experimentally. For example, silicide compounds (U3Si2 and U3Si) are known to become amorphous under irradiation. There was clear independent experimental evidence to support a crystalline to amorphous transformation in those compounds. However, it is still not well understood how the amorphous transformation will affect on fuel behavior. It is anticipated that modeling and simulation may deliver guidance on the importance of various properties and help prioritize experimental work. In order to develop knowledge-based models for use at the engineering scale with a minimum of empirical parameters and increase the predictive capabilities of the developed model, inputs from atomistic simulations are essential. First-principles based density functional theory (DFT) calculations will provide the most reliable information. However, it is probably not possible to obtain kinetic information such as amorphization under irradiation directly from DFT simulations due to size and time limitations. Thus, a more feasible way may be to employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Unfortunately, so far no MD potential is available for U-Si to discover the underlying mechanisms. Here, we will present our recent progress in developing a U-Si potential from ab initio data. This work is supported by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahoshi, Y.; Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  18. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of RNA motifs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csaszar, K.; Špačková, Naďa; Šponer, Jiří; Leontis, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 223, - (2002), s. 154 ISSN 0065-7727. [Annual Meeting of the American Chemistry Society /223./. 07.04.2002-11.04.2002, Orlando ] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : molecular dynamics * RNA * hydration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of a phospholipid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberts, Egbert; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a phospholipid membrane in water, including full atomic detail. The goal of the simulations was twofold: first we wanted to set up a simulation system which is able to reproduce experimental results and can serve as a model membrane in

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that the imidazoline derivative molecules uses the imidazoline ring to effectively adsorb on the surface of iron, with the alkyl hydrophobic tail forming an n shape (canopy like covering) at geometry optimization and at 353 K. The n shape canopy like covering to a large extent may ...

  3. Nanotribology investigations with classical molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of nanotribological problems investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, within the context of the applicability of continuum mechanics contact theories at the atomic scale. Along these lines, three different themes can be recognized herein:

  4. Catalysis and communication in dynamic molecular networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanlo Virgos, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of a Dynamic Combinatorial Library (DCL) of molecules with specific targets leads to composition changes of the library which can reveal potential guests and / or catalysts. In this thesis some chemical systems have been proposed to achieve a certain level of molecular complexity

  5. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  6. First-principles study on electron transport properties of carbon-silicon mixed chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Zhou, Qinghua; Liang, Yan; Liu, Wenhua; Wang, Tao; Wan, Haiqing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the transport properties of carbon-silicon mixed chains are studied by using the first-principles. We studied five atomic chain models. In these studies, we found that the equilibrium conductances of atomic chains appear to oscillate, the maximum conductance and the minimum conductance are more than twice the difference. Their I-V curves are linear and show the behavior of metal resistance, M5 system and M2 system current ratio is the largest in 0.9 V, which is 3.3, showing a good molecular switch behavior. In the case of bias, while the bias voltage increases, the transmission peaks move from the Fermi level. The resonance transmission peak height is reduced near the Fermi level. In the higher energy range, a large resonance transmission peak reappears, there is still no energy cut-off range.

  7. First-Principles Investigations of Defects in Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok K.

    2011-07-01

    The ideal crystal has an infinite 3-dimensional repetition of identical units which may be atoms or molecules. But real crystals are limited in size and they have disorder in stacking which as called defects. Basically three types of defects exist in solids: 1) point defects, 2) line defects, and 3) surface defects. Common point defects are vacant lattice sites, interstitial atoms and impurities and these are known to influence strongly many solid-state transport properties such as diffusion, electrical conduction, creep, etc. In thermal equilibrium point defects concentrations are determined by their formation enthalpies and their movement by their migration barriers. Line and surface defects are though absent from the ideal crystal in thermal equilibrium due to higher energy costs but they are invariably present in all real crystals. Line defects include edge-, screw- and mixed-dislocations and their presence is essential in explaining the mechanical strength and deformation of real crystals. Surface defects may arise at the boundary between two grains, or small crystals, within a larger crystal. A wide variety of grain boundaries can form in a polycrystal depending on factors such growth conditions and thermal treatment. In this talk we will present our first-principles density functional theory based defect studies of SiO2 polymorphs (stishovite, CaCl2-, α-PbO2-, and pyrite-type), Mg2SiO4 polymorphs (forsterite, wadsleyite and ringwoodite) and MgO [1-3]. Briefly, several native point defects including vacancies, interstitials, and their complexes were studied in silica polymorphs upto 200 GPa. Their values increase by a factor of 2 over the entire pressure range studied with large differences in some cases between different phases. The Schottky defects are energetically most favorable at zero pressure whereas O-Frenkel pairs become systematically more favorable at pressures higher than 20 GPa. The geometric and electronic structures of defects and migrating

  8. Designing Next Generation Rechargeable Battery Materials from First-Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo

    Technology has advanced rapidly, especially in the twenty-first century, influencing our day-to-day life on unprecedented levels. Most such advances in technology are closely linked to, and often driven by, the discovery and design of new materials. It follows that the discovery of new materials can not only improve existing technologies but also lead to revolutionary ones. In particular, there is a growing need to develop new energy materials that are reliable, clean, and affordable for emerging applications such as portable electronics, electric vehicles, and power grid systems. Many researchers have been actively searching for more cost-effective and clean electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) during the last few decades. These new electrode materials are also required to achieve higher electrochemical performance, compared to the already commercialized electrodes. Unfortunately, discovering the next sustainable energy materials based on a traditional 'trial-and-error' method via experiment would be extremely slow and difficult. In the last two decades, computational compilations of battery material properties such as voltage, diffusivity, and phase stability against irreversible phase transformation(s) using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations have helped researchers to understand the underlying mechanism in many oxide materials that are used as LIB electrodes. Here, we have examined the (001) and (111) surface structures of LiMn2O4 (LMO) spinel cathode materials using DFT calculations within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) + U approach. Our theoretical results explain the observation of a wide spectrum of polyhedral shapes between (001)- and (111)-dominated LMO particles in experiments, which can be described by the narrow range of surface energies and their sensitivity to synthesis conditions. We further show that single-layer graphene coatings help suppress manganese dissolution in LMO by chemically

  9. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  10. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  11. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  12. Recent Progress in First-Principles Methods for Computing the Electronic Structure of Correlated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Nilsson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Substantial progress has been achieved in the last couple of decades in computing the electronic structure of correlated materials from first principles. This progress has been driven by parallel development in theory and numerical algorithms. Theoretical development in combining ab initio approaches and many-body methods is particularly promising. A crucial role is also played by a systematic method for deriving a low-energy model, which bridges the gap between real and model systems. In this article, an overview is given tracing the development from the LDA+U to the latest progress in combining the G W method and (extended dynamical mean-field theory ( G W +EDMFT. The emphasis is on conceptual and theoretical aspects rather than technical ones.

  13. First principles investigation of the structure of a bacteriochlorophyll crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchi, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)]|[Centre d`Etudes Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hutter, J.; Parrinello, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1996-08-21

    In this communication we present an ab initio study of the crystal of methyl bacteriophorbide (MeBPheo) a, a bacteriochlorophyll derivative, and high-precision structure of which is available. Our main purpose has been to investigate the viability of the technique toward complex molecular systems relevant to biologically important phenomena, in this particular case photosynthesis. Here we present the following results: First, we show that DFT is capable of calculating nuclear positions in excellent agreement with the experimental X-ray structure. Second, the calculated electronic density of the HOMO orbital reveals a {pi} type bond between rings I and III, consistent with the one-dimensional chain structure of the MeBPheo a molecules in the crystal. Finally, after performing the optimization of the molecular geometry with one electron in the LUMO state, we find localized bond length changes near the ring II of the MeBPheo a. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Ab Initio Molecular-Dynamics Simulation of Neuromorphic Computing in Phase-Change Memory Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Jonathan M; Loke, Desmond; Lee, Taehoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2015-07-08

    We present an in silico study of the neuromorphic-computing behavior of the prototypical phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, using ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Stepwise changes in structural order in response to temperature pulses of varying length and duration are observed, and a good reproduction of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity observed in nanoelectronic synapses is demonstrated. Short above-melting pulses lead to instantaneous loss of structural and chemical order, followed by delayed partial recovery upon structural relaxation. We also investigate the link between structural order and electrical and optical properties. These results pave the way toward a first-principles understanding of phase-change physics beyond binary switching.

  15. Orthonormal Wavelet Bases for Quantum Molecular Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tymczak, C.; Wang, X.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the use of compactly supported, orthonormal wavelet bases for quantum molecular-dynamics (Car-Parrinello) algorithms. A wavelet selection scheme is developed and tested for prototypical problems, such as the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and the local density approximation to atomic and molecular systems. Our method shows systematic convergence with increased grid size, along with improvement on compression rates, thereby yielding an optimal grid for self-consistent electronic structure calculations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. First-principles density functional theory (DFT) study of gold nanorod and its interaction with alkanethiol ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang; Reven, Linda; Rey, Alejandro

    2013-10-17

    The structure and mechanical properties of gold nanorods and their interactions with alkenthiolate self-assembled monolayers have been determined using a novel first-principle density functional theory simulation approach. The multifaceted, 1-dimensional, octagonal nanorod has alternate Au100 and Au110 surfaces. The structural optimization of the gold nanorods was performed with a mixed basis: the outermost layer of gold atoms used double-ζ plus polarization (DZP), the layer below used double-ζ (DZ), and the inner layers used single-ζ (SZ). The final structure compares favorably with simulations using DZP for all atoms. Phonon dispersion calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) were used to establish the dynamic and thermal stability of the system. From the AIMD simulations it was found that the nanorod system will undergo significant surface reconstruction at 300 K. In addition, when subjected to mechanical stress in the axial direction, the nanorod responds as an orthotropic material, with uniform expansion along the radial direction. The Young's moduli are 207 kbar in the axial direction and 631 kbar in the radial direction. The binding of alkanethiolates, ranging from methanethiol to pentanethiol, caused formation of surface point defects on the Au110 surfaces. On the Au100 surfaces, the defects occurred in the inner layer, creating a small surface island. These defects make positive and negative concavities on the gold nanorod surface, which helps the ligand to achieve a more stable state. The simulation results narrowed significant knowledge gaps on the alkanethiolate adsorption process and on their mutual interactions on gold nanorods. The mechanical characterization offers a new dimension to understand the physical chemistry of these complex nanoparticles.

  17. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  18. First principles calculation of material properties of group IV elements and III-V compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Brad Dean

    This thesis presents first principles calculations on the properties of group IV elements and group III-V compounds. It includes investigations into what structure a material is likely to form in, and given that structure, what are its electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties as well as what are the properties of defects that might be introduced into the sample. The thesis is divided as follows: • Chapter 1 contains some of the conceptual foundations used in the present work. These involve the major approximations which allow us to approach the problem of systems with huge numbers of interacting electrons and atomic cores. • Then, in Chapter 2, we discuss one of the major limitations to the DFT formalism introduced in Chapter 1, namely its inability to predict the quasiparticle spectra of materials and in particular the band gap of a semiconductor. We introduce a Green's function approach to the electron self-energy Sigma known as the GW approximation and use it to compute the quasiparticle band structures of a number of group IV and III-V semiconductors. • In Chapter 3 we present a first-principles study of a number of high-pressure metastable phases of Si with tetrahedral bonding. The phases studied include all experimentally determined phases that result from decompression from the metallic beta-Sn phase, specifically the BC8 (Si-III), hexagonal diamond (Si-IV), and R8 (Si-XII). In addition to these, we also study the hypothetical ST12 structure found upon decompression from beta-Sn in germanium. • Our attention is then turned to the first principles calculations of optical properties in Chapter 4. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is then solved to obtain the optical spectrum of this material including electron-hole interactions. The calculated optical spectrum is compared with experimental data for other forms of silicon commonly used in photovoltaic devices, namely the cubic, polycrystalline, and amorphous forms. • In Chapter 5 we present

  19. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1991-03-01

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (r f ) and RNA polymerase (r t ). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking r f and r t suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin r t may depend on the length (λ t ) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  20. Electron-nuclear dynamics of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diz, A.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The content of an ab initio time-dependent theory of quantum molecular dynamics of electrons and atomic nuclei is presented. Employing the time-dependent variational principle and a family of approximate state vectors yields a set of dynamical equations approximating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. These equations govern the time evolution of the relevant state vector parameters as molecular orbital coefficients, nuclear positions, and momenta. This approach does not impose the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, does not use potential energy surfaces, and takes into account electron-nuclear coupling. Basic conservation laws are fully obeyed. The simplest model of the theory employs a single determinantal state for the electrons and classical nuclei and is implemented in the computer code ENDyne. Results from this ab-initio theory are reported for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions

  1. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible introduction. Although the

  2. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, Fabien (ed.) [Montpellier 2 Univ. (France). Inst. Charles Gerhardt - CNRS 5253

    2014-09-01

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible

  3. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  5. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics theory, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Billy D

    2017-01-01

    Written by two specialists with over twenty-five years of experience in the field, this valuable text presents a wide range of topics within the growing field of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). It introduces theories which are fundamental to the field - namely, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics - and provides state-of-the-art algorithms and advice for designing reliable NEMD code, as well as examining applications for both atomic and molecular fluids. It discusses homogenous and inhomogenous flows and pays considerable attention to highly confined fluids, such as nanofluidics. In addition to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, the book covers the themes of temperature and thermodynamic fluxes and their computation, the theory and algorithms for homogenous shear and elongational flows, response theory and its applications, heat and mass transport algorithms, applications in molecular rheology, highly confined fluids (nanofluidics), the phenomenon of slip and...

  6. A density-functional and molecular-dynamics study on the physical properties of yttrium-doped tantalum oxynitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.; Schilling, H.; Lerch, M.; Dronskowski, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fluorite-type phases in the system Y-Ta-O-N have been studied using both first-principle electronic-structure calculations and molecular-dynamic simulations to validate the structural data and to explain unusual asymmetric reflection profiles observed in the experimental X-ray diffraction patterns. We provide evidence that the compounds may be macroscopically described as to represent cubic fluorite-type defect structures despite the fact that DFT calculations clearly show that all crystallographic unit cells appear as triclinically distorted. Additionally, we find that there is a minute (but hardly significant) tendency for anionic ordering at absolute zero temperature but none under reaction conditions. - Graphical abstract: Structural result of a room-temperature molecular-dynamic simulation of a supercell of Y 0.125 Ta 0.875 O 0.875 N□ 0.125

  7. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach of tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method to the design of the automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuki; Jung, Changho; Luo, Yi; Koyama, Michihisa; Endou, Akira; Kubo, Momoji; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a new tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics program 'Colors' for combinatorial computational chemistry approach. This methodology is based on our original tight-binding approximation and realized over 5000 times acceleration compared to the conventional first-principles molecular dynamics method. In the present study, we applied our new program to the simulations on various realistic large-scale models of the automotive three-way catalysts, ultrafine Pt particle/CeO 2 (111) support. Significant electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 (111) surface was observed and it was found to strongly depend on the size of the Pt particle. Furthermore, our simulation results suggest that the reduction of the Ce atom due to the electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 surface is a main reason for the strong interaction of the Pt particle and CeO 2 (111) support

  8. Extended Lagrangian Excited State Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J A; Sheppard, D; Tretiak, S; Niklasson, A M N

    2018-02-13

    An extended Lagrangian framework for excited state molecular dynamics (XL-ESMD) using time-dependent self-consistent field theory is proposed. The formulation is a generalization of the extended Lagrangian formulations for ground state Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008 100, 123004]. The theory is implemented, demonstrated, and evaluated using a time-dependent semiempirical model, though it should be generally applicable to ab initio theory. The simulations show enhanced energy stability and a significantly reduced computational cost associated with the iterative solutions of both the ground state and the electronically excited states. Relaxed convergence criteria can therefore be used both for the self-consistent ground state optimization and for the iterative subspace diagonalization of the random phase approximation matrix used to calculate the excited state transitions. The XL-ESMD approach is expected to enable numerically efficient excited state molecular dynamics for such methods as time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), Configuration Interactions Singles (CIS), and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  9. Chlorination of zirconium (0001) surface: A first-principles study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunja [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Weck, Philippe F [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Borjas, Rosendo [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-01-01

    Here, the mechanisms and energetics of Zr(0001) surface chlorination by dissociative adsorption of gaseous Cl2, and associated speciation and surface degradation processes, have been investigated within the framework of density functional theory. Chlorination of Zr(0001) is predicted to be exothermic by ~3 eV/Cl for dissociative adsorption of a single Cl2 molecule, followed by exothermic chlorination to 1ML and 2 ML under Cl-rich conditions, with respective energy gains of 1.93 and 2.79 eV/Cl. Calculations also show that exfoliation of the top Cl-Zr-Cl sandwich layers is exothermic and most energetically favorable, and can thus be considered as a leading mechanism for Zr(0001) surface dissolution. Consistent with experimental findings, formation of ZrCl4 molecular products is also found to be dominant during Zr(0001) chlorination.

  10. Chlorination of zirconium (0001) surface: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy; Weck, Philippe F [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Poineau, F. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Department of Chemistry; Paviet, P. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The mechanisms and energetics of Zr(0001) surface chlorination by dissociative adsorption of gaseous Cl2, and associated speciation and surface degradation processes, have been investigated within the framework of density functional theory. Chlorination of Zr(0001) is predicted to be exothermic by 3 eV/Cl for dissociative adsorption of a single Cl2 molecule, followed by exothermic chlorination to 1ML and 2 ML under Cl-rich conditions, with respective energy gains of 1.93 and 2.79 eV/Cl. Calculations also show that exfoliation of the top Cl-Zr-Cl sandwich layers is exothermic and most energetically favorable, and can thus be considered as a leading mechanism for Zr(0001) surface dissolution. Finally, consistent with experimental findings, formation of ZrCl4 molecular products is also found to be dominant during Zr(0001) chlorination.

  11. Vibrational transition moments of CH4 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Barber, Robert J.; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-01

    New nine-dimensional (9D), ab initio electric dipole moment surfaces (DMSs) of methane in its ground electronic state are presented. The DMSs are computed using an explicitly correlated coupled cluster CCSD(T)-F12 method in conjunction with an F12-optimized correlation consistent basis set of the TZ-family. A symmetrized molecular bond representation is used to parameterise these 9D DMSs in terms of sixth-order polynomials. Vibrational transition moments as well as band intensities for a large number of IR-active vibrational bands of 12CH4 are computed by vibrationally averaging the ab initio dipole moment components. The vibrational wavefunctions required for these averages are computed variationally using the program TROVE and a new ‘spectroscopic’ 12CH4 potential energy surface. The new DMSs will be used to produce a hot line list for 12CH4.

  12. First-principles assessment of potential ultrafast laser-induced structural transition in Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P., E-mail: jean.philippe.colombier@univ-st-etienne.fr; Stoian, R.

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • First-principles theory calculations in nonequilibrium conditions. • Electronic temperatures fully and consistently taken into account. • Evaluation of an ultrafast laser-induced solid-to-solid transition in Ni. • Relative energies, phonon spectra and energy path are evaluated. • Discussion on the generation of non-thermal forces in metals. - Abstract: The possibility to trigger ultrafast solid-to-solid transitions in transition metals under femtosecond laser irradiation is investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Electronic heating can drastically modify screening, charge distribution and atomic binding features, potentially determining new structural relaxation paths in the solid phase, before thermodynamic solid-to-liquid transformations set in. Consequently, we evaluate here the effect of electronic excitation on structural stability and conditions for structural transitions. Ni is chosen as a case study for the probability of a solid transition, and the stability of its FCC phase is compared to the non-standard HCP structure while accounting for the heating of the electronic subsystem. From a phonon spectra analysis, we show that the thermodynamic stability order reverses at an electronic temperature of around 10{sup 4} K. Both structures exhibit a dynamic stability, indicating they present a metastability depending on the heating. However, the general hardening of phonon modes with the increase of the electronic temperature points out that no transformation will occur, as confirmed by the study of a typical FCC to HCP diffusionless transformation path, showing an increasing energy barrier. Finally, based on electronic density of states interpretation, the tendency of different metal categories to undergo or not an ultrafast laser-induced structural transition is discussed.

  13. Coulomb interactions via local dynamics: a molecular-dynamics algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasichnyk, Igor; Duenweg, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    We derive and describe in detail a recently proposed method for obtaining Coulomb interactions as the potential of mean force between charges which are dynamically coupled to a local electromagnetic field. We focus on the molecular dynamics version of the method and show that it is intimately related to the Car-Parrinello approach, while being equivalent to solving Maxwell's equations with a freely adjustable speed of light. Unphysical self-energies arise as a result of the lattice interpolation of charges, and are corrected by a subtraction scheme based on the exact lattice Green function. The method can be straightforwardly parallelized using standard domain decomposition. Some preliminary benchmark results are presented

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Vashishta, P.

    1983-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of superionic conductors AgI and CuI are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The model of these superionic conductors is based on the use of effective pair potentials. To determine the constants in these potentials, cohesive energy and bulk modulus are used as input: in addition one uses notions of ionic size based on the known crystal structure. Salient features of the MD technique are outlined. Methods of treating long range Coulomb forces are discussed in detail. This includes the manner of doing Ewald sum for MD cells of arbitrary shape. Features that can be incorporated to expedite the MD calculations are also discussed. A novel MD technique which allows for a dynamically controlled variation of the shape and size of the MD cell is described briefly. The development of this novel technique has made it possible to study structural phase transitions in superionic conductors. 68 references, 17 figures, 2 tables

  15. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  16. First principles study of edge carboxylated graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Elhaes, Hanan; Ibrahim, Medhat A.

    2018-05-01

    The structure stability and electronic properties of edge carboxylated hexagonal and triangular graphene quantum dots are investigated using density functional theory. The calculated binding energies show that the hexagonal clusters with armchair edges have the highest stability among all the quantum dots. The binding energy of carboxylated graphene quantum dots increases by increasing the number of carboxyl groups. Our study shows that the total dipole moment significantly increases by adding COOH with the highest value observed in triangular clusters. The edge states in triangular graphene quantum dots with zigzag edges produce completely different energy spectrum from other dots: (a) the energy gap in triangular zigzag is very small as compared to other clusters and (b) the highest occupied molecular orbital is localized at the edges which is in contrast to other clusters where it is distributed over the cluster surface. The enhanced reactivity and the controllable energy gap by shape and edge termination make graphene quantum dots ideal for various nanodevice applications such as sensors. The infrared spectra are presented to confirm the stability of the quantum dots.

  17. Prediction of solid oxide fuel cell cathode activity with first-principles descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin; Kleis, Jesper; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the experimentally measured area specific resistance and oxygen surface exchange of solid oxide fuel cell cathode perovskites are strongly correlated with the first-principles calculated oxygen p-band center and vacancy formation energy. These quantities...... are therefore descriptors of catalytic activity that can be used in the first-principles design of new SOFC cathodes....

  18. First-principles insights into interaction of CO, NO, and HCN with Ag{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbatian, Zahra; Hashemifar, S. Javad, E-mail: hashemifar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-28

    We use static as well as time-dependent first-principles computations to study interaction of the CO, NO, and HCN molecules with the Ag{sub 8} nanocluster. The many-body based GW correction is applied for accurate description of the highest occupied (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital levels. It is argued that the adsorption of these molecules changes the stable structure of Ag{sub 8} from Td to the more chemically active D{sub 2d} symmetry. We discuss that the CO, NO, and HCN molecules prefer to adsorb on the atom of the cluster with significant contribution to both HOMO and LUMO, for the accomplishment of the required charge transfers in the systems. The charge back donation is found to leave an excess energy of about 110 meV on the NO molecular bond, evidencing potential application of silver clusters for NO reduction. It is argued that CO and specially NO exhibit strong physical interaction with the silver cluster and hence significantly modify the electronic and optical properties of the system, while HCN makes very week physical bonds with the cluster. The optical absorption spectra of the Ag{sub 8} cluster before and after molecule adsorption are computed and a nontrivial red shift is observed in the NO and HCN adsorbed clusters.

  19. Electronic Structure of Cu(tmdt2 Studied with First-Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoyuki Terakura

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the electronic structure of Cu(tmdt2, a material related to single-component molecular conductors, by first-principles calculations. The total energy calculations for several different magnetic configurations show that there is strong antiferromagnetic (AFM exchange coupling along the crystal a-axis. The electronic structures are analyzed in terms of the molecular orbitals near the Fermi level of isolated Cu(tmdt2 molecule. This analysis reveals that the system is characterized by the half-filled pdσ(− band whose intermolecular hopping integrals have strong one-dimensionality along the crystal a-axis. As the exchange splitting of the band is larger than the band width, the basic mechanism of the AFM exchange coupling is the superexchange. It will also be shown that two more ligand orbitals which are fairly insensitive to magnetism are located near the Fermi level. Because of the presence of these orbitals, the present calculation predicts that Cu(tmdt2 is metallic even in its AFM state, being inconsistent with the available experiment. Some comments will be made on the difference between Cu(tmdt2 and Cu(dmdt2.

  20. First principles crystal engineering of nonlinear optical materials. I. Prototypical case of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunov, Artëm E.; Tannu, Arman; Dyakov, Alexander A.; Matveeva, Anastasia D.; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya.; Odinokov, Alexey V.; Bagaturyants, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    The crystalline materials with nonlinear optical (NLO) properties are critically important for several technological applications, including nanophotonic and second harmonic generation devices. Urea is often considered to be a standard NLO material, due to the combination of non-centrosymmetric crystal packing and capacity for intramolecular charge transfer. Various approaches to crystal engineering of non-centrosymmetric molecular materials were reported in the literature. Here we propose using global lattice energy minimization to predict the crystal packing from the first principles. We developed a methodology that includes the following: (1) parameter derivation for polarizable force field AMOEBA; (2) local minimizations of crystal structures with these parameters, combined with the evolutionary algorithm for a global minimum search, implemented in program USPEX; (3) filtering out duplicate polymorphs produced; (4) reoptimization and final ranking based on density functional theory (DFT) with many-body dispersion (MBD) correction; and (5) prediction of the second-order susceptibility tensor by finite field approach. This methodology was applied to predict virtual urea polymorphs. After filtering based on packing similarity, only two distinct packing modes were predicted: one experimental and one hypothetical. DFT + MBD ranking established non-centrosymmetric crystal packing as the global minimum, in agreement with the experiment. Finite field approach was used to predict nonlinear susceptibility, and H-bonding was found to account for a 2.5-fold increase in molecular hyperpolarizability to the bulk value.

  1. Quarkonium at finite temperature: towards realistic phenomenology from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnier, Yannis [Institute of Theoretical Physics, EPFL,CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kaczmarek, Olaf [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld,D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Rothkopf, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg University,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-12-16

    We present the finite temperature spectra of both bottomonium and charmonium, obtained from a consistent lattice QCD based potential picture. Starting point is the complex in-medium potential extracted on full QCD lattices with dynamical u,d and s quarks, generated by the HotQCD collaboration. Using the generalized Gauss law approach, vetted in a previous study on quenched QCD, we fit Re[V] with a single temperature dependent parameter m{sub D}, the Debye screening mass, and confirm the up to now tentative values of Im[V]. The obtained analytic expression for the complex potential allows us to compute quarkonium spectral functions by solving an appropriate Schrödinger equation. These spectra exhibit thermal widths, which are free from the resolution artifacts that plague direct reconstructions from Euclidean correlators using Bayesian methods. In the present adiabatic setting, we find clear evidence for sequential melting and derive melting temperatures for the different bound states. Quarkonium is gradually weakened by both screening (Re[V]) and scattering (Im[V]) effects that in combination lead to a shift of their in-medium spectral features to smaller frequencies, contrary to the mass gain of elementary particles at finite temperature.

  2. Hydrogen Bond Dynamics in Aqueous Solutions: Ab initio Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rate equation for the decay of CHB(t) · Definition of Hydrogen Bonds · Results of Molecular Dynamics · Dynamics of anion-water and water-water hydrogen bonds · Structural relaxation of anion-water & water-water H-bonds · Ab initio Molecular Dynamics : · Slide 14 · Dynamics of hydrogen bonds : CPMD results · Slide 16.

  3. Optoelectronics and defect levels in hydroxyapatite by first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Leon A.; Paramonova, Ekaterina V.; Coutinho, José; Öberg, Sven; Bystrov, Vladimir S.; Bugaev, Lusegen A.

    2018-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an important component of mammal bones and teeth, being widely used in prosthetic implants. Despite the importance of HAp in medicine, several promising applications involving this material (e.g., in photo-catalysis) depend on how well we understand its fundamental properties. Among the ones that are either unknown or not known accurately, we have the electronic band structure and all that relates to it, including the bandgap width. We employ state-of-the-art methodologies, including density hybrid-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory within the dynamically screened single-particle Green's function approximation, to look at the optoelectronic properties of HAp. These methods are also applied to the calculation of defect levels. We find that the use of a mix of (semi-)local and exact exchange in the exchange-correlation functional brings a drastic improvement to the band structure. Important side effects include improvements in the description of dielectric and optical properties not only involving conduction band (excited) states but also the valence. We find that the highly dispersive conduction band bottom of HAp originates from anti-bonding σ* states along the ⋯OH-OH-⋯ infinite chain, suggesting the formation of a conductive 1D-ice phase. The choice of the exchange-correlation treatment to the calculation of defect levels was also investigated by using the OH-vacancy as a testing model. We find that donor and acceptor transitions obtained within semi-local density functional theory (DFT) differ from those of hybrid-DFT by almost 2 eV. Such a large discrepancy emphasizes the importance of using a high-quality description of the electron-electron interactions in the calculation of electronic and optical transitions of defects in HAp.

  4. Time-dependent first-principles study of angle-resolved secondary electron emission from atomic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    Angle-resolved secondary electron emission (ARSEE) spectra were analyzed for two-dimensional atomic sheets using a time-dependent first-principles simulation of electron scattering. We demonstrate that the calculated ARSEE spectra capture the unoccupied band structure of the atomic sheets. The excitation dynamics that lead to SEE have also been revealed by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham decomposition scheme. In the present study, the mechanism for the experimentally observed ARSEE from atomic sheets is elucidated with respect to both energetics and the dynamical aspects of SEE.

  5. Electronic Structure and Transport in Solids from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Jamal Ibrahim

    The focus of this dissertation is the determination of the electronic structure and trans- port properties of solids. We first review some of the theory and computational methodology used in the calculation of electronic structure and materials properties. Throughout the dissertation, we make extensive use of state-of-the-art software packages that implement density functional theory, density functional perturbation theory, and the GW approximation, in addition to specialized methods for interpolating matrix elements for extremely accurate results. The first application of the computational framework introduced is the determination of band offsets in semiconductor heterojunctions using a theory of quantum dipoles at the interface. This method is applied to the case of heterojunction formed between a new metastable phase of silicon, with a rhombohedral structure, and cubic silicon. Next, we introduce a novel method for the construction of localized Wannier functions, which we have named the optimized projection functions method (OPFM). We illustrate the method on a variety of systems and find that it can reliably construct localized Wannier functions with minimal user intervention. We further develop the OPFM to investigate a class of materials called topological insulators, which are insulating in the bulk but have conductive surface states. These properties are a result of a nontrivial topology in their band structure, which has interesting effects on the character of the Wannier functions. In the last sections of the main text, the noble metals are studied in great detail, including their electronic properties and carrier dynamics. In particular, we investigate, the Fermi surface properties of the noble metals, specifically electron-phonon scattering lifetimes, and subsequently the transport properties determined by carriers on the Fermi surface. To achieve this, a novel sampling technique is developed, with wide applicability to transport calculations

  6. First-principle Simulations of Heavy Fermion Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruanchen

    Heavy fermion materials, one of the most challenging topics in condensed matter physics, pose a variety of interesting properties and have attracted extensive studies for decades. Although there has been great success in explaining many ground- state properties of solids, the well-known theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) in its popular local density approximation (LDA) fail to describe heavy fermion materials due to improper treatment of many-body correlation effects. Here with the implementations of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) and the Gutzwiller variational method, the computational simulation of the heavy fermion materials is explored further and better compared with experimental data. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical background of DMFT and LDA+G methods is described in detail. The rest is the application of these techniques and is basically divided into two parts. First, the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC) method combined with DMFT is used to calculate and compare both the periodic Anderson model (PAM) and the Kondo lattice model (KLM). Different parameter sets of both models are connected by the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation. For spin and orbital degeneracy N = 2 case, a special particle-hole symmetric case of PAM at half-filling which always fixes one electron per impurity site is compared with the results of the KLM. We find a good mapping between PAM and KLM in the limit of large on-site Hubbard interaction U for different properties like self-energy, quasiparticle residue and susceptibility. This allows us to extract quasiparticle mass renormalizations for the f-electrons directly from KLM. The method is further applied to higher degenerate cases and to the realistic heavy fermion system CeRhIn5 in which the estimate of the Sommerfeld coefficient is proven to be close to the experimental value. Second, a series of Cerium based heavy fermion materials is studied using a combination of local

  7. First-principles equation-of-state table of silicon and its effects on high-energy-density plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Gao, R.; Ding, Y.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Using density-functional theory-based molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated the equation of state for silicon in a wide range of plasma density and temperature conditions of ρ =0.001 -500 g /c m3 and T =2000 -108K . With these calculations, we have established a first-principles equation-of-state (FPEOS) table of silicon for high-energy-density (HED) plasma simulations. When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS model (Table 3810), we find that the FPEOS-predicted Hugoniot is ˜20% softer; for off-Hugoniot plasma conditions, the pressure and internal energy in FPEOS are lower than those of SESAME EOS for temperatures above T ≈ 1-10 eV (depending on density), while the former becomes higher in the low-T regime. The pressure difference between FPEOS and SESAME 3810 can reach to ˜50%, especially in the warm-dense-matter regime. Implementing the FPEOS table of silicon into our hydrocodes, we have studied its effects on Si-target implosions. When compared with the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation using the SESAME 3810 EOS model, the FPEOS simulation showed that (1) the shock speed in silicon is ˜10% slower; (2) the peak density of an in-flight Si shell during implosion is ˜20% higher than the SESAME 3810 simulation; (3) the maximum density reached in the FPEOS simulation is ˜40% higher at the peak compression; and (4) the final areal density and neutron yield are, respectively, ˜30% and ˜70% higher predicted by FPEOS versus the traditional simulation using SESAME 3810. All of these features can be attributed to the larger compressibility of silicon predicted by FPEOS. These results indicate that an accurate EOS table, like the FPEOS presented here, could be essential for the precise design of targets for HED experiments.

  8. The ionic structure of liquid sodium obtained by numerical simulation from 'first principles' and ab initio 'norm-conserving' pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harchaoui, N; Hellal, S; Grosdidier, B; Gasser, J G

    2008-01-01

    The physical properties of disordered matter depend on the 'atomic structure' i.e. the arrangement of the atoms. This arrangement is described by the structure factor S (q) in reciprocal space and by the pair correlation function g(r) in real space. The structure factor is obtained experimentally while the numerical simulation enables us to obtain the pair correlation function. Liquid sodium is one of the elements the most studied and one can wonder about new scientific contribution appropriateness. The majority of theoretical calculations are compared with the experiment of Waseda. However two other posterior measurements have been published and give different results, in particular with regard to the height of the first peak of the structure factor. Three models of pseudopotential are considered to describe the electron-ion interaction. The first is a local pseudopotential with the alternative known as 'individual' of the model suggested by Fiolhais et al. The second model considered is that of Bachelet et al. This one, ab-initio and 'norm conserving', is non local. The last model is that proposed by Shaw known as 'first principles' and 'energy dependent'. Various static dielectric functions characteristic of the effects of exchange and correlation have been used and developed by Hellal et al. We calculated the form factors (pseudopotential in reciprocal space) and deduce the normalized energy-wave-number characteristic F N (q), the interatomic pair potential V eff (r), then the pair correlation function g(r) by molecular dynamics. The structure factor S(q) is obtained by Fourier transform and is compared with the experiment. Our calculations with the Bachelet and Shaw pseudopotentials are close to the last experiments of Greenfield et al. and of Huijben et al. Our results are discussed

  9. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parallelization of quantum molecular dynamics simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaori; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Shibahara, Masahiko; Kotake, Susumu

    1998-02-01

    A quantum molecular dynamics simulation code has been developed for the analysis of the thermalization of photon energies in the molecule or materials in Kansai Research Establishment. The simulation code is parallelized for both Scalar massively parallel computer (Intel Paragon XP/S75) and Vector parallel computer (Fujitsu VPP300/12). Scalable speed-up has been obtained with a distribution to processor units by division of particle group in both parallel computers. As a result of distribution to processor units not only by particle group but also by the particles calculation that is constructed with fine calculations, highly parallelization performance is achieved in Intel Paragon XP/S75. (author)

  11. Lipid Configurations from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Khandelia, Himanshu; Marsh, Derek

    2018-01-01

    of dihedral angles in palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine from molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated fluid bilayer membranes. We compare results from the widely used lipid force field of Berger et al. with those from the most recent C36 release of the CHARMM force field for lipids. Only the CHARMM force......The extent to which current force fields faithfully reproduce conformational properties of lipids in bilayer membranes, and whether these reflect the structural principles established for phospholipids in bilayer crystals, are central to biomembrane simulations. We determine the distribution...

  12. Molecular dynamics studies of actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Minato, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) calculation was performed for actinide nitrides (UN, NpN, and PuN) in the temperature range from 300 to 2800 K to evaluate the physical properties viz., the lattice parameter, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and heat capacity. The Morse-type potential function added to the Busing-Ida type potential was employed for the ionic interactions. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting to the experimental data of the lattice parameter. The usefulness and applicability of the MD method to evaluate the physical properties of actinide nitrides were studied. (author)

  13. Viscosity calculations at molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, E M; Norman, G E

    2015-01-01

    Viscosity and diffusion are chosen as an example to demonstrate the universality of diagnostics methods in the molecular dynamics method. To emphasize the universality, three diverse systems are investigated, which differ from each other drastically: liquids with embedded atom method and pairwise interatomic interaction potentials and dusty plasma with a unique multiparametric interparticle interaction potential. Both the Einstein-Helfand and Green-Kubo relations are used. Such a particular process as glass transition is analysed at the simulation of the aluminium melt. The effect of the dust particle charge fluctuation is considered. The results are compared with the experimental data. (paper)

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...... are possible contributors to the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Molecular dynamics simulations using the NAMD2 package were performed for systems containing from one to seven SP-C molecules to study their behavior in water. The results of our simulations show that unfolding of the protein...

  16. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  17. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Krack, M.; Bertolus, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using forces calculated from empirical potentials, commonly called classical molecular dynamics, is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermomechanical properties. This enables one to obtain insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, as well as parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models. The interaction potentials used for the force calculations are generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data and electronic structure calculations (see Chapter 12). We present here the different types of potentials currently available for UO 2 and illustrations of applications to the description of the behaviour of this material under irradiation. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials for UO 2 are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine these existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry, and validate the models and assumptions used. (authors)

  18. Effect of metal doping on structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dong [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Lee, Kwang-Ryeol, E-mail: krlee@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-05-31

    First-principles calculation was performed to investigate the effect of metal doping on the structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system, and the 3d transition metals (TM) were particularly selected as representative case. Results showed that the total energy in TM–C systems caused by distorting the bond angles was reduced distinctly for comparison with that in C–C system. Further electronic structure revealed that as the 3d electrons of doped TM increased, the bond characteristic of highest occupied molecular orbital changed from bonding (Sc, Ti) to nonbonding (V, Cr, Mn, Fe) and finally to antibonding (Co, Ni, Cu) between the TM and C atoms. Meanwhile, the TM–C bond presented a mixture of the covalent and ionic characters. The decrease of strength and directionality of TM–C bonds resulted in the total energy change upon bond angle distortion, which demonstrated that the bond characteristics played an important role in reducing residual stress of TM-doped amorphous carbon systems. - Highlights: • The bond characteristics as 3d electrons changed from bonding, nonbonding to antibonding. • The TM–C bond was a mixture of covalent and ionic characters. • Reduced strength and directionality of TM–C bond led to small distortion energy change. • The weak TM–C bond accounted for the reduced compressive stress caused by TM.

  19. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, NIST

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  20. A close examination of the structure and dynamics of HC(NH2)2PbI3by MD simulations and group theory

    KAUST Repository

    Carignano, M. A.; Saeed, Y.; Aravindh, S. Assa; Roqan, Iman S.; Even, J.; Katan, C.

    2016-01-01

    The formamidinium lead iodide hybrid perovskite is studied using first principles molecular dynamics simulations and further analyzed using group theory. The simulations are performed on large supercells containing 768 atoms under isothermal

  1. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  2. Structural and electronic phase transitions of ThS2 from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yongliang; Wang, Changying; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Performed a systematic study using first-principles methods of the pressure-induced structural and electronic phase transitions in ThS_2, which may play an important role in the next generation nuclear energy fuel technology.

  3. First principles study of electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagare, Gitanjali; Chouhan, Sunil Singh; Soni, Pooja; Sanyal, S.P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics LuX have been studied theoretically by using first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with the generalized gradient approximation (GCA)

  4. Graphene substrate-mediated catalytic performance enhancement of Ru nanoparticles: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin; Yao, Kexin; Meng, Changgong; Han, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The structural, energetic and magnetic properties of Ru nanoparticles deposited on pristine and defective graphene have been thoroughly studied by first-principles based calculations. The calculated binding energy of a Ru 13 nanoparticle on a single

  5. Quantum Well States in Fe/Nb(001) Multilayers: First Principles Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sliukia, Nitya N; Sen, A; Prasad, R

    2007-01-01

    A first principle study to understand the phenomena of interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Nb multilayers using the linearized-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the generalized gradient approximation was performed...

  6. Investigating the Thermochemical Response of Avcoat TPS from First Principles for Comparison with EFT-1 Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of our work is to develop improved thermal response models of the AVCOAT thermal protection system (TPS) from first principles, and to validate the...

  7. On possibility of superconductivity in SnSb: A first principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabhi, Shweta D. [Department of Physics, M. K. Bhavnagar University, Bhavnagar 364001 (India); Shrivastava, Deepika [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal 462026 (India); Jha, Prafulla K., E-mail: prafullaj@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390002 (India); Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal 462026 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Superconducting property of SnSb is predicted by ab-initio calculations. • Electronic properties of SnSb in RS phase shows metallic behaviour similar to SnAs. • Phonon dispersion confirms the dynamical stability of SnSb in RS phase. • Superconducting transition temperature is 3.1 K, slightly lower than that of SnAs. • Calculated thermodynamic properties are also reported. - Abstract: The electronic, phonon structure and superconducting properties of tin antimonide (SnSb) in rock-salt (RS) structure are calculated using first-principles density functional theory. The electronic band structure and density of states show metallic behavior. The phonon frequencies are positive throughout the Brillouin zone in rock-salt structure indicating its stability in that phase. Superconductivity of SnSb in RS phase is discussed in detail by calculating phonon linewidths, Eliashberg spectral function, electron-phonon coupling constant and superconducting transition temperature. SnSb is found to have a slightly lower T{sub C} (3.1 K), as compared to SnAs.

  8. First-principles thermodynamic calculations of diffusion characteristics of impurities in γ-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuru, T.; Kaji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Because solute impurities have an effect on embrittlement through segregation under irradiation, solute stability and the influence of irradiation on the diffusion characteristics of impurities become prominent due to several acceleration effects of high irradiance circumstances in irradiated materials. In this study, the diffusion characteristics of several impurities in non-magnetic fcc iron are investigated using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In accordance with classical diffusion and transition state theories, we nonempirically evaluated the contribution to properties of the binding energy between vacancy and each impurity and the migration enthalpy. The migration energy was calculated using the nudged elastic band method with DFT. The vacancy formation energy, including the entropic contributions to free energies in γ-iron, was evaluated by considering vibrational phonon frequencies based on frozen phonons employing the harmonic approximation for the lattice dynamics. Consequently, we confirmed that the binding energy between large-radius impurities and vacancies is larger than that with an equivalent size of the solvent element, and that the migration enthalpies of these impurities are quite small compared with self diffusion. This finding may indicate that the electronic binding states at the saddle point have a large influence on the migration of impurities

  9. First-Principles Study of Superconductivity in Ultra- thin Pb Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffsinger, Jesse; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, superconductivity in ultrathin layered Pb has been confirmed in samples with as few as two atomic layers [S. Qin, J. Kim, Q. Niu, and C.-K. Shih, Science 2009]. Interestingly, the prototypical strong-coupling superconductor exhibits different Tc's for differing surface reconstructions in samples with only two monolayers. Additionally, Tc is seen to oscillate as the number of atomic layers is increased. Using first principles techniques based on Wannier functions, we analyze the electronic structure, lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling for varying thicknesses and surface reconstructions of layered Pb. We discuss results as they relate to superconductivity in the bulk, for which accurate calculations of superconducting properties can be compared to experiment [W. L. McMillan and J.M. Rowell, PRL 1965]. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR07-05941, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the Lawrencium computational cluster resource provided by the IT Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231)

  10. First-principles thermodynamics and defect kinetics guidelines for engineering a tailored RRAM device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clima, Sergiu, E-mail: clima@imec.be; Chen, Yang Yin; Goux, Ludovic; Govoreanu, Bogdan; Degraeve, Robin; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Chen, Chao Yang [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pourtois, Geoffrey [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); PLASMANT, University of Antwerp, 2610 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    Resistive Random Access Memories are among the most promising candidates for the next generation of non-volatile memory. Transition metal oxides such as HfOx and TaOx attracted a lot of attention due to their CMOS compatibility. Furthermore, these materials do not require the inclusion of extrinsic conducting defects since their operation is based on intrinsic ones (oxygen vacancies). Using Density Functional Theory, we evaluated the thermodynamics of the defects formation and the kinetics of diffusion of the conducting species active in transition metal oxide RRAM materials. The gained insights based on the thermodynamics in the Top Electrode, Insulating Matrix and Bottom Electrode and at the interfaces are used to design a proper defect reservoir, which is needed for a low-energy reliable switching device. The defect reservoir has also a direct impact on the retention of the Low Resistance State due to the resulting thermodynamic driving forces. The kinetics of the diffusing conducting defects in the Insulating Matrix determine the switching dynamics and resistance retention. The interface at the Bottom Electrode has a significant impact on the low-current operation and long endurance of the memory cell. Our first-principles findings are confirmed by experimental measurements on fabricated RRAM devices.

  11. First-principles thermodynamics and defect kinetics guidelines for engineering a tailored RRAM device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clima, Sergiu; Chen, Yang Yin; Goux, Ludovic; Govoreanu, Bogdan; Degraeve, Robin; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Chen, Chao Yang; Pourtois, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Random Access Memories are among the most promising candidates for the next generation of non-volatile memory. Transition metal oxides such as HfOx and TaOx attracted a lot of attention due to their CMOS compatibility. Furthermore, these materials do not require the inclusion of extrinsic conducting defects since their operation is based on intrinsic ones (oxygen vacancies). Using Density Functional Theory, we evaluated the thermodynamics of the defects formation and the kinetics of diffusion of the conducting species active in transition metal oxide RRAM materials. The gained insights based on the thermodynamics in the Top Electrode, Insulating Matrix and Bottom Electrode and at the interfaces are used to design a proper defect reservoir, which is needed for a low-energy reliable switching device. The defect reservoir has also a direct impact on the retention of the Low Resistance State due to the resulting thermodynamic driving forces. The kinetics of the diffusing conducting defects in the Insulating Matrix determine the switching dynamics and resistance retention. The interface at the Bottom Electrode has a significant impact on the low-current operation and long endurance of the memory cell. Our first-principles findings are confirmed by experimental measurements on fabricated RRAM devices.

  12. An application of first-principles diagnosis to a thermalhydraulic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapointe, P.A.; Chung, J.

    1990-03-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, such as artificial intelligence and interactive multimedia, offer significant new opportunities to enhance nuclear plant safety and improve the performance of the operations staff. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is developing a framework on which newer approaches to operator support systems will be implemented. A prototype system has been developed for plant information access and display, on-line advice and diagnosis, and interactive operating procedures; it is called the Operator Companion. This paper describes the work performed for the development of the fault detection and diagnostic module within the Operator Companion. An early prototype of the module was developed for a small heat transfer circuit. A qualitative physics representation coupled with first-principles diagnosis using constraint suspension was utilized. Temporal information was required; it was integrated into the diagnosis using a type of directed graph to record event dependencies. This graph dynamically altered the qualitative model to reflect changes in the system over time. Although not completely formal, out method has successfully integrated the time diagnostic information to permit the identification of the faulty components and limit the number of spurious candidates in the tests performed. This paper summarizes the qualitative diagnosis concepts, describes the special temporal reasoning scheme developed, and presents a summary of the results obtained

  13. Chemical modifications and stability of phosphorene with impurities: a first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D W; Rudenko, A N; Prishchenko, D A; Mazurenko, V G; Katsnelson, M I

    2015-06-21

    We perform a systematic first-principles study of phosphorene in the presence of typical monovalent (hydrogen and fluorine) and divalent (oxygen) impurities. The results of our modeling suggest a decomposition of phosphorene into weakly bonded one-dimensional (1D) chains upon single- and double-side hydrogenation and fluorination. In spite of a sizable quasiparticle band gap (2.29 eV), fully hydrogenated phosphorene was found to be dynamically unstable. In contrast, complete fluorination of phosphorene gives rise to a stable structure, which is an indirect gap semiconductor with a band gap of 2.27 eV. We also show that fluorination of phosphorene from the gas phase is significantly more likely than hydrogenation due to the relatively low energy barrier for the dissociative adsorption of F2 (0.19 eV) compared to H2 (2.54 eV). At low concentrations, monovalent impurities tend to form regular atomic rows of phosphorene, though such patterns do not seem to be easily achievable due to high migration barriers (1.09 and 2.81 eV for H2 and F2, respectively). Oxidation of phosphorene is shown to be a qualitatively different process. Particularly, we observe instability of phosphorene upon oxidation, leading to the formation of disordered amorphous-like structures at high concentrations of impurities.

  14. First-principles study of the elastic and thermodynamic properties of thorium hydrides at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiao-Lin; Wu Yuan-Yuan; Shao Xiao-Hong; Lu Yong; Zhang Ping

    2016-01-01

    The high pressure behaviors of Th 4 H 15 and ThH 2 are investigated by using the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). From the energy–volume relations, the bct phase of ThH 2 is more stable than the fcc phase at ambient conditions. At high pressure, the bct ThH 2 and bcc Th 4 H 15 phases are more brittle than they are at ambient pressure from the calculated elastic constants and the Poisson ratio. The thermodynamic stability of the bct phase ThH 2 is determined from the calculated phonon dispersion. In the pressure domain of interest, the phonon dispersions of bcc Th 4 H 15 and bct ThH 2 are positive, indicating the dynamical stability of these two phases, while the fcc ThH 2 is unstable. The thermodynamic properties including the lattice vibration energy, entropy, and specific heat are predicted for these stable phases. The vibrational free energy decreases with the increase of the temperature, and the entropy and the heat capacity are proportional to the temperature and inversely proportional to the pressure. As the pressure increases, the resistance to the external pressure is strengthened for Th 4 H 15 and ThH 2 . (paper)

  15. First-principles screening of structural properties of intermetallic compounds on martensitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ikeda, Yuji; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-11-01

    Martensitic transformation with good structural compatibility between parent and martensitic phases are required for shape memory alloys (SMAs) in terms of functional stability. In this study, first-principles-based materials screening is systematically performed to investigate the intermetallic compounds with the martensitic phases by focusing on energetic and dynamical stabilities as well as structural compatibility with the parent phase. The B2, D03, and L21 crystal structures are considered as the parent phases, and the 2H and 6M structures are considered as the martensitic phases. In total, 3384 binary and 3243 ternary alloys with stoichiometric composition ratios are investigated. It is found that 187 alloys survive after the screening. Some of the surviving alloys are constituted by the chemical elements already widely used in SMAs, but other various metallic elements are also found in the surviving alloys. The energetic stability of the surviving alloys is further analyzed by comparison with the data in Materials Project Database (MPD) to examine the alloys whose martensitic structures may cause further phase separation or transition to the other structures.

  16. First-principles study of the elastic and thermodynamic properties of thorium hydrides at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Lin, Zhang; Yuan-Yuan, Wu; Xiao-Hong, Shao; Yong, Lu; Ping, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    The high pressure behaviors of Th4H15 and ThH2 are investigated by using the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). From the energy-volume relations, the bct phase of ThH2 is more stable than the fcc phase at ambient conditions. At high pressure, the bct ThH2 and bcc Th4H15 phases are more brittle than they are at ambient pressure from the calculated elastic constants and the Poisson ratio. The thermodynamic stability of the bct phase ThH2 is determined from the calculated phonon dispersion. In the pressure domain of interest, the phonon dispersions of bcc Th4H15 and bct ThH2 are positive, indicating the dynamical stability of these two phases, while the fcc ThH2 is unstable. The thermodynamic properties including the lattice vibration energy, entropy, and specific heat are predicted for these stable phases. The vibrational free energy decreases with the increase of the temperature, and the entropy and the heat capacity are proportional to the temperature and inversely proportional to the pressure. As the pressure increases, the resistance to the external pressure is strengthened for Th4H15 and ThH2. Project supported by the Long-Term Subsidy Mechanism from the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Education of China.

  17. Spin resolved electronic transport through N@C20 fullerene molecule between Au electrodes: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Serkan

    2018-05-01

    Using first principles study, through Density Functional Theory combined with Non Equilibrium Green's Function Formalism, electronic properties of endohedral N@C20 fullerene molecule joining Au electrodes (Au-N@C20) was addressed in the presence of spin property. The electronic transport behavior across the Au-N@C20 molecular junction was investigated by spin resolved transmission, density of states, molecular orbitals, differential conductance and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Spin asymmetric variation was clearly observed in the results due to single N atom encapsulated in the C20 fullerene cage, where the N atom played an essential role in the electronic behavior of Au-N@C20. This N@C20 based molecular bridge, exhibiting a spin dependent I-V variation, revealed a metallic behavior within the bias range from -1 V to 1 V. The induced magnetic moment, spin polarization and other relevant quantities associated with the spin resolved transport were elucidated.

  18. First-principles study of high-conductance DNA sequencing with carbon nanotube electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, X.

    2012-03-26

    Rapid and cost-effective DNA sequencing at the single nucleotide level might be achieved by measuring a transverse electronic current as single-stranded DNA is pulled through a nanometer-sized pore. In order to enhance the electronic coupling between the nucleotides and the electrodes and hence the current signals, we employ a pair of single-walled close-ended (6,6) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electrodes. We then investigate the electron transport properties of nucleotides sandwiched between such electrodes by using first-principles quantum transport theory. In particular, we consider the extreme case where the separation between the electrodes is the smallest possible that still allows the DNA translocation. The benzene-like ring at the end cap of the CNT can strongly couple with the nucleobases and therefore it can both reduce conformational fluctuations and significantly improve the conductance. As such, when the electrodes are closely spaced, the nucleobases can pass through only with their base plane parallel to the plane of CNT end caps. The optimal molecular configurations, at which the nucleotides strongly couple to the CNTs, and which yield the largest transmission, are first identified. These correspond approximately to the lowest energy configurations. Then the electronic structures and the electron transport of these optimal configurations are analyzed. The typical tunneling currents are of the order of 50 nA for voltages up to 1 V. At higher bias, where resonant transport through the molecular states is possible, the current is of the order of several μA. Below 1 V, the currents associated to the different nucleotides are consistently distinguishable, with adenine having the largest current, guanine the second largest, cytosine the third and, finally, thymine the smallest. We further calculate the transmission coefficient profiles as the nucleotides are dragged along the DNA translocation path and investigate the effects of configurational variations

  19. Elastic interaction of hydrogen atoms on graphene: A multiscale approach from first principles to continuum elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Vastola, Guglielmo; Jhon, Mark H.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2016-10-01

    The deformation of graphene due to the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms on its surface and the long-range elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms induced by these deformations are investigated using a multiscale approach based on first principles, empirical interactions, and continuum modeling. Focus is given to the intrinsic low-temperature structure and interactions. Therefore, all calculations are performed at T =0 , neglecting possible temperature or thermal fluctuation effects. Results from different methods agree well and consistently describe the local deformation of graphene on multiple length scales reaching 500 Å . The results indicate that the elastic interaction mediated by this deformation is significant and depends on the deformation of the graphene sheet both in and out of plane. Surprisingly, despite the isotropic elasticity of graphene, within the linear elastic regime, atoms elastically attract or repel each other depending on (i) the specific site they are chemisorbed; (ii) the relative position of the sites; (iii) and if they are on the same or on opposite surface sides. The interaction energy sign and power-law decay calculated from molecular statics agree well with theoretical predictions from linear elasticity theory, considering in-plane or out-of-plane deformations as a superposition or in a coupled nonlinear approach. Deviations on the exact power law between molecular statics and the linear elastic analysis are evidence of the importance of nonlinear effects on the elasticity of monolayer graphene. These results have implications for the understanding of the generation of clusters and regular formations of hydrogen and other chemisorbed atoms on graphene.

  20. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp; Tchipev, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm

  1. Hydration dynamics in water clusters via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turi, László, E-mail: turi@chem.elte.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest 112, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 (Hungary)

    2014-05-28

    We have investigated the hydration dynamics in size selected water clusters with n = 66, 104, 200, 500, and 1000 water molecules using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the most fundamental aspects of relaxation phenomena in clusters, we choose one of the simplest, still realistic, quantum mechanically treated test solute, an excess electron. The project focuses on the time evolution of the clusters following two processes, electron attachment to neutral equilibrated water clusters and electron detachment from an equilibrated water cluster anion. The relaxation dynamics is significantly different in the two processes, most notably restoring the equilibrium final state is less effective after electron attachment. Nevertheless, in both scenarios only minor cluster size dependence is observed. Significantly different relaxation patterns characterize electron detachment for interior and surface state clusters, interior state clusters relaxing significantly faster. This observation may indicate a potential way to distinguish surface state and interior state water cluster anion isomers experimentally. A comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium trajectories suggests that linear response theory breaks down for electron attachment at 200 K, but the results converge to reasonable agreement at higher temperatures. Relaxation following electron detachment clearly belongs to the linear regime. Cluster relaxation was also investigated using two different computational models, one preferring cavity type interior states for the excess electron in bulk water, while the other simulating non-cavity structure. While the cavity model predicts appearance of several different hydrated electron isomers in agreement with experiment, the non-cavity model locates only cluster anions with interior excess electron distribution. The present simulations show that surface isomers computed with the cavity predicting potential show similar dynamical behavior to the interior clusters of

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  3. Molecular dynamic simulation study of molten cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganegi Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study thermodynamics and structural properties of expanded caesium fluid. Internal pressure, radial distribution functions (RDFs, coordination numbers and diffusion coefficients have been calculated at temperature range 700–1600 K and pressure range 100–800 bar. We used the internal pressure to predict the metal–non-metal transition occurrence region. RDFs were calculated at wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The coordination numbers decrease and positions of the first peak of RDFs slightly increase as the temperature increases and pressure decreases. The calculated self-diffusion coefficients at various temperatures and pressures show no distinct boundary between Cs metallic fluid and its expanded fluid where it continuously increases with temperature.

  4. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  5. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Transthyretin Association from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedrix J. Dongmo Foumthuim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are used in this work to probe the structural stability and the dynamics of engineered mutants of transthyretin (TTR, i.e., the double mutant F87M/L110M (MT-TTR and the triple mutant F87M/L110M/S117E (3M-TTR, in relation to wild-type. Free energy analysis from end-point simulations and statistical effective energy functions are used to analyze trajectories, revealing that mutations do not have major impact on protein structure but rather on protein association, shifting the equilibria towards dissociated species. The result is confirmed by the analysis of 3M-TTR which shows dissociation within the first 10 ns of the simulation, indicating that contacts are lost at the dimer-dimer interface, whereas dimers (formed by monomers which pair to form two extended β-sheets appear fairly stable. Overall the simulations provide a detailed view of the dynamics and thermodynamics of wild-type and mutant transthyretins and a rationale of the observed effects.

  6. An Evaluation of Explicit Receptor Flexibility in Molecular Docking Using Molecular Dynamics and Torsion Angle Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armen, Roger S; Chen, Jianhan; Brooks, Charles L

    2009-10-13

    Incorporating receptor flexibility into molecular docking should improve results for flexible proteins. However, the incorporation of explicit all-atom flexibility with molecular dynamics for the entire protein chain may also introduce significant error and "noise" that could decrease docking accuracy and deteriorate the ability of a scoring function to rank native-like poses. We address this apparent paradox by comparing the success of several flexible receptor models in cross-docking and multiple receptor ensemble docking for p38α mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Explicit all-atom receptor flexibility has been incorporated into a CHARMM-based molecular docking method (CDOCKER) using both molecular dynamics (MD) and torsion angle molecular dynamics (TAMD) for the refinement of predicted protein-ligand binding geometries. These flexible receptor models have been evaluated, and the accuracy and efficiency of TAMD sampling is directly compared to MD sampling. Several flexible receptor models are compared, encompassing flexible side chains, flexible loops, multiple flexible backbone segments, and treatment of the entire chain as flexible. We find that although including side chain and some backbone flexibility is required for improved docking accuracy as expected, docking accuracy also diminishes as additional and unnecessary receptor flexibility is included into the conformational search space. Ensemble docking results demonstrate that including protein flexibility leads to to improved agreement with binding data for 227 active compounds. This comparison also demonstrates that a flexible receptor model enriches high affinity compound identification without significantly increasing the number of false positives from low affinity compounds.

  7. A molecular dynamics simulation study of chloroform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, Ilario G.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    Three different chloroform models have been investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulation. The thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties of the various models were investigated in detail. In particular, the potential energies, diffusion coefficients and rotational correlation times obtained for each model are compared with experiment. It is found that the theory of rotational Brownian motion fails in describing the rotational diffusion of chloroform. The force field of Dietz and Heinzinger was found to give good overall agreement with experiment. An extended investigation of this chloroform model has been performed. Values are reported for the isothermal compressibility, the thermal expansion coefficient and the constant volume heat capacity. The values agree well with experiment. The static and frequency dependent dielectric permittivity were computed from a 1·2 ns simulation conducted under reaction field boundary conditions. Considering the fact that the model is rigid with fixed partial charges, the static dielectric constant and Debye relaxation time compare well with experiment. From the same simulation the shear viscosity was computed using the off-diagonal elements of the pressure tensor, both via an Einstein type relation and via a Green-Kubo equation. The calculated viscosities show good agreement with experimental values. The excess Helmholtz energy is calculated using the thermodynamic integration technique and simulations of 50 and 80 ps. The value obtained for the excess Helmholtz energy matches the theoretical value within a few per cent.

  8. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation

  9. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  10. First-principles investigation of quantum transport through an endohedral N@C60 in the Coulomb blockade regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhizhou; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2013-12-11

    We report an investigation of Coulomb blockade transport through an endohedral N@C60 weakly coupled with aluminum leads, employing the first-principles method combined with the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function derived from the equation of motion beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. The differential conductance characteristics of the molecular device are calculated within the Coulomb blockade regime, which shows the Coulomb diamond as observed experimentally. When the gate voltage is less than that of the degeneracy point, there are two peaks in the differential conductance with an excited state induced by the change of the exchange interaction between the spin of C60 and the encapsulated nitrogen atom due to the transition from N@C(1-)(60) to N@C(2-)(60), while for a gate voltage larger than that of the degeneracy point, no excited state is available due to the quenching of exchange energy. As a result, there is only one Coulomb blockade peak in the differential conductance from the electron tunneling through the highest energy level below the Fermi level. Our first-principles results are in good agreement with experimental data obtained by an endohedral N@C60 molecular device.

  11. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  12. Approximation of quantum observables by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sandberg, Mattias

    2016-01-06

    In this talk I will discuss how to estimate the uncertainty in molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics is a computational method to study molecular systems in materials science, chemistry, and molecular biology. The wide popularity of molecular dynamics simulations relies on the fact that in many cases it agrees very well with experiments. If we however want the simulation to predict something that has no comparing experiment, we need a mathematical estimate of the accuracy of the computation. In the case of molecular systems with few particles, such studies are made by directly solving the Schrodinger equation. In this talk I will discuss theoretical results on the accuracy between quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, to be used for systems that are too large to be handled computationally by the Schrodinger equation.

  13. Fluctuations and Anharmonicity in Lead Iodide Perovskites from Molecular Dynamics Supercell Simulationss

    KAUST Repository

    Carignano, Marcelo Andrés

    2017-09-05

    We present a systematic study based on first principles molecular dynamics simulations of lead iodide perovskites with three different cations, including methylammonium (MA), formamidinium (FA) and cesium. Using the high temperature perovskite structure as a reference, we investigate the instabilities that develop as the material is cooled down to 370 K. All three perovskites display anharmonicity in the motion of the iodine atoms, with the stronger effect observed for the MAPbI$_3$ and CsPbI$_3$. At high temperature, this behavior can be traced back to the reduced effective size of the Cs$^+$ and MA$^+$ cations. MAPbI$_3$ undergoes a spontaneous phase transition within our simulation model driven by the dipolar interaction between neighboring MA cations as the temperature is decreased from 450 K. The reverse transformation from tetragonal to cubic is also monitored through the large distribution of the octahedral tilting angles accompanied by an increase in the anharmonicity of the iodine atoms motion. Both MA and FA hybrid perovskites show a strong coupling between the molecular orientations and the local lattice deformations, suggesting mixed order-disorder/displacive characters of the high temperature phase transitions.

  14. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D., E-mail: sergei.ivanov@uni-rostock.de; Kühn, Oliver [Institute of Physics, Rostock University, Universitätsplatz 3, 18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  15. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom

  16. First-principles calculation of adsorption of shale gas on CaCO3 (100) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiang; Pan, Yikun; Guo, Ping; Wang, Zhouhua; Wei, Na; Sun, Pengfei; Liu, Yuxiao

    2017-06-16

    To demonstrate the adsorption strength of shale gas to calcium carbonate in shale matrix, the adsorption of shale gas on CaCO3 (100) surfaces was studied using the first-principles method, which is based on the density functional theory (DFT). The structures and electronic properties of CH4, C2H6, CO2 and N2 molecules were calculated by the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), for a coverage of 1 monolayer (ML). Under the same conditions, the density of states (DOS) of CaCO3 (100) surfaces before and after the adsorption of shale gas molecules at high-symmetry adsorption sites were compared. The results showed that the adsorption energies of CH4, C2H6, CO2 and N2 on CaCO3 (100) surfaces were between 0.2683 eV and -0.7388 eV. When a CH4 molecule was adsorbed at a hollow site and its 2 hydrogen atoms were parallel to the long diagonal (H3) on the CaCO3 (100) surface, it had the most stable adsorption, and the adsorption energy was only -0.4160 eV. The change of adsorption energy of CH4 was no more than 0.0535 eV. Compared with the DOS distribution of CH4 before adsorption, it shifted to the left overall after adsorption. At the same time, the partial density of states (PDOS) curves of CaCO3 (100) surfaces before and after adsorption basically overlapped. This work showed that the adsorption effect of shale gas on calcium carbonate is very weak, and the adsorption is physisorption at the molecular level.

  17. First-principles investigation of hydrogen storage capacity of Y-decorated porous graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Lihua, E-mail: yuanlh@lut.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-Ferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); School of Sciences, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Chen, Yuhong, E-mail: chenyh@lut.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-Ferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); School of Sciences, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Kang, Long [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-Ferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Zhang, Cairong [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-Ferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); School of Sciences, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Wang, Daobin; Wang, Chunni [School of Sciences, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Zhang, Meiling [School of Sciences, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou university, 73000 (China); Wu, Xiaojuan [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-Ferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • The bridge of C–C bond is favorable site for a Y atom on the single side of PG and six H{sub 2} can be absorbed around it. • Two Y atoms can be stably adsorbed on the same side of one unit cell of PG, but there isn’t sufficient space for H{sub 2} absorbing around each Y atom. • The maximum number of absorbed Y atoms is two for double side of PG unit cell. • Fourteen H{sub 2} can be absorbed on the both sides of PG, and the hydrogen storage capacity is 7.87 wt.%. - Abstract: Based on first-principles method, the electron structure of porous graphene (PG) and adsorption ability of H{sub 2} molecular on Y-decorated porous graphene are investigated using CASTEP code. It is found that the bridge of C–C bond which connects two C hexagons is favorable site for a Y atom adsorbed on the single side of PG, and six H{sub 2} molecules can be absorbed around a Y atom with average adsorption energy of −0.297 eV/H{sub 2} computed by GGA-PBE functional. Though two Y atoms can be stably adsorbed on the same side of one unit cell of PG, there isn’t sufficient space for H{sub 2} absorbing around each Y atom. To improve capability of hydrogen storage, the unit cell of PG with single side should only contain one Y atom. For the case of double side of porous graphene, two Y atoms are preferably located above the center of the different C hexagon. Fourteen H{sub 2} molecules can be absorbed on both sides of PG, and the gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity is 7.87 wt.% with the average adsorption energy of −0.23 eV/H{sub 2}.

  18. Thermodynamic assessment of the Sn–Sr system supported by first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jingrui; Du, Yong; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Aijun; Zhou, Liangcai; Zhao, Dongdong; Liang, Jianlie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► All the literature data of Sn–Sr system is critically reviewed. ► First-principles calculation of enthalpy of formation is carried out for each compound. ► Thermodynamic parameters for Sn–Sr system are obtained by CALPHAD method. ► A hybrid approach of CALPHAD and first-principles calculations is recommended. - Abstract: A hybrid approach of CALPHAD and first-principles calculations was employed to perform a thermodynamic modeling of the Sn–Sr system. The experimental phase diagram and thermodynamic data available in the literature were critically reviewed. The enthalpies of formation for the 6 stoichiometric compounds (i.e. Sr 2 Sn, Sr 5 Sn 3 , SrSn, Sr 3 Sn 5 , SrSn 3 and SrSn 4 ) at 0 K were computed by means of first-principles calculations. These data were used as the experimental values in the optimization module PARROT in the subsequent CALPHAD assessment to provide thermodynamic parameters with sound physical meaning. A set of self-consistent thermodynamic parameters was finally obtained by considering reliable literature data and the first-principles computed results. Comprehensive comparisons between the calculated and measured quantities indicate that all the reliable experimental information can be satisfactorily accounted for by the present thermodynamic description.

  19. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T, Joe Francis [Computational Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Nano Science and Technology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kozhikode (India); Sathian, Sarith P. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  20. Investigating Ebola virus pathogenicity using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Morena; Collu, Francesca; Macpherson, James; Michaelis, Martin; Fraternali, Franca; Wass, Mark N

    2017-08-11

    Ebolaviruses have been known to cause deadly disease in humans for 40 years and have recently been demonstrated in West Africa to be able to cause large outbreaks. Four Ebolavirus species cause severe disease associated with high mortality in humans. Reston viruses are the only Ebolaviruses that do not cause disease in humans. Conserved amino acid changes in the Reston virus protein VP24 compared to VP24 of other Ebolaviruses have been suggested to alter VP24 binding to host cell karyopherins resulting in impaired inhibition of interferon signalling, which may explain the difference in human pathogenicity. Here we used protein structural analysis and molecular dynamics to further elucidate the interaction between VP24 and KPNA5. As a control experiment, we compared the interaction of wild-type and R137A-mutant (known to affect KPNA5 binding) Ebola virus VP24 with KPNA5. Results confirmed that the R137A mutation weakens direct VP24-KPNA5 binding and enables water molecules to penetrate at the interface. Similarly, Reston virus VP24 displayed a weaker interaction with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is likely to reduce the ability of Reston virus VP24 to prevent host cell interferon signalling. Our results provide novel molecular detail on the interaction of Reston virus VP24 and Ebola virus VP24 with human KPNA5. The results indicate a weaker interaction of Reston virus VP24 with KPNA5 than Ebola virus VP24, which is probably associated with a decreased ability to interfere with the host cell interferon response. Hence, our study provides further evidence that VP24 is a key player in determining Ebolavirus pathogenicity.

  1. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  2. Molecular beam studies of adsorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumainayagam, C.R.; McMaster, M.C.; Madix, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the trapping dynamics of C 1 -C 3 alkanes and Xe on Pt(111) using supersonic molecular beams and a direct technique to measure trapping probabilities. We have extended a one-dimensional model based on classical mechanics to include trapping and have found semiquantitative agreement with experimental results for the dependence of the initial trapping probability on incident translational energy at normal incidence. Our measurements of the initial trapping probability as a function of incident translational energy at normal incidence are in agreement with previous mean translational energy measurements for Xe and CH 4 desorbing near the surface normal, in accordance with detailed balance. However, the angular dependence of the initial trapping probability shows deviations from normal energy scaling, demonstrating the importance of parallel momentum in the trapping process and the inadequacy of one-dimensional models. The dependence of the initial trapping probability of Xe on incident translational energy and angle is quite well fit by three-dimensional stochastic classical trajectory calculations utilizing a Morse potential. Angular distributions of the scattered molecules indicate that the trapping probability is not a sensitive function of surface temperature. The trapping probability increases with surface coverage in quantitative agreement with a modified Kisliuk model which incorporates enhanced trapping onto the monolayer. We have also used the direct technique to study trapping onto a saturated monolayer state to investigate the dynamics of extrinsic precursor adsorption and find that the initial trapping probability onto the monolayer is higher than on the clean surface. The initial trapping probability onto the monolayer scales with total energy, indicating a highly corrugated interaction potential

  3. First-principles study of crystalline and amorphous AlMgB14-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Turchi, P. E. A.; Veprek, S.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances

    2016-01-01

    We report first-principles investigations of crystalline and amorphous boron and M1 x M2 y X z B 14−z (M1, M2 = Al, Mg, Li, Na, Y; X = Ti, C, Si) phases (so-called “BAM” materials). Phase stability is analyzed in terms of formation energy and dynamical stability. The atomic configurations as well as the electronic and phonon density states of these phases are compared. Amorphous boron consists of distorted icosahedra, icosahedron fragments, and dioctahedra, connected by an amorphous network. The presence of metal atoms in amorphous BAM materials precludes the formation of icosahedra. For all the amorphous structures considered here, the Fermi level is located in the mobility gap independent of the number of valence electrons. The intra-icosahedral vibrations are localized in the range of 800 cm −1 , whereas the inter-icosahedral vibrations appear at higher wavenumbers. The amorphization leads to an enhancement of the vibrations in the range of 1100–1250 cm −1 . The mechanical properties of BAM materials are investigated at equilibrium and under shear and tensile strain. The anisotropy of the ideal shear and tensile strengths is explained in terms of a layered structure of the B 12 units. The strength of amorphous BAM materials is lower than that of the crystalline counterparts because of the partial fragmentation of the boron icosahedra in amorphous structures. The strength enhancement found experimentally for amorphous boron-based films is very likely related to an increase in film density, and the presence of oxygen impurities. For crystalline BAM materials, the icosahedra are preserved during elongation upon tension as well as upon shear in the (010)[100] slip system.

  4. Mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of β-B{sub 6}O. First-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruike; Ma, Shaowei; Wei, Qun [Xidian Univ., Shaanxi (China). School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering; Du, Zheng [National Supercomputing Center in Shenzhen, Shenzhen (China)

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of β-B{sub 6}O are calculated by first-principles. The structural optimization and all properties are calculated by the method of generalized gradient approximation - Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE). The hardness of β-B{sub 6}O is 39 GPa under a pressure of 0 GPa, which indicates that it belongs to a hard material. The band gap is indirect with a value of 1.836 eV, showing that β-B{sub 6}O is a semiconductor. The research of the electron localization function shows that the bonds of β-B{sub 6}O are covalent bonds, which can increase the stability of the compound. The phonon dispersion curves present the dynamical stability of β-B{sub 6}O under pressures of 0 and 50 GPa. The optical properties of β-B{sub 6}O are also calculated. In the energy range from 0 to 18 eV, β-B{sub 6}O presents high reflectivity; it has a strong absorption in the energy range from 3 to 18 eV. The refractive index results show that light propagates through the β-B{sub 6}O in a difficult manner in the energy range from 6.9 to 16.5 eV. In addition, the energy of the plasma frequency for β-B{sub 6}O is 16.6 eV and the peak value of the loss function is 13.6. These properties provide the basis for the development and application of β-B{sub 6}O.

  5. First-principles study of crystalline and amorphous AlMgB{sub 14}-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Shevchenko, V. I., E-mail: shev@materials.kiev.ua [Institute of Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Krzhyzhanosky Str. 3, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Turchi, P. E. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (L-352), P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Veprek, S. [Department of Chemistry, Technical University Munich, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Leszczynski, Jerzy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 (United States); Gorb, Leonid [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 (United States); Badger Technical Services, LLC, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180 (United States); Hill, Frances [U.S. Army ERDC, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    We report first-principles investigations of crystalline and amorphous boron and M1{sub x}M2{sub y}X{sub z}B{sub 14−z} (M1, M2 = Al, Mg, Li, Na, Y; X = Ti, C, Si) phases (so-called “BAM” materials). Phase stability is analyzed in terms of formation energy and dynamical stability. The atomic configurations as well as the electronic and phonon density states of these phases are compared. Amorphous boron consists of distorted icosahedra, icosahedron fragments, and dioctahedra, connected by an amorphous network. The presence of metal atoms in amorphous BAM materials precludes the formation of icosahedra. For all the amorphous structures considered here, the Fermi level is located in the mobility gap independent of the number of valence electrons. The intra-icosahedral vibrations are localized in the range of 800 cm{sup −1}, whereas the inter-icosahedral vibrations appear at higher wavenumbers. The amorphization leads to an enhancement of the vibrations in the range of 1100–1250 cm{sup −1}. The mechanical properties of BAM materials are investigated at equilibrium and under shear and tensile strain. The anisotropy of the ideal shear and tensile strengths is explained in terms of a layered structure of the B{sub 12} units. The strength of amorphous BAM materials is lower than that of the crystalline counterparts because of the partial fragmentation of the boron icosahedra in amorphous structures. The strength enhancement found experimentally for amorphous boron-based films is very likely related to an increase in film density, and the presence of oxygen impurities. For crystalline BAM materials, the icosahedra are preserved during elongation upon tension as well as upon shear in the (010)[100] slip system.

  6. First principles, thermal stability and thermodynamic assessment of the binary Ni-W system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isomaeki, Iikka; Haemaelaeinen, Marko; Gasik, Michael [Aalto Univ., Espoo (Finland). School of Chemical Engineering; Braga, Maria H. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). CEMUC, Physics Engineering Dept.

    2017-12-15

    The Ni-W binary system was assessed using critically evaluated experimental data with assistance from first principles analysis and the CALPHAD method. The solution phases (liquid, fcc-A1 and bcc-A2) were modeled using the substitutional regular solution model. The recently discovered Ni{sub 8}W metastable phase was evaluated as Fe{sub 16}C{sub 2}- like martensite with three sublattices, and shown to be possibly stable according to first principles calculations. Ni{sub 8}W was also modeled as an interstitial compound, but the model is not good because the solubility of tungsten in nickel is very low, especially at low temperatures. There is no experimental evidence for such low solubility. The other binary compounds Ni{sub 4}W and Ni{sub 3}W were assessed as stoichiometric ones. Compared independent experimental and first principles data agree well with the calculated phase diagram using updated thermodynamic parameters.

  7. Folding very short peptides using molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco K Ho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Peptides often have conformational preferences. We simulated 133 peptide 8-mer fragments from six different proteins, sampled by replica-exchange molecular dynamics using Amber7 with a GB/SA (generalized-Born/solvent-accessible electrostatic approximation to water implicit solvent. We found that 85 of the peptides have no preferred structure, while 48 of them converge to a preferred structure. In 85% of the converged cases (41 peptides, the structures found by the simulations bear some resemblance to their native structures, based on a coarse-grained backbone description. In particular, all seven of the beta hairpins in the native structures contain a fragment in the turn that is highly structured. In the eight cases where the bioinformatics-based I-sites library picks out native-like structures, the present simulations are largely in agreement. Such physics-based modeling may be useful for identifying early nuclei in folding kinetics and for assisting in protein-structure prediction methods that utilize the assembly of peptide fragments.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1990-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of cascades in Cu and Ni with primary-knock-on energies up to 5 keV and lattice temperatures in the range 0 K--700 K are described. Interatomic forces were represented by either the Gibson II (Cu) or Johnson-Erginsoy (Ni) potentials in most of this work, although some simulations using ''Embedded Atom Method'' potentials, e.g., for threshold events in Ni 3 Al, are also presented. The results indicate that the primary state of damage produced by displacement cascades is controlled by two phenomena, replacement collision sequences during the collisional phase of the cascade and local melting during the thermal spike. As expected, the collisional phase is rather similar in Cu and Ni, however, the thermal spike is of longer duration and has a more pronounced influence in Cu than Ni. When the ambient temperature of the lattice is increased, the melt zones are observed to both increase in size and cool more slowly. This has the effect of reducing defect production and enhancing atomic mixing and disordering. The implications of these results for defect production, cascade collapse, atomic disordering will be discussed. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. A molecular dynamics simulation code ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambayashi, Shaw

    1992-06-01

    Computer simulation based on the molecular dynamics (MD) method has become an important tool complementary to experiments and theoretical calculations in a wide range of scientific fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and so on. In the MD method, the Newtonian equations-of-motion of classical particles are integrated numerically to reproduce a phase-space trajectory of the system. In the 1980's, several new techniques have been developed for simulation at constant-temperature and/or constant-pressure in convenient to compare result of computer simulation with experimental results. We first summarize the MD method for both microcanonical and canonical simulations. Then, we present and overview of a newly developed ISIS (Isokinetic Simulation of Soft-spheres) code and its performance on various computers including vector processors. The ISIS code has a capability to make a MD simulation under constant-temperature condition by using the isokinetic constraint method. The equations-of-motion is integrated by a very accurate fifth-order finite differential algorithm. The bookkeeping method is also utilized to reduce the computational time. Furthermore, the ISIS code is well adopted for vector processing: Speedup ratio ranged from 16 to 24 times is obtained on a VP2600/10 vector processor. (author)

  10. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  11. First-principles study of electron transport through monatomic Al and Na wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Brandbyge, Mads; Tsukada, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electron transport, in particular, the conduction channels of monatomic Al and Na atom wires bridged between metallic jellium electrodes. The electronic structures are calculated by the first-principles recursion-transfer matrix method, and the conduction...... channels are investigated using the eigenchannel decomposition (ECD) of the conductance, the local density of states (LDOS), and the current density. The ECD is different from the conventional decomposition of atomic orbitals, and the study of decomposed electronic structures is shown to be effective...

  12. Using continuous time stochastic modelling and nonparametric statistics to improve the quality of first principles models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A methodology is presented that combines modelling based on first principles and data based modelling into a modelling cycle that facilitates fast decision-making based on statistical methods. A strong feature of this methodology is that given a first principles model along with process data......, the corresponding modelling cycle model of the given system for a given purpose. A computer-aided tool, which integrates the elements of the modelling cycle, is also presented, and an example is given of modelling a fed-batch bioreactor....

  13. A first-principles study of short range order in Cu-Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutter, M.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Johnson, D.D.; Nicholson, D.M.; Stocks, G.M.; Pinski, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, measurements of short-range order (SRO) diffuse neutron scattering intensity have been performed on quenched Cu-Zn alloys with 22.4 to 31.1 atomic percent (a/o) Zn, and pair interactions were obtained by inverse Monte Carlo simulation. These results are compared to SRO intensities and effective pair interactions obtained from first-principles electronic structure calculations. The theoretical SRO intensities were calculated with the cluster variation method (CVM) in the tetrahedron-octahedron approximation with first-principles pain interactions as input. More generally, phase stability in the Cu-Zn alloy system is discussed, using ab-initio energetic properties

  14. Thermodynamic modeling of the Sc-Zn system coupled with first-principles calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sc-Zn system has been critically reviewed and assessed by means of CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram approach. By means of first-principles calculation, the enthalpies of formation at 0 K for the ScZn, ScZn2, Sc17Zn58, Sc3Zn17 and ScZn12 have been computed with the desire to assist thermodynamic modeling. A set of self-consistent thermodynamic parameters for the Sc-Zn system is then obtained. The calculated phase diagram and thermodynamic properties agree well with the experimental data and first-principles calculations, respectively.

  15. Accelerating the discovery of hidden two-dimensional magnets using machine learning and first principle calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazato, Itsuki; Tanaka, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Keisuke

    2018-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) magnets are explored in terms of data science and first principle calculations. Machine learning determines four descriptors for predicting the magnetic moments of 2D materials within reported 216 2D materials data. With the trained machine, 254 2D materials are predicted to have high magnetic moments. First principle calculations are performed to evaluate the predicted 254 2D materials where eight undiscovered stable 2D materials with high magnetic moments are revealed. The approach taken in this work indicates that undiscovered materials can be surfaced by utilizing data science and materials data, leading to an innovative way of discovering hidden materials.

  16. Forecast of Piezoelectric Properties of Crystalline Materials from First Principles Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yanqing; Shi Erwei; Chen Jianjun; Zhang Tao; Song Lixin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, forecast of piezoelectric tensors are presented. Piezo crystals including quartz, quartz-like crystals, known and novel crystals of langasite-type structure are treated with density-functional perturb theory (DFPT) using plane-wave pseudopotentials method, within the local density approximation (LDA) to the exchange-correlation functional. Compared with experimental results, the ab initio calculation results have quantitative or semi-quantitative accuracy. It is shown that first principles calculation opens a door to the search and design of new piezoelectric material. Further application of first principles calculation to forecast the whole piezoelectric properties are also discussed

  17. Research on regularized mean-variance portfolio selection strategy with modified Roy safety-first principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta Mills, Ebenezer Fiifi Emire; Yan, Dawen; Yu, Bo; Wei, Xinyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a consolidated risk measure based on variance and the safety-first principle in a mean-risk portfolio optimization framework. The safety-first principle to financial portfolio selection strategy is modified and improved. Our proposed models are subjected to norm regularization to seek near-optimal stable and sparse portfolios. We compare the cumulative wealth of our preferred proposed model to a benchmark, S&P 500 index for the same period. Our proposed portfolio strategies have better out-of-sample performance than the selected alternative portfolio rules in literature and control the downside risk of the portfolio returns.

  18. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongbin Lee

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB 14

  19. Ultrafast optically induced ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic phase transition in GdTiO3 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Guru; Benedek, Nicole A.

    2018-03-01

    Epitaxial strain and chemical substitution have been the workhorses of functional materials design. These static techniques have shown immense success in controlling properties in complex oxides through the tuning of subtle structural distortions. Recently, an approach based on the excitation of an infrared active phonon with intense midinfrared light has created an opportunity for dynamical control of structure through special nonlinear coupling to Raman phonons. We use first-principles techniques to show that this approach can dynamically induce a magnetic phase transition from the ferromagnetic ground state to a hidden antiferromagnetic phase in the rare earth titanate GdTiO3 for realistic experimental parameters. We show that a combination of a Jahn-Teller distortion, Gd displacement, and infrared phonon motion dominate this phase transition with little effect from the octahedral rotations, contrary to conventional wisdom.

  20. First-principles study of molecular NO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.; Khalifeh, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The dissociation of NO on Ir(100) surface is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The pathway and transition state (TS) of the dissociation of NO molecule are determined using climbing image nudge elastic band (CI-NEB). The prerequisite state of NO dissociation is determining the most stable sites of the reactant and products. We found that the most energetically stable sites are the hollow for N atom and the bridge for NO molecule as well as O atom. We found that the bending of NO is the first step of the dissociation reaction due to the increase of the back-donation from the d-band of Ir to 2 π ∗ orbital of NO, which causes the weakening of NO bond. The dissociation energy barrier of NO molecule on Ir(100) surface is 0.49 eV.

  1. Towards A Predictive First Principles Understanding Of Molecular Adsorption On Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    DFT is clear. The functionals that have better agreement with experiments, after applying the zero point energy ( ZPE ) correction, are vdW-DF...the experimental evaluation, plus the need to correctly account for ZPE corrections, makes a direct computational evaluation of the binging energy via

  2. First Principles Thermodynamics of Minerals at HP–HT Conditions: MgO as a Prototypical Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Belmonte

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio thermodynamic properties, equation of state and phase stability of periclase (MgO, B1-type structure have been investigated in a broad P–T range (0–160 GPa; 0–3000 K in order to set a model reference system for phase equilibria simulations under deep Earth conditions. Phonon dispersion calculations performed on large supercells using the finite displacement method and in the framework of quasi-harmonic approximation highlight the performance of the Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP hybrid density functional in predicting accurate thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy, thermal expansivity, isothermal bulk modulus and phase reaction boundaries at high pressure and temperature. A first principles Mie–Grüneisen equation of state based on lattice vibrations directly provides a physically-consistent description of thermal pressure and P–V–T relations without any need to rely on empirical parameters or other phenomenological formalisms that could give spurious anomalies or uncontrolled extrapolations at HP–HT. The post-spinel phase transformation, Mg2SiO4 (ringwoodite = MgO (periclase + MgSiO3 (bridgmanite, is taken as a computational example to illustrate how first principles theory combined with the use of hybrid functionals is able to provide sound results on the Clapeyron slope, density change and P–T location of equilibrium mineral reactions relevant to mantle dynamics.

  3. Dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of terahertz vibration, and evidence for weak hydrogen bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2013-03-01

    A weak hydrogen bond (WHB) such as CH-O is very important for the structure, function, and dynamics in a chemical and biological system WHB stretching vibration is in a terahertz (THz) frequency region Very recently, the reasonable performance of dispersion-corrected first-principles to WHB has been proven. In this lecture, we report dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of the vibrational absorption of some organic crystals, and low-temperature THz spectral measurement, in order to clarify WHB stretching vibration. The THz frequency calculation of a WHB crystal has extremely improved by dispersion correction. Moreover, the discrepancy in frequency between an experiment and calculation and is 10 1/cm or less. Dispersion correction is especially effective for intermolecular mode. The very sharp peak appearing at 4 K is assigned to the intermolecular translational mode that corresponds to WHB stretching vibration. It is difficult to detect and control the WHB formation in a crystal because the binding energy is very small. With the help of the latest intense development of experimental and theoretical technique and its careful use, we reveal solid-state WHB stretching vibration as evidence for the WHB formation that differs in respective WHB networks The research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Grant No. 22550003).

  4. Origin of structural analogies and differences between the atomic structures of GeSe{sub 4} and GeS{sub 4} glasses: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzid, Assil; Le Roux, Sébastien; Ori, Guido; Boero, Mauro; Massobrio, Carlo [Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg and CNRS UMR 7504, 23 rue du Loess, BP43, F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-07-21

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory are employed for a comparative study of structural and bonding properties of two stoichiometrically identical chalcogenide glasses, GeSe{sub 4} and GeS{sub 4}. Two periodic cells of 120 and 480 atoms are adopted. Both glasses feature a coexistence of Ge-centered tetrahedra and Se(S) homopolar connections. Results obtained for N = 480 indicate substantial differences at the level of the Se(S) environment, since Ge–Se–Se connections are more frequent than the corresponding Ge–S–S ones. The presence of a more prominent first sharp diffraction peak in the total neutron structure factor of glassy GeS{sub 4} is rationalized in terms of a higher number of large size rings, accounting for extended Ge–Se correlations. Both the electronic density of states and appropriate electronic localization tools provide evidence of a higher ionic character of Ge–S bonds when compared to Ge–Se bonds. An interesting byproduct of these investigations is the occurrence of discernible size effects that affect structural motifs involving next nearest neighbor distances, when 120 or 480 atoms are used.

  5. Screening based approach and dehydrogenation kinetics for MgH2: Guide to find suitable dopant using first-principles approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, E Mathan; Rajkamal, A; Thapa, Ranjit

    2017-11-14

    First-principles based calculations are performed to investigate the dehydrogenation kinetics considering doping at various layers of MgH 2 (110) surface. Doping at first and second layer of MgH 2 (110) has a significant role in lowering the H 2 desorption (from surface) barrier energy, whereas the doping at third layer has no impact on the barrier energy. Molecular dynamics calculations are also performed to check the bonding strength, clusterization, and system stability. We study in details about the influence of doping on dehydrogenation, considering the screening factors such as formation enthalpy, bulk modulus, and gravimetric density. Screening based approach assist in finding Al and Sc as the best possible dopant in lowering of desorption temperature, while preserving similar gravimetric density and Bulk modulus as of pure MgH 2 system. The electron localization function plot and population analysis illustrate that the bond between Dopant-Hydrogen is mainly covalent, which weaken the Mg-Hydrogen bonds. Overall we observed that Al as dopant is suitable and surface doping can help in lowering the desorption temperature. So layer dependent doping studies can help to find the best possible reversible hydride based hydrogen storage materials.

  6. Origin of structural analogies and differences between the atomic structures of GeSe4 and GeS4 glasses: A first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Assil; Le Roux, Sébastien; Ori, Guido; Boero, Mauro; Massobrio, Carlo

    2015-07-21

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory are employed for a comparative study of structural and bonding properties of two stoichiometrically identical chalcogenide glasses, GeSe4 and GeS4. Two periodic cells of 120 and 480 atoms are adopted. Both glasses feature a coexistence of Ge-centered tetrahedra and Se(S) homopolar connections. Results obtained for N = 480 indicate substantial differences at the level of the Se(S) environment, since Ge-Se-Se connections are more frequent than the corresponding Ge-S-S ones. The presence of a more prominent first sharp diffraction peak in the total neutron structure factor of glassy GeS4 is rationalized in terms of a higher number of large size rings, accounting for extended Ge-Se correlations. Both the electronic density of states and appropriate electronic localization tools provide evidence of a higher ionic character of Ge-S bonds when compared to Ge-Se bonds. An interesting byproduct of these investigations is the occurrence of discernible size effects that affect structural motifs involving next nearest neighbor distances, when 120 or 480 atoms are used.

  7. First principles study of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U in an electrorefining system using molybdenum cathode and LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Choah; Kang, Joonhee; Kang, Woojong; Kwak, Dohyun; Han, Byungchan

    2016-01-01

    Using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations we obtain thermodynamic and kinetic properties of U in an electrorefining process for spent nuclear fuels using a LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt and Mo as a cathode. The thermodynamic stability of electrodeposited U from the molten salt onto the Mo(110) surface electrode is evaluated by activity coefficients as function of surface coverages of U and Cl. Additionally, ab-initio molecular dynamic simulations combined with the Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland relation enables us to calculate the viscosity of the LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt. Our results well agree with previously reported experimental data endorsing the credibility. Based on our atomic-level mechanical understanding we propose that an accurate computational model system incorporating the electrochemical conditions of the electrorefining process essential for the purpose of establishing thermodynamic and kinetic database of U, otherwise critical deviations are inevitable. More interestingly, the effect of coadsorption of Cl with U on the Mo(110) surface plays a key role in stabilizing electrodeposited U on the cathode. Our approach can be useful for validating published experimental database and for identifying key factors guiding a rational design of highly efficient electrorefining system for spent nuclear fuels, and thus reducing high-level radioactive nuclear wastes.

  8. Modeling shockwave deformation via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD), where the equations of motion of up to thousands of interacting atoms are solved on the computer, has proven to be a powerful tool for investigating a wide variety of nonequilibrium processes from the atomistic viewpoint. Simulations of shock waves in three-dimensional (3D) solids and fluids have shown conclusively that shear-stress relaxation is achieved through atomic rearrangement. In the case of fluids, the transverse motion is viscous, and the constitutive model of Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics has been shown to be accurate - even on the time and distance scales of MD experiments. For strong shocks in solids, the plastic flow that leads to shear-stress relaxation in MD is highly localized near the shock front, involving a slippage along close-packed planes. For shocks of intermediate strength, MD calculations exhibit an elastic precursor running out in front of the steady plastic wave, where slippage similar in character to that in the very strong shocks leads to shear-stress relaxation. An interesting correlation between the maximum shear stress and the Hugoniot pressure jump is observed for both 3D and fluid shockwave calculations, which may have some utility in modeling applications. At low shock strengths, the MD simulations show only elastic compression, with no permanent transverse atomic strains. The result for perfect 3D crystals is also seen in calculations for 1D chains. It is speculated that, if it were practical, a very large MD system containing dislocations could be expected to exhibit more realistic plastic flow for weak shock waves, too

  9. First-principles quantum mechanical investigations: Catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111) and at the water/Pd(111) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenhua

    Bio-oils have drawn more and more attention from scientists as a promising new clean, cheap energy source. One of the most interesting relevant issues is the effect of catalysts on the catalytic reactions that are used for producing bio-oils. Furfural, as a very important intermediate during these reactions, has attracted significant studies. However, the effect of catalysts, including particularly the liquid/solid interface formed by a metal catalyst and liquid water, in the catalytic reactions involving furfural still remains elusive. In this research, we performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory calculations to investigate the atomic-scale mechanisms of catalytic hydrogenation of furfural on the palladium surface and at the liquid/state interface formed by the palladium surface and liquid water. We studied all the possible mechanisms that lead to formation of furfuryl alcohol (FOL), formation of tetrahydrofurfural (THFAL), and formation of tetrahydrofurfurfuryl alcohol (THFOL). We found that liquid water plays a significant role in the hydrogenation reactions. During the reaction in the presence of water and the palladium catalyst, in particular, water directly participates in the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group of furfural and facilitates the formation of FOL by reducing the activation energy. Our calculations show that water provides hydrogen for the hydrogenation of the aldehyde group, and at the same time, a pre-existing hydrogen atom, which is resulted from dissociation of molecular hydrogen (experimentally, molecular hydrogen is always supplied for hydrogenation) on the palladium surface, is bonded to water, making the water molecule intact in structure. In the absence of water, on the other hand, formation of FOL and THFAL on the palladium surface involves almost the same energy barriers, suggesting a comparable selectivity. Overall, as water reduces the activation energy for the formation of FOL

  10. Analysis of Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition, as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties, such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamics simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one-dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  11. Integration of first-principles methods and crystallographic database searches for new ferroelectrics: Strategies and explorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Joseph W.; Rabe, Karin M.

    2012-01-01

    In this concept paper, the development of strategies for the integration of first-principles methods with crystallographic database mining for the discovery and design of novel ferroelectric materials is discussed, drawing on the results and experience derived from exploratory investigations on three different systems: (1) the double perovskite Sr(Sb 1/2 Mn 1/2 )O 3 as a candidate semiconducting ferroelectric; (2) polar derivatives of schafarzikite MSb 2 O 4 ; and (3) ferroelectric semiconductors with formula M 2 P 2 (S,Se) 6 . A variety of avenues for further research and investigation are suggested, including automated structure type classification, low-symmetry improper ferroelectrics, and high-throughput first-principles searches for additional representatives of structural families with desirable functional properties. - Graphical abstract: Integration of first-principles methods with crystallographic database mining, for the discovery and design of novel ferroelectric materials, could potentially lead to new classes of multifunctional materials. Highlights: ► Integration of first-principles methods and database mining. ► Minor structural families with desirable functional properties. ► Survey of polar entries in the Inorganic Crystal Structural Database.

  12. Electronic and optical properties of new multifunctional materials via half-substituted hematite: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Hua; Mi, Wenbo; Bai, Haili; Cheng, Yingchun

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Cd or In) have been investigated using first principles calculations. All of the FeMO 3 systems have a large net magnetic moment. The ground state of pure α-Fe 2

  13. Origin of current-induced forces in an atomic gold wire: A first-principles study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Taylor, Jeremy Philip

    2003-01-01

    We address the microscopic origin of the current-induced forces by analyzing results of first principles density functional calculations of atomic gold wires connected to two gold electrodes with different electrochemical potentials. We find that current induced forces are closely related...

  14. First-principles study of the interaction and charge transfer between graphene and metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khomyakov, Petr; Giovannetti, G.; Rusu, P.C.; Brocks, G.; van den Brink, J.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring the transport of electrons through a graphene sheet necessarily involves contacting it with metal electrodes. We study the adsorption of graphene on metal substrates using first-principles calculations at the level of density-functional theory. The bonding of graphene to Al, Ag, Cu, Au,

  15. First-Principles Petascale Simulations for Predicting Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khokhlov, Alexei [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Enrico Fermi Inst.; Austin, Joanna [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Argonne Leadership Computing Facility; Bacon, C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    2015-03-02

    Hydrogen has emerged as an important fuel across a range of industries as a means of achieving energy independence and to reduce emissions. DDT and the resulting detonation waves in hydrogen-oxygen can have especially catastrophic consequences in a variety of industrial and energy producing settings related to hydrogen. First-principles numerical simulations of flame acceleration and DDT are required for an in-depth understanding of the phenomena and facilitating design of safe hydrogen systems. The goals of this project were (1) to develop first-principles petascale reactive flow Navier-Stokes simulation code for predicting gaseous high-speed combustion and detonation (HSCD) phenomena and (2) demonstrate feasibility of first-principles simulations of rapid flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture (2H2 + O2). The goals of the project have been accomplished. We have developed a novel numerical simulation code, named HSCD, for performing first-principles direct numerical simulations of high-speed hydrogen combustion. We carried out a series of validating numerical simulations of inert and reactive shock reflection experiments in shock tubes. We then performed a pilot numerical simulation of flame acceleration in a long pipe. The simulation showed the transition of the rapidly accelerating flame into a detonation. The DDT simulations were performed using BG/Q Mira at the Argonne National Laboratory, currently the fourth fastest super-computer in the world.

  16. First principles studies of extrinsic and intrinsic defects in boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 2012/ Vol. 12, 7807?7814 First Principles Studies of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Defects in Boron Nitride Nanotubes M. G. Mashapa 1, 2, ?, N. Chetty1, and S. Sinha Ray2, 3 1Physics Department, University...

  17. The Interface between Gd and Monolayer MoS2: A First-Principles Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuejing; Mi, Wenbo; Wang, Xiaocha; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of interfaces between two-, four- and six-layer Gd(0001) and monolayer MoS2 by first-principles calculations. Strong chemical bonds shift the Fermi energy of MoS2 upwards into the conduction band. At the surface

  18. First-principles study of high-conductance DNA sequencing with carbon nanotube electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, X.; Rungger, I.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Sanvito, S.

    2012-01-01

    such electrodes by using first-principles quantum transport theory. In particular, we consider the extreme case where the separation between the electrodes is the smallest possible that still allows the DNA translocation. The benzene-like ring at the end cap

  19. Valley Hall effect in disordered monolayer MoS2 from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Souza, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    ("unfolding") the Berry curvature from the folded Brillouin zone of the disordered supercell onto the normal Brillouin zone of the pristine crystal, and then averaging over several realizations of disorder. We use this scheme to study from first principles the effect of sulfur vacancies on the valley Hall...

  20. A first-principles model for the freezing step in ice cream manufacture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorneanu, B.; Bildea, C.S.; Girievink, J.; Bongers, P.M.M.; Jezowski, J.; Thullie, J.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution deals with the development of a first-principles model for ice cream formation in the freezing unit to support product design and plant operation. Conservation equations for the mass, energy and momentum, considering axial flow assumptions are taken into account. The distributed

  1. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobač, Vladimír; Lewis, J.P.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 28 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 285202. ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02079S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-adiabatic molecular dynamics * molecular junctions * molecular switches * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2016

  2. Molecular dynamics using quasielastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, S

    2003-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is well suited to study the molecular motions (rotations and translations) in solids or liquids. It offers a unique possibility of analysing spatial dimensions of atomic or molecular processes in their development over time. We describe here some of the systems studied using the QENS spectrometer, designed, developed and commissioned at Dhruva reactor in Trombay. We have studied a variety of systems to investigate the molecular motion, for example, simple molecular solids, molecules adsorbed in confined medium like porous systems or zeolites, monolayer-protected nano-sized metal clusters, water in Portland cement as it cures with time, etc. (author)

  3. Speciation in Aqueous MgSO4 Fluid at High Pressures and Temperatures Studied by First-Principles Modeling and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, S.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous fluids play an essential role in mass and energy transfer in the lithosphere. Their presence has also a large effect on physical properties of rocks, e.g. the electrical conductivity. Many chemical and physical properties of aqueous fluids strongly depend on the speciation, but very little is known about this fundamental parameter at high pressures and temperatures, e.g. at subduction zone conditions. Here we use a combined approach of first-principles molecular dynamics simulation and Raman spectroscopy to study the molecular structure of aqueous 2~mol/kg MgSO4 fluids up to pressures of 3~GPa and temperatures of 750~°C. MgSO4-H2O is selected as a model system for sulfate bearing subduction zone fluids. The simulations are performed using Car-Parrinello dynamics, a system size of 120 water and four MgSO4 molecules with production runs of at least 10~ps at each P and T. Raman spectra were obtained in situ using a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell with external heating. Both simulation and spectroscopic data show a dynamic co-existence of various associated molecular species as well as dissociated Mg2+ and SO42- in the single phase fluid. Fitting the Raman signal in the frequency range of the ν1-SO42- stretching mode yields the P-T dependence of the relative proportions of different peaks. The latter can be assigned to species based on literature data and related to the species found in the simulation. The dominant associated species found in the P-T range of interest here are Mg-SO4 ion pairs with one (monodentate) and two (bidentate) binding sites. At the highest P and T, an additional peak is identified. At low pressures and high temperature (T>230~°C), kieserite, MgSO4·H2O, nucleated in the experiment. At the same conditions the simulations show a clustering of Mg, which is interpreted as a precursor of precipitation. In conclusion, the speciation of aqueous MgSO4 fluid shows a complex behavior at high P and T that cannot be extrapolated

  4. First-Principles Studies of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) Single Crystal Unit Cell Volumes and Vibrational Frequencies under Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Warren F.; Zhao, Jijun; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2006-07-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the PETN molecular crystal were calculated using the first-principles CRYSTAL03 program which employs an all-electron LCAO approach and calculates analytic first derivatives of the total energy with respect to atomic displacements. Numerical second derivatives were used to enable calculation of the vibrational frequencies at ambient pressure and under various states of compression. Three different density functionals, B3LYP, PW91, and X3LYP were used to examine the effect of the exchange-correlation functional on the vibrational frequencies. The average deviation with experimental results is shown to be on the order of 2-3%, depending on the functional used. The pressure-induced shift of the vibrational frequencies is presented.

  5. First-Principles Computed Rate Constant for the O + O2 Isotopic Exchange Reaction Now Matches Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Grégoire; Honvault, Pascal; Kochanov, Roman; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2018-04-19

    We show, by performing exact time-independent quantum molecular scattering calculations, that the quality of the ground electronic state global potential energy surface appears to be of utmost importance in accurately obtaining even as strongly averaged quantities as kinetic rate constants. The oxygen isotope exchange reaction, 18 O + 32 O 2 , motivated by the understanding of a complex long-standing problem of isotopic ozone anomalies in the stratosphere and laboratory experiments, is explored in this context. The thermal rate constant for this key reaction is now in quantitative agreement with all experimental data available to date. A significant recent progress at the frontier of three research domains, advanced electronic structure calculations, ultrasensitive spectroscopy, and quantum scattering calculations, has therefore permitted a breakthrough in the theoretical modeling of this crucial collision process from first principles.

  6. First-principles study of Ga-vacancy induced magnetism in β-Ga2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Jihua; Hu, Shunbo; Wu, Yabei; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei; Cao, Shixun

    2017-11-01

    First principles calculations based on density functional theory were performed to study the electronic structure and magnetic properties of β-Ga 2 O 3 in the presence of cation vacancies. We investigated two kinds of Ga vacancies at different symmetry sites and the consequent structural distortion and defect states. We found that both the six-fold coordinated octahedral site and the four-fold coordinated tetrahedral site vacancies can lead to a spin polarized ground state. Furthermore, the calculation identified a relationship between the spin polarization and the charge states of the vacancies, which might be explained by a molecular orbital model consisting of uncompensated O 2- 2p dangling bonds. The calculations for the two vacancy systems also indicated a potential long-range ferromagnetic order which is beneficial for spintronics application.

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics, iterative methods and multiscale approaches in electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernholc, J.

    1998-01-01

    The field of computational materials physics has grown very quickly in the past decade, and it is now possible to simulate properties of complex materials completely from first principles. The presentation has mostly focused on first-principles dynamic simulations. Such simulations have been pioneered by Car and Parrinello, who introduced a method for performing realistic simulations within the context of density functional theory. The Car-Parrinello method and related plane wave approaches are reviewed in depth. The Car-Parrinello method was reviewed and illustrated with several applications: the dynamics of the C 60 solid, diffusion across Si steps, and computing free energy differences. Alternative ab initio simulation schemes, which use preconditioned conjugate gradient techniques for energy minimization and dynamics were also discussed

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study on Lubrication Mechanism in Crystalline Structure between Copper and Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Saitoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the nanosized mechanism of good lubrication in copper disulfide (Cu2S crystal which is used as a sliding material, atomistic modeling of Cu2S is conducted and molecular dynamics (MD simulations are performed in this paper. The interatomic interaction between atoms and crystalline structure in the phase of hexagonal crystal of Cu2S are carefully estimated by first-principle calculations. Then, approximating these interactions, we originally construct a conventional interatomic potential function of Cu2S crystal in its hexagonal phase. By using this potential function, we perform MD simulation of Cu2S crystal which is subjected to shear loading parallel to the basal plane. We compare results obtained by different conditions of sliding directions. Unlike ordinary hexagonal metallic crystals, it is found that the easy-glide direction does not always show small shear stress for Cu2S crystal. Besides, it is found that shearing velocity affects largely the magnitude of averaged shear stress. Generally speaking, higher velocity results in higher resistance against shear deformation. As a result, it is understood that Cu2S crystal exhibits somewhat liquid-like (amorphous behavior in sliding condition and shear resistance increases with increase of sliding speed.

  9. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Understand Mechanical Response of Thaumasite under Temperature and Strain Rate Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajilar, Shahin; Shafei, Behrouz; Cheng, Tao; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres

    2017-06-22

    Understanding the structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of thaumasite is of great interest to the cement industry, mainly because it is the phase responsible for the aging and deterioration of civil infrastructures made of cementitious materials attacked by external sources of sulfate. Despite the importance, effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical response of thaumasite had remained unexplored prior to the current study, in which the mechanical properties of thaumasite are fully characterized using the reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) method. With employing a first-principles based reactive force field, the RMD simulations enable the description of bond dissociation and formation under realistic conditions. From the stress-strain curves of thaumasite generated in the x, y, and z directions, the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and fracture strain are determined for the three orthogonal directions. During the course of each simulation, the chemical bonds undergoing tensile deformations are monitored to reveal the bonds responsible for the mechanical strength of thaumasite. The temperature increase is found to accelerate the bond breaking rate and consequently the degradation of mechanical properties of thaumasite, while the strain rate only leads to a slight enhancement of them for the ranges considered in this study.

  10. Crystal structure and pair potentials: A molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1980-10-06

    With use of a Lagrangian which allows for the variation of the shape and size of the periodically repeating molecular-dynamics cell, it is shown that different pair potentials lead to different crystal structures.

  11. Molecular Interactions and Reaction Dynamics in Supercritical Water Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, K

    1998-01-01

    .... From UV-vis spectroscopic measurements and molecular dynamics simulation of chemical equilibria, we have shown that density effects on broad classes of reactions may be explained in terms of changes...

  12. Molecular Dynamics and Bioactivity of a Novel Mutated Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Parathyroid hormone, Mutation prediction, Molecular dynamics, RANKL/OPG, UAMS-32P cell. Tropical .... PTH1R were used as MD simulation starting points. A full-atom ... Values of RMSD, Rg, and potential energy evaluation ...

  13. Olefin Metathesis in Peptidomimetics, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and Molecular Imprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Low, Tammy K

    2006-01-01

    .... Our research goals consisted of employing olefin metathesis in the synthesis of peptidomimetics, and studying the feasibility of this method in dynamic combinatorial chemistry and molecular imprinting of nerve agents...

  14. A molecular dynamics calculation of solid phase of malonic acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sathya S R R Perumal

    Keywords. Hydrogen bond chain; elastic constants; molecular dynamics. 1. Introduction ... theory - a probabilistic model to determine the hydro- gen bonds within the .... compares poorly with the experimental value of 108.5. Similarly β and γ ...

  15. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo calculations in statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.W.; Erpenbeck, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics calculations on statistical mechanical systems is reviewed giving some of the more significant recent developments. It is noted that the term molecular dynamics refers to the time-averaging technique for hard-core and square-well interactions and for continuous force-law interactions. Ergodic questions, methodology, quantum mechanical, Lorentz, and one-dimensional, hard-core, and square and triangular-well systems, short-range soft potentials, and other systems are included. 268 references

  16. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  17. First-Principles Study on the Adsorption Properties of Transition-Metal Atoms on CaO(001) Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Byung Deok [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Young-Rok [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    By using first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the density functional theory, we systematically investigated the adsorption properties of transition-metal (TM) adatoms on CaO(001) surfaces. Optimized adsorption structures and energetics of TM adatoms on CaO(001) are reported for various adsorption structures. The results are different from those of TM adatoms on MgO(001). Concomitantly, this suggests different dynamical properties of TM adatoms on CaO(001) surfaces as compared with TM adatoms on MgO(001) surfaces. Also performed was an analysis of the electronic structures of the TM adatoms on CaO(001) by using the energy positions of the adsorbate states with respect to the valence band maximum of CaO. The results are discussed in connection with the charge states of the TM adatoms on doped CaO(001).

  18. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β-CuGaO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO 2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO 2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO 2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. The optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment. (paper)

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  20. A fermionic molecular dynamics technique to model nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vantournhout, K.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At sub-nuclear densities of about 10 14 g/cm 3 , nuclear matter arranges itself in a variety of complex shapes. This can be the case in the crust of neutron stars and in core-collapse supernovae. These slab like and rod like structures, designated as nuclear pasta, have been modelled with classical molecular dynamics techniques. We present a technique, based on fermionic molecular dynamics, to model nuclear matter at sub-nuclear densities in a semi classical framework. The dynamical evolution of an antisymmetric ground state is described making the assumption of periodic boundary conditions. Adding the concepts of antisymmetry, spin and probability distributions to classical molecular dynamics, brings the dynamical description of nuclear matter to a quantum mechanical level. Applications of this model vary from investigation of macroscopic observables and the equation of state to the study of fundamental interactions on the microscopic structure of the matter. (author)